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Sample records for respiratory therapy technician

  1. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 37. Competency Curricula for Respiratory Therapy Assistant and Respiratory Therapy Technician.

    1974-08-31

    instruction. The training aids, like strategies, extend from the traditional references and handout material in the form of a student syllabus to...on careers; select students ; and identify and select faculty. The System Threa sub-systems, as described, comprise the proposed system for Education...of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing Treatment . . . . . . . . ... 13 5. Chest Physiotherapy ...... . .. . . . . . 14 6. Respiratory Exercises

  2. Pneumoconiosis and respiratory problems in dental laboratory technicians: Analysis of 893 dental technicians

    Dilek Ergün

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To explore the rate of pneumoconiosis in dental technicians (DTP and to evaluate the risk factors. Material and Methods: Data of 893 dental technicians, who were admitted to our hospital in the period January 2007–May 2012, from 170 dental laboratories were retrospectively examined. Demographic data, respiratory symptoms, smoking status, work duration, working fields, exposure to sandblasting, physical examination findings, chest radiographs, pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography results were evaluated. Results: Dental technicians’ pneumoconiosis rate was 10.1% among 893 cases. The disease was more common among males and in those exposed to sandblasting who had 77-fold higher risk of DTP. The highest profusion subcategory was 3/+ (according to the International Labour Organization (ILO 2011 standards and the large opacity rate was 13.3%. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, it was the largest DTP case series (N = 893/90 in the literature in English. Health screenings should be performed regularly for the early diagnosis of pneumoconiosis, which is an important occupational disease for dental technicians.

  3. Pharmacy technician involvement in community pharmacy medication therapy management.

    Lengel, Matthew; Kuhn, Catherine H; Worley, Marcia; Wehr, Allison M; McAuley, James W

    To assess the impact of technician involvement on the completion of medication therapy management (MTM) services in a community pharmacy setting and to describe pharmacists' and technicians' perceptions of technician involvement in MTM-related tasks and their satisfaction with the technician's role in MTM. Prospective observational study. In the fall of 2015, pharmacists and selected technicians from 32 grocery store-based community pharmacies were trained to use technicians within MTM services. Completed MTM claims were evaluated at all pharmacies for 3 months before training and 3 months after training. An electronic survey, developed with the use of competencies taught in the training and relevant published literature, was distributed via e-mail to trained employees 3 months after training. The total number of completed MTM claims at the 32 pharmacy sites was higher during the posttraining time period (2687 claims) versus the pretraining period (1735 claims). Of the 182 trained participants, 112 (61.5%) completed the survey. Overall, perceived technician involvement was lower than expected. However, identifying MTM opportunities was the most commonly reported technician MTM task, with 62.5% of technicians and 47.2% of pharmacists reporting technician involvement. Nearly one-half of technicians (42.5%) and pharmacists (44.0%) agreed or strongly agreed they were satisfied with the technician's role in MTM services, and 40.0% of technicians agreed that they were more satisfied with their work in the pharmacy after involvement in MTM. Three months after initial training of technicians in MTM, participation of technicians was lower than expected. However, the technicians involved most often reported identifying MTM opportunities for pharmacists, which may be a focus for future technician trainings. In addition, technician involvement in MTM services may increase satisfaction with many aspects of work for actively involved technicians. Copyright © 2018 American

  4. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 8 Occupational/Physical Therapy Technician.

    1974-08-31

    job analysis was implemented to a level of methodology determination. These methods and curriculum materials constituted a third (instructional) sub...Technician 8494 Physical Therapy Technician 8495 Dermatology Technician 8496 Embalming Technician 8497 Medical Illustration Technician 8498 Medical...IGIVE ICE PACK TREATMENT 9 IAPPLY WET COMPRESSESISOAKSIPACKS I 10 IGIVE INFRARED TREATMENT 11 IGIVE ULTRAVIOLET TREATMENT 12 EXPLAIN UVL THERAPY

  5. Respiratory Systems of Dental Technicians Negatively Affected during 5 Years of Follow-Up

    Nurgül Bozkurt

    2016-08-01

    forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1. While restrictive disorder was found 25% in the first PFT evaluations, this ratio increased to 31% in the second PFT. When the radiological results were considered, 62% of the first X-ray results were found to be normal but this ratio decreased to 18% in 2013. While reticular/reticulonodular opacities were found in 11% of cases in 2008, it increased to 30% in 2013. Seven technicians were diagnosed with pneumoconiosis (5.6%. Conclusion: Respiratory tracts of the technicians were negatively affected during the five year period. The number of pneumoconiosis cases (5.6% shows that it is necessary to adopt comprehensive work health and safety precautions for laboratories.

  6. Respiratory assessment of refractory ceramic fibers in a heating technician population.

    Lucas, David; Clamagirand, Vincent; Capellmann, Pascale; Hervé, Agnès; Mauguen, Gilles; Le Mer, Yannik; Jegaden, Dominique

    2018-04-01

    Refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) have been extensively used for insulation in condensing boilers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the respiratory exposure to these fibers among maintenance heating technicians. We first created a working group (Carsat Brittany and Finistère Occupational Health Services) and carried out a sampling strategy. Atmospheric measurements were done during work tasks, and filters were analyzed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in French approved laboratories. Four companies were included for a total of 15 days of work. During those 15 workdays, 12 SEM and 21 PCM samples were taken and analyzed. The phase contrast microscopy and SEM average results were 0.04 and 0.004 fibers/cm 3 , respectively. In conclusion, the study confirms heating technician RCF respiratory exposure during maintenance work for both condensation gas boilers and atmospheric boilers. Collective and individual prevention measures should be implemented along with appropriate medical follow-up.

  7. [Immunomodulators in Therapy of Respiratory Infections].

    Isakov, V A; Isakov, D V

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections provoke dysbalance in the interferon system and inhibition of the cellular and phagocytic responses of the host. Long-term persistence of pathogenic viruses and bacteria induce atopy and could aggravate chronic respiratory diseases. The up-to-date classification of immunomodulators is described. High efficacy of interferon inductors, such as cycloferon and some others as auxiliary means in therapy or prophylaxis (immunorehabilitation) of viral respiratory infections in adults and children was shown.

  8. Quality verification for respiratory gated proton therapy

    Kim, Eun Sook; Jang, Yo Jong; Park, Ji Yeon; Kang, Dong Yun; Yeom, Doo Seok

    2013-01-01

    To verify accuracy of respiratory gated proton therapy by measuring and analyzing proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed in our institute. The plan data of 3 patients who took respiratory gated proton therapy were used to deliver proton beam from proton therapy system. The manufactured moving phantom was used to apply respiratory gating system to reproduce proton beam which was partially irradiated. The key characteristics of proton beam, range, spreat-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and output factor were measured 5 times and the same categories were measured in the continuous proton beam which was not performed with respiratory gating system. Multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure range and SOBP, and Scanditronix Wellhofer and farmer chamber was used to measure output factor. The average ranges of 3 patients (A, B, C), who had taken respiratory gated proton therapy or not, were (A) 7.226, 7.230, (B) 12.216, 12.220 and (C) 19.918, 19.920 g/cm 2 and average SOBP were (A) 4.950, 4.940, (B) 6.496, 6.512 and (C) 8.486, 8.490 g/cm 2 . And average output factor were (A) 0.985, 0.984 (B) 1.026, 1.027 and (C) 1.138, 1.136 cGy/MU. The differences of average range were -0.004, -0.004, -0.002 g/cm 2 , that of SOBP were 0.010, -0.016, -0.004 g/cm 2 and that of output factor were 0.001, -0.001, 0.002 cGy/MU. It is observed that the range, SOBP and output factor of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed have the same beam quality with no significant difference compared to the proton beam which was continuously irradiated. Therefore, this study verified the quality of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy and confirmed the accuracy of proton therapy using this

  9. Reduction in respiratory motion artefacts on gadoxetate-enhanced MRI after training technicians to apply a simple and more patient-adapted breathing command

    Gutzeit, Andreas; Matoori, Simon; Weymarn, Constantin von; Reischauer, Carolin; Goyen, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Forstner, Rosemarie; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Soyka, Jan D.; Doert, Aleksis; Koh, Dow-Mu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether a trained group of technicians using a modified breathing command during gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI reduces respiratory motion artefacts compared to non-trained technicians using a traditional breathing command. The gadoxetate-enhanced liver MR images of 30 patients acquired using the traditional breathing command and the subsequent 30 patients after training the technicians to use a modified breathing command were analyzed. A subgroup of patients (n = 8) underwent scans both by trained and untrained technicians. Images obtained using the traditional and modified breathing command were compared for the presence of breathing artefacts [respiratory artefact-based image quality scores from 1 (best) to 5 (non-diagnostic)]. There was a highly significant improvement in the arterial phase image quality scores in patients using the modified breathing command compared to the traditional one (P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with severe and extensive breathing artefacts in the arterial phase decreased from 33.3 % to 6.7 % after introducing the modified breathing command (P = 0.021). In the subgroup that underwent MRI using both breathing commands, arterial phase image quality improved significantly (P = 0.008) using the modified breathing command. Training technicians to use a modified breathing command significantly improved arterial phase image quality of gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI. (orig.)

  10. Photodynamic therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Lieder, Anja; Khan, Muhammad K; Lippert, Burkard M

    2014-06-05

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a benign condition of the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. It is characterised by recurrent papillomatous lesions and is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Frequent recurrence and rapid papilloma growth are common and in part responsible for the onset of potentially life-threatening symptoms. Most patients afflicted by the condition will require repeated surgical treatments to maintain their airway, and these may result in scarring and voice problems. Photodynamic therapy introduces a light-sensitising agent, which is administered either orally or by injection. This substance (called a photo-sensitiser) is selectively retained in hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue, including papilloma. It is then activated by light of a specific wavelength and may be used as a sole or adjuvant treatment for RRP. To assess the effects of photodynamic therapy in the management of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) in children and adults. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 27 January 2014. Randomised controlled trials utilising photodynamic therapy as sole or adjuvant therapy in participants of any age with proven RRP versus control intervention. Primary outcome measures were symptom improvement (respiratory distress/dyspnoea and voice quality), quality of life improvement and recurrence-free interval. Secondary outcomes included reduction in the frequency of surgical intervention, reduction in disease volume and adverse effects of treatment.   We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Meta-analysis was not possible and results are presented descriptively. We included one trial with a total of 23

  11. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  12. Respiratory therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a primer.

    Gruis, Kirsten L; Lechtzin, Noah

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory complications are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Treatment of respiratory insufficiency with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) improves ALS patients' quality of life and survival. Evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of ALS patients recommend treatment of respiratory insufficiency with NIV as well as consideration of insufflation/exsufflation to improve clearance of airway secretions. Despite these recommendations respiratory therapies remain underused. In this review we provide a practical guide for the clinician to prescribe and manage respiratory therapies for the patient with ALS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nanoparticle-based therapy for respiratory diseases

    ADRIANA L. DA SILVA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is an emerging science with the potential to create new materials and strategies involving manipulation of matter at the nanometer scale (<100 nm. With size-dependent properties, nanoparticles have introduced a new paradigm in pharmacotherapy – the possibility of cell-targeted drug delivery with minimal systemic side effects and toxicity. The present review provides a summary of published findings, especially regarding to nanoparticle formulations for lung diseases. The available data have shown some benefits with nanoparticle-based therapy in the development of the disease and lung remodeling in respiratory diseases. However, there is a wide gap between the concepts of nanomedicine and the published experimental data and clinical reality. In addition, studies are still required to determine the potential of nanotherapy and the systemic toxicity of nanomaterials for future human use.

  14. Three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy. All cases involved relapsed cervical lesions, and two showed edema of the larynx. Emergency tracheostomy was performed to treat the respiratory failure in one case while the others were treated conservatively. All patients showed improvements without after-effects. Patients who undergo I-131 radioiodine therapy, especially those with cervical lesions, should be carefully monitored for this rare complication after treatment. (author)

  15. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 5. CPR, Oxygen Therapy. Revised.

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fifth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (including artificial ventilation, foreign body obstructions, adjunctive equipment and special techniques, artificial…

  16. Respiratory signal analysis of liver cancer patients with respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Kang, Dong Im; Jung, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chul Jong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Byung Ki

    2015-01-01

    External markers respiratory movement measuring device (RPM; Real-time Position Management, Varian Medical System, USA) Liver Cancer Radiation Therapy Respiratory gated with respiratory signal with irradiation time and the actual research by analyzing the respiratory phase with the breathing motion measurement device respiratory tuning evaluate the accuracy of radiation therapy May-September 2014 Novalis Tx. (Varian Medical System, USA) and liver cancer radiotherapy using respiratory gated RPM (Duty Cycle 20%, Gating window 40%-60%) of 16 patients who underwent total when recording the analyzed respiratory movement. After the breathing motion of the external markers recorded on the RPM was reconstructed by breathing through the acts phase analysis, for Beam-on Time and Duty Cycle recorded by using the reconstructed phase breathing breathing with RPM gated the prediction accuracy of the radiation treatment analysis and analyzed the correlation between prediction accuracy and Duty Cycle in accordance with the reproducibility of the respiratory movement. Treatment of 16 patients with respiratory cycle during the actual treatment plan was analyzed with an average difference -0.03 seconds (range -0.50 seconds to 0.09 seconds) could not be confirmed statistically significant difference between the two breathing (p = 0.472). The average respiratory period when treatment is 4.02 sec (0.71 sec), the average value of the respiratory cycle of the treatment was characterized by a standard deviation 7.43% (range 2.57 to 19.20%). Duty Cycle is that the actual average 16.05% (range 13.78 to 17.41%), average 56.05 got through the acts of the show and then analyzed% (range 39.23 to 75.10%) is planned in respiratory research phase (40% to 60%) in was confirmed. The investigation on the correlation between the ratio Duty Cycle and planned respiratory phase and the standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was analyzed in each -0.156 (p = 0.282) and -0.385 (p = 0.070). This study is

  17. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Guro Hospital, Korea Univeristy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The respiration is one of the most important factors in respiratory gating radiation therapy (RGRT). We have developed an unique respiratory guidance system using an audio-visual system in order to support and stabilize individual patient's respiration and evaluated the usefulness of this system. Seven patients received the RGRT at our clinic from June 2011 to April 2012. After breathing exercise standard deviations by the superficial contents of respiratory cycles and functions, and analyzed them to examine changes in their breathing before and with the audio-visual system, we measured their spontaneous respiration and their respiration with the audio-visual system respectively. With the measured data, we yielded after the therapy. The PTP (peak to peak) of the standard deviations of the free breathing, the audio guidance system, and the respiratory guidance system were 0.343, 0.148, and 0.078 respectively. The respiratory cycles were 0.645, 0.345, and 0.171 respectively and the superficial contents of the respiratory functions were 2.591, 1.008, and 0.877 respectively. The average values of the differences in the standard deviations among the whole patients at the CT room and therapy room were 0.425 for the PTP, 1.566 for the respiratory cycles, and 3.671 for the respiratory superficial contents. As for the standard deviations before and after the application of the PTP respiratory guidance system, that of the PTP was 0.265, that of the respiratory cycles was 0.474, and that of the respiratory superficial contents. The results of t-test of the values before and after free breathing and the audio-visual guidance system showed that the P-value of the PTP was 0.035, that of the cycles 0.009, and that of the respiratory superficial contents 0.010. The respiratory control could be one of the most important factors in the RGRT which determines the success or failure of a treatment. We were able to get more stable breathing with the audio-visual respiratory

  18. Evaluation of the Usefulness of the Respiratory Guidance System in the Respiratory Gating Radiation Therapy

    Lee, Yeong Cheol; Kim, Sun Myung; Do, Gyeong Min; Park, Geun Yong; Kim, Gun Oh; Kim, Young Bum

    2012-01-01

    The respiration is one of the most important factors in respiratory gating radiation therapy (RGRT). We have developed an unique respiratory guidance system using an audio-visual system in order to support and stabilize individual patient's respiration and evaluated the usefulness of this system. Seven patients received the RGRT at our clinic from June 2011 to April 2012. After breathing exercise standard deviations by the superficial contents of respiratory cycles and functions, and analyzed them to examine changes in their breathing before and with the audio-visual system, we measured their spontaneous respiration and their respiration with the audio-visual system respectively. With the measured data, we yielded after the therapy. The PTP (peak to peak) of the standard deviations of the free breathing, the audio guidance system, and the respiratory guidance system were 0.343, 0.148, and 0.078 respectively. The respiratory cycles were 0.645, 0.345, and 0.171 respectively and the superficial contents of the respiratory functions were 2.591, 1.008, and 0.877 respectively. The average values of the differences in the standard deviations among the whole patients at the CT room and therapy room were 0.425 for the PTP, 1.566 for the respiratory cycles, and 3.671 for the respiratory superficial contents. As for the standard deviations before and after the application of the PTP respiratory guidance system, that of the PTP was 0.265, that of the respiratory cycles was 0.474, and that of the respiratory superficial contents. The results of t-test of the values before and after free breathing and the audio-visual guidance system showed that the P-value of the PTP was 0.035, that of the cycles 0.009, and that of the respiratory superficial contents 0.010. The respiratory control could be one of the most important factors in the RGRT which determines the success or failure of a treatment. We were able to get more stable breathing with the audio-visual respiratory guidance

  19. Guidelines for respiratory motion management in radiation therapy

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion management (RMM) systems in external and stereotactic radiotherapies have been developed in the past two decades. Japanese medical service fee regulations introduced reimbursement for RMM from April 2012. Based on thorough discussions among the four academic societies concerned, these Guidelines have been developed to enable staff (radiation oncologists, radiological technologists, medical physicists, radiotherapy quality managers, radiation oncology nurses, and others) to apply RMM to radiation therapy for tumors subject to respiratory motion, safely and appropriately. (author)

  20. Prolonged lateral steep position impairs respiratory mechanics during continuous lateral rotation therapy in respiratory failure.

    Schellongowski, Peter; Losert, Heidrun; Locker, Gottfried J; Laczika, Klaus; Frass, Michael; Holzinger, Ulrike; Bojic, Andja; Staudinger, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    To establish whether prolonged lateral steep position during continuous rotation therapy leads to improvement on pulmonary gas exchange, respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twelve consecutive patients suffering from acute lung injury or adult respiratory distress syndrome undergoing continuous rotation therapy. Blood gas analysis, static lung compliance, blood pressure, cardiac index and pulmonary shunt fraction were measured in supine as well as in left and right lateral steep position at 62 degrees during continuous rotation therapy (phase I). Rotation was then stopped for 30 min with the patients in supine position, left and right lateral steep position, and the same measurements were performed every 10 min (phase II). Phase I and II revealed no significant changes in PaO(2)/FiO(2) ratio, mean arterial blood pressure, pulmonary shunt fraction, or cardiac index. Significantly lower static compliance was observed in lateral steep position than in supine position (pposition than in left and right lateral steep position (ppositioning impairs the compliance of the respiratory system. Prolonged lateral steep position does not lead to benefits with respect to oxygenation or hemodynamics. Individual response to the different positions is unpredictable. The pauses in "extreme" positions should be as short as possible.

  1. Welding Technician

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  2. Interferon therapy of acute respiratory viral infections in children

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    within the age limit and corresponded to the temperature response. Analyzing the dynamics of clinical symptoms of acute respiratory viral infection in both groups, it should be noted that there was a persistent tendency to lower body temperature in patients, both in the main and control groups. However, in the group of patients receiving Laferobionum®, the decrease in the temperature curve occurred faster, its normalization was noted already on the 4th day of therapy in 100 % of patients, whereas in the control group on the 4th day of the disease the body temperature remained subfebrile in 12 (28.6 %, on the 5th day — in 2 (4.8 % children. Complete blood count in children of the main and control groups at the beginning of the disease showed leukopenia of varying severity, relative lymphocytosis, and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. On the 5th day of therapy in patients of the main group, the number of leukocytes was normalized, the relative lymphocytosis persisted against the background of a decrease in ESR. While in the control group, the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood remained lower with an elevated level of ESR. During the whole period of observation, the presence and nature of possible complications of acute respiratory viral infection was assessed. The total duration of the observation period was 14 days. During the observation period, no complications were detected in any of the patients in the main or control groups. During the time of the clinical trial, no adverse reactions were recorded that could be associated with the administration of Laferobionum®. There were no cases of exacerbation of existing chronic diseases in the children of the main group, while 1 (2.4 % person from the control group had exacerbation of chronic tonsillitis. Evaluation of the effectiveness of therapy with the drug was carried out on the 5th day of treatment. Since one of the effectiveness criteria was the absence of clinical signs of the disease at the

  3. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases

    Wupeng Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO, small interfering RNA (siRNA, and microRNA (miRNA are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  4. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  5. Clinical education and clinical evaluation of respiratory therapy students.

    Cullen, Deborah L

    2005-09-01

    Different blends of knowledge, decision making, problem solving,professional behaviors, values, and technical skills are necessary in the changing health care environments in which respiratory therapists practice. Frequently, novice students are expected to perform quickly and efficiently,and it may be forgotten that students are still learning and mastering the foundation pieces of practice. Clinical educators take on the responsibility of student development in addition to overseeing patient care. Normally,these volunteer instructors are role models for respiratory therapy students. The characteristic of initiative when demonstrated by a beginning student is attractive to the clinical instructor, promotes sharing of experiences, and may evolve into a mentor-protege relationship. Some clinical instructors may be underprepared to teach and are uncomfortable with student evaluation. Respiratory therapy facilities in conjunction with academic institutions may consider sponsoring ongoing programs for clinical teachers. Teaching and learning in the clinical environment is more than demonstration of skills and knowledge. Furthermore, it can be debated whether the memorization of facts or of the steps of a skill is more valuable than competency in problem solving, clinical reasoning, or information retrieval. New knowledge is built within a context and is further integrated when grounded by experience. Development of "prediction in practice" or the anticipation of the next necessary actions may be worth integrating into the instructional toolbox. Intuition has been defined as an "understanding without a rationale". This definition separates intuition from rational decision making and presents intuition as a type of innate ability. Reflection when guided by clinical instructors can help deepen critical thinking, as will Socratic questioning on a regular basis. Most clinical staff can agree on the performance of an incompetent student, but discrimination of the levels of

  6. High-Flow Nasal Cannula versus Conventional Oxygen Therapy in Children with Respiratory Distress.

    Sitthikarnkha, Punthila; Samransamruajkit, Rujipat; Prapphal, Nuanchan; Deerojanawong, Jitladda; Sritippayawan, Suchada

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the clinical efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy compared with conventional oxygen therapy in children presented with respiratory distress. This was a randomized controlled study. Infants and children aged between 1 month to 5 years who were admitted to our tertiary referral center for respiratory distress (July 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015) and met the inclusion criteria were recruited. Infants and children hospitalized with respiratory distress were randomized into two groups of interventions. All clinical data, for example, respiratory score, pulse rate, and respiratory rate were recorded. The results were subsequently analyzed. A total of 98 respiratory distress children were enrolled during the study period. Only 4 children (8.2%) failed in HFNC therapy, compared with 10 children (20.4%) in conventional oxygen therapy group ( P = 0.09). After adjusted for body weight, underlying diseases, and respiratory distress score, there was an 85% reduction in the odds of treatment failure in HFNC therapy group (adjusted odds ratio 0.15, 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.66, P = 0.01). Most children in HFNC therapy group had significant improvement in clinical respiratory score, heart rate, and respiratory rate at 240, 360, and 120 min compared with conventional oxygen therapy ( P = 0.03, 0.04, and 0.03). HFNC therapy revealed a potential clinical advantage in management children hospitalized with respiratory distress compared with conventional respiratory therapy. The early use of HFNC in children with moderate-to-severe respiratory distress may prevent endotracheal tube intubation. TCTR 20170222007.

  7. Non-vascular interventional therapy for respiratory diseases

    Ji Hongjian; Chen Liping; Wang Hui; Cheng Yongde

    2009-01-01

    To review the recent literature relating to non-vascular interventional therapy of respiratory diseases. Metal airway stent insertion can immediately relieve tracheobronchial obstruction and improve pulmonary function. However, as there is a high occurrence of the restenosis after stent insertion, it should be very careful to use metal stenting to treat the benign airway obstruction. Compared with traditional lung volume reduction surgery in treating severe emphysema, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction appears to be effective, safe and less invasive, although its clinical usefullness need to be further proved. Endoscopic occlusion of bronchial fistula represents an effective alternative to surgical treatment. Percutaneous lung biopsy under ultrasound or CT guidance has been applied successfully in the management of both benign and malignant lesions. (authors)

  8. Dose verification for respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Qian Jianguo; Xing Lei; Liu Wu; Luxton, Gary, E-mail: gluxton@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-08-07

    A novel commercial medical linac system (TrueBeam(TM), Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) allows respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new modality for treating moving tumors with high precision and improved accuracy by allowing for regular motion associated with a patient's breathing during VMAT delivery. The purpose of this work is to adapt a previously-developed dose reconstruction technique to evaluate the fidelity of VMAT treatment during gated delivery under clinic-relevant periodic motion related to patient breathing. A Varian TrueBeam system was used in this study. VMAT plans were created for three patients with lung or pancreas tumors. Conventional 6 and 15 MV beams with flattening filter and high-dose-rate 10 MV beams with no flattening filter were used in these plans. Each patient plan was delivered to a phantom first without gating and then with gating for three simulated respiratory periods (3, 4.5 and 6 s). Using the adapted log-file-based dose reconstruction procedure supplemented with ion chamber array (Seven29(TM), PTW, Freiburg, Germany) measurements, the delivered dose was used to evaluate the fidelity of gated VMAT delivery. Comparison of Seven29 measurements with and without gating showed good agreement with gamma-index passing rates above 99% for 1%/1 mm dose accuracy/distance-to-agreement criteria. With original plans as reference, gamma-index passing rates were 100% for the reconstituted plans (1%/1 mm criteria) and 93.5-100% for gated Seven29 measurements (3%/3 mm criteria). In the presence of leaf error deliberately introduced into the gated delivery of a pancreas patient plan, both dose reconstruction and Seven29 measurement consistently indicated substantial dosimetric differences from the original plan. In summary, a dose reconstruction procedure was demonstrated for evaluating the accuracy of respiratory-gated VMAT delivery. This technique showed that under clinical operation, the TrueBeam system

  9. Distance learning and the internet in respiratory therapy education.

    Varekojis, Sarah M; Sergakis, Georgianna G; Dunlevy, Crystal L; Foote, Elbie; Clutter, Jill

    2011-11-01

    The profession of respiratory therapy (RT) continues to grow both in number, due to population growth and an ever-increasing aging population, and scope of practice, due to both new and expanded roles and responsibilities in divergent areas of clinical practice. Instructional technology, including distance learning, will probably play a key role in training, educating, and assessing RT students to meet the increasing demand for practitioners. To assess current uses of distance learning and opinions concerning the appropriate use of distance education in RT education programs nationwide. A 13-item on-line survey was designed to collect information about the frequency of use of various types of distance education typically utilized in RT education programs. The survey was sent to directors of 343 Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care accredited programs of RT education that offer entry-level or advanced courses of study. The response rate was 50% (169 respondents). Fifty-two percent of the respondents indicated that their courses included some form of on-line learning component. Most directors anticipated that the distance composition of their course offerings will remain unchanged or increase in the near future. Our results indicate that, while distance education plays an important supportive role in RT education, there is still a preference for face-to-face instruction and Internet-facilitated courses among program directors. Program directors continue to view the laboratory and clinical settings as hands-on environments that require instructor supervision in order for students to demonstrate proficiency and critical thinking skills. When used appropriately, distance learning may be an efficient and effective approach to address the many barriers to education faced by the health workforce in general, including budget constraints, overloaded schedules, the need for on-the-job learning opportunities, and lack of access.

  10. Forensic Science Technician

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  11. Respiratory

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  12. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Bryan Wilson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the PICU will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition, and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness and yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation, advancement, and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both over and underfeeding prolongs duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsens other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a ‘motor’ of organ dysfunction and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition, current

  13. Antitussive pharmaceutical drugs administration in complex therapy of acute respiratory infections in children

    Lokshina, E.; Zajtseva, O.

    2009-01-01

    There is considered the problem of treatment of cough in children with acute respiratory infections in article. In particular, the data on an effective administration of the domestic combined medication framed on basis of medicinal grasses with codeine in complex therapy of acute respiratory infections is presented.

  14. Macrolide therapy is associated with reduced mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients

    Simonis, Fabienne D.; de Iudicibus, Gianfranco; Cremer, Olaf L.; Ong, David S.Y.; van der Poll, Tom; Bos, Lieuwe D.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    Background: Macrolides have been associated with favorable immunological effects in various inflammatory disease states. We investigated the association between macrolide therapy and mortality in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods: This was an unplanned secondary

  15. Impact of pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation on optimization of antiretroviral therapy and opportunistic infection prophylaxis in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Siemianowski, Laura A; Sen, Sanchita; George, Jomy M

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of a pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation (PTMR) program in optimization of medication therapy in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS. A chart review was conducted for all inpatients that had a medication reconciliation performed by the PTMR program. Adult patients with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART) and/or the opportunistic infection (OI) prophylaxis listed on the medication reconciliation form were included. The primary objective is to describe the (1) number and types of medication errors and (2) the percentage of patients who received appropriate ART. The secondary objective is a comparison of the number of medication errors between standard mediation reconciliation and a pharmacy-led program. In the PTMR period, 55 admissions were evaluated. In all, 50% of the patients received appropriate ART. In 27of the 55 admissions, there were 49 combined ART and OI-related errors. The most common ART-related errors were drug-drug interactions. The incidence of ART-related medication errors that included drug-drug interactions and renal dosing adjustments were similar between the pre-PTMR and PTMR groups (P = .0868). Of the 49 errors in the PTMR group, 18 were intervened by a medication reconciliation pharmacist. A PTMR program has a positive impact on optimizing ART and OI prophylaxis in patients with HIV/AIDS.

  16. Current possibilities of anti-inflammatory therapy in children with acute respiratory diseases

    E. E. Lokshina; O. V. Zaytseva

    2017-01-01

    The paper gives an update on the pathogenesis of acute respiratory diseases, the basis for which is inflammation of the airway mucosal lining. It reflects the results of a comparative clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride used in the combination therapy for respiratory diseases in children. The findings allow one to recommend the use of fenspiride to treat this condition in children.

  17. Current possibilities of anti-inflammatory therapy in children with acute respiratory diseases

    E. E. Lokshina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the pathogenesis of acute respiratory diseases, the basis for which is inflammation of the airway mucosal lining. It reflects the results of a comparative clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of the anti-inflammatory drug fenspiride used in the combination therapy for respiratory diseases in children. The findings allow one to recommend the use of fenspiride to treat this condition in children.

  18. The Reasoned Arguments of a Group of Future Biotechnology Technicians on a Controversial Socio-Scientific Issue: Human Gene Therapy

    Simonneaux, Laurence; Chouchane, Habib

    2011-01-01

    We tried to determine the reasoning behind the stances taken by a group of 19-21-year-old students on the controversial issue of the feasibility and acceptability of human gene therapy. The students were in training at a biotechnology institute. We organised classroom debates, punctuated by phases of epistemological "disturbances". We…

  19. The feasibility evaluation of Respiratory Gated radiation therapy simulation according to the Respiratory Training with lung cancer

    Hong, Mi Ran; Kim, Cheol Jong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Jae Won; Pyo, Hong Ryeol

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the breathing exercise,we analyzed the change in the RPM signal and the diaphragm image before 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy planning of lung cancer patients. The breathing training was enforced on 11 patients getting the 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy from April, 2016 until August. At the same time, RPM signal and diaphragm image was obtained respiration training total three steps in step 1 signal acquisition of free-breathing state, 2 steps respiratory signal acquisition through the guide of the respiratory signal, 3 steps, won the regular respiration signal to the description and repeat training. And then, acquired the minimum value, maximum value, average value, and a standard deviation of the inspiration and expiration in RPM signal and diaphragm image in each steps. Were normalized by the value of the step 1, to convert the 2,3 steps to the other distribution ratio (%), by evaluating the change in the interior of the respiratory motion of the patient, it was evaluated breathing exercise usefulness of each patient. The mean value and the standard deviation of each step were obtained with the procedure 1 of the RPM signal and the diaphragm amplitude as a 100% reference. In the RPM signal, the amplitudes and standard deviations of four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by 18.1%, 27.6% on average in 3 steps, and 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) had standard deviation, It decreased by an average of 36.5%. Meanwhile, the other four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by an average of only amplitude 13.1%. In Step 3, the amplitude of the diaphragm image decreased by 30% on average of 9 patients (81.8%, 11 people), and the average of 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) increased by 7.3%. However, the amplitudes of RPM signals and diaphragm image in 3 steps were reduced by 52.6% and 42.1% on average from all patients, respectively, compared to the 2 steps. Relationship between RPM signal and diaphragm image amplitude difference

  20. The feasibility evaluation of Respiratory Gated radiation therapy simulation according to the Respiratory Training with lung cancer

    Hong, Mi Ran; Kim, Cheol Jong; Park, Soo Yeon; Choi, Jae Won; Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of the breathing exercise,we analyzed the change in the RPM signal and the diaphragm image before 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy planning of lung cancer patients. The breathing training was enforced on 11 patients getting the 4D respiratory gated radiation therapy from April, 2016 until August. At the same time, RPM signal and diaphragm image was obtained respiration training total three steps in step 1 signal acquisition of free-breathing state, 2 steps respiratory signal acquisition through the guide of the respiratory signal, 3 steps, won the regular respiration signal to the description and repeat training. And then, acquired the minimum value, maximum value, average value, and a standard deviation of the inspiration and expiration in RPM signal and diaphragm image in each steps. Were normalized by the value of the step 1, to convert the 2,3 steps to the other distribution ratio (%), by evaluating the change in the interior of the respiratory motion of the patient, it was evaluated breathing exercise usefulness of each patient. The mean value and the standard deviation of each step were obtained with the procedure 1 of the RPM signal and the diaphragm amplitude as a 100% reference. In the RPM signal, the amplitudes and standard deviations of four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by 18.1%, 27.6% on average in 3 steps, and 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) had standard deviation, It decreased by an average of 36.5%. Meanwhile, the other four patients (36.4%, eleven) decreased by an average of only amplitude 13.1%. In Step 3, the amplitude of the diaphragm image decreased by 30% on average of 9 patients (81.8%, 11 people), and the average of 2 patients (18.2%, 11 people) increased by 7.3%. However, the amplitudes of RPM signals and diaphragm image in 3 steps were reduced by 52.6% and 42.1% on average from all patients, respectively, compared to the 2 steps. Relationship between RPM signal and diaphragm image amplitude difference

  1. Section 608 Technician Certification

    Certifications for technicians who maintain, service, repair, or dispose of equipment that could release ozone depleting refrigerants or, after January 1, 2018, substitute refrigerants into the atmosphere.

  2. Technicians and Shop Owners

    Overview page provides information for shops and technicians that repair or service motor vehicle air-conditioning systems, including information on proper training, approved equipment, and regulatory practices.

  3. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    René Agustín Flores-Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure.

  4. SU-E-J-48: Development of An Abdominal Compression Device for Respiratory Correlated Radiation Therapy

    Kim, T; Kang, S; Kim, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2014-01-01

    therapy and respiratory training system will be investigated. This work was supported by Radiation Technology R and D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498)and Basic Atomic Energy Research Institute (BAERI)(No. NRF-2009-0078390) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning

  5. Rapid improvement of respiratory quality in asthmatic children after "assisted drainage" therapy

    Haryono Utomo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Whilst current asthma management is well-developed, there are still 5-10% uncontrolled asthma patients with unknown etiologies. However, its connection with oral focal infection is still uncertain. Therefore, a collaborated research for asthma management was conducted by pediatricians and dental practitioners. Within minutes after the "assisted drainage" therapy, a modification of healing root planning procedure, there is rapid improvement of respiratory function, ie., forced expiratory-volume one second (FEV1 in asthmatic children. This quick response usually achieved by oral inhalation. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of the assisted drainage therapy in the improvement of respiratory quality. Methods Fifteen asthmatic children were subjected to a longitudinal study for two weeks. In tbe first week they were instructed for al lergen avoidance only and the fOllowing one week was combined with tbe assisted drainage therapy, followed by  mental health education and dental plaque control therapy. Each s'ubject was af'sef'sed for respiratory quality with a computerized spirometer and blood sampling test. Paired t-test analysis was used for statistical analysis. Results Assisted drainage therapy was performed, within minutes FEV1 increased significantly (P= 0.001. Additionally, there were significant differences serum histamine (P= 0,001 pre and post treatment. Conclusions The assisted drainage therapy is effective as an adjuvant therapy for mild persistent asthma in children.

  6. Diesel Engine Technician

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diesel engine technicians maintain and repair the engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, trains, buses, and locomotives. Some technicians work mainly on farm machines, ships, compressors, and pumps. Others work mostly on construction equipment such as cranes, power shovels, bulldozers, and paving machines. This article…

  7. Electric Vehicle Technician

    Moore, Pam

    2011-01-01

    With President Obama's goal to have one million electric vehicles (EV) on the road by 2015, the electric vehicle technician should have a promising and busy future. "The job force in the car industry is ramping up for a revitalized green car industry," according to Greencareersguide.com. An electric vehicle technician will safely troubleshoot and…

  8. Career Directions: HVACR Technician

    Moore, Pam

    2005-01-01

    Heating/ventilation/air conditioning/refrigeration (HVACR) technicians (also known as "heating and cooling technicians") are the people who install, maintain, test and repair the machines that control temperature, circulation, moisture and purity of air in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. These systems consist of a variety of…

  9. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  10. Programmable segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy for respiratory coordination in pancreatic cancer

    Wu, Jian-Kuen; Wu, Chien-Jang; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    We programmably divided long-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) into split short arcs, each taking less than 30 s for respiratory coordination. The VMAT plans of five pancreatic cancer patients were modified; the short-arc plans had negligible dose differences and satisfied the 3%/3-mm gamma index on a MapCHECK-2 device.

  11. Rotational bed therapy to prevent and treat respiratory complications: a review and meta-analysis.

    Goldhill, David R; Imhoff, Michael; McLean, Barbara; Waldmann, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Immobility is associated with complications involving many body systems. To review the effect of rotational therapy (use of therapeutic surfaces that turn on their longitudinal axes) on prevention and/or treatment of respiratory complications in critically ill patients. Published articles evaluating prophylaxis and/or treatment were reviewed. Prospective randomized controlled trials were assessed for quality and included in meta-analyses. A literature search yielded 15 nonrandomized, uncontrolled, or retrospective studies. Twenty prospective randomized controlled trials on rotational therapy were published between 1987 and 2004. Various types of beds were studied, but few details on the rotational parameters were reported. The usual control was manual turning of patients by nurses every 2 hours. One animal investigation and 12 clinical trials addressed the effectiveness of rotational therapy in preventing respiratory complications. Significant benefits were reported in the animal study and 4 of the trials. Significant benefits to patients were reported in 2 of another 4 studies focused on treatment of established complications. Researchers have examined the effects of rotational therapy on mucus transport, intrapulmonary shunt, hemodynamic effects, urine output, and intracranial pressure. Little convincing evidence is available, however, on the most effective rotation parameters (eg, degree, pause time, and amount of time per day). Meta-analysis suggests that rotational therapy decreases the incidence of pneumonia but has no effect on duration of mechanical ventilation, number of days in intensive care, or hospital mortality. Rotational therapy may be useful for preventing and treating respiratory complications in selected critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Challenge for Diagnosis and Therapy

    Chun Pan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: ARDS is a devastating clinical syndrome whose incidence and mortality has remained high over the past 50 years. Its definition and treatments are still confronted with challenges, and early recognition and intervention are crucial for improving the outcomes of ARDS. More clinical studies are needed to improve early diagnosis and appropriate therapy.

  13. Compliance with therapy in children with respiratory diseases.

    Schöni, M H; Horak, E; Nikolaizik, W H

    1995-01-01

    Compliance with medical treatment was evaluated in 89 children and adolescents with respiratory diseases using two methods of assessment: a double blinded covert recording of the use of an air compressor for nebulization of drugs and the determination of theophylline levels in serum. In the covert monitoring of inhalation the overall compliance with the prescribed medication was 47.6%. In the open randomized theophylline trial, 56%-71% of the patients (according to uncontrolled or controlled intake of the drug) received a dosage of theophylline which was too low to achieve a sufficient serum level in the range of 10-20 mg/l. This, however, was also due to the fact that in 72% of the cases physicians prescribed doses which were substantially below the recommended amount of drug according to age and weight. It is, therefore, concluded that compliance of medication is based on the patients adherence to the medication, to the efficacy of the drug itself and the attitude of the physician.

  14. Pneumoconiosis and exposures of dental laboratory technicians

    Rom, W.N.; Lockey, J.E.; Lee, J.S.; Kimball, A.C.; Bang, K.M.; Leaman, H.; Johns, R.E. Jr.; Perrota, D.; Gibbons, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight dental laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean values for per cent predicted FVC and FEV1 were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls; after controlling for age, there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work-years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Salt Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures in dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis

  15. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 15. Biotronics Technicians.

    1974-08-31

    curricula based upon job analysis was implemented to a level of methodology determination. These methods and curriculum materials constituted a third...Therapy Technician 8495 Dermatology Technician 8496 Embalming Technician 8497 Medical Illustration Technician 8498 Medical Equipment Repair Technician... WET COMPRESSES/SOAKS/PACKS 24 ICONTROL BLEEDING BY PRESSURE DRESSING 25 1APPLY/CHANGE BANDAGES, E.G. ROLLER, TRIANGULAR, KURLEX GO TO RIGHT HAND PAGE

  16. Current Issues of Antipyretic Therapy in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections

    E. I. Novikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the current issues in the pediatric practice of seasonal incidence of children with acute respiratory infections. The basic etiological aspects of this pathology, specific clinical symptoms typical for different pathogens, causes of bursts of disease in certain periods are described. Special attention is paid to the tactics of antipyretic therapy in different groups of children with fever and acute respiratory diseases, understand the typical errors in its appointment. The author discusses the domestic and foreign results of using ibuprofen to relieve fever in children with this pathology, comparative efficacy and safety data of ibuprofen with other analgesics-antipyretics.

  17. [Physical therapy performance in respiratory and motor involvement during postoperative in children submitted to abdominal surgeries].

    Santo, Caroline C; Gonçalves, Marcela T; Piccolo, Mariana M; Lima, Simone; Rosa, George J da; Paulin, Elaine; Schivinski, Camila S

    2011-01-01

    to verify the physiotherapy performance in the respiratory and motor affections during postoperative period in pediatric patients undergoing abdominal surgery. was a literature review of articles published in the databases Lilacs, Medline and SciELO in the period 1983 to 2010 as well as books, papers presented at scientific meetings and journals of the area, who approached the post-therapy of abdominal surgery in children. The keywords used were: abdominal surgery, children and physiotherapy. 28 articles, one book chapter and one dissertation had been selected that examined the question and proposed that contained all, or at least two of the descriptors listed. Most of the material included covers the incidence of respiratory complications after surgery for pediatric abdominal surgery due to immaturity of the respiratory system of this population, abdominal manipulation of surgical period, the prolonged time in bed, pain at the incision site and waste anesthetic. Some authors also discuss the musculoskeletal and connective tissue arising from the inaction and delay of psychomotor development consequent to periods of hospitalization in early childhood, taking on the role of physiotherapy to prevent motor and respiratory involvement. there are few publications addressing this topic, but the positive aspects of physiotherapy have been described, especially in relation to the prevention of respiratory complications and motor, recognized the constraints and consequences of hospitalizations and surgeries cause in children.

  18. Recent advances in delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy during pediatric respiratory diseases.

    Wu, Yue'E; Zhang, Chonglin; Zhen, Qing

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of pediatric surgery diseases via utilization of aerosol delivery mechanisms is in progress for the betterment of pediatric care. Over the years, aerosol therapy has come to play an integral role in the treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases. Inhaled aerosol agents such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and mucolytics are commonly delivered to spontaneously breathing pediatric patients with a tracheostomy. Administering therapeutic inhaled aerosols to pediatric patients is challenging. The pediatric population ranges in age, which means patients with different airway sizes, breathing patterns, and cooperation levels. These patient-related factors impact the deposition of aerosol drugs in the lungs. The present review article will discuss the recent advancements in the delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy in pediatric patients with respiratory diseases.

  19. 4D modeling and estimation of respiratory motion for radiation therapy

    Lorenz, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes an important uncertainty in radiotherapy planning of the thorax and upper abdomen. The main objective of radiation therapy is to eradicate or shrink tumor cells without damaging the surrounding tissue by delivering a high radiation dose to the tumor region and a dose as low as possible to healthy organ tissues. Meeting this demand remains a challenge especially in case of lung tumors due to breathing-induced tumor and organ motion where motion amplitudes can measure up to several centimeters. Therefore, modeling of respiratory motion has become increasingly important in radiation therapy. With 4D imaging techniques spatiotemporal image sequences can be acquired to investigate dynamic processes in the patient’s body. Furthermore, image registration enables the estimation of the breathing-induced motion and the description of the temporal change in position and shape of the structures of interest by establishing the correspondence between images acquired at different phases of the br...

  20. Insight into team competence in medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students.

    Sigalet, Elaine L; Donnon, Tyrone L; Grant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information for educators about levels of competence in teams comprised of medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students after receiving a simulation-based team-training (SBT) curriculum with and without an additional formalized 30-min team-training (TT) module. A two-group pre- and post-test research design was used to evaluate team competence with respect to leadership, roles and responsibilities, communication, situation awareness and resource utilization. All scenarios were digitally recorded and evaluated using the KidSIM Team Performance Scale by six experts from medicine, nursing and respiratory therapy. The lowest scores occurred for items that reflected situation awareness. All teams improved their aggregate scores from Time 1 to Time 2 (p performance scores at Time 1 (Cohen's d = 0.92, p performances at Time 1 and 2.

  1. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered.

  2. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiological Control Technician: Standardized technician Qualification Standard

    1992-10-01

    The Qualification Standard states and defines the knowledge and skill requirements necessary for successful completion of the Radiological Control Technician Training Program. The standard is divided into three phases: Phase I concerns RCT Academic training. There are 13 lessons associated with the core academics program and 19 lessons associated with the site academics program. The staff member should sign the appropriate blocks upon successful completion of the examination for that lesson or group of lessons. In addition, facility specific lesson plans may be added to meet the knowledge requirements in the Job Performance Measures (JPM) of the practical program. Phase II concerns RCT core/site practical (JPMs) training. There are thirteen generic tasks associated with the core practical program. Both the trainer/evaluator and student should sign the appropriate block upon successful completion of the JPM. In addition, facility specific tasks may be added or generic tasks deleted based on the results of the facility job evaluation. Phase III concerns the oral examination board successful completion of the oral examination board is documented by the signature of the chairperson of the board. Upon completion of all of the standardized technician qualification requirements, final qualification is verified by the student and the manager of the Radiological Control Department and acknowledged by signatures on the qualification standard. The completed Qualification Standard shall be maintained as an official training record

  4. Electronics for technicians

    Crane, P W

    2013-01-01

    Electronics for Technicians covers the basic fundamentals of electronics, including the operation of devices and circuits. The book is meant to help the technician to obtain numerical answers to actual circuit problems. This volume consists of seven chapters, the first of which introduces the reader to the basic rules for circuits containing resistive and reactive elements. Charge and discharge of a capacitor through a resistor is discussed, along with charge and discharge of an inductance through a resistance, application of sinusoidal voltages to simple networks, and series and parallel LCR

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated Rapid

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy.

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients' treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc therapy. Varied results were

  7. SU-G-JeP3-09: Tumor Location Prediction Using Natural Respiratory Volume for Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT): System Verification Study

    Kim, M; Jung, J; Yoon, D; Shin, H; Kim, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient’s breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be fully aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. In order to bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a target location prediction system for RGRT that uses only natural respiratory volume, and confirm its application. Methods: In order to verify the proposed target location prediction system, an in-house phantom set was used. This set involves a chest phantom including target, external markers, and motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using the random function in MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target takes a linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted target location prediction using random respiratory volume values. Results: The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41%. In addition, the average error rate of target location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. Conclusion: We confirmed the applicability of our proposed target location prediction system for RGRT using natural respiratory volume. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction system can be realized without requiring respiratory pattern training.

  8. Respiratory muscle training with enzyme replacement therapy improves muscle strength in late - onset Pompe disease.

    Jevnikar, Mitja; Kodric, Metka; Cantarutti, Fabiana; Cifaldi, Rossella; Longo, Cinzia; Della Porta, Rossana; Bembi, Bruno; Confalonieri, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of muscle tissue causing progressive muscular weakness particularly of the respiratory system. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has demonstrated efficacy in slowing down disease progression in infants. Despite the large number of studies describing the effects of physical training in juvenile and adult late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). There are very few reports that analyze the benefits of respiratory muscle rehabilitation or training. The effectiveness of respiratory muscle training was investigated using a specific appliance with adjustable resistance (Threshold). The primary endpoint was effect on respiratory muscular strength by measurements of MIP and MEP. Eight late-onset Pompe patients (aged 13 to 58 years; 4 female, 4 male) with respiratory muscle deficiency on functional respiratory tests were studied. All patients received ERT at the dosage of 20 mg/kg/every 2 weeks and underwent training with Threshold at specified pressures for 24 months. A significant increase in MIP was observed during the follow-up of 24 month: 39.6 cm H 2 O (+ 25.0%) at month 3; 39.5 cm H 2 O (+ 24.9%) at month 6; 39.1 cm H 2 O (+ 23.7%) at month 9; 37.3 cm H 2 O (+ 18.2%) at month 12; and 37.3 cm H 2 O (+ 17.8%) at month 24. Median MEP values also showed a significant increase during the first 9 months: 29.8 cm H 2 O, (+ 14.3%) at month 3; 31.0 cm H 2 O (+ 18.6) at month 6; and 29.5 cm H 2 O (+ 12.9) at month 9. MEP was then shown to be decreased at months 12 and 24; median MEP was 27.2 cm H 2 O (+ 4.3%) at 12 months and 26.6 cm H 2 O (+ 1.9%) at 24 months. The FVC remain stable throughout the study. An increase in respiratory muscular strength was demonstrated with Threshold training when used in combination with ERT.

  9. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwang Yang Health Collage, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam{sub t}ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule.

  10. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam; Song, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Jae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam t ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule

  11. Hypersensitivity Reaction and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Pyrethroid Poisoning and Role of Steroid Therapy

    Jisa George

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrethroids are generally of low toxicity to humans, but in suicidal poisonings which are usually associated with ingestion of high doses, they lead to severe systemic effects. Case Report: A 30-year old woman presented to emergency department with a history of intentional ingestion of about 15 mL of prallethrin around 3 days earlier. She complained of shortness of breath along with chest pain for the last 2 days. She reported no vomiting or stomach pain prior to presentation to hospital. On chest auscultation, breath sounds were mildly decreased in bilateral infrascapular areas with generalized crepitation. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed respiratory alkalosis. Chest X ray and computed tomography of thorax revealed widespread confluent areas of consolidation with interlobular septal thickening involving bilateral parahilar regions suggestive of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The patient did not respond to broad spectrum antibiotic coverage, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Intravenous methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day divided 6 hourly was started and slowly tapered off during the next days. The patient discharged after 3 weeks in good health. Discussion: As pyrethroids can affect sodium channels, the osmotic gradient of alveolar epithelium probably disrupts and therefore, alveolar infiltrations gradually spread over lungs. In addition, there is a possibility of hypersensitivity reactions to pyrethroids, which can cause progressive inflammation and involve respiratory tract in severe cases. Conclusion: Pyrethroid poisoning can lead to ARDS. Steroid therapy may help such patients tide over the pulmonary crisis.

  12. Cardio-respiratory symptoms in panic disorder: a contribution from cognitive-behaviour therapy

    Anna Lucia Spear King

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia treated with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT associated with the medication with patients treated only with medication and verify the behaviour of the cardio-respiratory symptoms of both groups. Methods: Randomized sample in the Psychiatry Institute of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, divided in two groups of 25 participants each. Group 1 undertook 10 weekly sessions of CBT with one hour of duration each together with medication. Group 2, Control, were administered medication that only consisted of tricyclic anti-depressants and selective inhibitors of the re-uptake of serotonin. Evaluation instruments were applied at the beginning and to the end of the interventions. Results: According to the applied scales, group 1 showed statistically more significant results than group 2, with: reduction of panic attacks, cardio-respiratory symptoms, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia avoidance and fear of bodily sensations. Conclusion: Exposures (in vivo and interoceptive, especially for induction symptom exercises and relaxation, were considered essential to prepare patients with panic disorder to handle future cardio-respiratory symptoms and panic attacks with agoraphobia.

  13. Immediate effect of manual therapy on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD

    Yilmaz Yelvar GD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gul Deniz Yilmaz Yelvar,1 Yasemin Çirak,2 Yasemin Parlak Demir,3 Murat Dalkilinç,1 Bülent Bozkurt4 1Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, 2Department of Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy, 3Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Turgut Özal University, Ankara, Turkey Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effect of manual therapy (MT on respiratory functions and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with COPD.Participants and methods: Thirty patients with severe COPD (eight females and 22 males; mean age 62.4±6.8 years referred to pulmonary physiotherapy were included in this study. The patients participated in a single session of MT to measure the short-term effects. The lung function was measured using a portable spirometer. An electronic pressure transducer was used to measure respiratory muscle strength. Heart rate, breathing frequency, and oxygen saturation were measured with a pulse oximeter. For fatigue and dyspnea perception, the modified Borg rating of perceived exertion scale was used. All measurements were taken before and immediately after the first MT session. The ease-of-breathing visual analog scale was used for rating patients’ symptoms subjectively during the MT session.Results: There was a significant improvement in the forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and vital capacity values (P<0.05. The maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure values increased significantly after MT, compared to the pre-MT session (P<0.05. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, respiratory rate (P<0.05, and dyspnea and fatigue perception (P<0.05.Conclusion: A single MT session immediately improved pulmonary function, inspiratory muscle strength, and oxygen saturation and reduced dyspnea, fatigue, and heart and respiratory rates in patients with

  14. IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND TACTICS OF RATIONAL CHOICE OF ETIOTROPIC IMMUNOMODULATORY THERAPIES IN CHILDREN

    V. V. Malinovskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates that the basis for pathogenesis of acute respiratory infection (ARI is a deficiency in a number of factors of virus protection. This deficiency manifests itself through low concentration of interferon and secretory IgA in the nasal mucosa at higher levels of IL-8, alongside with low serum antiviral activity and significant inhibition of interferon production and reduction of the compensatory mechanisms of adaptive immunity. These disorders require prescription of alpha-interferon preparations. For infants and children with a burdened pre-morbid background, regardless of age, such preparations can be administered with all clinical forms of ARI; in older children — with severe forms, including complications. Alpha-interferon preparations can be introduced at in any stage of the disease. Combination therapy with alpha-interferon drugs (VIFERON® suppositories and VIFERON® ointment allows for enhanced clinical and immunological effects of therapy.

  15. Experience with inhaled nitric oxide therapy in hypoxic respiratory failure of the newborn.

    Sehgal, Arvind; Callander, Ian; Stack, Jacqueline; Momsen, Tracey; Sterling-Levis, Katy

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been shown to be effective in the management of persistent pulmonory hypertension of newborn (PPHN). To retrospectively analyse data to determine the effectiveness of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the management of newborns with PPHN in terms of survival and changes in oxygenation status. Neo-natal data since inception of iNO therapy at the unit (past six years) was reviewed. Pertinent demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records of newborns that received inhaled nitric oxide therapy during their stay. Details of underlying illnesses, other therapeutic modalities, arterial blood gas, ventilatory and nitric oxide parameters were assessed and analysed to ascertain efficacy of iNO. A total of 36 babies (gestational age ranging from 24-41 weeks) received iNO during this period; two were excluded from final analysis. Overall survival rate was 80 percent. There was a statistically significant increase in systemic oxygenation (PaO2) from 41.1 +/- 2.1 mmHg to 128.5 +/- 13.2 mmHg and a decline in oxygenation index (OI) from 49.4 +/- 5.9 to 17.3 +/- 2.5, when assessed after four hours (P < 0.001). Mean duration of iNO therapy was 63 +/- 7.3 hours and the maximum methaemoglobin levels were noted to be 2.1 percent. Inhaled nitric oxide appears to be an effective rescue therapy for the management of PPHN associated with hypoxic respiratory failure. It is safe and well tolerated with no evidence of clinical or biochemical side effects.

  16. Principles of etiopathogenetic therapy for acute respiratory viral infections in frequently ill children

    L. A. Kharitonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the impact of incorporation of cycloferon into a therapy regimen on the efficiency of treatment for acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in frequently ill children. Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 117 children divided into three groups according to the therapy regimen. Thus, symptomatic and local antiviral therapies (interferon nasal ointment and viferon suppositories were prescribed to all the children; furthermore, Group 1 (control used antibiotic therapy; Group 2 (Comparison Group 1 took antibiotics and cycloferon (tablets, and Group 3 (Comparison Group 2 had Cycloferon. Results: At the beginning of treatment, there was a reduction in interferon-a and interferon-y values with preserved serum interferon levels, suggesting the diminished compensatory responses ensuring antiviral protection. Analysis of the immune status revealed that virtually half of the children exhibited activation of compensatory mechanisms (stimulation of CD4+ and CD8+ production and an increase in NST test activity, one third displayed a disturbance (decreases in CD4+, CDlfrf, IgA, and NST test activity. After treatment, interferonogenesis was recovered in the majority (86,7% of the patients taking Cycloferon, in 74,1% of those who had a treatment regimen containing cycloferon and antibiotics, and only in 47,1 % of those who received antibiotics. Comparison of the immunological indicators during therapy with antibiotics alone or in combination with cycloferon demonstrated a more noticeable and balanced response to the latter: the normalized CD4+ and CD8+ values in the patients on antibiotic therapy was 8,9 and 5,8%, respectively, and 11,1 % in those who received antibiotics and cycloferon. Conclusion. Incorporation of cycloferon into ARVI treatment regimens for frequently ill patients has the positive effect on immunological indicators, which shows itself as recovery of initially diminished interferonogenesis

  17. Dental technician pneumoconiosis mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.

    Tan, Han Loong; Faisal, Mohamed; Soo, Chun Ian; Ban, Andrea Y L; Manap, Roslina Abdul; Hassan, Tidi M

    2016-09-07

    Dental laboratory technicians are at risk of developing occupational respiratory diseases due to exposure to various potentially toxic substances in their working environment. Since 1939, few cases of silicosis among dental technician have been reported. We illustrate a 38 year-old female, who worked in a dental laboratory for 20 years, initially treated as pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic necrotising aspergillosis without much improvement. Computed tomography guided lung biopsy and bronchoscopic transbronchial lung biopsy were performed. Lung tissue biopsies showed presence of refractile dental materials within the areas of histiocyte proliferation. The diagnosis of dental technician pneumoconiosis was obtained and our patient underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. This case highlights the importance of obtaining a detailed occupational history in tuberculosis endemic area, as pulmonary tuberculosis is a great mimicker of other respiratory diseases.

  18. Macrolide therapy is associated with reduced mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients

    de Iudicibus, Gianfranco; Cremer, Olaf L.; Ong, David S. Y.; van der Poll, Tom; Bos, Lieuwe D.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2018-01-01

    Background Macrolides have been associated with favorable immunological effects in various inflammatory disease states. We investigated the association between macrolide therapy and mortality in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods This was an unplanned secondary analysis of patients with ARDS within a large prospective observational study of critically ill patients in the intensive care units (ICUs) of two university-affiliated hospitals in the Netherlands. The exposure of interest was low-dose macrolide use prescribed for another reason than infection; we excluded patients who received high-dose macrolides for an infection. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. The association between macrolide therapy and mortality was determined in the whole cohort, as well as in a propensity score matched cohort; the association was compared between pulmonary versus non-pulmonary ARDS, and between two biological phenotypes based on plasma levels of 20 biomarkers. Results In total, 873 patients with ARDS were analyzed, of whom 158 patients (18%) received macrolide therapy during stay in ICU for a median duration of 3 (interquartile range, 1–4) days. Erythromycin was the most frequent prescribed macrolide (97%). Macrolide therapy was associated with reduced 30-day mortality in the whole cohort [22.8% vs. 31.6%; crude odds ratio (OR), 0.64 (interquartile range, 0.43–0.96), P=0.03]. The association in the propensity score matched cohort remained significant [22.8% vs. 32.9%; OR, 0.62 (interquartile range, 0.39–0.96), P=0.03]. Propensity matched associations with mortality were different in patients with non-pulmonary ARDS vs. pulmonary ARDS and also varied by biological phenotype. Conclusions These data together show that low-dose macrolide therapy prescribed for another reason than infection is associated with decreased mortality in patients with ARDS. PMID:29430441

  19. Macrolide therapy is associated with reduced mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients.

    Simonis, Fabienne D; de Iudicibus, Gianfranco; Cremer, Olaf L; Ong, David S Y; van der Poll, Tom; Bos, Lieuwe D; Schultz, Marcus J

    2018-01-01

    Macrolides have been associated with favorable immunological effects in various inflammatory disease states. We investigated the association between macrolide therapy and mortality in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This was an unplanned secondary analysis of patients with ARDS within a large prospective observational study of critically ill patients in the intensive care units (ICUs) of two university-affiliated hospitals in the Netherlands. The exposure of interest was low-dose macrolide use prescribed for another reason than infection; we excluded patients who received high-dose macrolides for an infection. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. The association between macrolide therapy and mortality was determined in the whole cohort, as well as in a propensity score matched cohort; the association was compared between pulmonary versus non-pulmonary ARDS, and between two biological phenotypes based on plasma levels of 20 biomarkers. In total, 873 patients with ARDS were analyzed, of whom 158 patients (18%) received macrolide therapy during stay in ICU for a median duration of 3 (interquartile range, 1-4) days. Erythromycin was the most frequent prescribed macrolide (97%). Macrolide therapy was associated with reduced 30-day mortality in the whole cohort [22.8% vs. 31.6%; crude odds ratio (OR), 0.64 (interquartile range, 0.43-0.96), P=0.03]. The association in the propensity score matched cohort remained significant [22.8% vs. 32.9%; OR, 0.62 (interquartile range, 0.39-0.96), P=0.03]. Propensity matched associations with mortality were different in patients with non-pulmonary ARDS vs. pulmonary ARDS and also varied by biological phenotype. These data together show that low-dose macrolide therapy prescribed for another reason than infection is associated with decreased mortality in patients with ARDS.

  20. Factors affecting responses of infants with respiratory distress syndrome to exogenous surfactant therapy.

    Ho, N K

    1993-02-01

    Approximately 20% to 30% of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) do not respond to surfactant replacement therapy. Unfortunately there is no uniform definition of 'response' or 'non-response' to surfactant therapy. Response was based on improvement in a/A PO2 and/or mean airway pressure (MAP) by some and on improvement in FIO2 and/or MAP by others. Even the point of time at which evaluation of response was done is different in various reports. There is an urgent need to adopt an uniform definition. Most premature babies are surfactant deficient which is the aetiological factor of RDS. Generally good antenatal care and perinatal management are essential in avoidance of premature birth. Babies with lung hypoplasia and who are extremely premature (less than 24 weeks of gestation) do not respond well to exogenous surfactant replacement because of structural immaturity. Prompt management of asphyxiated birth and shock are necessary as there may be negative response to surfactant replacement. Foetal exposure to glucocorticoids improves responsiveness to postnatal administration of surfactant. Antenatal steroid therapy has become an important part of management of RDS with surfactant replacement. The premature lungs with high alveolar permeability tend to develop pulmonary oedema. With the presence of plasma-derived surfactant inhibitors, the response to exogenous surfactant may be affected. These inhibitors may also be released following ventilator barotrauma. The standard of neonatal intensive care such as ventilatory techniques has an important bearing on the outcome of the RDS babies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Inhaled phage therapy: a promising and challenging approach to treat bacterial respiratory infections.

    Bodier-Montagutelli, Elsa; Morello, Eric; L'Hostis, Guillaume; Guillon, Antoine; Dalloneau, Emilie; Respaud, Renaud; Pallaoro, Nikita; Blois, Hélène; Vecellio, Laurent; Gabard, Jérôme; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are increasingly difficult to treat due to evolving antibiotic resistance. In this context, bacteriophages (or phages) are part of the foreseen alternatives or combination therapies. Delivering phages through the airways seems more relevant to accumulate these natural antibacterial viruses in proximity to their bacterial host, within the infectious site. Areas covered: This review addresses the potential of phage therapy to treat RTIs and discusses preclinical and clinical results of phages administration in this context. Recent phage formulation and aerosolization attempts are also reviewed, raising technical challenges to achieve efficient pulmonary deposition via inhalation. Expert opinion: Overall, the inhalation of phages as antibacterial treatment seems both clinically relevant and technically feasible. Several crucial points still need to be investigated, such as phage product pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity. Furthermore, given phage-specific features, appropriate regulatory and manufacturing guidelines will need to be defined. Finally, randomized controlled clinical trials should be carried out to establish phage therapy's clinical positioning in the antimicrobial arsenal against RTIs.

  2. Alternative and Natural Therapies for Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Vipul J. Patel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by acute inflammation, microvascular damage, and increased pulmonary vascular and epithelial permeability, frequently resulting in acute respiratory failure and death. Current best practice for ARDS involves “lung-protective ventilation,” which entails low tidal volumes and limiting the plateau pressures in mechanically ventilated patients. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ARDS, little progress has been made in the development of specific therapies to combat injury and inflammation. Areas Covered. In recent years, several natural products have been studied in experimental models and have been shown to inhibit multiple inflammatory pathways associated with acute lung injury and ARDS at a molecular level. Because of the pleiotropic effects of these agents, many of them also activate antioxidant pathways through nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2, thereby targeting multiple pathways. Several of these agents are prescribed for treatment of inflammatory conditions in the Asian subcontinent and have shown to be relatively safe. Expert Commentary. Here we review natural remedies shown to attenuate lung injury and inflammation in experimental models. Translational human studies in patients with ARDS may facilitate treatment of this devastating disease.

  3. Data analyst technician: an innovative role for the pharmacy technician.

    Ervin, K C; Skledar, S; Hess, M M; Ryan, M

    2001-10-01

    The development of an innovative role for the pharmacy technician is described. The role of the pharmacy technician was based on a needs assessment and the expertise of the pharmacy technician selected. Initial responsibilities of the technician included chart reviews, benchmarking surveys, monthly financial impact analysis, initiative assessment, and quality improvement reporting. As the drug-use and disease-state management (DUDSM) program expanded, pharmacist activities increased, requiring the expansion of data analyst technician (DAT) duties. These new responsibilities included participation in patient assessment, data collection and interpretation, and formulary enforcement. Most recently, technicians' expanded duties include maintenance of a physician compliance profiling database, quality improvement reporting and graphing, active role in patient risk assessment and database management for adult vaccination, and support of financial impact monitoring for other institutions within the health system. This pharmacist-technician collaboration resulted a threefold increase in patient assessments completed per day. In addition, as the DUDSM program continues to expand across the health system, an increase in DAT resources from 0.5 to 1.0 full-time equivalent was obtained. The role of the DAT has increased the efficiency of the DUDSM program and has provided an innovative role for the pharmacy technician.

  4. Pressing Issues of Rational Antibiotic Therapy for Inflammatory Diseases of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Pediatric Practice

    Ye.N. Okhotnikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 30 years, high incidence of acute lower respiratory tract infections of bacterial origin, primarily pneumonia and bronchitis, treatment of which under the spread of antibiotic resistance is often a difficult task, cause alarm. Bronchitis — one of the most common respiratory diseases in childhood after acute respiratory viral infections. Application of antibiotics for acute bronchitis in children is not recommended, but they are prescribed for severe intoxication and prolonged hyperthermia (over 3 days, especially in infants, children with poor premorbid background and high risk of pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy is considered as the only science-based treatment of pneumonia. Taking into account the broad spectrum of modern antibiotics, monotherapy is most suitable. If it is necessary to extend their effect, combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate with macrolides, to which all the major respiratory pathogens are sensitive, is preferred.

  5. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Hansen, Rune; Larsen, Lars Peter; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Intrafraction motion may compromise the target dose in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver. Respiratory gating can improve the treatment delivery, but gating based on an external surrogate signal may be inaccurate. This is the first paper reporting on respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic monitoring during liver SBRT. Two patients with solitary liver metastases were treated with respiratory-gated SBRT guided by three implanted electromagnetic transponders. The treatment was delivered in end-exhale with beam-on when the centroid of the three transponders deviated less than 3 mm [left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions] and 4mm [cranio-caudal (CC)] from the planned position. For each treatment fraction, log files were used to determine the transponder motion during beam-on in the actual gated treatments and in simulated treatments without gating. The motion was used to reconstruct the dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) with and without gating. The reduction in D95 (minimum dose to 95% of the CTV) relative to the plan was calculated for both treatment courses. With gating the maximum course mean (standard deviation) geometrical error in any direction was 1.2 mm (1.8 mm). Without gating the course mean error would mainly increase for Patient 1 [to -2.8 mm (1.6 mm) (LR), 7.1 mm (5.8 mm) (CC), -2.6 mm (2.8mm) (AP)] due to a large systematic cranial baseline drift at each fraction. The errors without gating increased only slightly for Patient 2. The reduction in CTV D95 was 0.5% (gating) and 12.1% (non-gating) for Patient 1 and 0.3% (gating) and 1.7% (non-gating) for Patient 2. The mean duty cycle was 55%. Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion.

  6. Nuclear instrument technician training

    Wollesen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Nuclear Instrument Technician (NIT) training that has developed at an accelerated rate over the past three decades. During the 1960's commercial nuclear power plants were in their infancy. For that reason, there is little wonder that NIT training had little structure and little creditability. NIT training, in many early plants, was little more than On-The Job Training (OJT). The seventies brought changes in Instrumentation and Controls as well as emphasis on the requirements for more in depth training and documentation. As in the seventies, the eighties saw not only changes in technologies but tighter requirements, standardized training and the development of accredited Nuclear Instrument Training; thus the conclusion: Nuclear Instrument Training Isn't What It Used To Be

  7. Radiation Technician Scientist service

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique; Barrera Gonzalez, Gisela; Guerra Torres, Mercedes; Mora Lopez, Leonor; Altanes Valentin, Sonia; Rapado Paneque, Manuel; Plasencia Gutierrez, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The irradiation service is part of the specialized technician scientist services of the Center of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development it belonging to the Radiobiological Department it provides a self shielded laboratory irradiator, PX y 30 type with Cobalt 60 sources, it destined for searches studies, so much basic as applying, in several branches of the science, like the radiobiology, the radiation chemistry, the solid state physics, the medicine, the agriculture and the Pharmaceutical- Medical Industry and besides offering the irradiation service properly with the which have been gotten significant economical outputs. The radiation processing is controlled by means of the dosimetric systems of Freckle, ceric cerous sulfate, Perspex (red, clear and Amber) and dose indicators

  8. The value of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy after extubation in patients with acute respiratory failure

    Hong-Zhuan Song

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy after extubation in patients with acute respiratory failure. METHODS: A single-center, prospective, randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted between January 2013 and December 2014. Sixty enrolled patients were randomized immediately after extubation into either a high-flow nasal cannula group (n=30 or an air entrainment mask group (n=30 at a fixed inspired oxygen fraction (40%. The success rate of oxygen therapy, respiratory and hemodynamic parameters and subjective discomfort (using a visual analogue scale were assessed at 24h after extubation. RESULTS: The two groups were comparable at extubation. A total of 46 patients were successfully treated including 27 patients in the high-flow nasal cannula group and 19 patients in the air entrainment mask group. Compared to the air entrainment mask group, the success rate of oxygen therapy and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen were significantly higher and the respiratory rate was lower in the high-flow nasal cannula group. In addition, less discomfort related to interface displacement and airway dryness was observed in the high-flow nasal cannula group than in the air entrainment mask group. CONCLUSIONS: At a fixed inspired oxygen fraction, the application of a high-flow nasal cannula after extubation achieves a higher success rate of oxygen therapy and less discomfort at 24h than an air entrainment mask in patients with acute respiratory failure.

  9. A review of palivizumab and emerging therapies for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Shadman, Kristin A; Wald, Ellen R

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen in children and adults; however, current treatment options are primarily supportive. Palivizumab, the only approved specific monoclonal antibody for RSV is used prophylactically to reduce morbidity in a select population of high-risk children. The development and current use of palivizumab; the potential role of palivizumab as preventive therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis, asthma and compromised immune systems; and explores the limited research in which palivizumab has been used for treatment of RSV. The modified recommendations for the use of palivizumab espoused by the American Academy of Pediatrics and research on the cost-effectiveness of this product are presented. In addition, the authors discuss the development of enhanced monoclonal antibodies including motavizumab, which was recently denied FDA approval for preventative therapy. The authors explore the historical and current efforts to develop a vaccine targeting RSV. The current status of antiviral drug development is also reviewed. The literature search included RSV-Ig, palivizumab, and emerging drugs and vaccines for the treatment of RSV as keywords and titles from 1997 to 2011. Although there are potential drugs and vaccines in development to prevent or reduce the effects of RSV infection, palivizumab remains the only licensed product to reduce the severity of disease in high-risk pediatric patients.

  10. High flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy, work in progress in respiratory critical care.

    Schreiber, Annia; DI Marco, Fabiano; Braido, Fulvio; Solidoro, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    After a planned extubation, the re-occurrence of acute respiratory distress needing the restoration of invasive mechanical support is a severe phenomenon associated with several important consequences, including increased morbidity, Intensive Care Unit mortality, and an enormous financial burden. So far, the most commonly used techniques to ameliorate gas exchange in the postextubation period were low-flow oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation (NIV). High flows through nasal cannulae (HFNC) is a system which allows increased CO2 wash-out of anatomical dead space, positive nasopharyngeal pressure, a relatively constant FiO2, and an improvement of mucociliary function. In a recently published paper by Hernandez et al. HFNC therapy, compared in the postextubation period to standard oxygen in patients at low risk of re-intubation, was associated with a lower re-intubation rate within 72 hours of extubation, with no evidence of any delays in re-intubation which may prove fatal, as previously reported in the context of NIV. Despite yielding some useful starting points and positive results with HFNC, some discrepancies have emerged in the findings of the studies in this field. As we await further more homogeneous and enlightening studies, at present we can only affirm that HFNC seems to be a useful means to prevent and treat postextubation hypoxemia. In fact no harmful or adverse effects related to HFNC emerged in any of the studies and globally, it was associated with better comfort and tolerance compared with NIV, which justifies its use as a first alternative to standard oxygen therapy.

  11. A computer-aided audit system for respiratory therapy consult evaluations: description of a method and early results.

    Kester, Lucy; Stoller, James K

    2013-05-01

    Use of respiratory therapist (RT)-guided protocols enhances allocation of respiratory care. In the context that optimal protocol use requires a system for auditing respiratory care plans to assure adherence to protocols and expertise of the RTs generating the care plan, a live audit system has been in longstanding use in our Respiratory Therapy Consult Service. Growth in the number of RT positions and the need to audit more frequently has prompted development of a new, computer-aided audit system. The number and results of audits using the old and new systems were compared (for the periods May 30, 2009 through May 30, 2011 and January 1, 2012 through May 30, 2012, respectively). In contrast to the original, live system requiring a patient visit by the auditor, the new system involves completion of a respiratory therapy care plan using patient information in the electronic medical record, both by the RT generating the care plan and the auditor. Completing audits in the new system also uses an electronic respiratory therapy management system. The degrees of concordance between the audited RT's care plans and the "gold standard" care plans using the old and new audit systems were similar. Use of the new system was associated with an almost doubling of the rate of audits (ie, 11 per month vs 6.1 per month). The new, computer-aided audit system increased capacity to audit more RTs performing RT-guided consults while preserving accuracy as an audit tool. Ensuring that RTs adhere to the audit process remains the challenge for the new system, and is the rate-limiting step.

  12. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross; Wolfgang, John; Jiang, Steve B

    2006-01-01

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  13. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross; Wolfgang, John; Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-02-07

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  14. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

    Kelly Julia L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15 compared to the controls (n = 13; +7.5(14.6 vs. -3.8(8.4 p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7 vs. +0.8(1.7 p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114.

  15. Critical Thinking in Respiratory Therapy Students: Comparing Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Students

    Clark, Myava C.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory care is an allied health discipline that specializes in cardiopulmonary function and health. Respiratory therapists apply scientific principles to prevent, identify, and treat acute and chronic dysfunction of the cardiopulmonary system. Respiratory care specifically focuses on the assessment, treatment, management, control, diagnostic…

  16. The impact of respiratory motion and treatment technique on stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver cancer

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang Zhiheng; Chankong, Vira; Yin Fangfang

    2008-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which delivers a much higher fractional dose than conventional treatment in only a few fractions, is an effective treatment for liver metastases. For patients who are treated under free-breathing conditions, however, respiration-induced tumor motion in the liver is a concern. Limited clinical information is available related to the impact of tumor motion and treatment technique on the dosimetric consequences. This study evaluated the dosimetric deviations between planned and delivered SBRT dose in the presence of tumor motion for three delivery techniques: three-dimensional conformal static beams (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc (DARC), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five cases treated with SBRT for liver metastases were included in the study, with tumor motions ranging from 0.5 to 1.75 cm. For each case, three different treatment plans were developed using 3DCRT, DARC, and IMRT. The gantry/multileaf collimator (MLC) motion in the DARC plans and the MLC motion in the IMRT plans were synchronized to the patient's respiratory motion. Retrospectively sorted four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were used to determine patient-organ motion and to calculate the dose delivered during each respiratory phase. Deformable registration, using thin-plate-spline models, was performed to encode the tumor motion and deformation and to register the dose-per-phase to the reference phase images. The different dose distributions resulting from the different delivery techniques and motion ranges were compared to assess the effect of organ motion on dose delivery. Voxel dose variations occurred mostly in the high gradient regions, typically between the target volume and normal tissues, with a maximum variation up to 20%. The greatest CTV variation of all the plans was seen in the IMRT technique with the largest motion range (D99: -8.9%, D95: -8.3%, and D90: -6.3%). The greatest variation for all 3DCRT plans was less

  17. ROLE OF ENTEROSORPTION IN COMPREHENSIVE THERAPY FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES COMBINED DAMAGE TO WITH GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASE

    Yu.B. Belan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of acute respiratory infections remains high in childhood. It is impossible to identify etiology most accurately in each particular case. However, according to multiple studies, viruses, their associations with each other and bacteria prevail as causative agents. In addition, it is quite often that a respiratory infection, especially in minor children, is combined with a condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Apart from symptomatic and antiviral therapies in these cases, as the authors of this article demonstrated, it is advisable to use enterosorbents. This tactics results in a decreased level of intoxication, lower intensity and duration of diarrheal syndrome, i.e. more speedy recovery.Key words: acute respiratory infections, condition of gastro tract, intoxication, diarrheal syndrome, treatment, enterosorbents, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:88-90

  18. Dynamic gating window for compensation of baseline shift in respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze and evaluate the necessity and use of dynamic gating techniques for compensation of baseline shift during respiratory-gated radiation therapy of lung tumors. Methods: Motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 592 treatment fractions were analyzed for baseline shift. The finite state model (FSM) was used to identify the end-of-exhale (EOE) breathing phase throughout each treatment fraction. Using duty cycle as an evaluation metric, several methods of end-of-exhale dynamic gating were compared: An a posteriori ideal gating window, a predictive trend-line-based gating window, and a predictive weighted point-based gating window. These methods were evaluated for each of several gating window types: Superior/inferior (SI) gating, anterior/posterior beam, lateral beam, and 3D gating. Results: In the absence of dynamic gating techniques, SI gating gave a 39.6% duty cycle. The ideal SI gating window yielded a 41.5% duty cycle. The weight-based method of dynamic SI gating yielded a duty cycle of 36.2%. The trend-line-based method yielded a duty cycle of 34.0%. Conclusions: Dynamic gating was not broadly beneficial due to a breakdown of the FSM's ability to identify the EOE phase. When the EOE phase was well defined, dynamic gating showed an improvement over static-window gating.

  19. Experimental verification of a two-dimensional respiratory motion compensation system with ultrasound tracking technique in radiation therapy.

    Ting, Lai-Lei; Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Liao, Ai-Ho; Kuo, Chia-Chun; Yu, Hsiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Liang; Tien, Der-Chi; Jeng, Shiu-Chen; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2018-05-01

    This study proposed respiratory motion compensation system (RMCS) combined with an ultrasound image tracking algorithm (UITA) to compensate for respiration-induced tumor motion during radiotherapy, and to address the problem of inaccurate radiation dose delivery caused by respiratory movement. This study used an ultrasound imaging system to monitor respiratory movements combined with the proposed UITA and RMCS for tracking and compensation of the respiratory motion. Respiratory motion compensation was performed using prerecorded human respiratory motion signals and also sinusoidal signals. A linear accelerator was used to deliver radiation doses to GAFchromic EBT3 dosimetry film, and the conformity index (CI), root-mean-square error, compensation rate (CR), and planning target volume (PTV) were used to evaluate the tracking and compensation performance of the proposed system. Human respiratory pattern signals were captured using the UITA and compensated by the RMCS, which yielded CR values of 34-78%. In addition, the maximum coronal area of the PTV ranged from 85.53 mm 2 to 351.11 mm 2 (uncompensated), which reduced to from 17.72 mm 2 to 66.17 mm 2 after compensation, with an area reduction ratio of up to 90%. In real-time monitoring of the respiration compensation state, the CI values for 85% and 90% isodose areas increased to 0.7 and 0.68, respectively. The proposed UITA and RMCS can reduce the movement of the tracked target relative to the LINAC in radiation therapy, thereby reducing the required size of the PTV margin and increasing the effect of the radiation dose received by the treatment target. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  1. SPECIFIC DISORDERS OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF THERAPY WITH DORNASE ALFA IN CHILDREN

    T.V. Simanova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to specific disorders of the respiratory system in cystic fibrosis. 64 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF aged 2 months to 32 years and residing in the Udmurtian Republic were studied. Epidemiological and genetic specifics of this disease in the mentioned region of the RF were examined. Clinical, X-ray, functional and microbiological studies of the CF patients’ respiratory system were conducted. It was found that genotype delF508 and chronic infection Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus cause severe structural changes to the bronchopulmonary system more often. The obtained data suggest the advisability of identifying the groups of CF patients at the highest risk of severe respiratory system disorders in order to optimise therapeutic efforts. The article provides indicators of clinical efficacy of a dornase alfa therapy in CF children.Key words: cystic fibrosis, genotype, delF508 mutation, respiratory organs, pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, staphylococcal infection, respiratory function, mucolytic function, dornase alfa. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(6:44-48

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Werner C. Albrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10, France (n = 3 and the United States (n = 1. Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%. 1,520 (86.4% patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%. Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2% was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001, outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001 and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001 and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP

  3. The acute effects of body position strategies and respiratory therapy in paralyzed patients with acute lung injury

    Davis, Kenneth; Johannigman, Jay A; Campbell, Robert S; Marraccini, Ann; Luchette, Fred A; Frame, Scott B; Branson, Richard D

    2001-01-01

    Background: Routine turning of critically ill patients is a standard of care. In recent years, specialized beds that provide automated turning have been introduced. These beds have been reported to improve lung function, reduce hospital-acquired pneumonia, and facilitate secretion removal. This trial was designed to measure the physiological effects of routine turning and respiratory therapy in comparison with continuous lateral rotation (CLR). Methods: The study was a prospective, quasi-expe...

  4. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training study guides

    1992-10-01

    This volume is a study guide for training Radiological Control Technicians. Provided herein are support materials for learning radiological documentation, communication systems, counting errors and statistics, dosimetry, contamination control, airborne sampling program methods, respiratory protection, radiological source control, environmental monitoring, access control and work area setup, radiological work coverage, shipment and receipt for radioactive material, radiological incidents and emergencies, personnel decontamination, first aid, radiation survey instrumentation, contamination monitoring, air sampling, and counting room equipment

  5. Surfactant nebulisation prevents the adverse effects of surfactant therapy on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in rabbits with severe respiratory failure

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant replacement therapy for the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome has shown beneficial effects on lung function and survival. Recently, rapid fluctuations of haemodynamics and cerebral perfusion following surfactant instillation have beer, described and an association with the

  6. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF IBUPROFEN IN THERAPY FOR VIRAL UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN INFANTS

    I.O. Skugarevskaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of use of ibuprofen in cases of viral upper respiratory tract infections (Vuri in children of early childhood has proved its' safety and efficacy. This medical agent has not only terminate fever but also diminished some other symptoms of Vuri.Key words: ibuprofen, viral upper respiratory tract infections, children.

  7. Procalcitonin Testing to Guide Antibiotic Therapy in Acute Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Mueller, Beat

    2018-03-06

    Is the use of procalcitonin for guiding antibiotic decisions in patients with acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections associated with improved clinical outcomes compared with usual care? Among patients with varying types and severity of acute respiratory infection, using procalcitonin to guide decisions about antibiotics is associated with lower rates of antibiotic exposure, antibiotic-related adverse effects, and mortality.

  8. SU-E-J-89: Motion Effects On Organ Dose in Respiratory Gated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Wang, T; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Khan, M; Landry, J; Rajpara, R; Hawk, N [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Existing reports on gated radiation therapy focus mainly on optimizing dose delivery to the target structure. This work investigates the motion effects on radiation dose delivered to organs at risk (OAR) in respiratory gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A new algorithmic tool of dose analysis is developed to evaluate the optimality of gating phase for dose sparing on OARs while ensuring adequate target coverage. Methods: Eight patients with pancreatic cancer were treated on a phase I prospective study employing 4DCT-based SBRT. For each patient, 4DCT scans are acquired and sorted into 10 respiratory phases (inhale-exhale- inhale). Treatment planning is performed on the average CT image. The average CT is spatially registered to other phases. The resultant displacement field is then applied on the plan dose map to estimate the actual dose map for each phase. Dose values of each voxel are fitted to a sinusoidal function. Fitting parameters of dose variation, mean delivered dose and optimal gating phase for each voxel over respiration cycle are mapped on the dose volume. Results: The sinusoidal function accurately models the dose change during respiratory motion (mean fitting error 4.6%). In the eight patients, mean dose variation is 3.3 Gy on OARs with maximum of 13.7 Gy. Two patients have about 100cm{sup 3} volumes covered by more than 5 Gy deviation. The mean delivered dose maps are similar to plan dose with slight deformation. The optimal gating phase highly varies across the patient, with phase 5 or 6 on about 60% of the volume, and phase 0 on most of the rest. Conclusion: A new algorithmic tool is developed to conveniently quantify dose deviation on OARs from plan dose during the respiratory cycle. The proposed software facilitates the treatment planning process by providing the optimal respiratory gating phase for dose sparing on each OAR.

  9. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing

  10. Heuristic evaluation of online COPD respiratory therapy and education video resource center.

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Purpose: Because of limited accessibility to pulmonary rehabilitation programs, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are infrequently provided with patient education resources. To help educate patients with COPD on how to live a better life with diminished breathing capacity, we developed a novel social media resource center containing COPD respiratory therapy and education videos called "COPDFlix." A heuristic evaluation of COPDFlix was conducted as part of a larger study to determine whether the prototype was successful in adhering to formal Web site usability guidelines for older adults. A purposive sample of three experts, with expertise in Web design and health communications technology, was recruited (a) to identify usability violations and (b) to propose solutions to improve the functionality of the COPDFlix prototype. Each expert evaluated 18 heuristics in four categories of task-based criteria (i.e., interaction and navigation, information architecture, presentation design, and information design). Seventy-six subcriteria across these four categories were assessed. Quantitative ratings and qualitative comments from each expert were compiled into a single master list, noting the violated heuristic and type/location of problem(s). Sixty-one usability violations were identified across the 18 heuristics. Evaluators rated the majority of heuristic subcriteria as either a "minor hindrance" (n=32) or "no problem" (n=132). Moreover, only 2 of the 18 heuristic categories were noted as "major" violations, with mean severity scores of ≥3. Mixed-methods data analysis helped the multidisciplinary research team to categorize and prioritize usability problems and solutions, leading to 26 discrete design modifications within the COPDFlix prototype.

  11. Quality assurance for respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung using real-time position management system

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Maruyama, Masato; Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated comprehensive quality assurance (QA) for respiratory-gated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the lungs using a real-time position management system (RPM). By using the phantom study, we evaluated dose liberality and reproducibility, and dose distributions for low monitor unite (MU), and also checked the absorbed dose at isocenter and dose profiles for the respiratory-gated exposure using RPM. Furthermore, we evaluated isocenter dose and dose distributions for respiratory-gated SBRT plans in the lungs using RPM. The maximum errors for the dose liberality were 4% for 2 MU, 1% for 4-10 MU, and 0.5% for 15 MU and 20 MU. The dose reproducibility was 2% for 1 MU and within 0.1% for 5 MU or greater. The accuracy for dose distributions was within 2% for 2 MU or greater. The dose error along a central axis for respiratory cycles of 2, 4, and 6 sec was within 1%. As for geometric accuracy, 90% and 50% isodose areas for the respiratory-gated exposure became almost 1 mm and 2 mm larger than without gating, respectively. For clinical lung-SBRT plans, the point dose at isocenter agreed within 2.1% with treatment planning system (TPS). And the pass rates of all plans for TPS were more than 96% in the gamma analysis (3 mm/3%). The geometrical accuracy and the dose accuracy of TPS calculation algorithm are more important for the dose evaluation at penumbra region for respiratory-gated SBRT in lung using RPM. (author)

  12. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C.; Bluett, Jaques; Chen, Yi Pei; Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E.; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential

  13. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential

  14. Oxygen therapy devices and portable ventilators for improved physical activity in daily life in patients with chronic respiratory disease.

    Furlanetto, Karina Couto; Pitta, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hypoxemia and chronic respiratory failure may need to use oxygen therapy to correct hypoxemia and to use ventilatory support to augment alveolar ventilation, reverse abnormalities in blood gases (in particular hypercapnia) and reduce the work of breathing. Areas covered: This narrative review provides an overview on the use of oxygen therapy devices or portable ventilators for improved physical activity in daily life (PADL) as well as discusses the issue of lower mobility in daily life among stable patients with chronic respiratory disease who present indication for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) or home-based noninvasive ventilation (NIV). A literature review of these concepts was performed by using all related search terms. Expert commentary: Technological advances led to the development of light and small oxygen therapy devices and portable ventilators which aim to facilitate patients' mobility and ambulation. However, the day-by-day dependence of a device may reduce mobility and partially impair patients' PADL. Nocturnal NIV implementation in hypercapnic patients seems promising to improve PADL. The magnitude of their equipment-related physical inactivity is underexplored up to this moment and more long-term randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis examining the effects of ambulatory oxygen and NIV on PADL are required.

  15. A longitudinal study on lung disease in dental technicians: What has changed after seven years?

    Derya Özdemir Dogan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this 7-year follow-up study was to determine respiratory changes in dental technicians. Material and Methods: In our region, in the year 2005, 36 dental technicians were evaluated with a cross-sectional study on respiratory occupational diseases, and in 2012 we evaluated them again. Inclusion of information on respiratory symptoms and demographic features questionnaires was applied. Pulmonary function tests (PFT were performed. Chest X-rays (CXR were evaluated according to the ILO-2000 classification. For the comparisons of the technicians' findings in 2005 and 2012, data analyses were performed with the Wilcoxon test in addition to descriptive statistical procedures. Results: In 2012, 19 out of the 36 technicians continued to work in the same place, so we were able to evaluate their findings. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms in dental technician was as follows: dyspnea 7 (37%, cough 6 (32%, and phlegm 5 (26%. According to ILO classifications in 2005, among the 36 technicians, 5 (13.8% had pneumoconiosis. At the end of 7 years, there were 9 pneumoconiosis cases among the 19 remaining technicians (47%. Thus, there was a statistically significant progression on the profusion of the radiologic findings (p < 0.005. Also there was a significant worsening on spirometric findings (p < 0.05. Conclusion: In dental technicians, a determination of both radiologic and functional progressions at the end of 7 years demonstrate that the primary and secondary preventive measures are necessary for these workplaces. Workplaces must be regularly controlled for worker health and hygiene.

  16. [Respiratory hypercapnic-hypoxic training is an effective component of complex therapy of polyneuropathy in children with diabetes type 1].

    Smirnov, K V; Smirnova, Yu V; Kulikov, V P; Nazarkina, O M

    2018-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of respiratory hypercapnic-hypoxic training in complex treatment of neuropathy due to diabetes type 1. Fifty children, 31 girls and 19 boys, were examined. The inclusion criteria were the presence of polyneuropathy, verified on the basis of clinical data and electromyographic changes. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the main group (n=25, 15 girls and 10 boys, mean age 12.9±1.8 years (M±SD) and the comparison group (n=25, 16 girls and 9 boys, mean age 13.2±2.0 years). Patients of the main group, along with standard therapy received respiratory hypercapnic-hypoxic training. The positive clinical and neurophysiological dynamics was noted in both groups, with more significant changes in children after respiratory training. Hypercapnic exercises significantly contribute to the pathogenetic therapy of diabetes mellitus and polyneuropathy in this disease, have a significant clinical effects reducing serum concentrations of fasting glucose and severity of neurological deficit scores on the NIS-LL, increasing the speed of conduction of excitation through the nerves, reducing the residual latency of EMG activity.

  17. Practical analog electronics for technicians

    Kimber, W A

    2013-01-01

    'Practical Analog Electronics for Technicians' not only provides an accessible introduction to electronics, but also supplies all the problems and practical activities needed to gain hands-on knowledge and experience. This emphasis on practice is surprisingly unusual in electronics texts, and has already gained Will Kimber popularity through the companion volume, 'Practical Digital Electronics for Technicians'. Written to cover the Advanced GNVQ optional unit in electronics, this book is also ideal for BTEC National, A-level electronics and City & Guilds courses. Together with 'Practical Digit

  18. Respiratory Therapy for Acute Lung Lesion, by Using Biphasic Positive Pressure Ventilation

    Yu. V. Marchenkov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To comparatively study the efficiency of respiratory support in patients with acute lung lesion, by applying BIPAP, SIMV, and aIPPV.Subjects. Twenty-six patients with acute lung lesion whose pattern included acute respiratory distress syndrome (n=16, pneumonia (и=6, and pneumonitis (n=4 were examined. The severity of disease was 18 to 21 APACHE II scale score.Results. The use of BIPAP leads to a better adaptation of a patient to respiratory support, to a reduction in the number of used myorelaxants and sedatives, and to improvement of gas exchange in the lung and diminishes the negative impact of artificial ventilation on hemodynamics. As compared with other types of assisted ventilation, BIPAP accelerates transfer from total respiratory support to spontaneous breathing.

  19. Inhaled β-agonist therapy and respiratory muscle fatigue as under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis.

    Lau, Emily; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

    2013-10-14

    A 49-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presented with significant tachypnoea, fevers, productive cough and increased work of breathing for the previous 4 days. Laboratory data showed elevated lactate of 3.2 mEq/L. Continuous inhaled ipratropium and albuterol nebuliser treatments were administered. Lactate levels increased to 5.5 and 3.9 mEq/L, at 6 and 12 h, respectively. No infectious source was found and the lactic acidosis cleared as the patient improved. The lactic acidosis was determined to be secondary to respiratory muscle fatigue and inhaled β-agonist therapy, two under-recognised causes of lactic acidosis in patients presenting with respiratory distress. Lactic acidosis is commonly used as a clinical marker for sepsis and shock, but in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion and severe hypoxia, alternative aetiologies for elevated levels should be sought to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful medical interventions.

  20. FEVER AS KEY SYMPTOM OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AND MODERN METHODS OF THERAPY FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE IN CHILDREN

    O.A. Solntseva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is the key symptom of acute respiratory infections (ARI. An increase in the body temperature is accompanied with phagocytosis activation, increased interferon synthesis, antibody genesis stimulation, lymphocytes activation and differentiation. Nevertheless, significant hyperthermia may result in my unfavourable consequences. It may particularly cause an exacerbation of chronic diseases. Modern therapy for hyperthermia is, therefore, an important aspect of treating children with ARI. The article outlines the modern approach to treating fever in children, identifies key criteria for selecting a medication. It also contains a case study of applying ibuprofen and data from various trials which verify the rationale for applying ibuprofen in children with hyperthermia that developed in conjunction with ARI.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, hyperthermia, ibuprofen.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:80-84

  1. Monitoring of pulmonary mechanics in acute respiratory distress syndrome to titrate therapy.

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Eleonora, Carlesso; Caironi, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    This paper reviews recent findings regarding the respiratory mechanics during acute respiratory distress syndrome as a tool for tailoring its ventilatory management. The pressure-volume curve has been used for many years as a descriptor of the respiratory mechanics in patients affected by acute respiratory distress syndrome. The use of the sigmoidal equation introduced by Venegas for the analysis of the pressure-volume curve seems to be the most rigorous mathematical approach to assessing lung mechanics. Increasing attention has been focused on the deflation limb for titration of positive end-expiratory pressure. Based on physiologic reasoning, a novel parameter, the stress index, has been proposed for tailoring a safe mechanical ventilation, although its clinical impact has still to be proved. Evidence has confirmed that a variety of underlying pathologies may lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, making unrealistic any attempt to unify the ventilatory approach. Although extensively proposed to tailor mechanical ventilation during acute respiratory distress syndrome, there is no evidence that the pressure-volume curve may be useful in setting a lung-protective strategy in the presence of different potentials for recruitment. The Venegas approach should be the standard analysis of pressure-volume curves. In any patient, the potential for recruitment should be assessed, as a basis for tailoring the most effective mechanical ventilation. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential use of the pressure-volume curve to guide a lung-protective ventilatory strategy.

  2. Respiratory symptoms in people living with HIV and the effect of antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Brown, James; Roy, Anjana; Harris, Ross; Filson, Sarah; Johnson, Margaret; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Lipman, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly altered the pattern of acute and chronic HIV-related disease. However, it is not clear what this means in terms of respiratory symptoms. We sought to investigate the association between HIV status and respiratory symptoms and how these have changed with the availability of ART. We searched Cochrane, Medline and Embase databases for studies published between 1946 and August 2015 comparing the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in populations with and without HIV infection. We undertook random effects meta-analysis of the main symptoms reported. We studied heterogeneity and completed sensitivity analyses and funnel plots. From 5788 unique references identified, 24 papers provided relevant data: 18 documented the prevalence of cough and 11 examined the prevalence of breathlessness among other symptoms reported. Compared with the HIV negative, people living with HIV (PLWH) were more likely to have respiratory symptoms with pooled ORs for the prevalence of cough of 3.05 (95% CI 2.24 to 4.16) in resource-limited populations without access to ART; 2.18 (1.56 to 3.18) in resource-rich populations without access to ART and 1.11 (0.99 to 1.24) in resource-rich populations with access to ART. In resource-rich settings, although the availability of ART was associated with a reduction in the difference between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, PLWH were more likely to report breathlessness, OR 1.39 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.73). Respiratory symptoms are more common in PLWH than controls. This association persists although at a reduced level in populations with access to ART. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Evaluating FDG uptake changes between pre and post therapy respiratory gated PET scans

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Yong, Yue; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Allen, Aaron M.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Chen, Aileen B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole body (3D) and respiratory gated (4D) FDG-PET/CT scans performed pre-radiotherapy (pre-RT) and post-radiotherapy (post-RT) were analyzed to investigate the impact of 4D PET in evaluating 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake changes due to therapy, relative to traditional 3D PET. Methods and materials: 3D and 4D sequential FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired pre-RT and approximately one month post-RT for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lesions of high uptake targeted with radiotherapy were identified on the pre-RT scan of each patient. Each lesion on the 3D and each of the five phases of the 4D scan were analyzed using a region of interest (ROI). For each patient the ROIs of the pre-RT scans were used to locate the areas of initial FDG uptake on the post-RT scans following rigid registration. Post-RT ROIs were drawn and the FDG uptake was compared with that of the pre-RT scans. Results: Sixteen distinct lesions from 12 patients were identified and analyzed. Standardized uptake value (SUV) maxima were significantly higher (p-value <0.005) for the lesions as measured on the 4D compared to 3D PET. Comparison of serial pre and post-RT scans showed a mean 62% decrease in SUV with the 3D PET scan (range 36–89%), and a 67% decrease with the 4D PET scan (range 30–89%). The mean absolute difference in SUV change on 3D versus 4D scans was 4.9%, with a range 0–15% (p-value = 0.07). Conclusions: Signal recovery with 4D PET results in higher SUVs when compared to standard 3D PET. Consequently, differences in the evaluation of SUV changes between pre and post-RT plans were observed. Such difference can have a significant impact in PET-based response assessment.

  4. How do laboratory technicians perceive their role in the tuberculosis diagnostic process? A cross-sectional study among laboratory technicians in health centers of Central Java Province, Indonesia.

    Widjanarko, Bagoes; Widyastari, Dyah Anantalia; Martini, Martini; Ginandjar, Praba

    2016-01-01

    Detection of acid-fast bacilli in respiratory specimens serves as an initial pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. Laboratories are the essential and fundamental part of all health systems. This study aimed to describe how laboratory technicians perceived their own self and work. This included perceived self-efficacy, perceived role, perceived equipment availability, perceived procedures, perceived reward and job, and perceived benefit of health education, as well as level of knowledge and attitudes related to work performance of laboratory technicians. This was a cross-sectional quantitative study involving 120 laboratory technicians conducted in Central Java. Interviews and observation were conducted to measure performance and work-related variables. Among 120 laboratory technicians, 43.3% showed fairly good performance. They complied with 50%-75% of all procedures, including sputum collection, laboratory tools utilization, sputum smearing, staining, smear examination, grading of results, and universal precaution practice. Perceived role, perceived self-efficacy, and knowledge of laboratory procedures were significantly correlated to performance, besides education and years of working as a laboratory technician. Perceived equipment availability was also significantly correlated to performance after the education variable was controlled. Most of the laboratory technicians believed that they have an important role in TB patients' treatment and should display proper self-efficacy in performing laboratory activities. The result may serve as a basic consideration to develop a policy for enhancing motivation of laboratory technicians in order to improve the TB control program.

  5. Solar Technician Program Blows Hot

    Ziegler, Peg Moran

    1977-01-01

    A training program for solar heating technicians was initiated at Sonoma State College's School of Environmental Studies for CETA applicants. Among the projects designed and built were a solar alternative energy center, a solar hot water system, and a solar greenhouse. (MF)

  6. Career Directions--Electronics Technician

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Electronics technicians (ETs) work with electronics engineers to set up and maintain complicated electronics equipment that many of today's businesses rely on. The field is varied. An ET might service the industrial controls on a factory floor. Or repair missile control systems for the government. Or an ET could specialize in cars and trucks,…

  7. Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians.

    Doty, Charles R.

    Major resources exist that can be used to develop or upgrade programs in community colleges and technical institutes that educate robotics/automated systems technicians. The first category of resources is Economic, Social, and Education Issues. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) report, "Automation and the Workplace," presents analyses of…

  8. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Wu Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B

    2004-01-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates

  9. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  10. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  11. You're a What?: Tower Technician

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the role and functions of a tower technician. A tower technician climbs up the face of telecommunications towers to remove, install, test, maintain, and repair a variety of equipment--from antennas to light bulbs. Tower technicians also build shelters and radiofrequency shields for electronic equipment, lay…

  12. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jimin; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Liang, Weitao; Liu, Diangang; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Respiratory symptoms are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance–pH (MII-pH) monitoring in GERD is clear, little is known regarding the characteristics of patients with respiratory symptoms based on MII-pH monitoring and anti-reflux therapy. We evaluated a cohort of GERD patients to identify the MII-pH parameters of GERD-related respiratory symptoms and to assess the anti-reflux therapy outcomes. Methods We undertook a prospective study of patients who were referred for GERD evaluation from January 2011 to January 2012. One hundred ninety-five patients underwent MII-pH monitoring and esophageal manometry, and one hundred sixty-five patients underwent invasive anti-reflux therapy that included laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) and the Stretta procedure. The patient characteristics and MII-pH parameters were analyzed, and the symptom scores were assessed at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up evaluations. Results Of the 195 patients, 96 (49.2%) exhibited respiratory symptoms and significantly more reflux episodes (70.7±29.3) than patients without respiratory symptoms (64.7±24.4, p = 0.044) based on the MII-pH monitoring results. Moreover, the group of patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal reflux episodes (35.2±21.3) than the non-respiratory symptomatic group (28.3±17.9, p = 0.013). One hundred twenty-five patients following the Stretta procedure (n = 60, 31 with respiratory symptoms) or LTF (n = 65, 35 with respiratory symptoms) completed the designated 3-year follow-up period and were included in the final analysis. The symptom scores after anti-reflux therapy all decreased relative to the corresponding baseline values (p0.05). However, LTF significantly reduced the recurrence (re-operation) rate compared with the Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006). Conclusions MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory

  13. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring.

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available Respiratory symptoms are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Although the role of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH monitoring in GERD is clear, little is known regarding the characteristics of patients with respiratory symptoms based on MII-pH monitoring and anti-reflux therapy. We evaluated a cohort of GERD patients to identify the MII-pH parameters of GERD-related respiratory symptoms and to assess the anti-reflux therapy outcomes.We undertook a prospective study of patients who were referred for GERD evaluation from January 2011 to January 2012. One hundred ninety-five patients underwent MII-pH monitoring and esophageal manometry, and one hundred sixty-five patients underwent invasive anti-reflux therapy that included laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF and the Stretta procedure. The patient characteristics and MII-pH parameters were analyzed, and the symptom scores were assessed at baseline and at 1- and 3-year follow-up evaluations.Of the 195 patients, 96 (49.2% exhibited respiratory symptoms and significantly more reflux episodes (70.7±29.3 than patients without respiratory symptoms (64.7±24.4, p = 0.044 based on the MII-pH monitoring results. Moreover, the group of patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal reflux episodes (35.2±21.3 than the non-respiratory symptomatic group (28.3±17.9, p = 0.013. One hundred twenty-five patients following the Stretta procedure (n = 60, 31 with respiratory symptoms or LTF (n = 65, 35 with respiratory symptoms completed the designated 3-year follow-up period and were included in the final analysis. The symptom scores after anti-reflux therapy all decreased relative to the corresponding baseline values (p0.05. However, LTF significantly reduced the recurrence (re-operation rate compared with the Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006.MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory-related predictive parameters, including total

  14. Contrast media inhibit exogenous surfactant therapy in rats with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Kesecioglu, Jozef; Haitsma, Jack J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of various contrast media on the pulmonary surfactant system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by lung lavage, the effects of surfactant suspended in saline were compared with surfactant suspended in the contrast

  15. MODERN OPPORTUNITIES OF INTERFERON THERAPY AT INFLUENZA AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    T. A. Chebotareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new dosing scheme for the preparation VIFERON®, rectal suppositories for infants of II, III and IV groups of health was suggested. The application of the scheme has resulted in a more pronounced clinical and immunological effects at treatment of influenza and acute respiratory infections compared to the previously used sc heme. 

  16. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    Darin J Falk

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa−/− mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa−/− animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea. However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease.

  17. Practical digital electronics for technicians

    Kimber, Will

    2013-01-01

    Practical Digital Electronics for Technicians covers topics on analog and digital signals, logic gates, combinational logic, and Karnaugh mapping. The book discusses the characteristics and types of logic families; sequential systems including latch, bistable circuits, counters and shift registers; Schmitt triggers and multivibrators; and MSI combinational logic systems. Display devices, including LED, LCD and dot matrix display; analog and digital conversion; and examples of and equipment for digital fault finding are also considered. The book concludes by providing answers to the questions

  18. Training pharmacy technicians to administer immunizations.

    McKeirnan, Kimberly C; Frazier, Kyle R; Nguyen, Maryann; MacLean, Linda Garrelts

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immunization training program for pharmacy technicians on technicians' self-reported confidence, knowledge, and number of vaccines administered. A one-group pre- and posttest study was conducted with certified pharmacy technicians from Albertsons and Safeway community pharmacies in Idaho. Thirty pharmacy technicians were recruited to participate in an immunization administration training program comprising a 2-hour home study and a 2-hour live training. Pharmacy technician scores on a 10-question knowledge assessment, responses on a pre- and posttraining survey, and number of immunizations administered in the 6-month period following the training were collected. Twenty-five pharmacy technicians completed the home study and live portions of the immunization training program. All 29 pharmacy technicians who took the home study assessment passed with greater than 70% competency on the first attempt. Technicians self-reported increased confidence with immunization skills between the pretraining survey and the posttraining survey. From December 2016 to May 2017, the technicians administered 953 immunizations with 0 adverse events reported. For the first time, pharmacy technicians have legally administered immunizations in the United States. Trained pharmacy technicians demonstrated knowledge of vaccination procedures and self-reported improved confidence in immunization skills and administered immunizations after participating in a 4-hour training program. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CERTAIN ASPECTS OF COUGH PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ACUTE CHILD RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    S.I. Bardenikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An open controlled comparative research was conducted on 263 children with acute respiratory infection (ARI in order to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, acceptability and safety of plant based preparation that contains ivy leaf extract. It was established that prescribing the preparation during the first days of disease reduced the duration of dry and inefficient cough, improved sputum rheology and bronchial tree drainage function, reduced bronchial obstruction intensity, reduced the need for prescribing bronchial spasmolitics less necessary and decreased Staybin term. Compared to other antibcough medicines, plant based preparation with ivy leaf extract has quicker effect (effective on the 1st–3rd day.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, cough, treatment.

  20. The promise of bacteriophage therapy for Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Diana Dawn Semler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, increased attention has been given to evaluating the efficacy of phage therapy, especially in scenarios where the bacterial infectious agent of interest is highly antibiotic resistant. In this regard, phage therapy is especially applicable to infections caused by the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC since members of the BCC are antibiotic pan-resistant. Current studies in BCC phage therapy are unique from many other avenues of phage therapy research in that the research is not only comprised of phage isolation, in vitro phage characterization and in vivo infection model efficacy, but also adapting aerosol drug delivery techniques to aerosol phage formulation delivery and storage.

  1. How do laboratory technicians perceive their role in tuberculosis diagnostic process: a cross-sectional study among laboratory technicians in health centers of Central Java Province, Indonesia

    Widjanarko B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bagoes Widjanarko,1 Dyah Anantalia Widyastari,2 Martini Martini,3 Praba Ginandjar3 1Department of Health Education and Behavior Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia; 2Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Salaya, Thailand; 3Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia Purpose: Detection of acid-fast bacilli in respiratory specimens serves as an initial pulmonary tuberculosis (TB diagnosis. Laboratories are the essential and fundamental part of all health systems. This study aimed to describe how laboratory technicians perceived their own self and work. This included perceived self-efficacy, perceived role, perceived equipment availability, perceived procedures, perceived reward and job, and perceived benefit of health education, as well as level of knowledge and attitudes related to work performance of laboratory technicians.Methods: This was a cross-sectional quantitative study involving 120 laboratory technicians conducted in Central Java. Interviews and observation were conducted to measure performance and work-related variables.Results: Among 120 laboratory technicians, 43.3% showed fairly good performance. They complied with 50%–75% of all procedures, including sputum collection, laboratory tools utilization, sputum smearing, staining, smear examination, grading of results, and universal precaution practice. Perceived role, perceived self-efficacy, and knowledge of laboratory procedures were significantly correlated to performance, besides education and years of working as a laboratory technician. Perceived equipment availability was also significantly correlated to performance after the education variable was controlled.Conclusion: Most of the laboratory technicians believed that they have an important role in TB patients’ treatment and should display proper self-efficacy in performing laboratory activities. The

  2. Uncertainties associated with treatments of hepatic lesions in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using respiratory tracking

    Charoy, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Oscar Lambret Center treated with Cyberknife R , since June 2007, liver lesions in stereotactic conditions with respiratory tracking using external LEDs correlated with seeds implanted near the target. Clinical results show excellent local control but there are still uncertainties in the preparation and delivery of treatment. The aims of this thesis are to identify and quantify these uncertainties, to define solutions and/or alternatives and to assess their added value. As a first step, the method of the target definition by the radiation oncologist is evaluated. Improvement of the method currently used in routine is considered, including the choice of the most appropriate imaging and the intervention of a second operator, expert in imaging (radiologist). The organ at risk and target movements induced by the respiratory motion are not taken into account in the treatment planning step, performed on the 3D images (the so-called planning CT). The dosimetric impact associated with this type of planning is evaluated using 4D Monte Carlo simulations that take into account patient and linear accelerator movements and the synchrony between both movements. The question of 4D planning as prospect of improvement is then investigated. Movements and deformations of the liver due to respiration are also implicated in the uncertainties involved in the treatment. The correlation model of external markers with the target, used for respiratory tracking, ignores eventual deformations and rotations within the liver. A study of the impact on the target tracking is performed. All these studies were conducted using real patient data sets. (author) [fr

  3. Facial Involuntary Movements and Respiratory Failure in CANOMAD, Responsive to IVIG Therapy

    Kate Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CANOMAD is a rare chronic neuropathy, characterized by chronic sensory ataxia and intermittent brain stem symptoms due to antidisialosyl antibodies. The disorder results in significant morbidity but is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. We describe a unique case of CANOMAD, associated with involuntary movements of the face; patient reported exacerbations with citrus and chocolate and respiratory muscle weakness. Our patient was initially misdiagnosed with Miller Fisher Syndrome, highlighting the need for vigilance should neurological symptoms recur in patients initially diagnosed with a Guillain Barre variant. Moreover, the optimal treatment is unknown. This patient responded remarkably to intravenous immunoglobulin and has been maintained on this treatment, without further exacerbations.

  4. [Clinical usefulness of the combined empirical therapy with flomoxef and fosfomycin for intractable respiratory tract infections. With a background of increasing MRSA incidence].

    Shimada, K; Kudoh, S; Hayashi, I; Shishido, H; Fukuchi, Y; Suzuki, H; Oritsu, M; Nakada, K; Sano, Y; Goto, H

    1994-10-01

    We conducted a multicenter trial to determine the clinical usefulness of the combined therapy with flomoxef (FMOX) and fosfomycin (FOM) (FF therapy) as an empirical therapy in the treatment of intractable respiratory tract infections, because FF therapy has clinically been proved to be very useful for the treatment of severe infections including MRSA infections. The overall efficacy rate of FF therapy was 69.2%. The efficacy rate for "pneumonia/lung abscess," which occupy the largest portions of respiratory tract infections, was 70.0%, showing a statistically significant difference from the efficacy rate for FMOX alone (56.7%) found in a previous study (P = 0.09 by chi-squared test). Although MRSA was eradicated in only 3 cases (37.5%) including superinfection cases, of 8 patients, from whom MRSA had been isolated as causative organisms, none of our patients were superinfected with MRSA. Thus it has been concluded that FF therapy is clinically very useful when used as an empirical therapy in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  5. Sleep technologists educational needs assessment: a survey of polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory therapy education program directors.

    Wells, Mary Ellen; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assessed the community and educational needs for sleep technologists by surveying program directors of nationally accredited polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory care educational programs. Currently, little is known about our educational capacity and the need for advanced degrees for sleep medicine technical support. A questionnaire was developed about current and future community and educational needs for sleep technologists. The questionnaire was sent to directors of CAAHEP-accredited polysomnography and electroneurodiagnostic technology programs (associate degree and certificate programs), and directors of CoARC-accredited respiratory therapy associate degree and bachelor degree programs (n = 358). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via an internet survey tool. Data analysis was conducted with the IBM SPSS statistical package and included calculating means and standard deviations of the frequency of responses. Qualitative data was analyzed and classified based on emerging themes. One hundred seven of 408 program directors completed the survey. Seventy-four percent agreed that demand for qualified sleep technologists will increase, yet 50% of those surveyed believe there are not enough educational programs to meet the demand. Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed agreed that the educational requirements for sleep technologists will soon increase; 79% of those surveyed believe sleep centers have a need for technologists with advanced training or specialization. Our study shows educators of associate and certificate degree programs believe there is a need for a bachelor's degree in sleep science and technology.

  6. Effectiveness of conventional and alternative therapy in treatment of respiratory infections in poultry

    D. S. Rekhe

    Full Text Available A flock of 12000 commercial broilers of 3 weeks age were observed to exhibit the clinical signs like, dullness, anorexia, sneezing, coughing with facial edema, which was tentatively diagnosed for respiratory disease (RD. For treatment these birds were divided into two groups A and B each comprised of 6000 birds. Group A birds were treated with enrofloxacin (10% liquid @ 10 mg/kg body weight for 5 days and group B received polyherbal formulation AV/CRP/11 (new coded formulation supplied by Ayurvet Limited, Baddi India @ 20 ml/100 birds for 5 days. The parameters studied were clinical signs, growth, performance, morbidity, livability, mortality, post mortem findings (gross lesions, air sac and intestinal lesion scores and histopathological changes. Both treatments showed improvement in average growth and performance parameters with recovery in clinical signs, histopathological alterations, morbidity and mortality percentage and enhanced livability. The polyherbal formulation was found to be equally efficacious like Enrofloxacin in treating respiratory disease. [Vet World 2009; 2(8.000: 313-316

  7. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    Kyung-Yil Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis. The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS.

  8. Technicians for the Brazilian nuclear power programme

    Martins Pinto, C.S.; Spitalnik, J.; Meakins, E.J.; Hurley, I.

    1980-01-01

    The technician has a responsible role to fulfil in nuclear industry, acting as a bridge between the engineer and the skilled worker. Technicians must have sufficient theoretical knowledge to communicate with engineers, and a thorough understanding of technological practice; the nuclear industry demands both theory and practice of a high standard. In Brazil the essential role of the technician in industry is in general recognized. However, the lack of a nationally recognized Nuclear Technician and Nuclear Technologist qualification, as well as a desire of the best technicians to quality as engineers and, in some areas, inadequate salaries has resulted in a shortage of well-trained technicians. A first step to ensure availability of these technicians is to improve their career prospects and status through definition of appropriate career standards and salaries. Practical training by the industry can only be given in factories, plants and construction sites where nuclear work is done. It is proposed to extend apprentice training centres at three sites, to give the most promising students after two years of apprentice training two further years of instruction and practice to qualify as Nuclear Technicians. The training centres are chosen to cover the three sectors of nuclear industry where special training of technicians is important: manufacture and construction; operation and maintenance; and testing and analysis for process control and safety. (author)

  9. Automated respiratory therapy system based on the ARDSNet protocol with systemic perfusion control

    Pomprapa Anake

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A medical expert system of automatic artificial ventilation is set up in a star topology with additional closed-loop hemodynamic control. Arterial blood pressure (MAP is controlled by noradrenaline (NA as a controlling variable. The overall patient-in-the-loop expert system can intensively and intelligently perform a long-term treatment based on the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network (ARDSNet protocol. Three main goals are actively carried out, namely the stabilization and regulation of oxygenation, plateau pressure and blood pH value. The developed system shows a distinctive experimental result based on a 31.5-kg pig, in order to fulfil the ventilatory goals and to ensure proper systemic perfusion. Hence, this system has enormous potentials to realize a commercial system for individual patient with ARDS.

  10. RANDOMIZED EUROPEAN MULTICENTER TRIAL OF SURFACTANT REPLACEMENT THERAPY FOR SEVERE NEONATAL RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME - SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE DOSES OF CUROSURF

    SPEER, CP; ROBERTSON, B; CURSTEDT, T; HALLIDAY, HL; COMPAGNONE, D; GEFELLER, O; HARMS, K; HERTING, E; MCCLURE, G; REID, M; TUBMAN, R; HERIN, P; NOACK, G; KOK, J; KOPPE, J; VANSONDEREN, L; LAUFKOTTER, E; KOHLER, W; BOENISCH, H; ALBRECHT, K; HANSSLER, L; HAIM, M; OETOMO, SB; Okken, Albert; ALTFELD, PC; GRONECK, P; KACHEL, W; RELIER, JP; WALTI, H

    There is now convincing evidence that the severity of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome can be reduced by surfactant replacement therapy; however, the optimal therapeutic regimen has not been defined. This randomized European multicenter trial was designed to determine whether the beneficial

  11. The role of procalcitonin as a guide for the diagnosis, prognosis, and decision of antibiotic therapy for lower respiratory tract infections

    Amal Abd El-Azeem

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: Serum PCT level could be used as a novel marker of lower respiratory tract bacterial infections for diagnosis, prognosis and follow up of therapy. This reduces side-effects of an unnecessary antibiotic use, lowers costs, and in the long-term, leads to diminishing drug resistance.

  12. Fifty Years of Research in ARDS. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Biology and Potential Therapeutic Value.

    Laffey, John G; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of several preclinical studies, cell-based therapy has emerged as a potential new therapeutic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Of the various cell-based therapy options, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord have the most experimental data to support their potential efficacy for lung injury from both infectious and noninfectious causes. Mechanistically, MSCs exert their beneficial effects by release of paracrine factors, microvesicles, and transfer of mitochondria, all of which have antiinflammatory and pro-resolving effects on injured lung endothelium and alveolar epithelium, including enhancing the resolution of pulmonary edema by up-regulating sodium-dependent alveolar fluid clearance. MSCs also have antimicrobial effects mediated by release of antimicrobial factors and by up-regulating monocyte/macrophage phagocytosis. Phase 2a clinical trials to establish safety in ARDS are in progress, and two phase 1 trials did not report any serious adverse events. Several issues need further study, including: determining the optimal methods for large-scale production, reconstitution of cryopreserved cells for clinical use, defining cell potency assays, and determining the therapeutic potential of conditioned media derived from MSCs. Because ARDS is a heterogeneous syndrome, targeting MSCs to patients with ARDS with a more hyperinflammatory endotype may further enhance their potential for efficacy.

  13. Spacecraft and propulsion technician error

    Schultz, Daniel Clyde

    Commercial aviation and commercial space similarly launch, fly, and land passenger vehicles. Unlike aviation, the U.S. government has not established maintenance policies for commercial space. This study conducted a mixed methods review of 610 U.S. space launches from 1984 through 2011, which included 31 failures. An analysis of the failure causal factors showed that human error accounted for 76% of those failures, which included workmanship error accounting for 29% of the failures. With the imminent future of commercial space travel, the increased potential for the loss of human life demands that changes be made to the standardized procedures, training, and certification to reduce human error and failure rates. Several recommendations were made by this study to the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation, space launch vehicle operators, and maintenance technician schools in an effort to increase the safety of the space transportation passengers.

  14. Always Consider the Possibility of Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression in Patients Presenting with Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure Who Fail to Improve as Expected with Appropriate Therapy

    Martin Steynor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercapnic respiratory failure is a frequently encountered medical emergency. Two common causes are acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and as a side effect of opioids. The two causes may coexist leading to diagnostic confusion and consequent delay in optimal management. We report a case of what was initially thought to be an exacerbation of COPD. The patient failed to improve with treatment as expected which led to the empirical administration of naloxone resulting in a dramatic reversal of her respiratory failure. The patient was subsequently discovered to be taking regular dihydrocodeine for chronic back pain.

  15. Filgrastim as a Rescue Therapy for Persistent Neutropenia in a Case of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Myocarditis

    Desh Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of dengue involves suppression of immune system leading to development of characteristic presentation of haematological picture of thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. Sometimes, this suppression in immune response is responsible for deterioration in clinical status of the patient in spite of all specific and supportive therapy. Certain drugs like steroids are used for rescue therapy in conditions like sepsis. We present a novel use of filgrastim as a rescue therapy in a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, myocarditis, and febrile neutropenia and not responding to standard management.

  16. Cytokine expression before and after aspirin desensitization therapy in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Aktas, Ayse; Kurt, Emel; Gulbas, Zafer

    2013-12-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Effects of desensitization on many mediators have been examined previously, but few studies addressed the influence of desensitization on T lymphocytes and T lymphocyte-derived cytokines. This study was performed to examine peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) cytokine expression in aspirin-sensitive patients who have asthma before and after aspirin desensitization. In this study, the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4), and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ T lymphocytes prior to aspirin desensitization were also measured at intracellular levels, and expression of these cytokines after 1 month aspirin desensitization was evaluated. Twelve patients with AERD were included in the study. Two different control groups were formed, one consisted of 15 healthy people and second 12 aspirin tolerant asthmatic (ATA) patients using aspirin. A blood sample was collected prior to desensitization, and the tests were repeated by taking a second blood sample 1 month after the 4-day desensitization treatment. The proportion of lymphocytes secreting IFN-γ in the study group was 15.61 ± 4.40 % before desensitization and 15.08 ± 5.89 % after desensitization. The rate of IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T lymphocytes was 20.51 ± 4.41 % in the normal control group and 16.07 ± 5.7 % in the ATA group (p = 0.021). The ratio of CD4+ T lymphocyte secreting IFN-γ was reduced in patients with AERD before desensitization compared to normal control group (p = 0.040). The levels of IL-2, IL-4, and the subsets of lymphocyte were not different before and after desensitization compared to control groups.

  17. SU-E-J-169: The Dosimetric and Temporal Effects of Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients

    Rouabhi, O; Gross, B; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric and temporal effects of high dose rate treatment mode for respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients. Methods: Treatment plans from five lung cancer patients (3 nongated (Group 1), 2 gated at 80EX-80IN (Group 2)) were retrospectively evaluated. The maximum tumor motions range from 6–12 mm. Using the same planning criteria, four new treatment plans, corresponding to four gating windows (20EX–20IN, 40EX–40IN, 60EX–60IN, and 80EX–80IN), were generated for each patient. Mean tumor dose (MTD), mean lung dose (MLD), and lung V20 were used to assess the dosimetric effects. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to compute treatment time by considering gantry rotation time, time to position collimator leaves, dose delivery time (scaled relative to the gating window), and communication overhead. Treatment delivery time for each plan was estimated using a 500 MU/min dose rate for the original plans and a 1500 MU/min dose rate for the gated plans. Results: Differences in MTD were less than 1Gy across plans for all five patients. MLD and lung V20 were on average reduced between −16.1% to −6.0% and −20.0% to −7.2%, respectively for non-gated plans when compared with the corresponding gated plans, and between − 5.8% to −4.2% and −7.0% to −5.4%, respectively for plans originally gated at 80EX–80IN when compared with the corresponding 20EX-20IN to 60EX– 60IN gated plans. Treatment delivery times of gated plans using high dose rate were reduced on average between −19.7% (−1.9min) to −27.2% (−2.7min) for originally non-gated plans and −15.6% (−0.9min) to −20.3% (−1.2min) for originally 80EX-80IN gated plans. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated radiation therapy in lung cancer patients can reduce lung toxicity, while maintaining tumor dose. Using a gated high-dose-rate treatment, delivery time comparable to non-gated normal-dose-rate treatment can be achieved. This research is supported by Siemens

  18. Respiratory-Gated Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Adjacent to the Gastrointestinal Tract without Fiducial Markers

    Miu Mizuhata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of proton beam therapy (PBT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been reported, but insertion of fiducial markers in the liver is usually required. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of respiratory-gated PBT without fiducial markers for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract. From March 2011 to December 2015 at our institution, 40 patients were evaluated (median age, 72 years; range, 38–87 years. All patients underwent PBT at a dose of 60 to 80 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE in 20 to 38 fractions. The median follow-up period was 19.9 months (range, 1.2–72.3 months. The median tumor size was 36.5 mm (range, 11–124 mm. Kaplan–Meier estimates of the 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local tumor control rates were 76%, 60%, and 94%, respectively. One patient (2.5% developed a grade 3 gastric ulcer and one (2.5% developed grade 3 ascites retention; none of the remaining patients developed grade >3 toxicities (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.0.. This study indicates that PBT without fiducial markers achieves good local control without severe treatment-related toxicity of the gastrointestinal tract for HCC located within 2 cm of the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Does respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) predict anxiety reduction during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD)?

    Mathewson, Karen J; Schmidt, Louis A; Miskovic, Vladimir; Santesso, Diane L; Duku, Eric; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M; Moscovitch, David A

    2013-05-01

    Modifying dysfunctional emotion regulation is an important goal in psychological treatments for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Antecedent-focused strategies learned in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), such as cognitive reappraisal, have proven more effective in reducing social anxiety than response-focused strategies, such as expressive suppression. Still, not all patients with SAD respond well to CBT. Medications and physiological factors may also influence the clinical response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role that these factors play in determining treatment response following CBT for SAD. Using multilevel modeling, we examined associations across four separate laboratory visits between change in self-reported anxiety and indices of reappraisal, suppression, medication status, and resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a proxy measure of self-regulatory capacity, in 23 socially anxious adults during a 12-week program of CBT. Most participants were ultimately classified as responders to CBT (n=15), but in some, anxiety levels remained unchanged (n=8). Medication use explained substantial variance related to individual differences in anxiety among participants. When modeled separately, reappraisal, suppression, and RSA each accounted for significant variance related to anxiety. However, the best-fitting model included reappraisal and RSA. Moreover, RSA reactivity (change in RSA levels over time) was more important for predicting anxiety reduction than were baseline levels of RSA. These findings suggest that reappraisal and parasympathetic responsiveness may be important in reducing anxiety in adults with SAD who respond well to CBT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Respiratory acidosis

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  1. Statistical Study on Respiratory Stability Through RPM Signal Analysis according to Patient Position Under Radiation Therapy and Device

    Park, Myung Hwan; Seo, Jeong Min; Choi, Byeong Gi; Shin, Eun Hyeok; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    This study statistically analyzed the difference of the stability of maintaining a respiratory period shown according to position and use of a device to search the tendency and usefulness of a device. The study obtained respiratory signals which maintained a respiratory period for 20 minutes each supine and prone position for 11 subjects. The study obtained respiratory signals in a state of using a belly board for 7 patients in a bad condition of a respiratory period in a prone position to analyze a change in respiration and the stability before and after the use of a device. The supine part showed 54.5%, better than the prone part of 36.4% in a case that the stability for maintaining a respiratory period was in a good condition as a fixed respiratory period was well maintained according to the position. 6 patients (85%) showed a maintenance pattern of a respiratory period significantly different before the use and 4 patients showed a significantly good change in the stability for maintaining a respiratory period as a result that belly boards were used for 7 patients that the maintenance of a respiratory period was not in a good condition on a prone position. It seemed that this study could contribute to the maintenance of respiratory period and of respiratory stability as the optimal position for maintenance of respiration and the use of a device such as a belly board were decided through statistic analysis of respiratory signals and its application even if patient position and use of device were decided by the beam arrangement a treatment part of a patient, location of a target, and an expected plan.

  2. Aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    Kitabatake, T.; Watanabe, T.; Saito, A.; Nakamura, M.; Shiohama Hospital, Mie

    1976-01-01

    Among the Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been reported after 1930. On the other hand, during the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However, actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. While, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been induced frequently among the Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (orig.) [de

  3. The Role of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in the Management of Respiratory Distress in Extremely Premature Infants

    Sekar, Kris

    2006-01-01

    The use of mechanical ventilation for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in low birth weight infants may cause barotrauma, volutrauma, and chronic lung disease. Different continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery systems exist, each with its own practical and clinical advantages and disadvantages. CPAP can be used as either a primary or an adjunctive respiratory support for RDS. Research demonstrates that CPAP decreases the incidence of respiratory failure after ex...

  4. The acute effects of body position strategies and respiratory therapy in paralyzed patients with acute lung injury.

    Davis, K; Johannigman, J A; Campbell, R S; Marraccini, A; Luchette, F A; Frame, S B; Branson, R D

    2001-01-01

    Routine turning of critically ill patients is a standard of care. In recent years, specialized beds that provide automated turning have been introduced. These beds have been reported to improve lung function, reduce hospital-acquired pneumonia, and facilitate secretion removal. This trial was designed to measure the physiological effects of routine turning and respiratory therapy in comparison with continuous lateral rotation (CLR). The study was a prospective, quasi-experimental, random assignment, trial with patients serving as their own controls. Paralyzed, sedated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were eligible for study. Patients were randomized to receive four turning and secretion management regimens in random sequence for 6 h each over a period of 24 h: (1) routine turning every 2 h from the left to right lateral position; (2) routine turning every 2 h from the left to right lateral position including a 15-min period of manual percussion and postural drainage (P&PD); (3) CLR with a specialized bed that turned patients from left to right lateral position, pausing at each position for 2 min; and (4) CLR with a specialized bed that turned patients from left to right lateral position pausing at each position for 2 min, and a 15-min period of percussion provided by the pneumatic cushions of the bed every 2 h. Nineteen patients were entered into the study. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured cardiorespiratory variables. There was a tendency for the ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2) to increase (174 +/- 31 versus 188 +/- 36; P = 0.068) and for the ratio of deadspace to tidal volume (Vd/Vt) to decrease (0.62 +/- 0.18 versus 0.59 +/- 0.18; P = 0.19) during periods of CLR, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance. There were statistically significant increases in sputum volume during the periods of CLR. The addition of P&PD did not

  5. Technician Career Opportunities in Engineering Technology.

    Engineers' Council for Professional Development, New York, NY.

    Career opportunities for engineering technicians are available in the technologies relating to air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration, aviation and aerospace, building construction, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, electronics, industrial engineering, instrumentation, internal combustion engines, mechanical…

  6. The Library Technician Programme in Lebanon

    Rafidi, Samia

    1973-01-01

    A description of the library technician program established by the Beirut College for Women in February 1970: its curriculum, professional staff, students, and reactions produced by the program is presented. (Author/SJ)

  7. Section 608 Technician Certification Test Topics

    Identifies some of the topics covered on Section 608 Technician Certification tests such as ozone depletion, the Clean Air Act and Montreal Protocol, Substitute Refrigerants and oils, Refrigeration and Recovery Techniques.

  8. Snapshot of cobalt, chromium and nickel exposure in dental technicians.

    Kettelarij, Jolinde; Nilsson, Sara; Midander, Klara; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli

    2016-12-01

    It is not fully understood where and how people are exposed to sensitizing metals. Much can be learnt from studying occupational settings where metals are handled. To quantify cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) exposure on the skin and in the air, and urine levels, in dental technicians working with tools and alloys that may result in skin and respiratory exposure. The metal skin dose was quantified with acid wipe sampling in dental technicians (n = 13). Air exposure was monitored by personal air sampling. Spot urine samples were collected for 24 h. Metals were analysed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Before work, Co was detected on the skin of 10 participants (0.00025-0.0039 µg/cm 2 ), and Cr (0.00051-0.011 µg/cm 2 ) and Ni (0.0062-0.15 µg/cm 2 ) on the skin of all participants. After a 2-h period without hand washing, CoCr-exposed participants had more Co on the skin (p = 0.004) than non-CoCr-exposed participants. Co was found in 10 air samples (0.22-155 µg/m 3 ), Cr in nine (0.43-71 µg/m 3 ), and Ni in four (0.48-3.7 µg/m 3 ). Metal urine concentrations were considered to be normal. Dental technicians were exposed to Co, Cr and Ni on the skin and through the air, which was not reflected in the urine concentrations in this study. Cobalt skin doses may potentially elicit allergic contact dermatitis and cause sensitization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Breathing Patterns for Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy Using Respiration Regularity Index

    Cheong, K; Lee, M; Kang, S; Yoon, J; Park, S; Hwang, T; Kim, H; Kim, K; Han, T; Bae, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the importance of accurately estimating the respiration regularity of a patient in motion compensation treatment, an effective and simply applicable method has rarely been reported. The authors propose a simple respiration regularity index based on parameters derived from a correspondingly simplified respiration model. Methods: In order to simplify a patient's breathing pattern while preserving the data's intrinsic properties, we defined a respiration model as a power of cosine form with a baseline drift. According to this respiration formula, breathing-pattern fluctuation could be explained using four factors: sample standard deviation of respiration period, sample standard deviation of amplitude and the results of simple regression of the baseline drift (slope and standard deviation of residuals of a respiration signal. Overall irregularity (δ) was defined as a Euclidean norm of newly derived variable using principal component analysis (PCA) for the four fluctuation parameters. Finally, the proposed respiration regularity index was defined as ρ=ln(1+(1/ δ))/2, a higher ρ indicating a more regular breathing pattern. Subsequently, we applied it to simulated and clinical respiration signals from real-time position management (RPM; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and investigated respiration regularity. Moreover, correlations between the regularity of the first session and the remaining fractions were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The respiration regularity was determined based on ρ; patients with ρ 0.7 was suitable for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). Fluctuations in breathing cycle and amplitude were especially determinative of ρ. If the respiration regularity of a patient's first session was known, it could be estimated through subsequent sessions. Conclusions: Respiration regularity could be objectively determined using a respiration regularity index, ρ. Such single-index testing of

  10. Expanded access to naloxone among firefighters, police officers, and emergency medical technicians in Massachusetts.

    Davis, Corey S; Ruiz, Sarah; Glynn, Patrick; Picariello, Gerald; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-08-01

    Naloxone is a medication that reverses respiratory depression from opioid overdose if given in time. Paramedics routinely administer naloxone to opioid overdose victims in the prehospital setting, and many states are moving to increase access to the medication. Several jurisdictions have expanded naloxone administration authority to nonparamedic first responders, and others are considering that step. We report here on policy change in Massachusetts, where several communities have equipped emergency medical technicians, law enforcement officers, and firefighters with naloxone.

  11. The Effects of Smartphone-based Nebulizer Therapy Education on Parents' Knowledge and Confidence of Performance in Caring for Children with Respiratory Disease.

    Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Min, Hae Young

    This study aimed to identify the effects of smartphone-based nebulizer therapy education on the knowledge and confidence of parents while performing care for their children with respiratory disease. This quasi-experimental study employed a pretest-posttest design using a nonequivalent control group. Data were collected from children's parents who had not used nebulizer therapy for their children previously. Both the groups were given nebulizer therapy education using the same content but different learning methods. The experimental group (n=36) was taught using smartphones, while the control group (n=36) was taught using verbal and paper-based methods. The data were analyzed using the Chi Square test, repeated measures analysis of variance, and t-test. The mean scores on knowledge improvement (F=100.949, psmartphone-based education on nebulizer therapy might be effective in improving parents' knowledge and confidence in performing care for their children. This study suggests that smartphone-based education needs to be considered as an effective educational intervention in providing nursing support for parents of children with respiratory disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of the baseline shift using a new and simple method for respiratory-gated radiation therapy: Detectability and effectiveness of a flexible monitoring system

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kitamura, Nozomi; Ito, Yasushi; Kawai, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masaru; Tsuda, Akihisa; Shiizuka, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiation therapy, a baseline shift decreases the accuracy of target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing. The effectiveness of audio-feedback and audio-visual feedback in correcting the baseline shift in the breathing pattern of the patient has been demonstrated previously. However, the baseline shift derived from the intrafraction motion of the patient's body cannot be corrected by these methods. In the present study, the authors designed and developed a simple and flexible system. Methods: The system consisted of a web camera and a computer running our in-house software. The in-house software was adapted to template matching and also to no preimage processing. The system was capable of monitoring the baseline shift in the intrafraction motion of the patient's body. Another marker box was used to monitor the baseline shift due to the flexible setups required of a marker box for gated signals. The system accuracy was evaluated by employing a respiratory motion phantom and was found to be within AAPM Task Group 142 tolerance (positional accuracy <2 mm and temporal accuracy <100 ms) for respiratory-gated radiation therapy. Additionally, the effectiveness of this flexible and independent system in gated treatment was investigated in healthy volunteers, in terms of the results from the differences in the baseline shift detectable between the marker positions, which the authors evaluated statistically. Results: The movement of the marker on the sternum [1.599 ± 0.622 mm (1 SD)] was substantially decreased as compared with the abdomen [6.547 ± 0.962 mm (1 SD)]. Additionally, in all of the volunteers, the baseline shifts for the sternum [-0.136 ± 0.868 (2 SD)] were in better agreement with the nominal baseline shifts than was the case for the abdomen [-0.722 ± 1.56 mm (2 SD)]. The baseline shifts could be accurately measured and detected using the monitoring system, which could acquire the movement of the marker on the sternum. The

  13. The potential of heliox as a therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children: a descriptive review

    Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Preckel, Benedikt; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    In neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and acute RDS (ARDS) mechanical ventilation is often necessary to manage hypoxia, whilst protecting the lungs through lower volume ventilation and permissive hypercapnia. Mechanical ventilation can, however, induce or aggravate the lung injury caused

  14. Analysis of the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis under high-flow oxygen therapy during emergency transport.

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Naoki; Yamano, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Genta; Tomishima, Yutaka; Jinta, Torahiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    High-flow oxygen is often administered to patients during emergency transport and can sometimes cause respiratory acidosis with disturbed consciousness, thereby necessitating mechanical ventilation. Although oxygen titration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during emergency transport reduces mortality rates, the clinical risk factors for respiratory acidosis in emergency settings are not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis during pre-hospital transport. This was a retrospective study of patients who arrived at our hospital by emergency transport in 2010 who received high-flow oxygen while in transit. Respiratory acidosis was defined by the following arterial blood gas readings: pH, ≤7.35; PaCO 2 , ≥45 mmHg; and HCO 3 - , ≥24 mmol/L. The risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 765 study patients, 66 patients showed respiratory acidosis. The following risk factors for respiratory acidosis were identified: age, ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-2.8); transportation time, ≥10 min (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7); three digits on the Japan Coma Scale (OR 3.1; 95% CI, 1.7-5.8); percutaneous oxygen saturation, ≤90% (OR 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0); tuberculosis (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 1.4-15.1); asthma (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.3); pneumonia (OR 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7-3.1); and lung cancer (OR 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5-10.1). These underlying diseases as risk factors included both comorbid diseases and past medical conditions. The factors identified may contribute to the development of respiratory acidosis. Further studies on preventing respiratory acidosis will improve the quality of emergency medical care.

  15. Preparing technicians for photonics industries and organizations

    Souders, John; Hull, Dan

    2012-10-01

    U.S. photonics organizations need about 800 new photonics technicians each year. Thirty-one community and technical colleges have approximately 700 students enrolled in photonics related programs; about 275 of them complete their coursework and enter the workforce each year. A disparity exists between the demand and supply of qualified photonics technicians in the U.S. OP-TEC, the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education is a consortium of seven colleges, under the leadership of the University of Central Florida, and sponsored by NSF. OP-TEC's mission is to increase the quantity and quality of photonics technicians prepared at two-year colleges. OP-TEC maintains the National Photonics Skill Standards for Technicians, provides curriculum models, teaching materials, faculty training/professional development and planning services to strengthen existing college photonics programs and to attract and support new ones. OP-TEC is converting its text materials to E-Books to support students in technical programs. Through OP-TEC's recruitment efforts 84 additional colleges are interested in initiating new photonics programs. The OP-TEC Photonics College Network (OPCN) consists of 28 colleges that are currently providing photonics education. This fall OPCN will lead an additional national effort to further educate employed photonics technicians through on-line courses, complemented by lab experiences at nearby colleges. OP-TEC is expanding its outreach to photonics employers and colleges by regionalizing its approach to offering its services. OP-TEC is also planning to develop new curricula and instructional materials for AAS programs to prepare Precision Optics Technicians. This paper will detail OP-TEC's work with particular emphases on its materials and services.

  16. SU-E-J-67: Evaluation of Breathing Patterns for Respiratory-Gated Radiation Therapy Using Respiration Regularity Index

    Cheong, K; Lee, M; Kang, S; Yoon, J; Park, S; Hwang, T; Kim, H; Kim, K; Han, T; Bae, H [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Despite the importance of accurately estimating the respiration regularity of a patient in motion compensation treatment, an effective and simply applicable method has rarely been reported. The authors propose a simple respiration regularity index based on parameters derived from a correspondingly simplified respiration model. Methods: In order to simplify a patient's breathing pattern while preserving the data's intrinsic properties, we defined a respiration model as a power of cosine form with a baseline drift. According to this respiration formula, breathing-pattern fluctuation could be explained using four factors: sample standard deviation of respiration period, sample standard deviation of amplitude and the results of simple regression of the baseline drift (slope and standard deviation of residuals of a respiration signal. Overall irregularity (δ) was defined as a Euclidean norm of newly derived variable using principal component analysis (PCA) for the four fluctuation parameters. Finally, the proposed respiration regularity index was defined as ρ=ln(1+(1/ δ))/2, a higher ρ indicating a more regular breathing pattern. Subsequently, we applied it to simulated and clinical respiration signals from real-time position management (RPM; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and investigated respiration regularity. Moreover, correlations between the regularity of the first session and the remaining fractions were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The respiration regularity was determined based on ρ; patients with ρ<0.3 showed worse regularity than the others, whereas ρ>0.7 was suitable for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). Fluctuations in breathing cycle and amplitude were especially determinative of ρ. If the respiration regularity of a patient's first session was known, it could be estimated through subsequent sessions. Conclusions: Respiration regularity could be objectively determined

  17. Motivational interviewing in respiratory therapy: What do clinicians need to make it part of routine care? A qualitative study.

    Robert Shannon

    Full Text Available Motivational interviewing (MI is a method for building motivation for behaviour change that has potential for use in respiratory contexts. There is a paucity of published research exploring the feasibility of this intervention from the clinicians' perspective. This study aimed to explore respiratory clinicians' views of MI: Is it perceived as useful? Could it be integrated into practice? What training would be required to make it part of routine care? Nine respiratory clinicians attended a one-day MI workshop and a semi-structured face-to-face interview two weeks later. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed with thematic analysis. Four main themes are presented-1 MI's suitability for use in respiratory contexts: participants saw potential in using MI to motivate their patients to engage with prescribed respiratory interventions, such as increased physical activity. Those who experimented with new skills post-workshop were encouraged by patient responsiveness and outcomes. 2 MI's relationship with routine clinical practice: some believed they already used elements of MI, but most participants felt MI was fundamentally 'different' to their normal style of working. 3 Implementation issues: additional time would need to be made available to enable an appropriate depth of conversation. 4 Training issues: Participants sensed the complexity of MI could make it difficult to learn and that it would take them time to become competent. On-going supervision was perceived as necessary. One key challenge identified was how to suppress behaviours that are antithetical to MI. These findings lend support to the feasibility of using MI in respiratory contexts such as pulmonary rehabilitation programmes, but highlight implementation and training issues that would need to be overcome. The insights have informed the development of another study, testing the effect of a tailored training package on MI skill, specifically for

  18. SU-E-T-452: Impact of Respiratory Motion On Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy to Treat Lung Cancers

    Liu, W; Schild, S; Bues, M; Liao, Z; Sahoo, N; Park, P; Li, H; Li, Y; Li, X; Shen, J; Anand, A; Dong, L; Zhu, X; Mohan, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We compared conventionally optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans against the worst-case robustly optimized treatment plans for lung cancer. The comparison of the two IMPT optimization strategies focused on the resulting plans' ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set-up, inherent proton range uncertainty, and dose perturbation caused by respiratory motion. Methods: For each of the 9 lung cancer cases two treatment plans were created accounting for treatment uncertainties in two different ways: the first used the conventional Method: delivery of prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) that is geometrically expanded from the internal target volume (ITV). The second employed the worst-case robust optimization scheme that addressed set-up and range uncertainties through beamlet optimization. The plan optimality and plan robustness were calculated and compared. Furthermore, the effects on dose distributions of the changes in patient anatomy due to respiratory motion was investigated for both strategies by comparing the corresponding plan evaluation metrics at the end-inspiration and end-expiration phase and absolute differences between these phases. The mean plan evaluation metrics of the two groups were compared using two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Without respiratory motion considered, we affirmed that worst-case robust optimization is superior to PTV-based conventional optimization in terms of plan robustness and optimality. With respiratory motion considered, robust optimization still leads to more robust dose distributions to respiratory motion for targets and comparable or even better plan optimality [D95% ITV: 96.6% versus 96.1% (p=0.26), D5% - D95% ITV: 10.0% versus 12.3% (p=0.082), D1% spinal cord: 31.8% versus 36.5% (p =0.035)]. Conclusion: Worst-case robust optimization led to superior solutions for lung IMPT. Despite of the fact that robust optimization did not explicitly

  19. Respiratory alkalosis

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  20. So You Want to Train Solar Technicians.

    Ensign, M. Dale; Richins, Michael Paul

    1978-01-01

    Considers the role of solar energy in meeting the nation's energy requirements and the future needs for solar technicians and mechanics. Discusses the precautions community colleges must take in training these workers, to ensure that the demand be met without flooding the job market. (MB)

  1. Section 609 Technician Training and Certification Programs

    EPA-approved programs for technicians who service motor vehicle air conditioning (MVAC) systems. Any person who repairs or services a MVAC system for consideration must be certified under section 609 of the Clean Air Act by an EPA-approved program.

  2. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology (AFSC 90470).

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are laboratory procedures in clinical bacteriology (the history of bacteriology; aseptic techniques and sterilization procedures; bacterial morphology and…

  3. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Davies, Matthew; McIntyre, Karen; Robinson, Emma; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-08

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9). Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (ptechnician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for depression. This form of treatment has potential to increase the capacity of existing mental health services. Australian New

  4. Analysis of the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis under high‐flow oxygen therapy during emergency transport

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Yamano, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Genta; Tomishima, Yutaka; Jinta, Torahiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2015-01-01

    Aim High‐flow oxygen is often administered to patients during emergency transport and can sometimes cause respiratory acidosis with disturbed consciousness, thereby necessitating mechanical ventilation. Although oxygen titration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during emergency transport reduces mortality rates, the clinical risk factors for respiratory acidosis in emergency settings are not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis during pre‐hospital transport. Methods This was a retrospective study of patients who arrived at our hospital by emergency transport in 2010 who received high‐flow oxygen while in transit. Respiratory acidosis was defined by the following arterial blood gas readings: pH, ≤7.35; PaCO 2, ≥45 mmHg; and HCO 3 −, ≥24 mmol/L. The risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results In 765 study patients, 66 patients showed respiratory acidosis. The following risk factors for respiratory acidosis were identified: age, ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7–2.8); transportation time, ≥10 min (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.7); three digits on the Japan Coma Scale (OR 3.1; 95% CI, 1.7–5.8); percutaneous oxygen saturation, ≤90% (OR 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.0); tuberculosis (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 1.4–15.1); asthma (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6–5.3); pneumonia (OR 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7–3.1); and lung cancer (OR 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5–10.1). These underlying diseases as risk factors included both comorbid diseases and past medical conditions. Conclusions The factors identified may contribute to the development of respiratory acidosis. Further studies on preventing respiratory acidosis will improve the quality of emergency medical care. PMID:29123744

  5. [Emergency Medical Technician profile in Spain].

    Martínez-Isasi, Santiago; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, María José; Vázquez-Santamariña, David; Abella-Lorenzo, Javier; Castro Dios, Diana Josefa; Fernández García, Daniel

    2017-12-11

    The emergency medical technician plays a fundamental role and is the most important figure quantitatively in pre-hospital emergencies. The aim was to asses the socio-demographic, work-related, health characteristics and technical skills of an Emergency Medical Technician in Spain. Cross-sectional descriptive study. An ad hoc questionnaire was managed using Google Docs® that was delivered between April-June 2014 via email and social networks. A total of 705 questionnaires were collected. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS ® 20.0 Windows version. A significance level p≤0.05 was used for all analyzes. The data analyzed show that the profile of the Emergency Medical Technician in Spain is an 39 year-old man, married or living as a couple and has a child. The average BMI is 27 kg/m2, does regular exercise, does not smoke. His seniority in the company is 10 years and has the Medium Cycle of Emergency Medical Technician. The analysis for gender shows that men have an average of 40, an average BMI of 27, 5 kg/m2 and work in an advanced life support unit; while women have an average of 36,5 years, an average BMI of 24,7 kg/m2, mainly work in Basic Life Support Unit and her seniority in the company is 6,76 years. Emergency Medical Technician profile is a overweight men, who refer to practise regular exercise, his seniority in the company is 10 years and is in possession of CMTES; differences were observed according to gender in BMI, resource where they perform their work, seniority and age.

  6. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) ...

  7. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to a...

  8. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  9. 46 CFR 160.151-39 - Training of servicing technicians.

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training of servicing technicians. 160.151-39 Section...-39 Training of servicing technicians. (a) The training program for certification of servicing technicians must include— (1) Training and practice in packing an inflatable liferaft, repairing buoyancy...

  10. 5 CFR 842.210 - Military reserve technicians.

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military reserve technicians. 842.210 Section 842.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... reserve technicians. (a) A military reserve technician as defined in 5 U.S.C. 8401(30) who is separated...

  11. Pulmonary Foreign Body Granulomatosis in Dental Technician.

    Chung, Sung Jun; Koo, Gun Woo; Park, Dong Won; Kwak, Hyun Jung; Yhi, Ji Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Jang Won; Yoon, Ho Joo; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2015-10-01

    Occupational lung diseases are caused by several toxic substances including heavy metals; however, the exact pathologic mechanisms remain unknown. In the workplace, dental technicians are often exposed to heavy metals such as cobalt, nickel, or beryllium and occasionally develop occupational lung diseases. We described a case of occupational lung disease in a patient who was employed as a dental technician for over a decade. A 31-year-old, non-smoking woman presented with productive cough and shortness of breath of several weeks duration. Chest computed tomography revealed a large number of scattered, bilateral small pulmonary nodules throughout the lung field, and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes enlargement. Percutaneous needle biopsy showed multifocal small granulomas with foreign body type giant cells suggestive of heavy metals inhalation. The patient's condition improved on simple avoidance strategy for several months. This case highlighted the importance of proper workplace safety.

  12. Job Satisfaction among Turkish Business Aviation Technicians

    Tevfik Uyar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most applicable models in safety management put the human factors, employers’ attitudes and behaviors at the center. This study reports an investigation of job satisfaction among business aviation technicians. A demographic information form and Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS were used to collect data from 44 individuals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Student’s t-test. Our results show that there is significant difference in total job satisfaction levels with regard to marital status while other personal factors are not related to the total job satisfaction levels. However several sub dimensions of job satisfaction are affected by the workers’ military or civilian origin, their training background, types of companies they work in or their license category. No difference is found in age and position groups. Secondly, study shows that technicians are the most satisfied from the nature of their work, while they are the least satisfied by operational procedures.

  13. 40 CFR 745.90 - Renovator certification and dust sampling technician certification.

    2010-07-01

    ... sampling technician certification. 745.90 Section 745.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... technician certification. (a) Renovator certification and dust sampling technician certification. (1) To become a certified renovator or certified dust sampling technician, an individual must successfully...

  14. Respiratory guiding system for respiratory motion management in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory guiding systems have been shown to improve the respiratory regularity. This, in turn, improves the efficiency of synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy, and it reduces the artifacts caused by irregular breathing in imaging techniques such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), which is used for treatment planning in RGRT. We have previously developed a respiratory guiding system that incorporates an individual-specific guiding waveform, which is easy to follow for each volunteer, to improve the respiratory regularity. The present study evaluates the application of this system to improve the respiratory regularity for respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT). In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an in-house-developed respiratory guiding system incorporating an individual specific guiding waveform to improve the respiratory regularity for RGRT. Most volunteers showed significantly less residual motion at each phase during guided breathing owing to the improvement in respiratory regularity. Therefore, the respiratory guiding system can clearly reduce the residual, or respiratory, motion in each phase. From the result, the CTV and the PTV margins during RGRT can be reduced by using the respiratory guiding system, which reduces the residual motions, thus improving the accuracy of RGRT

  15. Knowledge and attitudes about smoking cessation among pharmacy technicians.

    Zillich, Alan J; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy technicians before and after attending a continuing education program about smoking cessation. A pre/post survey of a single group. Two statewide meetings of the Iowa Pharmacy Association. Pharmacy technicians. One 2-hour continuing education (CE) course about smoking cessation for pharmacy technicians. Changes in scores before and after the CE sessions among three domains (knowledge, efficacy, and outcome) of a validated survey instrument. Fifty-one technicians completed both the presession and postsession questionnaire. For the three survey domains, technicians' knowledge (P = .034), efficacy (P < .001), and outcome (P < .001) showed significant improvement between the presession and postsession surveys (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Pharmacy technicians who attended a CE program on smoking cessation improved their knowledge, attitudes, and self-confidence in helping smokers quit. Additional research should be conducted to test the role of pharmacy technicians in smoking cessation promotion.

  16. Terapia com células-tronco na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo Stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Tatiana Maron-Gutierrez

    2009-03-01

    . It is believed that an efficient therapy for the acute respiratory distress syndrome should attenuate inflammatory response and promote adequate repair of the lung injury. This article presents a brief review on the use of stem cells and their potential therapeutic effect on the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This systematic review was based upon clinical and experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome studies included in the MedLine and SciElO database during the last 10 years. Stem cell transplant lead to an improvement in lung injury and fibrotic process by inducing adequate tissue repair. This includes alveolar epithelial cell differentiation,and also reduces pulmonary and systemic inflammatory mediators and secretion of growth factors. Stem cells could be a potential therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome promoting lung repair and attenuating the inflammatory response. However, mechanisms involving their anti-inflammatory and antifibrinogenic effects require better elucidation, limiting their immediate clinical use in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  17. Respiratory Failure

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  18. Respiratory system

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  19. Changing Roles of Librarians and Library Technicians

    Norene James

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available What significant changes are librarians and library technicians experiencing in their roles? A survey put forward across Canada to librarians and library technicians addressing this question was conducted in February 2014. Eight hundred eighty-two responses were obtained from librarians, defined as MLIS graduates, and library technicians, defined as graduates from a two-year library diploma program. Respondents needed to have been employed in the last two years in these roles and students of either an MLIS or LIT program were also welcome to participate. The results suggest that both librarians and library technicians perceive their roles as growing in scope and complexity and that the lines of responsibility are blurring. A majority of respondents indicated that they perceive a change in their roles in the past five years and commented on what the perceived changes were. Librarian and library technician roles may be shifting away from what may be viewed as traditional or clearly defined responsibilities and both librarians and library technicians may be taking on new tasks as well as experiencing task overlap. All library staff will need to be fluid, adaptable, and open to change. Library school curricula and workplace training need to incorporate the development of these competencies. Quels sont les changements importants éprouvés par les bibliothécaires et les bibliotechniciens dans leurs rôles? Un sondage mené en février de 2014 a posé cette question aux bibliothécaires et aux bibliotechniciens dans tout le Canada. On a reçu huit-cent quatre-vingt-deux réponses des bibliothécaires, définis comme étant diplômés en MSIB, et les bibliotechniciens, définis comme étant diplômés d’un programme de deux ans en bibliotechnique. Les sondés devaient avoir travaillé au cours des deux dernières années dans ces fonctions et les étudiants d’un programme MSIB ou de bibliothéconomie/ sciences de l’information pouvaient aussi y

  20. Dental technician pneumoconiosis mimicking lung cancer.

    Uyar, Meral; Sokucu, Oral; Sanli, Maruf; Filiz, Ayten; Ali Ikidag, Mehmet; Feridun Isik, Ahmet; Bakir, Kemal

    2015-09-01

    A 47-year-old man was referred for assessment of bilateral lymph node enlargement identified on a routine chest radiograph. Positron emission tomography showed high standardized uptake values (SUVmax: 20.5) in right supraclavicular, right intercostal, and multiple mediastinal lymph nodes. Biopsy samples obtained from the right upper and left lower paratracheal nodes by mediastinoscopy revealed granulomatous inflammation. Clinical and laboratory findings indicated a diagnosis of dental technician pneumoconiosis. The patient is alive and well 3 years after diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of obtaining an occupational history.

  1. Mechanical technology for higher engineering technicians

    Black, Peter

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical Technology for Higher Engineering Technicians deals with the mechanics of machines, thermodynamics, and mechanics of fluids. This book presents discussions and examples that deal with the strength of materials, technology of machines, and techniques used by professional engineers. The book explains the strain energy of torsion, coil springs, and the effects of axial load. The author also discusses the forces that produce bending, shearing, and bending combined with direct stress, as well as beams subjected to a uniform bending moment or simply supported beams with concentrated non-c

  2. Microprocessor based systems for the higher technician

    Vears, RE

    2013-01-01

    Microprocessor Based Systems for the Higher Technician provides coverage of the BTEC level 4 unit in Microprocessor Based Systems (syllabus U80/674). This book is composed of 10 chapters and concentrates on the development of 8-bit microcontrollers specifically constructed around the Z80 microprocessor. The design cycle for the development of such a microprocessor based system and the use of a disk-based development system (MDS) as an aid to design are both described in detail. The book deals with the Control Program Monitor (CP/M) operating system and gives background information on file hand

  3. Radiation protection technician job task analysis manual

    1990-03-01

    This manual was developed to assist all DOE contractors in the design and conduct of job task analysis (JTA) for the radiation protection technician. Experience throughout the nuclear industry and the DOE system has indicated that the quality and efficiency in conducting a JTA at most sites is greatly enhanced by using a generic task list for the position, and clearly written guidelines on the JTA process. This manual is designed to provide this information for personnel to use in developing and conducting site-specific JTAs. (VC)

  4. Acupuncture therapy for fever induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in military medical service: a case series.

    Kwon, SeungWon; Shin, KyoungHo; Jung, WooSang; Moon, SangKwan; Cho, KiHo

    2014-12-01

    We report the cases of eight military patients with fever (≥38°C) induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) who requested treatment with acupuncture in the military medical service room. All patients were treated immediately after diagnosis with classical acupuncture (GV14, GB20, TE8 points) and a new type of acupuncture, equilibrium acupuncture (Feibing and Ganmao points). After one treatment session (20 min), reduction of body temperature was confirmed in all patients. Accompanying symptoms such as headache, myalgia and nasal obstruction also showed a tendency to decrease. Within 3 days of treatment, six of the eight patients had recovered from the URTI. No adverse effects of acupuncture treatment were reported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Early Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Therapy in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report

    Ho-Ming Su

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by acute-onset dyspnea, diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltration, low pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP, and an arterial oxygen tension/ inspired oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2 ratio of less than 200 mmHg. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI, whether complicated by circulatory arrest, cardiogenic shock, and hypotension or not, was reported as an etiologic factor in the development of ARDS in the prethrombolytic era. In the thrombolytic era, two cases of AMI complicated with ARDS have been reported. ARDS in these two patients resulted from anaphylactic reaction to the thrombolytic agent and not from the hemodynamic consequences of AMI. Development of ARDS during the AMI period has not been reported after early successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Herein, we report a 61-year-old male patient with persistent chest pain who was diagnosed with Killip II anterior ST-segment elevation AMI. He was treated successfully with primary PCI 2.5 hours after the onset of chest pain. Unfortunately, on the third hospital day, acuteonset dyspnea (respiratory rate, 33 beats/min, fever (38.5°C, leukocytosis (white blood cell count, 18,360/μL, and diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltration were noted. ARDS was diagnosed from the low PCWP (8 mmHg and a PaO2/FiO2 of less than 200 mmHg (160 mmHg. No usual causes of ARDS such as infection, aspiration, trauma, shock, or drug reactions were noted. We assumed that, in this particular patient, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome frequently induced by AMI might have caused this episode of ARDS. This may imply that AMI itself is a possible etiology of ARDS.

  6. Can they do it? Comparing the views of pharmacists and technicians to the introduction of an advanced technician role.

    Napier, Patti; Norris, Pauline; Green, James; Braund, Rhiannon

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the opinions of pharmacists and technicians regarding the ability of New Zealand technicians to take on an advanced checking technician role. A survey was developed to investigate the opinions regarding the introduction of this new role. The questions covered are: perceived ability to take on the role, training requirements and competence. Surveys were sent to pharmacists whose contact details are available for research purposes (n = 2095) and to all pharmacies in New Zealand (both community and hospital) for the attention of technicians (n = 858). The results were analysed using IBM SPSS and thematic analysis of comments was conducted. A total of 1221 surveys were returned (pharmacists = 736 and technicians = 485). The majority of the technicians (83%) believed that 'some' technicians could work in a CT role, compared with 73% of the pharmacists. Over two-thirds (69%) of the technicians felt comfortable checking a prescription at their current level of training compared with 53% of pharmacists. Both groups' comfort increased with further specific training for the technicians. The majority of both of these groups supported the change in roles. Pharmacists were less confident that technicians could take on this role now, but were more comfortable after extra training had been completed. The technicians, however, were confident they could take on this role now but would take on extra training if needed. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P nurses and medical technicians (P Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type.

  8. Technicians under the Microscope: The Training and Skills of University Laboratory and Engineering Workshop Technicians

    Lewis, Paul A.; Gospel, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The UK government aims to increase both the number, and also the status, of workers with intermediate-level skills, with a view to creating a "modern class of technicians" who can help to bolster economic growth and prosperity. This article considers the prospects for such a policy by focusing on one particular, but neglected, group of…

  9. Preparing technicians for engineering materials technology

    Jacobs, James A.; Metzloff, Carlton H.

    1990-01-01

    A long held principle is that for every engineer and scientist there is a need for ten technicians to maximize the efficiency of the technology team for meeting needs of industry and government. Developing an adequate supply of technicians to meet the requirements of the materials related industry will be a challenge and difficult to accomplish. A variety of agencies feel the need and wish to support development of engineering materials technology programs. In a joint effort among Battelle Laboratories, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Northwest College and University Association for Science (NORCUS), the development of an engineering materials technology program for vocational programs and community colleges for the Pacific Northwest Region was recently completed. This effort has implications for a national model. The model Associate of Applied Science degree in Engineering Materials Technology shown provides a general structure. It purposely has course titles which need delimiting while also including a core of courses necessary to develop cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills with the underlining principles of math, science and technology so students have job entry skills, and so that students can learn about and adapt to evolving technology.

  10. Evaluation of accuracy about 2D vs 3D real-time position management system based on couch rotation when non-coplanar respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Kwon, Kyung Tae; Kim, Jung Soo; Sim, Hyun Sun; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Soon Yong; Han, Dong Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Because of non-coplanar therapy with couch rotation in respiratory gated radiation therapy, the recognition of marker movement due to the change in the distance between the infrared camera and the marker due to the rotation of the couch is called RPM (Real-time The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of motion reflections (baseline changes) of 2D gating configuration (two dot marker block) and 3D gating configuration (six dot marker block). The motion was measured by varying the couch angle in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions by 10° in the 2D gating configuration. In the 3D gating configuration, the couch angle was changed by 10° in the clockwise direction and compared with the baseline at the reference 0°. The reference amplitude was 1.173 to 1.165, the couch angle at 20° was 1.132, and the couch angle at 1.0° was 1.083. At 350° counterclockwise, the reference amplitude was 1.168 to 1.157, the couch angle at 340° was 1.124, and the couch angle at 330° was 1.079. In this study, the phantom is used to quantitatively evaluate the value of the amplitude according to couch change

  11. Evaluation of accuracy about 2D vs 3D real-time position management system based on couch rotation when non-coplanar respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Kwon, Kyung Tae; Kim, Jung Soo [Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Hyun Sun [College of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Shingu University College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Dong Kyoon [College of Health Sciences, EulJi University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Because of non-coplanar therapy with couch rotation in respiratory gated radiation therapy, the recognition of marker movement due to the change in the distance between the infrared camera and the marker due to the rotation of the couch is called RPM (Real-time The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of motion reflections (baseline changes) of 2D gating configuration (two dot marker block) and 3D gating configuration (six dot marker block). The motion was measured by varying the couch angle in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions by 10° in the 2D gating configuration. In the 3D gating configuration, the couch angle was changed by 10° in the clockwise direction and compared with the baseline at the reference 0°. The reference amplitude was 1.173 to 1.165, the couch angle at 20° was 1.132, and the couch angle at 1.0° was 1.083. At 350° counterclockwise, the reference amplitude was 1.168 to 1.157, the couch angle at 340° was 1.124, and the couch angle at 330° was 1.079. In this study, the phantom is used to quantitatively evaluate the value of the amplitude according to couch change.

  12. Therapy for influenza and acute respiratory viral infection in young and middle-aged schoolchildren: Effect of Ingavirin® on intoxication, fever, and catarrhal syndromes

    I. M. Farber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the clinical results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter phase III study evaluating the clinical efficacy and safety of Ingavirin® capsules 30 mg at a daily dose of 60 mg for the treatment of influenza and other acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in 7–12-year-old children.The study included 310 children of both sexes. The study participants took Ingavirin® 60 mg/day or placebo for 5 days. The drug was shown to be effective in normalizing temperature and alleviating intoxication and catarrhal syndromes just at day 3 of therapy. Ingavirin® was demonstrated to considerably reduce the risk of bacterial complications of ARVI/influenza, which require antibiotic therapy, which is important for clinical use in children. This clinical trial has shown the high safety and tolerance of the drug. Ingavirin® contributes to accelerated virus elimination, shorter disease duration, and lower risk of complications.

  13. Prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child affected by rituximab-resistant autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    Beretta Chiara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children younger than 2 years of age is usually characterized by a severe course, with a mortality rate of approximately 10%. The prolonged immunosuppression following specific treatment may be associated with a high risk of developing severe infections. Recently, the use of monoclonal antibodies (rituximab has allowed sustained remissions to be obtained in the majority of pediatric patients with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Case presentation We describe the case of an 8-month-old Caucasian girl affected by a severe form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which required continuous steroid treatment for 16 months. Thereafter, she received 4 weekly doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2/dose associated with steroid therapy, which was then tapered over the subsequent 2 weeks. One month after the last dose of rrituximab, she presented with recurrence of severe hemolysis and received two more doses of rrituximab. The patient remained in clinical remission for 7 months, before presenting with a further relapse. An alternative heavy immunosuppressive therapy was administered combining cyclophosphamide 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days with methylprednisolone 40 mg/kg/day for 5 days, which was then tapered down over 3 weeks. While still on steroid therapy, the patient developed an interstitial pneumonia with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which required immediate admission to the intensive care unit where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy was administered continuously for 37 days. At 16-month follow-up, the patient is alive and in good clinical condition, with no organ dysfunction, free from any immunosuppressive treatment and with a normal Hb level. Conclusions This case shows that aggressive combined immunosuppressive therapy may lead to a sustained complete remission in children with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. However, the severe life-threatening complication presented by our

  14. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 2, Core/site practical training

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides a description of the guidelines, qualification in radiological instrumentation, qualification in radiological protection, and qualification in emergency preparedness for radiological control technicians

  15. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  16. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  17. Evaluation of respiratory pattern during respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Dobashi, Suguru; Mori, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory cycle is not strictly regular, and generally varies in amplitude and period from one cycle to the next. We evaluated the characteristics of respiratory patterns acquired during respiratory gating treatment in more than 300 patients. A total 331 patients treated with respiratory-gated carbon-ion beam therapy were selected from a group of patients with thoracic and abdominal conditions. Respiratory data were acquired for a total of 3,171 fractions using an external respiratory sensing monitor and evaluated for respiratory cycle, duty cycle, magnitude of baseline drift, and intrafractional/interfractional peak inhalation/exhalation positional variation. Results for the treated anatomical sites and patient positioning were compared. Mean ± SD respiratory cycle averaged over all patients was 4.1 ± 1.3 s. Mean ± SD duty cycle averaged over all patients was 36.5 ± 7.3 %. Two types of baseline drift were seen, the first decremental and the second incremental. For respiratory peak variation, the mean intrafractional variation in peak-inhalation position relative to the amplitude in the first respiratory cycle (15.5 ± 9.3 %) was significantly larger than that in exhalation (7.5 ± 4.6 %). Interfractional variations in inhalation (17.2 ± 18.5 %) were also significantly greater than those in exhalation (9.4 ± 10.0 %). Statistically significant differences were observed between patients in the supine position and those in the prone position in mean respiratory cycle, duty cycle, and intra-/interfractional variations. We quantified the characteristics of the respiratory curve based on a large number of respiratory data obtained during treatment. These results might be useful in improving the accuracy of respiratory-gated treatment.

  18. Partnering for optimal respiratory home care: physicians working with respiratory therapists to optimally meet respiratory home care needs.

    Spratt, G; Petty, T L

    2001-05-01

    The need for respiratory care services continues to increase, reimbursement for those services has decreased, and cost-containment measures have increased the frequency of home health care. Respiratory therapists are well qualified to provide home respiratory care, reduce misallocation of respiratory services, assess patient respiratory status, identify problems and needs, evaluate the effect of the home setting, educate the patient on proper equipment use, monitor patient response to and complications of therapy, monitor equipment functioning, monitor for appropriate infection control procedures, make recommendations for changes to therapy regimen, and adjust therapy under the direction of the physician. Teamwork benefits all parties and offers cost and time savings, improved data collection and communication, higher job satisfaction, and better patient monitoring, education, and quality of life. Respiratory therapists are positioned to optimize treatment efficacy, maximize patient compliance, and minimize hospitalizations among patients receiving respiratory home care.

  19. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Oliveira, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel de; Freitas, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; Almeida, Andréa Adriana de

    Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were divided into two groups: intervention-group, who performed out-patient physiotherapy twice a week, from thirty to sixty days after surgery; and the control-group, who only followed home instructions. Both groups were evaluated before surgery and sixty days after surgery through manovacuometry, six-minute walk test and the Borg Scale of perceived exertion. Twenty participants were included the intervention-group and twenty-three in the control-group. Both groups had significant and similar weight loss after surgery. The manovacuometry presented no differences comparing pre- and post-surgery and in the comparison between the groups. The result of the six-minute walk test for the intervention-group increased by 10.1% in the post-operative period in relation to pre-. The Borg scale of perceived exertion in the intervention-group in pre-surgery decreased by 13.5% in the post-surgery compared to pre-surgery. In the control-group there was no difference comparing pre- and post-operative values, as in the comparison with the intervention-group. The low-intensity exercise program, carried out between the 30th and the 60th day after bariatric surgery provided better functional capacity; did not change respiratory muscle strength; and improved the perceived exertion rate. A fisioterapia respiratória tem papel importante na prevenção das complicações da cirurgia bariátrica. Avaliar os efeitos da fisioterapia ambulatorial no pós-operatório através das pressões respiratórias e da capacidade funcional dos indiv

  20. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    Parrott, J.R.; Nicol, R.G.

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of these personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. Training methods are described that have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. Emphasis is placed on training programs for technicians for the 233 U Processing Facility since essentially all aspects of radiochemical operations are encountered in this facility. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. (U.S.)

  1. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  2. Coordinating technician allocation and maintenance routing for offshore wind farms

    Schrotenboer, Albert H.; uit het Broek, Michiel A. J.; Jargalsaikhan, Bolor; Roodbergen, Kees Jan

    2018-01-01

    A maintenance activity at offshore wind farms requires a combination of technicians with different skills. At an operational level, it is important to fully utilize and coordinate technicians in order to increase efficiency of the short-term maintenance planning. In this paper, we investigate

  3. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  4. Respiratory mechanics

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  5. [Role of the technician in a brachytherapy department].

    Bélot-Cheval, V; Lemoine, L; Cuisinier, C; Gensse, M-C; Lasbareilles, O

    2013-04-01

    The role of the technician in a brachytherapy department is essential for the cohesion of the treatment team made up of the radiation oncologist, the physicist, and the technician. He/she collaborates in the different treatment steps such as taking care of the patients, training of the professionals and research studies in collaboration with the team. He participates in all steps of the treatment such as preparation, technician's consultation, catheters/templates and radioactives sources implant, dose distribution analysis and treatment. He looks after the management of planning, radioactive sources and chemist's equipments. He takes part in the training of the junior technician, and support doctors and physicists in different studies. The procedure writing and the presentation of professional practices are also part of the technician task. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Advancing the role of the pharmacy technician: A systematic review.

    Mattingly, Ashlee N; Mattingly, T Joseph

    To summarize the findings of a literature search on advancing the role of pharmacy technicians, including the types of training identified and the potential costs and benefits to both the technician and the pharmacy. A literature search of Scopus, Embase, and Medline was conducted on January 11, 2017. Original research, research reports, case studies, or association reports were included for review. Articles were considered to be relevant based on identification of an advanced pharmacy technician role or addressing additional training/education for technician functions. A standard data extraction form was used to collect study authors, article title, year published, journal title, study design, brief description of methods, primary outcome measures, advanced technician roles identified, additional education or training addressed, and additional costs and benefits identified in each article. A total of 33 articles were included for full review and data extraction. Study design varied, with 17 (52%) quantitative, 1 (3%) qualitative, 5 (15%) mixed-method, and 10 (30%) case study designs. Seventeen (52%) of the studies included were published after 2006. The mechanism of training was primarily through supervised on-the-job training, allowing technicians to assume administrative-based positions that facilitated a pharmacist-led clinical service, with either the pharmacist or the pharmacy receiving the greatest benefits. Although the literature supports technicians performing advanced roles in the pharmacy, resulting in either improved patient outcomes or opportunities for pharmacists to engage in additional clinical services, the benefits to the technician were primarily indirect, such as an increase in job satisfaction or a more desirable work schedule. If a technician is to take on additional roles that require completion of a formalized training or educational program, benefits that are more tangible may help to inspire technicians to pursue these roles. Copyright

  7. Improving job satisfaction and enlarging the role of technicians.

    Spooner, S H; Britton, M E; Erskine, L M; Verschoor, B A; Williams, P A

    1991-01-01

    The process used in preparing this administrative report provided the means of documenting departmental support of technician task expansion, cost benefits, increased availability of professional time, and the need for a dynamic department. Some of the benefits to St. Luke's Regional Medical Center and its Pharmacy Department were an increase in technician job satisfaction, improved quality of patient care attributable to the increased scope of pharmacy service, and up to 8554 hours per year of professional time available for more clinically oriented responsibilities. If technician turnover were decreased by half, technician pricing errors eliminated, and technicians assumed the identified technical tasks, potential monetary benefits could be as much as +116,900 per year. The departmental cost of implementing these recommendations would be an additional 4.16 technician FTEs, and the professional time for training, supervising, and coordinating technicians and functions. These recommendations were well received by pharmacy administration, and the committee was asked to develop a list of priorities and an implementation plan for administrative approval.

  8. Respiratory problems in foals.

    Beech, J

    1985-04-01

    Despite major advances in our knowledge and ability to treat respiratory diseases in neonatal foals, neonatal respiratory medicine is still in its infancy. It is hoped that this article may serve as a guideline for diagnosis and treatment. Specific antibiotic regimens and emergency procedures are covered in other articles in this symposium. Because management factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, education of clients as to their importance would help both prophylactically and therapeutically. The necessity of very careful monitoring of neonates, which is critical to early detection of disease, should be stressed. As respiratory diseases can be fulminant and rapidly fatal, it is imperative not to delay diagnosis and therapy. Thorough examination and implementation of appropriate diagnostic techniques, as well as prompt early referral to a more sophisticated facility when indicated, would prevent many deaths. Although sophisticated support systems are vital for survival of some of these foals, good basic intensive nursing care combined with selection of appropriate drug therapy very early in the course of the disease is all that many foals require and can significantly improve survival rates.

  9. Enactment of mandatory pharmacy technician certification in Kansas.

    Lucas, Amber; Massey, Lindsay; Gill, Taylor; Burger, Gregory; Little, Jeff D

    2016-02-01

    The successful enactment of mandatory pharmacy technician certification in Kansas is described. In 2004, Kansas began requiring registration of all pharmacy technicians with the state board of pharmacy. Registration identified individuals working as pharmacy technicians but did not require any specific education or certification. In September 2012, the Kansas Board of Pharmacy created a task force of key stakeholders including pharmacists from multiple areas of practice, the University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, organizational leaders from the Kansas Council of Health-System Pharmacists (KCHP) and Kansas Pharmacists Association, and professional lobbyists. The goals of this task force were to research practices of technician certification in other states and to make recommendations to the state board of pharmacy on how Kansas could accomplish mandatory technician certification. The task force outlined the steps needed to achieve legislation that could be supported by the members. These topics included the creation of a technician trainee category, grandfathering certain technicians who had been practicing for a designated period of time, state board-approved exemptions, training requirements, age and education requirements, continuing-education requirements, and pharmacist:technician ratio. The recommendations were finalized at the August 2013 Kansas Pharmacy Summit, and the proposed legislation was introduced and passed during the 2014 legislative session. KCHP members learned many valuable lessons about advocacy and the legislative process with this initiative, including building relationships, working with legislators, and working with other professional organizations. The formation of a task force led to the successful passage of a bill granting the Kansas Board of Pharmacy the authority to issue regulations regarding mandatory pharmacy technician certification. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of respiratory motion on variable relative biological effectiveness in 4D-dose distributions of proton therapy.

    Ulrich, Silke; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Cao, Wenhua; Mohan, Radhe; Bangert, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Organ motion during radiation therapy with scanned protons leads to deviations between the planned and the delivered physical dose. Using a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 linearly maps these deviations into RBE-weighted dose. However, a constant value cannot account for potential nonlinear variations in RBE suggested by variable RBE models. Here, we study the impact of motion on recalculations of RBE-weighted dose distributions using a phenomenological variable RBE model. 4D-dose calculation including variable RBE was implemented in the open source treatment planning toolkit matRad. Four scenarios were compared for one field and two field proton treatments for a liver cancer patient assuming (α∕β) x  = 2 Gy and (α∕β) x  = 10 Gy: (A) the optimized static dose distribution with constant RBE, (B) a static recalculation with variable RBE, (C) a 4D-dose recalculation with constant RBE and (D) a 4D-dose recalculation with variable RBE. For (B) and (D), the variable RBE was calculated by the model proposed by McNamara. For (C), the physical dose was accumulated with direct dose mapping; for (D), dose-weighted radio-sensitivity parameters of the linear quadratic model were accumulated to model synergistic irradiation effects on RBE. Dose recalculation with variable RBE led to an elevated biological dose at the end of the proton field, while 4D-dose recalculation exhibited random deviations everywhere in the radiation field depending on the interplay of beam delivery and organ motion. For a single beam treatment assuming (α∕β) x  = 2 Gy, D 95 % was 1.98 Gy (RBE) (A), 2.15 Gy (RBE) (B), 1.81 Gy (RBE) (C) and 1.98 Gy (RBE) (D). The homogeneity index was 1.04 (A), 1.08 (B), 1.23 (C) and 1.25 (D). For the studied liver case, intrafractional motion did not reduce the modulation of the RBE-weighted dose postulated by variable RBE models for proton treatments.

  11. Flow Cytometry Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Flow Cytometry Core (Flow Core) of the Cancer and Inflammation Program (CIP) is a service core which supports the research efforts of the CCR by providing expertise in the field of flow cytometry (using analyzers and sorters) with the goal of gaining a more thorough understanding of the biology of cancer and cancer cells. The Flow Core provides service to 12-15 CIP laboratories and more than 22 non-CIP laboratories. Flow core staff provide technical advice on the experimental design of applications, which include immunological phenotyping, cell function assays, and cell cycle analysis. Work is performed per customer requirements, and no independent research is involved. The Flow Cytometry Technician will be responsible for: Monitor performance of and maintain high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Operate high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Monitoring lab supply levels and order lab supplies, perform various record keeping responsibilities Assist in the training of scientific end users on the use of flow cytometry in their research, as well as how to operate and troubleshoot the bench-top analyzer instruments Experience with sterile technique and tissue culture

  12. Internet treatment for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Robinson, Emma; Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; McIntyre, Karen; Schwencke, Genevieve; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-03

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been shown to be effective when guided by a clinician. The present study sought to replicate this finding, and determine whether support from a technician is as effective as guidance from a clinician. Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program and 150 participants with GAD were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for GAD comprising six online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 10 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Item (GAD-7). Completion rates were high, and both treatment groups reduced scores on the PSWQ (ptechnician-assisted groups, respectively, and on the GAD-7 were 1.55 and 1.73, respectively. At 3 month follow-up participants in both treatment groups had sustained the gains made at post-treatment. Participants in the clinician-assisted group had made further gains on the PSWQ. Approximately 81 minutes of clinician time and 75 minutes of technician time were required per participant during the 10 week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment/control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for GAD. This form of treatment has potential to increase the

  13. Acute Responses to Diuretic Therapy in Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns: Results from the Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program Cohort Study.

    Blaisdell, Carol J; Troendle, James; Zajicek, Anne

    2018-06-01

    To determine if daily respiratory status improved more in extremely low gestational age (GA) premature infants after diuretic exposure compared with those not exposed in modern neonatal intensive care units. The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) was a multicenter observational cohort study of 835 extremely premature infants, GAs of 23 0/7 -28 6/7 weeks, enrolled in the first week of life from 13 US tertiary neonatal intensive care units. We analyzed the PROP study daily medication and respiratory support records of infants ≤34 weeks postmenstrual age. We determined whether there was a temporal association between the administration of diuretics and an acute change in respiratory status in premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit, using an ordered categorical ranking of respiratory status. Infants in the diuretic exposed group of PROP were of lower mean GA and lower mean birth weight (P respiratory status before receiving diuretics) that the exposed infants were on a higher level of respiratory support was significantly greater (OR, >1) for each day after the initial day of diuretic exposure. Our analysis did not support the ability of diuretics to substantially improve the extremely premature infant's respiratory status. Further study of both safety and efficacy of diuretics in this setting are warranted. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01435187. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. DOD Recovery personnel and NASA technicians inspect Friendship 7 spacecraft

    1964-01-01

    Department of Defense Recovery personnel and spacecraft technicians from NASA adn McDonnell Aircraft Corp., inspect Astronaut John Glenn's Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, following its return to Cape Canaveral after recovery in the Atlantic Ocean.

  15. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4

  16. 24 CFR 291.530 - Eligible firefighter/emergency medical technicians.

    2010-04-01

    ... medical technicians. 291.530 Section 291.530 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... medical technicians. A person qualifies as a firefighter/emergency medical technician for the purposes of... technician by a fire department or emergency medical services responder unit of the federal government, a...

  17. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  18. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  19. Chemistry technician performance evaluation program Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station

    Shawver, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Arizona Nuclear Power Project (ANPP), a three-reactor site located 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona, has developed and implemented a program for evaluating individual chemistry technician analytical performance on a routine basis. About 45 chemistry technicians are employed at the site, 15 at each operating unit. The technicians routinely perform trace level analyses for impurities of concern to PWRs. Each month a set of blind samples is provided by an outside vendor. The blind samples contain 16 parameters which are matrixed to approximate the PWR's primary and secondary cycles. Nine technicians receive the samples, three from each operating unit, and perform the required analyses. Acceptance criteria for successful performance on the blind parameters is based on the values found in the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Document 83-016, Revision 2, August 1989, Chemistry Quality Control Program. The goal of the program is to have each technician demonstrate acceptable performance on each of 16 analytical parameters. On completion of each monthly set, a summary report of all of the analytical results for the sample set is prepared. From the summary report, analytical bias can be detected, technician performance is documented, and overall laboratory performance can be evaluated. The program has been very successful at satisfying the INPO requirement that the analytical performance of each individual technician should be checked on at least a six-month frequency for all important parameters measured. This paper describes the program as implemented at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and provides a summary report and trend and bias graphs for illustrative purposes

  20. Respiratory Home Health Care

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  1. Advancing technician practice: Deliberations of a regulatory board.

    Adams, Alex J

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, the Idaho State Board of Pharmacy (U.S.) undertook a major rulemaking initiative to advance pharmacy practice by broadening the ability of pharmacists to delegate tasks to pharmacy technicians. The new rules of the Board thus moved the locus of control in technician scope of practice from law to pharmacist delegation. Pharmacist delegation is individualistic and takes into account the individual technician's capabilities, the pharmacist's comfort level, facility policies, and the risk mitigation strategies present at the facility, among other factors. State law limits, by contrast, are rigid and can mean that pharmacists are unable to delegate tasks that are or could otherwise be within the abilities of their technicians. The expanded technician duties are in two domains: 1) medication dispensing support (e.g., tech-check-tech, accepting verbal prescriptions, transferring prescriptions, and performing remote data entry); and 2) technical support for pharmacist clinical services (e.g., administering immunizations). This commentary reviews the evidence behind these expanded duties, as well as the key regulatory decision points for each task. The Board's rules and approach may prove useful to other states and even other governing bodies outside the U.S. as they consider similar issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hematological findings in male x-ray technicians

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    In view of the known health hazards of x-ray radiation, this study focuses on the basic hematological parameters: red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs) and platelets count in x-ray technicians. The aim was to identify the affect of x-ray radiation on blood cell counts in x-ray technicians. The present study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the year 2002. In this study, a group of 40 apparently healthy male x-ray technicians with age ranging from 25-50-years were recruited. They were matched with another group of 40 apparently healthy control subjects in terms of age, sex and ethnic origin. Both groups met with exclusion criteria as per standard. Red blood cells, WBC and platelets count were performed by using a blood cell auto analyser. The mean value of platelet count was significantly decreased (p<0.01) in x-ray technicians when compared to controls. However, no significant difference was observed in RBC and WBC count between the groups. Radiation causes decreased platelet count. Further, studies are needed to study the long-term effects of x-ray radiation on blood cell count in x-ray technicians. (author)

  3. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...... and therapy of HDM respiratory allergy in practice....

  4. Epidemiology of aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    Kitabatake, Takashi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Akira; Nakamura, Minoru.

    1976-01-01

    Among Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been recorded. Based on this fact, some epidemiological considerations are tried. During the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. On the other hand, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been frequently induced among Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (auth.)

  5. Intraoperative monitoring technician: a new member of the surgical team.

    Brown, Molly S; Brown, Debra S

    2011-02-01

    As surgery needs have increased, the traditional surgical team has expanded to include personnel from radiology and perfusion services. A new surgical team member, the intraoperative monitoring technician, is needed to perform intraoperative monitoring during procedures that carry a higher risk of central and peripheral nerve injury. Including the intraoperative monitoring technician on the surgical team can create challenges, including surgical delays and anesthesia care considerations. When the surgical team members, including the surgeon, anesthesia care provider, and circulating nurse, understand and facilitate this new staff member's responsibilities, the technician is able to perform monitoring functions that promote the smooth flow of the surgical procedure and positive patient outcomes. Copyright © 2011 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 4, Facility practical training attachment

    1992-10-01

    At DOE sites with more than one facility, and where RCT tasks at each facility may differ, site and facility tasks should be separated. The tasks that are common to all the facilities on the site should be included in Phase II training with the core tasks. Tasks unique to a facility should be added to the training program qualification standard, as an attachment, as Phase IV training. Not all the DOE sites will include Phase IV training in their programs. Phase IV training allows each site to qualify technicians to a select facility. Since the core training for the technicians is standardized, the transfer of technicians between facilities requires that only facility tasks be taught, provided the core qualification is current

  7. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  8. How best to capture the respiratory consequences of prematurity?

    Ciuffini, Francesca; Robertson, Colin F; Tingay, David G

    2018-03-31

    Chronic respiratory morbidity is a common complication of premature birth, generally defined by the presence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, both clinically and in trials of respiratory therapies. However, recent data have highlighted that bronchopulmonary dysplasia does not correlate with chronic respiratory morbidity in older children born preterm. Longitudinally evaluating pulmonary morbidity from early life through to childhood provides a more rational method of defining the continuum of chronic respiratory morbidity of prematurity, and offers new insights into the efficacy of neonatal respiratory interventions. The changing nature of preterm lung disease suggests that a multimodal approach using dynamic lung function assessment will be needed to assess the efficacy of a neonatal respiratory therapy and predict the long-term respiratory consequences of premature birth. Our aim is to review the literature regarding the long-term respiratory outcomes of neonatal respiratory strategies, the difficulties of assessing dynamic lung function in infants, and potential new solutions. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  9. Rapid methods for jugular bleeding of dogs requiring one technician.

    Frisk, C S; Richardson, M R

    1979-06-01

    Two methods were used to collect blood from the jugular vein of dogs. In both techniques, only one technician was required. A rope with a slip knot was placed around the base of the neck to assist in restraint and act as a tourniquet for the vein. The technician used one hand to restrain the dog by the muzzle and position the head. The other hand was used for collecting the sample. One of the methods could be accomplished with the dog in its cage. The bleeding techniques were rapid, requiring approximately 1 minute per dog.

  10. Hydraulics and pneumatics a technician's and engineer's guide

    Parr, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all industrial processes require objects to be moved, manipulated or subjected to some sort of force. Such movements and manipulations are frequently accomplished by means of devices driven by liquids (hydraulics) or air (pneumatics), the subject of this book. Hydraulics and Pneumatics is written by a practicing process control engineer as a guide to the successful operation of hydraulic and pneumatic systems for all engineers and technicians working with them. Keeping mathematics and theory to a minimum, this practical guide is thorough but accessible to technicians without a

  11. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  12. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 05: A novel respiratory motion simulation program for VMAT treatment plans: a phantom validation study

    Hubley, Emily; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a computational method to simulate craniocaudal respiratory motion in a VMAT treatment plan. Methods: Three 4DCTs of the QUASAR respiratory motion phantom were acquired with a 2cm water-density spherical tumour embedded in cedar to simulate lung. The phantom was oscillating sinusoidally with an amplitude of 2cm and periods of 3, 4, and 5 seconds. An ITV was contoured and 5mm PTV margin was added. High and a low modulation factor VMAT plans were created for each scan. An in-house program was developed to simulate respiratory motion in the treatment plans by shifting the MLC leaf positions relative to the phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom and the dose was measured using Gafchromic film. The measured and calculated plans were compared using an absolute dose gamma analysis (3%/3mm). Results: The average gamma pass rate for the low modulation plan and high modulation plans were 91.1% and 51.4% respectively. The difference between the high and low modulation plans gamma pass rates is likely related to the different sampling frequency of the respiratory curve and the higher MLC leaf speeds in the high modulation plan. A high modulation plan has a slower gantry speed and therefore samples the breathing cycle at a coarser frequency leading to inaccuracies between the measured and planned doses. Conclusion: A simple program, including a novel method for increasing sampling frequency beyond the control point frequency, has been developed to simulate respiratory motion in VMAT plans by shifting the MLC leaf positions.

  13. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 05: A novel respiratory motion simulation program for VMAT treatment plans: a phantom validation study

    Hubley, Emily; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a computational method to simulate craniocaudal respiratory motion in a VMAT treatment plan. Methods: Three 4DCTs of the QUASAR respiratory motion phantom were acquired with a 2cm water-density spherical tumour embedded in cedar to simulate lung. The phantom was oscillating sinusoidally with an amplitude of 2cm and periods of 3, 4, and 5 seconds. An ITV was contoured and 5mm PTV margin was added. High and a low modulation factor VMAT plans were created for each scan. An in-house program was developed to simulate respiratory motion in the treatment plans by shifting the MLC leaf positions relative to the phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom and the dose was measured using Gafchromic film. The measured and calculated plans were compared using an absolute dose gamma analysis (3%/3mm). Results: The average gamma pass rate for the low modulation plan and high modulation plans were 91.1% and 51.4% respectively. The difference between the high and low modulation plans gamma pass rates is likely related to the different sampling frequency of the respiratory curve and the higher MLC leaf speeds in the high modulation plan. A high modulation plan has a slower gantry speed and therefore samples the breathing cycle at a coarser frequency leading to inaccuracies between the measured and planned doses. Conclusion: A simple program, including a novel method for increasing sampling frequency beyond the control point frequency, has been developed to simulate respiratory motion in VMAT plans by shifting the MLC leaf positions.

  14. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  15. 40 CFR 82.40 - Technician training and certification.

    2010-07-01

    ... speaking technicians by providing tests in other languages or allowing the use of a translator when taking the test. If a translator is used, the certificate received must indicate that translator assistance.... Each program must provide adequate training, through one or more of the following means: on-the-job...

  16. Technician Training for the Semiconductor Microdevices Industry. Final Report.

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    The Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) carried out four activities to foster semiconductor manufacturing technician (SMT) training: (1) collaboration with industry experts and educators while developing a curriculum to train SMTs; (2) implementation and testing of the curriculum at a technical college; (3) dissemination of…

  17. The Technician beneath Our Wings, or Is That Blades?

    Colony, Lee; Foster, John

    2011-01-01

    Today's trained technicians in alternative energy fields are finding even more career opportunities open to them as the United States and the world turn to green technology to power their homes and businesses. Wisconsin's Gateway Technical College is training workers for green collar careers in geoexchange heating and cooling systems, wind power…

  18. [EEG technician-nurse collaboration during stereo-electroencephalography].

    Jomard, Caroline; Benghezal, Mouna; Cheramy, Isabelle; De Beaumont, Ségolène

    2017-01-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy has significant repercussions on the daily life of children. Surgery may represent a hope. The nurse and the electroencephalogram technician carry out important teamwork during pre-surgical assessment tests and notably the stereo-electroencephalography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Scheduling technicians and tasks in a telecommunications company

    Cordeau, J. F.; Laporte, G.; Pasin, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a construction heuristic and an adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for the technician and task scheduling problem arising in a large telecommunications company. This problem was solved within the framework of the 2007 challenge set up by the French Operational Research...

  20. An Integration of Math with Auto Technician Courses

    Valenzuela, Hector

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development of the contextualized math, the course design, student teaching and daily interaction with the students, and the implementation aspects of the research project designed to develop contextualized mathematics and integrate it into the Auto Technician courses. The applied math curriculum was integrated into…

  1. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  2. Are further education opportunities for emergency care technicians ...

    Background. A recent review of emergency care education and training in South Africa resulted in the creation of a new 2-year, 240-credit National Qualifications Framework (NQF) level 6 Emergency Care Technician (ECT) qualification. The National Department of Health (NDoH) view ECTs as 'mid-level workers' in the ...

  3. Technicians dismantle the inner section of L3

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    The technicians are dismantling the forward tracking chamber located at the heart of the L3 detector. This formed part of the hadronic calorimeter, which is used for measuring particle energies. L3 was an experiment at the LEP collider that ran from 1989 to 2000.

  4. Two technicians apply insulation to S-II second stage

    1964-01-01

    Two technicians apply insulation to the outer surface of the S-II second stage booster for the Saturn V moon rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  5. Communication Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 2209

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The graduate of the Communication Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) supervise, train and coach apprentices; (2) use a thorough knowledge of electrical and electronic theory and its application to communication and associated equipment used in the telecommunication industry; (3) understand…

  6. Fulbright project focuses on rehabilitation technician education and ...

    Rehabilitation technician education and physiotherapy practice 272. Fulbright project focuses on ... particularly those qualified to mentor and teach entry-level learners, there are ... to reinforce classroom didactic knowledge as ongoing learning .... utilization of limited resources, and development of linkages with professional ...

  7. Science and engineering technicians in the United States: characteristics of a redefined population, 1972

    Finn, M.G.

    1978-02-01

    The 1972 redefined population was distributed among 10 technician fields. Approximately 75% of the total were concentrated in four relatively large fields: computer programmers; draftsmen; electrical and electronic technicians; and technicians, other fields. Women accounted for 11% of all technicians. The average age of technicians in 1972 was 37. Whites comprised 94.8% of all technicians, while 3.0% were black. More technicians resided in the middle Atlantic region than in any other region. As a percentage of the civilian labor force, however, technicians were most heavily concentrated in the New England and mountain regions. The educational level of technicians was quite diverse: about one-third had no postsecondary education, about one-sixth had at least a bachelor's degree. About one-half fell somewhere between these extremes. Approximately 68% of all technicians reported some form of supplemental training outside formal educational institutions. This training was quite diverse. In 1972, unemployed technicians totaled 3.2% of the technician labor force. Fourteen percent of technicians reported employment outside their field, and 11% reported employment outside the 10 technician fields that constituted the focus of this report. The median annual earnings of technicians employed full-time in 1971 was approximately $10,400. Private companies employed 71% of the technicians; federal and state governments employed 12.4% and 7.4%, respectively. Most other technicians were employed by local government or nonprofit organizations. Implications for policy and planning are drawn. The statistics presented here indicate that the most commonly used assumptions about education--occupation linkages are grossly oversimplified. 5 figures, 44 tables

  8. A new standard for multidisciplinary health and safety technicians

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Fry, L.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of California, CA (United States); Egbert, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Allied Signal Technical Corporation (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Over the last two decades, a significant trend in health and safety has been toward greater specialization. However, compartmentalization of health and safety disciplines often leads to an inequity in resources, especially when appropriations overemphasize one risk to the detriment of others. For example, overemphasis on radiological safety can create an imbalance in overall worker protection. A multidisciplinary technical can help restore the balance and provide for a healthier and safer work environment. The key advantages of a multidisciplinary health and safety technician include: Broad coverage of the work area by one technician, More diverse use of the technician pool, Better coverage for off-shift or nonstandard hours, Balance of risks because all hazards are considered, Integrated emergency response, Ownership, Less time of identify the correct person with the requisite skills. We have developed a new standard that establishes the training and related qualifications for a multidisciplinary health and safety technician. The areas of training and qualification that are addressed include elements of industrial hygiene, industrial safety, fire protection, electrical safety, construction safety, and radiation safety. The initial core training program ensures that individuals are trained to the performance of requirements of the job. Initial training is in five areas: Fundamentals, Hazard recognition, Hazard assessment, Hazards controls, Hazards minimization. Core training is followed by formal qualification on specific tasks, including ventilation surveys, air monitoring, noise assessments, radiological monitoring, area inspections, work-area setups, and work coverage. The new standard addresses not only training topics and requirements, but also guidance to ensure that performance objectives are met. The standard applies to technicians, supervisors, technologists, and six specialty areas, including academic institutions and decontamination and decommissioning

  9. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  10. Experience with a pharmacy technician medication history program.

    Cooper, Julie B; Lilliston, Michelle; Brooks, DeAnne; Swords, Bruce

    2014-09-15

    The implementation and outcomes of a pharmacy technician medication history program are described. An interprofessional medication reconciliation team, led by a clinical pharmacist and a clinical nurse specialist, was charged with implementing a new electronic medication reconciliation system to improve compliance with medication reconciliation at discharge and capture compliance-linked reimbursement. The team recommended that the pharmacy department be allocated new pharmacy technician full-time-equivalent positions to assume ownership of the medication history process. Concurrent with the implementation of this program, a medication history standard was developed to define rules for documentation of what a patient reports he or she is actually taking. The standard requires a structured interview with the patient or caregiver and validation with outside sources as indicated to determine which medications to document in the medication history. The standard is based on four medication administration category rules: scheduled, as-needed, short-term, and discontinued medications. The medication history standard forms the core of the medication history technician training and accountability program. Pharmacy technicians are supervised by pharmacists, using a defined accountability plan based on a set of medical staff approved rules for what medications comprise a best possible medication history. Medication history accuracy and completeness rates have been consistently over 90% and rates of provider compliance with medication reconciliation rose from under 20% to 100% since program implementation. A defined medication history based on a medication history standard served as an effective foundation for a pharmacy technician medication history program, which helped improve provider compliance with discharge medication reconciliation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A new standard for multidisciplinary health and safety technicians

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Fry, L.A.; Egbert, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last two decades, a significant trend in health and safety has been toward greater specialization. However, compartmentalization of health and safety disciplines often leads to an inequity in resources, especially when appropriations overemphasize one risk to the detriment of others. For example, overemphasis on radiological safety can create an imbalance in overall worker protection. A multidisciplinary technical can help restore the balance and provide for a healthier and safer work environment. The key advantages of a multidisciplinary health and safety technician include: Broad coverage of the work area by one technician, More diverse use of the technician pool, Better coverage for off-shift or nonstandard hours, Balance of risks because all hazards are considered, Integrated emergency response, Ownership, Less time of identify the correct person with the requisite skills. We have developed a new standard that establishes the training and related qualifications for a multidisciplinary health and safety technician. The areas of training and qualification that are addressed include elements of industrial hygiene, industrial safety, fire protection, electrical safety, construction safety, and radiation safety. The initial core training program ensures that individuals are trained to the performance of requirements of the job. Initial training is in five areas: Fundamentals, Hazard recognition, Hazard assessment, Hazards controls, Hazards minimization. Core training is followed by formal qualification on specific tasks, including ventilation surveys, air monitoring, noise assessments, radiological monitoring, area inspections, work-area setups, and work coverage. The new standard addresses not only training topics and requirements, but also guidance to ensure that performance objectives are met. The standard applies to technicians, supervisors, technologists, and six specialty areas, including academic institutions and decontamination and decommissioning

  12. Training nuclear technicians in two-year, post-secondary educational programs

    Hull, D.M.; Roney, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    An available and economical supply to future manpower requirements for various types of nuclear technicians can be met by developing and/or restructuring two-year, post-secondary programs at local educational institutions. The Technical Education Research Centers program is under contract from the U.S. Office of Education to delineate the job requirements and develop curricula and instructional materials for two-year, post-secondary training of nuclear technicians. Six job categories have been identified along with corresponding tasks which the technician performs. These categories are: Reactor Operator, Nuclear Instrumentation Technician, Nuclear QA/QC Technician, Radiochemistry Technician, Radiation Protection Technician and Nuclear Medicine Technician. For the first five categories curricula have been established, courses have been described, and instructional materials are being written

  13. Postoperative chest physical therapy prevents respiratory complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy Fisioterapia respiratória pós-operatória previne complicações respiratórias em pacientes submetidos à esofagectomia

    Adriana C. Lunardi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Esophagectomy presents the highest rate of postoperative pulmonary complications among all types of upper abdominal surgery. The benefits of chest physical therapy in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery have been shown by many studies; however, its specific effect in patients receiving esophagectomy has been seldom investigated. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to compare the frequency of respiratory complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy receiving chest physical therapy compared to no treatment. METHODS: 70 consecutive patients were evaluated retrospectively and allocated to two groups: control group (CG=no physical therapy; n=30 and chest physical therapy group (PTG; n=40. Patients received chest physical therapy which includes lung re-expansion and airway clearance maneuvers. They were not submitted to either noninvasive ventilation or exercises with devices that generate airways positive pressure. All patients were instructed to early mobilization. Information about pre-operative and respiratory complications were collected. Statistic analysis to compare the frequency of respiratory complications was performed by the Z test. The significance level was set to 5%. RESULTS: Patients in the CG and PTG were similar in terms of age, BMI, smoking and drinking status, malignant diseases, surgical and anesthesia duration and types of esophagectomy (p>0.05. Our results show that patients received chest physical therapy after esophagectomy had a lower frequency of respiratory complications (15% vs. 37%, pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A esofagectomia apresenta a maior taxa de complicações pulmonares pós-operatórias dentre as cirurgias abdominais altas. Os benefícios da fisioterapia respiratória em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia abdominal alta convencional têm sido mostrados na literatura, porém esse efeito na esofagectomia tem sido pouco investigado. OBJETIVOS: Comparar a frequência de complicações respiratórias em dois

  14. Association between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Type of Infectious Respiratory Disease and All-Cause In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with HIV/AIDS: A Case Series.

    Renata Báez-Saldaña

    Full Text Available Respiratory manifestations of HIV disease differ globally due to differences in current availability of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART programs and epidemiology of infectious diseases.To describe the association between HAART and discharge diagnosis and all-cause in-hospital mortality among hospitalized patients with infectious respiratory disease and HIV/AIDS.We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients hospitalized at a specialty hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City between January 1st, 2010 and December 31st, 2011. We included patients whose discharge diagnosis included HIV or AIDS and at least one infectious respiratory diagnosis. The information source was the clinical chart. We analyzed the association between HAART for 180 days or more and type of respiratory disease using polytomous logistic regression and all-cause hospital mortality by multiple logistic regressions.We studied 308 patients, of whom 206 (66.9% had been diagnosed with HIV infection before admission to the hospital. The CD4+ lymphocyte median count was 68 cells/mm3 [interquartile range (IQR: 30-150]. Seventy-five (24.4% cases had received HAART for more than 180 days. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP (n = 142, tuberculosis (n = 63, and bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (n = 60 were the most frequent discharge diagnoses. Receiving HAART for more than 180 days was associated with a lower probability of PJP [Adjusted odd ratio (aOR: 0.245, 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 0.08-0.8, p = 0.02], adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical covariates. HAART was independently associated with reduced odds (aOR 0.214, 95% CI 0.06-0.75 of all-cause in-hospital mortality, adjusting for HIV diagnosis previous to hospitalization, age, access to social security, low socioeconomic level, CD4 cell count, viral load, and discharge diagnoses.HAART for 180 days or more was associated with 79% decrease in all-cause in-hospital mortality and lower

  15. Lungs and Respiratory System

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth / For Parents / Lungs and Respiratory System ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't ...

  16. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  17. 5 CFR 831.306 - Service as a National Guard technician before January 1, 1969.

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service as a National Guard technician... National Guard technician before January 1, 1969. (a) Definitions. In this section—(1) Service as a National Guard technician is service performed under section 709 of title 32, United States Code (or under...

  18. Subtipo respiratório versus não respiratório no transtorno de pânico com agorafobia: avaliação com terapia cognitivo-comportamental Respiratory versus non respiratory subtypes of panic disorder with agoraphobia: cognitive behavioral therapy assessment

    Anna Lucia Spear King

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a resposta dos pacientes com transtorno de pânico com agorafobia à modelo proposto de terapia cognitivo-comportamental (TCC nos dois subtipos respiratórios de transtorno de pânico: o subtipo respiratório (SR e subtipo não respiratório (SNR Amostra randomizada por sorteio com 50 pacientes diagnosticados segundo o Manual Diagnóstico e Estatístico dos Transtornos Mentais. A medicação: antidepressivos tricíclicos ou inibidores seletivos de recaptação da serotonina. Setenta e sete ponto seis porcento da amostra de pacientes de ambos os grupos apresentaram o SR e 22,4 % o SNR. Os pacientes do SR, responderam satisfatoriamente ao tratamento com técnicas da TCC, reduzindo ansiedade, sintomas respiratórios e os ataques de pânico. Os pacientes do SR melhoraram, segundo a escala de avaliação global do funcionamento, de 55,8 para 70,9 em comparação com o SNR.The objective of the present study was to verify the response of patients with panic disorder (agoraphobia to existing cognitive-behavior therapy models (CBT of two respiratory subtypes of panic disorder (PD: respiratory subtype (RS and non respiratory subtype (NRS. We randomly selected a sample of 50 patients diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The medication used was tricycle or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. Seventy-seven point six percent of the patients from both groups showed RS and 22.4% the NRS. The RS patients responded satisfactorily to the treatment with techniques of CBT decreasing anxiety, breathing symptoms and panic attacks. According to the global functioning assessment scale, RS patients improved from 55.8 to 70.9 in comparison with NRS ones.

  19. Technician checks the mirrors of the Starshine-2 experiment

    2001-01-01

    Technician checks the mirrors of the Starshine-2 experiment KSC-01PD-1715 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A technician checks the mirrors on the Starshine-2 experiment inside a canister in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The deployable experiment is being carried on mission STS-108. Starshine-2's 800 aluminum mirrors were polished by more than 25,000 students from 26 countries. Top priorities for the STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition Three and Expedition Four crews, bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and completion of robotics tasks and a spacewalk to install thermal blankets over two pieces of equipment at the bases of the Space Station's solar wings. Liftoff of Endeavour on mission STS-108 is scheduled for 7:41 p.m. EST.

  20. Compensation of Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics.

    Studnek, Jonathan R

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify factors associated with compensation for Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics and assess whether these associations have changed over the period 1999-2008. Data obtained from the Longitudinal EMT Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) surveys, a mail survey of a random, stratified sample of nationally certified EMT-Basics and Paramedics, were analyzed. For the 1999-2003 period, analyses included all respondents providing Emergency Medical Services (EMS). With the addition of a survey in 2004 about volunteers, it was possible to exclude volunteers from these analyses. Over 60% of EMT-Basics reported being either compensated or noncompensated volunteers in the 2004-2008 period. This was substantially and significantly greater than the proportion of EMT-Paramedic volunteers (Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s87-s95.

  1. Work group design in pharmacy: the pharmacist-technician team.

    Kershaw, B P; Solomon, D K; Zarowitz, B J

    1987-05-01

    The contemporary pharmacy practice manager faces the challenge of designing pharmacy service programs that not only satisfy the needs of the patient, but at the same time satisfy and motivate the pharmacists and technicians who sustain the programs. This research examined the team design, which has been recommended but not fully described in the literature. This application did not explore the full potential of the team design in the hospital pharmacy setting. More study is needed in this area to assess the impact of work group design on the expansion of clinical programs, employee turnover rates, quality and quantity of work produced, and, most important, the impact on job satisfaction enjoyed by pharmacists and technicians.

  2. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev receives assistance from suit technician

    1994-01-01

    Sergei Krikalev, alternative mission specialist for STS-63, gets help from Dawn Mays, a Boeing suit technician. The cosmonaut was about to participate in a training session at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Wearing the training version of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) space suit, weighted to allow neutral buoyancy in the 25 feet deep WETF pool, Krikalev minutes later was underwater simulating a contingency spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA).

  3. Digitizing the Facebow: A Clinician/Technician Communication Tool.

    Kalman, Les; Chrapka, Julia; Joseph, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the clinician and the technician has been an ongoing problem in dentistry. To improve the issue, a dental software application has been developed--the Virtual Facebow App. It is an alternative to the traditional analog facebow, used to orient the maxillary cast in mounting. Comparison data of the two methods indicated that the digitized virtual facebow provided increased efficiency in mounting, increased accuracy in occlusion, and lower cost. Occlusal accuracy, lab time, and total time were statistically significant (Ptechnician communication.

  4. Results of the 2015 National Certified Pharmacy Technician Workforce Survey.

    Desselle, Shane P; Holmes, Erin R

    2017-07-01

    The results of the 2015 National Certified Pharmacy Technician Workforce Survey are described. A survey was e-mailed to a randomized sample of 5,000 certified pharmacy technicians (CPhTs) throughout the United States, with response reminders employed. Survey items eliciting demographic and work characteristics and work life attitudes were generated from the literature and qualitative interviews. This study aimed to describe job satisfaction, sources of stress, profession and employer commitment, education and training, and reasons for entry into the profession among CPhTs and determine relationships between those variables and CPhTs' level of involvement in various work activities, with particular attention paid to differences in practice setting. Frequency statistics, correlation analysis, and means testing were used to meet study objectives and identify significant differences. A total of 516 CPhTs currently working as a pharmacy technician responded to the survey. The CPhTs reported high levels of involvement in more traditional activities but less involvement in those that involve greater cognitive load. Respondents reported moderate levels of job satisfaction and commitment and somewhat high levels of stress overall. Most CPhTs chose to be a pharmacy technician because they desired to enter a healthcare field and help people and were recruited. CPhTs derived benefit from all aspects of education and training evaluated and most from on-the-job training. Perceived value of education and training was associated with higher satisfaction and commitment and with lower stress. There were a number of differences in these work life attitudes across practice settings and by involvement in various job functions. The results of the survey indicated that job satisfaction and commitment were moderate and that stress levels were somewhat high among CPhTs. There were a number of differences in work life attitudes across practice settings and by involvement in various job

  5. Training needs analysis for engineering technicians in Oman

    Al-Mughairi, Abdulkarim Sultan

    This thesis examines the transition from the Omani Colleges of Technology (CT) to employment of its engineering graduates. It arises out of concerns that the transition to the labour market for engineering graduate is problematical. The research was carried out to identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) of engineering technicians required in the Omani market place. The aim is to provide local curriculum designers in the Colleges of Technology with sufficient information about the required KSA in order to create and enhance the engineering curriculum so that it has greater capacity to meet the needs of a variety of stakeholders and of employers in particular. This in turn has the potential to bridge the gap between what is presently taught and what the workplace demands. Personnel psychologists identify views concerning the skills that are required for different jobs. One of these is based on the assumption that quite different skills are required in different jobs (SCANS, 1990). This view generates approaches within job analysis: the worker-oriented and the task-oriented approaches. This research uses Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ), which is a worker-oriented job analysis instrument, to investigate the KSA required to perform some of the engineering technician jobs in Omani industries. In addition, semi-structured interviews were used to investigate the factors that either hinder or entirely prevent the new graduates from Colleges of Technology from being accepted in the workforce pool. The major research findings concern the dimensions of knowledge, skills, and abilities of six engineering technician job titles and the major factors that hinder or (prevent) the technical college graduates from being accepted in the market place in Oman. These findings would definitely help design better transition route and bridge the gap between the CT technicians engineering programmes and the workplace demands.

  6. Occupational contact dermatitis amongst dentists and dental technicians

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Ferček, Iva; Duvančić, Tomislav; Bulat, Vedrana; Ježovita, Josip; Novak-Bilić, Gaby; Šitum, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Since the working medical personnel including dentists and dental technicians mainly use their hands, it is understandable that the most common occupational disease amongst medical personnel is contact dermatitis (CD) (80%-90% of cases). Development of occupational CD is caused by contact of the skin with various substances in occupational environment. Occupational etiologic factors for dental personnel are foremost reactions to gloves containing latex, followed by various dental materials...

  7. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. STUDY DESIGN: This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA...... 2014 (follow-up). METHODS: Participants (n = 112) were allocated to receive either physical, cognitive, and mindfulness group-based training (PCMT group) or a reference group (REF) for 10 weeks at the worksite. PCMT consisted of 4 major elements: 1) resistance training individually tailored to the pain...... affected area, 2) motor control training, 3) mindfulness, and 4) cognitive and behavioral therapy/education. Participants of the REF group were encouraged to follow ongoing company health initiatives. The predefined primary outcome measure was pain intensity (VAS scale 0 - 10) in average of the regions...

  8. Qualitative risk analysis in the process of treatment in radiation oncology for the steps performed by the technician/technologist in intensity modulated radiotherapy (lMRT)

    Teixeira, Flavia C.S.; Faria, Alessandra L.; Pereira, Danielle P.S.; Silva, Fabiana M.I.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of radiation therapy is to eradicate the tumor while preserving the integrity of normal tissues. Technological advances have allowed to develop techniques capable of modulating doses delivered to the target volume, providing more effective treatments. However, the operational complexity of these techniques makes the benefits offered are directly proportional to the chances of occurrences of serious errors. The objective of this work is to analyze the steps performed by the technician/technologist in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), to detect possible errors in order to determine ways to mitigate them. After literature regarding errors in the radiation therapy, a prospective analysis was performed in the first half of 2012 in a radiation clinic located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in which 11 technicians/technologists contributed to the survey data analysis. The method of risk analysis Failure Mode and Effects Analysis was used for prospective analysis of accidents/incidents, with respect to a qualitative assessment . The method allowed mapping 16 steps performed by technicians/technologists in the treatments with IMRT, identifying possible failures and their causes allowing to find ways to avoid possible errors. This analysis helped to confirm that the qualification and continuing education of technicians/technologists, allied to implement quality assurance programs and a computerized management can make a tool capable of IMRT to achieve the greatest challenge of radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Investigating laparoscopic psychomotor skills in veterinarians and veterinary technicians.

    Kilkenny, Jessica; Santarossa, Amanda; Mrotz, Victoria; Walker, Meagan; Monaghan, Dominique; Singh, Ameet

    2017-04-01

    To determine the influence of age, year of graduation, and video game experience on baseline laparoscopic psychomotor skills. Cross-sectional. Licensed veterinarians (n = 38) and registered veterinary technicians (VTs) (n = 49). A laparoscopic box trainer was set up at the 2016 Ontario Veterinary Medical Association (OVMA) and the 2016 Ontario Association of Veterinary Technicians (OAVT) conferences held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants volunteered to perform a single repetition of a peg transfer (PT) exercise. Participants were given a short demonstration of the PT task prior to testing. A Spearman's rank correlation (r s ) was used to identify associations between baseline psychomotor skills and self-reported surgical and non-surgical experiences collected via survey. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare PT scores in veterinarians and VTs. A P-value of  .05). Veterinary technicians that frequently used chopsticks scored higher than those without chopstick experience (P = .04). Age and year of graduation correlated inversely, while self-reported VG experience correlated positively with laparoscopic psychomotor skills of veterinarians, when assessed on a simulator. The use of chopsticks may contribute to the acquisition of psychomotor skills in VTs. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. DEGREE OF AWARENESS OF SOFT RELINING MATERIALS BY DENTAL TECHNICIANS

    Ilian Hristov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current investigation is to analyze the dental-technicians’ awareness of the soft relining materials, their characteristics, advantages, shortcomings and methods for relining. Materials and methods: For the purpose of this investigation a standard questionnaire has been presented. A direct survey method, documentary and statistical method, as well as graphical methods, including tables, charts, graphics and figures, were used. Data were analysed with the help of IBM SPSS Statistics (ver. 19. Results: One hundred and eight dental technicians were included in the survey, evenly distributed by gender. Removable and fixed prosthodontics is the most commonly mentioned spheres of dental activities. Almost all included in the investigation point out the laboratory relining method as the most frequently used. Acrylic and silicone SRM are the most used groups of relining materials. Change of colour and hardness are the most frequently noticed shortcomings of these materials. The majority of the dental technicians declare that they have never done replacement of SRM or the relining has lasted more than a year. Discussion: The correlation between the age and the years of labour service among the participants is quite obvious. Most of them start working soon after their graduation. Removable prosthodontics is among the priorities for the majority of the labs. Conclusion: Although their unambiguous advantages, the soft relining materials have lots of shortcomings as well. The major problems are connected with their change of colour and hardness. Nevertheless, the dental technicians find them useful and reliable in overcoming specific prosthetic problems.

  11. Respiratory care management information systems.

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  12. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitamin D and respiratory disorder

    Mahnaz Hushmand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The active form of vitamin D is synthesized in some body organs following sun exposure and dietary intake. Vitamin D exhibits its major and critical effects not only through regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism but also by influencing on respiratory and immune system. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D below the optimum limit lead to vitamin D insufficiency or maybe deficiency. These inappropriate concentrations of vitamin D lead to different types of pulmonary diseases such as viral and bacterial respiratory infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. In this review we described the association between vitamin D deficiency and severe therapy resistant asthma. We also reviewed the underlying molecular mechanism of vitamin D deficiency in children with severe- therapy resistant asthma. Based on current information, future clinical trial are needed to study the role of vitamin D supplementation on different groups of patients with severe asthma including infants, children of school age, and ethnic minorities.

  14. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  17. Regulation on the training-schools and institutions for radiation-technicians and x-ray technicians

    1977-01-01

    The regulation, in accordance with the Law on X-ray technicians (Law No. 227, 1951), controls and makes rules of the establishment and activities of schools and institutions for those technicians as above mentioned, with intent to secure prescribed qualifications and capabilities of said technicians. Such schools and institutions shall get the designation by relevant ministers of the government who have the power to supervise them, namely the Education Minister and the Minister for Health and Welfare (Article 2). Articles 4 and 4(2) prescribe the standards for the relevant ministers to make the designation of those schools and institutions, in relation to the school years, curriculums, teachers, equipments, etc. According to the standards, those schools and institutions may be of 3-year, 2-year on one-year course according to the required attainment level of students who enters them. The minimum requirement of the attainment is the secondary-school certificates for the 3-year course. The relevant ministers may require such reports from, and give such instructions to those schools and institutions as they consider necessary, and may revoke their designation when such a school on institution has become incompliant with above mentioned standards (Articles 6 and 7). (Matsushima, A.)

  18. Ask not what your technician can do for you-ask what you can do for your technician.

    Ganderton, L

    2018-04-27

    Historically, the vital roles played by technicians in Higher Education have had little recognition. Job opportunities are often overlooked by those who have no working knowledge of such organisations and poorly defined career pathways mean that it may not be a first choice for well-qualified, ambitious individuals. With just over a third of all Higher Education technicians in the UK now due to retire in the next 10 to 15 years, fundamental changes are needed, both to attract large numbers of people into vacant roles and to retain current technical staff.National initiatives, founded and driven by charitable and professional bodies, are currently working to address the issues of technicians within Higher Education. Organisations have been urged to take action or face potential recruitment difficulties and skills gaps over the coming years. In light of these national campaigns, institutions across the UK are beginning to develop proper structured career pathways, provide professional development and improve recognition for the work of their technical workforce. Whilst these are encouraging signs, only time will tell if enough has been done to raise both the profile and appeal of a technical career in Higher Education.

  19. RCT: Module 2.07, Respiratory Protection, Course 8773

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Internal dosimetry controls require the use of engineering controls to prevent the internal deposition of radioactive and nonradiological contaminants. However, when engineering and administrative controls are not available or feasible, respiratory protection may be necessary. The radiation control technician (RCT) should know and apply the considerations used in determining the respiratory protection equipment that is most appropriate for the job. The inappropriate use of or the use of the wrong respiratory protection equipment may result in undesirable health effects. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for RCT qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and will provide in-the-field skills.

  20. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    Stephan Budweiser

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy.Keywords: respiratory failure, COPD, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation long-term oxygen therapy, chronic

  1. Development of a Training Program for Commercial Building Technicians

    Rinholm, Rod

    2013-05-31

    This project focused on developing and deploying a comprehensive program of 22 training modules, including certification requirements, and accreditation standards for commercial building technicians, to help achieve the full savings potential of energy efficient buildings, equipment, and systems. This curriculum extended the currently available commercial building technician programs -- training a labor force in a growing market area focused on energy efficiency. The program helps to remove a major market impediment to low energy/zero energy commercial building system acceptance, namely a lack of operating personnel capable of handling more complex high efficiency systems. The project developed a training curriculum for commercial building technicians, with particular focus on high-efficiency building technology, and systems. In Phase 1, the project team worked collaboratively in developing a draft training syllabus to address project objectives. The team identified energy efficiency knowledge gaps in existing programs and plans and plans to address the gaps with either modified or new curricula. In Phase 2, appropriate training materials were developed to meet project objectives. This material was developed for alternative modes of delivery, including classroom lecture materials, e-learning elements, video segments, exercises, and hands-on training elements. A Certification and Accreditation Plan and a Commercialization and Sustainability Plan were also investigated and developed. The Project Management Plan was updated quarterly and provided direction on the management approaches used to accomplish the expected project objectives. GTI project management practices tightly coordinate project activities using management controls to deliver optimal customer value. The project management practices include clear scope definition, schedule/budget tracking, risk/issue resolution and team coordination.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of an online medical laboratory technician program.

    Hansen-Suchy, Kara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of an online medical laboratory technician program in the academic preparation and development of laboratory professionals. A semi-quantitative comparative research design was used. Several factors were considered in this evaluation. Academic outcomes between online and campus medical laboratory technician (MLT) students was determined by comparing overall and categorical scores on certification exams as well as first time pass rate. Certification exam scores and first time pass rates were also compared to national norms when possible to do so. Demographic data, including age and experience were compared. Additionally, learning styles were assessed to determine if there was a correlation to overall GPA and MLT GPA and if learning styles could be used to predict successful completion of an online Associates of Applied Science. The research was conducted at an academic university located in the mountain west United States. Participants consisted of online and campus students enrolled in a Medical Laboratory Technician program that graduated with their Associate of Applied Science degree between the years 2007-2009. Results of these years were also compared to graduates from 2004-2006 in the same program. Certification performance and first time pass rates were the major outcomes measured. Age and experience were correlated. Online learning styles and GPA were also compared to successful degree completion. The researcher found no significant difference in certification performance with regard to total and categorical scores, and first time pass rates between campus and online MLT students. Online students were slightly older and had more experience working in a laboratory in some capacity. Correlation studies showed significant positive correlation between learning styles, GPA, and successful completion of an Associate of Applied Science degree. When registry scores were compared to the prior cohort of online

  3. Rural emergency medical technician pre-hospital electrocardiogram transmission.

    Powell, A M; Halon, J M; Nelson, J

    2014-01-01

    Emergent care of the acute heart attack patient continues to be at the forefront of quality and cost reduction strategies throughout the healthcare industry. Although the average cardiac door-to-balloon (D2B) times have decreased substantially over the past few years, there are still vast disparities found in D2B times in populations that reside in rural areas. Such disparities are mostly related to prolonged travel time and subsequent delays in cardiac catherization lab team activation. Urban ambulance companies that are routinely staffed with paramedic level providers have been successful in the implementation of pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) protocols as a strategy to reduce D2B times. The authors sought to evaluate the evidence related to the risk and benefits associated with the replication of an ECG transmission protocol in a small rural emergency medical service. The latter is staffed with emergency medical technician-basics (EMT-B), emergency medical technician-advanced (EMT-A), and emergency medical technician-intermediate (EMT-I) level. The evidence reviewed was limited to studies with relevant data regarding the challenges and complexities of the ECG transmission process, the difficulties associated with ECG transmission in rural settings, and ECG transmission outcomes by provider level. The evidence supports additional research to further evaluate the feasibility of ECG transmission at the non-paramedic level. Multiple variables must be investigated including equipment cost, utilization, and rural transmission capabilities. Clearly, pre-hospital ECG transmission and early activation of the cardiac catheterization laboratory are critical components to successfully decreasing D2B times.

  4. Cooperative educational project for optical technicians utilizing amateur telescope making

    Williamson, Ray

    2004-01-01

    In the modern optical shop, technicians are typically skilled machine operators who work on only one phase of the manufacture for each and every component. The product is designed, specified, methodized, scheduled and integrated by people off the shop floor. Even at the component level, the people inside the shop usually see only one stage of completion. In an effort to make the relevance of their work visible; to demonstrate competence to their peers; to gain appreciation for the work of others; and to give them a meaningful connection with the functions of optical systems, I created "The Telescope Project" for my former employer. I invited those interested to participate in an after-hours, partially subsidized project to build telescopes for themselves. The ground-rules included that we would all make the same design (thus practicing consensus and configuration management); that we would all work on every phase (thus learning from each other); and that we would obtain our parts by random lot at the end (thus making quality assurance a personal issue). In the process the participating technicians learned about optical theory, design, tolerancing, negotiation, scheduling, purchasing, fabrication, coating and assembly. They developed an appreciation for each other's contributions and a broader perspective on the consequences of their actions. In the end, each obtained a high-quality telescope for his or her personal use. Several developed an abiding love for astronomy. The project generated much interest from technicians who didn"t initially choose to participate. In this paper I describe the project in detail.

  5. Guidelines for training and qualification of radiological protection technicians

    1987-08-01

    These guidelines, used in combination with plant-specific job analysis, provide the framework for a training and qualification program for radiological protection technicians at nuclear power plants. Radiological protection technicians are defined as those individuals, both plant and contractor, who will be engaged in the evaluation of radiological conditions in the nuclear plant and the implementation of the necessary radiological safety measures as they apply to nuclear plant workers and members of the general public. An important aspect of this work is recognizing and handling unusual situations involving radioactivity, including incidents related to degraded core conditions. These guidelines incorporate the results of an industry-wide job analysis and task analysis (JTA) combined with industry operating experience review. However, the industry-wide analyses did not identify all important academic and fundamental knowledge and skills. Further in-depth analysis by subject matter experts produced additional knowledge and skills that were added to these guidelines. All utilities should use these guidelines in conjunction with plant-specific and industry-wide JTA results to develop or validate their radiological protection technician training program. Plant-specific information should be used to establish appropriate training program content. This plant-specific information should reflect unique job duties, equipment, operating experience, and trainee entry-level qualifications. Revisions to these guidelines should be reviewed for applicability and incorporated into the training program using each utility's training system development (TSD) procedures. Plant-specific job analysis and task analysis data is essential to the development of performance-based training programs. These analyses are particularly useful in selecting tasks for training and in developing on-the-job training (OJT), laboratory training, and mock-up training. Qualification programs based on these

  6. Hydraulics and pneumatics a technician's and engineer's guide

    Parr, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Hydraulics and Pneumatics: A Technician's and Engineer's Guide provides an introduction to the components and operation of a hydraulic or pneumatic system. This book discusses the main advantages and disadvantages of pneumatic or hydraulic systems.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of industrial prime movers. This text then examines the three different types of positive displacement pump used in hydraulic systems, namely, gear pumps, vane pumps, and piston pumps. Other chapters consider the pressure in a hydraulic system, which can be quickly and easily controlled

  7. Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance-Administered Antibiotics with Standard Guidelines on Antibiotic Therapy in Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: A Retrospective Study in China.

    Wu, Guo; Wu, Gao; Wu, Shuxie; Wu, Hanbin

    2017-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of an algorithm based on the biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) to reduce antibiotic exposure in pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The clinical data of 357 patients (standard group (n = 174) using SAS 9.1.3 software. The overall adverse effect rates were similar in both the PCT and standard groups: 42 (22.95%) and 51 (29.31%), respectively. The length of hospital stay was not significantly different between the PCT (9.96 ± 5.81 days) and standard groups (10.58 ± 4.24 days) (difference: -0.62%; 95% CI: -1.68 to 0.43). Antibiotic prescribing rates were significantly different in the PCT group compared to the standard group: 54.64% versus 83.91% (difference: -29.26%; 95% CI: -38.31, -20.22; p = 0.23). Mean duration of antibiotic exposure in the PCT group (3.98 ± 2.17 days) was lower than the standard groups (6.66 ± 5.59 days) (difference: -2.68%; 95% CI: -3.21 to -2.16). This study showed that PCT guidance of antibiotic treatment in children and adolescents with LRTI reduced the duration of antibiotic exposure and antibiotic prescribing rates, but did not affect the adverse effect rate and length of hospital stay. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Comparison of exercise blood pressure measured by technician and an automated system.

    Garcia-Gregory, J A; Jackson, A S; Studeville, J; Squires, W G; Owen, C A

    1984-05-01

    We evaluated the automated system Blood Pressure Measuring System (BPMS) developed by NASA on 277 adult males who elected to have a treadmill test as part of their annual physical. The BPMS uses acoustic transduction with a computer-assisted ECG gating to detect nonsynchronous noise. The BPMS readings were compared to pressures simultaneously measured by trained technicians. For all stages of work, BPMS readings were higher for systolic and lower for diastolic than technician readings. At peak stages of work, BPMS systolic pressures were about 20 mmHg higher than technician readings. Within each 3-min workstage, BPMS readings were found to be more inconsistent than technician readings. The standard errors of measurement for BPMS were from two to three times higher than technician values. These data showed automated blood pressure readings were significantly different than technician values and subject to more random fluctuations. These findings demonstrate the need to view exercise blood pressure measured by automated systems with caution.

  9. The respiratory microbiome and respiratory infections

    Unger, Stefan A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances over the past ten years lower respiratory tract infections still comprise around a fifth of all deaths worldwide in children under five years of age with the majority in low- and middle-income countries. Known risk factors for severe respiratory infections and poor chronic

  10. [Undernutrition in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Hadzik-Błaszczyk, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, lung cancer, infections, including also tuberculosis constitute the most frequent diseases in the word. Undernutrition frequently accompanies these diseases. Early diagnosis of malnutrition and implementation of appropriate treatment is very important. A nutritional interview and anthropometric examinations, such as body mass index, fat free mass and fat mass are used to diagnose it. Nutritional therapy affects the course and prognosis of these diseases. Diet should be individually adjusted to the calculated caloric intake that increases during exacerbation of disease, because of increased respiratory effort. Too large supply of energy can cause increase metabolism, higher oxygen consumption and PaCO2 increase each dangerous for patients with respiratory insufficiency. Main source of carbohydrates for these patients should be products with low glycemic index and with high dietary fiber contents. Large meals should be avoided since they cause rapid satiety, abdominal discomfort and have negative impact on the work of the respiratory muscles, especially of the diaphragm. Dietary supplements can be used in case of ineffectiveness of diet or for the patients with severe undernutrition.

  11. CERN's Technician Training Experience notches up another success!

    Stephanie Hills

    2015-01-01

    The programme was set up almost three years ago to help address a Europe-wide shortage of highly skilled technicians, with the participants gaining valuable skills and experience in an international environment. It’s clear that the programme works: some of the technician fellows who have taken part are being snapped up by major science projects and the high-tech industry.   Going underground: Fay Chicken at work in ATLAS. Fay Chicken (see UK news from CERN 59) has just accepted a job offer from the European Spallation Source in Sweden, where she will be working in the detector development team: “I’m also going to be setting up a new workshop where prototype detectors will be built. When I went to Lund, I was shown a big, empty room – it’s up to me to equip it!” This level of responsibility is a big step up for Fay, but there is no doubt that her time at CERN has both built her confidence to take on the role, and convinced ESS th...

  12. Job analysis of nuclear power reactor health physics technicians

    Davis, L.T.; Mazour, T.J.; Clark, P.V.; Todd, R.C.; Marotta, F.J.

    1984-06-01

    This report describes a project, an industry-wide Job Analysis of Nuclear Power Reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs), conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Analysis and Technology, Inc. to provide the industry with job-performance data that can be used in systematically defining training programs in terms of required job functions responsibilities, and performance standards. The job-analysis methodology is consistent with that used by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in similar industry-wide projects and includes administration of over 850 job task questionnaires to utility and contractor Health Physics Technicians throughout the country. Data collected includes task performance (difficulty, importance, and frequency) and industry-wide demographics (job levels, experience, education, and training). The results of this project discussed herein include model job descriptions for HPT positions, summaries of HPT experience, education, and training, industry-wide task listings with task-performance characteristics, and recommendations of selected tasks as a basis for HPT training development. Finally, potential future applications of the data base by utility and contractor organizations in training program development and evaluation and personnel qualifications are discussed

  13. The relation between respiratory motion artifact correction and lung standardized uptake value

    Yin Lijie; Liu Xiaojian; Liu Jie; Xu Rui; Yan Jue

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT is playing an important role in disease diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. But the respiratory motion artifact may bring trouble in diagnosis and therapy. There are many methods to correct the respiratory motion artifact. Respiratory gated PET/CT is applied most extensively of them. Using respiratory gated PET/CT to correct respiratory motion artifact can increase the maximum standardized uptake value of lung lesion obviously, thereby improving the quality of image and accuracy of diagnosis. (authors)

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Credit: CDC This is the ... the United States. Why Is the Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) a Priority for NIAID? In ...

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  16. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Respiratory Issues in Osteogenesis Imperfecta \\ Introduction The respiratory system’s job is to bring oxygen into the body and remove carbon dioxide, the waste product of breathing. Because oxygen is the fuel ...

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  18. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  19. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  20. A uniform approach for on-site training and qualification of health physics technicians

    Till, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates show that in the U.S. approx. 75% of the health physics technicians received their training through courses offered by their employer. The quality and the extent of this training vary considerably among nuclear facilities. This paper describes a uniform approach for on-site training and qualification of health physics technicians applicable to all nuclear facilities. The program consists of four levels of qualification: Health Physics Technician Trainee, Technician I, Technician II and Senior Technician. The training is divided into modules that are composed of formal lectures, practical factors, experience, and a comprehensive examination. The minimum time required from hiring of inexperienced trainees to qualification as Senior Technicians is approx. 24 months. A qualification guide lists each step a technician must complete in the training program and provides documentation which facilitates audits by internal and external groups. Although items in the program would differ between facilities, the program provides specific titles for technicians, based on their training and experience, which would be applicable throughout the nuclear industry. (author)

  1. Role of the chemical engineering technician in applied research related to tritium separation from aqueous effluents

    Nelson, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Applied research and development activities related to the removal of tritium from aqueous effluent streams have presented broad opportunities to the chemical engineering technician for professional growth. Technician job activities involve operating complex analytical instrumentation and constructing, maintaining, and operating experimental electrolysis apparatus. The technician is a member of a professional team including scientific, engineering, and other technical personnel and as such is expected to exercise creative thought. Proximity of a large university and availability of formalized ''in house'' training courses provide incentives for technicians to broaden their academic base concurrent with their work involvement

  2. Doping and respiratory system.

    Casali, L; Pinchi, G; Puxeddu, E

    2007-03-01

    Historically many different drugs have been used to enhance sporting performances. The magic elixir is still elusive and the drugs are still used despite the heavy adverse effects. The respiratory system is regularly involved in this research probably because of its central location in the body with several connections to the cardiovascular system. Moreover people are aware that O2 consumption and its delivery to mitochondria firstly depend on ventilation and on the respiratory exchanges. The second step consists in the tendency to increase V'O2 max and to prolong its availability with the aim of improving the endurance time and to relieve the fatigue. Many methods and substances had been used in order to gain an artificial success. Additional oxygen, autologous and homologous transfusion and erythropoietin, mainly the synthetic type, have been administered with the aim of increasing the amount of oxygen being delivered to the tissues. Some compounds like stimulants and caffeine are endowed of excitatory activity on the CNS and stimulate pulmonary ventilation. They did not prove to have any real activity in supporting the athletic performances. Beta-adrenergic drugs, particularly clenbuterol, when administered orally or parenterally develop a clear illicit activity on the myosin fibres and on the muscles as a whole. Salbutamol, terbutaline, salmeterol and formoterol are legally admitted when administrated by MDI in the treatment of asthma. The prevalence of asthma and bronchial hyperactivity is higher in athletes than amongst the general population. This implies that clear rules must be provided to set a correct diagnosis of asthma in the athletes and a correct therapy to align with the actual guidelines according to the same rights of the "other" asthmatic patients.

  3. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome Also known as What Is Respiratory ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  4. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  5. TU-F-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - An Automatic Toolkit for Efficient and Robust Analysis of 4D Respiratory Motion

    Wei, J; Yuan, A; Li, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an automatic image analysis toolkit to process thoracic 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and extract patient-specific motion information to facilitate investigational or clinical use of 4DCT. Methods: We developed an automatic toolkit in MATLAB to overcome the extra workload from the time dimension in 4DCT. This toolkit employs image/signal processing, computer vision, and machine learning methods to visualize, segment, register, and characterize lung 4DCT automatically or interactively. A fully-automated 3D lung segmentation algorithm was designed and 4D lung segmentation was achieved in batch mode. Voxel counting was used to calculate volume variations of the torso, lung and its air component, and local volume changes at the diaphragm and chest wall to characterize breathing pattern. Segmented lung volumes in 12 patients are compared with those from a treatment planning system (TPS). Voxel conversion was introduced from CT# to other physical parameters, such as gravity-induced pressure, to create a secondary 4D image. A demon algorithm was applied in deformable image registration and motion trajectories were extracted automatically. Calculated motion parameters were plotted with various templates. Machine learning algorithms, such as Naive Bayes and random forests, were implemented to study respiratory motion. This toolkit is complementary to and will be integrated with the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR). Results: The automatic 4D image/data processing toolkit provides a platform for analysis of 4D images and datasets. It processes 4D data automatically in batch mode and provides interactive visual verification for manual adjustments. The discrepancy in lung volume calculation between this and the TPS is <±2% and the time saving is by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Conclusion: A framework of 4D toolkit has been developed to analyze thoracic 4DCT automatically or interactively, facilitating both investigational

  6. TU-F-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - An Automatic Toolkit for Efficient and Robust Analysis of 4D Respiratory Motion

    Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States); Yuan, A; Li, G [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To provide an automatic image analysis toolkit to process thoracic 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and extract patient-specific motion information to facilitate investigational or clinical use of 4DCT. Methods: We developed an automatic toolkit in MATLAB to overcome the extra workload from the time dimension in 4DCT. This toolkit employs image/signal processing, computer vision, and machine learning methods to visualize, segment, register, and characterize lung 4DCT automatically or interactively. A fully-automated 3D lung segmentation algorithm was designed and 4D lung segmentation was achieved in batch mode. Voxel counting was used to calculate volume variations of the torso, lung and its air component, and local volume changes at the diaphragm and chest wall to characterize breathing pattern. Segmented lung volumes in 12 patients are compared with those from a treatment planning system (TPS). Voxel conversion was introduced from CT# to other physical parameters, such as gravity-induced pressure, to create a secondary 4D image. A demon algorithm was applied in deformable image registration and motion trajectories were extracted automatically. Calculated motion parameters were plotted with various templates. Machine learning algorithms, such as Naive Bayes and random forests, were implemented to study respiratory motion. This toolkit is complementary to and will be integrated with the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR). Results: The automatic 4D image/data processing toolkit provides a platform for analysis of 4D images and datasets. It processes 4D data automatically in batch mode and provides interactive visual verification for manual adjustments. The discrepancy in lung volume calculation between this and the TPS is <±2% and the time saving is by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Conclusion: A framework of 4D toolkit has been developed to analyze thoracic 4DCT automatically or interactively, facilitating both investigational

  7. Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy: predictors in a contemporary cohort study.

    Lamas, Cristiane C; Coelho, Lara E; Grinsztejn, Beatriz J; Veloso, Valdilea G

    2017-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia represents the most frequent bacterial infection in patients with HIV/AIDS. We aimed to assess variables associated with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) among HIV-infected adults using ART. A cohort study of HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years, enrolled from 2000 to 2015, on ART for at least 60 days, with primary outcome as the 1st episode of LRTI during follow-up. The independent variables included were sex at birth, age, race/skin color, educational level, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, cocaine use, diabetes mellitus, CD4 count, HIV viral load, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Extended Cox proportional hazards models accounting for time-updated variables were fitted to assess LRTI predictors. 2669 patients were included; median follow-up was 3.9 years per patient. LRTI was diagnosed in 384 patients; incidence rate was 30.7/1000 PY. In the unadjusted Cox extended models, non-white race [crude hazard ratio (cHR) 1.28, p = 0.020], cocaine use (cHR 2.01, p < 0.001), tobacco smoking (cHR 1.34, p value 0.007), and HIV viral load ≥400 copies/mL (cHR 3.40, p < 0.001) increased the risk of LRTI. Lower risk of LRTI was seen with higher educational level (cHR 0.61, p < 0.001), rise in CD4 counts (cHR 0.81, p < 0.001, per 100 cells/mm 3 increase), influenza (cHR 0.60, p = 0.002) and pneumococcal vaccination (cHR 0.57, p < 0.001). In the adjusted model, aHR for CD4 count was 0.86, for cocaine use 1.47 and for viral load ≥400 copies 2.20. LRTI has a high incidence in HIV-infected adults using ART. Higher CD4 counts and undetectable viral loads were protective, as were pneumococcal and influenza vaccines.

  8. Respiratory physiology during early life.

    Stocks, J

    1999-08-01

    Despite the rapid adaptation to extrauterine life, the respiratory system of an infant is not simply a miniaturized version of that of an adult, since the rapid somatic growth that occurs during the first year of life is accompanied by major developmental changes in respiratory physiology. The highly compliant chest wall of the infant results in relatively low transpulmonary pressures at end expiration with increased tendency of the small peripheral airways to close during tidal breathing. This not only impairs gas exchange and ventilation-perfusion balance, particularly in dependent parts of the lung, but, together with the small absolute size of the airways, renders the infant and young child particularly susceptible to airway obstruction. Premature airways are highly compliant structures compared with those of mature newborns or adults. This increased compliance can cause airway collapse, resulting in increased airways resistance, flow limitation, poor gas exchange and increased work of breathing. Although there is clear evidence that airway reactivity is present from birth, its role in wheezing lower respiratory tract illnesses in young infants may be overshadowed by pre-existing abnormalities of airway geometry and lung mechanics, or by pathological changes such as airway oedema and mucus hypersecretion. Attempts to assess age-related changes in airway reactivity or response to aerosol therapy in the very young is confounded by changes in breathing patterns and the fact that infants are preferential nose breathers. There is increasing evidence that pre-existing abnormalities of respiratory function, associated with adverse events during foetal life (including maternal smoking during pregnancy), and familial predisposition to wheezing are important determinants of wheezing illnesses during the first years of life. This emphasizes the need to identify and minimize any factors that threaten the normal development of the lung during this critical period if

  9. Clinical Experience and Learning Style of Flight Nurse and Aeromedical Evacuation Technician Students.

    De Jong, Marla J; Dukes, Susan F; Dufour, Karey M; Mortimer, Darcy L

    2017-01-01

    The clinical experience and preferred learning style of U.S. Air Force flight nurses and aeromedical evacuation technicians are unknown. Using a cross-sectional survey design, we gathered data regarding the clinical experience, level of comfort providing clinical care, and preferred learning style of 77 active duty (AD), Air Force Reserve (AFR), and Air National Guard (ANG) nurses enrolled in the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Flight Nurse course, and 121 AD, AFR, and ANG medical technicians enrolled in the Aeromedical Evacuation Technician course. Nurses and medical technicians reported 7.6 ± 5.5 and 3.9 ± 4.5 yr of experience, respectively. AD, AFR, and ANG nurses had comparable years of experience: 5.8 ± 3.2, 8.3 ± 6.6, and 7.9 ± 4.2 yr, respectively; however, AD medical technicians had more years of experience (5.6 ± 4.4 yr) than AFR (3.1 ± 4.8 yr) and ANG (1.9 ± 2.8 yr) medical technicians. Both nurses and medical technicians reported infrequently caring for patients with various disease processes and managing equipment or devices that they will routinely encounter when transporting patients as an aeromedical evacuation clinician. Nurses and medical technicians preferred a kinesthetic learning style or a multimodal learning style that included kinesthetic learning. Nearly all (99%) nurses and 97% of medical technicians identified simulation as their preferred teaching method. These findings confirm faculty concerns regarding the clinical experience of flight nurse and aerospace evacuation technician students.De Jong MJ, Dukes SF, Dufour KM, Mortimer DL. Clinical experience and learning style of flight nurse and aeromedical evacuation technician students. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(1):23-29.

  10. Establishing a clinical pharmacy technician at a United States Army military treatment facility.

    Evans, Jennifer L; Gladd, Ellen M; Gonzalez, Alicia C; Tranam, Salman; Larrabee, Joni M; Lipphardt, Sarah E; Chen, Tina T; Ronn, Michael D; Spain, John

    2016-01-01

    To describe the creation of a clinical pharmacy technician position within the U.S. Army and to identify the personal skills and characteristics required to meet the demands of this role. An outpatient military treatment facility located in Maryland. The clinical pharmacy technician position was designed to support clinical pharmacy services within a patient-centered medical home. Funding and a position description were established to hire a clinical pharmacy technician. Expected duties included administrative (45%), patient education (30%), and dispensing (25%). Local policy, in accordance with federal law and U.S. Army regulations, was developed to define the expanded technician responsibility to deliver patient medication education. In the initial 3 months, the clinical pharmacy technician spent 24 hours per week on clinical activities, affording an additional 10-15 hours per week for clinical pharmacists to provide patient care. Completed consults increased from 41% to 56%, and patient-pharmacist encounters increased from 240 to 290 per month. The technician, acting as a clinical pharmacist extender, also completed an average of 90 patient encounters independently each month. As a result of these improvements, the decision was made to hire a second technician. Currently, the technicians spend 28-40 hours per week on clinical activities, offsetting an average of 26 hours per week for the clinical pharmacists. A patient-centered medical home clinical pharmacy technician can reduce the administrative workload for clinical pharmacists, improve their efficiency, and enhance the use of clinical pharmacy services. Several characteristics, particularly medication knowledge, make pharmacy technicians particularly suited for this role. The results from the implementation of a clinical pharmacy technician at this military treatment facility resulted in an Army-wide expansion of the position and suggested applicability in other practice sites, particularly in federal

  11. A Novel Simulation Technician Laboratory Design: Results of a Survey-Based Study.

    Ahmed, Rami; Hughes, Patrick G; Friedl, Ed; Ortiz Figueroa, Fabiana; Cepeda Brito, Jose R; Frey, Jennifer; Birmingham, Lauren E; Atkinson, Steven Scott

    2016-03-16

    OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to elicit feedback from simulation technicians prior to developing the first simulation technician-specific simulation laboratory in Akron, OH. Simulation technicians serve a vital role in simulation centers within hospitals/health centers around the world. The first simulation technician degree program in the US has been approved in Akron, OH. To satisfy the requirements of this program and to meet the needs of this special audience of learners, a customized simulation lab is essential. A web-based survey was circulated to simulation technicians prior to completion of the lab for the new program. The survey consisted of questions aimed at identifying structural and functional design elements of a novel simulation center for the training of simulation technicians. Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze data. Over 90% of technicians (n=65) think that a lab designed explicitly for the training of technicians is novel and beneficial. Approximately 75% of respondents think that the space provided appropriate audiovisual (AV) infrastructure and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent. The respondents think that the lab needed more storage space, visualization space for a large number of students, and more space in the technical/repair area. CONCLUSIONS : A space designed for the training of simulation technicians was considered to be beneficial. This laboratory requires distinct space for technical repair, adequate bench space for the maintenance and repair of simulators, an appropriate AV infrastructure, and space to evaluate the ability of technicians to be independent.

  12. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  13. NASDA technician test real-time radiation monitoring device

    1997-01-01

    A technician from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) tests the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  14. SU-F-T-560: Measurement of Dose Blurring Effect Due to Respiratory Motion for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Using Monte Carlo Based Calculation Algorithm

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Lominska, C; Wang, F; Ramanjappa, T

    2016-01-01

    .87 for 20 and 30mm motion respectively. For SBRT plans central axis dose values were within 1% upto 10mm motions but decreased to average of 5% for 20mm and 8% for 30mm motion. Mapcheck comparison with static showed penumbra enlargement due to motion blurring at the edges of the field for 3×3,5×5,10×10 pass rates were 88% to 12%, 100% to 43% and 100% to 63% respectively as motion increased from 5 to 30mm. For SBRT plans MapCheck mean pass rate were decreased from 73.8% to 39.5% as motion increased from 5mm to 30mm. Conclusion: Dose blurring effect has been seen in open fields as well as SBRT lung plans using NCDCA with CB which worsens with increasing respiratory motion and decreasing field size(tumor size). To reduce this effect larger margins and appropriate motion reduction techniques should be utilized.

  15. Professional expectations of students of the oral health technician course

    José Ferreira Lima Junior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the expectations of students enrolled in the oral health technician course conducted by the School of Public Health of Ceará, about their professional future. Methods:This work presents a quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study held with students of seven classes in dental hygiene course conducted by the School of Public Health. Data collection was conducted between March and April 2011, through the application of a semistructured questionnaire, which addressed the professional profile of the participants, their expectations about the labor market and the profession. Statistical analysis was performedwith a degree of significance of 0.05. Results: 154 students were interviewed, of whom 96.1% were women, mean age of 32.9 (± 7.3 years. Most (93.8%, N = 120 graduated from high school and 71.1% (N = 108 were registered at the Regional Council of Dentistry. Regardingtheir insertion in the labor market, 42.9% believed it would be satisfactory and 58% that it would occur in public service. The biggest obstacle mentioned by the subjects about the insertion of oral health technicians in the labor market was the difficulty of hiring (45.5%. When asked to punctuate some actions that they would play as TSB, 82.2% cited clinical and collective actions. The majority (96% claimed to feel safe to act as TSB. Conclusion:The students’ expectations regarding their professional future are positive. However, it is necessary to develop further research in this area, so that the profession has a growing support within the labor market.

  16. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Chang, Yu-Tung; Tsai, Kuang-Chau; Williams, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents' perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS) education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of incorporating competency standards in the current skills-based curriculum. Moreover, the core-competencies gap that exists between Taiwanese EMT-1s, EMT-2s, and EMT-Paramedics and internationally recognized core competencies needs to be addressed. By identifying the key factors that potentially impact the development of the EMS education system, such as the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation, these findings will inform

  17. The Validity of Subjects in Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination

    Woong-chul Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prepared a basic framework for the development and improvement of Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination, based on actual test questions. A peer review was conducted to ensure relevance to current practices in dental technology. For the statistical analysis, 1000 dental laboratory technicians were selected; specialists in dental laboratory technology (laboratory owners, educators, etc. were involved in creating valid and reliable questions. Results indicated that examination subjects should be divided into three categories: basic dental laboratory theory, dental laboratory specialties, and a practical examination. To ensure relevance to current practice, there should be less emphasis on basic dental laboratory theory, including health-related laws, and more emphasis on dental laboratory specialties. Introduction to dental anatomy should be separated from oral anatomy and tooth morphology; and fixed prosthodontics should be separated from crown and bridge technology and dental ceramics technology. Removable orthodontic appliance technology should be renamed 'orthodontic laboratory technology'. There should be less questions related to health related law, oral anatomy, dental hygiene, dental materials science and inlay, while the distribution ratio of questions related to tooth morphology should be maintained. There should be a decrease in the distribution ratio of questions related to crown and bridge technology, dental ceramics technology, complete dentures and removable partial dentures technology, and orthodontic laboratory technology. In the practical examination, the current multiple choice test should be replaced with tooth carving using wax or plaster. In dental laboratory specialties, subjects related to contemporary dental laboratory technology should be included in the test items.

  18. 14 CFR 65.80 - Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students.

    2010-01-01

    ... students has made satisfactory progress at the school and is prepared to take the oral and practical tests... technician school students. 65.80 Section 65.80 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 65.80 Certificated aviation maintenance technician school students. Whenever an aviation maintenance...

  19. The law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    1977-01-01

    The Law aims to define the qulifications of radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment and to regulate so that the works are carried out properly for helping popularization and improvement of medicine and public hygiene. Persons who wish to be radiation or x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment are required to pass the examinations for such technicians and obtain the licenes of the Minister of Health and Welfare for the former technicians and the license of a prefectural governor for the latter technicians. Mentally disordered, deaf, dumb or blind persons are excluded from licensees. Registration of such technicians, delivery of the license certificates and other related matters are provided for. The examinations are held concerning the knowledges and skills necessary for such technicians and carried out by the Minister of Health and Welfare. Persons except doctors, dentists and such technicians are prohibited to engage in the practices to apply radiation to human bodies. Restrictions on the intensity of radiation applied and the places of work are defined concerning such practices. Penal servitude of less than a year and fines less than yen 10,000 or yen 5,000 are imposed upon the violation of such prohibitions or restrictions. (Okada, K.)

  20. Advances and results of the educative project: Implementation of the career of 'Technician in Radiological protection'

    Vizuet G, J.; Suarez, G.; Sanchez C, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the obtained advances and achievements during the impartment of the technician career in radiological protection are presented. This is carried out in the 'Justo Sierra' Technological High School Center of San Mateo Atenco, Estado de Mexico, and has for objective the formation of professional-technicians. (Author)

  1. Examining Career Success of Minority and Women Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs): A LEADS Project

    Russ-Eft, Darlene F.; Dickison, Philip D.; Levine, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) are a critical segment in prehospital medical care. This study examined EMT-paramedic career success focused on minorities and women, as part of the Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS). The LEADS data come from a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the…

  2. Task Analysis and Job Descriptions for Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians. Final Report. Volume 1.

    Hull, Daniel M.; Lovett, James E.

    The Robotics/Automated Systems Technician (RAST) project developed a robotics technician model curriculum for the use of state directors of vocational education and two-year college vocational/technical educators. A baseline management plan was developed to guide the project. To provide awareness, project staff developed a dissemination plan…

  3. Management competencies required in the transition from a technician to a supervisor

    Sibongile R. Mahlangu (Kubheka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Technicians are frequently promoted to supervisory positions based on their technical abilities, with scant attention focused on developing management competencies. This oversight often poses significant challenges. The effective transition from technician to supervisor is important in any organisation. Research objective: The primary objective is to identify and verify the competencies that are required for a technician and a supervisory position; the secondary objective is to identify the gap that must be filled with relevant training interventions to enable technicians to make an effective transition to a supervisory position. Motivation for this study: The identification of the management competencies required for a technician who makes a career change to a supervisor position. Research method: The sequential mixed method approach was used to enable the twophase data collection process: phase one was the quantitative phase and phase two was the qualitative phase. Main findings: The overall findings confirm that there are indeed management competencies that technicians require training and development on before being promoted to a supervisory position. Implication: Organisations need to identify the key competencies for a technician and a supervisor and implement development or training interventions that are essential to successfully transition an employee from the level of a technician to the level of a supervisor. Contribution: Organisations need to implement essential development or training interventions focused on developing management competencies and put in place support interventions such as coaching, job shadowing, mentoring and networking.

  4. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  5. Job satisfaction and patient care practices of hemodialysis nurses and technicians.

    Perumal, Seena; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2003-10-01

    The quality of hemodialysis care has been the focus of intense scrutiny, yet little is known about the job satisfaction of the nurses and technicians providing this care. We identified 240 nurses and technicians from 307 randomly selected American facilities and asked them about (a) specific domains of job satisfaction, (b) overall job satisfaction, and (c) self-reported patient care practices. Fewer than half of nurses and technicians were satisfied with their pay or their opportunities for advancement. Almost all subjects were satisfied with their personal delivery of patient care, their chance to do things for others, and their job security. About three-fourths of nurses and technicians expressed overall satisfaction with their jobs. Higher job satisfaction was associated with increased attention to patient psychosocial and educational needs. We urge local and national associations of nurses and technicians to collaborate with dialysis facilities, chains, and regulatory agencies to address specific aspects of job satisfaction.

  6. Influence of macrolides, nutritional support and respiratory therapies in diabetes and normal glucose tolerance in cystic fibrosis. A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult and younger patients.

    Megías, Marta Cano; Albarrán, Olga González; Vasco, Pablo Guisado; Ferreiro, Adelaida Lamas; Carro, Luis Maiz

    2015-01-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis related diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, worse nutritional status and lung function decline. It is known that patients with cystic fibrosis have a chronic inflammation status and that β pancreatic cells are very sensitive to oxidative stress. So these inflammatory mediators could contribute to the onset of progressive pancreatic fibrosis and, hence, to impair glucose metabolism. So, it could be hypothesized that the treatment with macrolides would protect and preserve β-cell function by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and free oxidative radicals. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 64 patients affected of cystic fibrosis, older than 14 years, by using the first pathological 2-h oral glucose tolerance test; peripheral insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA - IR) and pancreatic β-cell function was estimated according to Wareham. The influence of macrolides, microbiological colonization, nutritional support and related clinical parameters were analyzed. Comparing CFRD without FPG and NGT, and after adjustment for microbial colonization, the significance of the use of macrolides was lost (p=0.1), as a risk or protective factor for any of the studied groups. Non-significative associations were found in the use of macrolides, inhaled corticosteroids and nutritional support therapies within the different disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effect of macrolides did not seem to affect the β cell function or insulin resistance in patients with cystic fibrosis. The use of inhaled corticosteroids or nutritional supplements have not any influence in the carbohydrate metabolism. Further prospective studies are needed to analyze a potential protective role of macrolides in the development of carbohydrate metabolism alterations in cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by

  7. Use of a pharmacy technician to facilitate postfracture care provided by clinical pharmacy specialists.

    Irwin, Adriane N; Heilmann, Rachel M F; Gerrity, Theresa M; Kroner, Beverly A; Olson, Kari L

    2014-12-01

    The ability of a pharmacy technician to support the patient screening and documentation-related functions of a pharmacist-driven osteoporosis management service was evaluated. A two-phase prospective study was conducted within a large integrated health system to assess a pharmacy technician's performance in supporting a multisite team of clinical pharmacy specialists providing postfracture care. In phase I of the study, a specially trained pharmacy technician provided support to pharmacists at five participating medical offices, helping to identify patients requiring pharmacist intervention and, when applicable, collecting patient-specific clinical information from the electronic health record. In phase II of the study, the amount of pharmacist time saved through the use of technician support versus usual care was evaluated. The records of 127 patient cases were reviewed by the pharmacy technician during phase I of the study, and a pharmacist agreed with the technician's determination of the need for intervention in the majority of instances (92.9%). An additional 91 patient cases were reviewed by the technician in phase II of the research. With technician support, pharmacists spent less time reviewing cases subsequently determined as not requiring intervention (mean ± S.D., 5.0 ± 3.8 minutes per case compared with 5.2 ± 4.5 minutes under the usual care model; p = 0.78). In cases requiring intervention, technician support was associated with a reduction in the average pharmacist time spent on care plan development (13.5 ± 7.1 minutes versus 18.2 ± 16.6 minutes with usual care, p = 0.34). The study results suggest that a pharmacy technician can accurately determine if a patient is a candidate for pharmacist intervention and collect clinical information to facilitate care plan development. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacy technician self-efficacies: Insight to aid future education, staff development, and workforce planning.

    Desselle, Shane P; Hoh, Ryan; Holmes, Erin R; Gill, Amanpreet; Zamora, Lemuel

    2017-07-15

    The roles of pharmacy technicians are increasingly prominent given pharmacy's transition to patient-centered activities and evolving scopes of practice in many U.S. states and throughout the world. The aims of this study were to assess U.S. pharmacy technicians' self-efficacies for and attitudes toward performing current and emerging roles in hospital and in community pharmacy and to identify factors related to pharmacy technician self-efficacies in these roles. A total of 5000 pharmacy technicians from 8 U.S. states were sent an electronic survey eliciting data on current involvement, self-efficacies, and attitudes for practicing in an expansive list of practice activities. The 8 states from which the sample was drawn were selected from a stratified randomized procedure using U.S. Census Bureau geographically defined regions. Pre-notification and response reminders were employed. Data were analyzed descriptively and with univariate, inferential tests, as appropriate, to determine associations with commitment, practice environment, experience level, and other variables. Of the 612 participants who responded, 494 were currently working as a technician and not enrolled in a PharmD program of study. Participants reported various activities in which they were highly engaged. Overall, attitudes toward performing most of the activities and self-efficacies were quite favorable, even for those activities in which technicians were currently less involved. There were some notable differences between technicians practicing in community versus hospital settings. Years of experience, profession commitment, and advanced employee ranking were associated with higher levels of self-efficacy, overall. This initial examination of pharmacy technician self-efficacies identified areas that along with other factors could help employers with further expanding technician practice activities and vocational institutions with considerations for education and development of these key members

  9. Best possible medication history for hemodialysis patients obtained by a pharmacy technician.

    Leung, Marianna; Jung, Joanne; Lau, Wynnie; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Jung, Beverly

    2009-09-01

    Outpatients undergoing hemodialysis are at high risk for adverse drug events. Limited resources make it challenging for pharmacists to routinely obtain a best possible medication history (BPMH). The primary objective was to determine whether, for patients undergoing hemodialysis, a pharmacy technician has the skills to obtain a BPMH that would allow a pharmacist to identify drug-related problems. The secondary objectives were to determine the number and types of medication discrepancies and drug-related problems identified and the time required by the technician to complete the BPMH. All patients treated in the hemodialysis unit during the study period were included, except for those who required an interpreter or were unable to participate in an in-person interview. A single technician was taught how to interview patients according to a structured format. For each patient, the technician's BMPH was verified by a pharmacist. The agreement rate between technician and pharmacists was determined, along with the number and types of discrepancies and drug-related problems identified. The technician interviewed 99 patients. Of the 1334 medication orders reviewed, the technician and pharmacists agreed on all but 15 (agreement rate 98.9%). A total of 358 medication discrepancies were noted for 93 patients (3.8 discrepancies per patient). Of these, 210 (59%) were undocumented intentional discrepancies, and 148 (41%) were unintentional discrepancies (most commonly errors of commission). Of the 135 drug-related problems identified, the majority involved dosing problems or nonadherence. The technician required an average of 17 min for each interview. An adequately trained technician was capable of interviewing patients to create a BPMH. A variety of medication discrepancies and drug-related problems were identified. Generation of a BPMH by a technician is a useful approach allowing pharmacists to identify drug-related problems.

  10. Personalizing mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Berngard, S Clark; Beitler, Jeremy R; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-03-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes remains the cornerstone for treating patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Personalizing such an approach to each patient's unique physiology may improve outcomes further. Many factors should be considered when mechanically ventilating a critically ill patient with ARDS. Estimations of transpulmonary pressures as well as individual's hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics should influence PEEP decisions as well as response to therapy (recruitability). This summary will emphasize the potential role of personalized therapy in mechanical ventilation.

  11. Detection of Severe Respiratory Disease Epidemic Outbreaks by CUSUM-Based Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index Model

    Carlos Polanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008–2010 taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts.

  12. Detection of Severe Respiratory Disease Epidemic Outbreaks by CUSUM-Based Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index Model

    Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Macías, Alejandro E.; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008–2010) taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts. PMID:24069063

  13. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    Andersen, Lars Louis; Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians.......To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians....

  14. Synchrony - Cyberknife Respiratory Compensation Technology

    Ozhasoglu, Cihat; Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Burton, Steven; Komanduri, Krishna; Yue, Ning J.; Huq, Saiful M.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of organs in the thorax and abdomen have shown that these organs can move as much as 40 mm due to respiratory motion. Without compensation for this motion during the course of external beam radiation therapy, the dose coverage to target may be compromised. On the other hand, if compensation of this motion is by expansion of the margin around the target, a significant volume of normal tissue may be unnecessarily irradiated. In hypofractionated regimens, the issue of respiratory compensation becomes an important factor and is critical in single-fraction extracranial radiosurgery applications. CyberKnife is an image-guided radiosurgery system that consists of a 6-MV LINAC mounted to a robotic arm coupled through a control loop to a digital diagnostic x-ray imaging system. The robotic arm can point the beam anywhere in space with 6 degrees of freedom, without being constrained to a conventional isocenter. The CyberKnife has been recently upgraded with a real-time respiratory tracking and compensation system called Synchrony. Using external markers in conjunction with diagnostic x-ray images, Synchrony helps guide the robotic arm to move the radiation beam in real time such that the beam always remains aligned with the target. With the aid of Synchrony, the tumor motion can be tracked in three-dimensional space, and the motion-induced dosimetric change to target can be minimized with a limited margin. The working principles, advantages, limitations, and our clinical experience with this new technology will be discussed

  15. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  16. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians

    Chang YT

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Tung Chang,1,2 Kuang-Chau Tsai,2 Brett Williams1,3 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Division of Paramedicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia Objectives: Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. Methods: A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents’ perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. Results: The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. Conclusion: The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of

  17. 40 CFR 745.92 - Fees for the accreditation of renovation and dust sampling technician training and the...

    2010-07-01

    ... renovation and dust sampling technician training and the certification of renovation firms. 745.92 Section... Renovation § 745.92 Fees for the accreditation of renovation and dust sampling technician training and the... the following disciplines: Renovator, dust sampling technician. (ii) Exemption. No fee shall be...

  18. 20 CFR 1002.306 - Is a National Guard civilian technician considered a State or Federal employee for purposes of...

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is a National Guard civilian technician... a National Guard civilian technician considered a State or Federal employee for purposes of USERRA? A National Guard civilian technician is considered a State employee for USERRA purposes, although he...

  19. Defining the Role of the Pharmacy Technician and Identifying Their Future Role in Medicines Optimisation.

    Boughen, Melanie; Sutton, Jane; Fenn, Tess; Wright, David

    2017-07-15

    Traditionally, pharmacy technicians have worked alongside pharmacists in community and hospital pharmacy. Changes within pharmacy provide opportunity for role expansion and with no apparent career pathway, there is a need to define the current pharmacy technician role and role in medicines optimisation. To capture the current roles of pharmacy technicians and identify how their future role will contribute to medicines optimisation. Following ethical approval and piloting, an online survey to ascertain pharmacy technicians' views about their roles was undertaken. Recruitment took place in collaboration with the Association of Pharmacy Technicians UK. Data were exported to SPSS, data screened and descriptive statistics produced. Free text responses were analysed and tasks collated into categories reflecting the type of work involved in each task. Responses received were 393 (28%, n = 1380). Results were organised into five groups: i.e., hospital, community, primary care, General Practitioner (GP) practice and other (which included HM Prison Service). Thirty tasks were reported as commonly undertaken in three or more settings and 206 (84.7%, n = 243) pharmacy technicians reported they would like to expand their role. Tasks core to hospital and community pharmacy should be considered for inclusion to initial education standards to reflect current practice. Post qualification, pharmacy technicians indicate a significant desire to expand clinically and managerially allowing pharmacists more time in patient-facing/clinical roles.

  20. Description and comparison of pharmacy technician training programs in the United States.

    Anderson, Douglas C; Draime, Juanita A; Anderson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    To describe pharmacy technician training programs in the United States and to compare pharmacy technician program characteristics between programs with and without a pharmacist on faculty and between programs with different accreditation status. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Not applicable. United States pharmacy technician programs. Not applicable. Student class size, faculty credentials, coursework components, program length, tuition rates, and admission criteria. Currently, there are more than 698 pharmacy technician programs across 1114 campuses, with complete data available for 216 programs. Programs varied widely in terms of class sizes, faculty credentials, and admission criteria. Programs with pharmacists on faculty were significantly less expensive than were those without pharmacists (P = 0.009). Accreditation had no impact on tuition prices. This is the first study of its kind to describe and characterize pharmacy technician training programs. There is relatively little control of technician training by the profession of pharmacy. The quality of these programs in terms of student outcomes is unknown, and it should be explored. Rigorous debate and discussion is needed regarding the future of pharmacy technician roles and the training required for those roles. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Defining the Simulation Technician Role: Results of a Survey-Based Study.

    Bailey, Rachel; Taylor, Regina G; FitzGerald, Michael R; Kerrey, Benjamin T; LeMaster, Thomas; Geis, Gary L

    2015-10-01

    In health care simulation, simulation technicians perform multiple tasks to support various educational offerings. Technician responsibilities and the tasks that accompany them seem to vary between centers. The objectives were to identify the range and frequency of tasks that technicians perform and to determine if there is a correspondence between what technicians do and what they feel their responsibilities should be. We hypothesized that there is a core set of responsibilities and tasks for the technician position regardless of background, experience, and type of simulation center. We conducted a prospective, survey-based study of individuals currently functioning in a simulation technician role in a simulation center. This survey was designed internally and piloted within 3 academic simulation centers. Potential respondents were identified through a national mailing list, and the survey was distributed electronically during a 3-week period. A survey request was sent to 280 potential participants, 136 (49%) responded, and 73 met inclusion criteria. Five core tasks were identified as follows: equipment setup and breakdown, programming scenarios into software, operation of software during simulation, audiovisual support for courses, and on-site simulator maintenance. Independent of background before they were hired, technicians felt unprepared for their role once taking the position. Formal training was identified as a need; however, the majority of technicians felt experience over time was the main contributor toward developing knowledge and skills within their role. This study represents a first step in defining the technician role within simulation-based education and supports the need for the development of a formal job description to allow recruitment, development, and certification.

  2. Radiologic Equipment and Technicians according to the Distribution of the Population

    Yoon, Chul Ho; Choi, Jun Gu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide basic data in order to systematize the management of demand and supply of radiologic technicians, to pursue a fair regional distribution of educational institutions, and furthermore to keep reasonable medical treatment and fee. This research was carried out through the investigation of radiologic equipment and technicians according to the distribution of the population. We compared and analyzed the correlation between regional population, the number of clinics and hospitals, the number of medical imaging devices, and the number of radiologists and radiologic technicians in 5 cities without 'Gu' administrative units in 2008. 27,317 radiologic technicians have been produced since the administration of the national qualifying exam for radiologic technicians. About 18,000 radiologic technicians are currently working. There are 39 colleges or universities with Departments of Radiology and the admission quota is 2,120 students excluding one college. The ratio of radiologic equipment to radiologic technicians is 2.6 to 1. There is a dilemma in which some radiologic technicians fail to find appropriate jobs while some clinics or hospitals are in need of radiologic technicians. This dilemma is due to unreasonable regional discrepancies in pay system and welfare situation, and excessive profit-oriented recruiting system of clinics and hospitals. The increase of students of Radiologic Departments and approval of additional departments will end up with producing superfluous high academic degree holders, which is on the contrary to the government policy to produce more job opportunities. So the policy of increasing Radiologic Departments should be reconsidered.

  3. Guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    1989-01-01

    The IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. In this Guidebook, technician level occupations include those filled by technicians and higher level technicians (techniciens superieurs or technologists) and also by non-graduate engineers. The Guidebook complements the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. The key objectives of this Guidebook are to describe: (1) the level and content of conventional education and training which a technician must have before nuclear oriented education and training can begin; (2) the level and content of nuclear oriented education and training; (3) measures to bridge the gap between the education and training acquired by technicians in the national technical schools (i.e. the level attained before upgrading) and the level of education and training qualifications needed for technicians to work in the nuclear power programme (i.e. the level attained after completion of nuclear oriented education and training). Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States, are included in IAEA-TECDOC-526, which should be read in conjunction with the present text. 3 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  4. AeroVironment technician checks a Helios solar cell panel

    2000-01-01

    A technician at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California, checks a panel of silicon solar cells for conductivity and voltage. The bi-facial cells, fabricated by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the Helios Prototype solar-powered aircraft to provide power to its 14 electric motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights above 50,000 feet altitude with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now under development in 2003.

  5. Management perceptions of the Health Physics Technician job

    Mazour, T.J.; Marotta, F.J.

    1985-12-01

    In 1984, an industry-wide job analysis of nuclear power reactor Health Physics Technicians (HPTs) was completed. These results provided the basis for job descriptions, industry-wide task listings and recommendations for task selections for further analysis and formal training. A total of 389 tasks were identified and reviewed by 850 HPTs representing 39 plants and 6 vendor companies. Constructive criticism of the HPT job analysis focused on the fact that HPT supervisors and managers were not included in the survey. Concerns were addressed that these supervisors/managers might have a divergent perception of the HPT job that could lead to different conclusions than those that were originally drawn. The only way to confirm (or deny) this hypothesis was to verify the results of the job analysis of HPTs by also surveying radiation protection management personnel. A total of 19 HPT supervisors/managers completed the same survey that had been used for HPT job incumbents. They were asked to rate each task on the basis of their job incumbents' performance of the task. Of the 1161 ratings (389 tasks each with a rating for frequency, difficulty, and importance), only 37 of the ratings differed between the HPTs and the HPT supervisors/managers (at the 99% confidence level)

  6. Barriers in detecting elder abuse among emergency medical technicians.

    Reingle Gonzalez, Jennifer M; Cannell, M Brad; Jetelina, Katelyn K; Radpour, Sepeadeh

    2016-09-02

    Elder abuse and neglect are highly under-reported in the United States. This may be partially attributed to low incidence of reporting among emergency medical technicians' (EMTs), despite state-mandated reporting of suspected elder abuse. Innovative solutions are needed to address under-reporting. The objective was to describe EMTs' experience detecting and reporting elder abuse. Qualitative data were collected from 11 EMTs and 12 Adult Protective Services (APS) caseworkers that participated in one of five semi-structured focus groups. Focus group data were iteratively coded by two coders. Findings suggest a number of barriers prevent EMTs from reporting elder abuse to APS. Participants suggested that limited training on elder abuse detection or reporting has been provided to them. EMTs suggested that training, creation of an automated reporting system or brief screening tool could be used to enhance EMT's ability to detect and communicate suspected cases of elder abuse to APS. Results from the present study suggest that EMTs may be uniquely situated to serve as elder abuse and neglect surveillance personnel. EMTs are eager to work with APS to address the under-reporting of elder abuse and neglect, but training is minimal and current reporting procedures are time-prohibitive given their primary role as emergency healthcare providers. Future studies should seek to translate these findings into practice by identifying specific indicators predictive of elder abuse and neglect for inclusion on an automated reporting instrument for EMTs.

  7. OCCUPATIONAL CONTACT DERMATITIS AMONGST DENTISTS AND DENTAL TECHNICIANS.

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Ferček, Iva; Duvančić, Tomislav; Bulat, Vedrana; Ježovita, Josip; Novak-Bilić, Gaby; Šitum, Mirna

    2016-06-01

    Since the working medical personnel including dentists and dental technicians mainly use their hands, it is understandable that the most common occupational disease amongst medical personnel is contact dermatitis (CD) (80%-90% of cases). Development of occupational CD is caused by contact of the skin with various substances in occupational environment. Occupational etiologic factors for dental personnel are foremost reactions to gloves containing latex, followed by various dental materials (e.g., metals, acrylates), detergents, lubricants, solvents, chemicals, etc. Since occupational CD is relatively common in dental personnel, its timely recognition, treatment and taking preventive measures is needed. Achieving skin protection at exposed workplaces is of special importance, as well as implementing necessary measures consequently and sufficiently, which is sometimes difficult to achieve. Various studies have shown the benefit of applying preventive measures, such as numerous protocols for reducing and managing latex sensitivity and other forms of CD in dentistry. Active involvement of physicians within the health care system, primarily dermatologists, occupational medicine specialists and general medicine doctors is needed for establishing an accurate medical diagnosis and confirmation of occupational skin disease.

  8. Downtime after Critical Incidents in Emergency Medical Technicians/Paramedics

    Janice Halpern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective workplace-based interventions after critical incidents (CIs are needed for emergency medical technicians (EMT/paramedics. The evidence for a period out of service post-CI (downtime is sparse; however it may prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and burnout symptoms. We examined the hypothesis that downtime post-CI is associated with fewer symptoms of four long-term emotional sequelae in EMT/paramedics: depression, PTSD, burnout, and stress-related emotional symptoms (accepted cut-offs defined high scores. Two hundred and one paramedics completed questionnaires concerning an index CI including downtime experience, acute distress, and current emotional symptoms. Nearly 75% received downtime; 59% found it helpful; 84% spent it with peers. Downtime was associated only with lower depression symptoms, not with other outcomes. The optimal period for downtime was between 1 day being less effective. Planned testing of mediation of the association between downtime and depression by either calming acute post-CI distress or feeling helped by others was not performed because post-CI distress was not associated with downtime and perceived helpfulness was not associated with depression. These results suggest that outcomes of CIs follow different pathways and may require different interventions. A brief downtime is a relatively simple and effective strategy in preventing later depression symptoms.

  9. Respiratory trace feature analysis for the prediction of respiratory-gated PET quantification

    Wang, Shouyi; Bowen, Stephen R.; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Sandison, George A.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-02-01

    The benefits of respiratory gating in quantitative PET/CT vary tremendously between individual patients. Respiratory pattern is among many patient-specific characteristics that are thought to play an important role in gating-induced imaging improvements. However, the quantitative relationship between patient-specific characteristics of respiratory pattern and improvements in quantitative accuracy from respiratory-gated PET/CT has not been well established. If such a relationship could be estimated, then patient-specific respiratory patterns could be used to prospectively select appropriate motion compensation during image acquisition on a per-patient basis. This study was undertaken to develop a novel statistical model that predicts quantitative changes in PET/CT imaging due to respiratory gating. Free-breathing static FDG-PET images without gating and respiratory-gated FDG-PET images were collected from 22 lung and liver cancer patients on a PET/CT scanner. PET imaging quality was quantified with peak standardized uptake value (SUVpeak) over lesions of interest. Relative differences in SUVpeak between static and gated PET images were calculated to indicate quantitative imaging changes due to gating. A comprehensive multidimensional extraction of the morphological and statistical characteristics of respiratory patterns was conducted, resulting in 16 features that characterize representative patterns of a single respiratory trace. The six most informative features were subsequently extracted using a stepwise feature selection approach. The multiple-regression model was trained and tested based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The predicted quantitative improvements in PET imaging achieved an accuracy higher than 90% using a criterion with a dynamic error-tolerance range for SUVpeak values. The results of this study suggest that our prediction framework could be applied to determine which patients would likely benefit from respiratory motion compensation

  10. Respiratory trace feature analysis for the prediction of respiratory-gated PET quantification

    Wang, Shouyi; Chaovalitwongse, W Art; Bowen, Stephen R; Kinahan, Paul E; Sandison, George A; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of respiratory gating in quantitative PET/CT vary tremendously between individual patients. Respiratory pattern is among many patient-specific characteristics that are thought to play an important role in gating-induced imaging improvements. However, the quantitative relationship between patient-specific characteristics of respiratory pattern and improvements in quantitative accuracy from respiratory-gated PET/CT has not been well established. If such a relationship could be estimated, then patient-specific respiratory patterns could be used to prospectively select appropriate motion compensation during image acquisition on a per-patient basis. This study was undertaken to develop a novel statistical model that predicts quantitative changes in PET/CT imaging due to respiratory gating. Free-breathing static FDG-PET images without gating and respiratory-gated FDG-PET images were collected from 22 lung and liver cancer patients on a PET/CT scanner. PET imaging quality was quantified with peak standardized uptake value (SUV peak ) over lesions of interest. Relative differences in SUV peak between static and gated PET images were calculated to indicate quantitative imaging changes due to gating. A comprehensive multidimensional extraction of the morphological and statistical characteristics of respiratory patterns was conducted, resulting in 16 features that characterize representative patterns of a single respiratory trace. The six most informative features were subsequently extracted using a stepwise feature selection approach. The multiple-regression model was trained and tested based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The predicted quantitative improvements in PET imaging achieved an accuracy higher than 90% using a criterion with a dynamic error-tolerance range for SUV peak values. The results of this study suggest that our prediction framework could be applied to determine which patients would likely benefit from respiratory motion

  11. Staphylococcus aureus with Panton-Valentine toxin skin infection in a medical laboratory technician.

    Pougnet, Richard; Pougnet, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    This report exposes the case of a Staphylococcus aureus infection occurring in a microbiology laboratory technician. He was a 52 year-old man without medical history. He presented an abscess on the anterior aspect of the left forearm. Analysis showed that it was a Staphylococcus aureus secreting the Panton-Valentine toxin. The study of the workplace found the frequency of exposure. The study of workstation showed the link between the technician position and the infection. Indeed, this man touched an area where the biocleaning was hard to do. This is the first case of infection with PVL described for a laboratory technician.

  12. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population

  13. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. (Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada))

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  14. Respiratory manifestations of panic disorder: causes, consequences and therapeutic implications.

    Sardinha, Aline; Freire, Rafael Christophe da Rocha; Zin, Walter Araújo; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2009-07-01

    Multiple respiratory abnormalities can be found in anxiety disorders, especially in panic disorder (PD). Individuals with PD experience unexpected panic attacks, characterized by anxiety and fear, resulting in a number of autonomic and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory stimulation is a common event during panic attacks. The respiratory abnormality most often reported in PD patients is increased CO2 sensitivity, which has given rise to the hypothesis of fundamental abnormalities in the physiological mechanisms that control breathing in PD. There is evidence that PD patients with dominant respiratory symptoms are more sensitive to respiratory tests than are those who do not manifest such symptoms, and that the former group constitutes a distinct subtype. Patients with PD tend to hyperventilate and to panic in response to respiratory stimulants such as CO2, triggering the activation of a hypersensitive fear network. Although respiratory physiology seems to remain normal in these subjects, recent evidence supports the idea that they present subclinical abnormalities in respiration and in other functions related to body homeostasis. The fear network, composed of the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex, the amygdala and its brain stem projections, might be oversensitive in PD patients. This theory might explain why medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy are both clearly effective. Our aim was to review the relationship between respiration and PD, addressing the respiratory subtype of PD and the hyperventilation syndrome, with a focus on respiratory challenge tests, as well as on the current mechanistic concepts and the pharmacological implications of this relationship.

  15. Time to pregnancy among Danish laboratory technicians who were a part of the National Birth Cohort

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2005-01-01

    in 1997-2003. Altogether 6250 female teachers formed the reference group. A discrete-time survival analysis with a complementary log-log link was applied to estimate the fecundability ratio between the exposed and unexposed women, with adjustment for maternal age, gravidity, smoking, prepregnancy body......OBJECTIVES: The Danish National Birth Cohort was used to examine whether laboratory work was associated with reduced fecundity. METHODS: Self-reported data on laboratory work and waiting time to pregnancy (0-2, 3-5, 6-12 and > 12 months) were used for 829 female laboratory technicians interviewed...... mass index, and paternal job. RESULTS: No difference in time to pregnancy was found between the laboratory technicians and teachers or between the laboratory technicians with different exposures. The adjusted fecundability ratio for the laboratory technicians was 0.94 [95% confidence interval (95% CI...

  16. Multidisciplinary training program to create new breed of radiation monitor: the health and safety technician

    Vance, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    A multidiscipline training program established to create a new monitor, theHealth and Safety Technician, is described. The training program includes instruction in fire safety, explosives safety, industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, and general safety practices

  17. [Competencies in the education of nursing technicians to implement the nursing care systematization].

    da Cruz, Andrea de Mello Pereira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2010-12-01

    This is a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study whose general objective was to learn, considering the perspective of the nursing technician who works in school hospitals, the competencies developed during their educational process to implement the Nursing Care Systematization (NCS). Data collection and analysis were carried out through a focal group, with content analysis and nursing technicians. Two thematic categories emerged: The participation of the nursing technician in the NCS and The competencies in the education of the nursing technician. Each one received two subcategories: Conception of the NCS and (De)valuation of the NCS, Technical-scientific competency and Competency in the interpersonal relationship, respectively. It was observed that the NCS must be shared, discussed and made public among nursing professionals, so that they may acknowledge themselves as the leading actors of their methodology and be aware that their practices determine the results.

  18. Integrated Technical Information for the Air Logistics Center: Enhancing Maintenance Technician Task Performance

    Mitta, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    This technical paper documents the final results of an analysis of the task environment under which depot maintenance technicians perform their jobs--specifically, programmed depot maintenance (PDM) for F-15 aircraft...

  19. Nontraditional roles for certified pharmacy technicians in a pharmaceutical company.

    Fung, Stacey M; Gilmour, Christine; McCracken, David; Shane, Korban; Matsuura, Gary

    2006-01-01

    To describe nontraditional roles for Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhTs) within pharmaceutical industry. Drug information department within a large biotechnology/pharmaceutical organization. The Medical Communications department within Genentech uses a skills-mix staffing model in which employees with varying educational and training backgrounds work as a team on meeting the informational needs of consumers and health professionals who contact the company. One position within the department is that of Medical Communications Associate, responsible primarily for managing product inquiries. Medical Communications Associates have degrees in life sciences or an equivalent combination of education and experience, including a minimum of 2 years of related experience in the health care industry. Currently, four of the seven Medical Communications Associates in the department are CPhTs. Not applicable. Ability to recruit CPhTs for Medical Communications Associate positions, and job satisfaction of those hired into these positions. Critical basic skills needed for the Medical Communications Associate position include strong computer literacy, ability to multitask, and ability to work in an environment with frequent interruptions. Strong oral and written communications skills, customer service skills, ability to deal with stressful situations, product-specific knowledge, ability to work on a daily basis with Medical Communications Pharmacists, and knowledge of medical terminology are also important. The skills set of CPhTs matches these requirements, as evidenced by the experiences of the four staff members who have worked in the department for a total of 17 person-years. This nontraditional role for CPhTs can be rewarding and beneficial to all, affording an unique opportunity within the pharmaceutical industry. The skill set and experience of CPhTs can be used in the nontraditional pharmacy practice setting of drug information.

  20. Measuring teamwork and conflict among emergency medical technician personnel.

    Patterson, P Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D; Weaver, Sallie J; Rosen, Michael A; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R; Arnold, Robert M; Yealy, Donald M; Salas, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among emergency medical technician (EMT) partnerships. We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool (EMT-TEAMWORK). We performed a series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. We received 687 completed surveys. The EFAs identified a nine-factor solution. We labeled these factors 1) Team Orientation, 2) Team Structure & Leadership, 3) Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, 4) Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, 5) Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, 6) Process Conflict, 7) Strong Task Conflict, 8) Mild Task Conflict, and 9) Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short-form (30-item SF) and long-form (45-item LF) version. The CFAs determined that both the SF and the LF possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties, with a mean Cronbach's alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all nine factors (mean = 0.84; minimum = 0.78, maximum = 0.94). The mean Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF was 0.87 (minimum = 0.79, maximum = 0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all nine factors and the global score for the SF and LF. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, standard deviation [SD] 21.5, SF; 49.3, SD 19.8, LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7, SD 18.1, for both SF and LF). We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners.

  1. Measuring teamwork and conflict among Emergency Medical Technician personnel

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D.; Weaver, Sallie J.; Rosen, Michael A.; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R.; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R.; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.; Salas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) partnerships. Methods We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool. We performed a series of Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. Results We received 687 completed surveys. The EFA analyses identified a 9-factor solution. We labeled these factors [1] Team Orientation, [2] Team Structure & Leadership, [3] Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, [4] Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, [5] Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, [6] Process Conflict, [7] Strong Task Conflict, [8] Mild Task Conflict, and [9] Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short form (30-item SF) and long form (45-item LF) version. The CFA analyses determined that both the SF and LF versions possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties with a mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all 9-factors (mean=0.84; min=0.78, max=0.94). The mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF version was 0.87 (min=0.79, max=0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all 9 factors and the global score for the SF and LF versions. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, SD 21.5 SF; 49.3 SD 19.8 LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7 SD 18.1 for both SF and LF). Conclusions We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners. PMID:22128909

  2. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens potential novel avenues of therapy to clinicians struggling to treat patients with apparently intractable respiratory complaints. This review provides a description of the airway reflux syndrome, its effects on the lung and current and future therapeutic options. PMID:23251752

  3. A method for the efficient and effective evaluation of contract health physics technicians

    Burkdoll, S.C.; Conley, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Wolf Creek has developed a method for efficiently training contract health physics technicians. The time allotted for training contractors prior to a refueling and maintenance outage is normally limited to a few days. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a systematic method to evaluate prior experience as well as practical skills and knowledge. In addition, instruction in the particular methodologies used at Wolf Creek hadto be included with methods for evaluating technician comprehension

  4. Survey on the use of CAD-CAM technology by UK and Irish dental technicians.

    Blackwell, E; Nesbit, M; Petridis, H

    2017-05-12

    Statement of the problem Digital workflows (CAD/CAM) have been introduced in dentistry during recent years. No published information exists on dental technicians' use and reporting of this technology.Purpose The aim of this cross sectional survey was to identify the extent digital technology has infiltrated the workplace and to investigate the factors affecting the use of CAD-CAM technology by dental laboratory technicians within Ireland and the UK.Materials and methods A web-based questionnaire was composed (Opinio, Object Planet Inc. Oslo, Norway) and distributed to UK and Irish dental technicians. Answers to all questions were anonymous and grouped such that general information was gathered initially, followed by branching of the survey into two sections depending on whether or not the respondent worked with CAD-CAM technology. Results were compiled and statistical analysis (Fisher's Exact test, SPSS, IBM, Armonk, New York, USA) was performed in order to investigate any correlation between various demographic variables and the answers provided.Results The survey was distributed to 760 UK technicians and 77 Irish technicians. The total number of completed surveys was 105, which yielded a total response rate of 14%. Most technicians reported using some form of CAD/CAM aspect in the workflow, and this was more significant for technicians working in large laboratories. Most training received was company-led. Large laboratories were also significantly correlated with less outsourcing of CAD/CAM work and a change in dental material use leading to the increase of zirconia and the decrease of noble alloys. Dental technicians did not report any significant change in working relationships and staffing as a result of CAD/CAM incorporation. High initial investment cost was the most common reason quoted from non-users, along with the lack of such technology in their working environment.

  5. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the Role of the Pharmacy Technician and Identifying Their Future Role in Medicines Optimisation

    Boughen, Melanie; Sutton, Jane; Fenn, Tess

    2017-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, pharmacy technicians have worked alongside pharmacists in community and hospital pharmacy. Changes within pharmacy provide opportunity for role expansion and with no apparent career pathway, there is a need to define the current pharmacy technician role and role in medicines optimisation. Aim: To capture the current roles of pharmacy technicians and identify how their future role will contribute to medicines optimisation. Methods: Following ethical approval and piloting, an online survey to ascertain pharmacy technicians’ views about their roles was undertaken. Recruitment took place in collaboration with the Association of Pharmacy Technicians UK. Data were exported to SPSS, data screened and descriptive statistics produced. Free text responses were analysed and tasks collated into categories reflecting the type of work involved in each task. Results: Responses received were 393 (28%, n = 1380). Results were organised into five groups: i.e., hospital, community, primary care, General Practitioner (GP) practice and other (which included HM Prison Service). Thirty tasks were reported as commonly undertaken in three or more settings and 206 (84.7%, n = 243) pharmacy technicians reported they would like to expand their role. Conclusions: Tasks core to hospital and community pharmacy should be considered for inclusion to initial education standards to reflect current practice. Post qualification, pharmacy technicians indicate a significant desire to expand clinically and managerially allowing pharmacists more time in patient-facing/clinical roles. PMID:28970452

  7. Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory

    Egbert, W.F.; Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function

  8. New Zealand dental technicians and continuing education: findings from a qualitative survey.

    Anderson, Vivienne R; Pang, Lilian C Y; Aarts, John M

    2012-06-01

    Under the 2003 Health Practitioners Competence Assurance (HPCA) Act, New Zealand registered dental technicians are subject to mandatory Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements. Internationally, little published literature has examined dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and CPD needs, and there is no published literature relating to the New Zealand context. Available research highlights the importance of CPD for maintaining high professional standards, ensuring patient safety, allowing dental technicians to keep abreast of current research and technological advances, fostering peer networks, and promoting job satisfaction. In 2009, an online open-ended questionnaire was developed to examine New Zealand dental and clinical dental technicians' perspectives of CPD and their perceived CPD needs. In total, 45 New Zealand registered dental technicians responded. Questionnaire responses provided rich qualitative insights into dental technicians' wide-ranging perceptions of CPD, factors that make CPD involvement more or less difficult and more or less desirable, and ways in which CPD access and relevance might be improved. This paper discusses the survey findings in the light of the existing literature on CPD and in relation to the unique New Zealand regulatory environment. It highlights the factors which respondents identified as shaping their CPD decisions, barriers to CPD engagement, perceived CPD needs, suggestions as to how the current CPD system could be improved, and areas for future research.

  9. Pharmacist and Technician Perceptions of Tech-Check-Tech in Community Pharmacy Practice Settings.

    Frost, Timothy P; Adams, Alex J

    2018-04-01

    Tech-check-tech (TCT) is a practice model in which pharmacy technicians with advanced training can perform final verification of prescriptions that have been previously reviewed for appropriateness by a pharmacist. Few states have adopted TCT in part because of the common view that this model is controversial among members of the profession. This article aims to summarize the existing research on pharmacist and technician perceptions of community pharmacy-based TCT. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE (January 1990 to August 2016) and Google Scholar (January 1990 to August 2016) using the terms "tech* and check," "tech-check-tech," "checking technician," and "accuracy checking tech*." Of the 7 studies identified we found general agreement among both pharmacists and technicians that TCT in community pharmacy settings can be safely performed. This agreement persisted in studies of theoretical TCT models and in studies assessing participants in actual community-based TCT models. Pharmacists who had previously worked with a checking technician were generally more favorable toward TCT. Both pharmacists and technicians in community pharmacy settings generally perceived TCT to be safe, in both theoretical surveys and in surveys following actual TCT demonstration projects. These perceptions of safety align well with the actual outcomes achieved from community pharmacy TCT studies.

  10. A reliability-based maintenance technicians' workloads optimisation model with stochastic consideration

    Ighravwe, D. E.; Oke, S. A.; Adebiyi, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    The growing interest in technicians' workloads research is probably associated with the recent surge in competition. This was prompted by unprecedented technological development that triggers changes in customer tastes and preferences for industrial goods. In a quest for business improvement, this worldwide intense competition in industries has stimulated theories and practical frameworks that seek to optimise performance in workplaces. In line with this drive, the present paper proposes an optimisation model which considers technicians' reliability that complements factory information obtained. The information used emerged from technicians' productivity and earned-values using the concept of multi-objective modelling approach. Since technicians are expected to carry out routine and stochastic maintenance work, we consider these workloads as constraints. The influence of training, fatigue and experiential knowledge of technicians on workload management was considered. These workloads were combined with maintenance policy in optimising reliability, productivity and earned-values using the goal programming approach. Practical datasets were utilised in studying the applicability of the proposed model in practice. It was observed that our model was able to generate information that practicing maintenance engineers can apply in making more informed decisions on technicians' management.

  11. Respiratory insufficiency with preserved diaphragmatic function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Yamauchi, Rika; Imai, Tomihiro; Tsuda, Emiko; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Shimohama, Shun

    2014-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal study to elucidate the correlation between respiratory insufficiency and respiratory biomarkers, including diaphragmatic compound muscle action potential (DCMAP), at the initiation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The patients were assessed at least every six months. Additional assessments were performed at the start of respiratory therapy when the patients met the criteria for the initiation of NIV. Each assessment consisted of a full neurological examination, a phrenic nerve conduction study, respiratory function tests, and nocturnal pulsed oximetry. We enrolled 43 patients with either definite or probable ALS as defined by the revised El Escorial criteria. The patients were divided into two groups according to the timing of the initiation of respiratory therapy. Seventeen patients (group A) met the criteria for NIV initiation when their DCMAP remained normal. Twenty-six patients (group B) met the criteria when their DCMAP decreased below normal limits. Although respiratory function parameters were significantly worse in group B compared with group A at NIV initiation, more than 80% of the patients in both groups developed nocturnal desaturation during sleep. DCMAP is not always a reliable indicator for determining the optimal timing for NIV initiation during the progression of respiratory insufficiency in ALS. Physicians should be aware of the risk of respiratory insufficiency during sleep in patients with ALS.

  12. The evaluation of the dust-related occupational respiratory disorders of dental laboratory technicians working in Denizli Province

    Belkis Yurdasal

    2015-01-01

    DISCUSSION: Technicians′ use of personal protective tools is not enough and ratio of smoking is rather high. Pneumoconiosis cases clearly show this exposure. It is necessary to adopt comprehensive work health and safety precautions considering the determined risk factors.

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis in Children.

    Smith, Dustin K; Seales, Sajeewane; Budzik, Carol

    2017-01-15

    Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of this infection. RSV is transmitted through contact with respiratory droplets either directly from an infected person or self-inoculation by contaminated secretions on surfaces. Patients with RSV bronchiolitis usually present with two to four days of upper respiratory tract symptoms such as fever, rhinorrhea, and congestion, followed by lower respiratory tract symptoms such as increasing cough, wheezing, and increased respiratory effort. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated its clinical practice guideline for diagnosis and management of RSV bronchiolitis to minimize unnecessary diagnostic testing and interventions. Bronchiolitis remains a clinical diagnosis, and diagnostic testing is not routinely recommended. Treatment of RSV infection is mainly supportive, and modalities such as bronchodilators, epinephrine, corticosteroids, hypertonic saline, and antibiotics are generally not useful. Evidence supports using supplemental oxygen to maintain adequate oxygen saturation; however, continuous pulse oximetry is no longer required. The other mainstay of therapy is intravenous or nasogastric administration of fluids for infants who cannot maintain their hydration status with oral fluid intake. Educating parents on reducing the risk of infection is one of the most important things a physician can do to help prevent RSV infection, especially early in life. Children at risk of severe lower respiratory tract infection should receive immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, in up to five monthly doses. Prophylaxis guidelines are restricted to infants born before 29 weeks' gestation, infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity, and infants and children with hemodynamically significant heart disease.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  15. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-01-01

    Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ produ...

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Confalonieri, Marco; Salton, Francesco; Fabiano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foste...

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    Dudas, Robert A.; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  18. Maintaining Respiratory Health in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    MR Modaresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an inherited disease that primarily affects the lungs and the digestive system, however, it also affects a number of other organs and systems. More than 90% of mortality of  CF patients is due to lung complications.  Healthy lungs are important for a long life for people with CF, We will discuss two important topics for maintaining respiratory health. Chronic use of drugs for maintaining respiratory health There are a number of drugs available to keep CF lungs healthy. We will discuss the science behind the recommendations for use of: Inhaled antibiotics Dornase alfa Azithromycin Hypertonic saline High-dose ibuprofen Ivacaftor CF Airway Clearance Therapies Airway Clearance therapy is very important to keeping CF lungs healthy. Our discussions cover the following topics such as the: Daily airway clearance Different techniques of airway clearance Effect of aerobic exercise on airway clearance  

  19. Surfactant Protein D in Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Diseases

    Sorensen, Grith L.

    2018-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a multimeric collectin that is involved in innate immune defense and expressed in pulmonary, as well as non-pulmonary, epithelia. SP-D exerts antimicrobial effects and dampens inflammation through direct microbial interactions and modulation of host cell responses via a series of cellular receptors. However, low protein concentrations, genetic variation, biochemical modification, and proteolytic breakdown can induce decomposition of multimeric SP-D into low-molecular weight forms, which may induce pro-inflammatory SP-D signaling. Multimeric SP-D can decompose into trimeric SP-D, and this process, and total SP-D levels, are partly determined by variation within the SP-D gene, SFTPD. SP-D has been implicated in the development of respiratory diseases including respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, allergic asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Disease-induced breakdown or modifications of SP-D facilitate its systemic leakage from the lung, and circulatory SP-D is a promising biomarker for lung injury. Moreover, studies in preclinical animal models have demonstrated that local pulmonary treatment with recombinant SP-D is beneficial in these diseases. In recent years, SP-D has been shown to exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects in various non-pulmonary organs and to have effects on lipid metabolism and pro-inflammatory effects in vessel walls, which enhance the risk of atherosclerosis. A common SFTPD polymorphism is associated with atherosclerosis and diabetes, and SP-D has been associated with metabolic disorders because of its effects in the endothelium and adipocytes and its obesity-dampening properties. This review summarizes and discusses the reported genetic associations of SP-D with disease and the clinical utility of circulating SP-D for respiratory disease prognosis. Moreover, basic research on the mechanistic links between SP-D and respiratory, cardiovascular, and metabolic diseases

  20. Critically Ill Patients With the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Arabi, Yaseen M; Al-Omari, Awad; Mandourah, Yasser; Al-Hameed, Fahad; Sindi, Anees A; Alraddadi, Basem; Shalhoub, Sarah; Almotairi, Abdullah; Al Khatib, Kasim; Abdulmomen, Ahmed; Qushmaq, Ismael; Mady, Ahmed; Solaiman, Othman; Al-Aithan, Abdulsalam M; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Ragab, Ahmed; Al Mekhlafi, Ghaleb A; Al Harthy, Abdulrahman; Kharaba, Ayman; Ahmadi, Mashael Al; Sadat, Musharaf; Mutairi, Hanan Al; Qasim, Eman Al; Jose, Jesna; Nasim, Maliha; Al-Dawood, Abdulaziz; Merson, Laura; Fowler, Robert; Hayden, Frederick G; Balkhy, Hanan H

    2017-10-01

    To describe patient characteristics, clinical manifestations, disease course including viral replication patterns, and outcomes of critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory infection from the Middle East respiratory syndrome and to compare these features with patients with severe acute respiratory infection due to other etiologies. Retrospective cohort study. Patients admitted to ICUs in 14 Saudi Arabian hospitals. Critically ill patients with laboratory-confirmed Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory infection (n = 330) admitted between September 2012 and October 2015 were compared to consecutive critically ill patients with community-acquired severe acute respiratory infection of non-Middle East respiratory syndrome etiology (non-Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory infection) (n = 222). None. Although Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory infection patients were younger than those with non-Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory infection (median [quartile 1, quartile 3] 58 yr [44, 69] vs 70 [52, 78]; p < 0.001), clinical presentations and comorbidities overlapped substantially. Patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory infection had more severe hypoxemic respiratory failure (PaO2/FIO2: 106 [66, 160] vs 176 [104, 252]; p < 0.001) and more frequent nonrespiratory organ failure (nonrespiratory Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score: 6 [4, 9] vs 5 [3, 7]; p = 0.002), thus required more frequently invasive mechanical ventilation (85.2% vs 73.0%; p < 0.001), oxygen rescue therapies (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation 5.8% vs 0.9%; p = 0.003), vasopressor support (79.4% vs 55.0%; p < 0.001), and renal replacement therapy (48.8% vs 22.1%; p < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, Middle East respiratory syndrome was independently associated with death compared to non-Middle East respiratory syndrome severe acute respiratory

  1. Clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center.

    Fera, Toni; Kanel, Keith T; Bolinger, Meghan L; Fink, Amber E; Iheasirim, Serah

    2018-02-01

    The creation of a clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center is described. In the Primary Care Resource Center (PCRC) Project, hospital-based care transition coordination hubs staffed by nurses and pharmacist teams were created in 6 independent community hospitals. At the largest site, patient volume for targeted diseases challenged the ability of the PCRC pharmacist to provide expected elements of care to targeted patients. Creation of a new pharmacy technician clinical support role was implemented as a cost-effective option to increase the pharmacist's efficiency. The pharmacist's work processes were reviewed and technical functions identified that could be assigned to a specially trained pharmacy technician under the direction of the PCRC pharmacist. Daily tasks performed by the pharmacy technician included maintenance of the patient roster and pending discharges, retrieval and documentation of pertinent laboratory and diagnostic test information from the patient's medical record, assembly of patient medication education materials, and identification of discrepancies between disparate systems' medication records. In the 6 months after establishing the PCRC pharmacy technician role, the pharmacist's completion of comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) for target patients increased by 40.5% ( p = 0.0223), driven largely by a 42.4% ( p technician to augment pharmacist care in a PCRC team extended the reach of the pharmacist and allowed more time for the pharmacist to engage patients. Technician support enabled the pharmacist to complete more CMRs and reduced the time required for chart reviews. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  3. The practical training of students - x-ray technicians and requirements to mentors in clinical bases

    Gagova, P; Boninska, N.; Jovchev, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Training of X-ray technicians in Bulgaria takes place in the Medical Colleges to Medical Universities. It's purpose is providing professional training of students in the area of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Practical training is based on the scientific and theoretical knowledge and skills and is organized in pedagogic environment, adequate to regularities for a gradual formation of practical skills and habits. The practical training and pre-graduation internship are performed in 1895 from total of 3810 hours, which represents about fifty percent of all training of X-ray technicians. Students are in groups of 2-4 students. Practical training is organized, accomplished and monitored by the teacher training practice with the help of a mentor in the clinical base. Purpose: To present the tasks of practical training of students - X-ray technicians and the requirements for the personal characteristics and activity of mentors. Materials and methods: Documentary method has been used. Literature and normative documents related to the practical training of students in 'X-ray technician' of Medical Colleges have been studied. The job descriptions of senior clinical X-ray technicians have been examined carefully. Results: By analyzing literature sources, we have structured the tasks of practical training and pre-graduation internship of students - X-ray technicians, also we have described the requirements for personal qualities of mentors and systematize the activities they perform. Conclusion: Practical training plays an important role in adaptation of young X-ray technicians to the conditions of medical work, improving their skills and habits, and to the development of specific practical skills for being able to respond to emergency conditions and to solve complicated practical situations. The mentor is the supervisor and the controller of interns who helps this happen through his own example, qualities and attitudes towards

  4. An in-depth examination into pharmacy technician worklife through an organizational behavior framework.

    Desselle, Shane P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are a vital part of the health care workforce. Little is known about perceptions of their own work environment that would engender more effective recruitment, retention, and management strategies by pharmacists and employers. The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of certified pharmacy technician worklife. Specific objectives included the identification of themes of worklife phenomena to assist with the development of appropriate responses by other pharmacy stakeholders and to ascertain the contribution of various factors engendering or discouraging career commitment of pharmacy technicians. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of pharmacy technicians in one U.S. state, who varied by their work settings and level of experience. The interview guide and corresponding participant responses were framed from around an organizational cultural basis rooted in organizational behavior theory. Notes from the interviews were analyzed thematically using directed content analysis. Four primary themes emerged, including: career impetus, job responsibilities, quality of work life, and equitable partnership. The data revealed pharmacy technicians' need for self-actualization and recognition of the value they bring to the organization. The participants identified primary responsibilities that contribute to their sense of worth and those that if not managed adequately potentially detract from their well-being and effectiveness. Findings in regard to rate of pay corroborate previous work on wages as both an intrinsic and extrinsic motivator. Pharmacy technicians seek equity among each other (their peers) and in a mutually beneficial relationship with their employing organization. This study provides the impetus for interventions and further study that should serve to enhance pharmacy technician effectiveness, quality of work life, and longevity in an emerging profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  5. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  6. Managing respiratory problems in athletes.

    Hull, James H; Ansley, Les; Robson-Ansley, Paula; Parsons, Jonathan P

    2012-08-01

    Respiratory problems are common in athletes of all abilities and can significantly impact upon their health and performance. In this article, we provide an overview of respiratory physiology in athletes. We also discuss the assessment and management of common clinical respiratory conditions as they pertain to athletes, including airways disease, respiratory tract infection and pneumothorax. We focus on providing a pragmatic approach and highlight important caveats for the physician treating respiratory conditions in this highly specific population.

  7. Respiratory disorders in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis

    Olga Alekseyevna Antelava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are rare disorders characterized by inflammatory lesions in skeletal muscles. These diseases include polymyositis (PM, dermatomyositis (DM, and inclusion body myositis, which exhibit clinicoimmunological heterogeneity and give different response to therapy. The most frequent manifestation in PM/DM patients is respiratory system dysfunction. The developing respiratory disorders are varied and may outpace the presentation of muscle pathology.

  8. A Grounded Theory Study of Aircraft Maintenance Technician Decision-Making

    Norcross, Robert

    Aircraft maintenance technician decision-making and actions have resulted in aircraft system errors causing aircraft incidents and accidents. Aircraft accident investigators and researchers examined the factors that influence aircraft maintenance technician errors and categorized the types of errors in an attempt to prevent similar occurrences. New aircraft technology introduced to improve aviation safety and efficiency incur failures that have no information contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, aircraft maintenance technicians must use only approved aircraft maintenance documents to repair, modify, and service aircraft. This qualitative research used a grounded theory approach to explore the decision-making processes and actions taken by aircraft maintenance technicians when confronted with an aircraft problem not contained in the aircraft maintenance manuals. The target population for the research was Federal Aviation Administration licensed aircraft and power plant mechanics from across the United States. Nonprobability purposeful sampling was used to obtain aircraft maintenance technicians with the experience sought in the study problem. The sample population recruitment yielded 19 participants for eight focus group sessions to obtain opinions, perceptions, and experiences related to the study problem. All data collected was entered into the Atlas ti qualitative analysis software. The emergence of Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making themes regarding Aircraft Maintenance Manual content, Aircraft Maintenance Technician experience, and legal implications of not following Aircraft Maintenance Manuals surfaced. Conclusions from this study suggest Aircraft Maintenance Technician decision-making were influenced by experience, gaps in the Aircraft Maintenance Manuals, reliance on others, realizing the impact of decisions concerning aircraft airworthiness, management pressures, and legal concerns

  9. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  10. Pharmacy technician-to-pharmacist ratios: a state-driven safety and quality decision.

    Bess, D Todd; Carter, Jason; DeLoach, Lindsey; White, Carol L

    2014-01-01

    To discuss the policy of pharmacy technician-to-pharmacist ratios by comparing Florida as an example of legislative-led authority versus Tennessee as an example of board of pharmacy-led ruling. Over the past 2 years, the Florida legislature has debated the issue of pharmacy staffing ratios, initially leaving the Florida Board of Pharmacy with little authority to advocate for and enact safe technician staffing ratios. Anticipating this situation, the Tennessee Board of Pharmacy created rules to meet pharmacy staffing needs while protecting the authority of the pharmacist-in-charge and promoting patient safety. Before enacting rules, members of the board toured the state and talked about proposed rule changes with pharmacists. The final rule sets the pharmacy technician-to-pharmacist ratio at 2:1 but permits a 4:1 ratio based on public safety considerations and availability of at least two Certified Pharmacy Technicians. Pharmacists and leaders within the profession should conduct further research on appropriate and safe ratios of pharmacy technicians to pharmacists, with a focus on safety and quality of care.

  11. Patient- and Technician-Oriented Attitudes Toward Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Devices.

    Lonergan, Brady; Nguyen, Eliza; Lembo, Cara; Hinchman, Carrie; Morales, Oscar G; Press, Daniel Z; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Stern, Adam P

    2018-01-25

    Four transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices are currently approved for use in treatment-resistant depression. The authors present the first data-driven study examining the patient- and technician-experience using three of these distinct devices. A retrospective survey design with both patient and technician arms was utilized. The study population included patients who received TMS for treatment-resistant depression at the Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for the first time between 2013 and 2016 and technicians who worked in the program from 2009 to 2017. Statistical analysis included t tests and analyses of variance to assess differences between and across the multiple groups, respectively. Patients treated with the NeuroStar device reported greater confidence that the treatment was being performed correctly compared with those treated with the Magstim device. Conversely, with regard to tolerability, patients treated with the Magstim device reported less pain in the last week and less pain on average compared with those treated with the NeuroStar device. On average, technicians reported feeling that both the Magstim and NeuroStar devices were significantly easier to use than the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device. Additionally, they found the former two devices to be more reliable and better tolerated. Furthermore, the technicians reported greater confidence in the Magstim and NeuroStar devices compared with the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device and indicated that they would be more likely to recommend the two former devices to other treatment centers.

  12. Effects of occupational exposure of X-Ray on hematological parameters of diagnostic technicians

    Taqi, Ali H.; Faraj, Kharman A.; Zaynal, Sarah A.; Hameed, Ahmed M.; Mahmood, Abd-Alkader A.

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effects of long term exposure of X-ray on diagnostic technicians which they work at Kirkuk hospitals through examining some hematological parameters which are white blood cells (WBC), Neutrophils, Lymphocyte, Monocyte, Eosinophil, Basophil, Reactive Lymphocyte, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (HCT), Mean Cell Volume (MCV), Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH), Mean Cell Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC), Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW), Platelet (PLT). The study included 54 male diagnostic technicians and 54 male healthy controls match with the first group to show any alteration of the hematological parameters. The diagnostic technicians divided into two groups depending on their work experience and hours working per day. The statistical analysis was performed using (Graph-pad) program. Our results showed that the Complete blood cells count (CBC) parameters (Neutrophil, Monocytes, Basophile, MCV, RDW and PLT) significantly (Pgroups of the diagnostic technicians compared with their controls. We concluded that chronic exposure of X-ray can significantly alter some hematological parameters and the number of hours working per day has observable effects on the some hematological parameters. We recommended training and courses about hazard of ionizing radiation should be organized for enhance the healthcare quality of the technicians and to improve their knowledge about benefit of radiation protection tools to protect themselves from any overexposure during the daily life.

  13. The enforcement regulation for the law for radiation technicians engaging in medical treatment

    1985-01-01

    The ordinance is set up under the provisions of the law concerning radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment, to enforce it. An application for the license of such a technician shall be filed according to the form prescribed, attached with a copy or an abstract of the census register of the applicant and a medical certificate of a doctor concerning whether the applicant is an insane, deaf or blind person, or a case of epidemic. The membership registration of such a technician shall include the number and date of the registration, the prefecture of his legal domicile, name birth date and sex distinction, the year and month of his success in the examination for such technicains, the items concerning the cancellation of the license or the suspension of the business, etc. The subjects of the examination for such technicians are physics, radiological physics, electrical engineering, chemistry, general basic medical science, radiological biology, photographing technology, treatment technics and others. An application for the examination for such technicians shall be filed to the Minister of Health and Welfare, attached with a personal history, a study certificate or a diploma of graduation, a photograph of the applicant and other specified documents. (Kubozono, M.)

  14. DNA damage and cytotoxicity in pathology laboratory technicians exposed to organic solvents

    TATIANE DE AQUINO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate potential DNA damage and cytotoxicity in pathology laboratory technicians exposed to organic solvents, mainly xylene. Peripheral blood and buccal cells samples were collected from 18 technicians occupationally exposed to organic solvents and 11 non-exposed individuals. The technicians were sampled at two moments: Monday and Friday. DNA damage and cytotoxicity were evaluated using the Comet Assay and the Buccal Micronucleus Cytome assay. Fifteen subjects (83.5% of the exposed group to solvents complained about some symptom probably related to contact with vapours of organic solvents. DNA damage in the exposed group to solvents was nearly 2-fold higher on Friday than on Monday, and in both moments the individuals of this group showed higher levels of DNA damage in relation to controls. No statistical difference was detected in buccal cell micronucleus frequency between the laboratory technicians and the control group. However, in the analysis performed on Friday, technicians presented higher frequency (about 3-fold of karyolytic and apoptotic-like cells (karyorrhectic and pyknotic in relation to control group. Considering the damage frequency and the working time, a positive correlation was found in the exposed group to solvents (r=0.468; p=0.05. The results suggest that pathology laboratory workers inappropriately exposed to organic solvents have increased levels of DNA damage.

  15. Characterization of Low Back Pain in Pilots and Maintenance Technicians on a Commercial Airline.

    Fajardo Rodriguez, Hugo A; Ortiz Mayorga, Viviana A

    2016-09-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is the most common complaint worldwide and the leading cause of disability in the workplace. In Colombia there are no epidemiological data on low back pain in aviation. This study aimed to characterize lower back pain in pilots and maintenance technicians in a Colombian commercial airline. Information was collected from the total population in a Colombian commercial airline in Bogota during the period from 2011 to 2013 using a voluntary survey which requested demographics, occupational (LEST survey) factors, back pain, and chronic pain (chronic pain grade scale). The prevalence rate of LBP in pilot respondents was 71% and the factors associated previously have belonged to the military forces: occupational exposure to physical load and work time. Chronic low back pain was at a prevalence of 49%. The prevalence of LBP in maintenance technicians was 65%. Associated factors were again similar to military forces and included mental workload. Chronic pain had a prevalence of 65%. Factors associated with chronic low back pain were the technicians' time in office and physical load. The prevalence of lower back pain in pilots is similar to that presented in the airline world population. In the case of maintenance technicians, the prevalence was higher than those found in other similar groups, but very similar to prevalences presented in different business industries, including the transport sector. Fajardo Rodriguez HA, Ortiz Mayorga VA. Characterization of low back pain in pilots and maintenance technicians on a commercial airline. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(9):795-799.

  16. Prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and postbronchiolitic wheezing

    Kimpen Jan LL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the primary cause of hospitalization for acute respiratory tract illness in general and specifically for bronchiolitis in young children. The link between RSV bronchiolitis and reactive airway disease is not completely understood, even though RSV bronchiolitis is frequently followed by recurrent episodes of wheezing. Therapy with ribavirin does not appear to significantly reduce long-term respiratory outcome of RSV lower respiratory tract infection, and corticosteroid or bronchodilator therapy may possibly improve outcomes only on a short-term basis. No vaccine against RSV is yet available. It is not known whether prophylaxis with RSV intravenous immune globulin or palivizumab can reduce postbronchiolitic wheezing.

  17. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  18. Technician Consistency in Specular Microscopy Measurements: A "Real-World" Retrospective Analysis of a United States Eye Bank.

    Rand, Gabriel M; Kwon, Ji Won; Gore, Patrick K; McCartney, Mitchell D; Chuck, Roy S

    2017-10-01

    To quantify consistency of endothelial cell density (ECD) measurements among technicians in a single US eye bank operating under typical operating conditions. In this retrospective analysis of 51 microscopy technicians using a semiautomated counting method on 35,067 eyes from July 2007 to May 2015, technician- and date-related marginal ECD effects were calculated using linear regression models. ECD variance was correlated with the number of specular microscopy technicians. Technician mean ECDs ranged from 2386 ± 431 to 3005 ± 560 cells/mm. Nine technicians had statistically and clinically significant marginal effects. Annual mean ECDs adjusted for changes in technicians ranged from 2422 ± 433 to 2644 ± 430 cells/mm. The period of 2007 to 2009 had statistically and clinically significant marginal effects. There was a nonstatistically significant association between the number of technicians and ECD standard deviation. There was significant ECD variability associated with specular microscopy technicians and with the date of measurement. We recommend that eye banks collect data related to laboratory factors that have been shown to influence ECD variability.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and occupation: Any association? Prevalence among auto technicians and school teachers in South West Nigeria.

    Akintunde, Adeseye A; Oloyede, Taiwo W

    2017-11-01

    To determine occupational association with metabolic syndrome among auto technicians and school teachers. One hundred and sixty six subjects were selected for this study. Clinical data was obtained while laboratory investigations including plasma glucose and lipid profile were performed. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 20.0. Pauto technicians. Mean serum triglycerides was significantly higher among auto-technicians compared to school teachers in this study. The prevalence of some conventional cardiovascular risk factors was significantly higher among auto-technicians compared to school teachers: Impaired blood glucose (9.6% vs. 1.2%, pauto-technicians. Based on the WHO and the Harmonized criteria, metabolic syndrome was more frequent among auto-technicians compared to school teachers. (8.4% vs. 1.2% and 19.3% vs. 7.2% respectively, pauto technicians despite their high level of physical activity, exertion and education compared to teachers. This may be related to the increased occupational exposure to organic and inorganic materials from dust particles, oil and oil related matter and particulate matter among auto technicians. Prompt definitive evaluation of this concept and appropriate health education to encourage safety mechanism can reduce this burden of metabolic syndrome among auto technicians in Nigeria. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fisioterapia respiratória em crianças com doença falciforme e síndrome torácica aguda Respiratory therapy in children with sickle cell disease and acute chest syndrome

    Sandro Valter Hostyn

    2011-12-01

    search of published articles found in Medline, Lilacs, SciELO and Cochrane databases, between 1995 and 2009, was carried out using the following keywords: "sickle cell disease", "acute chest syndrome", "physical therapy", "child", "incentive spirometry", in English and Portuguese; all review studies were excluded. The recovered studies were then classified according to their level of evidence and recommendation. DATA SYNTHESIS: Five papers were retrieved. Among them, three used incentive spirometry that played an important role in the prevention of pulmonary complications associated with acute chest syndrome (evidence levels II, III and IV; one of these studies (evidence II compared incentive spirometry versus positive expiratory pressure and did not find differences between them. One paper reported a clinical bundle to improve the quality of care, including incentive spirometry (evidence level V. Incentive spirometry was associated with shorter length of stay and less requirement of oral pain medications. Another study evaluated the effect of non-invasive ventilation on respiratory distress in children that could not perform incentive spirometry and reported improvement in the oxygenation and in the respiratory distress (evidence level V. CONCLUSIONS: Physiotherapy techniques with incentive spirometry device, positive expiratory pressure and non-invasive ventilation can be performed in children with sickle cell disease and acute chest syndrome, with a C recommendation level.

  1. THE ROLE OF SCHOOL TECHNICIANS IN PROMOTING SCIENCE THROUGH PRACTICAL WORK

    Anne T. Helliar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of the role of practical work in UK’s secondary school science lessons, the impact that practical work has in the promotion of science, the challenges created through use of non-specialist science teachers and a possible additional role for science technicians. The paper considers how improved deployment of suitably experienced school science technicians and their recognition, by schools’ management, for their involvement in the delivery of training in the use of practical work, for less experienced teachers, could benefit schools and their students. This together with its companion paper endeavours to show how the more effective use of practical work and technicians can encourage more students to select science at higher, non-compulsory levels.

  2. The nuclear industry is looking for its technicians; Le nucleaire cherche ses techniciens

    Dumas, A

    2010-03-15

    With massive retirements planned up to 2015, the French nuclear industry wishes to recruit technicians for the operation and maintenance of its power plants. The French nuclear park represents 19 power plants with 58 reactors. The nuclear industry personnel represents 19000 people at EdF and about 20000 people from about 600 different service provider companies. Technician's salary ranges from 1500 to 2800 euros for experienced people, bonus not included. Before being operational, the French nuclear technicians have to follow a long training period in one of the 20 specialized and certified training centres. However, the training demand is so important that the industry suffers from a lack of instructors as well. (J.S.)

  3. Appendices to the guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    1989-10-01

    The current publication, a supplement to the IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power, in conjunction with which it should be read, aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. The Guidebook and this TECDOC complement the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. This TECDOC supplements the Guidebook with valuable information on the national experience of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States. Figs and tabs

  4. Does pneumoconiosis of dental technician cause to calcific pleural lesions? (Case report

    Abdurrahman ŞENYİĞİT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The articles about various pneumoconiosis in dental technicians who work in inconvenient conditions have been increasing in recent years. Exposure to dust and fume that occur during the dental procedure may play role in pneumoconiosis of dental technicians.A 53 years old male patient conveyed that he has worked in dental prosthesis procedures for 22 years (1968-1990.Environmental asbestosis was not established in the history of the case but there were calcified pleural plaques in the chest x-ray graphy.There were appearance of calcific asbest plaques in many section of thorax CT.A case of pneumoconiosis in dental technician who work in unadequate preventive conditions was reported in this paper. Probably ,exposure to the asbest fibers that occurs during the procedure of dental prosthesis were the main reason for developing calcific pleural lesions.

  5. Medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews by pharmacy technicians in a geriatric ward

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Gronkjaer, Louise Smed; Duckert, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Incomplete medication histories obtained on hospital admission are responsible for more than 25% of prescribing errors. This study aimed to evaluate whether pharmacy technicians can assist hospital physicians' in obtaining medication histories by performing medication reconciliation an...... reconciliation and focused medication reviews. Further randomized, controlled studies including a larger number of patients are required to elucidate whether these observations are of significance and of importance for securing patient safety....... and prescribing reviews. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the interventions made by pharmacy technicians could reduce the time spent by the nurses on administration of medications to the patients. METHODS: This observational study was conducted over a 7 week period in the geriatric ward at Odense...... University Hospital, Denmark. Two pharmacy technicians conducted medication reconciliation and prescribing reviews at the time of patients' admission to the ward. The reviews were conducted according to standard operating procedures developed by a clinical pharmacist and approved by the Head of the Geriatric...

  6. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil.

  7. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure

    Nikola N. Radovanović

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin, with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES, and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF. We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF there is no coherence between signals (p < 0.01, while in HF-Sin it is reduced (p < 0.05, compared with control subjects. In all heart failure groups causality between signals is diminished, but with significantly stronger causality of RR signal in respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the

  8. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure.

    Radovanović, Nikola N; Pavlović, Siniša U; Milašinović, Goran; Kirćanski, Bratislav; Platiša, Mirjana M

    2018-01-01

    We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals) and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin), with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES), and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF). We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF) there is no coherence between signals ( p respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the presence of atrial/ventricular arrhythmias and it could be revealed by complementary methods of time series analysis.

  9. Expanded pharmacy technician roles: Accepting verbal prescriptions and communicating prescription transfers.

    Frost, Timothy P; Adams, Alex J

    2017-11-01

    As the role of the clinical pharmacist continues to develop and advance, it is critical to ensure pharmacists can operate in a practice environment and workflow that supports the full deployment of their clinical skills. When pharmacy technician roles are optimized, patient safety can be enhanced and pharmacists may dedicate more time to advanced clinical services. Currently, 17 states allow technicians to accept verbal prescriptions called in by a prescriber or prescriber's agent, or transfer a prescription order from one pharmacy to another. States that allow these activities generally put few legal limitations on them, and instead defer to the professional judgment of the supervising pharmacist whether to delegate these tasks or not. These activities were more likely to be seen in states that require technicians to be registered and certified, and in states that have accountability mechanisms (e.g., discipline authority) in place for technicians. There is little evidence to suggest these tasks cannot be performed safely and accurately by appropriately trained technicians, and the track record of success with these tasks spans four decades in some states. Pharmacists can adopt strong practice policies and procedures to mitigate the risk of harm from verbal orders, such as instituting read-back/spell-back techniques, or requiring the indication for each phoned-in medication, among other strategies. Pharmacists may also exercise discretion in deciding to whom to delegate these tasks. As the legal environment becomes more permissive, we foresee investment in more robust education and training of technicians to cover these activities. Thus, with the adoption of robust practice policies and procedures, delegation of verbal orders and prescription transfers can be safe and effective, remove undue stress on pharmacists, and potentially free up pharmacist time for higher-order clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer Vision Tool and Technician as First Reader of Lung Cancer Screening CT Scans.

    Ritchie, Alexander J; Sanghera, Calvin; Jacobs, Colin; Zhang, Wei; Mayo, John; Schmidt, Heidi; Gingras, Michel; Pasian, Sergio; Stewart, Lori; Tsai, Scott; Manos, Daria; Seely, Jean M; Burrowes, Paul; Bhatia, Rick; Atkar-Khattra, Sukhinder; van Ginneken, Bram; Tammemagi, Martin; Tsao, Ming Sound; Lam, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    To implement a cost-effective low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening program at the population level, accurate and efficient interpretation of a large volume of LDCT scans is needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate a workflow strategy to identify abnormal LDCT scans in which a technician assisted by computer vision (CV) software acts as a first reader with the aim to improve speed, consistency, and quality of scan interpretation. Without knowledge of the diagnosis, a technician reviewed 828 randomly batched scans (136 with lung cancers, 556 with benign nodules, and 136 without nodules) from the baseline Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study that had been annotated by the CV software CIRRUS Lung Screening (Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Nijmegen, The Netherlands). The scans were classified as either normal (no nodules ≥1 mm or benign nodules) or abnormal (nodules or other abnormality). The results were compared with the diagnostic interpretation by Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study radiologists. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the technician in identifying an abnormal scan were 97.8% (95% confidence interval: 96.4-98.8) and 98.0% (95% confidence interval: 89.5-99.7), respectively. Of the 112 prevalent nodules that were found to be malignant in follow-up, 92.9% were correctly identified by the technician plus CV compared with 84.8% by the study radiologists. The average time taken by the technician to review a scan after CV processing was 208 ± 120 seconds. Prescreening CV software and a technician as first reader is a promising strategy for improving the consistency and quality of screening interpretation of LDCT scans. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome among laboratory technicians in relation to personal and ergonomic factors at work.

    El-Helaly, Mohamed; Balkhy, Hanan H; Vallenius, Laura

    2017-11-25

    Work-related carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has been reported in different occupations, including laboratory technicians, so this study was carried out to determine the prevalence and the associated personal and ergonomic factors for CTS among laboratory technicians. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 279 laboratory technicians at King Fahd Hospital, Saudi Arabia, who filled in a self-administered questionnaire, including questions regarding their demographic criteria, occupational history, job tasks, workplace tools, ergonomic factors at work, and symptoms suggestive of CTS. Physical examinations and electrodiagnostic studies were carried out for those who had symptoms suggestive of CTS to confirm the diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed for both personal and physical factors in association with confirmed CTS among laboratory technicians. The prevalence of CTS among the laboratory technicians was 9.7% (27/279). The following were the statistically significant risk factors for CTS among them: gender (all cases of CTS were female, P=0.00), arm/hand exertion (OR: 7.96; 95% CI: 1.84-34.33), pipetting (OR: 7.27; 95% CI: 3.15-16.78), repetitive tasks (OR: 4.60; 95% CI: 1.39-15.70), using unadjustable chairs or desks (OR: 3.35; 95% CI: 1.23-9.15), and working with a biosafety cabinet (OR: 2.49; 95% CI: 1.11-5.59). CTS cases had significant longer work duration (17.9 ± 5.6 years) than CTS non-case (11.5 ± 7.4 yeas) with low OR (1.108). This study demonstrates some personal and ergonomic factors associated with CTS among the laboratory technicians, including female gender, arm/hand exertion, pipetting, repetitive tasks, working with a biosafety cabinet, and an unadjusted workstation.

  12. The validation of the Utrecht work engagement scale for emergency medical technicians in Gauteng

    JLP Naudé

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to validate the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES for emergency medical technicians in the Gauteng Province of South Africa and to determine its construct equivalence and bias for different language groups. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a convenient sample (N = 318 of emergency medical technicians in Gauteng. The UWES and a biographical questionnaire were administered. A two-factor model of work engagement, consisting of Vigour/Dedication and Absorption was found. Exploratory factor analysis with target rotations confirmed the construct equivalence of the work engagement construct for white and black employees.

  13. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among laboratory technicians and work-related stress may aggravate the problem. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effect of a multifaceted worksite intervention on pain and stress among laboratory technicians with chronic musculoskeletal......: neck, shoulder, lower and upper back, elbow, and hand at 10 week follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was stress assessed by Cohen´s perceived stress questionnaire. In addition, an explorative dose-response analysis was performed on the adherence to PCMT with pain and stress, respectively......, as outcome measures. RESULTS: A significant (P stress was observed (treatment by time P = 0.16). Exploratory analyses for each body...

  14. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered.

    2013-06-01

    The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered provides standards and tools to guide competence in performing nutrition and dietetics practice. Composed of statutory and individual components, the DTR's scope of practice is determined by state statute and the DTR's education, training, credentialing, and demonstrated and documented competence in practice. The Scope of Practice for the Dietetic Technician, Registered reflects the Academy's position on the DTR scope of practice and the essential technical assistance role of the DTR in providing safe timely person-centered care for the delivery of quality food and nutrition services.

  15. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  16. Adult respiratory distress syndrome

    Svendsen, J.; Jespersen, J.; Skjoedt, T.

    1986-01-01

    Our present-day knowledge concerning the clinico-chemical and radiological findings in adult respiratory distress syndrome are described. Three typical case histories have been selected to illustrate this condition; they were due to multiple trauma or sepsis. It is stressed that radiology is in a key position for making the diagnosis and for observing the course of the illness. (orig) [de

  17. European Respiratory Society statement

    Miravitlles, Marc; Dirksen, Asger; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    lung disease. A large proportion of individuals affected remain undiagnosed and therefore without access to appropriate care and treatment.The most recent international statement on AATD was published by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society in 2003. Since then there has...

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.

  19. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  20. Textbook of respiratory medicine

    Murray, J.F.; Nadel, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a clinical reference of respiratory medicine. It also details basic science aspects of pulmonary physiology and describes recently developed, sophisticated diagnostic tools and therapeutic methods. It also covers anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and pathology; microbiologic, radiologic, nuclear medicine, and biopsy methods for diagnosis

  1. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  2. [Respiratory handicap. Recognition, evaluation and social benefits].

    Marsac, J; Pujet, J C

    1983-01-01

    The medico-social aspects of respiratory handicap pose some perplexing problems, notably in their recognition, rigorous evaluation and in the granting of social security benefits. The clinical and respiratory function data should be standardised and classified according to type and significance of respiratory disease and also according to the degree of co-operation and understanding of the patient. The respiratory handicap should be evaluated after considering the functional disability engendered by the disorder and their socio-professional repercussions. The abnormality in the lungs should be measured by resting tests; the degree of disability by exercise studies; the socio-professional handicap by ergonometric tests to assess the scale of the demands and requirements of family and social and professional life, indeed the cultural and economic style of the individual concerned. Such combined studies would enable recognition of severe chronic respiratory handicap leading to decisions for exemption certificates, such as cases of severe respiratory failure in patients requiring supplementary treatment for oxygen therapy or assisted ventilation. The benefits and grants offered to those with respiratory handicaps would involve a number of rights relating to: care, work, costs of replacement of workers in the event of prolonged sick leave or the benefits of an invalidity pension. There will be other allowances such as invalidity cards, lodging special studies and other rights particularly relating to lodging and special equipment. The present scale is difficult to use both because of its lack of specificity and its ill-chosen terminology. For better balance between the handicap and the benefits offered, a common and more flexible system, with a printed table should be at hand for the doctor to use for certain decisions: long term illness, period of invalidity or early retirement because of medical incapacity. Within each table a sub-section should exist to allow for

  3. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    ... Also known as What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  4. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4...

  5. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... for Disease Control and Prevention website. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently asked questions and answers. www. ...

  6. Acute respiratory infections at children

    Delyagin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The common signs of virus respiratory diseases, role of pathological inclination to infections, value of immunodeficiency are presented at lecture. Features of most often meeting respiratory virus infections are given.

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: evaluation and management.

    Cortés, I; Peñuelas, O; Esteban, A

    2012-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition that affects patients admitted in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) under mechanical ventilation. ARDS is a process of non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of conditions, resulting in a direct (e.g., pneumonia) or indirect (e.g., sepsis) lung injury and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. A large body of clinical and basic research has focused in ventilatory strategies and novel pharmacological therapies but, nowadays, treatment is mainly supportive. Mechanical ventilation is the hallmark of the management of these patients. In the last decades, the recognition that mechanical ventilation can contribute to harming the lung has changed the goals of this therapy and has driven research to focus in ventilatory strategies that mitigate lung injury. This review emphasizes clinical aspects in the evaluation and management of ARDS in the ICUs and updates the latest advances in these therapies.

  8. Mutations des roles techniques et formation. Etude documentaire (Changes in the Roles and Education of Technicians. Documentary Study).

    Pinard, Helene

    Drawing from research conducted in 1990-91, this report examines trends affecting the future work of technicians in Quebec, their pre-employment education, and the link between college and work. Part 1 focuses on aspects of the economic, technological, and social environment that will influence the future role of technicians. Economic concerns…

  9. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement.

  10. Practice parameter update: the care of the patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: drug, nutritional, and respiratory therapies (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Miller, R G; Jackson, C E; Kasarskis, E J; England, J D; Forshew, D; Johnston, W; Kalra, S; Katz, J S; Mitsumoto, H; Rosenfeld, J; Shoesmith, C; Strong, M J; Woolley, S C

    2009-10-13

    To systematically review evidence bearing on the management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The authors analyzed studies from 1998 to 2007 to update the 1999 practice parameter. Topics covered in this section include slowing disease progression, nutrition, and respiratory management for patients with ALS. The authors identified 8 Class I studies, 5 Class II studies, and 43 Class III studies in ALS. Important treatments are available for patients with ALS that are underutilized. Noninvasive ventilation (NIV), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), and riluzole are particularly important and have the best evidence. More studies are needed to examine the best tests of respiratory function in ALS, as well as the optimal time for starting PEG, the impact of PEG on quality of life and survival, and the effect of vitamins and supplements on ALS. Riluzole should be offered to slow disease progression (Level A). PEG should be considered to stabilize weight and to prolong survival in patients with ALS (Level B). NIV should be considered to treat respiratory insufficiency in order to lengthen survival (Level B) and to slow the decline of forced vital capacity (Level B). NIV may be considered to improve quality of life (Level C) [corrected].Early initiation of NIV may increase compliance (Level C), and insufflation/exsufflation may be considered to help clear secretions (Level C).

  11. Electric Motor Systems Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 3006.2

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The graduate of the Electric Motor Systems Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) understand the principles of sound and safe trade practices; (2) interpret drawings, plans, and be able to layout and develop projects according to specifications; (3) use the tools of the trade in a safe and proper…

  12. Changes in the ocular surface: initial observations from a pilot study of diagnostic radiology technicians (radiographers)

    Guerdal, Canan; Aydin, Sevda; Sengoer, Tomris; Onmus, Hale; Oezarar, Muemtaz

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and cytological changes in the ocular surface of radiology technicians (radiographers) exposed to diagnostic doses of radiation. The Schirmer, Rose Bengal staining and Tear-Break-Up-Time tear function tests were carried out following routine ophthalmic examination in 15 radiology technicians (group I) and 15 controls (group II). Impression cytology was performed by placing 5-mm-thick half-circular cellulose acetate filter paper in the upper and lower quadrants around the limbus. The cytological evaluation was made using the mapping technique. Significantly increased dry eye was detected in group I. In the impression cytology investigation, squamous metaplasia and intraepithelial lymphocytic infiltration was noted in all the group-I cases. A distinct change was observed between the regions showing squamous metaplasia and neigbouring normal epithelial cell structure. Dry eye and ocular surface cytological changes were observed in diagnostic radiology technicians. Routine ophthalmic evaluation of radiology technicians would be beneficial in detecting early cytological changes and dry eye. (orig.)

  13. Power Product Equipment Technician: Outboard-Engine Systems and Service. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Hilley, Robert

    This curriculum guide contains teacher and student materials for a course on outboard-engine boat systems and service for power product equipment technician occupations. The course contains the following four units of instruction: (1) Outboard-Engine Design and Identification; (2) Operation and Service of Engine-Support Systems; (3) Operation and…

  14. Power Product Equipment Technician: Outboard-Engine Boat Systems. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Hilley, Robert

    This curriculum guide contains teacher and student materials for a course on outboard-engine boat systems for power product equipment technician occupations. The course contains the following three units of instruction: (1) Orientation to Outboard-Engine Boat Systems and Rigging; (2) Trailers and Safe Towing and Boat Operation; and (3) Seasonal…

  15. Prioritising Progression over Proficiency: Limitations of Teacher-Based Assessment within Technician-Level Vocational Education

    Carter, Alan; Bathmaker, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the evolution of assessment policy and practice in technician-level vocational education. Using the example of an advanced-level BTEC National programme in Engineering in one college in the UK, the article highlights how the origins of current assessment practice lie in genuine concerns since the late 1950s about the…

  16. Heavy Equipment Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 1912

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Heavy Equipment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) diagnose repair, and maintain by skills and knowledge gained through training and experience any of the working parts of diesel engines as well as the various components of mobile industrial equipment; (2) use, competently,…

  17. Agricultural Equipment Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 3212

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Agricultural Equipment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) repair, diagnose and maintain by skill and knowledge gained through training and experience any of the working parts of diesel engines as well as the various components of mobile farm machinery; (2) use, competently,…

  18. [Position-checking by imaging embarked there tomotherapy and the delegation to the radiology technician].

    Autret, A; Choupeaux, D; Le Mée, M

    2016-10-01

    Tomotherapy is a technique of IMRT and IGRT using a linear accelerator and a helical CT-scanner. To reach this targeting of precision, the repositioning of the patient is essential. The use of a contention adapted according to the location of the disease and the morphology of the patient is necessary for the safety of this one and the treatment. Once the patient positioned on the reference table, technicians of imager's team check by the acquisition of helical imagery with the reference CT-scanner the position of the patient, the zone of the PTV and healthy organs in the protected surroundings. At first, adjustment will be made automatically on three planes of the space (axial, sagittal, frontal) and three rotations (pitch, roll and yaw) by the device of treatment, then the technicians of imagery will bring a modification of these recalls manually. After validation, the processing will then be made in complete safety for the patient and the nursing. This check by MVCT is daily before every session of processing. It is made by the technicians of imagery. The radiation oncologist confirms the images at j0, then controls once a week MVCT. Traceability in the file of the patient of the various marks (osseous and\\or soft tissue) necessary for the daily gaps will be noted by this one to delegate to the technicians of imagery the validation of the MVCT before every session. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, A.

    a b s t r a c t Introduction: Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts.

  20. Transport Refrigeration Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 4112

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Transport Refrigeration Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able: (1) to diagnose repair, maintain and operate transport refrigeration equipment used to heat or cool the load as well as of diesel engines, APUs and other prime movers; (2) to use tools and equipment in order to carry out…

  1. How Technicians Can Lead Science Improvements in Any School: A Small-Scale Study in England

    Jones, Beth; Quinnell, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how seven schools in England improved their science provision by focusing on the professional development of their science technicians. In September 2013, the Gatsby Charitable Foundation funded the National Science Learning Centre to lead a project connecting secondary schools with experienced senior science technicians…

  2. Automotive Service Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 0912

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The graduate of the Automotive Service Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) repair, maintain and overhaul or modify a motor vehicle; (2) comprehend work orders, technical bulletins and estimates, and relate the information to the job at hand; (3) interpret warranty policy in terms of service…

  3. Rig Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 5211.1

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The graduate of the Rig Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) take responsibility for personal safety and the safety of others; (2) supervise, coach and train apprentices and floor hands; (3) perform the duties of a motorhand, derrickhand or driller; and (4) perform assigned tasks in accordance…

  4. Large Outbreak of Hepatitis C Virus Associated With Drug Diversion by a Healthcare Technician.

    Alroy-Preis, Sharon; Daly, Elizabeth R; Adamski, Christine; Dionne-Odom, Jodie; Talbot, Elizabeth A; Gao, Fengxiang; Cavallo, Steffany J; Hansen, Katrina; Mahoney, Jennifer C; Metcalf, Erin; Loring, Carol; Bean, Christine; Drobeniuc, Jan; Xia, Guo-Liang; Kamili, Saleem; Montero, José T

    2018-05-14

    In May 2012, the New Hampshire (NH) Division of Public Health Services (DPHS) was notified of 4 persons with newly diagnosed hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection at hospital X. Initial investigation suggested a common link to the hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) because the infected persons included 3 CCL patients and a CCL technician. NH DPHS initiated an investigation to determine the source and control the outbreak. NH DPHS conducted site visits, case patient and employee interviews, medical record and medication use review, and employee and patient HCV testing using enzyme immunoassay for anti-HCV, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for HCV RNA, nonstructural 5B (NS5B) and hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequencing, and quasispecies analysis. HCV HVR1 analysis of the first 4 cases confirmed a common source of infection. HCV testing identified 32 of 1074 CCL patients infected with the outbreak strain, including 3 patients coinfected with >1 HCV strain. The epidemiologic investigation revealed evidence of drug diversion by the HCV-infected technician, evidenced by gaps in controlled medication control, higher fentanyl use during procedures for confirmed cases, and building card key access records documenting the presence of the technician during days when transmission occurred. The employee's status as a traveling technician led to a multistate investigation, which identified additional cases at prior employment sites. This is the largest laboratory-confirmed drug diversion-associated HCV outbreak published to date. Recommendations to reduce drug diversion risk and to conduct outbreak investigations are provided.

  5. Outdoor Power Equipment Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 5111.1

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The graduate of the Outdoor Power Equipment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to: (1) supervise, train and coach apprentices; (2) service, maintain, repair and rebuild outdoor power equipment and outdoor power equipment accessories; (3) communicate clearly with customers, staff, suppliers, as required;…

  6. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking, and Immunohematology (AFSC 90470).

    Thompson, Joselyn H.

    This three-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for medical laboratory technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are hematology (the physiology of blood, complete blood counts and related studies, erythrocyte studies, leukocyte and thrombocyte maturation, and blood…

  7. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  8. V-TECS Guide for Automobile Air Conditioning and Electrical System Technician.

    Meyer, Calvin F.; Benson, Robert T.

    This curriculum guide provides an outline for an eight-unit course to train automobile air conditioning and electrical system technicians. Each unit focuses on a duty that is composed of a number of performance objectives. For each objective, these materials are provided: a task, a standard of performance of task, source of standard, conditions…

  9. An Analysis of the Future Need for Certified Animal Health Technicians and Instructional Program Content.

    Nevada State Council on Occupational Education, Carson City.

    A study examined the future need for certified animal health technicians (CAHT) in Nevada and the skills/knowledge that future CAHTs will need. Questionnaires were mailed to all of Nevada's 306 licensed veterinarians; 100 (32.68%) responded. The estimated numbers of CAHTs needed by the state's veterinarians in 1, 3, and 5 years were 62, 142, and…

  10. Animal Health Technicians: A Survey of Program Graduates and of Veterinarians.

    Barsaleau, Richard B.; Walters, Henry R.

    This document compiles the reports of two surveys conducted by Cosumnes River College to determine the status of graduates of its Animal Health Technician program, and to assess the acceptance and use of such paraprofessionals by area veterinarians. Information concerning type of employment, state certification, salaries, types of duties, length…

  11. Requirements for, and training and certification of, quality assurance technicians for nuclear power plants

    Saiz, A.; Mir, A.; Serrano, J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper examines the requirements for, and training and certification of, technicians working in a quality assurance department at periods when the site, the main supplier and the engineering firm are being selected for construction, commissioning and operation of a light-water nuclear power plant with an output of approximately 1000 MW(e). In determining the system to be applied for the present work, account is taken of the special fields of engineering, supply, commissioning and operation. To this end, an analysis is made of the necessary organization, pointing out the number of technicians in each of the phases mentioned, and the necessary experience and knowledge required for discharging the functions indicated and for obtaining the appropriate certification. The second generation of Spanish nuclear power stations - about 7500MW(e) - demonstrated the need for quality assurance technicians. The Spanish Atomic Forum, a member of Foratom, is the first Spanish body to deal with the problem of training of such technicians at the national level through holding of seminars. This led to the appearance (in April 1974) of the first publication in Spanish on these techniques, a document which is still being used for teaching purposes. Later, it was the university and the professional associations which, with the support of the State Administration, undertook to provide this instruction. The paper also analyses Spanish experience in the teaching of quality assurance techniques during the period 1975-80, describing the programmes and contents of the courses

  12. The Hazardous Material Technician Apprenticeship Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Steiner, S.D.

    1987-07-01

    This document describes an apprenticeship training program for hazardous material technician. This entry-level category is achieved after approximately 216 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. Procedures for evaluating performance include in-class testing, use of on-the-job checks, and the assignment of an apprentice mentor for each trainee

  13. Natural Gas Compression Technician: Apprenticeship Course Outline. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 5311.1

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The graduate of the Natural Gas Compression Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able to install, commission, maintain and repair equipment used to gather store and transmit natural gas. Advanced Education and Technology has prepared this course outline in partnership with the Natural Gas Compression…

  14. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 3--Anatomy and Physiology. Revised.

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the third in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains one section covering the following topics: general anatomical terms, the body cavities and contents, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the respiratory…

  15. Fuzzy hybrid MCDM approach for selection of wind turbine service technicians

    Goutam Kumar Bose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is aimed to present a fuzzy Hybrid Multi-criteria decision making (MCDM methodology for selecting employees. The present study aspires to present the hybrid approach of Fuzzy multiple MCDM techniques with tactical viewpoint to support the recruitment process of wind turbine service technicians. The methodology is based on the application of Fuzzy ARAS (Additive Ratio Assessment and Fuzzy MOORA (Multi-Objective Optimization on basis of Ratio Analysis which are integrated through group decision making (GDM method in the model for selection of wind turbine service technicians’ ranking. Here a group of experts from different fields of expertise are engaged to finalize the decision. Series of tests are conducted regarding physical fitness, technical written test, practical test along with general interview and medical examination to facilitate the final selection using the above techniques. In contrast to single decision making approaches, the proposed group decision making model efficiently supports the wind turbine service technicians ranking process. The effectiveness of the proposed approach manifest from the case study of service technicians required for the maintenance department of wind power plant using Fuzzy ARAS and Fuzzy MOORA. This set of potential technicians is evaluated based on five main criteria.

  16. A WIDER ROLE FOR TECHNICIANS IN SCIENCE PRACTICAL WORK WITH SCHOOL STUDENTS?

    Timothy G. Harrison

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a study made on the impact of improved deployment of science technicians in the classroom could directly benefit students in practical science investigations. Science technicians are skilled individuals whose understanding of practical work is a valuable resource not being used of in support of students understanding of science. Aspects of practical work and technician support were scrutinised, through information attained from a post-16 student survey to improve understanding about this teaching tool, to establish if it was being used to its full potential within science lessons. Analysis was also made of students’ perceptions of school science. The main outcomes were that the majority of students enjoyed science practical work and felt that science could not be taught without it. Students studying science at pre-university level attained a greater understanding, through participating in relevant practical work, than students who had studied it at earlier, compulsory levels. Students reported that science technicians provide impact on student learning when contact time was the greatest.

  17. A Canadian Approach to Training Technicians and Technologists In the Earth Sciences.

    Watts, Stephen H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two- and three-year undergraduate curricula for training earth science technicians at Sir Sanford Fleming College (Canada), emphasizing practical aspects and close student-faculty interaction. List of employment opportunities for geology graduates based on past placement data and geology curriculum outline are provided in tables. (JN)

  18. Impact of nasopharyngeal microbiota on the development of respiratory tract diseases.

    Esposito, S; Principi, N

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of whether and how respiratory microbiota composition can prime the immune system and provide colonisation resistance, limiting consecutive pathobiont overgrowth and infections, is essential to improving the prevention and therapy of respiratory disorders. Modulation of dysbiotic ecosystems or reconstitution of missing microbes might be a possible measure to reduce respiratory diseases. The aim of this review is to analyse the role of nasopharyngeal microbiota in the development of respiratory tract disease in paediatric-age subjects. PubMed was used to search for all studies published over the last 15 years using the following key words: "microbiota" or "microbioma" and "nasopharyngeal" or "respiratory" or "nasal" and "children" or "paediatric" or "infant". Analysis of the literature showed that respiratory microbiota can regulate health and disease development in the respiratory tract. Like the gut microbiota, the respiratory microbiota is established at birth, and early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children. Protective and dangerous bacteria have been identified, and this can be considered the base for developing new approaches to diseases that respond poorly to traditional interventions. Reconstitution of missing microbes can be achieved by the administration of pre- and probiotics. Modulation of respiratory microbiota by favouring colonisation of the upper respiratory tract by beneficial commensals can interfere with the proliferation and activity of resident pathobionts and is a possible new measure to reduce the risk of disease. However, further studies are needed because a deeper understanding of these and related issues can be transferred to clinical practice.

  19. Accuracy of vision technicians in screening ocular pathology at rural vision centres of southern India.

    Suram, Vasantha; Addepalli, Uday Kumar; Krishnaiah, Sannapaneni; Kovai, Vilas; Khanna, Rohit C

    2016-03-01

    There is paucity of data on the inter-observer agreement and diagnostic accuracy between a primary-care technician (vision technician) and an ophthalmologist. Hence, the current study was conducted to assess the accuracy of vision technicians, to screen potentially sight-threatening ocular conditions at rural vision centres of southern India and their agreement with an ophthalmologist. In July to August 2010, patients presenting to seven vision centres in Adilabad district (Andhra Pradesh) were selected and screened in a masked manner by seven vision technicians followed by an examination by a consultant ophthalmologist. Agreement was assessed between vision technicians and the ophthalmologist for screening of potential sight-threatening ocular conditions and decisions for referral. The ophthalmologist's findings were considered as the reference standard. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients were enrolled at seven vision centres with a mean age of 32.9 ± 21.8 years. Agreement for screening of ocular pathology was 0.82 (95 per cent CI, 0.8-0.83). There was excellent agreement for cataract (0.97; 95 per cent CI, 0.93-1), refractive error (0.98; 95 per cent CI, 0.96-1), corneal pathology (1.0; 95 per cent CI, 1.0-1.0) and other anterior segment pathology (0.95; 95 per cent CI, 0.9-1); the agreement was moderate to fair for detection of glaucoma suspects (0.43; 95 per cent CI, 0.28-0.60) and retinal pathology (0.39; 95 per cent CI, 0.14-0.63). Sensitivity for screening of anterior segment pathology was 94.6-100 per cent. There was a fair to moderate sensitivity for glaucoma suspect; 35.6 per cent (95 per cent CI, 21.9-51.2) and retinal pathology 26.3 per cent (95 per cent CI, 9.2-51.2). Specificity for screening of ocular pathology was 98.2 to 100 per cent. The kappa (κ) agreement for referral for any pathology was 0.82 (0.8-0.83) CONCLUSION: As there is good agreement between the vision technicians and the ophthalmologist for screening and referral of

  20. Patient training in respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    Kini, Vijay R.; Vedam, Subrahmanya S.; Keall, Paul J.; Patil, Sumukh; Chen, Clayton; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory gating is used to counter the effects of organ motion during radiotherapy for chest tumors. The effects of variations in patient breathing patterns during a single treatment and from day to day are unknown. We evaluated the feasibility of using patient training tools and their effect on the breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility during respiratory-gated radiotherapy. To monitor respiratory patterns, we used a component of a commercially available respiratory-gated radiotherapy system (Real Time Position Management (RPM) System, Varian Oncology Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304). This passive marker video tracking system consists of reflective markers placed on the patient's chest or abdomen, which are detected by a wall-mounted video camera. Software installed on a PC interfaced to this camera detects the marker motion digitally and records it. The marker position as a function of time serves as the motion signal that may be used to trigger imaging or treatment. The training tools used were audio prompting and visual feedback, with free breathing as a control. The audio prompting method used instructions to 'breathe in' or 'breathe out' at periodic intervals deduced from patients' own breathing patterns. In the visual feedback method, patients were shown a real-time trace of their abdominal wall motion due to breathing. Using this, they were asked to maintain a constant amplitude of motion. Motion traces of the abdominal wall were recorded for each patient for various maneuvers. Free breathing showed a variable amplitude and frequency. Audio prompting resulted in a reproducible frequency; however, the variability and the magnitude of amplitude increased. Visual feedback gave a better control over the amplitude but showed minor variations in frequency. We concluded that training improves the reproducibility of amplitude and frequency of patient breathing cycles. This may increase the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy

  1. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  2. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  3. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect of dental technician disparities on the 3-dimensional accuracy of definitive casts.

    Emir, Faruk; Piskin, Bulent; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2017-03-01

    Studies that evaluated the effect of dental technician disparities on the accuracy of presectioned and postsectioned definitive casts are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the accuracy of presectioned and postsectioned definitive casts fabricated by different dental technicians by using a 3-dimensional computer-aided measurement method. An arch-shaped metal master model consisting of 5 abutments resembling prepared mandibular incisors, canines, and first molars and with a 6-degree total angle of convergence was designed and fabricated by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. Complete arch impressions were made (N=110) from the master model, using polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) and delivered to 11 dental technicians. Each technician fabricated 10 definitive casts with dental stone, and the obtained casts were numbered. All casts were sectioned, and removable dies were obtained. The master model and the presectioned and postsectioned definitive casts were digitized with an extraoral scanner, and the virtual master model and virtual presectioned and postsectioned definitive casts were obtained. All definitive casts were compared with the master model by using computer-aided measurements, and the 3-dimensional accuracy of the definitive casts was determined with best fit alignment and represented in color-coded maps. Differences were analyzed using univariate analyses of variance, and the Tukey honest significant differences post hoc tests were used for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The accuracy of presectioned and postsectioned definitive casts was significantly affected by dental technician disparities (Ptechnician differences. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  6. Respiratory mechanics to understand ARDS and guide mechanical ventilation.

    Mauri, Tommaso; Lazzeri, Marta; Bellani, Giacomo; Zanella, Alberto; Grasselli, Giacomo

    2017-11-30

    As precision medicine is becoming a standard of care in selecting tailored rather than average treatments, physiological measurements might represent the first step in applying personalized therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU). A systematic assessment of respiratory mechanics in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) could represent a step in this direction, for two main reasons. Approach and Main results: On the one hand, respiratory mechanics are a powerful physiological method to understand the severity of this syndrome in each single patient. Decreased respiratory system compliance, for example, is associated with low end expiratory lung volume and more severe lung injury. On the other hand, respiratory mechanics might guide protective mechanical ventilation settings. Improved gravitationally dependent regional lung compliance could support the selection of positive end-expiratory pressure and maximize alveolar recruitment. Moreover, the association between driving airway pressure and mortality in ARDS patients potentially underlines the importance of sizing tidal volume on respiratory system compliance rather than on predicted body weight. The present review article aims to describe the main alterations of respiratory mechanics in ARDS as a potent bedside tool to understand severity and guide mechanical ventilation settings, thus representing a readily available clinical resource for ICU physicians.

  7. Adult respiratory distress syndrome

    Murphy, C.H.; Colvin, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Due to improved emergency resuscitation procedures, and with advancing medical technology in the field of critical care, an increasing number of patients survive the acute phase of shock and catastrophic trauma. Patients who previously died of massive sepsis, hypovolemic or hypotensive shock, multiple fractures, aspiration, toxic inhalation, and massive embolism are now surviving long enough to develop previously unsuspected and unrecognized secondary effects. With increasing frequency, clinicians are recognizing the clinical and radiographic manifestations of pathologic changes in the lungs occurring secondary to various types of massive insult. This paper gives a list of diseases that have been shown to precipitate or predispose to diffuse lung damage. Various terms have been used to describe the lung damage and respiratory failure secondary to these conditions. The term adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is applied to several cases of sudden respiratory failure in patients with previously healthy lungs following various types of trauma or shock. Numerous investigations and experiments have studied the pathologic changes in ARDS, and, while there is still no clear indication of why it develops, there is now some correlation of the sequential pathologic developments with the clinical and radiographic changes

  8. The scientific basis for postoperative respiratory care.

    Branson, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common and expensive. Costs, morbidity, and mortality are higher with PPCs than with cardiac or thromboembolic complications. Preventing and treating PPCs is a major focus of respiratory therapists, using a wide variety of techniques and devices, including incentive spirometry, CPAP, positive expiratory pressure, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and chest physical therapy. The scientific evidence for these techniques is lacking. CPAP has some evidence of benefit in high risk patients with hypoxemia. Incentive spirometry is used frequently, but the evidence suggests that incentive spirometry alone has no impact on PPC. Chest physical therapy, which includes mechanical clapping and postural drainage, appears to worsen atelectasis secondary to pain and splinting. As with many past respiratory therapy techniques, the profession needs to take a hard look at these techniques and work to provide only practices based on good evidence. The idea of a PPC bundle has merit and should be studied in larger, multicenter trials. Additionally, intraoperative ventilation may play a key role in the development of PPCs and should receive greater attention.

  9. Adherencia de planes caseros de terapia respiratoria en pacientes con enfermedades crónicas del programa de atención domiciliaria, Cali, 2014 / Adherence to home respiratory therapy plans among patients with chronic diseases from the home care program, Cali, 2014

    Anisbed Naranjo-Rojas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Objetivo: Determinar la adherencia de los planes caseros de terapia respiratoria en pacientes con enfermedades crónicas de un programa de atención domiciliaria, cuyos tratamientos incluyen prácticas de terapias respiratorias en la ciudad de Santiago de Cali – Colombia. Metodología: Se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo y de corte transversal. La población de estudio correspondió a 83 adultos entre 45 y 85 años con patologías crónicas, no alterara las funciones cognitivas, pertenecientes al programa de terapia respiratoria de la ips sisanar. Se diseñó una encuesta dirigida al paciente y cuidadores primarios. Resultados: El comportamiento entre las variables analizadas no fue paralelo, en ambas variables bien sea por factores como el tipo de afiliación, caso que correspondería al Plan casero Vs sgsss, mientras que el segundo de ellos presenta un comportamiento que refleja una diferencia en el número de sesiones realizadas por mes y las actividades registradas en el plan casero. Discusión: Este estudio encontró que los planes caseros muestran que la adherencia es efectiva pero depende del alto grado del manejo que se dé inicialmente desde los Sistemas de Seguridad Social al que pertenezcan los pacientes y al cumplimiento de las actividades. / Abstract Objective: to assess the adherence to home respiratory therapy plans in patients with chronic diseases from a home care program whose treatments include respiratory therapy practice in the city of Santiago de Cali, Colombia. This study focused mainly on the patients affiliated to the home care program of the SISANAR health care providing institution. Methodology: an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The studied population consisted of 83 adults aged 45 to 85 with chronic pathologies which did not alter cognitive functions. These patients were part of the respiratory therapy program of the SISANAR health care providing institution

  10. Myxedema coma leading to respiratory depression in a dog

    Atkinson, Kathryn; Aubert, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    A 10-year-old, intact male, cocker spaniel was presented with hypothermia, without shivering, and progressive stupor leading to coma. Myxedema coma, potentially precipitated by diuretic therapy, was tentatively diagnosed and treatment initiated, but progressive respiratory depression led to the decision to euthanize. Postmortem findings supported the diagnosis of myxedema coma.

  11. Myxedema coma leading to respiratory depression in a dog.

    Atkinson, Kathryn; Aubert, Isabelle

    2004-04-01

    A 10-year-old, intact male, cocker spaniel was presented with hypothermia, without shivering, and progressive stupor leading to coma. Myxedema coma, potentially precipitated by diuretic therapy, was tentatively diagnosed and treatment initiated, but progressive respiratory depression led to the decision to euthanize. Postmortem findings supported the diagnosis of myxedema coma.

  12. Metformin-associated respiratory alkalosis.

    Bryant, Sean M; Cumpston, Kirk; Lipsky, Martin S; Patel, Nirali; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2004-01-01

    We present an 84-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, and bladder cancer who presented to the emergency department after the police found him disoriented and confused. Metformin therapy began 3 days before, and he denied any overdose or suicidal ideation. Other daily medications included glipizide, fluticasone, prednisone, aspirin, furosemide, insulin, and potassium supplements. In the emergency department, his vital signs were significant for hypertension (168/90), tachycardia (120 bpm), and Kussmaul respirations at 24 breaths per minute. Oxygen saturation was 99% on room air, and a fingerstick glucose was 307 mg/dL. He was disoriented to time and answered questions slowly. Metformin was discontinued, and by day 3, the patient's vital signs and laboratory test results normalized. He has been asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up visits. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis is a well-known phenomenon. Respiratory alkalosis may be an early adverse event induced by metformin prior to the development of lactic acidosis.

  13. The potential role of respiratory motion management and image guidance in the reduction of severe toxicities following stereotactic ablative radiation therapy for patients with centrally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR. This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/ or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed.

  14. The management of respiratory motion in radiation oncology report of AAPM Task Group 76

    Keall, Paul J.; Mageras, Gig S.; Balter, James M.

    2006-01-01

    This document is the report of a task group of the AAPM and has been prepared primarily to advise medical physicists involved in the external-beam radiation therapy of patients with thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic tumors affected by respiratory motion. This report describes the magnitude of respiratory motion, discusses radiotherapy specific problems caused by respiratory motion, explains techniques that explicitly manage respiratory motion during radiotherapy and gives recommendations in the application of these techniques for patient care, including quality assurance (QA) guidelines for these devices and their use with conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy. The technologies covered by this report are motion-encompassing methods, respiratory gated techniques, breath-hold techniques, forced shallow-breathing methods, and respiration-synchronized techniques. The main outcome of this report is a clinical process guide for managing respiratory motion. Included in this guide is the recommendation that tumor motion should be measured (when possible) for each patient for whom respiratory motion is a concern. If target motion is greater than 5 mm, a method of respiratory motion management is available, and if the patient can tolerate the procedure, respiratory motion management technology is appropriate. Respiratory motion management is also appropriate when the procedure will increase normal tissue sparing. Respiratory motion management involves further resources, education and the development of and adherence to QA procedures

  15. Respiratory diagnostic possibilities during closed circuit anesthesia.

    Verkaaik, A P; Erdmann, W

    1990-01-01

    An automatic feed back controlled totally closed circuit system (Physioflex) has been developed for quantitative practice of inhalation anesthesia and ventilation. In the circuit system the gas is moved unidirectionally around by a blower at 70 l/min. In the system four membrane chambers are integrated for ventilation. Besides end-expiratory feed back control of inhalation anesthetics, and inspiratory closed loop control of oxygen, the system offers on-line registration of flow, volume and respiratory pressures as well as a capnogram and oxygen consumption. Alveolar ventilation and static compliance can easily be derived. On-line registration of oxygen consumption has proven to be of value for determination of any impairment of tissue oxygen supply when the oxygen delivery has dropped to critical values. Obstruction of the upper or lower airways are immediately detected and differentiated. Disregulations of metabolism, e.g. in malignant hyperthermia, are seen in a pre-crisis phase (increase of oxygen consumption and of CO2 production), and therapy can be started extremely early and before a disastrous condition has developed. Registration of compliance is only one of the continuously available parameters that guarantee a better and adequate control of lung function (e.g. atalectasis is early detected). The newly developed sophisticated anesthesia device enlarges tremendously the monitoring and respiratory diagnostic possibilities of artificial ventilation, gives new insights in the (patho)physiology and detects disturbances of respiratory parameters and metabolism in an early stage.

  16. The enforcement order for the law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    1984-01-01

    The enforcement order provides for the medical radiation technicians and medical X-ray technicians according to the established for them. The applicants for the license thereof must present their applications, together with the necessary documents, to the Government (or the prefectural government). The contents are as follows: application for license; to be entered in the register (with the items of the license); alteration of the registered items (the immediate corrective action, to the Government); elimination of the technicians from the register (to the Government); alteration of the license (the corrective action, to the Government); application for reissue of the license (to the Government); notification concerning the administrative measures. (Mori, K.)

  17. USE OF IMMUNOMODULATORS IN ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION TREATMENT IN FREQUENTLY ILL CHILDREN

    M.I. Ivardava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory infections, relapses of ear, nose, throat infections, acute and chronic bronchial infections — these are the most common infantile infections. Regardless the wide range of medications, treatment of recurrent ENT and respiratory infections is not always effective especially in the group of frequently ill children. This article contains analysis of the necessity of immunomodulation therapy of recurrent respiratory infections as a part of complex prophylaxis and treatment of infants.Key words: children, acute respiratory infection, polyoxidonium, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 103–107

  18. Insuficiência respiratória aguda causada por pneumonia em organização secundária à terapia antineoplásica para linfoma não Hodgkin Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Adriell Ramalho Santana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Doenças difusas do parênquima pulmonar pertencem a um grupo de doenças de evolução geralmente subaguda ou crônica, mas que podem determinar insuficiência respiratória aguda. Paciente masculino, 37 anos, em terapia para linfoma não Hodgkin, admitido com tosse seca, febre, dispneia e insuficiência respiratória aguda hipoxêmica. Iniciadas ventilação mecânica e antibioticoterapia, porém houve evolução desfavorável. Tomografia computadorizada de tórax mostrava opacidades pulmonares em "vidro fosco" bilaterais. Devido ao paciente ter feito uso de três drogas relacionadas à pneumonia em organização (ciclofosfamida, doxorrubicina e rituximabe e quadros clínico e radiológico serem sugestivos, iniciou-se pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona com boa resposta. Pneumonia em organização pode ser idiopática ou associada a colagenoses, drogas e neoplasias, e geralmente responde bem a corticoterapia. O diagnóstico é anatomopatológico, mas condições clínicas do paciente não permitiam a realização de biópsia pulmonar. Pneumonia em organização deve ser diagnóstico diferencial em pacientes com aparente pneumonia de evolução desfavorável ao tratamento antimicrobiano.Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab, and the clinical and radiological symptoms were

  19. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  20. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.