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Sample records for resonance imaging-based study

  1. Neovascularization in Vertebral Artery Atheroma-A Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Comparative Study in Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Ammara; Yuan, Jianmin; Patterson, Andrew J; Graves, Martin J; Varty, Kevin; Sadat, Umar; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2018-05-24

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease intertwined with neovascularization. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) enables the assessment of plaque neovascularization. This study aimed to explore the systemic nature of atherosclerosis by assessing difference in severity of neovascularization as quantified by DCE-MRI of vertebral arteries (VAs) between patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery disease. Ten consecutive patients with asymptomatic VA stenosis and concomitant symptomatic carotid artery disease (group 1) and 10 consecutive patients with asymptomatic VA stenosis and concomitant asymptomatic carotid artery disease (group 2) underwent 3-dimensional DCE-MRI of their cervical segment of VAs. A previously validated pharmacokinetic modeling approach was used for DCE-MRI analysis. K trans was calculated in the adventitia and plaque as a measure of neovessel permeability. Both patient groups were comparable for demographics and comorbidities. Mean luminal stenosis was comparable for both groups (54.4% versus 52.27%, P = .32). Group 1 had higher adventitial K trans and plaque K trans (.08 ± .01 min -1 , .07 ± .01 min -1 ) compared with Group 2 (.06 ± .01 min -1 , .06 ± .01 min -1 ) (P = .004 and .03, respectively). Good correlation was present among the two image analysts (intraclass correlation coefficient = .78). Vertebral Artery atheroma of patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease had increased neovessel permeability compared with the patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease. The VA atherosclerosis is likely to have increased severity of neovascularization if another arterial territory is symptomatic in the same patient cohort. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic-resonance-imaging-based three-dimensional muscle reconstruction of hip abductor muscle volume in a person with a transfemoral bone-anchored prosthesis : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijendekkers, Ruud A.; Marra, Marco A.; Ploegmakers, Marieke J.M.; Van Hinte, Gerben; Frölke, Jan Paul; Van De Meent, Hendrik; Staal, J. Bart; Hoogeboom, Thomas J.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2018-01-01

    Background: Persons with transfemoral amputation typically have severe muscle atrophy of the residual limb. The effect of bone-anchored prosthesis use on existing muscle atrophy is unknown. A potentially feasible method to evaluate this is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based three-dimensional

  3. Fast magnetic resonance imaging based on high degree total variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sujie; Lu, Liangliang; Zheng, Junbao; Jiang, Mingfeng

    2018-04-01

    In order to eliminating the artifacts and "staircase effect" of total variation in Compressive Sensing MRI, high degree total variation model is proposed for dynamic MRI reconstruction. the high degree total variation regularization term is used as a constraint to reconstruct the magnetic resonance image, and the iterative weighted MM algorithm is proposed to solve the convex optimization problem of the reconstructed MR image model, In addtion, one set of cardiac magnetic resonance data is used to verify the proposed algorithm for MRI. The results show that the high degree total variation method has a better reconstruction effect than the total variation and the total generalized variation, which can obtain higher reconstruction SNR and better structural similarity.

  4. Occupation-related squatting, kneeling, and heavy lifting and the knee joint: a magnetic resonance imaging-based study in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shreyasee; Goggins, Joyce; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali; Grigoryan, Mikayel; Hunter, David J; Genant, Harry K; Felson, David T

    2008-08-01

    We examined the relation between occupational exposures to frequent squatting/kneeling and/or heavy lifting with cartilage morphology, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), at the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints in men and determined which compartments are most affected. We evaluated 192 men with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The more symptomatic knee was imaged using MRI. Cartilage was scored using the Whole Organ MRI Score semiquantitative method at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint and patellofemoral joint. Occupational exposures to frequent squatting, kneeling, and/or heavy lifting were assessed using a validated questionnaire. Among the 192 men [mean (+/- standard deviation) age 69 +/- 9 yrs, body mass index (BMI) 30.8 +/- 4.7 kg/m(2)], those reporting occupational exposure to squatting/kneeling alone, heavy lifting alone, both squatting/kneeling and heavy lifting, or none of these activities numbered 7, 40, 47, and 98, respectively. Compared with men with no occupational exposure to these activities, and following adjustment for age, BMI, and history of knee injury or surgery, we found that men reporting occupational exposures to both squatting/kneeling and heavy lifting had a modest increased risk for worse cartilage morphology scores at the patellofemoral joint [odds ratio (OR) 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 3.2] and medial tibiofemoral joint (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9, 3.0), although the latter did not reach statistical significance. Men with frequent occupational squatting/kneeling and heavy lifting have a greater likelihood for worse cartilage morphology scores at the patellofemoral joint. These findings add support to the important role of biomechanical loading on the pathogenesis of knee OA, particularly patellofemoral OA.

  5. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth’s surface and it’s related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India. This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can’t do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good

  6. Image-based overlay measurement using subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, M. S.; van der Lans, M. J.; Sadeghian, H.

    2018-03-01

    Image Based Overlay (IBO) measurement is one of the most common techniques used in Integrated Circuit (IC) manufacturing to extract the overlay error values. The overlay error is measured using dedicated overlay targets which are optimized to increase the accuracy and the resolution, but these features are much larger than the IC feature size. IBO measurements are realized on the dedicated targets instead of product features, because the current overlay metrology solutions, mainly based on optics, cannot provide sufficient resolution on product features. However, considering the fact that the overlay error tolerance is approaching 2 nm, the overlay error measurement on product features becomes a need for the industry. For sub-nanometer resolution metrology, Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is widely used, though at the cost of very low throughput. The semiconductor industry is interested in non-destructive imaging of buried structures under one or more layers for the application of overlay and wafer alignment, specifically through optically opaque media. Recently an SPM technique has been developed for imaging subsurface features which can be potentially considered as a solution for overlay metrology. In this paper we present the use of Subsurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy (SSURFM) used for IBO measurement. We used SSURFM for imaging the most commonly used overlay targets on a silicon substrate and photoresist. As a proof of concept we have imaged surface and subsurface structures simultaneously. The surface and subsurface features of the overlay targets are fabricated with programmed overlay errors of +/-40 nm, +/-20 nm, and 0 nm. The top layer thickness changes between 30 nm and 80 nm. Using SSURFM the surface and subsurface features were successfully imaged and the overlay errors were extracted, via a rudimentary image processing algorithm. The measurement results are in agreement with the nominal values of the programmed overlay errors.

  7. Remote Cherenkov imaging-based quality assurance of a magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Mooney, Karen E; Brůža, Petr; Curcuru, Austen; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W; Green, Olga

    2018-06-01

    Tools to perform regular quality assurance of magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) systems should ideally be independent of interference from the magnetic fields. Remotely acquired optical Cherenkov imaging-based dosimetry measurements in water were investigated for this purpose, comparing measures of dose accuracy, temporal dynamics, and overall integrated IMRT delivery. A 40 × 30.5 × 37.5 cm 3 water tank doped with 1 g/L of quinine sulfate was imaged using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) to capture the Cherenkov emission while being irradiated by a commercial MRIgRT system (ViewRay™). The ICCD was placed down-bore at the end of the couch, 4 m from treatment isocenter and behind the 5-Gauss line of the 0.35-T MRI. After establishing optimal camera acquisition settings, square beams of increasing size (4.2 × 4.2 cm 2 , 10.5 × 10.5 cm 2 , and 14.7 × 14.7 cm 2 ) were imaged at 0.93 frames per second, from an individual cobalt-60 treatment head, to develop projection measures related to percent depth dose (PDD) curves and cross beam profiles (CPB). These Cherenkov-derived measurements were compared to ionization chamber (IC) and radiographic film dosimetry data, as well as simulation data from the treatment planning system (TPS). An intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) commissioning plan from AAPM TG-119 (C4:C-Shape) was also imaged at 2.1 frames per second, and the single linear sum image from 509 s of plan delivery was compared to the dose volume prediction generated by the TPS using gamma index analysis. Analysis of standardized test target images (1024 × 1024 pixels) yielded a pixel resolution of 0.37 mm/pixel. The beam width measured from the Cherenkov image-generated projection CBPs was within 1 mm accuracy when compared to film measurements for all beams. The 502 point measurements (i.e., pixels) of the Cherenkov image-based projection percent depth dose curves (pPDDs) were compared to p

  8. Application of Finite Element Modeling Methods in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Research and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fwu, Peter Tramyeon

    The medical image is very complex by its nature. Modeling built upon the medical image is challenging due to the lack of analytical solution. Finite element method (FEM) is a numerical technique which can be used to solve the partial differential equations. It utilized the transformation from a continuous domain into solvable discrete sub-domains. In three-dimensional space, FEM has the capability dealing with complicated structure and heterogeneous interior. That makes FEM an ideal tool to approach the medical-image based modeling problems. In this study, I will address the three modeling in (1) photon transport inside the human breast by implanting the radiative transfer equation to simulate the diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) in order to measurement the percent density (PD), which has been proven as a cancer risk factor in mammography. Our goal is to use MRI as the ground truth to optimize the DOSI scanning protocol to get a consistent measurement of PD. Our result shows DOSI measurement is position and depth dependent and proper scanning scheme and body configuration are needed; (2) heat flow in the prostate by implementing the Penne's bioheat equation to evaluate the cooling performance of regional hypothermia during the robot assisted radical prostatectomy for the individual patient in order to achieve the optimal cooling setting. Four factors are taken into account during the simulation: blood abundance, artery perfusion, cooling balloon temperature, and the anatomical distance. The result shows that blood abundance, prostate size, and anatomical distance are significant factors to the equilibrium temperature of neurovascular bundle; (3) shape analysis in hippocampus by using the radial distance mapping, and two registration methods to find the correlation between sub-regional change to the age and cognition performance, which might not reveal in the volumetric analysis. The result gives a fundamental knowledge of normal distribution in young

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging based noninvasive measurements of brain hemodynamics in neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, Jill B; Alderliesten, Thomas; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal disturbances of brain hemodynamics can have a detrimental effect on the brain's parenchyma with consequently adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Noninvasive, reliable tools to evaluate the neonate's brain hemodynamics are scarce. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging have provided new...

  10. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andres Pizarro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  11. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Ricardo A; Cheng, Xi; Barnett, Alan; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A; Goldman, Aaron L; Xiao, Ena; Luo, Qian; Berman, Karen F; Callicott, Joseph H; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI) is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI) automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy) of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Prediction of the Relationship between Whiplash Injury and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Auh, Q-Schick; Hong, Jyung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Whiplash injury can cause internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and lead to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to evaluate whether the initial clinical findings in TMD patients with whiplash injury are correlated with their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics. This case-control study involved 219 patients (135 women, 84 men; mean age: 37.84 years) who visited our orofacial pain clinic with TMD; TMD was diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria for TMD Axis I. Patients were categorized into three groups based on the presence and type of macrotrauma: in the "wTMD" group, patients had suffered whiplash injury; patients in the "pTMD" group had post-traumatic TMD; the "iTMD" group comprised patients who had presented with TMD symptoms and had sustained no macrotrauma. We investigated the presence of disk displacement, effusion, disk deformity, and condylar degeneration, and changes in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM). To evaluate the severity of TMD pain and objectively analyze symptoms, we used a visual analog scale (VAS), palpation index (PI), neck PI, dysfunction index, and craniomandibular index (CMI). The VAS scores, and the severity indexes of the TMD including PI, neck PI, and CMI were highest in the wTMD patients. Atrophy of the LPM was most commonly seen in the wTMD group, as was disk deformity. In wTMD patients only, VAS score was significantly correlated with stress; it was correlated with headache in wTMD and iTMD patients. The clinical symptoms of TMD were not correlated with MRI findings in the wTMD group. However, alterations in the LPM were strongly correlated with disk displacement. If clinicians recognize alterations in the LPM and disk displacement in the TMJ, they will better understand the clinical symptoms and pathophysiology of TMD with whiplash injury. Whiplash injury may lead to TMD via different mechanisms from other macrotraumas.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-based detection of glial brain tumors in mice after antiangiogenic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, A.; Gambarota, G.; Hamans, B.C.; Tellingen, O. van; Wesseling, P.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Proper delineation of gliomas using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) poses a problem in neuro-oncology. The blood brain barrier (BBB) in areas of diffuse-infiltrative growth may be intact, precluding extravasation and subsequent MR-based detection of the contrast agent

  14. NIR hyperspectral compressive imager based on a modified Fabry–Perot resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Blumberg, Dan G.; Stern, Adrian

    2018-04-01

    The acquisition of hyperspectral (HS) image datacubes with available 2D sensor arrays involves a time consuming scanning process. In the last decade, several compressive sensing (CS) techniques were proposed to reduce the HS acquisition time. In this paper, we present a method for near-infrared (NIR) HS imaging which relies on our rapid CS resonator spectroscopy technique. Within the framework of CS, and by using a modified Fabry–Perot resonator, a sequence of spectrally modulated images is used to recover NIR HS datacubes. Owing to the innovative CS design, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct NIR HS images with hundreds of spectral bands from an order of magnitude fewer measurements, i.e. with a compression ratio of about 10:1. This high compression ratio, together with the high optical throughput of the system, facilitates fast acquisition of large HS datacubes.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Prediction of the Relationship between Whiplash Injury and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Hee Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWhiplash injury can cause internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and lead to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. Our aim was to evaluate whether the initial clinical findings in TMD patients with whiplash injury are correlated with their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics.Materials and methodsThis case–control study involved 219 patients (135 women, 84 men; mean age: 37.84 years who visited our orofacial pain clinic with TMD; TMD was diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria for TMD Axis I. Patients were categorized into three groups based on the presence and type of macrotrauma: in the “wTMD” group, patients had suffered whiplash injury; patients in the “pTMD” group had post-traumatic TMD; the “iTMD” group comprised patients who had presented with TMD symptoms and had sustained no macrotrauma. We investigated the presence of disk displacement, effusion, disk deformity, and condylar degeneration, and changes in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM. To evaluate the severity of TMD pain and objectively analyze symptoms, we used a visual analog scale (VAS, palpation index (PI, neck PI, dysfunction index, and craniomandibular index (CMI.ResultsThe VAS scores, and the severity indexes of the TMD including PI, neck PI, and CMI were highest in the wTMD patients. Atrophy of the LPM was most commonly seen in the wTMD group, as was disk deformity. In wTMD patients only, VAS score was significantly correlated with stress; it was correlated with headache in wTMD and iTMD patients. The clinical symptoms of TMD were not correlated with MRI findings in the wTMD group. However, alterations in the LPM were strongly correlated with disk displacement.ConclusionIf clinicians recognize alterations in the LPM and disk displacement in the TMJ, they will better understand the clinical symptoms and pathophysiology of TMD with whiplash injury. Whiplash injury may lead to TMD via different mechanisms from other macrotraumas.

  16. Surgical neuro navigator guided by preoperative magnetic resonance images, based on a magnetic position sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Siqueira, Rogerio Bulha; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Oliveira, Lucas Ferrari de; Machado, Helio Rubens

    2009-01-01

    Image guided neurosurgery enables the neurosurgeon to navigate inside the patient's brain using pre-operative images as a guide and a tracking system, during a surgery. Following a calibration procedure, three-dimensional position and orientation of surgical instruments may be transmitted to computer. The spatial information is used to access a region of interest, in the pre-operative images, displaying them to the neurosurgeon during the surgical procedure. However, when a craniotomy is involved and the lesion is removed, movements of brain tissue can be a significant source of error in these conventional navigation systems. The architecture implemented in this work intends the development of a system to surgical planning and orientation guided by ultrasound image. For surgical orientation, the software developed allows the extraction of slices from the volume of the magnetic resonance images (MRI) with orientation supplied by a magnetic position sensor (Polhemus R ). The slices extracted with this software are important because they show the cerebral area that the neurosurgeon is observing during the surgery, and besides they can be correlated with the intra-operative ultrasound images to detect and to correct the deformation of brain tissue during the surgery. Also, a tool for per-operative navigation was developed, providing three orthogonal planes through the image volume. In the methodology used for the software implementation, the Python tm programming language and the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) graphics library were used. The program to extract slices of the MRI volume allowed the application of transformations in the volume, using coordinates supplied by the position sensor. (author)

  17. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempp, Hansjoerg, E-mail: hansjoerg.rempp@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Clasen, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L. [SLK-Kliniken, Clinic for Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Minimal Invasive Therapies (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  18. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempp, Hansjörg; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  19. Comparing Histopathological and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Mesorectal Fascia Status in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, U.; Khan, R.; Mehmood, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare mesorectal fascia status on histopathological findings with MRI based radiological mesorectal fascia status in patients with rectal carcinoma taking histopathology finding as gold standard. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, from January 2011 to April 2012. Methodology: Biopsy proven cases of rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing abdominoperineal resection were included in this study. Microscopic examination of slides was done to determine mesorectal fascia status as involved or otherwise without knowing the results of mesorectal fascia status on MRI. Mesorectal fascia status of MRI was determined by a radiologist who was not aware of the histopathological assessment of mesorectal fascia. Mean and standard deviation was calculated for age. Frequency and percentage were calculated for gender and mesorectal fascia status. 2 x 2 table was generated to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values and diagnostic accuracy of MRI for mesorectal fascia involvement taking histopathology as gold standard. Results: The sensitivity of MRI to detect mesorectal fascia involvement was 23.07% and specificity was 70.5%. Positive predictive value of MRI was 10% and negative predictive value was 54.54%. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for mesorectal fascia involvement was calculated as 50%. Conclusion: MRI findings regarding mesorectal fascia status as involved or otherwise are not helpful when compared with histopathological findings which is the gold standard. (author)

  20. Optimization for PET imaging based on phantom study and NECdensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Naoki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the requirement for global standardization and quality control of PET imaging, the present studies gave an outline of phantom study to decide both scan and reconstruction parameters based on FDG-PET/CT procedure guideline in Japan, and optimization of scan duration based on NEC density was performed continuously. In the phantom study, scan and reconstruction parameters were decided by visual assessment and physical indexes (N 10mm , NEC phantom , Q H,10mm /N 10mm ) to visualize hot spot of 10 mm diameter with standardized uptake value (SUV)=4 explicitly. Simultaneously, Recovery Coefficient (RC) was evaluated to recognize that PET images had enough quantifiably. Scan durations were optimized by Body Mass Index (BMI) based on retrospective analysis of NEC density . Correlation between visual score in clinical FDG-PET images and NEC density fell after the optimization of scan duration. Both Inter-institution and inter-patient variability were decreased by performing the phantom study based on the procedure guideline and the optimization of scan duration based on NEC density which seem finally useful to practice highly precise examination and promote high-quality controlled study. (author)

  1. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  2. An in vivo three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-based averaged brain collection of the neonatal piglet (Sus scrofa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Conrad

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that morphology and perinatal growth of the piglet brain is similar to humans, use of the piglet as a translational animal model for neurodevelopmental studies is increasing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be a powerful tool to study neurodevelopment in piglets, but many of the MRI resources have been produced for adult humans. Here, we present an average in vivo MRI-based atlas specific for the 4-week-old piglet. In addition, we have developed probabilistic tissue classification maps. These tools can be used with brain mapping software packages (e.g. SPM and FSL to aid in voxel-based morphometry and image analysis techniques. The atlas enables efficient study of neurodevelopment in a highly tractable translational animal with brain growth and development similar to humans.

  3. Computational Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Time-Dependent Bloch NMR Flow Equation and Bessel Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awojoyogbe, Bamidele O; Dada, Michael O; Onwu, Samuel O; Ige, Taofeeq A; Akinwande, Ninuola I

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field along with radio waves and a computer to produce highly detailed "slice-by-slice" pictures of virtually all internal structures of matter. The results enable physicians to examine parts of the body in minute detail and identify diseases in ways that are not possible with other techniques. For example, MRI is one of the few imaging tools that can see through bones, making it an excellent tool for examining the brain and other soft tissues. Pulsed-field gradient experiments provide a straightforward means of obtaining information on the translational motion of nuclear spins. However, the interpretation of the data is complicated by the effects of restricting geometries as in the case of most cancerous tissues and the mathematical concept required to account for this becomes very difficult. Most diffusion magnetic resonance techniques are based on the Stejskal-Tanner formulation usually derived from the Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation by including additional terms to accommodate the diffusion effect. Despite the early success of this technique, it has been shown that it has important limitations, the most of which occurs when there is orientation heterogeneity of the fibers in the voxel of interest (VOI). Overcoming this difficulty requires the specification of diffusion coefficients as function of spatial coordinate(s) and such a phenomenon is an indication of non-uniform compartmental conditions which can be analyzed accurately by solving the time-dependent Bloch NMR flow equation analytically. In this study, a mathematical formulation of magnetic resonance flow sequence in restricted geometry is developed based on a general second order partial differential equation derived directly from the fundamental Bloch NMR flow equations. The NMR signal is obtained completely in terms of NMR experimental parameters. The process is described based on Bessel functions and properties that can make it

  4. A Dose-Volume Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Aided High-Dose-Rate Image-Based Interstitial Brachytherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Results: The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D 2cc of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Conclusions: Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results.

  5. A dose-volume analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-aided high-dose-rate image-based interstitial brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Yamazaki, Hideya; Takenaka, Tadashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshida, Mineo; Furuya, Seiichi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Uegaki, Tadaaki; Kuriyama, Keiko; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Yamada, Shigetoshi; Ban, Chiaki

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of our novel image-based high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for uterine cervical cancer, we evaluated the dose-volume histogram (DVH) according to the recommendations of the Gynecological GEC-ESTRO Working Group for image-based intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). Between June 2005 and June 2007, 18 previously untreated cervical cancer patients were enrolled. We implanted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-available plastic applicators by our unique ambulatory technique. Total treatment doses were 30-36 Gy (6 Gy per fraction) combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Treatment plans were created based on planning computed tomography with MRI as a reference. DVHs of the high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV), intermediate-risk CTV (IR CTV), and the bladder and rectum were calculated. Dose values were biologically normalized to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The median D90 (HR CTV) and D90 (IR CTV) per fraction were 6.8 Gy (range, 5.5-7.5) and 5.4 Gy (range, 4.2-6.3), respectively. The median V100 (HR CTV) and V100 (IR CTV) were 98.4% (range, 83-100) and 81.8% (range, 64-93.8), respectively. When the dose of EBRT was added, the median D90 and D100 of HR CTV were 80.6 Gy (range, 65.5-96.6) and 62.4 Gy (range, 49-83.2). The D(2cc) of the bladder was 62 Gy (range, 51.4-89) and of the rectum was 65.9 Gy (range, 48.9-76). Although the targets were advanced and difficult to treat effectively by ICBT, MRI-aided image-based ISBT showed favorable results for CTV and organs at risk compared with previously reported image-based ICBT results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Proton capture resonance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, G.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bilpuch, E.G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bybee, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Shriner, J.F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Vavrina, G.A. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Wallace, P.M. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. A multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-based risk model to determine the risk of significant prostate cancer prior to biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Pim J; Hayen, Andrew; Thompson, James E; Moses, Daniel; Shnier, Ron; Böhm, Maret; Abuodha, Magdaline; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Ting, Francis; Barentsz, Jelle; Roobol, Monique; Vass, Justin; Rasiah, Krishan; Delprado, Warick; Stricker, Phillip D

    2017-12-01

    To develop and externally validate a predictive model for detection of significant prostate cancer. Development of the model was based on a prospective cohort including 393 men who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) before biopsy. External validity of the model was then examined retrospectively in 198 men from a separate institution whom underwent mpMRI followed by biopsy for abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level or digital rectal examination (DRE). A model was developed with age, PSA level, DRE, prostate volume, previous biopsy, and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS) score, as predictors for significant prostate cancer (Gleason 7 with >5% grade 4, ≥20% cores positive or ≥7 mm of cancer in any core). Probability was studied via logistic regression. Discriminatory performance was quantified by concordance statistics and internally validated with bootstrap resampling. In all, 393 men had complete data and 149 (37.9%) had significant prostate cancer. While the variable model had good accuracy in predicting significant prostate cancer, area under the curve (AUC) of 0.80, the advanced model (incorporating mpMRI) had a significantly higher AUC of 0.88 (P prostate cancer. Individualised risk assessment of significant prostate cancer using a predictive model that incorporates mpMRI PIRADS score and clinical data allows a considerable reduction in unnecessary biopsies and reduction of the risk of over-detection of insignificant prostate cancer at the cost of a very small increase in the number of significant cancers missed. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of Ho-166 Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, Peter R.; van de Maat, Gerrit H.; de Wit, Tim C.; Vente, Maarten A. D.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional Ho-166 activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in Ho-166-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere (Ho-166-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization.

  9. Evaluation of an image-based tracking workflow using a passive marker and resonant micro-coil fiducials for automatic image plane alignment in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, M; Breton, E; Cuvillon, L; Pan, L; Lorenz, C H; de Mathelin, M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an original workflow is presented for MR image plane alignment based on tracking in real-time MR images. A test device consisting of two resonant micro-coils and a passive marker is proposed for detection using image-based algorithms. Micro-coils allow for automated initialization of the object detection in dedicated low flip angle projection images; then the passive marker is tracked in clinical real-time MR images, with alternation between two oblique orthogonal image planes along the test device axis; in case the passive marker is lost in real-time images, the workflow is reinitialized. The proposed workflow was designed to minimize dedicated acquisition time to a single dedicated acquisition in the ideal case (no reinitialization required). First experiments have shown promising results for test-device tracking precision, with a mean position error of 0.79 mm and a mean orientation error of 0.24°.

  10. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author)

  11. Connecting imaging mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomical atlases for automated anatomical interpretation and differential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Nico; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Murphy, Monika J M; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Caprioli, Richard M; Van de Plas, Raf

    2017-07-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size and dimensionality often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model. The measurements are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. On Feature Relevance in Image-Based Prediction Models: An Empirical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konukoglu, E.; Ganz, Melanie; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Determining disease-related variations of the anatomy and function is an important step in better understanding diseases and developing early diagnostic systems. In particular, image-based multivariate prediction models and the “relevant features” they produce are attracting attention from the co...

  13. Study on the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete fourier transform measurement matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leihong; Liang, Dong; Li, Bei; Kang, Yi; Pan, Zilan; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Xiumin; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of analyzing the cosine light field with determined analytic expression and the pseudo-inverse method, the object is illuminated by a presetting light field with a determined discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix, and the object image is reconstructed by the pseudo-inverse method. The analytic expression of the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix is deduced theoretically, and compared with the algorithm of compressive computational ghost imaging based on random measurement matrix. The reconstruction process and the reconstruction error are analyzed. On this basis, the simulation is done to verify the theoretical analysis. When the sampling measurement number is similar to the number of object pixel, the rank of discrete Fourier transform matrix is the same as the one of the random measurement matrix, the PSNR of the reconstruction image of FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm are similar, the reconstruction error of the traditional CGI algorithm is lower than that of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm. As the decreasing of the number of sampling measurement, the PSNR of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm decreases slowly, and the PSNR of reconstruction image based on PGI algorithm and CGI algorithm decreases sharply. The reconstruction time of FGI algorithm is lower than that of other algorithms and is not affected by the number of sampling measurement. The FGI algorithm can effectively filter out the random white noise through a low-pass filter and realize the reconstruction denoising which has a higher denoising capability than that of the CGI algorithm. The FGI algorithm can improve the reconstruction accuracy and the reconstruction speed of computational ghost imaging.

  14. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors Using Image-Based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the most common approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, misdirection, vascular damage, intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and optic nerve injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less-experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation coupled with neuronavigation in localizing neurovascular structures during TSS. Twenty-five patients with a pituitary tumor underwent preoperative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI images loaded into the navigation platform were used for segmentation and preoperative planning. After patient registration and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe or Doppler probe on or as close as possible to the target. Preoperative segmentation of the internal carotid artery and cavernous sinus matched with the intraoperative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. Image guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of cases. The mean accuracy of the measurements was 1.20 ± 0.21 mm. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation, especially with 3-dimensional reconstruction, is highly informative preoperatively and potentially could assist less-experienced neurosurgeons in preventing vascular and neural injury during TSS. In addition, the accuracy found in this study is comparable to previously reported neuronavigation measurements. This preliminary study is encouraging for future prospective intraoperative validation with larger numbers of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-based cerebral tissue classification reveals distinct spatiotemporal patterns of changes after stroke in non-human primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Westmoreland, Susan. V.; de Crespigny, Alex J.; Liu, Yutong; Vangel, Mark; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.; Wu, Ona; D'Arceuil, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spatial and temporal changes in brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke are still poorly understood. Aims of this study were three-fold: (1) to determine unique temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns at the acute, subacute and chronic stages after stroke in macaques by

  16. Functional image-based radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Emma L.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Wild, Jim M.; Hatton, Matthew Q.F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the incorporation of data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He-MRI) into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: Seven scenarios were simulated that represent cases of NSCLC with significant functional lung defects. Two independent IMRT plans were produced for each scenario; one to minimise total lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ), and the other to minimise only the functional lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy (FV 20 ). Dose-volume characteristics and a plan quality index related to planning target volume coverage by the 95% isodose (V PTV95 /FV 20 ) were compared between anatomical and functional plans using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: Compared to anatomical IMRT plans, functional planning reduced FV 20 (median 2.7%, range 0.6-3.5%, p = 0.02), and total lung V 20 (median 1.5%, 0.5-2.7%, p = 0.02), with a small reduction in mean functional lung dose (median 0.4 Gy, 0-0.7 Gy, p = 0.03). There were no significant differences in target volume coverage or organ-at-risk doses. Plan quality index was improved for functional plans (median increase 1.4, range 0-11.8, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Statistically significant reductions in FV 20 , V 20 and mean functional lung dose are possible when IMRT planning is supplemented by functional information derived from SPECT or 3 He-MRI.

  17. Gastric Fluid Volume Change After Oral Rehydration Solution Intake in Morbidly Obese and Normal Controls: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Toshie; Kurosaki, Dai; Nakamura, Mitsuyo; Yazaki, Taiji; Kobinata, Satomi; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2017-04-01

    Although preoperative fluid intake 2 hours before anesthesia is generally considered safe, there are concerns about delayed gastric emptying in obese subjects. In this study, the gastric fluid volume (GFV) change in morbidly obese subjects was investigated after ingesting an oral rehydration solution (ORS) and then compared with that in nonobese subjects. GFV change over time after the ingestion of 500 mL of ORS containing 2.5% carbohydrate (OS-1) was measured in 10 morbidly obese subjects (body mass index [BMI], >35) scheduled for bariatric surgery and 10 nonobese (BMI, 19-24) using magnetic resonance imaging. After 9 hours of fasting, magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at preingestion, 0 min (just after ingestion), and every 30 minutes up to 120 minutes. GFV values were compared between morbidly obese and control groups and also between preingestion and postingestion time points. The morbidly obese group had a significantly higher body weight and BMI than the control group (mean body weight and BMI in morbidly obese, 129.6 kg and 46.3 kg/m, respectively; control, 59.5 kg and 21.6 kg/m, respectively). GFV was significantly higher in the morbidly obese subjects compared with the control group at preingestion (73 ± 30.8 mL vs 31 ± 19.9 mL, P = .001) and at 0 minutes after ingestion (561 ± 30.8 mL vs 486 ± 42.8 mL; P < .001). GFV declined rapidly in both groups and reached fasting baseline levels by 120 minutes (morbidly obese, 50 ± 29.5 mL; control, 30 ± 11.6 mL). A significant correlation was observed between preingestion residual GFV and body weight (r = .66; P = .001). Morbidly obese subjects have a higher residual gastric volume after 9 hours of fasting compared with subjects with a normal BMI. However, no differences were observed in gastric emptying after ORS ingestion in the 2 populations, and GFVs reached baseline within 2 hours after ORS ingestion. Further studies are required to confirm whether the preoperative fasting and fluid

  18. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging-based finite element analysis for the biomechanical stress analysis of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic carotid plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, U.; Teng, Z.; Young, V.E.; Li, Z.Y.; Gillard, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical stress analysis has been used for plaque vulnerability assessment. The presence of plaque hemorrhage (PH) is a feature of plaque vulnerability and is associated with thromboembolic ischemic events. The purpose of the present study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to compare the stress profiles of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic profiles. Forty-five consecutive patients who had suffered a cerebrovascular ischemic event with an underlying carotid artery disease underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their symptomatic carotid artery in a 1.5-T MRI system. Axial images were manually segmented for various plaque components and used for FEA. Maximum critical stress (M-Cstress SL ) for each slice was determined. Within a plaque, the maximum M-Cstress SL for each slice of a plaque was selected to represent the maximum critical stress of that plaque (M-Cstress PL ) and used to compare hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic plaques. A total of 62% of plaques had hemorrhage. It was observed that plaques with hemorrhage had significantly higher stress (M-Cstress PL ) than plaques without PH (median [interquartile range]: 315kPa [247-434] vs. 200kPa [171-282], P=0.003). Hemorrhagic plaques have higher biomechanical stresses than non-hemorrhagic plaques. MRI-based FEA seems to have the potential to assess plaque vulnerability. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-based cerebral tissue classification reveals distinct spatiotemporal patterns of changes after stroke in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouts, Mark J R J; Westmoreland, Susan V; de Crespigny, Alex J; Liu, Yutong; Vangel, Mark; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Wu, Ona; D'Arceuil, Helen E

    2015-12-15

    Spatial and temporal changes in brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke are still poorly understood. Aims of this study were three-fold: (1) to determine unique temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns at the acute, subacute and chronic stages after stroke in macaques by combining quantitative T2 and diffusion MRI indices into MRI 'tissue signatures', (2) to evaluate temporal differences in these signatures between transient (n = 2) and permanent (n = 2) middle cerebral artery occlusion, and (3) to correlate histopathology findings in the chronic stroke period to the acute and subacute MRI derived tissue signatures. An improved iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm was used to combine T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps across seven successive timepoints (1, 2, 3, 24, 72, 144, 240 h) which revealed five temporal MRI signatures, that were different from the normal tissue pattern (P MRI signatures associated with specific tissue fates may further aid in assessing and monitoring the efficacy of novel pharmaceutical treatments for stroke in a pre-clinical and clinical setting.

  20. A preliminary study on cone beam CT image based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Jeevanandham, Prakash; Boopathy, Raghavendiran; Sukumar, Prabakar; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Kunjithapatham, Bhuvana; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan

    2008-01-01

    Kilovolt Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) based on flat panel technology is primarily used for positioning verification. However it is required to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on CBCT images for the purpose of re-planning in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). In this study, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were done using both the planning CT and CBCT images and the corresponding variations in dose and MUs were analyzed, hence evaluating the feasibility of using kilovolt CBCT for dose calculation and patient dose verification. (author)

  1. Study on two-dimensional distribution of X-ray image based on improved Elman algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Ming-Yuan; Tian, Feng-Shuo; Liu, Yu-Fang; Li, Lei; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The principle of the X-ray detector which can simultaneously perform the measurement of the exposure rate and 2D (two-dimensional) distribution is described. A commercially available CMOS image sensor has been adopted as the key part to receive X-ray without any scintillators. The correlation between the pixel value (PV) and the absorbed exposure rate of X-ray is studied using the improved Elman neural network. Comparing the optimal adjustment process of the BP (Back Propagation) neural network and the improved Elman neural network, the neural network parameters are selected based on the fitting curve and the error curve. The experiments using the practical production data show that the proposed method achieves high accurate predictions to 10 −15 , which is consistent with the anticipated value. It is proven that it is possible to detect the exposure rate using the X-ray detector with the improved Elman algorithm for its advantages of fast converges and smooth error curve. - Highlights: • A method to measure the X-ray radiation with low cost and miniaturization. • A general CMOS image sensor is used to detect X-ray. • The system can measure exposure rate and 2D distribution simultaneously. • The Elman algorithm is adopted to improve the precision of the radiation detector

  2. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging-based prostate-specific antigen density of the prostate in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshii, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Toyabe, Shinichi; Akazawa, Kohei; Komatsu, Shuichi; Kaneko, Masaaki; Hara, Noboru; Takahashi, Kota

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density of the prostatic volume (PSAD) estimated using transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS; TRUS-based PSAD), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; MRI-based PSAD), and PSA density of the transition zone (TZ) volume (PSATZD) estimated using MRI (MRI-based PSATZD) in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). One hundred and twenty patients, who were suspected to have PCa based on PSA, ranged between 4.1 and 20.0 ng/mL were enrolled in this study. The prostatic volume estimated using TRUS was smaller than the volume estimated using MRI by 11.4% in the patients with PSA levels ranging 4.1-20.0 ng/mL, 7.2% in those 4.1-10.0 ng/mL, and 15.7% in those 10.1-20.0 ng/mL, respectively. PSA levels were correlated with the prostatic volume estimated using TRUS and MRI, and TZ volume estimated using MRI in the patients without PCa; however, the level was not correlated with them in the patients with PCa. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of MRI-based PSAD was higher than that of TRUS-based PSAD; however, there was no statistical difference. Stepwise logistic regression analysis for the prediction of PCa by using PSA-related parameters confirmed that MRI-based PSATZD was the most significant predictor in patients with PSA levels in the range of 4.1-20.0 ng/mL (P<0.001), the range of 4.1-10.0 ng/mL (P=0.002), and the range of 10.1-20.0 ng/mL (P<0.001), respectively. The prostatic volume estimated using TRUS was smaller than the volume estimated using MRI. MRI-based PSATZD is the most significant predictor in the four parameters. (author)

  3. Development and internal validation of a side-specific, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-based nomogram for the prediction of extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Alberto; Gupta, Akriti; Lewis, Sara C; Cumarasamy, Shivaram; Haines, Kenneth G; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2018-04-19

    To develop a nomogram for predicting side-specific extracapsular extension (ECE) for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analysed data from 561 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy between February 2014 and October 2015. To develop a side-specific predictive model, we considered the prostatic lobes separately. Four variables were included: prostate-specific antigen; highest ipsilateral biopsy Gleason grade; highest ipsilateral percentage core involvement; and ECE on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI). A multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to predict side-specific ECE. A nomogram was built based on the coefficients of the logit function. Internal validation was performed using 'leave-one-out' cross-validation. Calibration was graphically investigated. The decision curve analysis was used to evaluate the net clinical benefit. The study population consisted of 829 side-specific cases, after excluding negative biopsy observations (n = 293). ECE was reported on mpMRI and final pathology in 115 (14%) and 142 (17.1%) cases, respectively. Among these, mpMRI was able to predict ECE correctly in 57 (40.1%) cases. All variables in the model except highest percentage core involvement were predictors of ECE (all P ≤ 0.006). All variables were considered for inclusion in the nomogram. After internal validation, the area under the curve was 82.11%. The model demonstrated excellent calibration and improved clinical risk prediction, especially when compared with relying on mpMRI prediction of ECE alone. When retrospectively applying the nomogram-derived probability, using a 20% threshold for performing nerve-sparing, nine out of 14 positive surgical margins (PSMs) at the site of ECE resulted above the threshold. We developed an easy-to-use model for the prediction of side-specific ECE, and hope it serves as a tool for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy and in the reduction of PSM in

  4. Noncontrast cardiac computed tomography image-based vertebral bone mineral density: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Mao, Song Shou; Khazai, Bahram; Hyder, Joseph A; Allison, Matthew; McClelland, Robyn; de Boer, Ian; Carr, J Jeffrey; Criqui, Michael H; Gao, Yanlin; Budoff, Matthew J

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac computer tomography (CT) image-based vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) assessment and the influence of cardiovascular disease risk factors on BMD have not been systematically evaluated, especially in a community-based, multiethnic population. A cross-sectional study design is used to determine if cardiac CT image is a reliable source to assess vertebral BMD, and a total of 2028 CT images were obtained from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a large, diverse US cohort of adults 45 to 84 years of age. Cardiac CT image allows the rapid assessment of vertebral BMD and related fractures. The mean BMD was significantly higher in men compared with women for thoracic vertebrae (143.2 ± 41.2 vs 138.7 ± 42.7 mg/cm³, respectively, P = .014), as well as for lumbar vertebrae (125.0 ± 37.9 vs 117.2 ± 39.4 mg/cm³, respectively, P images to garner and assess vertebral BMD is a feasible and reliable method. Cardiac CT has the additional advantages of evaluate vertebral bone health while assessing cardiovascular disease risk with no extra cost or radiation exposure. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Feasibility Study with Image-Based Rendered Virtual Reality in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Manera

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality (VR has emerged as a promising tool in many domains of therapy and rehabilitation, and has recently attracted the attention of researchers and clinicians working with elderly people with MCI, Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Here we present a study testing the feasibility of using highly realistic image-based rendered VR with patients with MCI and dementia. We designed an attentional task to train selective and sustained attention, and we tested a VR and a paper version of this task in a single-session within-subjects design. Results showed that participants with MCI and dementia reported to be highly satisfied and interested in the task, and they reported high feelings of security, low discomfort, anxiety and fatigue. In addition, participants reported a preference for the VR condition compared to the paper condition, even if the task was more difficult. Interestingly, apathetic participants showed a preference for the VR condition stronger than that of non-apathetic participants. These findings suggest that VR-based training can be considered as an interesting tool to improve adherence to cognitive training in elderly people with cognitive impairment.

  6. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  7. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7 Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7 Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11 C

  8. BEEtag: A Low-Cost, Image-Based Tracking System for the Study of Animal Behavior and Locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Crall

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge common to studies of animal movement, behavior, and ecology is the collection of high-quality datasets on spatial positions of animals as they change through space and time. Recent innovations in tracking technology have allowed researchers to collect large and highly accurate datasets on animal spatiotemporal position while vastly decreasing the time and cost of collecting such data. One technique that is of particular relevance to the study of behavioral ecology involves tracking visual tags that can be uniquely identified in separate images or movie frames. These tags can be located within images that are visually complex, making them particularly well suited for longitudinal studies of animal behavior and movement in naturalistic environments. While several software packages have been developed that use computer vision to identify visual tags, these software packages are either (a not optimized for identification of single tags, which is generally of the most interest for biologists, or (b suffer from licensing issues, and therefore their use in the study of animal behavior has been limited. Here, we present BEEtag, an open-source, image-based tracking system in Matlab that allows for unique identification of individual animals or anatomical markers. The primary advantages of this system are that it (a independently identifies animals or marked points in each frame of a video, limiting error propagation, (b performs well in images with complex backgrounds, and (c is low-cost. To validate the use of this tracking system in animal behavior, we mark and track individual bumblebees (Bombus impatiens and recover individual patterns of space use and activity within the nest. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of this software package and its application to the study of animal movement, behavior, and ecology.

  9. Expectations of medical specialists about image-based teleconsultation - A qualitative study on acute burns in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Lisa; Laflamme, Lucie; Mölsted Alvesson, Helle

    2018-01-01

    Image-based teleconsultation between medical experts and healthcare staff at remote emergency centres can improve the diagnosis of conditions which are challenging to assess. One such condition is burns. Knowledge is scarce regarding how medical experts perceive the influence of such teleconsultation on their roles and relations to colleagues at point of care. In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 medical experts to explore their expectations of a newly developed App for burns diagnostics and care prior to its implementation. Purposive sampling included male and female physicians at different stages of their career, employed at different referral hospitals and all potential future tele-experts in remote teleconsultation using the App. Positioning theory was used to analyse the data. The experts are already facing changes in their diagnostic practices due to the informal use of open access applications like WhatsApp. Additional changes are expected when the new App is launched. Four positions of medical experts were identified in situations of diagnostic advice, two related to patient flow-clinical specialist and gatekeeper-and two to point of care staff-educator and mentor. The experts move flexibly between the positions during diagnostic practices with remote colleagues. A new position in relation to previous research on medical roles-the mentor-came to light in this setting. The App is expected to have an important educational impact, streamline the diagnostic process, improve both triage and referrals and be a more secure option for remote diagnosis compared to current practices. Verbal communication is however expected to remain important for certain situations, in particular those related to the mentor position. The quality and security of referrals are expected to be improved through the App but the medical experts see less potential for conveying moral support via the App during remote consultations. Experts

  10. Expectations of medical specialists about image-based teleconsultation – A qualitative study on acute burns in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, Lucie; Mölsted Alvesson, Helle

    2018-01-01

    Background Image-based teleconsultation between medical experts and healthcare staff at remote emergency centres can improve the diagnosis of conditions which are challenging to assess. One such condition is burns. Knowledge is scarce regarding how medical experts perceive the influence of such teleconsultation on their roles and relations to colleagues at point of care. Methods In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 medical experts to explore their expectations of a newly developed App for burns diagnostics and care prior to its implementation. Purposive sampling included male and female physicians at different stages of their career, employed at different referral hospitals and all potential future tele-experts in remote teleconsultation using the App. Positioning theory was used to analyse the data. Results The experts are already facing changes in their diagnostic practices due to the informal use of open access applications like WhatsApp. Additional changes are expected when the new App is launched. Four positions of medical experts were identified in situations of diagnostic advice, two related to patient flow–clinical specialist and gatekeeper–and two to point of care staff–educator and mentor. The experts move flexibly between the positions during diagnostic practices with remote colleagues. A new position in relation to previous research on medical roles–the mentor–came to light in this setting. The App is expected to have an important educational impact, streamline the diagnostic process, improve both triage and referrals and be a more secure option for remote diagnosis compared to current practices. Verbal communication is however expected to remain important for certain situations, in particular those related to the mentor position. Conclusion The quality and security of referrals are expected to be improved through the App but the medical experts see less potential for conveying moral support via the App

  11. Expectations of medical specialists about image-based teleconsultation - A qualitative study on acute burns in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Blom

    Full Text Available Image-based teleconsultation between medical experts and healthcare staff at remote emergency centres can improve the diagnosis of conditions which are challenging to assess. One such condition is burns. Knowledge is scarce regarding how medical experts perceive the influence of such teleconsultation on their roles and relations to colleagues at point of care.In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 medical experts to explore their expectations of a newly developed App for burns diagnostics and care prior to its implementation. Purposive sampling included male and female physicians at different stages of their career, employed at different referral hospitals and all potential future tele-experts in remote teleconsultation using the App. Positioning theory was used to analyse the data.The experts are already facing changes in their diagnostic practices due to the informal use of open access applications like WhatsApp. Additional changes are expected when the new App is launched. Four positions of medical experts were identified in situations of diagnostic advice, two related to patient flow-clinical specialist and gatekeeper-and two to point of care staff-educator and mentor. The experts move flexibly between the positions during diagnostic practices with remote colleagues. A new position in relation to previous research on medical roles-the mentor-came to light in this setting. The App is expected to have an important educational impact, streamline the diagnostic process, improve both triage and referrals and be a more secure option for remote diagnosis compared to current practices. Verbal communication is however expected to remain important for certain situations, in particular those related to the mentor position.The quality and security of referrals are expected to be improved through the App but the medical experts see less potential for conveying moral support via the App during remote consultations

  12. Increased detection rate of syringomyelia by whole spine sagittal magnetic resonance images: Based on the data from military conscription of Korean young males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Seok; Oh, Chang Hyun [Seoul Regional Military Manpower Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyeong Chun; Park, Chong Oon; Kim, Yeo Ju [Inha Univ. Hospital/College of Medicine/Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    We compared the detection rate of syringomyelia according to the type of magnetic resonance (MR) images among the Korean military conscription. Among the total of 238910 examinees (males aged 18 to 32 years old) from January 2008 to December 2011, the examinees with conventional single lesion MR images (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) with and without whole spine sagittal T2 weighted MR images (WSST2I) totaled 1206 cases, and syringomyelia was observed in 24 cases. The detection rate of syringomyelia according to the MR protocol (the presence of WSST2I or not) was done through analysis by annually and the clinical characters of syringomyelia was reviewed. The estimated prevalence of syringomyelia was approximately 10.0 cases per 100000 people. The detection rate was increased annually when the WSST2I proportion was increased (from 3.4 to 14.9 cases per 100000 persons, r = 0.939, p = 0.018). Clinical character of syringomyelia was ambiguous with other spinal diseases. The most affected spinal level was C5 to C7 (83%), and most cases were non communicating syringomyelia with benign central canal widening (79%). Whole spine sagittal MR image is useful to detect coexisting spinal diseases such as syringomyelia, and most syringomyelia in young males was benign hydromyelia. A whole spine sagittal MR image is recommended to increase the detection of syringomyelia.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging based Cartilage Loss in Painful Contra-Lateral Knees with and without Radiographic Joint Space Narrowing – Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Benichou, Olivier; Wirth, Wolfgang; Nelson, David R; Maschek, Susanne; Hudelmaier, Martin; Kwoh, C. Kent; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess whether knees with advanced radiographic disease (medial joint space narrowing = mJSN) encounter greater longitudinal cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with earlier disease (no or less mJSN). Methods Participants were selected from 2678 cases in the Osteoarthritis Initiative, based on exhibition of bilateral pain, BMI>25, mJSN in one knee, no or less mJSN in the contra-lateral knee, and no lateral JSN in both knees. 80 participants (age 60.6±9.1 yrs) fulfilled these criteria. Medial tibial and femoral cartilage morphology was analyzed from baseline and 1-year follow-up sagittal DESSwe 3 Tesla MRI of both knees, by experienced readers blinded to the timepoint and mJSN status. Results Knees with more radiographic mJSN displayed greater medial cartilage loss (-80 μm), assessed by MRI, than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN (-57μm). The difference reached statistical significance in participants with mJSN grade 2 or 3 (p=0.005 to p=0.08), but not in participants with mJSN grade 1 (p=0.28 to 0.98). In knees with more mJSN, cartilage loss increased with higher grades of mJSN (p=0.003 in the medial femur). Knees with mJSN grade 2 or 3 displayed greater cartilage loss in the weight-bearing medial femur than in the posterior femur or in the medial tibia (p=0.048). Conclusion Knees with advanced mJSN displayed greater cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN. These data suggest that radiography can be used to stratify fast structural progressors, and that MRI cartilage thickness loss is more pronounced at advanced radiographic disease stage. PMID:19714595

  14. Dust grain resonant capture: A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzari, F.; Vanzani, V.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical approach, based on a large number of simultaneous numerical integrations, is adopted to study the capture in external mean motion resonances with the Earth of micron size dust grains perturbed by solar radiation and wind forces. We explore the dependence of the resonant capture phenomenon on the initial eccentricity e(sub 0) and perihelion argument w(sub 0) of the dust particle orbit. The intensity of both the resonant and dissipative (Poynting-Robertson and wind drag) perturbations strongly depends on the eccentricity of the particle while the perihelion argument determines, for low inclination, the mutual geometrical configuration of the particle's orbit with respect to the Earth's orbit. We present results for three j:j+1 commensurabilities (2:3, 4:5 and 6:7) and also for particle sizes s = 15, 30 microns. This study extends our previous work on the long term orbital evolution of single dust particles trapped into resonances with the Earth.

  15. SS-HORSE method for studying resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Mazur, A. I.; Mazur, I. A., E-mail: 008043@pnu.edu.ru [Pacific National University (Russian Federation); Savin, D. A.; Shirokov, A. M. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    A new method for analyzing resonance states based on the Harmonic-Oscillator Representation of Scattering Equations (HORSE) formalism and analytic properties of partial-wave scattering amplitudes is proposed. The method is tested by applying it to the model problem of neutral-particle scattering and can be used to study resonance states on the basis of microscopic calculations performed within various versions of the shell model.

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess Pain and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based (MRI-Based) Structural Spine Changes in Low Back Pain Patients After Yoga Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Bhardwaj, Abhishek K.; Gupta, Ram K.; Sharma, Sachin K.; Monro, Robin; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study aimed at determining whether 12 weeks of yoga practice in patients with chronic LBP and MRI-based degenerative changes would result in differences in: (i) self-reported pain, anxiety, and spinal flexibility; and (ii) the structure of the discs or vertebrae. Material/Methods Sixty-two persons with MRI-proven degenerative intervertebral discs (group mean ±S.D., 36.2±6.4 years; 30 females) were randomly assigned to yoga and control groups. However, testing was conducted on only 40 subjects, so only their data are included in this study. The assessments were: self-reported pain, state anxiety, spinal flexibility, and MRI of the lumbosacral spine, performed using a 1.5 Tesla system with a spinal surface column. The yoga group was taught light exercises, physical postures, breathing techniques, and yoga relaxation techniques for 1 hour daily for 3 months. No intervention was given to the control group except for routine medical care. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc analyses (which was Bonferroni-adjusted) was used. The Ethics Committee of Patanjali Research Foundation had approved the study which had been registered in the Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI/2012/11/003094). Results The yoga group showed a significant reduction in self-reported pain and state anxiety in a before/after comparison at 12 weeks. A few patients in both groups showed changes in the discs and vertebrae at post-intervention assessment. Conclusions Within 12 weeks, yoga practice reduced pain and state anxiety but did not alter MRI-proven changes in the intervertebral discs and in the vertebrae.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  19. A Resonant Damping Study Using Piezoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, J. B.; Duffy, K. P.; Choi, B. B.; Morrison, C. R.; Jansen, R. H.; Provenza, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue (HCF) problems requiring damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery blade research, a feasibility study of resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches with passive and active control techniques has been conducted on cantilever beam specimens. Test results for the passive damping circuit show that the optimum resistive shunt circuit reduces the third bending resonant vibration by almost 50%, and the optimum inductive circuit reduces the vibration by 90%. In a separate test, active control reduced vibration by approximately 98%.

  20. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, R.

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author) [fr

  1. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    /R) directions, respectively. In the treatment protocol, adjustment of couch was guided by US images. Residual setup errors as assessed by kV images were found to be: μ residual = (−0.4, 0.2, 0.2) mm, Σ residual = (1.0, 1.0,0.7) mm, and σ residual = (2.5, 2.3, 1.8) mm. Intrafraction prostate motion, evaluated using electromagnetic transponders, was: μ intrafxn = (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) mm, Σ intrafxn = (1.3, 1.5, 0.6) mm, and σ intrafxn = (2.6, 2.4, 1.4) mm. Shifts between pre- and post-treatment kV images were: μ kV(post–pre) = (−0.3, 0.8, −0.2), Σ kV(post–pre) = (2.4, 2.7, 2.1) mm, and σ kV(post–pre) = (2.7, 3.2, 3.1) mm. Relative to skin tattoos, planning margins for setup error were within 10–11 mm for all image-based modalities. The use of image guidance was shown to reduce these margins to less than 5 mm. Margins to compensate for both residual setup (interfraction) errors as well as intrafraction motion were 6.6, 6.8, and 3.9 mm in the A/P, S/I, and L/R directions, respectively. Conclusions: Analysis of interfraction setup errors, performed with US, CBCT, planar kV images, and electromagnetic transponders, from a large dataset revealed intermodality shifts were comparable (within 3–4 mm). Interfraction planning margins, relative to setup based on skin marks, were generally within the 10 mm prostate-to-planning target volume margin used in our clinic. With image guidance, interfraction residual planning margins were reduced to approximately less than 4 mm. These findings are potentially important for dose escalation studies using smaller margins to better protect normal tissues.

  2. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    -posterior (A/P), superior-inferior (S/I), and the left-right (L/R) directions, respectively. In the treatment protocol, adjustment of couch was guided by US images. Residual setup errors as assessed by kV images were found to be: {mu}{sub residual}= (-0.4, 0.2, 0.2) mm, {Sigma}{sub residual}= (1.0, 1.0,0.7) mm, and {sigma}{sub residual}= (2.5, 2.3, 1.8) mm. Intrafraction prostate motion, evaluated using electromagnetic transponders, was: {mu}{sub intrafxn}= (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (1.3, 1.5, 0.6) mm, and {sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (2.6, 2.4, 1.4) mm. Shifts between pre- and post-treatment kV images were: {mu}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (-0.3, 0.8, -0.2), {Sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.4, 2.7, 2.1) mm, and {sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.7, 3.2, 3.1) mm. Relative to skin tattoos, planning margins for setup error were within 10-11 mm for all image-based modalities. The use of image guidance was shown to reduce these margins to less than 5 mm. Margins to compensate for both residual setup (interfraction) errors as well as intrafraction motion were 6.6, 6.8, and 3.9 mm in the A/P, S/I, and L/R directions, respectively. Conclusions: Analysis of interfraction setup errors, performed with US, CBCT, planar kV images, and electromagnetic transponders, from a large dataset revealed intermodality shifts were comparable (within 3-4 mm). Interfraction planning margins, relative to setup based on skin marks, were generally within the 10 mm prostate-to-planning target volume margin used in our clinic. With image guidance, interfraction residual planning margins were reduced to approximately less than 4 mm. These findings are potentially important for dose escalation studies using smaller margins to better protect normal tissues.

  3. Genetic and Computational Approaches for Studying Plant Development and Abiotic Stress Responses Using Image-Based Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. T.; Walia, H.; Grondin, A.; Knecht, A.

    2017-12-01

    The development of abiotic stress tolerant crops (i.e. drought, salinity, or heat stress) requires the discovery of DNA sequence variants associated with stress tolerance-related traits. However, many traits underlying adaptation to abiotic stress involve a suite of physiological pathways that may be induced at different times throughout the duration of stress. Conventional single-point phenotyping approaches fail to fully capture these temporal responses, and thus downstream genetic analysis may only identify a subset of the genetic variants that are important for adaptation to sub-optimal environments. Although genomic resources for crops have advanced tremendously, the collection of phenotypic data for morphological and physiological traits is laborious and remains a significant bottleneck in bridging the phenotype-genotype gap. In recent years, the availability of automated, image-based phenotyping platforms has provided researchers with an opportunity to collect morphological and physiological traits non-destructively in a highly controlled environment. Moreover, these platforms allow abiotic stress responses to be recorded throughout the duration of the experiment, and have facilitated the use of function-valued traits for genetic analyses in major crops. We will present our approaches for addressing abiotic stress tolerance in cereals. This talk will focus on novel open-source software to process and extract biological meaningful data from images generated from these phenomics platforms. In addition, we will discuss the statistical approaches to model longitudinal phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of dynamic responses to these abiotic stresses throughout development.

  4. Magnetic resonance studies of intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last three or four years, nearly tow hundred papers have been published that used NMR or ESR spectroscopy to study compounds formed by the intercalation of molecules or ions into the van der Waals gap of a layered hast compound. The host lattices have ranged from the simple, such as graphite, to the complex, such as clay. In many cases, magnetic resonance techniques now enable one to obtain quite detailed information on even fairly complex intercalated species, on the nature of the changes in the host lattice accompanying intercalation, and on the nature of the interactions between the intercalant species and the host lattice. Magnetic resonance is used in conunction with many other techniques to obtain a fuller picture of these interesting systems, but this review will limit its focus to the use of NMR and ESR techniques. (author). 51 refs

  5. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  6. Membrane metamaterial resonators with a sharp resonance: A comprehensive study towards practical terahertz filters and sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyao Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the resonant properties of high quality-factor membrane-based metamaterial resonators functioning in the terahertz regime. A number of factors, including the resonator geometry, dielectric loss, and most importantly the membrane thickness are found to extensively influence the resonance strength and quality factor of the sharp resonance. Further studies on the membrane thickness-dependent-sensitivity for sensing applications reveal that high quality-factor membrane metamaterials with a moderate thickness ranging from 10 to 50 μm are the most promising option towards developing realistic integrated terahertz filters and sensors.

  7. X-ray CT imaging and image-based modelling study of gas exchange in the rice rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affholder, Marie-Cecile; Keyes, Samuel David; Roose, Tiina; Heppell, James; Kirk, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We used X-ray computer tomography and image-based modelling to investigate CO2 uptake by rice roots growing in submerged soil, and its consequences for the chemistry and biology of the rhizosphere. From previous work, three processes are known to greatly modify the rhizophere of rice and other wetland plants: (1) oxygenation of the submerged, anoxic soil by O2 transported through the root gas channels (aerenchyma); (2) oxidation of ferrous iron and resulting accumulation of ferric oxide; and (3) pH changes due to protons formed in iron oxidation and released from the roots to balance excess intake of cations over anions. A further process, so far not much investigated, is the possibility of CO2 uptake by the roots. Large amounts of CO2 accumulate in submerged soils because CO2 formed in soil respiration escapes only slowly by diffusion through the water-saturated soil pores. There is therefore a large CO2 gradient between the soil and the aerenchyma inside the root, and CO2 may be taken up by the roots and vented to the atmosphere. The extent of this and its consequences for rhizosphere chemistry and biology are poorly understood. We grew rice plants in a submerged, strongly-reduced, Philippine rice soil contained in 10-cm diameter, 20-cm deep Perspex pots. Four-week old rice seedlings, grown in nutrient culture, were transplanted into the pots at either 1 or 4 plants per pot, planted closely together. After 3 and 4 weeks, the pots were analysed with an X-ray CT scanner (Custom Nikon/Xtek Hutch; 80 mm by 56 mm field of view and 40 μm voxel size). Gas bubbles were extracted from the data by 3D median filtering and roots using a region-growth method. The images showed prominent and abundant gas bubbles in the soil bulk, but no or very few bubbles in the soil close to roots. There was a clear relation between the absence of gas bubbles and the presence of roots, as well as an increasing concentration of bubbles with depth through the soil. Analysis of the bubbles

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Semi-automatized segmentation method using image-based flow cytometry to study sperm physiology: the case of capacitation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros-Volante, Arturo; Moreno-Irusta, Ayelen; Torres-Rodriguez, Paulina; Giojalas, Laura; Gervasi, María G; Visconti, Pablo E; Treviño, Claudia L

    2018-02-01

    Is image-based flow cytometry a useful tool to study intracellular events in human sperm such as protein tyrosine phosphorylation or signaling processes? Image-based flow cytometry is a powerful tool to study intracellular events in a relevant number of sperm cells, which enables a robust statistical analysis providing spatial resolution in terms of the specific subcellular localization of the labeling. Sperm capacitation is required for fertilization. During this process, spermatozoa undergo numerous physiological changes, via activation of different signaling pathways, which are not completely understood. Classical approaches for studying sperm physiology include conventional microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. These techniques present disadvantages for obtaining detailed subcellular information of signaling pathways in a relevant number of cells. This work describes a new semi-automatized analysis using image-based flow cytometry which enables the study, at the subcellular and population levels, of different sperm parameters associated with signaling. The increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation is presented as an example. Sperm cells were isolated from seminal plasma by the swim-up technique. We evaluated the intensity and distribution of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated in non-capacitation and capacitation-supporting media for 1 and 18 h under different experimental conditions. We used an antibody against FER kinase and pharmacological inhibitors in an attempt to identify the kinases involved in protein tyrosine phosphorylation during human sperm capacitation. Semen samples from normospermic donors were obtained by masturbation after 2-3 days of sexual abstinence. We used the innovative technique image-based flow cytometry and image analysis tools to segment individual images of spermatozoa. We evaluated and quantified the regions of sperm where protein tyrosine phosphorylation takes place at the

  10. Preliminary Study of Hemodynamic Distribution in Patient-Specific Stenotic Carotid Bifurcation by Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Y.J.; Gao, P.Y.; Duan, Q.; Lin, Y.; Dai, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Regions prone to atherosclerosis, such as bends and bifurcations, tend to exhibit a certain degree of non-planarity or curvature, and these geometric features are known to strongly influence local flow patterns. Recently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used as a means of enhancing understanding of the mechanisms involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and development. Purpose: To analyze flow patterns and hemodynamic distribution in stenotic carotid bifurcation in vivo by combining CFD with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Material and Methods: Twenty-one patients with carotid atherosclerosis proved by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and/or Doppler ultrasound underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid bifurcation by a 3.0T MR scanner. Hemodynamic variables and flow patterns of the carotid bifurcation were calculated and visualized by combining vascular imaging postprocessing with CFD. Results: In mild stenotic cases, there was much more streamlined flow in the bulbs, with reduced or disappeared areas of weakly turbulent flow. Also, the corresponding areas of low wall shear stress (WSS) were reduced or even disappeared. As the extent of stenosis increased, stronger blood jets formed at the portion of narrowing, and more prominent eddy flows and slow back flows were noted in the lee of the stenosis. Regions of elevated WSS were predicted at the portion of stenosis and in the path of the downstream jet. Areas of low WSS were predicted on the leeward side of the stenosis, corresponding with the location of slowly turbulent flows. Conclusion: CFD combined with MRA can simulate flow patterns and calculate hemodynamic variables in stenotic carotid bifurcations as well as normal ones. It provides a new method to investigate the relationship of vascular geometry and flow condition with atherosclerotic pathological changes

  11. MR Imaging-based Estimation of Upper Motor Neuron Density in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline; Kostenko, Volodymyr; Pioro, Erik P; Trapp, Bruce D

    2018-01-23

    Purpose To determine if magnetic resonance (MR) imaging metrics can estimate primary motor cortex (PMC) motor neuron (MN) density in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Materials and Methods Between 2012 and 2014, in situ brain MR imaging was performed in 11 patients with ALS (age range, 35-81 years; seven women and four men) soon after death (mean, 5.5 hours after death; range, 3.2-9.6 hours). The brain was removed, right PMC (RPMC) was excised, and MN density was quantified. RPMC metrics (thickness, volume, and magnetization transfer ratio) were calculated from MR images. Regression modeling was used to estimate MN density by using RPMC and global MR imaging metrics (brain and tissue volumes); clinical variables were subsequently evaluated as additional estimators. Models were tested at in vivo MR imaging by using the same imaging protocol (six patients with ALS; age range, 54-66 years; three women and three men). Results RPMC mean MN density varied over a greater than threefold range across patients and was estimated by a linear function of normalized gray matter volume (adjusted R 2 = 0.51; P = .008; <10% error in most patients). When considering only sporadic ALS, a linear function of normalized RPMC and white matter volumes estimated MN density (adjusted R 2 = 0.98; P = .01; <10% error in all patients). In vivo data analyses detected decreases in MN density over time. Conclusion PMC mean MN density varies widely in end-stage ALS possibly because of disease heterogeneity. MN density can potentially be estimated by MR imaging metrics. © RSNA, 2018 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors using Image-based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is a well-known approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, lateral misdirection and vascular damage, intraoperative CSF leakage, and optic nerve and vascular injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation in localization of neurovascular structures during TSS. Methods Twenty-five patients with pituitary tumors underwent preoperative 3TMRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE sequences. Images were reviewed by an expert independent neuroradiologist. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet (16/25 cases) or Stryker (9/25 cases) image guidance platforms for segmentation and pre-operative planning. After patient registration into the neuronavigation system and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe on or as close as possible to the target. The audible pulsations of the bilateral ICA were confirmed using a micro-Doppler probe. Results Pre-operative segmentation of the ICA and cavernous sinus matched with the intra-operative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases (Dice Similarity Coefficient =1). This information reassured the surgeons with regard to the lateral extent of bone removal at the sellar floor and the limits of lateral exploration. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. This assisted in preventing unnecessary removal of the normal pituitary gland. Image-guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of the cases and the diaphragma sella in 52% of cases, which helped to determine the limits of upward exploration and to decrease the risk of CSF

  13. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  14. Systematic study on nuclear resonant scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Freitas, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    New resonant scattering effect of thermal neutron capture gamma rays from Ti and Fe on Sb, Cu, Se and Ce target were observed. These results together with those published by other authors are summarized and discussed in terms of a possible systematic search for new resonant scattering effects

  15. A comprehensive tool for image-based generation of fetus and pregnant women mesh models for numerical dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahdouh, S; Serrurier, A; De la Plata, J-P; Anquez, J; Angelini, E D; Bloch, I; Varsier, N; Wiart, J

    2014-01-01

    Fetal dosimetry studies require the development of accurate numerical 3D models of the pregnant woman and the fetus. This paper proposes a 3D articulated fetal growth model covering the main phases of pregnancy and a pregnant woman model combining the utero-fetal structures and a deformable non-pregnant woman body envelope. The structures of interest were automatically or semi-automatically (depending on the stage of pregnancy) segmented from a database of images and surface meshes were generated. By interpolating linearly between fetal structures, each one can be generated at any age and in any position. A method is also described to insert the utero-fetal structures in the maternal body. A validation of the fetal models is proposed, comparing a set of biometric measurements to medical reference charts. The usability of the pregnant woman model in dosimetry studies is also investigated, with respect to the influence of the abdominal fat layer. (paper)

  16. Study of spin resonances in the accelerators with snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Spin resonances in the circular accelerators with snakes are studied to understand the nature of snake resonances. We analyze the effect of snake configuration, and the snake superperiod on the resonance. Defining the critical resonance strength ε c as the maximum tolerable resonance strength without losing the beam polarization after passing through the resonance, we found that ε c is a sensitive function of the snake configuration, the snake superperiod at the first order snake resonance, the higher order snake resonance conditions and the spin matching condition. Under properly designed snake configuration, the critical resonance strength ε c is found to vary linearly with N S as left-angle ε c right-angle=(1/π)sin -1 (cos πν z | 1/2 )N S , where ν| z and N S are the betatron tune and the number of snakes respectively. We also study the effect of overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. The imperfection resonance should be corrected to a magnitude of insignificance (e.g., ε≤0.1 for two snakes case) to maintain proper polarization

  17. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  18. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Carlson, Blake; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Yin Pen; Grigsby, Perry W.; Nguyen, Kim; Dempsey, James F; Lerma, Fritz A.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Vannier, Michael W.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2001-01-01

    cancer. These changes cannot be modeled by the conventional rigid landmark transformation method. In the current study, we found that the deformable anatomic template registration method, based on continuum-mechanics models of deformation, successfully described these large anatomic shape changes before and after ICT. These promising modeling results indicate that realistic registration of the cumulative dose distribution to the organs (or targets) of interest for radiation therapy of cervical cancers is achievable

  19. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  20. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  1. Eigenvalue study of a chaotic resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banova, Todorka [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Schlossgartenstrasse 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Graduate School of Computational Engineering, Dolivostrasse 15, D-64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Ackermann, Wolfgang; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Schlossgartenstrasse 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The field of quantum chaos comprises the study of the manifestations of classical chaos in the properties of the corresponding quantum systems. Within this work, we compute the eigenfrequencies that are needed for the level spacing analysis of a microwave resonator with chaotic characteristics. The major challenges posed by our work are: first, the ability of the approaches to tackle the large scale eigenvalue problem and second, the capability to extract many, i.e. order of thousands, eigenfrequencies for the considered cavity. The first proposed approach for an accurate eigenfrequency extraction takes into consideration the evaluated electric field computations in time domain of a superconducting cavity and by means of signal-processing techniques extracts the eigenfrequencies. The second approach is based on the finite element method with curvilinear elements, which transforms the continuous eigenvalue problem to a discrete generalized eigenvalue problem. Afterwards, the Lanczos algorithm is used for the solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem. In the poster, a summary of the applied algorithms, as well as, critical implementation details together with the simulation results are provided.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of metabolic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Han, C.H.; Whaley, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the detection of the metabolic transformations of biological compounds labeled with stable isotopes, particularly carbon-13 have been explored. We have studied adipose tissue in the intact rat, the exteriorized epididymal fat pad, and the isolated adipocyte. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue is regulated by lipogenic factors (insulin, corticosterone, thyroxine, and growth hormone) and lipolytic factors (glucagon and catecholamines). The synthesis of triglyceride from 5.5 mM glucose was stimulated by about 4-fold by 10 nM insulin. Triglyceride synthesis from glucose in the presence of insulin occurred at a rate of 330 nmol/hr/10 6 cells. Since the NMR signals from free and esterified fatty acids and glycerol are distinct, we could directly measure the rate of hormone-stimulated lipolysis. Epinephrine (10 μM) gave a lipolytic rate of 0.30 μmol/hr/10 6 cells as monitored by free-glycerol appearance in the medium. 13 C NMR provides a superior method for the measurement of triglyceride metabolism since it directly measures the changes in the substrates and products in situ

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Morrisett, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclei in lipoproteins are magnetically active and are thus potential NMR probes of lipoprotein structure. Table I lists the magnetic isotopes preset in the covalent structures of the molecular constituents of lipoproteins: lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Every type of nucleus that is part of the endogenous structure of these molecules has at least one magnetic isotope. Each magnetic nucleus represents an intrinsic and completely nonperturbing probe (when at the natural abundance level) of local molecular motion and magnetic environment. The NMR experiment itself is also nonperturbing and nondestructive. Table I also lists for each nucleus its nuclear spin, its natural isotopic abundance, its sensitivity, and its resonance frequency at two commonly employed magnetic in the low field range (21.14 kG or 2.11 Tesla) and the other in the high field range (47.0 kG or 4.70 Tesla). Of the nuclei listed in Table I, /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 31/P have been the primary ones studied in lipoproteins. The general advantages and disadvantages afforded by these and other nuclei as probes of lipoprotein structure are discussed. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the method which has had the most extensive application (and probably has the greatest future potential) to lipoproteins, is treated in greatest detail, but many of the principles described apply to other nuclei as well

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ( 31 P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the 31 P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. 1 H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T 1 and T 2 with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T 1 or T 2 , consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. 1 H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T 1 relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine γ-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T 1 with increasing magnetic field

  5. Deep-level defects in semiconductors: studies by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerlaan, C.A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, the following topics are discussed: paramagnetic centers in semiconductors, principles of magnetic resonance, spin-Hamiltonian, g-tensor, hyperfine interaction, magnetic resonance spectrometer. In the second part it is dicussed defects studied by magnetic resonance including vacancy and divacancy in silicon, iron in silicon, nitrogen in diamond and antisite defects in III-V compounds. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Simulation study of resonant reflector for S-band BWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choyal, Y; Parmar, Nidhi; Saini, Ajay Kumar; Chhotray, S K; Bhat, K S; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the result of simulation studies of resonant reflector used for reflection of backward wave in relativistic BWO. The resonant reflector is modelled and analyzed by CST MWS for TM 01 . A TM 01 mode is fed at the output end of the BWO and signal is observed at the cathode end. Results show that 90 percent of the backward TM 01 wave is get reflected back by the locked TM 02 mode in the resonant reflector.

  7. Multichannel approach to studying scalar resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, D.; Surovtsev, Yu.S.

    1995-11-01

    The multichannel approach to the investigation of resonances is given in order to determine their quantum chromodynamical nature. The formula for the analytic continuation of the N-channel S-matrix to the unphysical sheets of the Riemann surface is given, which is a solution of the N-channel problem in that it enables a prediction of the coupled-process amplitudes on the uniformization plane of the S-matrix. The resonance representations by pairs of complex-conjugate clusters of poles and zeros on the Riemann surface are discussed. The concept of standard clusters as model-independent characteristics of the resonance is developed. 32 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  8. Study of giant resonances in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldi, M.I.C.

    1986-01-01

    The electrodisintegration cross section for 181 Ta, 208 Pb and 209 Bi was measured by counting the emitted neutrons, with incident electrons in the energy range 8-22 MeV. The data was analysed using the virtual photon method, in order to obtain a multipole decomposition and the intensities of Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole, isoscalar and isovector, in the Giant Resonance. The results obtained for the isovector Giant Quadrupole Resonance are compared with the measured photodisintegration cross section, using data from Saclay and Livermore. This comparision indicates that the photodisintegration data can be well explained assuming an isovector E2 Resonance located between 120 and 130 A -1/3 MeV, with an intensity of one isovector E2 sum. (author) [pt

  9. Resonant Auger studies of metallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J. Jr.; Frigo, S. P.; Freeland, J. W.; Moore, J.; Calaway, W. S.; Pellin, M. J.; Mendelsohn, M.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Results of resonant Auger spectroscopy experimental are presented for Cu, Co, and oxidized Al. Sublifetime narrowing of Auger spectra and generation of sublifetime narrowed absorption spectra constructed from Auger yield measurements were observed. Resonant Auger yields are used to identify three chemical states of oxidized Al. Partial absorption yield spectra were derived giving detailed electronic information and thickness information for the various chemical states of the bulk metal, the passivating aluminum oxide layer, and the metal-oxide interface region. In addition, the total absorption yield spectrum for the oxidized Al sample was constructed from the partial yield data, supporting the consistency of our method. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  10. Study on Dynamic Alignment Technology of COIL Resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, M D; Zou, X J; Guo, J H; Jia, S N; Zhang, Z B

    2006-01-01

    The performance of great power chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) beam is decided mostly by resonator mirror maladjustment and environment vibration. To improve the performance of light beam, an auto-alignment device is used in COIL resonator, the device can keep COIL resonator collimating by adjusting the optical components of resonator. So the coupling model of COIL resonator is present. The multivariable self study fuzzy uncoupling arithmetic and six-dimensional micro drive technology are used to design a six-input-three-output uncoupling controller, resulting in the realization of the high precision dynamic alignment. The experiments indicate that the collimating range of this system is 8 mrad, precision is 5 urad and frequency response is 20Hz, which meet the demand of resonator alignment system

  11. Study of giant resonances with pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results on giant resonances obtained with pion-inelastic scattering and with single- and double-charge-exchange scattering are reviewed. The states discussed are isobaric analog states, double-isobaric analog states, and isovector L = 0, 1, and 2 collective states. 36 references

  12. Theoretical study of the electron paramagnetic resonance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conveniently investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In ... ion Ir2+ can experience the Jahn–Teller effect by means of vibration interaction, ... Similarly, k. (and k ) are the orbital reduction factors arising from the anisotropic interactions of the orbital angular momentum operator. From the cluster ...

  13. A Study on Measurement Variations in Resonant Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Iqbal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators require fast, accurate, and cost-effective testing for mass production. Among the different test methods, frequency domain analysis is one of the easiest and fastest. This paper presents the measurement uncertainties in electrostatically actuated MEMS resonators, using frequency domain analysis. The influence of the applied driving force was studied to evaluate the measurement variations in resonant characteristics, such as the natural frequency and the quality factor of the resonator. To quantify the measurement results, measurement system analysis (MSA was performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA method. The results demonstrate that the resonant frequency ( f r is mostly affected by systematic error. However, the quality (Q factor strongly depends on the applied driving force. To reduce the measurement variations in Q factor, experiments were carried out to study the influence of DC and/or AC driving voltages on the resonator. The results reveal that measurement uncertainties in the quality factor were high for a small electrostatic force.

  14. Dielectric studies of fluids with reentrant resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, A.R.H.; Moldover, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have used a reentrant radio-frequency (rf) cavity as a resonator operating near 375 MHz to measure changes in the dielectric constant of fluids within it. The utility of these measurements was demonstrated by determining the dipole moment of 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane, a candidate replacement refrigerant (denoted R236ea) and by detecting the phase boundaries in the mixture [(1-x)C 2 H 6 + xCO 2 ], for the mole fraction x = 0.492. The densities of the coexisting phases of the mixture were determined using the Clausius-Mossotti relation which has errors on the order of 0.5% in this application. To test the accuracy of the present techniques, the rf resonator was calibrated with helium and then used to redetermine the molar polarizability A e of argon. The results were in excellent agreement with published values. The design of the reentrant resonator makes it suitable for use with corrosive fluids at temperature up to 400 degrees C

  15. Contribution to the study of electron paramagnetic resonance and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, Jean-Gerard

    1962-01-01

    This research thesis reports an experimental work which comprises the development of a very practical and very sensitive electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer, and the use of this equipment for the study of irradiated substances and carbons. By studying electronic resonance signals by fast modulation of the magnetic field, the author studied phenomena of quick passage in electronic resonance, and showed that the study of these phenomena requires observation systems with a particularly large bandwidth. He reports the measurement of the line width of packs of spins of inhomogeneous lines by two different methods [fr

  16. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  17. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    , symptom relief was achieved. No severe acute and late side effects (Grade 3/4) were observed. Conclusions: Sectional image-based three-dimensional treatment planning on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is feasible in definitive brachytherapy of endometrial carcinoma and enables by the use of dwell time and location adaptation a sufficient coverage of GTV and major parts of CTV. Local control in this limited number of patients is excellent and rate of side effects minimal

  18. Cerebral fat embolism: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Barrena, R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Tejada, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of 26-year-old man who presented clinical evidence of fat embolism following a traffic accident. Although computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed no abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed several scattered points of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton density (PD) images, with complete resolution of the lesions on follow-up scan. MRI is considered more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting these lesions, and may be useful for their diagnosis, correlating well with the clinical course. (Author) 10 refs

  19. Role of chelates in magnetic resonance imaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies are tests performed with a variety of techniques that produce pictures of the inside of a patient′s body. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an imaging technique based on the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone, and virtually all other internal body structures. Chelates have a wide application in such imaging techniques. Chelates in imaging studies are used alone as radioactive agents or conjugated to monoclonal antibodies or to DNA as radioactive agents. Technetium chelates and gadolinium chelates are being widely used as magnetic resonance contrast media.

  20. Ferromagnetic resonance studies of lunar core stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, R. M.; Cirlin, E. H.; Goldberg, I. B.; Crowe, H.

    1976-01-01

    We first review the evidence which links the characteristic ferromagnetic resonance observed in lunar fines samples with agglutinatic glass produced primarily by micrometeorite impacts and present new results on Apollo 15, 16, and 17 breccias which support this link by showing that only regolith breccias contribute significantly to the characteristic FMR intensity. We then provide a calibration of the amount of Fe metal in the form of uniformly magnetized spheres required to give our observed FMR intensities and discuss the theoretical magnetic behavior to be expected of Fe spheres as a function of size. Finally, we present FMR results on samples from every 5 mm interval in the core segments 60003, 60009, and 70009. These results lead us to suggest: (1) that secondary mixing may generally be extensive during regolith deposition so that buried regolith surfaces are hard to recognize or define; and (2) that local grinding of rocks and pebbles during deposition may lead to short scale fluctuations in grain size, composition, and apparent exposure age of samples.

  1. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Postpartum Depression: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiorelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum depression is a frequent and disabling condition whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In recent years, the study of the neural correlates of mental disorders has been increasingly approached using magnetic resonance techniques. In this review we synthesize the results from studies on postpartum depression in the context of structural, functional, and spectroscopic magnetic resonance studies of major depression as a whole. Compared to the relative wealth of data available for major depression, magnetic resonance studies of postpartum depression are limited in number and design. A systematic literature search yielded only eleven studies conducted on about one hundred mothers with postpartum depression overall. Brain magnetic resonance findings in postpartum depression appear to replicate those obtained in major depression, with minor deviations that are not sufficient to delineate a distinct neurobiological profile for this condition, due to the small samples used and the lack of direct comparisons with subjects with major depression. However, it seems reasonable to expect that studies conducted in larger populations, and using a larger variety of brain magnetic resonance techniques than has been done so far, might allow for the identification of neuroimaging signatures for postpartum depression.

  3. Experimental study on moonpool resonance of offshore floating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating structures have so-called moonpool in the centre area for the purpose of drilling, installation of subsea structures, recovery of Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV and divers. However, this vertical opening has an effect on the operating performance of floating offshore structure in the vicinity of moonpool resonance frequency; piston mode and sloshing mode. Experimental study based on model test was carried out. Moonpool resonance of floating offshore structure on fixed condition and motion free condition were investigated. And, the effect of cofferdam which is representative inner structure inside moonpool was examined. Model test results showed that Molin's theoretical formula can predict moonpool resonance on fixed condition quite accurately. However, motion free condition has higher resonance frequency when it is compared with that of motion fixed. The installation of cofferdam moves resonance frequency to higher region and also generates secondary resonance at lower frequency. Furthermore, it was found that cofferdam was the cause of generating waves in the longitudinal direction when the vessel was in beam sea.

  4. Experimental study of resonance crossing with a Paul trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Takeuchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of resonance crossing on beam stability is studied systematically by employing a novel tabletop experimental tool and a multiparticle simulation code. A large number of ions are confined in a compact linear Paul trap to reproduce the collective beam behavior. We can prove that the ion plasma in the trap is physically equivalent to a charged-particle beam propagating through a strong focusing channel. The plasma confinement force is quickly ramped such that the trap operating point traverses linear and nonlinear resonance stop bands. Assuming a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator composed of many identical FODO cells, we measure how much ion losses occur under diverse conditions. It is experimentally and numerically demonstrated that too slow resonance crossing leads to significant ion losses as expected. Particular attention must be paid to the linear coherent resonance excited at a quarter-integer tune. When the beam intensity is high, this type of linear stop band can seriously affect the beam quality even for rather fast resonance crossing. A scaling law is given of the emittance growth caused by the quarter-integer resonance crossing.

  5. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    resonator, which reduces the energy loss arising from the heat conducting, the wall temperature almost have no limitation. The cavity is partitioned in two halves separated by a dialectic quartz plate. The propellant is swirl-injected tangentially in the nozzle side of the cavity (plasma chamber), which extends lifetime and working reliability of MPT. Compared, coaxial resonator has the characteristic of smaller structure, lighter weight, wider bandwidth of resonating frequency and more stable resonate state. microwave energy can heat propellant gas to produce thrust efficiently. According to the test method on the return loss of passive parts of microwave apparatus, this paper also makes experimental study on the resonating state of MPT cavity with scalar network analyzer operating under low signal. Purpose is to analyze its energy absorbing efficiency and resonant frequency band, research the matching of the cavity dimension, microwave coupling probe position and the isolate plate material within the cavity. The conclusion is helpful for the thruster design and improving the system efficiency. different propellant gases (Ar and He) have been fulfilled. The power, resonant pressure and mass flow rate have been measured and analyzed. Experiments show that MPT can start up reliably and work steadily. Keywords: microwave plasma thrustermicrowaveplasmaresonatorreturn loss

  6. Image-based occupancy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  7. Studies of magnetic resonance in anemia of hematies falciformes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lores Guevara, Manuel Arsenio; Balcom, Bruce John; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance applications to the study of Sickle Cell Disease are analyzed using classical procedures and Unilateral Magnetic Resonance. Hemoglobin and whole blood samples were obtained from healthy individual and patients with Sickle Cell Anemia to be used as samples. Classical pulse sequence as spin echo and inversion recovery were used in the experimental studies, the STEPR method was used for EPR spectrometric determinations. The results show the possibility of NMR methods to follow the molecular process causing the disease and allows to present quantitative procedures to estimate the clinical state of the patients and the results of clinical options. We present the Unilateral Magnetic Resonance as a new method to study Sickle Cell disease considering its portability and new possibilities as new image method

  8. Study of γ-irradiated lithographic polymers by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, S.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    The room temperature gamma irradiation degradation of the lithographic polymers, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(methyl-α-chloroacrylate) (PMCA), poly(methyl-α-fluoroacrylate) (PMFA), and poly(methylacrylonitrile) (PMCN), have been studied by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) to assess their molecular degradation processes of relevance to electron beam lithography. Two classes of radicals are found, chain radicals and chain scission radicals. PMMA and PMCA mainly form chain scission radicals consistent with degradation while for PMCN the resolution is poorer, and this is only probable. PMFA forms mainly chain radicals consistent with predominant crosslinking. The total radical yield is greatest in PMCA and PMCN. ENDOR is used to assess the compactness of the radiation degradation region for PMMA and PMCA and hence the potential resolution of the resist; this appears to be about the same for these methacrylate polymers

  9. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers; Etude des polymeres solides par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenk, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author) [French] Cette etude est une recherche bibliographique sur l'application de la resonance magnetique nucleaire (RMN) aux polymeres solides. Dans la premiere partie theorique on discute les elements de la theorie de RMN, necessaires pour l'etude des proprietes des polymeres solides: la methode des moments, la relaxation nucleaire et la distribution des temps de correlation. La deuxieme partie presente les resultats des experiences. (auteur)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are reviewed. After a brief discussion of two novel experimental techniques, the main focus of this review is on several specific studies which illustrate the versatility and power of this high pressure field. Experimental aspects of NMR measurements at high pressure and high temperature and the techniques for the high resolution NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are discussed. An overview of NMR studies of the dynamic structure of simple polyatomic liquids and hydrogen bonded liquids is followed by a discussion of high resolution spectroscopy at high pressure. Examples of NMR studies of disordered organic solids and polymers conclude the review. (author)

  11. Surgical neuro navigator guided by preoperative magnetic resonance images, based on a magnetic position sensor;Neuronavegador cirurgico guiado por imagens de ressonancia magnetica pre-operatoria, baseado num transdutor de posicao magnetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Siqueira, Rogerio Bulha; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira, E-mail: adilton@ffclrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Oliveira, Lucas Ferrari de [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica; Machado, Helio Rubens [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurocirurgia

    2009-08-15

    Image guided neurosurgery enables the neurosurgeon to navigate inside the patient's brain using pre-operative images as a guide and a tracking system, during a surgery. Following a calibration procedure, three-dimensional position and orientation of surgical instruments may be transmitted to computer. The spatial information is used to access a region of interest, in the pre-operative images, displaying them to the neurosurgeon during the surgical procedure. However, when a craniotomy is involved and the lesion is removed, movements of brain tissue can be a significant source of error in these conventional navigation systems. The architecture implemented in this work intends the development of a system to surgical planning and orientation guided by ultrasound image. For surgical orientation, the software developed allows the extraction of slices from the volume of the magnetic resonance images (MRI) with orientation supplied by a magnetic position sensor (Polhemus{sup R}). The slices extracted with this software are important because they show the cerebral area that the neurosurgeon is observing during the surgery, and besides they can be correlated with the intra-operative ultrasound images to detect and to correct the deformation of brain tissue during the surgery. Also, a tool for per-operative navigation was developed, providing three orthogonal planes through the image volume. In the methodology used for the software implementation, the Python{sup tm} programming language and the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) graphics library were used. The program to extract slices of the MRI volume allowed the application of transformations in the volume, using coordinates supplied by the position sensor. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  13. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    systems and ultra fast imaging techniques, such as echo planar imaging (EPI ) ... is used to understand brain organization, assessing of neurological status, and ..... J C 1998 Functional MRI studies of motor recovery after stroke;. NeuroImage 7 ...

  14. Studies on inclusive meson resonance and particle production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarikko, Heimo

    1978-01-01

    Production and decay of meson resonances are studied in medium energy meson-proton collisions. Strong evidence is found that hadronic collisions are dominated by resonance production. Especially the vector mesons have often large inclusive cross sections, typically of the order of few millibarns at the present energies. In all, a majority of pions and kaons appear to be decay products of resonances or other unstable particles. The detailed kinematics of the parent resonance's decays is found to play an important role in determining inclusive pion spectra. The squared transverse momentum distributions of hadrons heavier than the pion appear to have in common an exponential behaviour, with a universal slope for the esponential fall-off. The observed vector meson yields suggest that only a small fraction of the direct lepton production observed at large transverse momentum in nucleon-nucleon interactions is accounted for by the ''old'' vector mesons. An attempt has been made to separate out the central production and fragmentation components of the meson production. Both the central production and the fragmentation of the incoming meson are found to be important mechanisms in the non-strange meson production whereas the central production of strange meson resonances is rare at our energies. The ratios of the observed meson yields are found to be generally in good agreement with a simple quark-counting model. (author)

  15. Study of isovector resonances with pion charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, H.W.; Bolton, R.; Bowman, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with the pion charge exchange reactions (π/sup +-/,π 0 ) at 164 MeV using the LAMPF π 0 spectrometer are yielding new results on the existence and systematic features of isovector resonances in nuclei. These experiments possess an unusually high signal/background ratio for isovector resonances of low-multipolarity. Results obtained to date are: (1) observation and angular disribution measurement of the giant dipole resonance in nuclei 12 C, 40 Ca, 90 Zr, and 120 Sn; and (2) observation and angular distribution measurements in the (π - ,π 0 ) reaction on 90 Zr and 120 Sn of large signals possessing the expected angular distribution shapes and magnitudes for the isovector monopole resonance. Excitation energies are near the hydrodynamical model values 170 A - /sup 1/3/ MeV. Differential cross sections are approximately 0.7 J 1 2 (qR) mb/sr. An overview of this experimental program, with emphasis on new results and how they correlate with existing knowledge on the isovector resonances, is presented

  16. Resonance magnetic x-ray scattering study of erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanyal, M.K.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic phases of erbium have been studied by resonance x-ray-scattering techniques. When the incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L(III) absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering are observed above 18 K. We have measured the energy and polarization dependence...... of this magnetic scattering and analyzed it using a simple model based on electric dipole and quadrupole transitions among atomic orbitals. The line shapes can be fitted to a magnetic structure combining both c-axis-modulated and basal-plane components. Below 18 K, we have observed unusual behavior of the magnetic...

  17. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of elementary excitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Lucas Johannes Peter (Luuk)

    2010-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is an X-ray in, X-ray out technique that enables one to study the dispersion of excitations in solids. In this thesis, we investigated how various elementary excitations of transition metal oxides show up in RIXS spectra.

  18. Resonance Raman study on distorted symmetry of porphyrin in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of nickel octaethyl porphyrin, Ni(OEP), ... Nickel ocatethyl porphyrin, Ni(OEP), plays a central role in studies of the molec- ..... [8] T Kitagawa and Y Ozaki, Structure and bonding (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, ... [10] R S Czernuszewicz, K A Macar, Li Xiao-Yuan, J R Kincaid and T G Spiro, J. Am.

  19. Non-resonant microwave absorption studies of superconducting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) studies of superconducting MgB2 and a sample containing 10% by weight of MgO in MgB2 are reported. The NRMA results indicate near absence of intergranular weak links in the pure MgB2 sample. A linear temperature dependence of the lower critical field Hc1 is ...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antypas, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T 1 relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by 31 P NMR

  1. Study of giant multipole resonances in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rost, H.

    1979-01-01

    In the present thesis giant resonance states in 40 Ca were studied by scattering of 104 MeV a particles on 40 Ca and by the reactions 39 K(p vector,p') 39 K and 39 K(p,α) 36 Ar. The scattered α-particles were measured at extreme forward angles (THETAsub(L) = 4 0 -16 0 C), because at forward angles the cross sections for the excitation of states with spin 0 and 1 strongly differ from those with higher spin. The aim of this experiment was first of all the study of the giant resonance region in 40 Ca on the contribution to 0 + or 1 - states. Beside the known electric giant quadrupole resonances at Esub(x) approx. equal to 18.5 MeV (25% EWSR) contributions of EO-strength at Esub(x) approx. equal to 21 MeV (6% EWSR) and indications to a (isoscalar) E1-strength at Esub(x) approx. equal to 14 MeV and Esub(x) approx. equal to 16 MeV were found. At the reactions 39 K(p vector,p') 39 K and 39 K(p,α) 36 Ar in the channels (p,p 0 ),(p,p 4 ), (p,αsub(o)), and (p,α 1 ) at incident energies at about 10 MeV (Esub(x)( 40 Ca) approx. equal to 18 MeV) resonant structures were observed. A scattering phase analysis performed for the elastic proton scattering didn't however yield quantitative results about the resonance parameter. An expansion of the cross sections by Legendre polynomials for the remaining reaction channel didn't allow a conclusion about the dominance of a certain L-value. The only indication to the connection of the observed resonant structures with the giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca is therefore the energetic position at about Esub(x) approx. equal to 18 MeV. Altogether the observed structures however were not very pronounced, so it can be concluded, that the excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca by protons via the ground state of 39 K occurs not very strongly. (orig./HSI) [de

  2. Study of inelastic proton scattering at isobaric analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.L.

    1974-01-01

    Inelastic proton scattering at isobaric analog resonances (IAR's) was studied using the targets 138 Ba and 92 Mo. Differential cross sections and analyzing powers were measured at the 10.00, 10.63, 11.09, 11.45, and 11.70 MeV resonances in 138 Ba + p and at the 5.89, 6.09, and 6.55 MeV resonances in 92 Mo + p. In addition, a new measurement, the spin flip asymmetry, was developed. The experiment was performed by using a polarized beam to make spin flip measurements. Angular distributions for the spin flip probability and spin flip asymmetry were measured at all of the above energies except for the lowest three resonances in 138 Ba, where only the spin flip probability was measured. A DWBA code modified to include the coherent addition of resonance amplitudes was used to analyze the 138 Ba data. The partial widths extracted from this analysis were converted to expansion coefficients for parent states in 139 Ba. The coefficients were found to be in good agreement with unified model calculations. For 92 Mo, inelastic polarizations, deduced from the spin flip and spin flip asymmetry, were found to be large. Attempts using Hauser Feshbach theory to describe both the cross section and polarization data repeatedly failed for both the 6.55 and 5.87 MeV IAR's. This failure represents strong evidence that Hauser Feshbach theory is not valid when extended to describe scattering at an IAR. The 92 Mo data were analyzed using a reaction theory modified to include channel-channel correlations. This theory predicts that the enhanced compound scattering is identical to the resonance scattering. Good fits have been obtained with the use of this modified Hauser Feshbach theory. (U.S.)

  3. Magnetic resonance study of maghemite-based magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, L.C.; Lacava, B.M.; Skeff Neto, K.; Pelegrini, F.; Morais, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the magnetic resonance (MR) data (X-band experiment) of 10.2 nm average diameter maghemite nanoparticle in the temperature range of 100-230 K. Maghemite nanoparticles were suspended as low-pH ionic magnetic fluid containing 2.3x10 17 particles/cm 3 . The temperature dependence of both resonance linewidth and resonance field of the zero-field-cooled sample as well as the resonance field of the field-cooled sample (angular variation experiment) was analyzed using well-established methodology. Information regarding particle size, particle clusterization and surface magnetic anisotropy were obtained from the analysis of the MR data. The number of magnetic sites per particle from the MR data is in excellent agreement with the number provided by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data. The demagnetizing field value obtained from the MR data indicates cluster of particles containing on average 1.42 particles. The MR angular variation data suggest that magnetoelastic effect accounts for the non-linearity observed for the surface component of the magnetic anisotropy

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of epithelial metabolism and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a noninvasive technique for studying cellular metabolism and function. In this review the general applications and advantages of NMR will be discussed with specific reference to epithelial tissues. Phosphorus NMR investigations have been performed on epithelial tissues in vivo and in vitro; however, other detectable nuclei have not been utilized to date. Several new applications of phosphorus NMR to epithelial tissues are also discussed, including studies on isolated renal tubules and sheet epithelia

  5. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  6. Multimodal Image-Based Virtual Reality Presurgical Simulation and Evaluation for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shujing; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhao, Yining; Hou, Yuanzheng; Xu, Xinghua; Zhang, Zhizhong; Kikinis, Ron; Chen, Xiaolei

    2018-05-01

    To address the feasibility and predictive value of multimodal image-based virtual reality in detecting and assessing features of neurovascular confliction (NVC), particularly regarding the detection of offending vessels, degree of compression exerted on the nerve root, in patients who underwent microvascular decompression for nonlesional trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm (HFS). This prospective study includes 42 consecutive patients who underwent microvascular decompression for classic primary trigeminal neuralgia or HFS. All patients underwent preoperative 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted three-dimensional (3D) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions, 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and 3D T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced sequences in combination, whereas 2 patients underwent extra experimental preoperative 7.0-T MRI scans with the same imaging protocol. Multimodal MRIs were then coregistered with open-source software 3D Slicer, followed by 3D image reconstruction to generate virtual reality (VR) images for detection of possible NVC in the cerebellopontine angle. Evaluations were performed by 2 reviewers and compared with the intraoperative findings. For detection of NVC, multimodal image-based VR sensitivity was 97.6% (40/41) and specificity was 100% (1/1). Compared with the intraoperative findings, the κ coefficients for predicting the offending vessel and the degree of compression were >0.75 (P < 0.001). The 7.0-T scans have a clearer view of vessels in the cerebellopontine angle, which may have significant impact on detection of small-caliber offending vessels with relatively slow flow speed in cases of HFS. Multimodal image-based VR using 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions in combination with 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography sequences proved to be reliable in detecting NVC

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  8. Optimization experiments on the study of giant resonance in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubarskij, G.Ya.; Savitskij, G.A.; Fartushnyj, V.A.; Khazhmuradov, M.A.; Levandovskij, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Optimum choice of the target exposure to a beam in experiments on the study of giant resonances in nuclei is considered. Optimization is aimed at reducing mean square errors of defined formfactors. Four different optimization quality criteria - variances of four form factor experimental values are considered. Variances resulting form optimization are 1.5-2 times as less as variances in real experiment. The effect of experiment design optimization criterion on form factors determination errors is ascertained. 1 ref.; 3 tabs

  9. Study of resonances produced in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, L.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; Chbihi, A.; De Filippo, E.; Favela, F.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Martel, I.; Martorana, N. S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.

    2018-05-01

    At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of Catania an experiment has been carried out in order to investigate the correlations between particles produced in 12C+24Mg reaction at 35 AMeV incident energy. Two α correlation has been explored because provide information about temperature of 8Be nuclei produced in the reaction, while three α correaltion has been studied in order to evaluate the competition between sequential and direct decay mode of resonances produced in 12C quasi-projectiles.

  10. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  11. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  12. In utero eyeball development study by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémond-Gignac, D S; Benali, K; Deplus, S; Cussenot, O; Ferkdadji, L; Elmaleh, M; Lassau, J P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure fetal ocular development and to determine a growth curve by means of measurements in utero. Fetal ocular development was recorded by analysis of the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomic study allowed definition of the best contrasted MRI sequences for calculation of the ocular surface. Biometric analysis of the values of the ocular surface in the neuro-ocular plane in 35 fetuses allowed establishment of a linear model of ocular growth curve in utero. Evaluation of ocular development may allow the detection and confirmation of malformational ocular anomalies such as microphthalmia.

  13. Study of the maguemite-hematite transformation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portella, P.D.

    1979-08-01

    The conversion of γ-Fe 2 O 3 powders to α-Fe 2 O 3 has been studied with the magnetic resonance technique. The residual fraction of γ-Fe 2 O 3 was measured for several times and temperatures of isothermal treatments, in the range 450 0 C - 550 0 C. The transformation can be described by a first order Kinetic equation and the apparent activation energy is about 200 kJ/mol (48 kcal/mol). This value is independent of temperature and particle size. The experimental data suggest that the reaction is growth-controlled and nucleation occurs preferably at the particle surface. (Author) [pt

  14. Studies of nucleon resonance structure in exclusive meson electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Bashir, A.; Braun, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the structure of excited baryons are key factors to the N* program at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Within the first year of data taking with the Hall B CLAS12 detector following the 12 GeV upgrade, a dedicated experiment will aim to extract the N* electrocouplings at high photon virtualities Q 2 . This experiment will allow exploration of the structure of N* resonances at the highest photon virtualities ever achieved, with a kinematic reach up to Q 2 = 12 GeV 2 . This high-Q 2 reach will make it possible to probe the excited nucleon structures at distance scales ranging from where effective degrees of freedom, such as constituent quarks, are dominant through the transition to where nearly massless bare-quark degrees of freedom are relevant. In this document, we present a detailed description of the physics that can be addressed through N* structure studies in exclusive meson electroproduction. The discussion includes recent advances in reaction theory for extracting N* electrocouplings from meson electroproduction off protons, along with Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)-based approaches to the theoretical interpretation of these fundamental quantities. This program will afford access to the dynamics of the nonperturbative strong interaction responsible for resonance formation, and will be crucial in understanding the nature of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in baryons, and how excited nucleons emerge from QCD. (author)

  15. Nuclear quadrupole resonance applied for arsenic oxide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, J.A.S.

    1991-04-01

    The objectives of this study are mounting a pulsed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) building a flow cryostat capable of varying the temperature continuously from 77 K to 340 K and using the spectrometer and the cryostat to study the polycrystalline arsenic oxide. The spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ), the spin-spin relaxation time (T 2 ) and the resonance frequency are obtained as a function of temperature. These data are obtained in 77 to 330 K interval. The relaxation times are obtained using the spin echo technique. The spin echo phenomenon is due to refocusing spins, when a 180 0 C pulse is applied after a 90 0 C pulse. The spin-lattice relaxation time is obtained using the plot of echo amplitude versus the repetition time. The spin-spin relaxation time is obtained using the plot of echo amplitude versus the separation between the 90 0 C - 180 0 C pulses. The theory developed by Bayer is used to explain the spin-lattice relaxation time and the frequency temperature dependence. The spin-spin relaxation time is discussed using the Bloch equations. (author)

  16. Image-based navigation for a robotized flexible endoscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stap, N.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Luo, Xiongbiao; Reichl, Tobias; Mirota, Daniel; Soper, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Robotizing flexible endoscopy enables image-based control of endoscopes. Especially during high-throughput procedures, such as a colonoscopy, navigation support algorithms could improve procedure turnaround and ergonomics for the endoscopist. In this study, we have developed and implemented a

  17. Excitation of the Roper resonance and study of higher baryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.P.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    1992-01-01

    The region of the P 11 resonance N(1440) is investigated in inelastic α-scattering on hydrogen using alpha-particles from Saturne with a beam momentum of 7 GeV/c. In the missing mass spectra of the scattered α-particles two effects are observed, excitation of the projectile, preferentially excited to the Δ-resonance, and excitation of the Roper resonance. The large differential cross sections indicate a structure of a compression mode. From this the compressibility of the nucleon K N may be extracted. The Roper resonance excitation corresponds to a surface mode which may be related to an oscillation of the meson cloud. The other monopole mode which corresponds to a vibration of the valence quarks should lie at about 800 MeV of excitation or above. This is the region of the P 11 (1710 MeV) resonance. Therefore experiments are important to measure the monopole strength in this energy region. Another interesting aspect is the scalar polarizability which can be extracted from inelastic dipole excitations (squeezing modes) as excitation energies above 500 MeV

  18. Image-Based Models Using Crowdsourcing Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Spanò

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The conservation and valorization of Cultural Heritage require an extensive documentation, both in properly historic-artistic terms and regarding the physical characteristics of position, shape, color, and geometry. With the use of digital photogrammetry that make acquisition of overlapping images for 3D photo modeling and with the development of dense and accurate 3D point models, it is possible to obtain high-resolution orthoprojections of surfaces.Recent years have seen a growing interest in crowdsourcing that holds in the field of the protection and dissemination of cultural heritage, in parallel there is an increasing awareness for contributing the generation of digital models with the immense wealth of images available on the web which are useful for documentation heritage.In this way, the availability and ease the automation of SfM (Structure from Motion algorithm enables the generation of digital models of the built heritage, which can be inserted positively in crowdsourcing processes. In fact, non-expert users can handle the technology in the process of acquisition, which today is one of the fundamental points to involve the wider public to the cultural heritage protection. To present the image based models and their derivatives that can be made from a great digital resource; the current approach is useful for the little-known heritage or not easily accessible buildings as an emblematic case study that was selected. It is the Vank Cathedral in Isfahan in Iran: the availability of accurate point clouds and reliable orthophotos are very convenient since the building of the Safavid epoch (cent. XVII-XVIII completely frescoed with the internal surfaces, which the architecture and especially the architectural decoration reach their peak.The experimental part of the paper explores also some aspects of usability of the digital output from the image based modeling methods. The availability of orthophotos allows and facilitates the iconographic

  19. Review: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas G. Kondo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper focuses on the application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS to the study of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD in children and adolescents. Method. A literature search using the National Institutes of Health's PubMed database was conducted to identify indexed peer-reviewed MRS studies in pediatric patients with MDD. Results. The literature search yielded 18 articles reporting original MRS data in pediatric MDD. Neurochemical alterations in Choline, Glutamate, and N-Acetyl Aspartate are associated with pediatric MDD, suggesting pathophysiologic continuity with adult MDD. Conclusions. The MRS literature in pediatric MDD is modest but growing. In studies that are methodologically comparable, the results have been consistent. Because it offers a noninvasive and repeatable measurement of relevant in vivo brain chemistry, MRS has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiology of MDD as well as the mediators and moderators of treatment response.

  20. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  1. New possibilities for using laser polarimetry technology to study electron paramagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, E V; Zapasskii, V S

    1982-01-01

    Optical methods of recording electron paramagnetic resonance which arose in the early 50's as applied to the problem of recording the magnetic resonance of excited atoms is at the present time widely used in studying the electron paramagnetic resonance of the ground and excited states of free atoms and paramagnetic centers in condensed media. At the present time attention is devoted to the additional possibilities of optical methods of electron paramagnetic resonance which are realized using laser sources.

  2. Resonant beam behavior studies in the Proton Storage Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cousineau

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We present studies of space-charge-induced beam profile broadening at high intensities in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We investigate the profile broadening through detailed particle-in-cell simulations of several experiments and obtain results in good agreement with the measurements. We interpret these results within the framework of coherent resonance theory. With increasing intensity, our simulations show strong evidence for the presence of a quadrupole-mode resonance of the beam envelope with the lattice in the vertical plane. Specifically, we observe incoherent tunes crossing integer values, and large amplitude, nearly periodic envelope oscillations. At the highest operating intensities, we observe a continuing relaxation of the beam through space charge forces leading to emittance growth. The increase of emittance commences when the beam parameters encounter an envelope stop band. Once the stop band is reached, the emittance growth balances the intensity increase to maintain the beam near the stop band edge. Additionally, we investigate the potential benefit of a stop band correction to the high intensity PSR beam.

  3. Experimental REMPI [Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization] studies of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. We shall give an overview together with examples of current studies of excited molecular states to illustrate the principles of and prospects for REMPI. 27 refs., 3 figs

  4. Image-based petrophysical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe-Nygaard, Jakob; Engstrøm, Finn; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2017-01-01

    run directly from the micro-CT results on a cutting measured on an in-house instrument; the results clearly show that micro-CT measurements on chalk do not capture the pore space with sufficient detail to be predictive. Overall, with the appropriate resolution, the present study shows......-computed-tomography (nano-CT) images of trim sections and cuttings. Moreover, the trim-section results are upscaled to trim size to form the basis of an additional comparison. The results are also benchmarked against conventional core analysis (CCAL) results on trim-size samples. The comparison shows that petrophysical...... parameters from CT imaging agree reasonably well with those determined experimentally. The upscaled results show some discrepancy with the nano-CT results, particularly in the case of the low-permeability plug. This is probably because of the challenge in finding a representative subvolume. For the cuttings...

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrall, G.A.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample's density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques

  6. Image based radiotherapy, where we stand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of X-ray tube, image based therapy has evolved in many ways. The latest tool is the MR-Linac, where MRI guided Linac Bremsstrahlung radiation therapy is being promoted to cure cancers. Studies are underway to combine proton radiation therapy with positron emission tomography. Also, there are ideas for Bremsstrahlung beam therapy using a few MeV photons to combine with real-time positron emission tomography. While these technologies offer promises to revolutionize radiation oncology, one should be concerned about the potential excessive doses and their consequences to the patient. Also, one should be wary about the instantaneous real-time responses from oncologist or, even a bit scarier, automated decisions based on algorithm dictated protocols, which may result in life and death or even worse, those which may adversely affect the well being of a patient. In essence, treatment protocols which incorporate a thorough, careful assessments are warranted. Further concerns are economics of these developments weighed against the quality of life to the patients and their beloved's. This talk will present the current status and speculate on the possible developments with a few cautionary remarks. (author)

  7. Electron spin resonance intercomparison studies on irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of intercomparison studies organized by the Community Bureau of Reference on the use of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the identification of irradiated food are presented. A qualitative intercomparison was carried out using beef and trout bones, sardine scales, pistachio nut shells, dried grapes and papaya. A quantitative intercomparison involving the use of poultry bones was also organized. There was no difficulty in identifying meat bones, dried grapes and papaya. In the case of fish bones there is a need for further kinetic studies using different fish species. The identification of pistachio nut shells is more complicated and further research is needed prior to the organization of a further intercomparison. Laboratories were able to distinguish between chicken bones irradiated in the range 1 to 3 KGy or 7 to 10 KGy although there was a partial overlap between the results from different laboratories

  8. Electron spin resonance intercomparison studies on irradiated foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (FR)

    1992-07-01

    The results of intercomparison studies organized by the Community Bureau of Reference on the use of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the identification of irradiated food are presented. A qualitative intercomparison was carried out using beef and trout bones, sardine scales, pistachio nut shells, dried grapes and papaya. A quantitative intercomparison involving the use of poultry bones was also organized. There was no difficulty in identifying meat bones, dried grapes and papaya. In the case of fish bones there is a need for further kinetic studies using different fish species. The identification of pistachio nut shells is more complicated and further research is needed prior to the organization of a further intercomparison. Laboratories were able to distinguish between chicken bones irradiated in the range 1 to 3 KGy or 7 to 10 KGy although there was a partial overlap between the results from different laboratories.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  10. WE-EF-303-06: Feasibility of PET Image-Based On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification with Simulated Uniform Phantom and Human Brain Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, K; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Clark, J; Shao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of clinical on-line proton beam range verification with PET imaging Methods: We simulated a 179.2-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a PMMA phantom of human brain size, which was then imaged by a brain PET with 300*300*100-mm 3 FOV and different system sensitivities and spatial resolutions. We calculated the mean and standard deviation of positron activity range (AR) from reconstructed PET images, with respect to different data acquisition times (from 5 sec to 300 sec with 5-sec step). We also developed a technique, “Smoothed Maximum Value (SMV)”, to improve AR measurement under a given dose. Furthermore, we simulated a human brain irradiated by a 110-MeV proton beam of 50-mm diameter with 0.3-Gy dose at Bragg peak and imaged by the above PET system with 40% system sensitivity at the center of FOV and 1.7-mm spatial resolution. Results: MC Simulations on the PMMA phantom showed that, regardless of PET system sensitivities and spatial resolutions, the accuracy and precision of AR were proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of image count if image smoothing was not applied. With image smoothing or SMV method, the accuracy and precision could be substantially improved. For a cylindrical PMMA phantom (200 mm diameter and 290 mm long), the accuracy and precision of AR measurement could reach 1.0 and 1.7 mm, with 100-sec data acquired by the brain PET. The study with a human brain showed it was feasible to achieve sub-millimeter accuracy and precision of AR measurement with acquisition time within 60 sec. Conclusion: This study established the relationship between count statistics and the accuracy and precision of activity-range verification. It showed the feasibility of clinical on-line BR verification with high-performance PET systems and improved AR measurement techniques. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP120326, NIH grant R21CA187717, The Cancer Center Support (Core) Grant CA016672

  11. PROMO – Real-time Prospective Motion Correction in MRI using Image-based Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal 2D spiral navigator acquisitions (SP-Navs) along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm for online motion measurement. The SP-Nav/EKF framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of the SP-Nav/EKF motion estimates of less than 10 % of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 degrees. A preliminary in vivo application in 3D inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and 3D fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the SP-Nav/EKF framework for correcting 3D rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution 3D MRI scans. PMID:20027635

  12. Impact of 3D image-based PDR brachytherapy on outcome of patients treated for cervix carcinoma in France: Results of the French STIC prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charra-Brunaud, Claire; Harter, Valentin; Delannes, Martine; Haie-Meder, Christine; Quetin, Philippe; Kerr, Christine; Castelain, Bernard; Thomas, Laurence; Peiffert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In 2005 a French multicentric non randomized prospective study was initiated to compare two groups of patients treated for cervix carcinoma according to brachytherapy (BT) method: 2D vs 3D dosimetry. The BT dosimetric planning method was chosen for each patient in each center according to the availability of the technique. This study describes the results for 705 out of 801 patients available for analysis. Patients and methods: For the 2D arm, dosimetry was planned on orthogonal X-Rays using low dose rate (LDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) BT. For the 3D arm, dosimetry was planned on 3D imaging (mainly CT) and performed with PDR BT. Each center could follow the dosimetric method they were used to, according to the chosen radioelement and applicator. Manual or graphical optimization was allowed. Three treatment regimens were defined: Group 1: BT followed by surgery; 165 patients (2D arm: 76; 3D arm: 89); Group 2: EBRT (+chemotherapy), BT, then surgery; 305 patients (2D arm: 142; 3D arm: 163); Group 3: EBRT (+chemotherapy), then BT; 235 patients, (2D arm: 118; 3D arm: 117). The DVH parameters for CTVs (High Risk CTV and Intermediate Risk CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were computed as recommended by GYN GEC ESTRO guidelines. Total doses were converted to equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2). Side effects were prospectively assessed using the CTCAEv3.0. Results: The 2D and 3D arms were well balanced with regard to age, FIGO stage, histology, EBRT dose and chemotherapy. For each treatment regimen, BT doses and volumes were comparable between the 2D and 3D arms in terms of dose to point A, isodose 60 Gy volume, dose to ICRU rectal points, and TRAK. Dosimetric data in the 3D arm showed that the dose delivered to 90% of the High Risk CTV (HR CTV D90) was respectively, 81.2 Gy α/β10 , 63.2 Gy α/β10 and 73.1 Gy α/β10 for groups 1, 2 and 3. The Intermediate Risk (IR) CTV D90 was respectively, 58.5 Gy α/β10 , 57.3 Gy α/β10 and 61.7 Gy α/β10 for groups 1

  13. Feasibility of creating a high-resolution 3D diffusion tensor imaging based atlas of the human brainstem: a case study at 11.7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Pletnikova, Olga; Crain, Barbara; Troncoso, Juan; Mori, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    A three-dimensional stereotaxic atlas of the human brainstem based on high resolution ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is introduced. The atlas consists of high resolution (125-255 μm isotropic) three-dimensional DT images of the formalin-fixed brainstem acquired at 11.7 T. The DTI data revealed microscopic neuroanatomical details, allowing three-dimensional visualization and reconstruction of fiber pathways including the decussation of the pyramidal tract fibers, and interdigitating fascicles of the corticospinal and transverse pontine fibers. Additionally, strong gray-white matter contrasts in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps enabled precise delineation of gray matter nuclei in the brainstem, including the cranial nerve and the inferior olivary nuclei. Comparison with myelin-stained histology shows that at the level of resolution achieved in this study, the structural details resolved with DTI contrasts in the brainstem were comparable to anatomical delineation obtained with histological sectioning. Major neural structures delineated from DTI contrasts in the brainstem are segmented and three-dimensionally reconstructed. Further, the ex vivo DTI data are nonlinearly mapped to a widely-used in vivo human brain atlas, to construct a high-resolution atlas of the brainstem in the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) stereotaxic coordinate space. The results demonstrate the feasibility of developing a 3D DTI based atlas for detailed characterization of brainstem neuroanatomy with high resolution and contrasts, which will be a useful resource for research and clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Image based cardiac acceleration map using statistical shape and 3D+t myocardial tracking models; in-vitro study on heart phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, Ali; Piella, Gemma; Planes, Xavier; Duchateau, Nicolas; de Caralt, Teresa M.; Sitges, Marta; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the acceleration signal has potential to monitor heart function and adaptively optimize Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) systems. In this paper, we propose a non-invasive method for computing myocardial acceleration from 3D echocardiographic sequences. Displacement of the myocardium was estimated using a two-step approach: (1) 3D automatic segmentation of the myocardium at end-diastole using 3D Active Shape Models (ASM); (2) propagation of this segmentation along the sequence using non-rigid 3D+t image registration (temporal di eomorphic free-form-deformation, TDFFD). Acceleration was obtained locally at each point of the myocardium from local displacement. The framework has been tested on images from a realistic physical heart phantom (DHP-01, Shelley Medical Imaging Technologies, London, ON, CA) in which the displacement of some control regions was known. Good correlation has been demonstrated between the estimated displacement function from the algorithms and the phantom setup. Due to the limited temporal resolution, the acceleration signals are sparse and highly noisy. The study suggests a non-invasive technique to measure the cardiac acceleration that may be used to improve the monitoring of cardiac mechanics and optimization of CRT.

  15. Cavum septum pellucidum in schizophrenia. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzako, Tsuyoshi; Fukuzako, Hiroshi; Kodama, Satoshi; Hashiguchi, Tomo; Takigawa, Morikuni

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine if cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) is more prevalent in schizophrenic patients, we studied 72 Japanese patients who fulfilled the DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia and 41 normal controls. Sagittal, 1 mm thick magnetic resonance imaging slices of the entire cranium were obtained using a gradient-echo pulse sequence, and coronal and axial images were reconstructed for assessment. A CSP was observed in 34 patients (47.2%) and in 16 controls (38.0%). Although the CSP appeared to be more prevalent in schizophrenic patients, this difference was not statistically significant. However, schizophrenic patients with a history of long-term institutionalization had a higher incidence of CSP compared with patients who had not been admitted to hospital for more than 3 years (68.2 vs 38.0%). These results suggest that the CSP may be a pathophysiology that characterizes schizophrenic patients with poor prognoses. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  17. Structural and conformational study of polysaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossennec, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    As some natural polysaccharides are involved in important biological processes, the use of nuclear magnetic resonance appears to be an adapted mean to determine their structure-activity relationship and is therefore the object of this research thesis. By using bi-dimensional proton-based NMR techniques, it is possible to identify minority saccharide units, to determine their conformation, and to identify units which they are bound to. The author reports the application of these methods to swine mucosa heparin, and to heparins displaying a high and low anticoagulant activity. The dermatan sulphate has also been studied, and the NMR analysis allowed some polymer structure irregularities to be identified. A molecular modelling of dermatan sulphate has been performed [fr

  18. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen gas at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, W.N.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.W.; Kubik, P.R.; Marsolais, R.M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H 2 and 4 He, we have been able to store a low density (approximately 10 12 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T=1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4 He→H 2 + 4 He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4 He gas and the pressure shift of the hyperfine frequency due to the 4 He buffer gas. Here we discuss the application of hyperfine frequency shifts as a probe of the H-He potential, and as a means for determining the binding energy of H on liquid helium

  19. Study of biological fluids by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Sciaky, M.; Cozzone, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of biofluids is rapidly developing and might soon constitute a new major medical application of this technique which benefits from technological and methodological progress such as higher magnetic fields, new probe design, solvent suppression sequences and advanced data processing routines. In this overview, the clinical and pharmacological impact of this new approach is examined, with emphasis on the NMR spectroscopy of plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. Applications to pharmacokinetics and toxicology are illustrated. Interestingly, a number of biochemical components of fluids which are not usually assayed by conventional biochemical methods are readily detected by NMR spectroscopy which is clearly a new competitive entrant among the techniques used in clinical biology. Its ease-of-use, cost effectiveness and high informational content might turn it into a major diagnostic tool in the years to come [fr

  20. A semiclassical study of optical potentials - potential resonances -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.; Marty, C.

    1977-01-01

    A semiclassical method is used to analyze resonances produced by complex potentials. The absorption plays a central role: when it is not too great, resonances manifest themselves by enhancement of cross sections near π. The reverse is not necessarily true, for instance the anomalous large angle scattering for α-Ca is due to a coherent superposition of many partial waves

  1. Study of lone working magnetic resonance technologists in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Anne Dewland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is recommended that magnetic resonance (MR technologists should not work alone due to potential occupational health risks although lone working is legally acceptable. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of lone working MR technologists in Western Australia (WA and any issue against the regulations. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire regarding the issues of occupational health of lone working MR technologists was developed based on relevant literature and distributed to WA MR technologists. Descriptive (percentage of frequency, mean and standard deviation and inferential statistics (Fisher's exact, Chi2 and t tests, and analysis of variance were used to analyze the responses of the yes/no, multiple choice and 5 pt scale questions from the returned questionnaires. Results: The questionnaire response rate was 65.6% (59/90. It was found that about half of the MR technologists (45.8%, 27/59 experienced lone working. The private magnetic resonance imaging (MRI centers were more likely to arrange technologists to work alone (p < 0.05. The respondents expressed positive views on issues of adequacy of training and arrangement, confidence and comfort towards lone working except immediate assistance for emergency (mean: 3. Factors of existence of MRI safety officer (p < 0.05 and nature of lone working (p < 0.001-0.05 affected MR technologists' concerns. Conclusions: Lone working of MR technologists is common in WA especially in private centers. The training and arrangement provided seem to be adequate for meeting the legal requirements. However, several areas should be improved by the workplaces including enhancement on immediate emergency assistance and concern relief.

  2. Ultraviolet resonance Raman studies of N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, L.C.; Ziegler, L.D.; Hudson, B.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the simple peptide model compound N-methylacetamide have been obtained with 218- and 200-nm laser radiation. A large enhancement of the amide II vibration is observed relative to that of Raman spectra obtained with visible radiation. Replacement of the amide hydrogen by deuterium results in a spectrum with most of its intensity in the amide II' mode. Excitation of this deuterated species with 200-nm radiation results in intensity in the overtones of this modes, a feature characteristic of resonance enhanced spectra. Isotopic substitution of the amide carbon and nitrogen by 13 C and 15 N results in a spectral shift to lower frequency by nearly the amount expected for a normal mode consisting primarily of the motion of the amide C and N atoms. These results, taken together, demonstrate that the geometry change of N-methylacetamide upon electronic excitation to the π-π/sup */ state is dominated by a change in the C-N bond length. Studies of mixtures of the deuterio and protio forms show that a significant normal mode rotation occurs on isotopic substitution such that the amide II' of the deuterio form becomes approximately equally distributed between the amide II and III vibrations of the protio form. The amide I and I' vibrations are very diffuse in aqueous solutions at the dilutions used. These bands become sharp in acetonitrile. This behavior is interpreted in terms of a range of frequencies for this vibration due to a distribution of hydrogen-bonded species. 23 references, 5 figures

  3. Photoemission study of Kr 3d→np autoionization resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, D.W.; Heimann, P.A.; Ferrett, T.A.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Shirley, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Resonant photoelectron spectra of Kr have been taken in the photon-energy ranges of the 3d/sub 5/2/→5p,6p and 3d/sub 3/2/→5p excitations. The spectra, which closely resemble normal Kr + 3d/sup -1/ Auger spectra, illustrate the importance of ''spectator'' Auger-like decay for inner-shell resonances, in which the initially excited electron does not participate in the core-hole deexcitation process, except to respond to the change in the atomic potential. Possible assignments for some of the spectator decay channels are discussed based on photoemission intensity measurements at the different 3d resonances. These assignments suggest that shake-up (e.g., 5p→6p) of the ''spectator'' electron during the decay process is not quite as important as previously suspected. The resonance profiles of some of the more intense satellites have been determined over the 3d→np resonances. Very small resonance effects also were observed in the partial cross section for 4p subshell ionization, which produced asymmetric Fano-type profiles. The 4p angular distribution, in contrast, exhibits a pronounced effect in the resonance energy range. The 4p results demonstrate that nonspectator autoionization also is present

  4. Brain Magnetic Resonance Elastography on Healthy Volunteers: A Safety Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang-Rui Liu; Pei-Yi Gao; Yan Lin; Jing Xue; Xiao-Chun Wang; Bin-Bin Sui; Li Ma; Zhi-Nong Xi; Qin Bai; Hao Shen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a recently developed imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Purpose: To evaluate the safety of brain MRE on human subjects. Material and Methods: The study included 20 healthy volunteers. MRE sequence scan (drive signal not applied to external force actuator) and MRE study were separately performed on each volunteer at an interval of more than 24 hours. The heart rate and blood pressure of each volunteer were measured immediately before and after MRE sequence scan and MRE study. Electroencephalography (EEG) was also performed within 2 hours after each scan. The volunteers were asked about their experience of the two scans. Randomized-block analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data of blood pressure and heart rate. Paired t test was used to analyze the data of the two EEG examinations. The volunteers were followed up 1 week after the examination. Results: All procedures were performed on each volunteer, and no one complained of obvious discomfort. No related adverse events were reported during follow-up. There was no statistically significant difference in heart rate or blood pressure. There was a statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in EEG results in the right temporoparietal region. Increased power was found in the theta, delta, alpha, and beta2 bands. No brain injury was detected by the EEG examinations. Conclusion: Based on the study results, brain MRE examinations are safe to perform on human subjects

  5. Multiple sclerosis and anterograde axonal degeneration study by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Pardo, P.; Capdevila Cirera, A.; Sanz Marin, P.M.; Gili Planas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that affects specifically the myelin. Its diagnosis by imaging techniques is, since the development of magnetic resonance (MR), relatively simple, and its occasional association with anterograde axonal degeneration (WD) has been reported. In both disorders, there is a lengthening of the T1 and T2 relaxation times. In the present report, 76 patients with MS with less than 4 plaques in the typical periventricular position were studied retrospectively, resulting in a rate of association with anterograde axonal degeneration of 8%. We consider that in spite of their same behavior in MR,MS and WD, with moreover represent completely different pathologies, are perfectly differential by MR. The S-E images with longer repetition and echo times in the axial and coronal planes have proved to be those most sensitive for this differentiation. Given that MS is specific pathology of then myelin, the axonal damages in delayed until several plaques adjacent to an axon affect it. We consider that this, added to the restriction of our study group (less than 4 plaques), is the cause of the pow percentage of the MS-WD association in our study. (Author)

  6. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  7. Friction of polymer hydrogels studied by resonance shear measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Tanabe, Tadao; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Kurihara, Kazue

    2015-08-21

    The friction between an elastomer and a hard surface typically has two contributors, i.e., the interfacial and deformation components. The friction of viscoelastic hydrogel materials has been extensively studied between planar gel and planar substrate surfaces from the viewpoint of an interfacial interaction. However, the geometry of the contact in practical applications is much more complex. The contribution of geometric and elastic deformation terms of a gel to friction could not be neglected. In this study, we used resonance shear measurements (RSMs) for characterizing the shear response of a glass sphere on a flat polymer hydrogel, a double network (DN) gel of 2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and N,N-dimethylacrylamide. The contact mechanics conformed to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory. The observed resonance curves exhibited rather sharp peaks when the DN gel and the silica sphere were brought into contact, and their intensity and frequency increased with the increase in the normal load. We proposed a simple physical model of the shearing system, and the elastic (k2) and viscous (b2) parameters of the interface between a silica sphere and a flat DN gel were obtained. The friction force from elastic deformation and viscous dissipation terms was then estimated using the obtained parameters. It was revealed that the elastic parameter (k2) increased up to 1780 N m(-1) at a normal load of 524 mN, while the viscous parameter (b2) was zero or quite low (friction force between a flat DN gel and a silica sphere in air was dominated by the elastic term due to the local deformation by contact with the silica sphere. By adding water, the elastic parameter (k2) remained the same, while the viscous parameter (b2) slightly increased. However, the viscous term fviscous was still much smaller than felastic. To the best of our knowledge, this study was the first quantitative estimation of the contribution of the elastic deformation term to the friction in the case

  8. Deep Learning MR Imaging-based Attenuation Correction for PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Jang, Hyungseok; Kijowski, Richard; Bradshaw, Tyler; McMillan, Alan B

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate the feasibility of deep learning approaches for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based attenuation correction (AC) (termed deep MRAC) in brain positron emission tomography (PET)/MR imaging. Materials and Methods A PET/MR imaging AC pipeline was built by using a deep learning approach to generate pseudo computed tomographic (CT) scans from MR images. A deep convolutional auto-encoder network was trained to identify air, bone, and soft tissue in volumetric head MR images coregistered to CT data for training. A set of 30 retrospective three-dimensional T1-weighted head images was used to train the model, which was then evaluated in 10 patients by comparing the generated pseudo CT scan to an acquired CT scan. A prospective study was carried out for utilizing simultaneous PET/MR imaging for five subjects by using the proposed approach. Analysis of covariance and paired-sample t tests were used for statistical analysis to compare PET reconstruction error with deep MRAC and two existing MR imaging-based AC approaches with CT-based AC. Results Deep MRAC provides an accurate pseudo CT scan with a mean Dice coefficient of 0.971 ± 0.005 for air, 0.936 ± 0.011 for soft tissue, and 0.803 ± 0.021 for bone. Furthermore, deep MRAC provides good PET results, with average errors of less than 1% in most brain regions. Significantly lower PET reconstruction errors were realized with deep MRAC (-0.7% ± 1.1) compared with Dixon-based soft-tissue and air segmentation (-5.8% ± 3.1) and anatomic CT-based template registration (-4.8% ± 2.2). Conclusion The authors developed an automated approach that allows generation of discrete-valued pseudo CT scans (soft tissue, bone, and air) from a single high-spatial-resolution diagnostic-quality three-dimensional MR image and evaluated it in brain PET/MR imaging. This deep learning approach for MR imaging-based AC provided reduced PET reconstruction error relative to a CT-based standard within the brain compared

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Agarwal, Praveen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core

  10. Study on 2D arbitrary geometry coupling resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lei; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi

    2014-01-01

    The paper firstly proposes a coupling resonance method in which subgroup method is employed in the serried peak energy region, and wavelet expansion method is employed in single peak energy region. The original subgroup model and wavelet expansion model are improved and coupled through the calculation of scattering source from subgroup to wavelet expansion, so that the self-shielding cross section in the whole energy region can be calculated accurately. To verify these theories and to prove the improvements, a PWR cell benchmark problem is calculated. It is demonstrated that, compared with other traditional multi-group resonance methods and continuous energy resonance method, this coupling resonance method has the ability to accurately calculate the whole energy region's self-shielding cross section while Keeping enough efficiency and finally has an ability to offer the accurate self-shielding parameters for latter transport, calculation. (authors)

  11. Fourier Transform Infrared and Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Thomas Nixon

    Fourier transform infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure and function of the light-activated, transmembrane proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, from the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a 27,000 dalton integral membrane protein consisting of 248 amino acids with a retinylidene chromophore. Absorption of a photon leads to the translocation of one or two protons from the inside of the cell to the outside. Resonance Raman spectroscopy allows for the study of the configuration of retinal in bR and its photointermediates by the selective enhancement of vibrational modes of the chromophore. This technique was used to determine that the chromophore is attached to lysine-216 in both the bR _{570} and the M _{412} intermediates. In bR with tyrosine-64 selectively nitrated or aminated, the chromophore appears to have the same configuration in that bR _{570} (all- trans) and M _{412} (13- cis) states as it does in unmodified bR. Polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permits the study of the direction of transition dipole moments arising from molecular vibrations of the protein and the retinal chromophore. The orientation of alpha helical and beta sheet components was determined for bR with the average helical tilt found to lie mostly parallel to the membrane normal. The beta sheet structures also exhibit an IR linear dichroism for the amide I and amide II bands which suggest that the peptide backbone is mostly perpendicular to the membrane plane although it is difficult to determine whether the bands originate from sheet or turn components. The orientation of secondary structure components of the C-1 (residues 72-248) and C-2 (residues 1-71) fragments were also investigated to determine the structure of these putative membrane protein folding intermediates. Polarized, low temperature FTIR -difference spectroscopy was then used to investigate the structure of bR as it undergoes

  12. Regional South Australia Health (RESONATE) survey: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin; Gillam, Marianne; May, Esther

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Access to quality healthcare services is considered a moral right. However, for people living in regional locations, timely access to the services that they need may not always be possible because of structural and attitudinal barriers. This suggests that people living in regional areas may have unmet healthcare needs. The aim of this research will be to examine the healthcare needs, expectations and experiences of regional South Australians. Methods and analysis The Regional South Australia Health (RESONATE) survey is a cross-sectional study of adult health consumers living in any private or non-private dwelling, in any regional, rural, remote or very remote area of South Australia and with an understanding of written English. Data will be collected using a 45-item, multidimensional, self-administered instrument, designed to measure healthcare need, barriers to healthcare access and health service utilisation, attitudes, experiences and satisfaction. The instrument has demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties, including good content validity and internal reliability, good test–retest reliability and a high level of acceptability. The survey will be administered online and in hard-copy, with at least 1832 survey participants to be recruited over a 12-month period, using a comprehensive, multimodal recruitment campaign. Ethics and dissemination The study has been reviewed and approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of South Australia. The results will be actively disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations, social media, broadcast media, print media, the internet and various community/stakeholder engagement activities. PMID:29654014

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study Using True versus Sham Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been shown to detect the specificity of acupuncture points, as proved by numerous studies. In this study, resting-state fMRI was used to observe brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong (LR3 acupoint. A total of 15 healthy subjects received brain resting-state fMRI before acupuncture and after sham and true acupuncture, respectively, at LR3. Image data processing was performed using Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI and REST software. The combination of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo was used to analyze the changes in brain function during sham and true acupuncture. Acupuncture at LR3 can specifically activate or deactivate brain areas related to vision, movement, sensation, emotion, and analgesia. The specific alterations in the anterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and cerebellar posterior lobe have a crucial effect and provide a valuable reference. Sham acupuncture has a certain effect on psychological processes and does not affect brain areas related to function.

  14. Electron spin resonance study of radicals in irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Takashi

    1979-02-01

    In order to elucidate radiation effect in polyethylene, the nature and behavior of radicals produced in polyethylene and the model compound of polyethylene irradiated at 77 0 K were studied by using electron spin resonance. The structure of radical pairs, which are composed of two radicals produced very closely each other, was investigated in drawn polyethylene and the single crystal of n-eicosane. The radical pairs of intrachain type and interchain type were found in polyethylene and n-eicosane respectively. It was suggested that these two types of radical pairs are the precursors of double bonds and crosslinks respectively. The thermal decay reactions of radicals themselves produced in irradiated polyethylene were investigated. It was made clear that the short range distances between two radicals play an important role in the decay reaction of alkyl radicals at low temperatures. The trapping regions of radicals were studied and it was clarified that allyl radicals, which are produced by the reaction of alkyl radicals with double bonds, are trapped both in the crystalline and non-crystalline regions. (author)

  15. Study of a possible S=+1 dynamically generated baryonic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Oset, E.; Vaca, M.J.V.

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the lowest-order chiral Lagrangian for the interaction of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons we find an attractive interaction in the ΔK channel with L=0 and I=1, while the interaction is repulsive for I=2. The attractive interaction leads to a pole in the second Riemann sheet of the complex plane and manifests itself in a large strength of the K scattering amplitude close to the ΔK threshold, which is not the case for I=2. However, we also make a study of uncertainties in the model and conclude that the existence of this pole depends sensitively upon the input used and can disappear within reasonable variations of the input parameters. We take advantage to study the stability of the other poles obtained for the 3/2 - dynamically generated resonances of the model and conclude that they are stable and not contingent to reasonable changes in the input of the theory

  16. The amygdala in schizophrenia: a trimodal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalus, Peter; Slotboom, Johannes; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wiest, Roland; Ozdoba, Christoph; Federspiel, Andrea; Strik, Werner K; Buri, Caroline; Schroth, Gerhard; Kiefer, Claus

    2005-03-03

    In schizophrenic psychoses, structural and functional alterations of the amygdala have been demonstrated by several neuroimaging studies. However, postmortem examinations on the brains of schizophrenics did not confirm the volume changes reported by volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. In order to address these contradictory findings and to further elucidate the possibly underlying pathophysiological process of the amygdala, we employed a trimodal MRI design including high-resolution volumetry, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative magnetization transfer imaging (qMTI) in a sample of 14 schizophrenic patients and 14 matched controls. Three-dimensional MRI volumetry revealed a significant reduction of amygdala raw volumes in the patient group, while amygdala volumes normalized for intracranial volume did not differ between the two groups. The regional diffusional anisotropy of the amygdala, expressed as inter-voxel coherence (COH), showed a marked and significant reduction in schizophrenics. Assessment of qMTI parameters yielded significant group differences for the T2 time of the bound proton pool and the T1 time of the free proton pool, while the semi-quantitative magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) did not differ between the groups. The application of multimodal MRI protocols is diagnostically relevant for the differentiation between schizophrenic patients and controls and provides a new strategy for the detection and characterization of subtle structural alterations in defined regions of the living brain.

  17. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and studies of degenerative diseases of the developing human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviness, V.S. Jr.; Phil, D.; Filipek, P.A.; Kennedy, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Rett syndrome is a progressive disorder which is associated with regression of psychomotor development and precipitous deceleration of brain growth during the first year of life. General histopathological surveys in postmortem specimens have identified degeneration of subpopulations of neurons of the nigrostriatal system but no other evidence of degenerative process. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphometry may usefully guide application of rigorous but demanding quantitative histologic search for evidence of neuronal degeneration. The volumes of the principal set of cortical and nuclear structures of principal interest in the disorder may be measured by currently avaiable MRI-based methods. Opimized levels of precision now allow detection of volumetric changes over time in the same brain of approximately 10% at the 95% confidence level. (author)

  19. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (φ/ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13 C a , chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  20. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies of returned comet nucleus samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay, Fundow; Kim, S.S.; Liang, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The most important objective of the Comet Nucleus Sample Returm Mission is to return samples which could reflect formation conditions and evolutionary processes in the early solar nebula. It is expected that the returned samples will consist of fine-grained silicate materials mixed with ices composed of simple molecules such as H 2 O, NH 3 , CH 4 as well as organics and/or more complex compounds. Because of the exposure to ionizing radiation from cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, and solar wind protons at low temperature, free radicals are expected to be formed and trapped in the solid ice matrices. The kind of trapped radical species together with their concentration and thermal stability can be used as a dosimeter as well as a geothermometer to determine thermal and radiation histories as well as outgassing and other possible alternation effects since the nucleus material was formed. Since free radicals that are known to contain unpaired electrons are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected and characterized in their native form by the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) method. In fact, ESR has been shown to be a non-destructive, highly sensitive tool for the detection and characterization of paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and radiation damage centers in terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological samples. The potential use of ESR as an effective method in the study of returned comet nucleus samples, in particular, in the analysis of fine-grained solid state icy samples is discussed

  1. Studies of the giant resonances in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldi, M.I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the eletrodisintegration cross section in 181 Ta, 208 Pb and 209 Bi nuclei are made in the Linear Accelerator of the IFUSP-Brazil. The cross section is obtained by the direct counting of the emitted neutrons, in an electron excitation energy range between 8 to 22 MeV. The experimental data are analysed throught the virtual photon method, with the aim of obtaining the isoscalar and isovectorial electric quadrupole giant resonance (E2GR) intensities, as well as the magnetic dipole intensity. For each studied nucleus the results obtained for the E2GR, isoscalar and isovectorial, are compared with the photodisintegration cross section measured by the Saclay and Livermore laboratories. From this comparison, it is observed that the photodisintegration cross sections are compatibles with the existence of an isovector E2GR, located between 120 to 130 A -1/3 Mev and which exhaust around 100% of the Energy-Weighted Sum rules (EWSR). (L.C.) [pt

  2. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-01-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research

  3. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental consideration for realizing image based visual servo control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, N.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, Y.; Usui, H.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we consider the experimental aspect of image based visual servo control system. The items considered are the following; 1) Inertial parameter estimation, 2) Focal point estimation, 3) Controller performance for the system with delay. From the experimental result of visual control, it is found that the system is very sensitive to the controller gain because of the computational delay of vision. In order to establish a satisfactory delay compensation, more investigations on controller design are required. (author)

  5. Ferromagnetic resonance study of Fe{sub 50}Ag{sub 50} granular film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento, G. [Dpto. Electricicidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)]. E-mail: websamug@lg.ehu.es; Fdez-Gubieda, M.L. [Dpto. Electricicidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Siruguri, V. [Dpto. Electricicidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, R-5 Shed, BARC Campus, Mumbai 400085 (India); Lezama, L. [Dpto. Quimica Inorganica (UPV/EHU), Apdo. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); Orue, I. [Servicios Generales de Investigacion (SGIKER), Vicerrectorado de Investigacion (UPV/EHU) (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    Fe{sub 50}Ag{sub 50} granular film, produced by the pulsed laser deposition technique, has been studied using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) at temperatures ranging from 4 to 300K. Three different resonance modes are well observed in the whole temperature range. We have also studied the angular evolution of the resonance peaks at three different temperatures T=150, 250, 300K. The thermal and the angular evolution of the three resonance fields has been interpreted on the basis of the existence of different magnetic coupling between the Fe nanoparticles and a weakly magnetized interface.

  6. A study of artificial satellite resonance orbits due to lunisolar perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, S.

    1978-01-01

    A study of artificial satellite resonance orbits due to lunisolar perturbations is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the following aspects: the classification of resonance orbits according to their commensurability condition; the form of the commensurability condition when expressed in terms of the orbital elements of a satellite; the predominant resonant terms for each commensurability condition; and criteria which determine the existence or non-existence of a particular commensurability condition. (author)

  7. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of /sup 13/C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D/sub 2/O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, ..delta..sigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO/sub 3/.D/sub 2/O, ..cap alpha..,..beta.. d-2 HMB and ..cap alpha..,..beta..,..gamma.. d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules ..delta..m = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made.

  8. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A.; Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S.; Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 ± 4.7 cm 2 vs. 8.7 ± 2.3 cm 2 , p < 0.01 and 4.6 ± 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 ± 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 ± 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 ± 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  9. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  10. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji (Kinki Univ., Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5[+-]16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4[+-]7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author).

  11. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji

    1992-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5±16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4±7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author)

  12. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of 13 C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D 2 O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, Δsigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO 3 .D 2 O, α,β d-2 HMB and α,β,γ d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules Δm = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made

  13. Magnetic resonance of seminal vesicles: a noninvasive study of seminal way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocantos, J.A.; Rey Valzacchi, G.; Sinclair, M.E.; Loor Guadamud, G.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic resonance without endorectal coil is an excellent diagnostic tool for studying the entire route of seminal non-invasive way in a single step diagnosis. We call magnetic resonance of seminal vesicles, but includes both the study of the seminal vesicles as the channels of the seminal way. [es

  14. Magnetic resonance appearance of monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. The GRI Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, L; Laredo, J D; Lioté, F; Koeger, A C; Hamze, B; Ziza, J M; Pertuiset, E; Bardin, T; Tubiana, J M

    1997-11-01

    A prospective multicenter study. To evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the differentiation between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. Although multiple myeloma has been studied extensively with magnetic resonance imaging, to the authors' knowledge, no study has evaluated the clinical interest of magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. The magnetic resonance examinations of the thoracolumbar spine in 24 patients with newly diagnosed monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance were compared with those performed in 44 patients with newly diagnosed nontreated multiple myeloma. All findings on magnetic resonance examination performed in patients with monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance were normal, whereas findings on 38 (86%) of the 44 magnetic resonance examinations performed in patients with multiple myeloma were abnormal. Magnetic resonance imaging can be considered as an additional diagnostic tool in differentiating between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma, which may be helpful when routine criteria are not sufficient. An abnormal finding on magnetic resonance examination in a patient with monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance should suggest the diagnosis of multiple myeloma after other causes of marrow signal abnormalities are excluded. Magnetic resonance imaging also may be proposed in the long-term follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance when a new biologic or clinical event suggests the diagnosis of malignant monoclonal gammopathy.

  15. Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of electron spin polarized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelekhov, Denis V.; Selcu, Camelia; Banerjee, Palash; Chung Fong, Kin; Chris Hammel, P.; Bhaskaran, Harish; Schwab, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its excellent sensitivity opens the possibility for magnetic resonance studies of spin accumulation resulting from the injection of spin polarized currents into a para-magnetic collector. The method is based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance which requires low noise detection of cantilever displacement; so far, this has been accomplished using optical interferometry. This is undesirable for experiments on doped silicon, where the presence of light is known to enhance spin relaxation rates. We report a non-optical displacement detection scheme based on sensitive microwave capacitive readout

  16. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  17. Basic studies on the human uterus by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuzawa, Michio

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze characteristic features of the human uterus by using a 0.5 Tesla super-conducting magnet. Relative square ratios of the endometrium and the junctional zone to the uterine body were measured during menstrual cycle with a computed image analyser. Nine healthy volunteers aged 21 to 30 years underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proliferative, secretory, and menstrual phases. Relaxation times of the endometrium, junctional zone, and myometrium were determined. The relative ratio of the endometrium to the uterine body was 13.8% in the proliferative phase, 17.9% in the secretory phase, and 8.0% in the menstrual phase. The ratio of the junctional zone decreased from 26.6% in the proliferative phase to 23.4% in the secretory phase, and increased to 35.0% in the menstrual phase. Relaxation times of the endometrium and junctional zone were the shortest in the menstrual phase. For the myometrium, T 1 values showed the same tendency. T 2 values were the shortest in the proliferative phase. MRI was also performed in 39 patients with hydatidiform (one), myoma uteri (11), adenomyosis uteri (one), carcinoma of the uterine body (3), and carcinoma of the uterine cervix (23). Myoma nodule without degeneration appeared at low intensity, and had the shortest T 1 and T 2 values. Myoma uteri with degeneration had an increased intensity and larger T 1 and T 2 values. Adenomyosis uteri showed a diffuse low intensity with high intensity spots. Malignant lesions of both the uterine body and cervix showed a high intensity on T 2 -weighted image and similar T 1 and T 2 values. These T 1 and T 2 values were, however, shorter than tissue of unmarried normal women. MRI was considered useful for the observation of menstrual cyclic and quantitative change in the human physiologic uterus, as well as for the differentiation of malignant from benign uterine diseases. (N.K.)

  18. Photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, M; Klusmann, W; Gattermann, H; Massig, G; Peters, R

    1979-10-30

    Individual species of the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin, a retinal-protein complex of Halobacteria, were studied in aqueous suspensions of the "purple membrane" at room temperature by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with flow systems. Two pronounced deuterium shifts were found in the RR spectra of the all-trans complex BR-570 in H2O-D2O suspensions. The first is ascribed to C=NH+ (C=ND+) stretching vibrations of the protonated Schiff base which links retinal to opsin. The second is assigned tentatively to an "X-H" ("X-D") bending mode, where "X" is an atom which carries an exchangeable proton. A RR spectrum of the 13-cis-retinal complex "BR-548" could be deduced from spectra of the dark-adapted purple membrane. The RR spectrum of the M-412 intermediate was monitored in a double-beam pump-probe experiment. The main vibrational features of the intermediate M' in the reaction M-412 in equilibrium hv M' leads to delta BR-570 could be deduced from a photostationary mixture of M-412 and M'. Difference procedures were applied to obtain RR spectra of the L-550 intermediate and of two new long-lived species, R1'-590 and R2-550. From kinetic data it is suggested that T1'-590 links the proton-translocating cycle to the "13-cis" cycle of BR-548. The protonation and isomeric states of the different species are discussed in light of the new spectroscopic and kinetic data. It is found that conformational changes during the photochemical cycle play an important role.

  19. A study of nasal cavity volume by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, Yasuyoshi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-04-01

    The nasal cavity volume in 69 healthy volunteers from 8 to 23 years old (17 males and 52 females) was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Merits of MRI such as no radiation exposure, less artifact due to bone and air and measurement of intravascular blood flow; and demerits such as contraindication in users of heart pace-makers or magnetic clips, contraindication in people with claustrophobia and influence of environmental magnetic fields must be considered. A Magunetom M10 (Siemens), a superconduction device with 1.0 Tesla magnetic flux density was used. Enhanced patterns of T[sub 1], and pulse lines were photographed at 600 msec TR (repetition time) and 19 msec TE (echo time) using SE (spin echo) and short SE (spin echo), and 3 or 4 mm slices. Photographs were made of the piriform aperture, choana, superior-middle-inferior concha including the nasal meatus, the frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, cribriform plate, and upper surface of the palate. The line connecting the maximum depression point in the nasal root and the pontomedullary junction was selected by sagittal median section, because this corresponds well with the CM (canthomeatal) line which is useful in CT (computed tomography). The transverse section of the nasal cavity volume was traced by display console with an accessory MRI device and calculated by integration of the slice width. The increase of height and body weight neared a plateau at almost 16 years, whereas increase of nasal cavity volume continued until about 20 years. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and regression line were significant. There were no significant differences in these parameters between male and female groups. Comparatively strong correlation between nasal cavity volume, and age, height and body weight was statistically evident. (author).

  20. Magnetic resonance elastography in normal human brain: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lei; Gao Peiyi; Lin Yan; Han Jiancheng; Xi Zhinong; Shen Hao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the application of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the human brain. Methods: An external force actuator was developed. The actuator was fixed to the head coil. During MRE scan, one side of the actuator was attached to the volunteers' head. Low frequency oscillation was produced by the actuator and generated shear waves propagating into brain tissue. The pulse sequence of MRE was designed. A modified gradient echo sequence was developed with motion sensitizing gradient (MSG) imposed along X, Y or Z direction. Cyclic displacement within brain tissue induced by shear waves caused a measurable phase shift in the received MR signal. From the measured phase shift, the displacement at each voxel could be calculated, and the shear waves within the brain were directly imaged. By adjusting the phase offset, the dynamic propagation of shear waves in a wave cycle was obtained. Phase images were processed with local frequency estimation (LFE) technique to obtain the elasticity images. Shear waves at 100 Hz, 150 Hz, and 200 Hz were applied. Results: The phase images of MRE directly imaged the propagating shear waves within the brain. The direction of the propagation was from surface of the brain to the center. The wavelength of shear waves varied with the change of actuating frequency. The change of wavelength of shear waves in gray and white matter of the brain was identified. The wavelength of shear waves in gray matter was shorter than that in white matter. The elasticity image of the brain revealed that the shear modulus of the white matter was higher than that of gray matter. Conclusion: The phase images of MRE can directly visualize the propagation of shear waves in the brain tissue. The elasticity image of the brain can demonstrate the change of elasticity between gray and white matter. (authors)

  1. A data grid for imaging-based clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Chao, Sander S.; Lee, Jasper; Liu, Brent; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    Clinical trials play a crucial role in testing new drugs or devices in modern medicine. Medical imaging has also become an important tool in clinical trials because images provide a unique and fast diagnosis with visual observation and quantitative assessment. A typical imaging-based clinical trial consists of: 1) A well-defined rigorous clinical trial protocol, 2) a radiology core that has a quality control mechanism, a biostatistics component, and a server for storing and distributing data and analysis results; and 3) many field sites that generate and send image studies to the radiology core. As the number of clinical trials increases, it becomes a challenge for a radiology core servicing multiple trials to have a server robust enough to administrate and quickly distribute information to participating radiologists/clinicians worldwide. The Data Grid can satisfy the aforementioned requirements of imaging based clinical trials. In this paper, we present a Data Grid architecture for imaging-based clinical trials. A Data Grid prototype has been implemented in the Image Processing and Informatics (IPI) Laboratory at the University of Southern California to test and evaluate performance in storing trial images and analysis results for a clinical trial. The implementation methodology and evaluation protocol of the Data Grid are presented.

  2. Resonant photoemission study of CeRu4Sb12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hiroyoshi; Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Takayama, Yasuhiro; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Obu, Kenji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Aoki, Yuji; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Sato, Hideyuki

    2005-01-01

    We have measured the Ce 4d-4f and Ce 3d-4f resonant photoemission spectra of CeRu 4 Sb 12 . The Ce 4f spectra show the spectral features corresponding to a weakly hybridized system. The number of 4f electrons is estimated to be ∼1.0

  3. Resonance Raman and optical dephasing study of tricarbocyanine dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashworth, SH; Kummrow, A; Lenz, K

    Fluorescence lineshape analysis based on resonance Raman spectra of the dye HITCI was used to determine the details and magnitude of the vibrational part of the line broadening function, Forced light scattering (FLS) was applied to measure optical dephasing of HITCI in ethylene glycol, pumping at

  4. Study of the geometrical resonances of superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffmann; Finnegan, T.F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1973-01-01

    The resonant cavity structure of superconducting Sn-Sn-oxide-Sn tunnel junctions has been investigated via photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling. We find that the temperature-dependent losses at 35 GHz are determined by the surface resistance of the Sn films for reduced temperatures between 0...

  5. Studies of electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, O.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction to the plasma physics of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) and a review of the results obtained by the author and co-workers including discussion of related work by others. The thesis begins with a theoretical discussion dealing with plasma physics relevant for the production of highly charged ions in ECR ion source plasmas. This is followed by an overview of different techniques, such as gas mixing and double frequency heating, that can be used to improve the performance of this type of ion source. The experimental part of the work consists of studies related to ECRIS plasma physics. The effect of the gas mixing technique on the production efficiency of different ion beams was studied with both gaseous and solid materials. It was observed that gas mixing improves the confinement of the heavier element while the confinement of the lighter element is reduced. When the effect of gas mixing on MIVOC-plasmas was studied with several mixing gases it was observed that applying this technique can reduce the inevitable carbon contamination by a significant factor. In order to understand the different plasma processes taking place in ECRIS plasmas, a series of plasma potential and emittance measurements was carried out. An instrument, which can be used to measure the plasma potential in a single measurement without disturbing the plasma, was developed for this work. Studying the plasma potential of ECR ion sources is important not only because it helps to understand different plasma processes, but also because the information can be used as an input parameter for beam transport simulations and ion source extraction design. The experiments performed have revealed clear dependencies of the plasma potential on certain source parameters such as the amount of carbon contamination accumulated on the walls of the plasma chamber during a MIVOC-run. It was also observed that gas mixing affects not only the production efficiency

  6. Developing stereo image based robot control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprijadi,; Pambudi, I. R.; Woran, M.; Naa, C. F; Srigutomo, W. [Department of Physics, FMIPA, InstitutTeknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha No. 10. Bandung 40132, Indonesia supri@fi.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Application of image processing is developed in various field and purposes. In the last decade, image based system increase rapidly with the increasing of hardware and microprocessor performance. Many fields of science and technology were used this methods especially in medicine and instrumentation. New technique on stereovision to give a 3-dimension image or movie is very interesting, but not many applications in control system. Stereo image has pixel disparity information that is not existed in single image. In this research, we proposed a new method in wheel robot control system using stereovision. The result shows robot automatically moves based on stereovision captures.

  7. Use of a radio-frequency resonance circuit in studies of alkali ionization in flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgers, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The construction of a radio-frequency resonance system and its use in the study of alkali metal ionization in flames is described. The author re-determines the values of the alkali ionization rate constants for a CO flame with N 2 as diluent gas of known temperature using the RF resonance method. (Auth.)

  8. Overtones of isoscalar giant resonances studied in direct particle decay measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; van den Berg, AM; Csatlos, M; Csige, L; Davids, B; Garg, U; Gulyas, J; Harakeh, MN; de Huu, MA; Krasznahorkay, A; Sohler, D; Wortche, HJ

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), which is the lowest-energy overtone mode of the isoscalar giant resonances, has been studied in some medium-heavy and heavy nuclei in coincidence measurements. The observation of the direct nucleon decay channels significantly helped to enhance giant

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology [fr

  10. Electron spin resonance studies of gamma irradiated saccharides. Etudes par resonance paramagnetique electronique de saccharides soumis a un rayonnement gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J.; Thiery, C.; Battesti, C.; Agnel, J.P.; Triolet, J.; Vincent, P. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Physiologie Vegetale et Ecosystemes)

    1993-04-01

    The radiolysis mechanism of several saccharides was studied in order to understand the radiolysis mechanism of starches. Electron Spin Resonance first performed in powder state did not allow determination of the chemical structure of the induced radicals. The spin-trapping method combined with HPLC however, followed by ESR spectra analysis with the 'Voyons' simulation program was applied to the study of glucose, glucose oligomers and disaccharides. We were thus able to further our understanding of the radiolysis mechanism of starches. 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Jiang; Jianfang Liu; Qingqing Lv; Shoudong Gu; Xiaoyang Jiao; Minjiao Li; Shasha Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radi...

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  13. A case study on lightning protection, building resonances considered

    OpenAIRE

    Deursen, van, A.P.J.; Geers - Bargboer, G.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (G. Bargboer and A. P. J. van Deursen, IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat., vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 684-90, Aug. 2010) we dealt with current injection measurements to test the lightning protection system of a newly built pharmaceutical plant. In a tentative extrapolation, the measurements were extrapolated to actual lightning. Here, we extend the model and calculate the response of the installation on lightning currents and include resonances in the cable trays and test cables cont...

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of parkinsonism related to boxing.

    OpenAIRE

    Davie, C A; Pirtosek, Z; Barker, G J; Kingsley, D P; Miller, P H; Lees, A J

    1995-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, localised to the lentiform nucleus, was carried out in three ex-professional boxers who developed a parkinsonian syndrome, six patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and six age matched controls. The three ex-boxers all showed a pronounced reduction in the absolute concentration of N-acetylaspartate compared with the patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and the control group. This reduction is likely to reflect neuronal loss occurring in ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of flow and mass transfer in electrohydrodynamic liquid bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wexler, Adam D.; Drusová, Sandra; Fuchs, Elmar C.; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael; Reiter, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Here, we report on the feasibility and use of magnetic resonance imaging-based methods to the study of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) liquid bridges. High-speed tomographic recordings through the longitudinal axis of water bridges were used to characterize the mass transfer dynamics, mixing,

  16. Progresses in the studies of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams by crossing nonlinear resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Franchi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiturn extraction from a circular particle accelerator is performed by trapping the beam inside stable islands of the horizontal phase space. In general, by crossing a resonance of order n, n+1 beamlets are created whenever the resonance is stable, whereas if the resonance is unstable the beam is split in n parts. Islands are generated by nonlinear magnetic fields, whereas the trapping is realized by means of a given tune variation so to cross adiabatically a resonance. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron carried out in 2007 gave the evidence of protons trapped in stable islands while crossing the one-third and one-fifth resonances. Dedicated experiments were also carried out to study the trapping process and its reversibility properties. The results of these measurement campaigns are presented and discussed in this paper.

  17. Progresses in the Studies of Adiabatic Splitting of Charged Particles Beams by Crossing Nonlinear Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, A; Giovannozzi, M; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    The multi-turn extraction from a circular particle accelerator is performed by trapping the beam inside stable islands of the horizontal phase space. In general, by crossing a resonance of order n, n+1 beamlets are created whenever the resonance is stable, whereas if the resonance is unstable the beam is split in n parts. Islands are generated by non-linear magnetic fields, whereas the trapping is realized by means of a given tune variation so to cross adiabatically a resonance. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron carried out in 2007 gave the evidence of protons trapped in stable islands while crossing the one-third and one-fifth resonances. Dedicated experiments were also carried out to study the trapping process and its reversibility properties. The results of these measurement campaigns are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. GEANT4 simulation study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Harada, Hideo; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Kitatani, Fumito; Takamine, Jun; Kureta, Masatoshi; Iimura, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    A design study of a gamma-ray detector for neutron resonance densitometry was made with GEANT4. The neutron resonance densitometry, combining neutron resonance transmission analysis and neutron resonance capture analysis, is a non-destructive technique to measure amounts of nuclear materials in melted fuels of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. In order to effectively quantify impurities in the melted fuels via prompt gamma-ray measurements, a gamma-ray detector for the neutron resonance densitometry consists of cylindrical and well type LaBr 3 scintillators. The present simulation showed that the proposed gamma-ray detector suffices to clearly detect the gamma rays emitted by 10 B(n, αγ) reaction in a high environmental background due to 137 Cs radioactivity with its Compton edge suppressed at a considerably small level. (author)

  19. Moessbauer effect and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on yeast aconitase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Maeda, Yutaka; Sakai, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Morita, Yuhei.

    1975-01-01

    The Moessbauer effect and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of yeast aconitase [EC 4.2.1.3] purified from the cells of Candida lipolytica (ATCC 20114) were measured. Moessbauer spectra suggested that yeast acontitase mostly contained two high-spin Fe(III) ions in an antiferromagnetically coupled binuclear complex that resembled oxidized 2 Fe ferredoxins, together with a small amount of high-spin Fe(II). EPR spectra recorded no signal at 77 0 K, but showed a slightly asymmetric signal centered at g=2.0 at 4.2 0 K, presumably due to the small amount of Fe(II) Fe(III) pairs. (auth.)

  20. Transistor regenerative spectrometer for 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anferov, V.P.; Mikhal'kov, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement of the Robinson transducer for investigations of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in 14 N is described. Amplifier of the suggested transducer is made using p-n field effect transistor and small-noise SHF bipolar transistor. Such a circuit permits to obtain optimal relation between input resistance, low-frequency noises and transconductance which provides uniform gain of the transducer in the frequency range of 0.6-12 MHz and permits to construct a transistor spectrometer of NQR not yielding to a lamp spectrometer in sensitivity [ru

  1. Image based SAR product simulation for analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.

    1987-01-01

    SAR product simulation serves to predict SAR image gray values for various flight paths. Input typically consists of a digital elevation model and backscatter curves. A new method is described of product simulation that employs also a real SAR input image for image simulation. This can be denoted as 'image-based simulation'. Different methods to perform this SAR prediction are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Ascending and descending orbit images from NASA's SIR-B experiment were used for verification of the concept: input images from ascending orbits were converted into images from a descending orbit; the results are compared to the available real imagery to verify that the prediction technique produces meaningful image data.

  2. Bioceramic Resonance Effect on Meridian Channels: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Kai Leung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioceramic is a kind of material which emits nonionizing radiation and luminescence, induced by visible light. Bioceramic also facilitates the breakup of large clusters of water molecules by weakening hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bond weakening, which allows water molecules to act in diverse ways under different conditions, is one of the key mechanisms underlying the effects of Bioceramic on biophysical and physical-chemical processes. Herein, we used sound to amplify the effect of Bioceramic and further developed an experimental device for use in humans. Thirteen patients who suffered from various chronic and acute illnesses that severely affected their sleep patterns and life quality were enrolled in a trial of Bioceramic resonance (i.e., rhythmic 100-dB sound waves with frequency set at 10 Hz applied to the skin surface of the anterior chest. According to preliminary data, a “Propagated Sensation along Meridians” (PSM was experienced in all Bioceramic resonance-treated patients but not in any of the nine control patients. The device was believed to enhance microcirculation through a series of biomolecular and physiological processes and to subject the specific meridian channels of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM to coherent vibration. This noninvasive technique may offer an alternative to needle acupuncture and other traditional medical practices with clinical benefits.

  3. A nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance study on the dynamics of pentacoordinated organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keijzer, A.E.H. de.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the role of the steric and electronic effects on the fundamental dynamic behaviour of pentacoordinated phosporus compounds is further elaborated. In chapter 2 a variable temperature 13 C NMR study, performed on a series of monocyclic oxyphosphoranes, is presented. The investigations were carried out to determine the influence of the conformational transmission effect on the barriers to pseudorotation in pentacoordinated phosphorus compounds. Chapter 3 also comprises a variable temperature 13 C NMR study on pentacoordinated phosphorus compounds. In this chapter, however, an additional high-resolution 1 H NMR study on the conformational equilibria around the P-O-C-C-O fragments is included. These studies were performed in order to determine whether the enhancement of the reorganization rates around phosphorus is brought about by accelerated pseudorotation or by the involvement of hexacoordinated zwitterionic phosphorus intermediates. In chapter 4, a 31 P NMR study on the solvolysis rate of several phosphinate esters is described. This study was performed in order to determine the influence of the conformational transmission effect on the solvolysis rate of phosphate esters. A number of phosphates is examined in which, during the course of the solvolysis reaction, the conformational transmission effect is bound to be present or absent respectively. Moreover, it is discussed in which way the concept of conformational transmission induced differences in solvolysis rates can be used as a probe to examine the reactions of biologically important phosphate esters. In chapters 5 and 6 ESR studies on the influence of steric and electronic factors on phosphoranyl formation in solution, and on the intramolecular electron transfer in phosphoranyl radicals are presented. (author). 121 refs.; 33 figs.; 17 figs

  4. Study of resonance production as a probe of heavy-ion collisions with the ALICE detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic resonances provide a rich set of measurements that can be used to study the properties of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of resonances and long-lived particles provide information about the properties of the late hadronic phase due to the presence of scattering effects that can modify resonance yields. Resonances can also be used along with long-lived hadrons to study the various mechanisms that shape particle pT spectra, including in-medium energy loss, radial flow, and recombination. Measurements of resonances in pp and p-Pb collisions serve as baselines for measurements in heavy-ion collisions, provide input for tuning QCD-inspired event generators, and aid searches for collective behavior in small systems. I will present measurements of a wide variety of hadronic resonances, including some of the most recent results presented at the Quark Matter conference. By comparing measurements of resonances with different masses, lifetimes, and quark contents in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb co...

  5. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  6. Study of 234U(n,f) Resonances Measured at the CERN n_TOF Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Cidoncha, E; Paradela, C; Tarrío, D; Leong, L S; Audouin, L; Tassan-Got, L; Praena, J; Berthier, B; Ferrant, L; Isaev, S; Le Naour, C; Stephan, C; Trubert, D; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Bečvář, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S.; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krtička, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of the resolved resonance region for the U-234(n,f) cross section data measured at the CERN n\\_TOF facility. The resonance parameters in the energy range from 1 eV to 1500 eV have been obtained with the SAMMY code by using as initial parameters for the fit the resonance parameters of the JENDL-3.3 evaluation. In addition, the statistical analysis has been accomplished, partly with the SAMDIST code, in order to study the level spacing and the Mehta-Dyson correlation.

  7. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of (TMTSF) 2PF 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrierty, V. J.; Douglass, D. C.; Wudl, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inverse linewidths and spin-lattice relaxation times of fluorine and proton magnetic resonance spectra are used to examine molecular motion in the organic superconductor (TMTSF) 2PF 6. The results clearly show that rotation of the PF 6- anion is the principal agent for the observed relaxation of fluorine contrary to some suggestions in the current literature. This interpretation is based upon qualitative comparison with relaxation in plastic crystals, where molecular rotation is well characterized, and upon the quantitative agreement between the calculated and observed linewidth change near 90K and the maximum spin-lattice relaxation rate at 140K. There is also motional evidence, supported by X-ray structure measurements, that a phase transition occurs in the vicinity of 160K.

  8. Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas, magnetic resonance studies in four patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Garcia, S.; Bertrol, V.

    1998-01-01

    Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas are vascular malformations that can be located throughout the entire central nervous system. They are more frequently found in brain than in spinal cord, where it is only possible to diagnose them by magnetic resonance (RM): We present four cases of intramedullary spinal cord cavernoma, three of which were located in the thoracic spine and one in cervical spine. Computed tomography was ineffective in their diagnosis. However, MR disclosed there presence of well-defined tumors producing a thickening of the spinal cord. The signal was heterogeneous in both T1 and T2-weighted images. There were low signal areas due to the presence of calcium and hemosiderin and high intensity signals provoked by methemoglobin within the lesions, which were scarcely enhanced by intravenous gadolinium administration. One of the lesions presented in the form of a large intramedullary hematoma. (Author) 8 refs

  9. Theoretical study of platonic crystals with periodically structured N-beam resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Penglin; Climente, Alfonso; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Wu, Linzhi

    2018-03-01

    A multiple scattering theory is applied to study the properties of flexural waves propagating in a plate with periodically structured N-beam resonators. Each resonator consists of a circular hole containing an inner disk connected to background plate with N rectangular beams. The Bloch theorem is employed to obtain the band structure of a two-dimensional lattice containing a single resonator per unit cell. Also, a numerical algorithm has been developed to get the transmittance through resonator slabs infinitely long in the direction perpendicular to the incident wave. For the numerical validation, a square lattice of 2-beam resonators has been comprehensively analyzed. Its band structure exhibits several flat bands, indicating the existence of local resonances embedded in the structure. Particularly, the one featured as the fundamental mode of the inner disk opens a bandgap at low frequencies. This mode has been fully described in terms of a simple spring-mass model. As a practical application of the results obtained, a homogenization approach has been employed to design a focusing lens for flexural waves, where the index gradient is obtained by adjusting the orientation of the resonators beams. Numerical experiments performed within the framework of a three-dimensional finite element method have been employed to discuss the accuracy of the models described here.

  10. Image-based characterization of foamed polymeric tissue scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P; Crowe, John A; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tai, Hongyun; Howdle, Steven M; Kockenberger, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds are integral to many regenerative medicine therapies, providing suitable environments for tissue regeneration. In order to assess their suitability, methods to routinely and reproducibly characterize scaffolds are needed. Scaffold structures are typically complex, and thus their characterization is far from trivial. The work presented in this paper is centred on the application of the principles of scaffold characterization outlined in guidelines developed by ASTM International. Specifically, this work demonstrates the capabilities of different imaging modalities and analysis techniques used to characterize scaffolds fabricated from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) using supercritical carbon dioxide. Three structurally different scaffolds were used. The scaffolds were imaged using: scanning electron microscopy, micro x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and terahertz pulsed imaging. In each case two-dimensional images were obtained from which scaffold properties were determined using image processing. The findings of this work highlight how the chosen imaging modality and image-processing technique can influence the results of scaffold characterization. It is concluded that in order to obtain useful results from image-based scaffold characterization, an imaging methodology providing sufficient contrast and resolution must be used along with robust image segmentation methods to allow intercomparison of results

  11. Studies on polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guoping; Liu Maili; Li Liyun

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A series of polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups were studied as the potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for liver enhancement. Methods: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes were prepared and evaluated by relaxivity, acute toxicity studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats. Results: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes have higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and possess the low intravenous acute toxicities to Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats indicated that they greatly enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images and provide prolonged intravascular duration in the liver. Conclusion: These results indicated that the polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups could be considered as the appropriate MRI contrast agents for liver enhancement

  12. Image-based spectroscopy for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmakov, Eduard; Molina, Carolyn; Wynne, Rosalind

    2014-03-01

    An image-processing algorithm for use with a nano-featured spectrometer chemical agent detection configuration is presented. The spectrometer chip acquired from Nano-Optic DevicesTM can reduce the size of the spectrometer down to a coin. The nanospectrometer chip was aligned with a 635nm laser source, objective lenses, and a CCD camera. The images from a nanospectrometer chip were collected and compared to reference spectra. Random background noise contributions were isolated and removed from the diffraction pattern image analysis via a threshold filter. Results are provided for the image-based detection of the diffraction pattern produced by the nanospectrometer. The featured PCF spectrometer has the potential to measure optical absorption spectra in order to detect trace amounts of contaminants. MATLAB tools allow for implementation of intelligent, automatic detection of the relevant sub-patterns in the diffraction patterns and subsequent extraction of the parameters using region-detection algorithms such as the generalized Hough transform, which detects specific shapes within the image. This transform is a method for detecting curves by exploiting the duality between points on a curve and parameters of that curve. By employing this imageprocessing technique, future sensor systems will benefit from new applications such as unsupervised environmental monitoring of air or water quality.

  13. Simulation study of two-ion hybrid resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.

    1986-02-01

    A one-dimensional low-noise, low-frequency electromagnetic particle simulation code that is appropriate for investigation of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is developed. Retaining the hyperbolicity of the electromagnetic waves and exploiting nearly one-dimensional characteristics (perpendicular to the external magnetic field) of the ICRH, we use the guiding center electron approximation for the transverse electronic current calculation. We observe mode conversion of the incoming magnetosonic wave into the electrostatic ion-ion hybrid mode accompanied by strong ion-heating. The dependence of this heating on the different plasma parameters is examined through a series of simulations, focusing mainly on wave incidence from the high field side. Because K/sub parallel/ = 0 in our runs, the conventional Landau damping cannot explain the ion heating. Non-linear mechanisms for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy absorption during radio frequency heating in the ion cyclotron regime. 32 refs., 17 figs

  14. Late whiplash syndrome: a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, U; Pavese, N; Lucetti, C; Renna, M R; Gambaccini, G; Bernardini, S; Canapicchi, R; Carrozzi, L; Murri, L

    1999-01-01

    Cervical hyperextension injuries are common and are associated with significant morbidity. Clinically two syndromes are described: "acute" whiplash syndrome and "late" whiplash syndrome (in which the patients are still symptomatic after six months despite normal physical and radiological examination). In order to clarify the pathology of the persistent pain in late whiplash syndrome we performed a cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 33 consecutive patients suffering from this condition. Twenty-six patients (78.8%) showed MRI abnormalities, the most common MRI finding (57.6%) was pre-existent spondylosis. Indeed, the group of patients with spondylosis and other MRI changes had higher clinical scores than those without MRI abnormalities as measured by a three-point grading system based upon the symptoms and signs shown. Several MRI changes, most of them already demonstrable by standard X-ray were seen among 33 patients suffering from late whiplash syndrome. Although no one of these findings appears to be specific and certainly related to the previous neck injury, they could represent a risk factor for a longer pain duration.

  15. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J.

    1991-01-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain

  16. Study of skin markers for magnetic resonance imaging examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Umezaki, Yoshie; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2013-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), skin markers are used as a landmark in order to make plans for examinations. However, there isn't a lot of research about the material and shape of skin markers. The skin marker's essential elements are safety, good cost performance, high signal intensity for T 1 weighted image (T 1 WI) and T 2 weighted image (T 2 WI), and durable. In order to get a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of T 1 WI and T 2 WI, baby oil, salad oil and olive oil were chosen, because these materials were easy to obtain and safe for the skin. The SNR of baby oil was the best. Baby oil was injected into the infusion tube, and the tube was solvent welded and cut by a heat sealer. In order to make ring shaped skin markers, both ends of the tube were stuck with adhesive tape. Three different diameters of markers were made (3, 5, 10 cmφ). Ring shaped skin markers were put on to surround the examination area, therefore, the edge of the examination area could be seen at every cross section. Using baby oil in the ring shaped infusion tube is simple, easy, and a highly useful skin marker. (author)

  17. Experimental study on flow-induced acoustic resonance in square closed side branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Gu Hanyang; Liu Xiaojing; Zhang Kai; Xie Yongcheng; Zu Hongbiao

    2014-01-01

    Flow-induced acoustic resonance is a phenomenon caused by the interaction of flow and acoustic fields in special structure. Acoustic resonance characteristic experiments were carried out on square closed side branch. The influences of the velocity in main pipe and the length of the side branch on acoustic resonance were studied. The range of occurrence and characteristics of pressure pulsation were analyzed. Three lengths of side branches (L/d=5.6 and 7) were experimentally studied and the Reynolds number in the experiment was 2.74 X 10 4 -2.429 X 10 5 while the Mach number was 0.025-0.218. The results show that the resonance frequency shows a lock-in phenomenon with the increase of velocity. As the length of the side branch increasing, the amplitude of the acoustic pressure and the resonance frequency decrease. In the considered structure, the acoustic resonance occurs when Strouhal number is 0.3-0.6 and 0.7-1.0. (authors)

  18. Validation of a Smartphone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method for Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Ashman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Image-based dietary records could lower participant burden associated with traditional prospective methods of dietary assessment. They have been used in children, adolescents and adults, but have not been evaluated in pregnant women. The current study evaluated relative validity of the DietBytes image-based dietary assessment method for assessing energy and nutrient intakes. Pregnant women collected image-based dietary records (via a smartphone application of all food, drinks and supplements consumed over three non-consecutive days. Intakes from the image-based method were compared to intakes collected from three 24-h recalls, taken on random days; once per week, in the weeks following the image-based record. Data were analyzed using nutrient analysis software. Agreement between methods was ascertained using Pearson correlations and Bland-Altman plots. Twenty-five women (27 recruited, one withdrew, one incomplete, median age 29 years, 15 primiparas, eight Aboriginal Australians, completed image-based records for analysis. Significant correlations between the two methods were observed for energy, macronutrients and fiber (r = 0.58–0.84, all p < 0.05, and for micronutrients both including (r = 0.47–0.94, all p < 0.05 and excluding (r = 0.40–0.85, all p < 0.05 supplements in the analysis. Bland-Altman plots confirmed acceptable agreement with no systematic bias. The DietBytes method demonstrated acceptable relative validity for assessment of nutrient intakes of pregnant women.

  19. Experimental study of the influence of different resonators on thermoacoustic conversion performance of a thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, E C; Ling, H; Dai, W; Yu, G Y

    2006-12-22

    In this paper, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator shape on the performance of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine is presented. Two different resonators were tested in the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat. One resonator is an iso-diameter one, and the other is a tapered one. To have a reasonable comparison reference, we keep the same traveling-wave loop, the same resonant frequency and the same operating pressure. The experiment showed that the resonator shape has significant influence on the global performance of the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine. The tapered resonator gives much better performance than the iso-diameter resonator. The tapered resonator system achieved a maximum pressure ratio of about 1.3, a maximum net acoustical power output of about 450 W and a highest thermoacoustic efficiency of about 25%.

  20. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    Full Text Available Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data to image the vasculature, and iii diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  1. Study on electromagnetic characteristics of the magnetic coupling resonant coil for the wireless power transmission system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxian; Liu, Yiping; Wei, Yonggeng; Song, Yilin

    2018-01-01

    The resonant coil design is taken as the core technology in the magnetic coupling resonant wireless power transmission system, which achieves energy transmission by the coupling of the resonant coil. This paper studies the effect of the resonant coil on energy transmission and the efficiency of the system. Combining a two-coil with a three-coil system, the optimum design method for the resonant coil is given to propose a novel coil structure. First, the co-simulation methods of Pspice and Maxwell are used. When the coupling coefficient of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between system transmission efficiency, output power, and frequency is analyzed. When the self-inductance of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between the performance and frequency of the system transmission is analyzed. Then, two-coil and three-coil structure models are built, and the parameters of the magnetic field of the coils are calculated and analyzed using the finite element method. In the end, a dual E-type simulation circuit model is used to optimize the design of the novel resonance coil. The co-simulation results show that the coupling coefficients of the two-coil, three-coil, and novel coil systems are 0.017, 0.17 and 0.0126, respectively. The power loss of the novel coil is 16.4 mW. There is an obvious improvement in the three-coil system, which shows that the magnetic leakage of the field and the energy coupling are relatively small. The new structure coil has better performance, and the load loss is lower; it can improve the system output power and transmission efficiency.

  2. Dynamic study of pelvic floor in patients with constipation: dynamic magnetic resonance vs defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Vasquez, Carlos Mario; Pulgarin, Ricardo Luis German; Melo Arango, Catalina; Delgado de Bedout, Jorge Andres; Llano Serna, Juan Fernando; Restrepo Restrepo, Jose Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: to compare the concordance between defecography and magnetic resonance in patients with constipation. Materials and methods: we did a prospective and descriptive assay to determine the concordance of a diagnostic test with 17 patients. The evaluation of the studies was double blind. Results: the 17 patients were females, age range 31 - 77 year the symptoms were present between 3 to 120 months. Anterior rectocele was the most common diagnosis (11 patients) and magnetic resonance had sensibility 100%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 78, 57% and negative predictive value 100%. 7 patients had pelvic floor descent and magnetic resonance had sensibility 71.4%, specificity 20% positive predictive value 38.46% and negative predictive value 50%. Defecography found patients with enterocele and magnetic resonance had sensibility 0% and specificity 100 anismus was present in 2 patients and magnetic resonance didn't find them. Conclusion defecography is still the gold standard for patients with eonstipation. Magnetic resonance are a promise for those patients but has to improve

  3. A clinical study and the diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging of renal scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsugaya, Masayuki; Hirao, Noriaki; Ohtaguro, Kazuo; Kato, Jiro.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-nine kidneys of seventeen patients (nine boys and eight girls) with vesicoureteral reflux and repeated urinary tract infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of renal scarring and correlation between clinical data and the degree renal scarring. Renal scarring is classified into three types according to findings in magnetic resonance imaging. The degree of renal scarring are classified into five grades according to traditional grading of intravenous pyelogram. If a fine deformity of calyx is shown on intravenous pyelogram, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates renal scarring. Magnetic resonance imaging without irradiation is exceedingly valuable for the diagnosis of renal scarring. The appearances of magnetic resonance imaging were supported by X-ray computed tomography. There is a substantial correlation between serum creatinine and the grades of renal scarring by magnetic resonance imaging. There is a substantial correlation between fever attacks and the grade of renal scarring, and there is a significant reverse correlation between the age of the onset of upper urinary tract infection and the grade of renal scarring. It is suggested that upper urinary tract infection is the most significant factor in scar formation. (author)

  4. Laboratory studies of the dynamic of resonance cones formation in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, V. V.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Kostrov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    The paper is devoted to experimental studies of formation of resonance cones in magnetized plasmas by pulsed RF source in the lower-hybrid (whistler) and the upper-hybrid frequency ranges. It is shown that in both frequency ranges, resonance cones exhibit similar dynamics after switching-on the RF source: at first, wide maxima of radiation are formed in non-resonance directions, which then become narrower, with their direction approaching the resonance one. While the resonance cones are being formed, one observes a fine structure in the form of secondary radiation maxima. It is shown that the characteristic formation time of stationary resonance cones is determined by the minimal value of the group velocity of the quasi-electrostatic waves excited by the antenna. In the low-temperature plasma, this value is limited in the lower-hybrid frequency range by the spatial spectrum of the emitting antenna and in the upper-hybrid range, by the effects of spatial plasma dispersion.

  5. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  6. Application of laser resonance scattering to the study of high-temperature plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Hamamoto, Makoto; Akazaki, Masanori; Miyazoe, Yasushi

    1981-01-01

    Studies on laser resonance scattering and its application to the study of high-temperature plasma-wall interaction are reviewed. The application of dye laser beam to resonant scattering method has been developed. This method is able to detect low density atoms. The fluorescent photon counts can be estimated for a two-level system and a three-level system. The S/N ratio, Which is in close connection with the detection limit, has been estimated. The doppler effect due to the thermal motion of atoms is taken into consideration. The calibration of the absolute number of atoms is necessary. Tunable coherent light is used as the light source for resonance scattering method. This is able to excite atoms strongly and to increase the detection efficiency. As dye lasers, a N 2 laser, a YAG laser, and a KrF excimer laser have been studied. In VUV region, rare gas or rare gas halide lasers can be used. The strong output power can be expected when the resonance lines of atoms meet the synchronizing region of the excimer laser. The resonance scattering method is applied to the detection of impurity metal atoms in plasma. The studies of laser systems for the detection of hydrogen atoms are also in progress. (Kato, T.)

  7. Image-based reflectance conversion of ASTER and IKONOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectral signatures derived from different image-based models for ASTER and IKONOS were inspected visually as first departure. This was followed by comparison of the total accuracy and Kappa index computed from supervised classification of images that were derived from different image-based atmospheric correction ...

  8. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  9. Study of resonant processes in plasmonic nanostructures for sensor applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirunčík, Jiří; Kwiecien, Pavel; Fiala, Jan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    This contribution is focused on the numerical studies of resonant processes in individual plasmonic nanostructures, with the attention particularly given to rectangular nanoparticles and concominant localized surface plasmon resonance processes. Relevant models for the description and anylysis of localized surface plasmon resonance are introduced, in particular: quasistatic approximation, Mie theory and in particular, a generalized (quasi)analytical approach for treating rectangularly shaped nanostructures. The parameters influencing resonant behavior of nanoparticles are analyzed with special interest in morphology and sensor applications. Results acquired with Lumerical FDTD Solutions software, using finite-difference time-domain simulation method, are shown and discussed. Simulations were mostly performed for selected nanostructures composed of finite rectangular nanowires with square cross-sections. Systematic analysis is made for single nanowires with varying length, parallel couple of nanowires with varying gap (cut -wires) and selected dolmen structures with varying gap between one nanowire transversely located with respect to parallel couple of nanowires (in both in-plane and -out-of-plane arrangements). The dependence of resonant peaks of cross-section spectral behavior (absorption, scattering, extinction) and their tunability via suitable structuring and morphology changes are primarily researched. These studies are then followed with an analysis of the effect of periodic arrangements. The results can be usable with respect to possible sensor applications.

  10. A magnetic resonance study of 3d transition metals and thermal donors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezep, D.A. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of 3d-transition metal impurities in silicon (titanium and iron in particular) and a study of oxygen-related heat-treatment centers in silicon, both carried out mainly by magnetic resonances techniques like EPR and ENDOR. 119 refs.; 31 figs.; 14 tabs

  11. Transmission-line resonators for the study of individual two-level tunneling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Jan David; Bilmes, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Lisenfeld, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Parasitic two-level tunneling systems (TLS) emerge in amorphous dielectrics and constitute a serious nuisance for various microfabricated devices, where they act as a source of noise and decoherence. Here, we demonstrate a new test bed for the study of TLS in various materials which provides access to properties of individual TLS as well as their ensemble response. We terminate a superconducting transmission-line resonator with a capacitor that hosts TLS in its dielectric. By tuning TLS via applied mechanical strain, we observe the signatures of individual TLS strongly coupled to the resonator in its transmission characteristics and extract the coupling components of their dipole moments and energy relaxation rates. The strong and well-defined coupling to the TLS bath results in pronounced resonator frequency fluctuations and excess phase noise, through which we can study TLS ensemble effects such as spectral diffusion, and probe theoretical models of TLS interactions.

  12. Study on frequency characteristics of wireless power transmission system based on magnetic coupling resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L. H.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Yue, Z. K.; Cui, S.

    2017-11-01

    In order to study the frequency characteristics of the wireless energy transmission system based on the magnetic coupling resonance, a circuit model based on the magnetic coupling resonant wireless energy transmission system is established. The influence of the load on the frequency characteristics of the wireless power transmission system is analysed. The circuit coupling theory is used to derive the minimum load required to suppress frequency splitting. Simulation and experimental results verify that when the load size is lower than a certain value, the system will appear frequency splitting, increasing the load size can effectively suppress the frequency splitting phenomenon. The power regulation scheme of the wireless charging system based on magnetic coupling resonance is given. This study provides a theoretical basis for load selection and power regulation of wireless power transmission systems.

  13. Visual activation in infants and young children studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Leth, H; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether visual stimulation in sleeping infants and young children can be examined by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We studied 17 children, aged 3 d to 48 mo, and three healthy adults. Visual stimulation was performed with 8-Hz flickering light...... through the sleeping childs' closed eyelids. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a gradient echoplanar sequence in a l.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Six subjects were excluded because of movement artifacts; the youngest infant showed no response. In 10 children, we could demonstrate...... flow during activation. The different response patterns in young children and adults can reflect developmental or behavioral differences. Localization of the activation seemed to be age-dependent. In the older children and the adults, it encompassed the whole length of the calcarine sulcus, whereas...

  14. A study of the high frequency limitations of series resonant converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, T. A.; King, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A transformer induced oscillation in series resonant (SR) converters is studied. It may occur in the discontinuous current mode. The source of the oscillation is an unexpected resonant circuit formed by normal resonance components in series with the magnetizing inductance of the output transformers. The methods for achieving cyclic stability are: to use a half bridge SR converter where q0.5. Q should be as close to 1.0 as possible. If 0.5q1.0, the instability will be avoided if psi2/3q-1/3. The second objective was to investigate a power field effect transistor (FET) version of the SR converter capable of operating at frequencies above 100 KHz, to study component stress and losses at various frequencies.

  15. Wear Detection of Drill Bit by Image-based Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeri, Maziyah; Zulhilmi Paiz Ismadi, Mohd; Rahim Othman, Abdul; Kamaruddin, Shahrul

    2018-03-01

    Image processing for computer vision function plays an essential aspect in the manufacturing industries for the tool condition monitoring. This study proposes a dependable direct measurement method to measure the tool wear using image-based analysis. Segmentation and thresholding technique were used as the means to filter and convert the colour image to binary datasets. Then, the edge detection method was applied to characterize the edge of the drill bit. By using cross-correlation method, the edges of original and worn drill bits were correlated to each other. Cross-correlation graphs were able to detect the difference of the worn edge despite small difference between the graphs. Future development will focus on quantifying the worn profile as well as enhancing the sensitivity of the technique.

  16. Total and fission cross-sections of 239Pu - statistical study of resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrien, H.; Blons, J.; Eggermann, C.; Michaudon, A.; Paya, D.; Ribon, P.

    1967-01-01

    The authors measured the total and fission cross-sections of 239 Pu with the linear accelerator at Saclay as a pulsed source of neutrons. The total cross-section was measured in the range from 4 to 700 eV and the best resolution used was 1.5 ns/m; the fission cross-section was measured between 4 eV and 6 keV, the best resolution having been 6 ns/m. The transmission measurements on five samples were made at the temperature of liquid nitrogen, and comparisons made with supplementary experiments at ambient temperature made it possible to determine the Doppler broadening factor (Δ = η√E). The resonances were identified from 4 to 500 eV in the total cross-section; the average level spacing was of the order of 2.4 eV. It would appear that, in this energy range, nearly all the levels were identified. The resonance parameters were determined by analysis of shape in conjunction with a least-squares programme on an IBM-7094 computer. The existence of a large number of broad resonances corresponding to very large fission widths has been shown to exist. Statistical study of the fission widths actually shows the existence of two families of resonances, one corresponding to a mean Γ f of the order of 45 meV and the other to a mean Γ/f of about 750 meV. The authors were therefore able to postulate a classification of resonances in terms of two spin states, the level population ratio in each family being: (2J 1 +1)/(2J 2 +1) = 1/3; J 1 = 0 corresponds to the broad resonances and J 2 = 1 to the narrow ones. The partial widths for radiative capture fluctuate slightly around a mean value of 40 meV. By using a multilevel programme, the authors were able to investigate the extent to which the existence of large fission widths might give rise to fictitious resonances (quasi-resonances) and perturbations and also to make a statistical study of the resonance parameters. (author) [fr

  17. Psychosis and autism: magnetic resonance imaging study of brain anatomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toal, Fiona

    2009-05-01

    Autism-spectrum disorder is increasingly recognised, with recent studies estimating that 1% of children in South London are affected. However, the biology of comorbid mental health problems in people with autism-spectrum disorder is poorly understood.

  18. Microwave dynamics of high aspect ratio superconducting nanowires studied using self-resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Daniel F.; Adams, Jesse K.; Grant, Lierd E.; McCaughan, Adam N.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the microwave impedance of extremely high aspect ratio (length/width ≈ 5000) superconducting niobium nitride nanowires. The nanowires are fabricated in a compact meander geometry that is in series with the center conductor of a 50 Ω coplanar waveguide transmission line. The transmission coefficient of the sample is measured up to 20 GHz. At high frequency, a peak in the transmission coefficient is seen. Numerical simulations show that this is a half-wave resonance along the length of the nanowire, where the nanowire acts as a high impedance, slow wave transmission line. This resonance sets the upper frequency limit for these nanowires as inductive elements. Fitting simulations to the measured resonance enables a precise determination of the nanowire's complex sheet impedance at the resonance frequency. The real part is a measure of dissipation, while the imaginary part is dominated by kinetic inductance. We characterize the dependence of the sheet resistance and sheet inductance on both temperature and current and compare the results to recent theoretical predictions for disordered superconductors. These results can aid in the understanding of high frequency devices based on superconducting nanowires. They may also lead to the development of novel superconducting devices such as ultra-compact resonators and slow-wave structures.

  19. Resonant x-ray scattering study of the antiferroelectric and ferrielectric phases in liquid crystal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkin, L. S.; Watson, S. J.; Gleeson, H. F.; Pindak, R.; Pitney, J.; Johnson, P. M.; Huang, C. C.; Barois, P.; Levelut, A.-M.; Srajer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the interlayer ordering of the antiferroelectric and ferrielectric smectic C * subphases in a device geometry. The liquid crystalline materials studied contain a selenium atom and the experiments were carried out at the selenium K edge allowing x-ray transmission through glass. The resonant scattering peaks associated with the antiferroelectric phase were observed in two devices containing different materials. It was observed that the electric-field-induced antiferroelectric to ferroelectric transition coincides with the chevron to bookshelf transition in one of the devices. Observation of the splitting of the antiferroelectric resonant peaks as a function of applied field also confirmed that no helical unwinding occurs at fields lower than the chevron to bookshelf threshold. Resonant features associated with the four-layer ferrielectric liquid crystal phase were observed in a device geometry. Monitoring the electric field dependence of these ferrielectric resonant peaks showed that the chevron to bookshelf transition occurs at a lower applied field than the ferrielectric to ferroelectric switching transition

  20. Electron spin resonance studies of iron-group impurities in beryllium fluoride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griscom, D L; Stapelbroek, M [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Weber, M J [California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore National Lab.

    1980-11-01

    Electron spin resonance investigations have been carried out on unirradiated BeF/sub 2/ glasses. Two relatively intense resonances were observed in a water-free distilled glass known to contain 49 ppM Ni, 13 ppM Mn, and < 20 ppM Fe. One of these was the paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Mn/sup 2 +/. Analysis of the observed /sup 19/F superhyperfine structure demonstrated this manganese to occupy distorted octahedral sites in the glass network. The second resonance was shown by temperature and frequency dependence studies, coupled with computer line shape analysis, to be a ferromagnetic resonance signal due to precipitated ferrite phases. The data suggest that these ferrites are somewhat heterogeneous and most likely comprize magnetite-like phases similar to NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/. An optical extinction curve rising into the ultraviolet with an approximate lambda/sup -4/ dependence is tentatively ascribed to light scattering by ferrite particles approximately 1000 Angstroems in diameter.

  1. Placental Growth during Normal Pregnancy - A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Lasse; Grønbeck, Lene; von Huth, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    were measured in both sagittal and transversal slices. All placentas were weighed after delivery to make a comparative study. RESULTS: Sixteen of the 20 women had increasing placental volumes from the 14th to 38th week of gestation. The 6th and 7th scan showed that 4 women had placentas of the same...... was 640 g (range 500-787 g). All pregnancies were carried to term, resulting in the delivery of healthy infants with good correlation between placental size and birth weight (R = 0.56, p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Placental growth was measured systematically in a longitudinal study through the second and third...

  2. Experimental and analytical study of highly tunable electrostatically actuated resonant beams

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2015-11-03

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally highly tunable clamped–clamped microbeam resonators actuated with electrostatic forces. Theoretically, the Galerkin procedure is used to solve for static deflection as well as the eigenvalue problem as a function of the dc voltage for different values of the ratio between the air gap and the thickness of the microbeam. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the natural frequency of the microbeam can increase or decrease with the increase of the dc polarization voltage depending on the ratio between the air gap and the thickness. Hence, we show that unlike the classical softening effect of the dc voltage, by careful designs of the microbeams, the dc bias can be used to effectively increase the resonance frequencies by several factors. Experimental data are presented for two case studies of silicon beams showing the effective increase of their fundamental resonance frequencies by more than 50–80%. Excellent agreement is reported among the theoretical and experimental results.

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  4. Studies of weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via coincidence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, C; Champagne, A E; Dummer, A K; Fitzgerald, R; Harley, E C T; Mosher, J; Runkle, R

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via gamma gamma-coincidence counting techniques is described. The coincidence apparatus consisted of a large-volume germanium detector and an annular NaI(Tl) crystal. The setup was tested by measuring the weak E sub R =227 keV resonance in sup 2 sup 6 Mg(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Al. Absolute germanium and NaI(Tl) counting efficiencies for a range of gamma-ray energies and for different detector-target geometries are presented. Studies of the gamma-ray background in our spectra are described. Compared to previous work, our method improves the detection sensitivity for weak capture-gamma-ray resonances by a factor of approx 100. The usefulness of the present technique for investigations of interest to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  5. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sally Mahmood Mohamed Hussin Omar

    2015-07-10

    Jul 10, 2015 ... The tendon sheath of the posterior tibial muscle covers the posterior and ..... may be associated with avulsion fractures at either the origin or the insertion .... 14. Shibata Y, Nishi G, Masegi A. Stress test and anatomical study of.

  7. Bud abortion in tulip bulbs studied by magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, van M.G.; Nicolaij, K.; Franssen, J.M.; Kollöffel, C.

    2002-01-01

    After storage and subsequent planting of flower bulbs, the flower bud frequently appears to be aborted. This physiological aberration is probably caused by a change in the water status of the bulb and may be initiated during storage. The development of bud abortion in tulip bulbs was studied during

  8. Resonance Raman and quantum chemical studies of short polyene radical cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keszthelyi, T.; Wilbrandt, R.; Bally, T.

    1997-01-01

    ,3,5-hexatriene have been studied. The radical cations were generated radiolytically in a glassy Freon matrix and investigated by optical absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio and density functional molecular-orbital calculations have been carried out to predict equilibrium structures...... and to assist assignment of the resonance Raman spectra. A new and improved scaled quantum mechanical force field for the butadiene radical cation was also determined. The presence of more than one rotamer was observed in all the polyene radical cations we investigated. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  9. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  10. Resonant particle production during inflation: a full analytical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, Lauren; Peloso, Marco [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Sorbo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lpearce@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu [Amherst Center for Fundamental Interactions, Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, 1126 Lederle Graduate Research Tower (LGRT), Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We revisit the study of the phenomenology associated to a burst of particle production of a field whose mass is controlled by the inflaton field and vanishes at one given instance during inflation. This generates a bump in the correlators of the primordial scalar curvature. We provide a unified formalism to compute various effects that have been obtained in the literature and confirm that the dominant effects are due to the rescattering of the produced particles on the inflaton condensate. We improve over existing results (based on numerical fits) by providing exact analytic expressions for the shape and height of the bump, both in the power spectrum and the equilateral bispectrum. We then study the regime of validity of the perturbative computations of this signature. Finally, we extend these computations to the case of a burst of particle production in a sector coupled only gravitationally to the inflaton.

  11. Primary CNS lymphoma in nonimmunocompromised patients magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J.; Fernandez, J.M.; Galarraga, M.I.; Pozo, A.; Montes, A.; Ablanedo, P.

    1995-01-01

    Prymary lymphoma of the CNS (PLCNS) is a relatively infrequent malignant tumor that has become increasingly common over the past decade. The radiological signs, although not pathognomonic, are quite specific and suggestive of the correct diagnosis, thus facilitating therapeutic management. We present six cases of PLCNS in nonimmunocopromised patients studied by MR in our hospital over the past two and a half years. We describe theradiological findings, correlating them with those mentioned in the literature. 14 refs

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of defects in dilute magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, J.T.; Raizman, A.

    1980-01-01

    The EPR spectrum of erbium was used to study the effects of cold-working (rolling and mechanical polishing) in dilute gold-erbium alloys. Variation in the EPR linewidth, intensity and asymmetry parameter (A/B ratio) were investigated. Most of the results could be interpreted in terms of segregation of erbium ions to subgrain boundaries (dislocations) in a surface layer of a few thousand Angstroms. (author)

  13. Electron spin resonance studies of some irradiated pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibella, M.; Crucq, A-S.; Tilquin, B.; Stocker, P.; Lesgards, G.; Raffi, J.

    2000-01-01

    Five antibiotics belonging to the cephalosporins and penicillins groups have been irradiated: anhydrous ampicilline acid, amoxicilline acid trihydrate, cefuroxime sodium salt, cloxacilline sodium salt monohydrate and ceftazidime pentahydrate. ESR studies have been carried out, showing the influence of irradiation and storage parameters on the nature and concentration of the free radicals trapped. These results may be used to detect an irradiation treatment on such pharmaceuticals. (author)

  14. Childhood temporal lobe epilepsy: correlation between electroencephalography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham Fa; Sherief, Laila M; Saleh, Safaa H; Elshafeiy, Mona M; Siam, Ahmed G; Elsaeed, Wafaa F; Arafa, Mohamed A; Bendary, Eman A; Sherbiny, Hanan S; Elbehedy, Rabab M; Aziz, Khalid A

    2015-04-18

    The diagnosis of epilepsy should be made as early as possible to give a child the best chance for treatment success and also to decrease complications such as learning difficulties and social and behavioral problems. In this study, we aimed to assess the ability of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in detecting the lateralization side in patients with Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in correlation with EEG and MRI findings. This was a case-control study including 40 patients diagnosed (clinically and by EEG) as having temporal lobe epilepsy aged 8 to 14 years (mean, 10.4 years) and 20 healthy children with comparable age and gender as the control group. All patients were subjected to clinical examination, interictal electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examination (MRS) was performed to the patients and the controls. According to the findings of electroencephalography, our patients were classified to three groups: Group 1 included 20 patients with unitemporal (lateralized) epileptic focus, group 2 included 12 patients with bitemporal (non-lateralized) epileptic focus and group 3 included 8 patients with normal electroencephalography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy could lateralize the epileptic focus in 19 patients in group 1, nine patients in group2 and five patients in group 3 with overall lateralization of (82.5%), while electroencephalography was able to lateralize the focus in (50%) of patients and magnetic resonance imaging detected lateralization of mesial temporal sclerosis in (57.5%) of patients. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a promising tool in evaluating patients with epilepsy and offers increased sensitivity to detect temporal pathology that is not obvious on structural MRI imaging.

  15. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  16. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  17. Defect-related internal dissipation in mechanical resonators and the study of coupled mechanical systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Modine, Normand Arthur; Wendt, Joel Robert; Aslam, Dean (Michigan State University, Lansing, MI); Sepulveda-Alancastro, Nelson (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR)

    2007-01-01

    Understanding internal dissipation in resonant mechanical systems at the micro- and nanoscale is of great technological and fundamental interest. Resonant mechanical systems are central to many sensor technologies, and microscale resonators form the basis of a variety of scanning probe microscopies. Furthermore, coupled resonant mechanical systems are of great utility for the study of complex dynamics in systems ranging from biology to electronics to photonics. In this work, we report the detailed experimental study of internal dissipation in micro- and nanomechanical oscillators fabricated from amorphous and crystalline diamond materials, atomistic modeling of dissipation in amorphous, defect-free, and defect-containing crystalline silicon, and experimental work on the properties of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled mechanical oscillator arrays. We have identified that internal dissipation in most micro- and nanoscale oscillators is limited by defect relaxation processes, with large differences in the nature of the defects as the local order of the material ranges from amorphous to crystalline. Atomistic simulations also showed a dominant role of defect relaxation processes in controlling internal dissipation. Our studies of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled oscillator arrays revealed that it is possible to create mechanical systems that should be ideal for the study of non-linear dynamics and localization.

  18. Evidence for resonant bonding in phase-change materials studied by IR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shportko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phase-change materials (PCM attract attention due to their unique properties. This remarkable portfolio also makes them promising for applications in novel data storage devices. In this study, we discuss differences in the optical properties of PCM and non-PCM in the IR caused by presence or absence of resonant bonding.

  19. The magnetic-resonance properties study of nanostructures for spintronics by FMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupriyanova, G; Zyubin, A; Astashonok, A; Orlova, A; Prokhorenko, E

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the study of the magnetic-resonance properties such as magnetic anisotropy, magnetic damping, and interlayer exchange coupling between ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic spacer by FMR to assess their applicability in a functional magnetic tunnel junction.

  20. Ultraviolet-resonance femtosecond stimulated Raman study of the initial events in photoreceptor chromophore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahara T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Newly-developed ultraviolet-resonance femtosecond stimulated-Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study the initial structural evolution of photoactive yellow protein chromophore in solution. The obtained spectra changed drastically within 1 ps, demonstrating rapid in-plane deformations of the chromophore.

  1. Study of the arrangement of crystallites in γ-irradiated human enamel by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevc, P.; Schara, M.; Ravnik, C.; Skaleric, U.

    1976-01-01

    The arrangement of tooth enamel microcrystals has been studied on CO 3 3- bound electrons by paramagnetic resonance. It was found that noncarious human maxillary central incisors have a greater degree of alignment of tooth enamel microcrystals than the carious ones. The outermost surface layer of enamel showed a greater crystallite degree of alignment than other parts

  2. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  3. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  4. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Liu, Jianfang; Lv, Qingqing; Gu, Shoudong; Jiao, Xiaoyang; Li, Minjiao; Zhang, Shasha

    2016-09-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radii. Specifically, the levitation force is improved to a maximum degree when the resonance tube radius is slightly larger than the size of the reflector end face. Furthermore, the stability of acoustic levitation device is improved to a maximum degree by introducing a resonance tube of R=1.023λ. The experimental platform and levitation force measurement system of the acoustic levitation device with concave-end-face-type emitter and reflector are developed, and the test of suspended matters and liquid drops is conducted. Results show that the Φ6.5-mm steel ball is suspended easily when the resonance tube radius is 1.023λ, and the Φ5.5-mm steel ball cannot be suspended when the resonance tube radius is 1.251λ. The levitation capability of the original acoustic levitation device without a resonance tube is weakened when a resonance tube of R=1.251λ is applied. These results are consistent with the ANSYS simulation results. The levitation time of the liquid droplet with a resonance tube of R=1.023λ is longer than without a resonance tube. This result is also supported by the MATLAB simulation results. Therefore, the performance of acoustic levitation device can be improved by introducing a resonant tube with an appropriate radius.

  5. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radii. Specifically, the levitation force is improved to a maximum degree when the resonance tube radius is slightly larger than the size of the reflector end face. Furthermore, the stability of acoustic levitation device is improved to a maximum degree by introducing a resonance tube of R=1.023λ. The experimental platform and levitation force measurement system of the acoustic levitation device with concave-end-face-type emitter and reflector are developed, and the test of suspended matters and liquid drops is conducted. Results show that the Φ6.5-mm steel ball is suspended easily when the resonance tube radius is 1.023λ, and the Φ5.5-mm steel ball cannot be suspended when the resonance tube radius is 1.251λ. The levitation capability of the original acoustic levitation device without a resonance tube is weakened when a resonance tube of R=1.251λ is applied. These results are consistent with the ANSYS simulation results. The levitation time of the liquid droplet with a resonance tube of R=1.023λ is longer than without a resonance tube. This result is also supported by the MATLAB simulation results. Therefore, the performance of acoustic levitation device can be improved by introducing a resonant tube with an appropriate radius.

  6. Software for medical image based phantom modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possani, R.G.; Massicano, F.; Coelho, T.S.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2011-01-01

    Latest treatment planning systems depends strongly on CT images, so the tendency is that the dosimetry procedures in nuclear medicine therapy be also based on images, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), to extract anatomical and histological information, as well as, functional imaging or activities map as PET or SPECT. This information associated with the simulation of radiation transport software is used to estimate internal dose in patients undergoing treatment in nuclear medicine. This work aims to re-engineer the software SCMS, which is an interface software between the Monte Carlo code MCNP, and the medical images, that carry information from the patient in treatment. In other words, the necessary information contained in the images are interpreted and presented in a specific format to the Monte Carlo MCNP code to perform the simulation of radiation transport. Therefore, the user does not need to understand complex process of inputting data on MCNP, as the SCMS is responsible for automatically constructing anatomical data from the patient, as well as the radioactive source data. The SCMS was originally developed in Fortran- 77. In this work it was rewritten in an object-oriented language (JAVA). New features and data options have also been incorporated into the software. Thus, the new software has a number of improvements, such as intuitive GUI and a menu for the selection of the energy spectra correspondent to a specific radioisotope stored in a XML data bank. The new version also supports new materials and the user can specify an image region of interest for the calculation of absorbed dose. (author)

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Fluorine-Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A.M.; Goren, S.D.; Nakajima, T.; Vieth, H.-M.; Privalov, A.

    1998-01-01

    To study the origin of semimetal-metal and metal-insulator transformations, localization effects and C-E bonding in fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F, 13 C and 19 F NMR investigations have been carried out for a wide range of fluorine content, 3.8 8, are attributed to mobile fluorine acceptor species which are responsible for the increase of electric conductivity in the dilute compound. When increasing the fluorine content to x ∼ 8 corresponding to the maximum electric conductivity, covalent C-P bonds start to oc- cur. The number of these bonds grows with fluorine content resulting in the decrease in conductivity which is caused by a percolation mechanism rather than by a change in bond length. A difference in 19 F chemical shift for fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F and covalent graphite fluoride (CF) n has been observed and is attributed to different C-P bonding in these compounds

  8. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 199Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, H.; Lutz, O.; Nolle, A.; Schwenk, A.

    1975-01-01

    199 Hg Fourier Transform NMR studies of various solutions of diverse mercury salts in H 2 O and D 2 O or in the appropriate protonated and deuterated acids are reported for both Hg 2 ++ and Hg ++ . In the different solutions investigated the 199 Hg line positions depend on the concentration of the solution, on the solvents and their isotopic composition and on the temperature of the sample. A ratio of the Larmor frequency of 199 Hg and of 2 H in a Hg(NO 3 ) 2 solution in dilute DNO 3 is given. Using this ratio and the measured chemical shifts, a ratio of the Larmor frequencies of 199 Hg for infinite dilution relative to 2 H in pure D 2 O is given. From this a g 1 -factor for 199 Hg is derived and compared with the g 1 -factor of an optical pumping experiment. The resulting shielding constant is sigma (hydrated 199 Hg ++ versus 199 Hg atom) = -24.32(5) x 10 -4 . This yields an atomic reference scale for all measured NMR line shifts of mercury. (orig.) [de

  9. Ferromagnetic resonance study of sputtered NiFe/V/NiFe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayo, W., E-mail: willian.rodriguez@ufpel.edu.br [Departamento de Física – IFM, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, 96010-900 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    The Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/V/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} heterostructures has been produced by magnetron sputtering and analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance. Two systems were investigated: the non symmetrical NiFe(50 Å)/V(t)/NiFe(30 Å) trilayers and the symmetrical NiFe(80 Å)/V(t)/NiFe(80 Å) trilayers, with variable ultrathin V thickness t. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling was evidenced for t below 10 Å by the excitation of the optic mode, in the case of the non symmetrical samples, and by the observation of a single resonance mode for the symmetrical trilayers. For larger V thickness, all samples exhibited two modes, which were attributed to the resonance of the individual NiFe layers with different effective magnetizations. The analysis with the equilibrium and resonance conditions provided the exchange coupling constants and effective magnetizations. - Highlights: • We present a study of symmetrical and non symmetrical NiFe/V/NiFe trilayers deposited on Si single crystals by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) at room temperature. • For the non symmetrical trilayers, the FMR spectra show the optic and acoustic modes for samples with very thin V layer thicknesses, evidencing ferromagnetic exchange coupling, whereas, for larger V thickness, the spectra exhibited two well resolved modes associated to each independent NiFe layer. For the symmetrical trilayers, strong ferromagnetic exchange coupling is evidenced by the observation of a single resonance mode. • The analysis with the equilibrium condition and dispersion relation provides the exchange coupling constants and effective magnetizations.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage: ex vivo study on normal cartilage correlated with magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cova, M.; Frezza, F.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Dalla-Palma, L.; Toffanin, R.; Pozzi-Mucelli, M.; Mlynarik, V.; Vittur, F.

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to compare the MR appearance of normal articular cartilage in ex vivo MR imaging (MRI) and MR microscopy (MRM) images of disarticulated human femoral heads, (b) to evaluate by MRM the topographic variations in articular cartilage of disarticulated human femoral heads, and subsequently, (c) to compare MRM images with histology. Ten disarticulated femoral heads were examined. Magnetic resonance images were obtained using spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) sequences. Microimages were acquired on cartilage-bone cylindrical plugs excised from four regions (superior, inferior, anterior, posterior) of one femoral head, using a modified SE sequence. Both MRI and MRM images were obtained before and after a 90 rotation of the specimen, around the axis perpendicular to the examined cartilage surface. Finally, MRM images were correlated with histology. A trilaminar appearance of articular cartilage was observed with MRI and with a greater detail with MRM. A good correlation between MRI and MRM features was demonstrated. Both MRI and MRM showed a loss of the trilaminar cartilage appearance after specimen rotation, with greater evidence on MRM images. Cartilage excised from the four regions of the femoral head showed a different thickness, being thickest in the samples excised from the superior site. The MRM technique confirms the trilaminar MRI appearance of human articular cartilage, showing good correlation with histology. The loss of the trilaminar appearance of articular cartilage induced by specimen rotation suggests that this feature is partially related to the collagen-fiber orientation within the different layers. The MRM technique also shows topographic variations in thickness of human articular cartilage. (orig.)

  11. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) study of DNA hybridization at single nanoparticle transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Jahr, N.; Jatschka, J.; Csaki, A.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of DNA–DNA interaction on the localized surface plasmon resonance of single 80 nm gold nanoparticles is studied. Therefore, both the attachment of the capture DNA strands at the particle surface and the sequence-specific DNA binding (hybridization) of analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA is subject of investigations. The influence of substrate attachment chemistry, the packing density of DNA as controlled by an assisting layer of smaller molecules, and the distance as increased by a linker on the LSPR efficiency is investigated. The resulting changes in signal can be related to a higher hybridization efficiency of the analyte DNA to the immobilized capture DNA. The subsequent attachment of additional DNA strands to this system is studied, which allows for a multiple step detection of binding and an elucidation of the resulting resonance shifts. The detection limit was determined for the utilized DNA system by incubation with various concentration of analyte DNA. Although the method allows for a marker-free detection, we show that additional markers such as 20 nm gold particle labels increase the signal and thereby the sensitivity significantly. The study of resonance shift for various DNA lengths revealed that the resonance shift per base is stronger for shorter DNA molecules (20 bases) as compared to longer ones (46 bases).

  12. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond

  13. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kispert, Lowell D.; Focsan, A. Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A.; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K.; Dixon, David A.; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car ·+ ) but also neutral radicals ((number s ign)Car · ) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5(prime), and possibly 9 or 9(prime) and 13 or 13(prime). Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car # center d ot# + which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid π-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity (Lycopene (III) versus 8(prime)-apo-β-caroten-8(prime)-al (IV)); hydrogen bonding (Lutein (V) versus III); host (silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve); and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H + from the 5(5(prime)), 9(9(prime)) or 13(13(prime)) methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1 Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I # center d ot# + ...Chl # center d ot# - ), lower in

  14. High resolution study of proton resonances in 65Ga and 67Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for 64 Zn(p,p) from 2.50 to 3.24 MeV and for 66 Zn(p,p) from 2.60 to 3.26 MeV at laboratory angles of 90 0 , 105 0 , 135 0 , and 160 0 . These experiments were performed with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and associated electrostatic analyzer-homogenizer system. The total overall energy resolution was 420 to 525 eV for 64 Zn(p,p) and 360 to 405 eV for 66 Zn(p,p). Resonances observed in the excitation functions were analyzed with a multilevel R-Matrix formalism. Resonance energies, spins, parities, and elastic widths were extracted for 39 resonances in 65 Ga and 148 resonances in 67 Ga. The l = 0 proton strength functions were calculated for 64 Zn and 66 Zn. The s-wave strength function shows an increase for A=66, which is consistent with earlier results from (p,n) cross section studies. Statistical properties of the 1/2 + resonances in 65 Ga and 67 Ga were examined. The spacing and reduced width distributions were compared with the Wigner and Porter-Thomas distributions, respectively. This comparison indicates that 50% of the 1/2 + resonances were missed in 65 Ga and that 70% of the 1/2 + resonances were missed in 67 Ga. The observed s-wave level densities in 65 Ga and 67 Ga are compared with predictions from conventional level density models. The analogs of the 0.867 MeV, the 0.910 MeV, and the 1.370 MeV states of 65 Zn are observed in 65 Ga; the analogs of the 0.093 MeV and the 0.394 MeV states of 67 Zn are observed in 67 Ga. The analog states in 65 Ga were fragmented into only two or three resonances, while the two analog states in 67 Ga were highly fragmented. Fits to the fine structure distributions of these two analogs were obtained and the resulting parameters compared with the Robson model. Coulomb energies were extracted for these five analogs

  15. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on π-conjugated semiconductor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of excitons and charge carriers in π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Degradation behavior of the negative spin-1/2 electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (ELDMR) was observed in Alq3 devices. The increase in the resonance amplitude implies an increasing bipolaron formation during degradation, which might be the result of growth of charge traps in the device. The same behavior of the negative spin-1/2 ELDMR was observed in 2wt% Rubrene doped Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) devices. However, with increasing injection current, a positive spin-1/2 ELDMR, together with positive spin 1 triplet powder patterns at ΔmS=±1 and ΔmS=±2, emerges. Due to the similarities in the frequency dependences of single and double modulated ELDMR and the photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) results in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2 -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenyl ene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, the mechanism for this positive spin-1/2 ELDMR was assigned to enhanced triplet-polaron quenching under resonance conditions. The ELDMR in rubrene doped Alq3 devices provides a path to investigate charge distribution in the device under operational conditions. Combining the results of several devices with different carrier blocking properties and the results from transient EL, it was concluded trions not only exist near buffer layer but also exist in the electron transport layer. This TPQ model can also be used to explain the positive spin-1/2 PLDMR in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films at low temperature and in MEH-PPV films at various temperatures up to room temperature. Through quantitative analysis, TE-polaron quenching (TPQ) model is shown having the ability to explain most behaviors of the positive spin-1/2 resonance. Photocurrent detected magnetic resonance (PCDMR) studies on MEH-PPV devices revealed a novel transient resonance signal. The signal

  16. Design studies of heavy ion linear accelerators constructed of independently phased spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Armstrong, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are reported for two linear accelerators for heavy ions. One accelerator is a high-intensity machine which would operate with 100 percent duty factor and would produce tin ions with 6.1 MeV/A. Alternatively, it could be operated under pulsed conditions with 25 percent duty factor and would then accelerate uranium ions to 8.1 MeV/A, tin ions to 10.5 MeV/A, and all lighter ions to higher velocities. It would be injected with a positive multicharge ion source and a 4-MV single-ended dc generator. Also, design studies are reported for small postaccelerator injected by a model FN tandem. Both accelerators use three-drift-tube spiral resonators operating at room temperature. Magnetic quadrupole singlets are placed between all resonators to provide radial focussing. Each resonator is independently phased according to the velocity of the ion to be accelerated. The ability to adjust the phase of each resonator permits variations in final energy and other beam properties with great flexibility. (U.S.)

  17. Contribution to the Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Ferromagnets; Contribution a l'etude de la resonance nucleaire dans les corps ferromagnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    Properties of nuclear magnetic resonance in the field acting on the nucleus in a ferromagnet were studied. Nuclei were {sup 57}Fe in iron and yttrium iron garnet. Static properties of resonance (frequency, line-width, dipolar structure) were investigated and compared with magnetic behavior and magnetic structure of the materials. Relaxation in garnet points out importance of long range fluctuations induced by impurities in a ferromagnetic lattice. (author) [French] Nous avons etudie les proprietes de la resonance nucleaire dans le champ existant a remplacement d'un noyau dans un corps ferromagnetique (champ local). Les noyaux etaient ceux de {sup 57}Fe dans le fer et dans le grenat d'yttrium et de fer. Les proprietes statiques de la resonance (frequence de resonance, largeur de la raie, structures dues a l'interaction dipolaire) ont ete etudiees et reliees aux caracteristiques magnetiques et a la structure de ces corps. La relaxation dans le grenat a mis en evidence les fluctuations a longue distance induites par des impuretes dans un reseau ferromagnetique. (auteur)

  18. Contribution to the Study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Ferromagnets; Contribution a l'etude de la resonance nucleaire dans les corps ferromagnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    Properties of nuclear magnetic resonance in the field acting on the nucleus in a ferromagnet were studied. Nuclei were {sup 57}Fe in iron and yttrium iron garnet. Static properties of resonance (frequency, line-width, dipolar structure) were investigated and compared with magnetic behavior and magnetic structure of the materials. Relaxation in garnet points out importance of long range fluctuations induced by impurities in a ferromagnetic lattice. (author) [French] Nous avons etudie les proprietes de la resonance nucleaire dans le champ existant a remplacement d'un noyau dans un corps ferromagnetique (champ local). Les noyaux etaient ceux de {sup 57}Fe dans le fer et dans le grenat d'yttrium et de fer. Les proprietes statiques de la resonance (frequence de resonance, largeur de la raie, structures dues a l'interaction dipolaire) ont ete etudiees et reliees aux caracteristiques magnetiques et a la structure de ces corps. La relaxation dans le grenat a mis en evidence les fluctuations a longue distance induites par des impuretes dans un reseau ferromagnetique. (auteur)

  19. Using stationary image based data collection method for evaluation of traffic sign condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Khalilikhah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transportation asset management helps monitor the transportation systems and optimize the construction, operation, and maintenance of assets. Many state Department of Transportations (DOTs have already established asset management systems for high cost and low quantity assets, e.g., bridge and tunnel assets. However, due to the sheer number of traffic signs deployed by DOTs, statewide sign inventory and condition information are not well developed. Currently, using handheld devices is the most selected method by agencies to measure signs. To address safety challenge and high cost of data collection, an innovative stationary image based method has recently been proposed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of such image based method over using handheld devices in terms of the accuracy, possibility and consistency of data, speed, safety, maintenance, and cost. At its completion, this study provides suggestions to tackle the issues associated with image based method.

  20. Thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, V; Veeraraghavan, R; Sastry, M D

    2003-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on uranium doped calcium phosphate yielded mechanistic information on the observed glow peaks at 365, 410 and 450 K. TSL spectral studies of the glow peaks showed that UO sub 2 sup 2 sup + acts as the luminescent center. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on gamma-irradiated samples revealed that the predominant radiation induced centers are H sup 0 , PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - , PO sub 3 sup 2 sup - and O sup - ion. Studies on the temperature dependence studies of the EPR spectra of samples annealed to different temperatures indicate the role of H sup 0 and PO sub 4 sup 2 sup - ions in the main glow peak at 410 K.

  1. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform; Algoritmo para reconstrucao tridimensional de imagens de tomografos de ressonancia magnetica e de raio-X baseado no uso de Transformada Rapida de Fourier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas; Cruvinel, Paulo E. [EMBRAPA, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). CNPDIA

    1995-12-31

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Real time hybridization studies by resonant waveguide gratings using nanopattern imaging for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle

    2013-12-20

    2D imaging of biochips is particularly interesting for multiplex biosensing. Resonant properties allow label-free detection using the change of refractive index at the chip surface. We demonstrate a new principle of Scanning Of Resonance on Chip by Imaging (SORCI) based on spatial profiles of nanopatterns of resonant waveguide gratings (RWGs) and its embodiment in a fluidic chip for real-time biological studies. This scheme allows multiplexing of the resonance itself by providing nanopattern sensing areas in a bioarray format. Through several chip designs we discuss resonance spatial profiles, dispersion and electric field distribution for optimal light-matter interaction with biological species of different sizes. Fluidic integration is carried out with a black anodized aluminum chamber, advantageous in term of mechanical stability, multiple uses of the chip, temperature control and low optical background. Real-time hybridization experiments are illustrated by SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) detection in gyrase A of E. coli K12, observed in evolution studies of resistance to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. We choose a 100 base pairs (bp) DNA target (∼30 kDa) including the codon of interest and demonstrate the high specificity of our technique for probes and targets with close affinity constants. This work validates the safe applicability of our unique combination of RWGs and simple instrumentation for real-time biosensing with sensitivity in buffer solution of ∼10 pg/mm2. Paralleling the success of RWGs sensing for cells sensing, our work opens new avenues for a large number of biological studies. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media.

  3. Developing students’ ideas about lens imaging: teaching experiments with an image-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusche, Sascha

    2017-07-01

    Lens imaging is a classic topic in physics education. To guide students from their holistic viewpoint to the scientists’ analytic viewpoint, an image-based approach to lens imaging has recently been proposed. To study the effect of the image-based approach on undergraduate students’ ideas, teaching experiments are performed and evaluated using qualitative content analysis. Some of the students’ ideas have not been reported before, namely those related to blurry lens images, and those developed by the proposed teaching approach. To describe learning pathways systematically, a conception-versus-time coordinate system is introduced, specifying how teaching actions help students advance toward a scientific understanding.

  4. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  5. Brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury: an exploratory study by repeated magnetic resonance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannsjö, Marianne; Raininko, Raili; Bustamante, Mariana; von Seth, Charlotta; Borg, Jörgen

    2013-09-01

    To explore brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury by repeated magnetic resonance examination. A prospective follow-up study. Nineteen patients with mild traumatic brain injury presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 14-15. The patients were examined on day 2 or 3 and 3-7 months after the injury. The magnetic resonance protocol comprised conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), two susceptibility-weighted sequences to reveal haemorrhages, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Computer-aided volume comparison was performed. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). At follow-up, 7 patients (37%) reported ≥  3 symptoms in RPQ, 5 reported some anxiety and 1 reported mild depression. Fifteen patients reported upper level of good recovery and 4 patients lower level of good recovery (GOSE 8 and 7, respectively). Magnetic resonance pathology was found in 1 patient at the first examination, but 4 patients (21%) showed volume loss at the second examination, at which 3 of them reported GOSE scores of 8. Loss of brain volume, demonstrated by computer-aided magnetic resonance imaging volumetry, may be a feasible marker of brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

  6. Theoretical study of ferromagnetic resonance in exchange - coupled magnetic / nonmagnetic / magnetic multilayer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdogan, K.; Oezdemir, M.; Yalcin, O.; Aktas, B.

    2002-01-01

    The dispersion relation on ferromagnetic films was calculation by using torque equation of motion with a damping term. The total energy including zeeman, demagnetizing and anisotropy energy terms was used to get ferromagnetic resonance frequency for both uniform and higher order spin wave modes. In antiferromagnetic films, the torque equation of motion for each sub-lattice were written to derive an expression for the dispersion relation. The magnetic trilayer system under investigation consist of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic layer. The dispersion relation of magnetic/nonmagnetic/magnetic three layers is calculated by using Landau-Lifshitz dynamic equation of motion for the magnetization with interlayer exchange energy. As for the exchange-coupled resonance of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), the theoretical study has been calculated for both symmetrical and asymmetrical structures. In this systems, the exchange-coupling parameter A 12 between neighboring layers was used to get resonance fields as a function of the angle between the magnetization vectors of each magnetic layers

  7. Study of hyperon-pion resonances from kaonic absorption with KLOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez Doce Oton

    2015-01-01

    The study of the antiK-hadron interactions inside the drift chamber of KLOE was initiated in order to search for signals from the formation of deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and the study of resonances like the Λ(1405 and the Σ(1385, and constitute a first step towards the preparation of the AMADEUS experiment at DAFNE, the e+e− collider of the Frascati National Laboratories (Italy of INFN.

  8. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwen eSong; Zhiling eZou; Juan eKou; Yang eLiu; LiZhuang eYang; Anna ezilverstand; Federicod’Oleire eUquillas; Xiaochu eZhang; Xiaochu eZhang; Xiaochu eZhang

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state...

  9. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  10. A NEW TOOL FOR THE STUDY OF RESONANCE IN CHEMICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Torrens

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to present a computer-based project, for which our program POLAR and our version of PAPID were written for the study of the subject of resonance in chemistry. Both algorithms allow a better didactic strategy and methodological adaptation for the study of molecular properties in chemical education. Teachers will find the options of POLAR and PAPID useful for demonstrations. It is still to be explored the methodological application of these computational programs enriching the present teaching techniques. Implementing new algorithms in learning situations is technically simple, but checking their usefulness in teaching practice is extraordinarily complex and requires a research that has hardly begun. The topic of resonance in chemistry represents an opportunity for the integration of teaching and research into the European Space for Higher Education.

  11. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  12. Studies on the resonant properties in the asymmetric dipole-array terahertz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhou, Qingli; Li, Chenyu; Shi, Lan; Liu, Changxiang; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    Artificial metamaterials with appropriate design can exhibit unique electromagnetic phenomena which do not exist in natural materials. Some studies have shown that the method of breaking the geometric symmetry is capable to modify the electromagnetic response, such as the metamaterial induced transparency in the Fano resonators. In this work, by using the finite-difference time-domain method, we firstly simulate the process that terahertz wave interacts with double-bar structures, in which one bar length is fixed at 36 μm and the other bar length is set to be 12, 24, 36, 48, and 56 μm, respectively. The incident terahertz polarization is along the bar direction. Simulated results show when the variable bar length is less than 36 μm, there is only one obvious resonant dip in transmission spectrum. Meanwhile, with the decreased bar length, this dip frequency presents a slight blueshift. Additionally, by tuning the spacing vertical to bar direction between these two bars, it still exhibits one dip. This result indicates the short bar less than 36 μm does not play important role and the coupling between vertical bars is weak. However, when the variable bar length is larger than 36 μm there are two obvious Fano-shaped resonant dips. With the increased bar length, the low-frequency dip shows a remarkable redshift, while the high-frequency one is almost unchanged. By further tuning the bar spacing vertical to the bar direction, two dips always exist. This phenomenon implies that the coupling between horizontal bars is dominated in this process. Moreover, the metamaterial induced transparency window is found between two resonant dips. The appearance of the resonances is attributed to the excitation of trapped mode. Our obtained results indicate that such metamaterials with very simple configuration could also provide the potential application in the field of terahertz slow-light devices, amplitude and phase modulators.

  13. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off,

  14. Study by magnetic resonance and relaxation of carbon 13 of some paramagnetic coordination complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronfard-Haret, Jean-Claude

    1977-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of coordination complexes by using NMR. After a brief recall of the theoretical background required for the processing of experimental data (hyper-fine coupling and magnetic resonance, spin density distribution, chemical displacement, dipolar, scalar and electronic relaxation), the author describes the conditions in which experiments have been performed and presents measurement methods (pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, relaxation time measurement, determination of hyper-fine coupling constants, spectrometers and reactants). The next chapters address the study of different coordination complexes: [(pyridine-N-oxide) 2 Ni(acetylacetonate) 2 ], carbon 13 in alkyl-anilines-Ni II, complexation of 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene by transition ions, complexation of pyridine-N-oxide by the nickel Ni ++ ion in presence of water

  15. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study

    OpenAIRE

    Chalavi Sima; Simmons Andrew; Dijkstra Hildebrand; Barker Gareth J; Reinders AAT Simone

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in ...

  16. High-pressure electron-resonance studies of electronic, magnetic, and structural phase transitions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pifer, J.H.; Croft, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Research is described in development of a high-pressure electron-resonance probe capable of operating down to 1.5 0 K temperatures. The apparatus has been used to measure the EPR of a sample of DPPH at room temperature and zero pressure. EPR has been used to measure valence field instabilities in alloy systems. Studies have been done on metal-insulator transitions at high pressure, and are briefly described

  17. Gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (chapter 2 contains a short description of this method). Three chapters are mainly concerned with mechanistic aspects of gas phase ion/molecule reactions. An equally important aspect of the thesis is the stability and reactivity of α-thio carbanions, dipole stabilized carbanions and homoenolate anions, dealt with in the other four chapters. (Auth.)

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis study by magnetic resonance. A not frequent pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, J.; Miralles, S.; Singerman, L.; Neuman, J.

    2007-01-01

    The cerebral venous thrombosis constitutes a neurological disorder not frequent, potentially reversible with a early diagnosis. Exist multiple causative factors and its clinical manifestation is diverse, for which the images studies represents the first diagnostic when it is clinically suspected. The intention of the work is to carry out a bibliographical review of the cerebral venous thrombosis and to show the sequences for magnetic nuclear resonance for the diagnosis [es

  19. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present stu...

  20. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of prion peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Jonathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    High-resolution structural studies using x-ray diffraction and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are not feasible for proteins of low volubility and high tendency to aggregate. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) is in principle capable of providing structural information in such systems, however to do this efficiently and accurately, further SSNMR tools must be developed This dissertation describes the development of three new methods and their application to a biological system of interest, the priori protein (PrP).

  1. Study of titanium nitride elasticity characteristics in the homogeneity range by ultrasonic resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Khajdarov, T.

    1995-01-01

    Elasticity characteristics of cubic and tetragonal phases of titanium nitride in the homogeneity range were studied for the first time by ultrasonic resonance method. It is established that the Young modulus, the shift and volume module of cubic titanium nitride elasticity in the homogeneity range change nonlinearly with decrease in nitrogen concentration and correlate with concentration dependences of other physical properties.15 refs., 2 figs

  2. Cognitive Modules Utilized for Narrative Comprehension in Children: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Holland, Scott K.; Plante, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The ability to comprehend narratives constitutes an important component of human development and experience. The neural correlates of auditory narrative comprehension in children were investigated in a large-scale functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study involving 313 subjects ages 5–18. Using group Independent Component Analysis (ICA), bilateral task-related components were found comprising the primary auditory cortex, the mid-superior temporal gyrus, the hippocampus, the angular g...

  3. Electron spin resonance study of the demagnetization fields of the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Gimazov, Yu.I. Talanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the electron spin resonance study of the La1-xCaxMnO3 manganite and the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl thin films for the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to plane of the films are presented. The temperature dependence of the demagnetizing field is obtained. The parameters of the Curie-Weiss law are estimated for the paramagnetic thin film.

  4. Free Surface Waves And Interacting Bouncing Droplets: A Parametric Resonance Case Study

    KAUST Repository

    Borja, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Parametric resonance is a particular type of resonance in which a parameter in a system changes with time. A particularly interesting case is when the parameter changes in a periodic way, which can lead to very intricate behavior. This di↵ers from periodic forcing in that solutions are not necessarily periodic. A system in which parametric resonance is realized is when a fluid bath is shaken periodically, which leads to an e↵ective time dependent gravitational force. This system will be used to study the onset of surface waves in a bath with non-uniform topography. A linear model for the surface waves is derived from the Euler equations in the limit of shallow waves, which includes the geometry of the bottom and surface tension. Experiments are performed to compare with the proposed model and good qualitative agreement is found. Another experiment which relies on a shaking fluid bath is that of bouncing fluid droplets. In the case of two droplets the shaking allows for a larger bouncing droplet to attract a smaller moving droplet in a way that creates a bound system. This bound system is studied and shows some analogous properties to quantum systems, so a quantum mechanical model for a two dimensional atom is studied, as well as a proposed model for the droplet-wave system in terms of equations of fluid mechanics.

  5. Free Surface Waves And Interacting Bouncing Droplets: A Parametric Resonance Case Study

    KAUST Repository

    Borja, Francisco J.

    2013-07-01

    Parametric resonance is a particular type of resonance in which a parameter in a system changes with time. A particularly interesting case is when the parameter changes in a periodic way, which can lead to very intricate behavior. This di↵ers from periodic forcing in that solutions are not necessarily periodic. A system in which parametric resonance is realized is when a fluid bath is shaken periodically, which leads to an e↵ective time dependent gravitational force. This system will be used to study the onset of surface waves in a bath with non-uniform topography. A linear model for the surface waves is derived from the Euler equations in the limit of shallow waves, which includes the geometry of the bottom and surface tension. Experiments are performed to compare with the proposed model and good qualitative agreement is found. Another experiment which relies on a shaking fluid bath is that of bouncing fluid droplets. In the case of two droplets the shaking allows for a larger bouncing droplet to attract a smaller moving droplet in a way that creates a bound system. This bound system is studied and shows some analogous properties to quantum systems, so a quantum mechanical model for a two dimensional atom is studied, as well as a proposed model for the droplet-wave system in terms of equations of fluid mechanics.

  6. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vogel, S.C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R.O.; Brown, D.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1–1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  7. Income generated by women treated with magnetic resonance imaging-based brachytherapy: A simulation study evaluating the macroeconomic benefits of implementing a high-end technology in a public sector healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Santam; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Chopra, Supriya; Lewis, Shirley; Hande, Vinod; Gudi, Shivakumar; Krishnatry, Rahul; Engineer, Reena; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    To estimate the difference in income generated if all women presenting in our institute over a 5-year period were treated with MRI-based image-guided brachytherapy (MR-IGBT) instead of conventional radiograph-based brachytherapy (CR-BT). Outcome data from 463 patients (94 treated with MR-IGBT) treated in our institute was used to simulate cumulative women-days of work and cumulative income over 5 years for 5526 patients expected to be treated in this period. The average daily income for a woman was derived from the National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) survey data. Outcomes from both unmatched and propensity score-matched data sets were simulated. The cumulative income in 5 years ranged between Rs 101-168 million if all patients presenting at our institute underwent MR-IGBT. The simulated excess income ranged from Rs 4-45 million after 5 years, which represented 6-66% of the expenditure incurred for acquiring the required equipment and manpower for practicing exclusive MR-IGBT. Using outcome data from a prospective cohort of patients treated with MR-IGBT in our institute, we demonstrated that significant economic gains may be realized if MR-IGBT was used instead of CR-BT. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron Spin Resonance studies on PS, PP and PS/PP blends under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.; Claro, M.; Albano, C.; Venezuela Central University, Caracas; Moronta, D.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies on Polystyrene (PS), Polypropylene (PP) and their mixtures at compositions of 80/20 with and without a compatibilizer (SBS in block), 7.5 wt.%, irradiated with gamma rays from a Cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 4.8 KGy/h at integral doses of radiation of 10, 25, 50, 60, 70, 400, 800 and 1300 KGy in the presence of air and at room temperature (RT) are reported. The dependence of resonance line width, Hpp; resonance line shapes K, and radical concentration, S, with the integral dose of irradiation is investigated. The nature of the free radicals after ten days of air storage is discussed. The free radical concentration, the double integral of the resonance line, S, has been estimated at room temperature, RT, for a group of single lines, characterized by the same giromagnetic, g, value by direct numerical double integration. In the samples studied no spectrum of 0 kGy of integral dose was observed. The concentration of radicals, S, observed when the integral radiation doses was increased, presents a maximum value in the PP samples at high doses (70-1300 kGy) and minimum values in the PS samples with the same doses. This shows that the PP degrades at a faster rate than the PS, owing to the presence of the bencenic ring in the latter. In the PS/PP mixtures studied with and without compatibilizer, the values of the radical concentration is found between the observed values in the homopolymers, being closer to the PS, which might imply that the presence of PS decays the degradation process of the PP in the mixture

  9. A numerical study on acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I Sun; Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator is investigated numerically by adopting linear acoustic analysis. Helmholtz-type resonator is employed as acoustic resonator to suppress acoustic instability passively. The tuning frequency of acoustic resonator is adjusted by varying its length. Through harmonic analysis, acoustic-pressure responses of chamber to acoustic excitation are obtained and the resonant acoustic modes are identified. Acoustic damping effect of acoustic resonator is quantified by damping factor. As the tuning frequency of acoustic resonator approaches the target frequency of the resonant mode to be suppressed, mode split from the original resonant mode to lower and upper modes appears and thereby complex patterns of acoustic responses show up. Considering mode split and damping effect as a function of tuning frequency, it is desirable to make acoustic resonator tuned to broad-band frequencies near the maximum frequency of those of the possible upper modes

  10. A Computational Study on the Magnetic Resonance Coupling Technique for Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-radiative wireless power transfer (WPT system using magnetic resonance coupling (MRC technique has recently been a topic of discussion among researchers. This technique discussed more scenarios in mid-range field of wireless power transmission reflected to the distance and efficiency. The WPT system efficiency varies when the coupling distance between two coils involved changes. This could lead to a decisive issue of high efficient power transfer. This paper presents case studies on the relationship of operating range with the efficiency of the MRC technique. Demonstrative WPT system operates at two different frequencies are projected in order to verify performance. The resonance frequencies used are less than 100MHz within range of 10cm to 20cm.

  11. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles studied with EELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2013-01-01

    We study the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated spherical Ag nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride substrate in the diameter range 3.5–26 nm with monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy. A significant blueshift of the SP resonance energy of 0.5 eV is measured when...... the particle size decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm. We interpret the observed blueshift using three models for a metallic sphere embedded in homogeneous background material: a classical Drude model with a homogeneous electron density profile in the metal, a semiclassical model corrected for an inhomogeneous...... electron density associated with quantum confinement, and a semiclassical nonlocal hydrodynamic description of the electron density. We find that the latter two models provide a qualitative explanation for the observed blueshift, but the theoretical predictions show smaller blueshifts than observed...

  12. Non-conventional ordering studied by magnetic resonance in Fe-doped manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, J.; Siruguri, V.; Barandiaran, J.M.; Pena, A.; Lezama, L.; Rojo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Coexistence of ferromagnetic (FM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases in La 0.7 Pb 0.3 (Mn 1-x Fe x )O 3 (0.1=< x=<0.3) manganites is studied by the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Doping with Fe gives rise to a progressive decrease both in the low-temperature magnetic moment and magnetic order temperature values. Obtained spectra show narrow resonance signals above Curie temperature that transform to asymmetric Dyson-like signals as temperature decreases. The evolution of line width with temperature shows minima that correlate directly with the obtained paramagnetic Curie temperatures. Analysis of spectra above and below magnetic order temperatures reveals features of complex PM to FM transitions and coexistence of both type of phases in a wide range of temperatures

  13. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  14. Motor circuit computer model based on studies of functional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Ramo, Karla Batista; Rodriguez Rojas, Rafael; Carballo Barreda, Maylen

    2012-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a complex network of subcortical nuclei involved in motor control, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processes. Their functioning and interaction with other cerebral structures remains as a subject of debate. The aim of the present work was to simulate the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuitry interaction in motor program selection, supported by functional connectivity pattern obtained by functional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Determination of connections weights between neural populations by functional magnetic resonance imaging, contributed to a more realistic formulation of the model; and consequently to obtain similar results to clinical and experimental data. The network allowed to describe the participation of the basal ganglia in motor program selection and the changes in Parkinson disease. The simulation allowed to demonstrate that dopamine depletion above to 40 % leads to a loss of action selection capability, and to reflect the system adaptation ability to compensate dysfunction in Parkinson disease, coincident with experimental and clinical studies

  15. The clinical study on high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging using Scolopendrid Aquacupuncture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-a Lim

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out the effect of scolopendrid aquacupuncture on low back pain with or without sciatica showing high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging. Methods : The 30 patients who had a diagnosis of high intensity zone by lumbar-MRI and admitted to Gwangju oriental medical hospital in wonkwang university from January 2005 to August 2004 were observed. The symptom of inpatients is low back pain with or without sciatica. We treated 30 patients by scolopendrid aquacupuncture besides the general conservative treatment of oriental medicine. Results and Conclusion : The scolopendrid aquacupuncture treatment led to improvement in the pain and symptom of disability as determined by all efficacy measures. After scolopendrid aquacupuncture treatment, there was improvement in VAS, ROM and SLRT. This results suggest that scolopendrid aquacupuncture is good method for treatment of low back pain with or without sciatica showing high intensity zone of magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Reducing uncertainties in volumetric image based deformable organ registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Yan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Applying volumetric image feedback in radiotherapy requires image based deformable organ registration. The foundation of this registration is the ability of tracking subvolume displacement in organs of interest. Subvolume displacement can be calculated by applying biomechanics model and the finite element method to human organs manifested on the multiple volumetric images. The calculation accuracy, however, is highly dependent on the determination of the corresponding organ boundary points. Lacking sufficient information for such determination, uncertainties are inevitable--thus diminishing the registration accuracy. In this paper, a method of consuming energy minimization was developed to reduce these uncertainties. Starting from an initial selection of organ boundary point correspondence on volumetric image sets, the subvolume displacement and stress distribution of the whole organ are calculated and the consumed energy due to the subvolume displacements is computed accordingly. The corresponding positions of the initially selected boundary points are then iteratively optimized to minimize the consuming energy under geometry and stress constraints. In this study, a rectal wall delineated from patient CT image was artificially deformed using a computer simulation and utilized to test the optimization. Subvolume displacements calculated based on the optimized boundary point correspondence were compared to the true displacements, and the calculation accuracy was thereby evaluated. Results demonstrate that a significant improvement on the accuracy of the deformable organ registration can be achieved by applying the consuming energy minimization in the organ deformation calculation

  17. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. II. Magnetic resonance methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article continues our review of spectroscopic studies of G-protein-coupled receptors. Magnetic resonance methods including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide specific structural and dynamical data for the protein in conjunction with optical methods (vibrational, electronic spectroscopy) as discussed in the accompanying article. An additional advantage is the opportunity to explore the receptor proteins in the natural membrane lipid environment. Solid-state 2H and 13C NMR methods yield information about both the local structure and dynamics of the cofactor bound to the protein and its light-induced changes. Complementary site-directed spin-labeling studies monitor the structural alterations over larger distances and correspondingly longer time scales. A multiscale reaction mechanism describes how local changes of the retinal cofactor unlock the receptor to initiate large-scale conformational changes of rhodopsin. Activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor involves an ensemble of conformational substates within the rhodopsin manifold that characterize the dynamically active receptor.

  18. Self-consistent Study of Fast Particle Redistribution by Alfven Eigenmodes During Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergkvist, T.; Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) excited by fusion born α particles can degrade the heating efficiency of a burning plasma and throw out αs. To experimentally study the effects of excitation of AEs and the redistribution of the fast ions, ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is often used. The distribution function of thermonuclear αs in a reactor is expected to be isotropic and constantly renewed through DT reactions. The distribution function of cyclotron heated ions is strongly anisotropic, and the ICRH do not only renew the distribution function but also provide a strong decorrelation mechanism between the fast ions and the AE. Because of the sensitivity of the AE dynamics on the details of the distribution function, the location of the resonance surfaces in phase space and the extent of the overlapping resonant regions for different AEs, a self-consistent treatment of the AE excitation and the ICRH is necessary. Interactions of fast ions with AEs during ICRH has been implemented in the SELFO code. Simulations are in good agreement with the experimentally observer pitch-fork splitting and rapid damping of the AE as ICRH is turned off. The redistribution of fast ions have been studied in the presence of several driven AEs. (author)

  19. Automated image based prominent nucleoli detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Choon K; Kalaw, Emarene M; Singh, Malay; Chong, Kian T; Giron, Danilo M; Huang, Chao-Hui; Cheng, Li; Law, Yan N; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolar changes in cancer cells are one of the cytologic features important to the tumor pathologist in cancer assessments of tissue biopsies. However, inter-observer variability and the manual approach to this work hamper the accuracy of the assessment by pathologists. In this paper, we propose a computational method for prominent nucleoli pattern detection. Thirty-five hematoxylin and eosin stained images were acquired from prostate cancer, breast cancer, renal clear cell cancer and renal papillary cell cancer tissues. Prostate cancer images were used for the development of a computer-based automated prominent nucleoli pattern detector built on a cascade farm. An ensemble of approximately 1000 cascades was constructed by permuting different combinations of classifiers such as support vector machines, eXclusive component analysis, boosting, and logistic regression. The output of cascades was then combined using the RankBoost algorithm. The output of our prominent nucleoli pattern detector is a ranked set of detected image patches of patterns of prominent nucleoli. The mean number of detected prominent nucleoli patterns in the top 100 ranked detected objects was 58 in the prostate cancer dataset, 68 in the breast cancer dataset, 86 in the renal clear cell cancer dataset, and 76 in the renal papillary cell cancer dataset. The proposed cascade farm performs twice as good as the use of a single cascade proposed in the seminal paper by Viola and Jones. For comparison, a naive algorithm that randomly chooses a pixel as a nucleoli pattern would detect five correct patterns in the first 100 ranked objects. Detection of sparse nucleoli patterns in a large background of highly variable tissue patterns is a difficult challenge our method has overcome. This study developed an accurate prominent nucleoli pattern detector with the potential to be used in the clinical settings.

  20. Automated image based prominent nucleoli detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon K Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nucleolar changes in cancer cells are one of the cytologic features important to the tumor pathologist in cancer assessments of tissue biopsies. However, inter-observer variability and the manual approach to this work hamper the accuracy of the assessment by pathologists. In this paper, we propose a computational method for prominent nucleoli pattern detection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five hematoxylin and eosin stained images were acquired from prostate cancer, breast cancer, renal clear cell cancer and renal papillary cell cancer tissues. Prostate cancer images were used for the development of a computer-based automated prominent nucleoli pattern detector built on a cascade farm. An ensemble of approximately 1000 cascades was constructed by permuting different combinations of classifiers such as support vector machines, eXclusive component analysis, boosting, and logistic regression. The output of cascades was then combined using the RankBoost algorithm. The output of our prominent nucleoli pattern detector is a ranked set of detected image patches of patterns of prominent nucleoli. Results: The mean number of detected prominent nucleoli patterns in the top 100 ranked detected objects was 58 in the prostate cancer dataset, 68 in the breast cancer dataset, 86 in the renal clear cell cancer dataset, and 76 in the renal papillary cell cancer dataset. The proposed cascade farm performs twice as good as the use of a single cascade proposed in the seminal paper by Viola and Jones. For comparison, a naive algorithm that randomly chooses a pixel as a nucleoli pattern would detect five correct patterns in the first 100 ranked objects. Conclusions: Detection of sparse nucleoli patterns in a large background of highly variable tissue patterns is a difficult challenge our method has overcome. This study developed an accurate prominent nucleoli pattern detector with the potential to be used in the clinical settings.

  1. Study on guided-mode resonance characteristic of multilayer dielectric grating with broadband and wide using-angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian-Peng, Wang; Yun-Xia, Jin; Jian-Yong, Ma; Jian-Da, Shao; Zheng-Xiu, Fan

    2010-01-01

    Guided-mode resonance in a diffraction band of multilayer dielectric gratings may lead to a catastrophic result in laser system, especially in the ultrashort pulse laser system, so the inhibition of guided-mode resonance is very important. In this paper the characteristics of guided-mode resonance in multilayer dielectric grating are studied with the aim of better understanding the physical process of guided-mode resonance and designing a broadband multilayer dielectric grating with no guided-mode resonance. By employing waveguide theory, all guided-wave modes appearing in multilayer dielectric grating are found, and the incident conditions, separately, corresponding to each guided-wave mode are also obtained. The electric field enhancement in multilayer dielectric grating is shown obviously. Furthermore, from the detailed analyses on the guided-mode resonance conditions, it is found that the reduction of the grating period would effectively avoid the appearing of guided-mode resonance. And the expressions for calculating maximum periods, which ensure that no guided-mode resonance occurs in the requiring broad angle or wavelength range, are first reported. The above results calculated by waveguide theory and Fourier mode method are compared with each other, and they are coincident completely. Moreover, the method that relies on waveguide theory is more helpful for understanding the guided-mode resonance excited process and analyzing how each parameter affects the characteristic of guided-mode resonance. Therefore, the effects of multilayer dielectric grating parameters, such as period, fill factor, thickness of grating layer, et al., on the guided-mode resonance characteristic are discussed in detail based on waveguide theory, and some meaningful results are obtained. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  2. Image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yucong; Yang, Yang; Yao, Yuan; Li, Shengyuan; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2018-03-01

    Ship structures are subjected to corrosion inevitably in service. Existed image-based methods are influenced by the noises in images because they recognize corrosion by extracting features. In this paper, a novel method of image-based corrosion recognition for ship steel structures is proposed. The method utilizes convolutional neural networks (CNN) and will not be affected by noises in images. A CNN used to recognize corrosion was designed through fine-turning an existing CNN architecture and trained by datasets built using lots of images. Combining the trained CNN classifier with a sliding window technique, the corrosion zone in an image can be recognized.

  3. Nuclear resonance scattering study of iridates, iridium and antimony based pyrochlores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, P.

    2017-04-01

    This thesis shows the first synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy studies on iridium containing compounds and first vibrational spectroscopy on Sb containing compounds carried out at the P01 beamline of PETRA III. In this context, two types of X-ray monochromators have been developed: a monochromator for 73 keV photons with medium energy resolution, and a high-resolution backscattering monochromator based on a sapphire crystal. The monochromator for 73 keV X-rays is the key instrument for hyperfine spectroscopy on Iridium compounds, while the sapphire backscattering monochromator is purposed to vibrational spectroscopy on any Moessbauer resonances with the transition energies in the 20-50 keV range. Additionally, the signal detection for nuclear resonance scattering experiments at the beamline was significantly improved during this work, inspired by the high energies and low lifetimes of the employed resonances. The first synchrotron-based hyperfine spectroscopy on Iridium-containing compounds was demonstrated by NRS on 73 keV resonance in "1"9"3Ir. The results can be interpreted by dynamical theory of nuclear resonance scattering. In this work, special emphasis is set onto the electronic and magnetic properties of Ir nuclei in IrO_2 and in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases of strontium iridates Sr_n_+_1Ir_nO_3_n_+_1 (n=0,1). These systems are well-suited for studies with X-ray scattering techniques, since the scattered signal contains vast information about the widely tunable crystallographic and electronic structure of these systems; furthermore, studies with X-rays are less limited by absorption from iridium as it is the case for neutron scattering experiments. The hyperfine parameters in IrO_2, SrIrO_3 and Sr_2IrO_4 have been measured via Nuclear Forward Scattering for the first time. Using the dynamical theory of NRS, the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine field on Ir nucleus have been determined for

  4. Nuclear resonance scattering study of iridates, iridium and antimony based pyrochlores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, P.

    2017-04-15

    This thesis shows the first synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy studies on iridium containing compounds and first vibrational spectroscopy on Sb containing compounds carried out at the P01 beamline of PETRA III. In this context, two types of X-ray monochromators have been developed: a monochromator for 73 keV photons with medium energy resolution, and a high-resolution backscattering monochromator based on a sapphire crystal. The monochromator for 73 keV X-rays is the key instrument for hyperfine spectroscopy on Iridium compounds, while the sapphire backscattering monochromator is purposed to vibrational spectroscopy on any Moessbauer resonances with the transition energies in the 20-50 keV range. Additionally, the signal detection for nuclear resonance scattering experiments at the beamline was significantly improved during this work, inspired by the high energies and low lifetimes of the employed resonances. The first synchrotron-based hyperfine spectroscopy on Iridium-containing compounds was demonstrated by NRS on 73 keV resonance in {sup 193}Ir. The results can be interpreted by dynamical theory of nuclear resonance scattering. In this work, special emphasis is set onto the electronic and magnetic properties of Ir nuclei in IrO{sub 2} and in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases of strontium iridates Sr{sub n+1}Ir{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} (n=0,1). These systems are well-suited for studies with X-ray scattering techniques, since the scattered signal contains vast information about the widely tunable crystallographic and electronic structure of these systems; furthermore, studies with X-rays are less limited by absorption from iridium as it is the case for neutron scattering experiments. The hyperfine parameters in IrO{sub 2}, SrIrO{sub 3} and Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} have been measured via Nuclear Forward Scattering for the first time. Using the dynamical theory of NRS, the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine field

  5. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus and boron in coals and combustion residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchill, P.; Howarth, O.W.; Richards, D.G.; Sword, B.J. (British Coal Corporation, Stoke Orchard (UK). Coal Research Establishment)

    1990-04-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS-n.m.r.) was used to study the occurrence of phosphorus and boron in coal, and their fate on combustion. These elements are only minor components of coal, but may significantly influence the utilization properties. {sup 31} P MAS-n.m.r. spectroscopy has confirmed that phosphorus is present in coal predominantly as apatite. This mineral is thermally stable under oxidizing conditions, and survives largely unaltered in high temperature ashes. However, under the semi-reducing bed conditions of certain stoker-fired boilers, it may be decomposed, volatilizing the phosphorus. The {sup 31}P MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show phosphorus in a markedly different coordination environment to that in apatite, the chemical shift suggesting aluminium phosphate or boron phosphate. {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of coals exhibit resonances due to both trigonal and tetrahedrally coordinated boron. Trigonal boron is probably present as tourmaline, but the nature of the tetrahedral boron is less certain; it may be held in tetrahedral sites within certain clay minerals. In common with phosphorus, boron may be volatilized during combustion. The {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show a tetrahedral resonance with a chemical shift quite consistent with that of boron phosphate. 39 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Energy-loss of He ions in carbon allotropes studied by elastic resonance in backscattering spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo, E-mail: tosaki.mitsuo.3v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Rauhala, Eero [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-10-01

    Backscattering spectra for {sup 4}He ions incident on carbon allotropes have been measured in the energy range from 4.30 to 4.95 MeV in steps of 50–100 keV at scattering angles of 106° and 170°. We used three carbon allotropes: graphite, diamond and amorphous carbon. For all these allotropes, we can observe the sharp ({sup 4}He, {sup 12}C) elastic nuclear resonance at the He ion energy of 4.265 MeV in the backscattering spectra. By varying the incident He energy, we have systematically analyzed the profiles of the resonance peaks to study the energy-loss processes: stopping cross-sections and energy-loss straggling around the interesting region of the stopping maximum at about 500 keV. We focus on the resonance profiles and investigate an allotropic effect concerning the energy-loss. Furthermore, an energy bunching effect on the straggling is presented and the mechanism is discussed.

  7. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz

  8. Tsunami Induced Resonance in Enclosed Basins; Case Study of Haydarpasa Port In Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kian, Rozita; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey; Aytore, Betul

    2015-04-01

    Coincidence of the frequency of forcing mechanisms and the natural frequency of free oscillations in the harbors or basins leads to formation of resonance oscillations and additional amplifications in the basins. This phenomenon becomes much more critical when it is caused by a tsunamis. In the cases of tsunami induced basin resonances, the wave amplifications may occur with more and unexpected damages. The harbor resilience against the marine hazards is important for the performance and success of recovery operations. Classifying the tsunami effects on the ports and harbors and on their functions is the main concern of this study. There are two types of impacts; direct impacts including structural damages due to strong currents, high water elevation and indirect ones because of basin resonance expose to seiche oscillations. The sea of Marmara has experienced numerous (more than 30) tsunamis in history where a highly populated metropolitan city Istanbul is located at North coast of Maramara sea. There are numerous ports and harbors located at Istanbul Coast. Haydarpasa port (41.0033 N, 29.0139 E) in Istanbul coast near Marmara sea, as a case study is selected to test its resilience under tsunami attack by numerical experiments. There are two breakwaters in Haydarpasa port with total length of three kilometers and the shape of basins are regular. Applying numerical model (NAMI DANCE) which solves nonlinear form of shallow water equations, the resonance oscillations in Haydarpasa Port is investigated by following the method given in Yalciner and Pelinovsky, (2006). In the applications, high resolution bathymetry and topography are used and an initial impulse is inputted to the study domain in the simulations. The computed time histories of water surface fluctuations at different locations inside the harbor are analyzed by using Fast Fourier Transform technique. The frequencies where the peaks of spectrum curves indicates the amplification of waves in the respective

  9. Er3+ impurities in KTiOPO4 studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, D; MartIn, A; Carvajal, J J; Aguilo, M; DIaz, F; Lopez, F J

    2006-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of Er 3+ ions in single crystals of KTiOPO 4 (KTP) is presented. The EPR spectra show the existence of eight different Er 3+ centres. The g-matrix has been determined for all eight centres from the analysis of the angular dependences of the spectrum in three planes of the crystal. This study provides strong evidence about incorporation of erbium in the low-symmetry K + sites of KTP. Possible reasons for the appearance of such a large number of Er 3+ centres are discussed

  10. Theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering for NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, A.; Matsubara, M.; Uozumi, T.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Fracassi, F.; Dallera, C.; Tagliaferri, A.; Brookes, N.B.; Braicovich, L.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra for Ni 2p to 3d excitation and 3d to 2p de-excitation of NiO are studied both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical calculations with a single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) describe the charge transfer (CT) and d-d excitations in RIXS, and detailed study is made for the CT energy. High resolution RIXS measurements reveal the precise d-d excitation structure and its polarization dependence, and they are well reproduced by the SIAM calculation

  11. Study of resonant magnet exciting system for the 3 GeV proton synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, Shoichiro; Zhang, Fengqing; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tani, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Adachi, Toshikazu; Someya, Hirohiko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Exciting system for magnets of the 3 GeV Proton synchrotron is under consideration. A resonant exciting system is studied, and two type of power supply are compared. One is a parallel supply that is used generally. Another is a modified series supply. Either of them uses IGBT sinusoidal converters. Capacity of the power converter of the series supply for bending magnets becomes 28.8 MVAp. This is lager more than twice compared with the parallel supply. In the other hand, the series supply has good control performance and flexibility. More study is necessary to decide finally. (author)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease

  13. Simple and robust image-based autofocusing for digital microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Kenny, Kevin B; Tasimi, Krenar; Corwin, Alex D; Dixon, Elizabeth L; Filkins, Robert J

    2008-06-09

    A simple image-based autofocusing scheme for digital microscopy is demonstrated that uses as few as two intermediate images to bring the sample into focus. The algorithm is adapted to a commercial inverted microscope and used to automate brightfield and fluorescence imaging of histopathology tissue sections.

  14. Investigating Image-Based Perception and Reasoning in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephen R.; Handscomb, Kerry; Zaparyniuk, Nicholas E.; Sha, Li; Cimen, O. Arda; Shipulina, Olga V.

    2009-01-01

    Geometry is required for many secondary school students, and is often learned, taught, and assessed more in a heuristic image-based manner, than as a formal axiomatic deductive system. Students are required to prove general theorems, but diagrams are usually used. It follows that understanding how students engage in perceiving and reasoning about…

  15. Image-based fingerprint verification system using LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Singla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Biometric-based identification/verification systems provide a solution to the security concerns in the modern world where machine is replacing human in every aspect of life. Fingerprints, because of their uniqueness, are the most widely used and highly accepted biometrics. Fingerprint biometric systems are either minutiae-based or pattern learning (image based. The minutiae-based algorithm depends upon the local discontinuities in the ridge flow pattern and are used when template size is important while image-based matching algorithm uses both the micro and macro feature of a fingerprint and is used if fast response is required. In the present paper an image-based fingerprint verification system is discussed. The proposed method uses a learning phase, which is not present in conventional image-based systems. The learning phase uses pseudo random sub-sampling, which reduces the number of comparisons needed in the matching stage. This system has been developed using LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench toolbox version 6i. The availability of datalog files in LabVIEW makes it one of the most promising candidates for its usage as a database. Datalog files can access and manipulate data and complex data structures quickly and easily. It makes writing and reading much faster. After extensive experimentation involving a large number of samples and different learning sizes, high accuracy with learning image size of 100 100 and a threshold value of 700 (1000 being the perfect match has been achieved.

  16. Image based brachytherapy planning with special reference to gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and one of the most frequent malignancies in Europe and in North America. In addition endometrium, vagina and vulva cancer are treated with brachytherapy. Especially for locally advanced cervix cancer the integration of image based brachytherapy planning into clinical routine is becoming a new standard for the future

  17. Reconfigurable pipelined sensing for image-based control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, R.; Stuijk, S.; Goswami, D.; Basten, T.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based control systems are becoming common in domains such as robotics, healthcare and industrial automation. Coping with a long sample period because of the latency of the image processing algorithm is an open challenge. Modern multi-core platforms allow to address this challenge by pipelining

  18. Angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The project dealt with angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei. Both partial projects were worked in the period of the report. (orig.) [de

  19. Incidental findings are frequent in young healthy individuals undergoing magnetic resonance imaging in brain research imaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Siebner, Hartwig R; Deuschl, Günther

    2010-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about how to handle incidental findings (IF) detected in healthy individuals who participate in research-driven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. There are currently no established guidelines regarding their management....

  20. Real time hybridization studies by resonant waveguide gratings using nanopattern imaging for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Kodzius, Rimantas; Yue, Weisheng; Chen, Longqing; Li, Shunbo; Zhang, Xixiang; Bé nisty, Henri; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    2D imaging of biochips is particularly interesting for multiplex biosensing. Resonant properties allow label-free detection using the change of refractive index at the chip surface. We demonstrate a new principle of Scanning Of Resonance on Chip

  1. Fast magnetic resonance fingerprinting for dynamic contrast-enhanced studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuning; Wang, Charlie Y; Anderson, Christian E; Liu, Yuchi; Hu, He; Johansen, Mette L; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro; Brady-Kalnay, Susann; Griswold, Mark A; Flask, Chris A; Yu, Xin

    2018-05-09

    The goal of this study was to develop a fast MR fingerprinting (MRF) method for simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies in mice. The MRF sequences based on balanced SSFP and fast imaging with steady-state precession were implemented and evaluated on a 7T preclinical scanner. The readout used a zeroth-moment-compensated variable-density spiral trajectory that fully sampled the entire k-space and the inner 10 × 10 k-space with 48 and 4 interleaves, respectively. In vitro and in vivo studies of mouse brain were performed to evaluate the accuracy of MRF measurements with both fully sampled and undersampled data. The application of MRF to dynamic T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies were demonstrated in a mouse model of heterotopic glioblastoma using gadolinium-based and dysprosium-based contrast agents. The T 1 and T 2 measurements in phantom showed strong agreement between the MRF and the conventional methods. The MRF with spiral encoding allowed up to 8-fold undersampling without loss of measurement accuracy. This enabled simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping with 2-minute temporal resolution in DCE-MRI studies. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting provides the opportunity for dynamic quantification of contrast agent distribution in preclinical tumor models on high-field MRI scanners. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging

  3. A microscopic study of giant resonances in nuclei near drip lines

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H; Zhang, X Z

    1999-01-01

    We study giant resonances using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculation plus the random phase approximation with Skyrme interactions. Including simultaneously both the isoscalar and the isovector correlation the RPA response function is calculated in the coordinate space so as to take properly into account the continuum effect. Giant monopole states are discussed in relation with the nuclear compression modulus of the nuclear matter K sub n sub m. The core polarization charges are also discussed in comparison with recent empirical data in sup 1 sup 0 sup 0 Sn region.

  4. Nuclear Fusion Rate Study of a Muonic Molecule via Nuclear Threshold Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, F.; Eskandari, M. R.

    This work follows our previous calculations of the ground state binding energy, size, and the effective nuclear charge of the muonic T3 molecule, using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. In our past articles, we showed that the system possesses two minimum positions, the first one at the muonic distance and the second at the atomic distance. Also, the symmetric planner vibrational model assumed between the two minima and the approximated potential were calculated. Following from the previous studies, we now calculate the fusion rate of the T3 muonic molecule according to the overlap integral of the resonance nuclear compound nucleus and the molecular wave functions.

  5. High resolution resonance studies with the (p,p) and (p,α) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilpuch, E.G.; Mitchell, G.E.; Brooks, W.

    1985-01-01

    Recently the authors have extended their high resolution studies to targets with spin. A series of measurements on non-zero spin targets in the 2s-1d shell is now in progress. In section b the analysis of resonance data for targets with spin is described, with emphasis on s and l mixing. In sections c and d the authors briefly summarize the published data on 27 Al and 25 Mg, while in sections e, f, and g preliminary results for 33 S, 39 K, and 23 Na are described. The relevance of the entrance channel relative phase to a class of parity mixing experiments is discussed in section h

  6. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1...... echoes. Applying biexponential curve analysis, a significant deviation from a monoexponential behaviour was recognized at a ratio of corresponding relaxation rates of about 3 and 2, estimating T1 and T2 relaxation, respectively (p less than 0.01, F-test). Requiring an SD less than or equal to 10 per cent...

  7. Chiral Domain Structure in Superfluid 3He-A Studied by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Nishioka, K.; Takagi, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    2018-05-01

    The existence of a spatially varying texture in superfluid 3He is a direct manifestation of the complex macroscopic wave function. The real space shape of the texture, namely, a macroscopic wave function, has been studied extensively with the help of theoretical modeling but has never been directly observed experimentally with spatial resolution. We have succeeded in visualizing the texture by a specialized magnetic resonance imaging. With this new technology, we have discovered that the macroscopic chiral domains, of which sizes are as large as 1 mm, and corresponding chiral domain walls exist rather stably in 3He - A film at temperatures far below the transition temperature.

  8. Nonperturbative study of the damping of giant resonances in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Blasio, F.V.; Cassing, W.; Tohyama, M.; Bortignon, P.F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The damping of dipole and quadrupole motion in 16 O and 40 Ca at zero and finite temperature is studied including particle-particle and particle-hole interactions to all orders of perturbation. We find that the dipole dynamics in these light nuclei is well described in terms of mean-field theory (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), while the quadrupole motion is strongly damped through the coupling to more complicated configurations. Both the centroid and the damping width of the quadrupole and dipole giant resonances show a clear stability with temperature as a consequence of the weakening of the interaction, which contrasts with the increase of the phase space

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of ions with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of H 2 + , HeH + , and CO 2 + ions with hydrogen atoms, and the reactions of D 2 + , CO 2 + , CO + , N 2 + and HCN + with deuterium atoms, were studied using ion cyclotron resonance techniques. These reactions proceed predominantly via a charge transfer mechanism. The rate constants measured are: 6.4, 9.1, 1.1, 5.0, 0.84, 0.90, 1.2, and 0.37 x 10 -10 cm 3 /sec, respectively. Hydrocarbon ions of the types CH/sub n/ + and C 2 H/sub n/ + , where n=2--4, do not react with H or D atoms

  10. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  11. Study of loading by beam of dual-resonator structure of linear electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanov, O.S.; Smirnov, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Loading by the beam of the accelerating structure of an Argus dual-resonator linear electron accelerator with a kinetic energy of ∼ 1 MeV and a pulsed beam current of up to 0.5 A is studied experimentally. It is shown that the conditions for stable single-frequency operation of the magnetron are disrupted and the acceleration process is cut off at certain electron-beam currents. Experimental curves of the maximum beam current and maximum electron efficiency of the Argus linear electron accelerator as functions of rf power are given

  12. Studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region using microtrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep; Nguyen Van Do; Nguyen Khac Thi; Truong Thi An; Nguyen Ngoc Son

    2004-01-01

    Microtrons are accelerators of electrons and are simultaneous source of Bremsstrahlung photon flux and fission neutrons. In 1982, a microtron of seventeen trajectories Microtron MT - 17 was put into operation at the National Institute of Physics of Vietnam. Though very modest, microtrons are very useful for developing countries such as Vietnam in both fundamental and applied physics research. During the recent years by using the above mentioned MT - 17 and microtrons from other institutes we have carried out different investigation. In this report we present some results obtained in the studies of photonuclear reactions and photon activation analysis in the giant dipole resonance region. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance butterfly coils: Design and application for hyperpolarized 13C studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Attanasio, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pig models enables cardiac metabolism assessment and provides a powerful tool for heart physiology studies, although the low molar concentration of derivate metabolites gives rise to technological limitations in terms of data quality. The desi...... throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Experimental SNR-vs-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), permitted to highlight the performance of the proposed coils configuration. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Comparative study of ultrasound imaging, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hisaaki; Hoshihara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Mitsunao; Suda, Yoshio; Takenaka, Eiichi; Sasa, Hidenori.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 18 patients who were operated at the National Defense Medical College Hospital and confirmed by pathological diagnosis. We compared ultrasound imaging, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patients. MRI was useful to diagnose enlargement of the uterine cavity and a small amount of ascites and to understand orientation of the pelvic organs. Ultrasound imaging is the most useful examination to diagnose gynecological diseases. But when it is difficult to diagnose by ultrasound imaging alone, we should employ either CT or MRI, or preferably both. (author)

  15. Study by electron spin resonance of the free radicals created under irradiation in glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomet, P.; Rassat, A.; Servoz-Gavin, P.; Choudens, H. de

    1967-01-01

    The free radicals created by different radiations in glycine are measured by electron spin resonance and their number is evaluated in function of the absorbed dose. This number decreases when the LET of the radiations increases ; in other words,high LET radiations gives less radiochemical effects; in contrary with the fact that high LET radiations creates more damage in biological materials. The decreasing with time of the number of free radicals and the speed of this decrease is a function of temperature; by the study of the kinetics of this decrease, an attempt has been made to prove the presence of three radicals. (authors) [fr

  16. Lactate quantification by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a clinical MRI machine: a basic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, T.; Muraishi, H.; Matsumura, A.; Kawamura, H.; Shibata, Y.; Anno, I.; Minami, M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish quantification method of lactate concentration by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) carried out using a conventional 1.5-T MRI machine. We used a lactate phantom with known concentrations (1, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 14 mmol/L). As a clinical example, a patient with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was evaluated. Proton MRS was carried out using a clinical 1.5-T super-conducting magnetic resonance whole-body system. Data were acquired by point resolved spectroscopy. A coupling constant of J = 7.35 Hz (2/7 = 272 ms) and two long in-phase echo time of 272 ms and 544 ms were used to calculate the T2 relaxation time. The tissue water signal was used as an internal standard to quantify lactate. The correlation coefficient R between the calculated lactate concentrations and the known concentration of lactate was 0.99 with a constant factor of 0.32 (1/3.14). In patients with MELAS, the lactate concentration measured by MRS was 6.2 mmol/kg wet weight, which is similar to the value obtained in previous studies. In the present study, we have established a reliable method for lactate quantification in a phantom study and have shown a sample of clinical case of MELAS

  17. Improving Docking Performance Using Negative Image-Based Rescoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkinen, Sami T; Niinivehmas, Sanna; Ahinko, Mira; Lätti, Sakari; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Postila, Pekka A

    2018-01-01

    Despite the large computational costs of molecular docking, the default scoring functions are often unable to recognize the active hits from the inactive molecules in large-scale virtual screening experiments. Thus, even though a correct binding pose might be sampled during the docking, the active compound or its biologically relevant pose is not necessarily given high enough score to arouse the attention. Various rescoring and post-processing approaches have emerged for improving the docking performance. Here, it is shown that the very early enrichment (number of actives scored higher than 1% of the highest ranked decoys) can be improved on average 2.5-fold or even 8.7-fold by comparing the docking-based ligand conformers directly against the target protein's cavity shape and electrostatics. The similarity comparison of the conformers is performed without geometry optimization against the negative image of the target protein's ligand-binding cavity using the negative image-based (NIB) screening protocol. The viability of the NIB rescoring or the R-NiB, pioneered in this study, was tested with 11 target proteins using benchmark libraries. By focusing on the shape/electrostatics complementarity of the ligand-receptor association, the R-NiB is able to improve the early enrichment of docking essentially without adding to the computing cost. By implementing consensus scoring, in which the R-NiB and the original docking scoring are weighted for optimal outcome, the early enrichment is improved to a level that facilitates effective drug discovery. Moreover, the use of equal weight from the original docking scoring and the R-NiB scoring improves the yield in most cases.

  18. Proof-of-the-Concept Study on Mathematically Optimized Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dževad; Belkić, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based modalities aid breast cancer detection without exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging is very sensitive but costly and insufficiently specific. Molecular imaging through magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can provide information about key metabolites. Here, the measured/encoded time signals cannot be interpreted directly, necessitating mathematics for mapping to the more manageable frequency domain. Conventional applications of MRS are hampered by data analysis via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and postprocessing by fitting techniques. Most in vivo MRS studies on breast cancer rely upon estimations of total choline (tCHO). These have yielded only incremental improvements in diagnostic accuracy. In vitro studies reveal richer metabolic information for identifying breast cancer, particularly in closely overlapping components of tCHO. Among these are phosphocholine (PC), a marker of malignant transformation of the breast. The FFT cannot assess these congested spectral components. This can be done by the fast Padé transform (FPT), a high-resolution, quantification-equipped method, which we presently apply to noisy MRS time signals consistent with those encoded in breast cancer. The FPT unequivocally and robustly extracted the concentrations of all physical metabolites, including PC. In sharp contrast, the FFT produced a rough envelope spectrum with a few distorted peaks and key metabolites absent altogether. As such, the FFT has poor resolution for these typical MRS time signals from breast cancer. Hence, based on Fourier-estimated envelope spectra, tCHO estimates are unreliable. Using even truncated time signals, the FPT clearly distinguishes noise from true metabolites whose concentrations are accurately extracted. The high resolution of the FPT translates directly into shortened examination time of the patient. These capabilities strongly suggest that by applying the FPT to time signals encoded in vivo from

  19. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  20. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number k z is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the k z spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B 0 , and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44 Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  1. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroll J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154–158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ′ data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  2. Understanding disease processes in multiple sclerosis through magnetic resonance imaging studies in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeela Nathoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are exciting new advances in multiple sclerosis (MS resulting in a growing understanding of both the complexity of the disorder and the relative involvement of grey matter, white matter and inflammation. Increasing need for preclinical imaging is anticipated, as animal models provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Magnetic resonance (MR is the key imaging tool used to diagnose and to monitor disease progression in MS, and thus will be a cornerstone for future research. Although gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions on MRI have been useful for detecting MS pathology, they are not correlative of disability. Therefore, new MRI methods are needed. Such methods require validation in animal models. The increasing necessity for MRI of animal models makes it critical and timely to understand what research has been conducted in this area and what potential there is for use of MRI in preclinical models of MS. Here, we provide a review of MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies that have been carried out in animal models of MS that focus on pathology. We compare the MRI phenotypes of animals and patients and provide advice on how best to use animal MR studies to increase our understanding of the linkages between MR and pathology in patients. This review describes how MRI studies of animal models have been, and will continue to be, used in the ongoing effort to understand MS.

  3. The hippocampus in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, G; Braus, D F; Walter, S; Weber-Fahr, W; Henn, F A

    2000-10-01

    We monitored the effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on the nuclear magnetic resonance-detectable metabolites N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds in the hippocampus by means of hydrogen 1 magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. We hypothesized that if ECT-induced memory deterioration was associated with neuronal loss in the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate signal would decrease after ECT and any increased membrane turnover would result in an increase in the signal from choline-containing compounds. Seventeen patients received complete courses of ECT, during which repeated proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies of the hippocampal region were performed. Individual changes during the course of ECT were compared with values obtained in 24 healthy control subjects and 6 patients remitted from major depression without ECT. No changes in the hippocampal N-acetylaspartate signals were detected after ECT. A significant mean increase of 16% of the signal from choline-containing compounds after 5 or more ECT treatments was observed. Despite the mostly unilateral ECT application (14 of 17 patients), the increase in the choline-containing compound signal was observed bilaterally. Lactate or elevated lipid signals were not detected. All patients showed clinical amelioration of depression after ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy is not likely to induce hippocampal atrophy or cell death, which would be reflected by a decrease in the N-acetylaspartate signal. Compared with an age-matched control group, the choline-containing compounds signal in patients with a major depressive episode was significantly lower than normal, before ECT and normalized during ECT.

  4. Postmortem cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in fetuses and children: a masked comparison study with conventional autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew M; Sebire, Neil J; Ashworth, Michael T; Schievano, Silvia; Scott, Rosemary J; Wade, Angie; Chitty, Lyn S; Robertson, Nikki; Thayyil, Sudhin

    2014-05-13

    Perinatal and pediatric autopsies have declined worldwide in the past decade. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of postmortem, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with conventional autopsy and histopathology assessment in fetuses and children. We performed postmortem magnetic resonance imaging in 400 fetuses and children, using a 1.5-T Siemens Avanto magnetic resonance scanner before conventional autopsy. A pediatric CMR imager reported the CMR images, masked to autopsy information. The pathologists were masked to the information from CMR images. The institutional research ethics committee approved the study, and parental consent was obtained. Assuming a diagnostic accuracy of 50%, 400 cases were required for a 5% precision of estimate. Three cases were excluded from analysis, 2 with no conventional autopsy performed and 1 with insufficient CMR sequences performed. Thirty-eight CMR data sets were nondiagnostic (37 in fetuses ≤24 weeks; 1 in a fetus >24 weeks). In the remaining 359 cases, 44 cardiac abnormalities were noted at autopsy. Overall sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of CMR was 72.7% (58.2-83.7%) and 96.2% (93.5-97.8%) for detecting any cardiac pathology, with positive and negative predictive values of 72.7% (58.2-83.7%) and 96.2% (93.5-97.8%), respectively. Higher sensitivity of 92.6% (76.6-97.9%), specificity of 99.1% (97.4-99.7%), positive predictive value of 89.3% (72.8-96.3%), and negative predictive value of 99.4% (97.8-99.8%) were seen for major structural heart disease. Postmortem CMR imaging may be a useful alternative to conventional cardiac autopsy in fetuses and children for detecting cardiac abnormalities. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01417962.

  5. A study of the Roper resonance as a hybrid state from J/ψ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ping, R.G.; Chiang, H.C.; Zou, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of the Roper resonance as a hybrid baryon is investigated through studying the transitional amplitudes in J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N* decays. We begin with perturbative QCD to describe the dynamical process for the J/ψ->3q-bar +3q decay to the lowest order of αs, and by extending the modified quark creation model to the J/ψ energy region to describe the J/ψ->3q-bar +3q+g process. The nonperturbative effects are incorporated by a simple quark model of baryons to evaluate the angular distribution parameters and decay widths for the processes J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N*. From fitting the decay width of J/ψ->γpp-bar to the experimental data, we extract the quark-pair creation strength gI=15.40-bar GeV. Our numerical results for J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N* decays show that the branching ratios for these decays are quite different if the Roper resonance is assumed to be a common 3q state or a pure hybrid state. For testing its mixing properties, we present a scheme to construct the Roper wave function by mixing vertical bar qqqg> state with a normal vertical bar qqq,2s> state. Under this picture, the ratios of the decay widths to that of the J/ψ->pp-bar decay are re-evaluated versus the mixing parameter. A test of the hybrid nature of the Roper resonance in J/ψ decays is discussed

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance study of structure and relaxation of magnetization in NiFe/Ru superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayo, W., E-mail: willian.rodriguez@ufpel.edu.br [Depto. de Física, Univ. Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Landi Jr, S. [Instituto Federal Goiano, Rio Verde 75901-970 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    The structural properties and relaxation processes of magnetization in [Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}(t{sub 1})/Ru(t{sub 2})]{sub N} superlattices (N=number of bilayers) were analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) with a fixed microwave frequency. One series of samples was deposited with constant NiFe layer thickness (t{sub 1}) and variable Ru layer thickness (t{sub 2}); the other series, with constant t{sub 2} and variable t{sub 1}. A single FMR mode was observed for t{sub 2}<15 Å and t{sub 1}>75 Å and it has been attributed to the resonance of the exchange-coupled NiFe layers across the Ru interlayers. For the other values of t{sub 1} and t{sub 2}, several FMR modes appeared and they were associated to non-coupled magnetic phases with different effective magnetization formed during the multilayer growth. The FMR linewidths were analyzed as a function of the magnetic layer thickness and a strong dependence on t{sub 1}{sup −2} was observed. It was attributed to the contribution of the two-magnon scattering mechanism for the linewidth. - Highlights: • We present a study of magnetic properties of NiFe/Ru superlattices by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). • The FMR spectra show several modes for large Ru thicknesses and for low NiFe thicknesses. • The above behavior is correlated with the interlayer exchange coupling. • The two-magnon scattering mechanism is revealed by the dependence of the FMR linewidth on the NiFe thickness.

  7. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, Ilona; Boice, John D; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2005-01-01

    to determine the feasibility of conducting a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based study of rupture incidence. The pilot investigation included a clinical examination by a plastic surgeon, MRI scan, and self-administered questionnaire. The participation rate was 100%. Implants in our study represented a cross...... the other diagnosed all implants as intact. The procedures of the feasibility study proved successful, and the results demonstrate the importance of a rigid image evaluation protocol with employment of well-defined rupture criteria, as well as the benefits of several image readers.......Cosmetic breast implants have become increasingly popular throughout the world. However, there is insufficient knowledge about the frequency and severity of local complications such as rupture and capsular contracture. A pilot study of 25 Finnish women with 50 cosmetic breast implants was organized...

  8. Comparative in vivo mucoadhesion studies of thiomer formulations using magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, K; Greindl, M; Kremser, C; Wolf, C; Debbage, P; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2006-09-28

    The aim of this study was to compare different oral delivery systems based on the thiolated polymer polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) and to provide evidence for the validity of the hypothesis that unhydrated polymers provide better mucoadhesion in vivo. To achieve dry polymer application, a new, experimental dosage form named Eutex (made of Eudragit L100-55 and latex) capsule has been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the point of release of the thiolated polymer from the application forms via the positive magnetic resonance signal from a gadolinium complex (Gd-DTPA). In vivo mucoadhesion was determined by ascertaining the residence time of the fluorescence-tagged thiomer on intestinal mucosa after 3 h. Results showed that in comparison to conventional application forms the Eutex capsules led to 1.9-fold higher mucoadhesive properties of PCP-Cys when compared to application with a conventional enteric-coated capsule, and to 1.4-fold higher mucoadhesion when compared to administration with an enteric-coated tablet of the thiomer. The findings of this study should contribute to the understanding of mucoadhesion and mucoadhesion influencing parameters in vivo and should therefore be of considerable interest for the development of future mucoadhesive oral drug delivery dosage forms.

  9. Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based skeletal muscle bioenergetic studies in subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, P; Sripathy, G; Varshney, A; Kumar, P; Devi, M Memita; Marwaha, R K; Tripathi, R P; Khushu, S

    2012-02-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (sHT) is considered to be a milder form of thyroid dysfunction. Few earlier studies have reported neuromuscular symptoms as well as impaired muscle metabolism in sHT patients. In this study we report our findings on muscle bioenergetics in sHT patients using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) and look upon the possibility to use 31P MRS technique as a clinical marker for monitoring muscle function in subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Seventeen normal subjects, 15 patients with sHT, and 9 patients with hypothyroidism performed plantar flexion exercise while lying supine in 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner using custom built exercise device. MR Spectroscopy measurements of inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP of the calf muscle were taken during rest, at the end of exercise and in the recovery phase. PCr recovery rate constant (kPCr) and oxidative capacity were calculated by monoexponential fit of PCr vs time (t) at the beginning of recovery. We observed that changes in some of the phosphometabolites (increased phosphodiester levels and Pi concentration) in sHT patients which were similar to those detected in patients with hypothyroidism. However, our results do not demonstrate impaired muscle oxidative metabolism in sHT patients based upon PCr dynamics as observed in hypothyroid patients. 31P MRS-based PCr recovery rate could be used as a marker for monitoring muscle oxidative metabolism in sub clinical thyroid dysfunction.

  10. The study of human organs by phosphorus-31 topical magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhaensli, R.D.; Galloway, G.J.; Hilton-Jones, David; Bore, P.J.; Styles, Peter; Rajagopalan, Bheeshma; Taylor, D.J.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential clinical use of topical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (volume selection by static magnetic field gradients) was tested in 50 studies in volunteers. Topical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was shown to be a straightforward method for localising 31 P spectra of brain and liver. However, the spherical shape and fixed position of the selected volume posed serious limitations to the study of heart and transplanted kidney by topical MRS. Phosphorus-31 spectra of approx. 30 cm -3 of brain or liver could be obtained in 8 min. Ratios of metabolite concentrations could be determined with a coefficient of variation ranging from 10% to 30%. The ratios of phosphocreatine/ATP and inorganic phosphate/ATP in brain were 1.8 and 0.3, respectively. The ratio of inorganic phosphate/ATP in liver was 0.9. Intracellular pH was 7.03 in brain and 7.24 in liver. The T 1 relaxation times of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate and γ-ATP in brain were 4.8 s, 2.5 s and 1.0 s, respectively. (author)

  11. Relaxation study of a paramagnetic ion by the observation of nuclear resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, A.

    1960-01-01

    Dynamic polarization of protons in water containing the paramagnetic ion NO(SO 3 ) 2 was studied, both theoretically and experimentally, as a function of magnetic field. The enhancement of the proton polarization depends appreciably on the relaxation process of the electron spin and so enables us to decide which is the real relaxation process. We tried the two following processes: a) The electron spin is coupled with the nitrogen magnetic moment by hyperfine interaction; if this interaction has an anisotropic part, a relaxation process for the electronic spin will result through the Brownian motion of the ion. b) The relaxation of the electron spin takes place through spin-orbit coupling of the electron spin. Experimental results showed that the relaxation took place through the second process with the help of dynamic polarization we were able to study the relaxation of an electron spin in a liquid without using any electron resonance spectrometer, simply by observing the resonance of a nuclear spin coupled with the electron spin. Reprint of a paper published in Le Journal de Physique et le Radium, t. 20, p. 937-948, 1959 [fr

  12. Cardiac structure and function in Cushing's syndrome: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenický, Peter; Redheuil, Alban; Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2-12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism.

  13. Exploratory study of possible resonances in heavy meson - heavy baryon coupled-channel interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao-Wei; Rönchen, Deborah; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Zou, Bing-Song

    2018-01-01

    We use a unitary coupled-channel model to study the \\bar{{{D}}}{{{Λ }}}{{c}}-\\bar{{{D}}}{{{Σ }}}{{c}} interactions. In our calculation, SU(3) flavor symmetry is applied to determine the coupling constants. Several resonant and bound states with different spin and parity are dynamically generated in the mass range of the recently observed pentaquarks. The approach is also extended to the hidden beauty sector to study the {{B}}{{{Λ }}}{{b}}-{{B}}{{{Σ }}}{{b}} interactions. As the b-quark mass is heavier than the c-quark mass, there are more resonances observed for the {{B}}{{{Λ }}}{{b}}-{{B}}{{{Σ }}}{{b}} interactions and they are more tightly bound. Supported by DFG and NSFC through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetry and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC 11621131001, DFG TR110), as well as an NSFC fund (11647601). The work of UGM was also supported by the CAS President’s International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) (2017VMA0025)

  14. Demonstration of Neutron Resonance capture applied to a Cultural Heritage study of Antique Benin Bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaauw, M.; Postma, H.; Mutti, P.

    2001-01-01

    In many cases of historical and archaeological studies physical techniques Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) are used to get information about the element composition of objects. INAA is usually carried out using small samples taken from the object . XRF and PIXE only yield surface information, and require cleaning of the surface to suppress the effect of external contamination. Such actions on artefacts are unwanted. Recently neutron capture resonances have been used to identify elements in artefacts using a set of γray detectors and a time-of flight system at the GELINA facility. This allows identification and quantification of elements of precious artefacts in an fully non-destructive way and with very little activation Because of the novelly of the method the principles of neutron resonance capture analysis (NRC A) will be discussed and the results of an applications to a comparative study of two Benin Bronzes presented

  15. Electronic structure of Mo1-x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Phase, D. M.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1-x Re x alloys (0≤slant x≤slant 0.4 ) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23-70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  -6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  -4 to  -10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p-5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p-4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p-5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  -5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1-x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s-d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x.

  16. Imaged-Based Visual Servo Control for a VTOL Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel control strategy to force a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL aircraft to accomplish the pinpoint landing task. The control development is based on the image-based visual servoing method and the back-stepping technique; its design differs from the existing methods because the controller maps the image errors onto the actuator space via a visual model which does not contain the depth information of the feature point. The novelty of the proposed method is to extend the image-based visual servoing technique to the VTOL aircraft control. In addition, the Lyapunov theory is used to prove the asymptotic stability of the VTOL aircraft visual servoing system, while the image error can converge to zero. Furthermore, simulations have been also conducted to demonstrate the performances of the proposed method.

  17. ESR spectrometer with a loop-gap resonator for cw and time resolved studies in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ferenc; Murányi, Ferenc

    2005-04-01

    The design and performance of an electron spin resonance spectrometer operating at 3 and 9 GHz microwave frequencies combined with a 9-T superconducting magnet are described. The probehead contains a compact two-loop, one gap resonator, and is inside the variable temperature insert of the magnet enabling measurements in the 0-9T magnetic field and 1.5-400 K temperature range. The spectrometer allows studies on systems where resonance occurs at fields far above the g approximately 2 paramagnetic condition such as in antiferromagnets. The low quality factor of the resonator allows time resolved experiments such as, e.g., longitudinally detected ESR. We demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer on the NaNiO2 antiferromagnet, the MgB2 superconductor, and the RbC60 conducting alkaline fulleride polymer.

  18. Point defects in crystalline zircon (zirconium silicate), ZrSiO4: electron paramagnetic resonance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, W. C.; Claridge, R. F. C.; Walsby, C. J.; Lees, N. S.

    This article outlines the present state of knowledge of paramagnetic defects in crystalline zircon as obtained mainly, but not exclusively, from electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies in crystalline zircon (zirconium silicate, ZrSiO4). The emphasis is on single-crystal studies where, in principle, unambiguous analysis is possible. Firstly, the crystallography of zircon is presented. Secondly, the relationships between available crystal-site symmetries and the symmetries of observed paramagnetic species in zircon, and how these observations lead to unambiguous assignments of point-group symmetries for particular paramagnetic species are detailed. Next, spin-Hamiltonian (SH) analysis is discussed with emphasis on the symmetry relationships that necessarily exist amongst the Laue classes of the crystal sites in zircon, the paramagnetic species occupying those sites and the SH itself. The final sections of the article then survey the results of EPR studies on zircon over the period 1960-2002.

  19. Spatial and verbal working memory: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available According to numerous studies, working memory is not a unitary system. Baddeley's model of working memory includes besides central executive also two separate systems for verbal and visuo-spatial information processing. A modality- and process-specific specialization presumably exists in working memory system of the frontal lobes. In our preliminary study, we have used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the pattern of cortical activation during spatial and verbal n-back task in six healthy subjects. A bilateral fronto-parietal cortical network was activated in both tasks. There was larger activation of right parietal and bilateral occipital areas in spatial than in vebal task. Activation of left sensorimotor area was larger in verbal compared to spatial task. No task-specific differences were found in the prefrontal cortex. Our results support the assumption that modality-specific processes exist within the working-memory system.

  20. Study of the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging on neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    One hundred and ten patients with several neurological disorders including cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), degenerative diseases, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies, diseases of the spine or spinal cord and myelopathy were studied by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Superconductive magnetic systems of 0.5 T, 1.0 T or 1.5 T were used for this study. MRI could show the lesions clearly in many neurological disorders such as CVD, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies and myeloythy. However, MRI could not necessarily show the lesions cleary in neurodegenerative disease and bone or calcified lesions such as ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. MRI is better than CT in spatial and tissue resolution. MRI study is expected to be the more beneficial procedure in neurological disorders, if a much shorter scanning time can be achieved. (author).

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging study in first-episode disorganized-type patients with schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Tohru; Kimura, Michihiro; Takahashi, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Norihiko; Arai, Heii

    1997-01-01

    Although a number of radiological studies have suggested that brains of patients suffering from schizophrenia have morphological abnormalities, the results are inconsistent. In the present study, in order to examine the brain, morphological features of homogeneous schizophrenics' brain magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) were taken, before neuroleptic treatment, from subjects suffering from disorganized-type schizophrenia, (DOS) during their first episodes. Results showed that DOS had significantly smaller indices for bilateral frontal gray matter (GM), left hippocampal formation (HF), left parahippocampal gray matter (PHGM) and left cingulate gyrus gray matter (CGM) than normal controls. These findings support the previous computed tomography (CT) and MRI studies on schizophrenic brains, although the subjects were not defined as disorganized-type, and may suggest the involvement of a neurocircuit between the bilateral frontal lobe and the left side of limbic system in the first-episode DOS group. (author). 54 refs

  2. Organization of the human motor system as studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI), because of its superior resolution and unlimited repeatability, can be particularly useful in studying functional aspects of the human motor system, especially plasticity, and somatotopic and temporal organization. In this survey, while describing studies that have reliably used BOLD fMRI to examine these aspects of the motor system, we also discuss studies that investigate the neural substrates underlying motor skill acquisition, motor imagery, production of motor sequences; effect of rate and force of movement on brain activation and hemispheric control of motor function. In the clinical realm, in addition to the presurgical evaluation of neurosurgical patients, BOLD fMRI has been used to explore the mechanisms underlying motor abnormalities in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders and the mechanisms underlying reorganization or plasticity of the motor system following a cerebral insult

  3. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    and neurological disability. METHODS: We studied 20 recently diagnosed, clinically definite, relapsing-remitting MS patients. Global and cortical CMRglc was estimated using PET with 18-F-deoxyglucose and NAA/Cr ratio was measured using multislice echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. All subjects were neuro-psychologically......OBJECTIVES: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown that cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) normalized to creatine (NAA/Cr) assess neuronal...... deterioration, and several studies have shown reductions in MS. Furthermore, both PET and MRS reductions correlate with cognitive dysfunction in MS. Our aim was to determine if changes in cortical CMRglc in early MS correlate with NAA/Cr measurements of neuronal deterioration, as well as cognitive dysfunction...

  4. Study of the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging on neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokezu, Youichi

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and ten patients with several neurological disorders including cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), degenerative diseases, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies, diseases of the spine or spinal cord and myelopathy were studied by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Superconductive magnetic systems of 0.5 T, 1.0 T or 1.5 T were used for this study. MRI could show the lesions clearly in many neurological disorders such as CVD, demyelinating diseases, infections of the nervous systems, neurometabolic disorders, myopathies and myeloythy. However, MRI could not necessarily show the lesions cleary in neurodegenerative disease and bone or calcified lesions such as ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. MRI is better than CT in spatial and tissue resolution. MRI study is expected to be the more beneficial procedure in neurological disorders, if a much shorter scanning time can be achieved. (author)

  5. Deformation Measurements of Gabion Walls Using Image Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Fraštia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The image based modeling finds use in applications where it is necessary to reconstructthe 3D surface of the observed object with a high level of detail. Previous experiments showrelatively high variability of the results depending on the camera type used, the processingsoftware, or the process evaluation. The authors tested the method of SFM (Structure fromMotion to determine the stability of gabion walls. The results of photogrammetricmeasurements were compared to precise geodetic point measurements.

  6. Image-based compound profiling reveals a dual inhibitor of tyrosine kinase and microtubule polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule compounds are widely used as biological research tools and therapeutic drugs. Therefore, uncovering novel targets of these compounds should provide insights that are valuable in both basic and clinical studies. I developed a method for image-based compound profiling by quantitating the effects of compounds on signal transduction and vesicle trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Using six signal transduction molecules and two markers of vesicle trafficking, 570...

  7. Prospective regularization design in prior-image-based reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Hao; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2015-01-01

    Prior-image-based reconstruction (PIBR) methods leveraging patient-specific anatomical information from previous imaging studies and/or sequences have demonstrated dramatic improvements in dose utilization and image quality for low-fidelity data. However, a proper balance of information from the prior images and information from the measurements is required (e.g. through careful tuning of regularization parameters). Inappropriate selection of reconstruction parameters can lead to detrimental effects including false structures and failure to improve image quality. Traditional methods based on heuristics are subject to error and sub-optimal solutions, while exhaustive searches require a large number of computationally intensive image reconstructions. In this work, we propose a novel method that prospectively estimates the optimal amount of prior image information for accurate admission of specific anatomical changes in PIBR without performing full image reconstructions. This method leverages an analytical approximation to the implicitly defined PIBR estimator, and introduces a predictive performance metric leveraging this analytical form and knowledge of a particular presumed anatomical change whose accurate reconstruction is sought. Additionally, since model-based PIBR approaches tend to be space-variant, a spatially varying prior image strength map is proposed to optimally admit changes everywhere in the image (eliminating the need to know change locations a priori). Studies were conducted in both an ellipse phantom and a realistic thorax phantom emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. The proposed method demonstrated accurate estimation of the optimal prior image strength while achieving a substantial computational speedup (about a factor of 20) compared to traditional exhaustive search. Moreover, the use of the proposed prior strength map in PIBR demonstrated accurate reconstruction of anatomical changes without foreknowledge of change locations in

  8. Hemispheric asymmetries in dorsal language pathway white-matter tracts: A magnetic resonance imaging tractography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Guilherme; Citterio, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that the arcuate fasciculus has a leftward asymmetry in right-handers that could be correlated with the language lateralisation defined by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Nonetheless, information about the asymmetry of the other fibres that constitute the dorsal language pathway is scarce. Objectives This study investigated the asymmetry of the white-matter tracts involved in the dorsal language pathway through the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique, in relation to language hemispheric dominance determined by task-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods We selected 11 patients (10 right-handed) who had been studied with task-dependent fMRI for language areas and DTI and who had no language impairment or structural abnormalities that could compromise magnetic resonance tractography of the fibres involved in the dorsal language pathway. Laterality indices (LI) for fMRI and for the volumes of each tract were calculated. Results In fMRI, all the right-handers had left hemispheric lateralisation, and the ambidextrous subject presented right hemispheric dominance. The arcuate fasciculus LI was strongly correlated with fMRI LI ( r = 0.739, p = 0.009), presenting the same lateralisation of fMRI in seven subjects (including the right hemispheric dominant). It was not asymmetric in three cases and had opposite lateralisation in one case. The other tracts presented predominance for rightward lateralisation, especially superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II/III (nine subjects), but their LI did not correlate (directly or inversely) with fMRI LI. Conclusion The fibres that constitute the dorsal language pathway have an asymmetric distribution in the cerebral hemispheres. Only the asymmetry of the arcuate fasciculus is correlated with fMRI language lateralisation.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging-based temporomandibular joint space evaluation in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Disc and condylar position were observed on MRIs of temporomandibular joint disorder patients and condylar position agreement between MRI and tranascranal radiography was evaluated. MRI and transcranial radiographs of both TM joints from 67 patients with temporomandibular disorder were used. On MRI, the position and shape of disc and condylar position as anterior, middle, posterior was evaluated at medial, center, and lateral views. On transcranial radiographs, condylar position was evaluated using the shortest distance from condyle to fossa in anterior, superior, and posterior directions. 1. On MRI, 96 joints (71.6%) of 134 had anterior disc dispalcement with reduction and 38 joints (28.4%) without reduction. 2. Fourteen (14.6%) of 96 reducible joints showed anterior condylar position. 19 (19.8%) showed central position, 63 joints (65.6%) showed posterior position. Two joints (5.3%) of 38 non-reducible joints showed anterior condylar position, while 9 (23.7%) showed central position, and 27 (71.1%)-posterior position. 3. In 85 joints (63.4%) of 134, the transcranial condylar position agreed with that of the central MRI view, 10 joints (7.5%) with that of medial, 16 joints (11.6%) with that of lateral, and 23 joints (17.2%) disagreed with that of MRI. On MRI, most of the reducible and non-reducible joints showed posterior condylar position. Transcranial radiographs taken with machine designed for TMJ had better agreement of condylar position with that of MRI. Extremely narrow joint spaces or very posterior condylar positions observed on transcranial radiographs had a little more than fifty percent agreement with those of MRIs.

  10. Study of orbitally excited $B$ mesons and evidence for a new $B\\pi$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Feindt, Michael; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Heck, Martin; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-07-28

    Using the full CDF Run II data sample, we report evidence for a new resonance, which we refer to as B(5970), found simultaneously in the $B^0\\pi^+$ and $B^+\\pi^-$ mass distributions with a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. We further report the first study of resonances consistent with orbitally excited $B^{+}$ mesons and an updated measurement of the properties of orbitally excited $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons. Using samples of approximately 8400 $B^{**0}$, 3300 $B^{**+}$, 1350 $B^{**0}_s$, 2600 $B(5970)^0$, and 1400 $B(5970)^+$ decays, we measure the masses and widths of all states, as well as the product of the relative production rate of $B_1$ and $B_2^*$ states times the branching fraction into a $B^{0,+}$ meson and a charged particle. Furthermore, we measure the branching fraction of the $B_{s2}^{*0} \\rightarrow B^{*+} K^-$ decay relative to the $B_{s2}^{*0} \\rightarrow B^{+} K^-$ decay, the production rate times the branching fraction of the B(5970) state relative to the $B_{2}^{*0,+}$ state, and th...

  11. Acupuncture therapy in treating migraine: results of a magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tao; Lin, Lei; Jiang, Yun; Chen, Juan; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn; Chen, Min; Song, Xiaowei

    2018-01-01

    Acupuncture has been proven to be effective as an alternative therapy in treating migraine, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of the treatment remain unclear. This study investigated possible neurochemical responses to acupuncture treatment. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging was used to investigate biochemical levels pre- and post-acupuncture treatment. Participants (N=45) included subjects diagnosed with: 1) migraine without aura; 2) cervicogenic headache; and 3) healthy controls. Participants in the two patient groups received verum acupuncture using acupoints that target migraine without aura but not cervicogenic headache, while the healthy controls received a sham treatment. All participants had magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans before and after the acupuncture therapy. Levels of brain metabolites were examined in relation to clinical headache assessment scores. A significant increase in N -acetylaspartate/creatine was observed in bilateral thalamus in migraine without aura after the acupuncture treatment, which was significantly correlated with the headache intensity score. The data demonstrate brain biochemical changes underlying the effect of acupuncture treatment of migraine.

  12. Pulse Double-Resonance EPR Techniques for the Study of Metallobiomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Nalepa, Anna; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy exploits an intrinsic property of matter, namely the electron spin and its related magnetic moment. This can be oriented in a magnetic field and thus, in the classical limit, acts like a little bar magnet. Its moment will align either parallel or antiparallel to the field, giving rise to different energies (termed Zeeman splitting). Transitions between these two quantized states can be driven by incident microwave frequency radiation, analogous to NMR experiments, where radiofrequency radiation is used. However, the electron Zeeman interaction alone provides only limited information. Instead, much of the usefulness of EPR is derived from the fact that the electron spin also interacts with its local magnetic environment and thus can be used to probe structure via detection of nearby spins, e.g., NMR-active magnetic nuclei and/or other electron spin(s). The latter is exploited in spin labeling techniques, an exciting new area in the development of noncrystallographic protein structure determination. Although these interactions are often smaller than the linewidth of the EPR experiment, sophisticated pulse EPR methods allow their detection. A number of such techniques are well established today and can be broadly described as double-resonance methods, in which the electron spin is used as a reporter. Below we give a brief description of pulse EPR methods, particularly their implementation at higher magnetic fields, and how to best exploit them for studying metallobiomolecules. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study on the barrier function of pig corneal epithelium and endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Norihiko; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Morimoto, Taketoshi; Yoshizaki, Kazuo.

    1995-01-01

    Using gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) as a tracer, the barrier function of the corneal epithelium and endothelium was evaluated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. Whole pig eyes and cornea excised with scleral rim, which had been incubated in dextran-added Gd-DTPA solution, were subjected to T 1 relaxation measurement and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After incubation, the T 1 relaxation rate (1/T 1 ) of the excised cornea increased to a steady value, whereas that of the cornea from the whole eye increased only slightly. These results indicated that the increase in the T 1 relaxation rate of the excised cornea was attributable to Gd-DTPA penetration from the corneal endothelium and that the corneal epithelium exhibited a strong barrier function against Gd-DTPA entry. The MRI study also confirmed the strong barrier, enhanced signals being detected within the aqueous fluid in the T 1 -weighted image only when the corneal epithelium was abraded. Since Gd-DTPA scarcely penetrates the intact corneal epithelium, Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI shows potential as a quantitative tracer in evaluating epithelial barrier disruption. (author)

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Magnetic Resonance : Introduction, Advanced Topics and Applications to Fossil Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at an Advanced Study Institute on "Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Fossil Energy Problems," which was held at the village of Maleme, Crete, in July of 1983. As of this writing, a different popular attitude prevails from that when the ASI was proposed as far as how critical the world energy picture is. In the popular press, a panglossian attitude (the "petroleum glut" of the 80's) has replaced the jeremiads of the 70's ( a catastrophic "energy crisis"). Yet, there are certain important constants: (a) for the foreseeable future, fossil energy sources (petroleum, coal, oil shale, etc. ) will continue to be of paramount importance; and (b) science and technology of the highest order are needed to extend the fossil ener~y resource base and to utilize it in a cost-effective manner that is also environmentally acceptable. It is precisely this second item that this volume addresses. The volume introduces the phenomenology of magnetic resonance ~n a unified and detailed man...

  15. Spectroscopy study of electron spin resonance of coal oxidation of different rank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enciso Prieto, Hector Manuel

    1992-01-01

    The present work constitutes an initial step for the knowledge of the coal oxidation, with the purpose of preventing the adverse influences caused by this phenomenon in the physical-chemical characteristics and in the tendency to the spontaneous combustion. Since the knowledge the influence of the free radicals in this process, their relative concentration was measured by means of the use of the technique of resonance spin electron. This technique measures the absorption of electromagnetic radiation, generally in the microwaves region, for the materials that not have electrons matched up in a strong magnetic field. In the essays of oxidation three coal of different range and different characteristics of mass were used and it was studied the influence of the temperature, particle size and the range. The results showed that the coal of Guacheta (bituminous low in volatile) it presents bigger concentration of free radicals, after the reaction with the atmospheric oxygen, with regard to the coal of the Cerrejon (bituminous high in volatile B) and Amaga (bituminous high in volatile C). Although this doesn't indicate that the coal of Guacheta is that more easily is oxidized, but rather it possibly presents stabilization of radicals for resonance. It concluded that there are differences in the oxidation mechanism between coal of different rank and different agglomeration properties

  16. Molecular Dynamics of Water in Wood Studied by Fast Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water plays a very important role in wood and wood products. The molecular motion of water in wood is susceptible to thermal activation. Thermal energy makes water molecules more active and weakens the force between water and wood; therefore, the water molecules dynamic properties are greatly influenced. Molecular dynamics study is important for wood drying; this paper therefore focuses on water molecular dynamics in wood through fast field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry techniques. The results show that the spin-lattice relaxation rate decreases with the Larmor frequency. Nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles at different temperatures could separate the relaxation contribution of water in bigger pores and smaller pores. The T1 distribution from wide to narrow at 10 MHz Larmor frequency reflects the shrinkage of pore size with the higher temperature. The dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate on correlation time for water molecular motion based on BPP (proposed by Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound theory shows that water correlation time increases with higher temperature, and its activation energy, calculated using the Arrhenius transformation equation, is 9.06±0.53 kJ/mol.

  17. Polarization phenomena in deuteron proton scattering: a useful tool for the study of nucleon resonances properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-01-01

    The microscopic structure of the nucleon N and its excited states N* can be determined through the (elastic or inelastic) electromagnetic form factors. These form factors should help to understand the nature of the transition regime from soft physics of the confinement region to the hard physics of the perturbative QCD. The authors show that hadron induced reactions with isospin zero projectiles, could be an effective method for the study of the nucleon structure, in particular through the measurement of polarization observables. They analyzed the properties of the inclusive d + p reactions, with particular interest in the domain of nucleonic resonances excitation. The calculated cross section and polarization observables show that it is possible to disentangle the different reaction mechanisms (omega, sigma and eta exchange) and bring new information about the electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron as well as of the nucleonic resonances. Existing data on the tensor analyzing power are in agreement with the prediction based on the omega exchange model. (authors)

  18. Study on the Interaction between Cadmium Sulphide Nanoparticles and Proteins by Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles [(CdSn] with proteins has been studied by resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS. Below the isoelectric point, proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA, human serum albumin (HSA, lysozyme (Lys, hemoglobin (HGB, and ovalbumin (OVA can bind with CdSn to form macromolecules by virtue of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force. It can result in the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS intensity. Their maximum scattering peaks were 280 nm, and there was a smaller peak at 370 nm. The scattering enhancement (ΔIRRS is directly proportional to the concentration of proteins. A new RRS method for the determination of trace proteins using uncapped CdSn nanoparticles probe has been developed. The detection limits are 19.6 ng/mL for HSA, 16.7 ng/mL for BSA, 18.5 ng/mL for OVA, 80.2 ng/mL for HGB, and 67.4 ng/mL for Lys, separately. In this work, the optimum condition of reaction, the effect of foreign, and the analytical application had been investigated.

  19. Study of photon–magnon coupling in a YIG-film split-ring resonant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoi, B.; Aiyar, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); CRNTS, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Cliff, T.; Maksymov, I. S.; Kostylev, M., E-mail: mikhail.kostylev@uwa.edu.au [School of Physics M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); Venkataramani, N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Prasad, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Stamps, R. L. [School of Physics M013, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-28

    By using the stripline Microwave Vector–Network Analyser Ferromagnetic Resonance and Time Domain spectroscopy techniques, we study a strong coupling regime of magnons to microwave photons in the planar geometry of a lithographically formed split-ring resonator (SRR) loaded by a single-crystal epitaxial yttrium–iron–garnet (YIG) film. Strong anti-crossing of the photon modes of SRR and of the magnon modes of the YIG film is observed in the applied-magnetic-field resolved measurements. The coupling strength extracted from the experimental data reaches 9% at 3 GHz. Theoretically, we propose an equivalent circuit model of the SRR loaded by a magnetic film. This model follows from the results of our numerical simulations of the microwave field structure of the SRR and of the magnetisation dynamics in the YIG film driven by the microwave currents in the SRR. The results obtained with the equivalent-circuit model are in good agreement with the experiment. This model provides a simple physical explanation of the process of mode anti-crossing. Our findings are important for future applications in microwave quantum photonic devices as well as in nonlinear and magnetically tuneable metamaterials exploiting the strong coupling of magnons to microwave photons.

  20. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  1. Resonance studies of H atoms adsorbed on frozen H2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampton, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are reported of the ground state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms stored in a 5 cm. diameter bottle coated with frozen molecular hydrogen. Dephasing of the hyperfine resonance while the atoms are adsorbed produces frequency shifts which vary by a factor of two over the temperature range 3.7 K to 4.6 K and radiative decay rates which vary by a factor of five over this range. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the frequency shifts and decay rates are consistent with a non-uniform distribution of surface adsorption energies with mean about 38(8) K, in agreement with theoretical estimates for a smooth surface. Extrapolation of the 30 nanosec. mean adsorption times at 4.2 K predicts very long adsorption times for H on H 2 below 1 K. Studies of level population recovery rates provide evidence for surface electron spin exchange collisions between adsorbed atoms with collision duration long compared to the hyperfine period, suggesting that the atoms are partially mobile on the surface. The lowest rates observed for level population recovery set a lower limit of about 500 atom-surface collisions at 4.2 K without recombination

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  3. Study on Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Machining Applying the Non-Resonant Three-Dimensional Elliptical Vibration Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The poor machinability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy makes it hard to process by conventional processing methods even though it has been widely used in military and civilian enterprise fields. Non-resonant three-dimensional elliptical vibration cutting (3D-EVC is a novel cutting technique which is a significant development potential for difficult-to-cut materials. However, few studies have been conducted on processing the Ti-6Al-4V alloy using the non-resonant 3D-EVC technique, the effect of surface quality, roughness, topography and freeform surface has not been clearly researched yet. Therefore, the machinability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using the non-resonant 3D-EVC apparatus is studied in this paper. Firstly, the principle of non-resonant 3D-EVC technique and the model of cutter motion are introduced. Then the tool path is synthesized. The comparison experiments are carried out with traditional continuous cutting (TCC, two-dimension elliptical vibration cutting (2D-EVC, and the non-resonant 3D-EVC method. The experimental results shown that the excellent surface and lower roughness (77.3 nm could be obtained using the non-resonant 3D-EVC method; the shape and dimension of elliptical cutting mark also relates to the cutting speed and vibration frequency, and the concave/convex spherical surface topography are achieved by non-resonant 3D-EVC in the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. This proved that the non-resonant 3D-EVC technique has the better machinability compared with the TCC and 2D-EVC methods.

  4. Influence of simulated bone-implant contact and implant diameter on secondary stability: a resonance frequency in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Mario; González-Martín, Oscar; Belser, Urs C

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis of no differences in resonance frequency for standardized amounts of simulated bone-implant contact around implants with different diameters. In addition, it was evaluated if resonance frequency is able to detect a difference between stable and rotation mobile ("spinning") implants. Implants with diameters of 3.3, 4.1 and 4.8 mm were placed in a purposely designed metal mould where liquid polyurethane resin was then poured to obtain a simulated bone-implant specimen. By regulating the mould, it was possible to create the following simulated bone-implant contact groups: 3.3 mm (198.6 mm(2)); 4.1 mm (198.8 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (200.2 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (231.7 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (294.7 mm(2)). Each group included 10 specimens. After resin setting, resonance frequency was measured. On the last group, measurements were repeated after establishing implant rotational mobility. One-way ANOVA tests with post hoc comparisons, a Pearson's correlation coefficient and a t-test for repeated measurements were used to evaluate statistically significant differences. Implants with different diameters but with the same amount of simulated osseointegration revealed no differences in resonance frequency. On the contrary, an increase of simulated bone-implant contact resulted in significantly higher resonance frequency. A clear direct linear correlation resulted between resonance frequency and simulated bone-implant contact. Furthermore, a significant difference resulted between resonance frequency measured before and after creation of rotational mobility. Within the conditions of this study, the secondary stability was correlated with the simulated bone-implant contact. In addition, resonance frequency was able to discern between stable and rotation mobile implants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Characterization of lipid rafts in human platelets using nuclear magnetic resonance: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua F. Ceñido

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipid microdomains (‘lipid rafts’ are plasma membrane subregions, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, which participate dynamically in cell signaling and molecular trafficking operations. One strategy for the study of the physicochemical properties of lipid rafts in model membrane systems has been the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, but until now this spectroscopic method has not been considered a clinically relevant tool. We performed a proof-of-concept study to test the feasibility of using NMR to study lipid rafts in human tissues. Platelets were selected as a cost-effective and minimally invasive model system in which lipid rafts have previously been studied using other approaches. Platelets were isolated from plasma of medication-free adult research participants (n=13 and lysed with homogenization and sonication. Lipid-enriched fractions were obtained using a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Association of lipid fractions with GM1 ganglioside was tested using HRP-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit dot blot assays. 1H high resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR spectra obtained with single-pulse Bloch decay experiments yielded spectral linewidths and intensities as a function of temperature. Rates of lipid lateral diffusion that reported on raft size were measured with a two-dimensional stimulated echo longitudinal encode-decode NMR experiment. We found that lipid fractions at 10–35% sucrose density associated with GM1 ganglioside, a marker for lipid rafts. NMR spectra of the membrane phospholipids featured a prominent ‘centerband’ peak associated with the hydrocarbon chain methylene resonance at 1.3 ppm; the linewidth (full width at half-maximum intensity of this ‘centerband’ peak, together with the ratio of intensities between the centerband and ‘spinning sideband’ peaks, agreed well with values reported previously for lipid rafts in model membranes. Decreasing

  7. Low-grade Glioma Surgery in Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Results of a Multicenter Retrospective Assessment of the German Study Group for Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburger, Jan; Merkel, Andreas; Scherer, Moritz; Schwartz, Felix; Gessler, Florian; Roder, Constantin; Pala, Andrej; König, Ralph; Bullinger, Lars; Nagel, Gabriele; Jungk, Christine; Bisdas, Sotirios; Nabavi, Arya; Ganslandt, Oliver; Seifert, Volker; Tatagiba, Marcos; Senft, Christian; Mehdorn, Maximilian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Rössler, Karl; Wirtz, Christian Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The ideal treatment strategy for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) is a controversial topic. Additionally, only smaller single-center series dealing with the concept of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) have been published. To investigate determinants for patient outcome and progression-free-survival (PFS) after iMRI-guided surgery for LGGs in a multicenter retrospective study initiated by the German Study Group for Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging. A retrospective consecutive assessment of patients treated for LGGs (World Health Organization grade II) with iMRI-guided resection at 6 neurosurgical centers was performed. Eloquent location, extent of resection, first-line adjuvant treatment, neurophysiological monitoring, awake brain surgery, intraoperative ultrasound, and field-strength of iMRI were analyzed, as well as progression-free survival (PFS), new permanent neurological deficits, and complications. Multivariate binary logistic and Cox regression models were calculated to evaluate determinants of PFS, gross total resection (GTR), and adjuvant treatment. A total of 288 patients met the inclusion criteria. On multivariate analysis, GTR significantly increased PFS (hazard ratio, 0.44; P surgery. Patients with accidentally left tumor remnants showed a similar prognosis compared with patients harboring only partially resectable tumors. Use of high-field iMRI was significantly associated with GTR. However, the field strength of iMRI did not affect PFS. EoR, extent of resectionFLAIR, fluid-attenuated inversion recoveryGTR, gross total resectionIDH1, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1iMRI, intraoperative magnetic resonance imagingLGG, low-grade gliomaMGMT, methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferasenPND, new permanent neurological deficitOS, overall survivalPFS, progression-free survivalSTR, subtotal resectionWHO, World Health Organization.

  8. Heterogeneity, histological features and DNA ploidy in oral carcinoma by image-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, N; Sperandio, M; Sherriff, M; Brown, A; Odell, E W

    2005-04-01

    Oral squamous carcinomas appear heterogeneous on DNA ploidy analysis. However, this may be partly a result of sample dilution or the detection limit of techniques. The aim of this study was to determine whether oral squamous carcinomas are heterogeneous for ploidy status using image-based ploidy analysis and to determine whether ploidy status correlates with histological parameters. Multiple samples from 42 oral squamous carcinomas were analysed for DNA ploidy using an image-based system and scored for histological parameters. 22 were uniformly aneuploid, 1 uniformly tetraploid and 3 uniformly diploid. 16 appeared heterogeneous but only 8 appeared to be genuinely heterogeneous when minor ploidy histogram peaks were taken into account. Ploidy was closely related to nuclear pleomorphism but not differentiation. Sample variation, detection limits and diagnostic criteria account for much of the ploidy heterogeneity observed. Confident diagnosis of diploid status in an oral squamous cell carcinoma requires a minimum of 5 samples.

  9. Studies of Actinides Reduction on Iron Surfaces by Means of Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Ollila, K.; Soroka, I.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.; Nordgren, J.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of actinides with corroded iron surfaces was studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy at actinide 5d edges. RIXS profiles, corresponding to the f-f excitations are found to be very sensitive to the chemical states of actinides in different systems. Our results clearly indicate that U(VI) (as soluble uranyl ion) was reduced to U(IV) in the form of relatively insoluble uranium species, indicating that the iron presence significantly affects the mobility of actinides, creating reducing conditions. Also Np(V) and Pu (VI) in the ground water solution were getting reduced by the iron surface to Np(IV) and Pu (IV) respectively. Studying the reduction of actinides compounds will have an important process controlling the environmental behavior. Using RIXS we have shown that actinides, formed by radiolysis of water in the disposal canister, are likely to be reduced on the inset corrosion products and prevent release from the canister

  10. Muscular sufficiency, serum protein, enzymes and bioenergetic studies in chronic malnutrition. [31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R K; Mittal, R D; Agarwal, K N; Agarwal, D K [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1994-03-01

    Muscle sufficiency was significantly lower in 1336 children with chronic malnutrition of moderate to severe degree. 18 children with a chronic moderate degree of malnutrition and 8 well-nourished age-matched controls were selected for biochemical and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31-P MRS) studies. The results shows that: (a) serum total protein, albumin, iron, calcium and inorganic phosphate were similar in both groups; (b) serum enzyme levels were significantly increased in the malnuourished group; (c) 31-P MRS showed significantly higher means for total ATP, [beta]-ATP, [alpha]-ATP and inorganic phosphate for the malnourished compared to the control group. In chronic malnutrition, proteins are maintained by degradation in muscle resulting in release of amino acids and enzymes. 31-P MRS studies showing increases in total ATP, [beta]-ATP and inorganic phosphate and a decrease in phosphocreatine suggest that ATP is maintained at the cost of phosphocreatine. 22 refs., 4 tabs. 1 fig.

  11. {sup 23}Na nuclear magnetic resonance study of the structure and dynamic of natrolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paczwa, Mateusz; Olszewski, Marcin; Sergeev, Nikolaj [Szczecin Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Sapiga, Aleksej A.; Sapiga, Aleksej V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky Univ., Simferopol, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependences of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of {sup 23}Na nuclei in natrolite (Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10} . 2H{sub 2}O) have been studied. The temperature dependences of the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} in natrolite have also been studied. It has been shown that the spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 23}Na is governed by the electric quadrupole interaction with the crystal electric field gradients modulated by translational motion of H{sub 2}O molecules in the natrolite pores. The dipolar interactions with paramagnetic impurities become significant as a relaxation mechanism of the {sup 23}Na nuclei only at low temperature (<270 K).

  12. Study of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states in Sn and Dy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolk, A.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states. The aim is to get more detailed information on the properties of the GDR and to use it as a tool for the investigation of nuclear structure at high excitation energy. The high energy γ-rays seen from the decay of excited state GDRs in heavy ion fusion reactions reflect the average properties of the states populated by the γ-emission. The measurements at different initial excitation energies of 114 Sn provide information on the nuclear level density near the particle separation energy at an average angular momentum of 10ℎ. The study of shape changes at very high spin in 152-156 Dy nuclei is presented. A theoretical model developed to describe fusion-evaporation reactions is presented. 149 refs.; 63 figs.; 13 tabs

  13. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Simonsen, H.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment...... strategies. Methods: Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate...... blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. Results: MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability...

  14. Complementary role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the fetal urinary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Huertas, M; Culiañez Casas, M; Molina García, F S; Carrillo Badillo, M P; Pastor Pons, E

    2016-01-01

    Urinary system birth defects represent the abnormality most often detected in prenatal studies, accounting for 30% to 50% of all structural anomalies present at birth. The most common disorders are urinary tract dilation, developmental variants, cystic kidney diseases, kidney tumors, and bladder defects. These anomalies can present in isolation or in association with various syndromes. They are normally evaluated with sonography, and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered only in inconclusive cases. In this article, we show the potential of fetal MRI as a technique to complement sonography in the study of fetal urinary system anomalies. We show the additional information that MRI can provide in each entity, especially in the evaluation of kidney function through diffusion-weighted sequences. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  16. [Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in mechanism studies of tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B B; Li, M; Zhang, J N

    2018-02-07

    Tinnitus is a subjective symptom of phantom sound in the ear or brain without sound or electrical stimulation in the environment. The mechanism of tinnitus is complicated and mostly unclear. Recent studies suggested that the abnormal peripheral auditory input lead to neuroplasticity changes in central nervous system followed by tinnitus. More research concerned on the tinnitus central mechanism. A rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique made it more widely used in tinnitus central mechanism research. fMRI brought new findings but also presented some shortages in technology and cognition in tinnitus study. This article summarized the outcomes of fMRI research on tinnitus in recent years, exploring its existing problems and application prospects.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray microtomography studies of a gel-forming tablet formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laity, P R; Mantle, M D; Gladden, L F; Cameron, R E

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of two methods for investigating tablet swelling are investigated, based on a study of a model gel-forming system. Results from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with results from a novel application of X-ray microtomography (XmicroT) to track the movements of embedded glass microsphere tracers as the model tablets swelled. MRI provided information concerning the movement of hydration fronts into the tablets and the composition of the swollen gel layer, which formed at the tablet surface and progressively thickened with time. Conversely, XmicroT revealed significant axial expansion within the tablet core, at short times and ahead of the hydration fronts, where there was insufficient water to be observed by MRI (estimated to be around 15% by weight for the system used here). Thus, MRI and XmicroT may be regarded as complementary methods for studying the hydration and swelling behaviour of tablets. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurable realistic image-based 3D mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. J.; Ding, W.; Almagbile, A.

    2011-12-01

    Maps with 3D visual models are becoming a remarkable feature of 3D map services. High-resolution image data is obtained for the construction of 3D visualized models.The3D map not only provides the capabilities of 3D measurements and knowledge mining, but also provides the virtual experienceof places of interest, such as demonstrated in the Google Earth. Applications of 3D maps are expanding into the areas of architecture, property management, and urban environment monitoring. However, the reconstruction of high quality 3D models is time consuming, and requires robust hardware and powerful software to handle the enormous amount of data. This is especially for automatic implementation of 3D models and the representation of complicated surfacesthat still need improvements with in the visualisation techniques. The shortcoming of 3D model-based maps is the limitation of detailed coverage since a user can only view and measure objects that are already modelled in the virtual environment. This paper proposes and demonstrates a 3D map concept that is realistic and image-based, that enables geometric measurements and geo-location services. Additionally, image-based 3D maps provide more detailed information of the real world than 3D model-based maps. The image-based 3D maps use geo-referenced stereo images or panoramic images. The geometric relationships between objects in the images can be resolved from the geometric model of stereo images. The panoramic function makes 3D maps more interactive with users but also creates an interesting immersive circumstance. Actually, unmeasurable image-based 3D maps already exist, such as Google street view, but only provide virtual experiences in terms of photos. The topographic and terrain attributes, such as shapes and heights though are omitted. This paper also discusses the potential for using a low cost land Mobile Mapping System (MMS) to implement realistic image 3D mapping, and evaluates the positioning accuracy that a measureable

  19. Contactless Abdominal Fat Reduction With Selective RF™ Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Jeanine; Kaspar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive body shaping methods seem to be an ascending part of the aesthetics market. As a result, the pressure to develop reliable methods for the collection and presentation of their results has also increased. The most used techniques currently include ultrasound measurements of fat thickness in the treated area, caliper measurements, bioimpedance-based scale measurements or circumferential tape measurements. Although these are the most used techniques, almost all of them have some limitations in reproducibility and/or accuracy. This study shows Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as the new method for the presentation of results in the body shaping industry. Six subjects were treated by a contactless selective radiofrequency device (BTL Vanquish ME, BTL Industries Inc., Boston, MA). The MRI fat thickness was measured at the baseline and at 4-weeks following the treatment. In addition to MRI images and measurements, digital photographs and anthropometric evaluations such as weight, abdominal circumference, and caliper fat thickness measurements were recorded. Abdominal fat thickness measurements from the MRI were performed from the same slices determined by the same tissue artefacts. The MRI fat thickness difference between the baseline measurement and follow up visit showed an average reduction of 5.36 mm as calculated from the data of 5 subjects. One subject dropped out of study due to non-study related issues. The results were statistically significant based on the Student's T-test evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging abdominal fat thickness measurements seems to be the best method for the evaluation of fat thickness reduction after non-invasive body shaping treatments. In this study, this method shows average fat thickness reduction of 5.36 mm while the weight of the subjects didn't change significantly. A large spot size measuring 1317 cm(2) (204 square inches) covers the abdomen flank to flank. The average thickness of 5.36 mm of the fat layer reduced

  20. Effects of acupuncture therapy on abdominal fat and hepatic fat content in obese children: a magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Peng, Yun; Liu, ZuXiang; Li, Shilian; Lv, Zhongli; Tian, LiFang; Zhu, Jie; Zhao, XuNa; Chen, Min

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to study the influence of acupuncture therapy on abdominal fat and hepatic fat content in obese children. The design was a longitudinal, clinical intervention study of acupuncture therapy. SUBJECTS were 10 healthy, obese children (age: 11.4 ± 1.65 years, body-mass index [BMI]: 29.03 ± 4.81 kg/m(2)). Measurements included various anthropometric parameters, abdominal fat (assessed by MRI) and hepatic fat content (assessed by (1)H-MRS) at baseline and after 1 month of acupuncture therapy. One (1) month of acupuncture therapy significantly reduced the subjects' BMI by 3.5% (p = 0.005), abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume by 16.04% (p  0.05). There was a significant correlation between the level of abdominal fat (SAT, VAT) and anthropometric parameters (weight, BMI, waist circumferences, hip circumferences). There was no statistically significant correlation between IHTG and anthropometric parameters or abdominal fat content. The first direct experimental evidence is provided demonstrating that acupuncture therapy significantly reduces BMI and abdominal adipose tissue by reducing abdominal VAT content without significant changes in body weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, WHR, abdominal SAT, or IHTG content. Thus, the use of acupuncture therapy to selectively target a reduction in abdominal VAT content should become more important and more popular in the future.

  1. Numerical studies of radiofrequency of the electromagnetic radiation power absorption in paediatrics undergoing brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Subaar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging current operating frequencies are above 100 kHz which is converted to heat through resistive tissue losses during imaging. The imaging is coupled with a concurring increase in temperature in patients. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain has seen a rising clinical request during diagnosis and therefore become imperative that its safety issues be assessed. This study modelled Pennes' classical bio-heat equation using Finite Difference Method (FDM approach and with the help of MATLAB programming language, predicted three dimensional steady state temperature distributions in patients during magnetic resonance imaging. Sixty-four paediatric patients' referred for (head brain magnetic resonance imaging scan at 37 Military Hospital and the Diagnostic Center Limited, Ghana, pre-scan and post-scan temperatures were measured at the right tympanic. The numerically steady state temperature distribution during magnetic resonance imaging shows that there is excessive temperature elevation at the skin surface of the patients. The resulting skin heating during magnetic resonance imaging can reach dangerous level which suggests that the ohmic heating of tissue is greatest at the surface and minimal at the center of the patient's brain. Though the experimental results show that patients brain temperature increase after imaging, all measured temperatures were within acceptable safe levels.

  2. An image-based method to measure all-terrain vehicle dimensions for engineering safety purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennissen, Charles A; Miller, Nathan S; Tang, Kaiyang; Denning, Gerene M

    2014-04-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes are a serious public health and safety concern. Engineering approaches that address ATV injury prevention are critically needed. Avenues to pursue include evidence-based seat design that decreases risky behaviours, such as carrying passengers and operation of adult-size vehicles by children. The goal of this study was to create and validate an image-based method to measure ATV seat length and placement. Publicly available ATV images were downloaded. Adobe Photoshop was then used to generate a vertical grid through the centre of the vehicle, to define the grid scale using the manufacturer's reported wheelbase, and to determine seat length and placement relative to the front and rear axles using this scale. Images that yielded a difference greater than 5% between the calculated and the manufacturer's reported ATV lengths were excluded from further analysis. For the 77 images that met inclusion criteria, the mean±SD for the difference in calculated versus reported vehicle length was 1.8%±1.2%. The Pearson correlation coefficient for comparing image-based seat lengths determined by two independent measurers (20 models) and image-based lengths versus lengths measured at dealerships (12 models) were 0.95 and 0.96, respectively. The image-based method provides accurate and reproducible results for determining ATV measurements, including seat length and placement. This method greatly expands the number of ATV models that can be studied, and may be generalisable to other motor vehicle types. These measurements can be used to guide engineering approaches that improve ATV safety design.

  3. Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition in the development of hypertrophy in the hyperthyroid rat heart: a combined magnetic resonance imaging and hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen J; Dodd, Michael S; Heather, Lisa C; Schroeder, Marie A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-06-07

    Hyperthyroidism increases heart rate, contractility, cardiac output, and metabolic rate. It is also accompanied by alterations in the regulation of cardiac substrate use. Specifically, hyperthyroidism increases the ex vivo activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, thereby inhibiting glucose oxidation via pyruvate dehydrogenase. Cardiac hypertrophy is another effect of hyperthyroidism, with an increase in the abundance of mitochondria. Although the hypertrophy is initially beneficial, it can eventually lead to heart failure. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the rate and regulation of in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in the hyperthyroid heart and to establish whether modulation of flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase would alter cardiac hypertrophy. Hyperthyroidism was induced in 18 male Wistar rats with 7 daily intraperitoneal injections of freshly prepared triiodothyronine (0.2 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). In vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, assessed with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy, was reduced by 59% in hyperthyroid animals (0.0022 ± 0.0002 versus 0.0055 ± 0.0005 second(-1); P=0.0003), and this reduction was completely reversed by both short- and long-term delivery of dichloroacetic acid, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor. Hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate was also used to evaluate Krebs cycle metabolism and demonstrated a unique marker of anaplerosis, the level of which was significantly increased in the hyperthyroid heart. Cine magnetic resonance imaging showed that long-term dichloroacetic acid treatment significantly reduced the hypertrophy observed in hyperthyroid animals (100 ± 20 versus 200 ± 30 mg; P=0.04) despite no change in the increase observed in cardiac output. This work has demonstrated that inhibition of glucose oxidation in the hyperthyroid heart in vivo is mediated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Relieving this inhibition can increase the metabolic

  4. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  5. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and fetal organ growth: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devasuda Anblagan

    Full Text Available To study whether maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy is associated with alterations in the growth of fetal lungs, kidneys, liver, brain, and placenta.A case-control study, with operators performing the image analysis blinded.Study performed on a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner (1.5 T with participants recruited from a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom.A total of 26 pregnant women (13 current smokers, 13 non smokers were recruited; 18 women (10 current smokers, 8 nonsmokers returned for the second scan later in their pregnancy.Each fetus was scanned with MRI at 22-27 weeks and 33-38 weeks gestational age (GA.Images obtained with MRI were used to measure volumes of the fetal brain, kidneys, lungs, liver and overall fetal size, as well as placental volumes.Exposed fetuses showed lower brain volumes, kidney volumes, and total fetal volumes, with this effect being greater at visit 2 than at visit 1 for brain and kidney volumes, and greater at visit 1 than at visit 2 for total fetal volume. Exposed fetuses also demonstrated lower lung volume and placental volume, and this effect was similar at both visits. No difference was found between the exposed and nonexposed fetuses with regards to liver volume.Magnetic resonance imaging has been used to show that maternal smoking is associated with reduced growth of fetal brain, lung and kidney; this effect persists even when the volumes are corrected for maternal education, gestational age, and fetal sex. As expected, the fetuses exposed to maternal smoking are smaller in size. Similarly, placental volumes are smaller in smoking versus nonsmoking pregnant women.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  9. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound for Palliation of Painful Skeletal Metastases: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael; Dennis, Kristopher; Huang, Yuexi; Mougenot, Charles; Chow, Edward; DeAngelis, Carlo; Coccagna, Jennifer; Sahgal, Arjun; Hynynen, Kullervo; Czarnota, Gregory; Chu, William

    2017-10-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of metastases, with bone metastases-related pain representing a significant source of morbidity among patients with cancer. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound is a noninvasive, outpatient modality with the potential for treating painful bone metastases. The aim of this study is to report our initial experience with magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in the treatment of bone metastases and our preliminary analysis of urinary cytokine levels after therapy. This was a single-center pilot study of 10 patients with metastatic cancer to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for primary pain control in device-accessible skeletal metastases. Treatments were performed on a clinical magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system using a volumetric ablation technique. Primary efficacy was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory scores and morphine equivalent daily dose intake at 3 time points: before, day 14, and day 30 after the magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment. Urine cytokines were measured 3 days before treatment and 2 days after the treatment. Of the 10 patients, 8 were followed up 14 days and 6 were followed up 30 days after the treatment. At day 14, 3 patients (37.5%) exhibited partial pain response and 4 patients (50%) exhibited an indeterminate response, and at day 30 after the treatment, 5 patients (83%) exhibited partial pain response. No treatment-related adverse events were recorded. Of the urine cytokines measured, only Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) demonstrated an overall decrease, with a trend toward statistical significance ( P = .078). Our study corroborates magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound as a feasible and safe modality as a primary, palliative treatment for painful bone metastases and contributes to the limited body of literature using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for this clinical indication.

  10. Field emission studies of silver nanoparticles synthesized by electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, Vishwas; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Bhise, A.B.; Poddar, Pankaj; Joag, D.S.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Field emission has been studied for silver nanoparticles (25-200 nm), deposited within a cylindrical silver target in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. Particle size distribution was controlled by optimum biasing voltages between the chamber and the target. Presence of non-oxidized silver was confirmed from the X-Ray diffraction analysis; however, thin protective layer of oxide was identified from the selective area electron diffraction pattern obtained with transmission electron microscopy. The silver nanoparticles were seen to exhibit hilly pointed like structures when viewed under the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The emissive properties of these particles were investigated by field emission microscopy. It is found that this technique of deposition is ideal for formation of nanoparticles films on different substrate geometries with size controllability as well as its application to emission devices.

  11. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  12. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates

  13. Studies on the crystallization of a metal glass by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.W.D.

    1983-01-01

    The crystallization of the metal glass METGLAS 2826A has been studied with the ferromagnetic resonance technique. The first-derivative linewidth of the absorption curve was measured for several times and temperatures of isothermal treatments, in the range 350 0 C - 375 0 C. After an initial decrease, attributed to stress relaxation, the linewidth increases linearly with the transformed fraction of the first crystallization phase. The measured apparent activation energy for this first phase is 306 KJ/mol. The experimental results for larger aging times show that, for all aging temperature, the second crystallization phase starts to form when the transformed fraction of the first phase is of the order of 50%. (Author) [pt

  14. Use of a radio-frequency resonance circuit in studies of alkali ionization in flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgers, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The context of the investigations are outlined with a short review about recent flame studies at Utrecht University and a discussion about discrepancies and agreements in the literature concerning alkali ionization in flames. The measuring technique chosen is described and the general design of the radio-frequency resonance system presented. The optical track measurements and the theoretical calculations of flame rise velocity are dealt with. The collisional ionization rate constants for Na, K and Cs are determined. The collisional-ionization rate constant for lithium is treated separately by reason of the hydroxide formation. Finally a theoretical model for the conducting flame in a weak, alternating electric field is developed. The relation betaeen the admittance and the flame conductivity in first order approximations is derived. (Auth.)

  15. Photoionization and ion cyclotron resonance studies of the ion chemistry of ethylene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corderman, R. R.; Williamson, A. D.; Lebreton, P. R.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of the ethylene oxide molecular ion and its subsequent ion-molecule reactions leading to the products C2H5O(+) and C3H5O(+) have been studied using time-resolved photoionization mass spectroscopy, ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy. An examination of the effects of internal energy on reactivity shows that the ratio of C3H5O(+) to C2H5O(+) increases by an order of magnitude with a single quantum of vibrational energy. The formation of (C2H4O/+/)-asterisk in a collision-induced isomerization is found which yields a ring-opened structure by C-C bond cleavage. The relaxed ring-opened C2H4O(+) ion reacts with neutral ethylene oxide by CH2(+) transfer to yield an intermediate product ion C3H6O(+) which gives C3H5O(+) by loss of H.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study; Ressonancia magnetica na esquizofrenia: um estudo morfometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao (InCor). Secao de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: campi@uol.com.br

    2001-06-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  17. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period

  18. A Langevin Canonical Approach to the Study of Quantum Stochastic Resonance in Chiral Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Rojas-Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Langevin canonical framework for a chiral two-level system coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators is used within a coupling scheme different from the well-known spin-boson model to study the quantum stochastic resonance for chiral molecules. This process refers to the amplification of the response to an external periodic signal at a certain value of the noise strength, being a cooperative effect of friction, noise, and periodic driving occurring in a bistable system. Furthermore, from this stochastic dynamics within the Markovian regime and Ohmic friction, the competing process between tunneling and the parity violating energy difference present in this type of chiral systems plays a fundamental role. This mechanism is finally proposed to observe the so-far elusive parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules.

  19. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance studies on normoxic and ischemic cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadian, D G; Hoult, D I; Radda, G K; Seeley, P J; Chance, B; Barlow, C

    1976-12-01

    The intact heart of a young rat was excised rapidly and cooled to 0 degree C; its energy-rich compounds were examined by 31P Fourier Transform nuclear magnetic resonance. The heart showed the characteristic spectrum of sugar phosphates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatine, and magniesium phates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocreatine, and magnesium ATP, characteristics of the energizing state of the nonbeating tissue. Warming to 30 degrees C imposes an energy load upon the heart consistent with short-term resumption of beating, concomitant intracellular acidosis, and decomposition of all detectable energy-rich compounds. The intracellular acidity causes a shift from pH 7.0 to 6.0. The effects of possible interferences with this pH measurement are considered. The method appears to have wide usefulness in cardiac infarct models for detecting the fraction of the total volume occupied by the infarct and for studying the effect of various proposed therapies upon this infarcted volume.

  20. Study Free Radical Of Irradiated Pulasari (Alexyia reinwadrtii BI) By Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erizal; Chosdu, Rahayu

    2000-01-01

    In the effort to develop the application of gamma irradiation for medicinal plant preservation especially for seeds i.e. pulasari (Alyxia reinwardtii Bi), the characteristic of free radical of irradiated pulasari (water content 4-6%) at doses of 10; 20; 30 kGy after storage time ranged 0-70 days were studied by using electron spin resonance. It was found that with increasing irradiation dose, the yield of free radicals formation increase. The yield of free radical of pulasari powder more lower than in a chips state. With increasing storage time up 5 days, the yield of free radical decrease up to 60-70 %. At storage time up to 70 days, the free radical remained ranged 10-20%, relatively

  1. Microspectroscopic Study of Liposome-to-cell Interaction Revealed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, Svetlana L; Kurilchenko, Irina Yu; Tkacheva, Tatyana N; Kavok, Nataliya S; Todor, Igor N; Lukianova, Nataliya Yu; Chekhun, Vasyl F; Malyukin, Yuriy V

    2014-03-01

    We report the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-labeling of liposomal vesicles as an effective approach to study in dynamics the interaction of liposomes with living cells of different types (rat hepatocytes, rat bone marrow, mouse fibroblast-like cells and human breast cancer cells) and cell organelles (hepatocyte nuclei). The in vitro experiments were performed using fluorescent microspectroscopic technique. Two fluorescent dyes (DiO as the energy donor and DiI as an acceptor) were preloaded in lipid bilayers of phosphatidylcholine liposomes that ensures the necessary distance between the dyes for effective FRET. The change in time of the donor and acceptor relative fluorescence intensities was used to visualize and trace the liposome-to-cell interaction. We show that FRET-labeling of liposome vesicles allows one to reveal the differences in efficiency and dynamics of these interactions, which are associated with composition, fluidity, and metabolic activity of cell plasma membranes.

  2. Comparison of field swept ferromagnetic resonance methods - A case study using Ni-Mn-Sn films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, R.; Samantaray, B.; Mandal, P.; Srinivasu, V. V.; Srinivasan, A.

    2018-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to understand the magnetic behavior of Ni-Mn-Sn Heusler alloy film. Two popular experimental methods available for recording FMR spectra are presented here. In plane angular (φH) variation of magnetic relaxation is used to evaluate the in plane anisotropy (Ku) of the film. The out of plane (θH) variation of FMR spectra has been numerically analyzed to extract the Gilbert damping coefficient, effective magnetization and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (K1). Magnetic homogeneity of the film had also been evaluated in terms of 2-magnon contribution from FMR linewidth. The advantage and limitations of these two popular FMR techniques are discussed on the basis of the results obtained in this comparative study.

  3. Application of parametric equations of motion to study the resonance coalescence in H2(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Dhruba J; Gupta, Ashish K

    2012-12-07

    Recently, occurrence of coalescence point was reported in H(2)(+) undergoing multiphoton dissociation in strong laser field. We have applied parametric equations of motion and smooth exterior scaling method to study the coalescence phenomenon of H(2)(+). The advantage of this method is that one can easily trace the different states that are changing as the field parameters change. It was reported earlier that in the parameter space, only two bound states coalesce [R. Lefebvre, O. Atabek, M. Sindelka, and N. Moiseyev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 123003 (2009)]. However, it is found that increasing the accuracy of the calculation leads to the coalescence between resonance states originating from the bound and the continuum states. We have also reported many other coalescence points.

  4. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  5. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  6. The binding of cytochrome c to neuroglobin: A docking and surface plasmon resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønding, Signe Helbo; Henty, K.; Dingley, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    is associated with a small unfavourable enthalpy change (1.9 kcal mol-1) and a moderately large, favourable entropy change (14.8 cal mol-1 deg-1). The sensitivity of the binding constant to the presence of salt suggests that the complex formation involves electrostatic interactions....... one major binding site for cytochrome c to neuroglobin. The results yield a plausible structure for the most likely complex structure in which the hemes of each protein are in close contact. NMR analysis identifies the formation of a weak complex in which the heme group of cytochrome c is involved....... surface plasmon resonance studies provide a value of 45 μM for the equilibrium constant for cytochrome c binding to neuroglobin, which increases significantly as the ionic strength of the solution increases. The temperature dependence of the binding constant indicates that the complex formation...

  7. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  8. Lumbar muscle activity during common lifts: a preliminary study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John M; Graves, James E; Manini, Todd M; Nuzzo, James L; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess lumbar multifidus, erector spinae, and quadratus lumborum muscle activity during lifts as measured by changes in transverse relaxation time (T2) from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen healthy adults performed dynamic squat, stoop, and asymmetric stoop lifts at a standard load, with each lift followed by MRI. Increase in T2 for the multifidus and erector spinae was greater for the stoop than squat. No difference in T2 increase was noted between the multifidus and erector spinae for the squat or stoop. Increase in T2 for the contralateral multifidus was less for the asymmetric stoop than stoop. Future research using MRI and other biomechanical techniques is needed to fully characterize lumbar muscle activity during lifts for various populations, settings, postures, and loads.

  9. Production of low mass dimuons at high transverse momentum: Study of rho,#betta#,phi resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.; Bourotte, J.; Mine, P.; Vanderhaghen, R.; Weisz, S.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Decamp, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lefrancois, J.; Crozon, M.; Delpierre, P.; Leray, T.; Maillard, J.; Tilquin, C.; Valentin, J.

    1983-01-01

    We use low mass dimuons (0.35 2 ) to analyse the production at high transverse momentum (Psub(T) >= 2 GeV/c) of the resonances p, #betta#, THETA. We have studied the variation of the cross section with the type of incident particle (π, K, p) at 150, 200, 280 GeV/c and the nuclear effects by comparison of platinum and hydrogen targets. There is no significant difference between the slopes of the transverse momentum distributions with those observed at lower Psub(T) (0< Psub(T) < 2 GeV/c), meanwhile xsub(F)-distributions show a leading effect in the production of THETA by kaons at these relatively high transverse momenta. (orig.)

  10. P-N defect in GaNP studied by optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Thinh, N.Q.; Vorona, I.P.; Buyanova, I.A.; Xin, H.P.; Tu, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    We provide experimental evidence for an intrinsic defect in GaNP from optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR). This defect is identified as a P-N complex, exhibiting hyperfine structure due to interactions with a nuclear spin I=((1)/(2)) of one P atom and also a nuclear spin I=1 due to one N atom. The introduction of the defect is assisted by the incorporation of N within the studied N composition range of up to 3.1%, under non-equilibrium growth conditions during gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The corresponding ODMR spectrum was found to be isotropic, suggesting an A 1 symmetry of the defect state. The localization of the electron wave function at the P-N defect in GaNP is found to be even stronger than that for the isolated P Ga antisite in its parent binary compound GaP

  11. Qualification of a Null Lens Using Image-Based Phase Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Aronstein, David L.; Hill, Peter C.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    In measuring the figure error of an aspheric optic using a null lens, the wavefront contribution from the null lens must be independently and accurately characterized in order to isolate the optical performance of the aspheric optic alone. Various techniques can be used to characterize such a null lens, including interferometry, profilometry and image-based methods. Only image-based methods, such as phase retrieval, can measure the null-lens wavefront in situ - in single-pass, and at the same conjugates and in the same alignment state in which the null lens will ultimately be used - with no additional optical components. Due to the intended purpose of a Dull lens (e.g., to null a large aspheric wavefront with a near-equal-but-opposite spherical wavefront), characterizing a null-lens wavefront presents several challenges to image-based phase retrieval: Large wavefront slopes and high-dynamic-range data decrease the capture range of phase-retrieval algorithms, increase the requirements on the fidelity of the forward model of the optical system, and make it difficult to extract diagnostic information (e.g., the system F/#) from the image data. In this paper, we present a study of these effects on phase-retrieval algorithms in the context of a null lens used in component development for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission. Approaches for mitigation are also discussed.

  12. Range and Image Based Modelling: a way for Frescoed Vault Texturing Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroti, G.; Martínez-Espejo Zaragoza, I.; Piemonte, A.

    2015-02-01

    In the restoration of the frescoed vaults it is not only important to know the geometric shape of the painted surface, but it is essential to document its chromatic characterization and conservation status. The new techniques of range-based and image-based modelling, each with its limitations and advantages, offer a wide range of methods to obtain the geometric shape. In fact, several studies widely document that laser scanning enable obtaining three-dimensional models with high morphological precision. However, the quality level of the colour obtained with built-in laser scanner cameras is not comparable to that obtained for the shape. It is possible to improve the texture quality by means of a dedicated photographic campaign. This procedure, however, requires to calculate the external orientation of each image identifying the control points on it and on the model through a costly step of post processing. With image-based modelling techniques it is possible to obtain models that maintain the colour quality of the original images, but with variable geometric precision, locally lower than the laser scanning model. This paper presents a methodology that uses the camera external orientation parameters calculated by image based modelling techniques to project the same image on the model obtained from the laser scan. This methodology is tested on an Italian mirror (a schifo) frescoed vault. In the paper the different models, the analysis of precision and the efficiency evaluation of proposed methodology are presented.

  13. Studies of new light resonances decaying into two hadronic jets produced in association with a radiated jet

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhiying

    This report presents combinatorics studies in the search for a resonance of below 800 GeV which decay product is a pair of hadronic jets from quarks. The resonance, predicted as a dark matter mediator, has couplings to dark matter particles as well as quarks and gluons. The resonance is created in association with a radiated object that can be either a photon or a jet. In the case of the radiation being a jet, the dijet from the resonance and the radiated jet cannot be distinguished. Choosing the wrong dijet to reconstruct the resonance decreases the sensitivity of the search. The study focuses on studies that help improve the search sensitivity. The signal samples used in this thesis are generated with Monte Carlo simulation and passed through the ATLAS detector simulation. Firstly, in an attempt to identify the jet from radiation, samples where a jet is radiated and a photon is radiated are compared. However, due to the differences in the sample generations, this attempt does not lead to a successful identi...

  14. Image based Monte Carlo modeling for computational phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M.; Wang, W.; Zhao, K.; Fan, Y.; Long, P.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows. The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verification of the models for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addition, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling. The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients (Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection. (authors)

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance radiofrequency tissue tagging for diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, John A; Thompson, Diane V; Rayarao, Geetha; Doyle, Mark; Biederman, Robert W W

    2016-05-01

    Invasive cardiac catheterization is the venerable "gold standard" for diagnosing constrictive pericarditis. However, its sensitivity and specificity vary dramatically from center to center. Given the ability to unequivocally define segments of the pericardium with the heart via radiofrequency tissue tagging, we hypothesize that cardiac magnetic resonance has the capability to be the new gold standard. All patients who were referred for cardiac magnetic resonance evaluation of constrictive pericarditis underwent cardiac magnetic resonance radiofrequency tissue tagging to define visceral-parietal pericardial adherence to determine constriction. This was then compared with intraoperative surgical findings. Likewise, all preoperative cardiac catheterization testing was reviewed in a blinded manner. A total of 120 patients were referred for clinical suspicion of constrictive pericarditis. Thirty-nine patients were defined as constrictive pericarditis positive solely via radiofrequency tissue-tagging cardiac magnetic resonance, of whom 21 were positive, 4 were negative, and 1 was equivocal for constrictive pericarditis, as defined by cardiac catheterization. Of these patients, 16 underwent pericardiectomy and were surgically confirmed. There was 100% agreement between cardiac magnetic resonance-defined constrictive pericarditis positivity and postsurgical findings. No patients were misclassified by cardiac magnetic resonance. In regard to the remaining constrictive pericarditis-positive patients defined by cardiac magnetic resonance, 10 were treated medically, declined, were ineligible for surgery, or were lost to follow-up. Long-term follow-up of those who were constrictive pericarditis negative by cardiac magnetic resonance showed no early or late crossover to the surgery arm. Cardiac magnetic resonance via radiofrequency tissue tagging offers a unique, efficient, and effective manner of defining clinically and surgically relevant constrictive pericarditis

  16. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for prostate cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging technique that reconstructs the conductivity distribution inside the subject using magnetic flux density or current density measurements acquired by a magnetic resonance imaging system. Since the primary prostate cancer diagnostic method, prostate biopsy, has limited accuracy in cancer diagnosis and malignant tissues have shown significantly different electrical properties from normal or benign tissues, MREIT has potential application in prostate cancer detection. The feasibility of utilizing MREIT in detecting prostate cancer was evaluated via a series of well-designed computer simulations in the present study. MREIT techniques with three different electrode configurations (external, trans-rectal, and trans-urethral electrode arrays) and two different reconstruction algorithms (J-substitution algorithm and harmonic B z  algorithm) were successfully developed. The performance of different MREIT techniques were evaluated and compared based on the imaging accuracy of the reconstructed conductivity distribution in the prostate. Without the presence of noise, the external MREIT achieves a better imaging accuracy than the two endo-MREIT (trans-rectal and trans-urethral) techniques, while the trans-urethral MREIT achieves the best imaging accuracy in noisy environments. We also found that the J-substitution reconstruction algorithm consistently offered better imaging accuracy than the harmonic B z  algorithm. When Gaussian distributed random noise with a standard deviation of 0.25 nT was added, the relative errors (RE) between the reconstructed and target conductivity distributions inside the prostate were observed to be 14.18% and 17.35% by the trans-urethral MREIT with the J-substitution and harmonic B z  algorithms respectively. The lower REs of 9.64% and 11.17% were achieved respectively when the standard deviation of noise was reduced to 0.05 nT. The simulation results demonstrate the

  17. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Hara, Masayuki [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ogura, Takashi, E-mail: ogura@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm{sup −1}, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp.

  18. Resonant x-ray scattering in manganites: study of the orbital degree of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Sumio; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2002-01-01

    The orbital degree of freedom of electrons and its interplay with spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom are some of the central issues in colossal magnetoresistive manganites. The orbital degree of freedom has until recently remained hidden, since it does not couple directly to most experimental probes. Development of synchrotron light sources has changed the situation; by the resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) technique the orbital ordering has successfully been observed. In this article, we review progress in the recent studies of RXS in manganites. We start with a detailed review of the RXS experiments applied to the orbital-ordered manganites and other correlated electron systems. We derive the scattering cross section of RXS, where the tensor character of the atomic scattering factor (ASF) with respect to the x-ray polarization is stressed. Microscopic mechanisms of the anisotropic tensor character of the ASF are introduced and numerical results of the ASF and the scattering intensity are presented. The azimuthal angle scan is a unique experimental method to identify RXS from the orbital degree of freedom. A theory of the azimuthal angle and polarization dependence of the RXS intensity is presented. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experiments in manganites. Apart from the microscopic description of the ASF, a theoretical framework of RXS to relate directly to the 3d orbital is presented. The scattering cross section is represented by the correlation function of the pseudo-spin operator for the orbital degree of freedom. A theory is extended to the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and methods to observe excitations of the orbital degree of freedom are proposed. (author)

  19. Electron magnetic resonance and magnetooptical studies of nanoparticle-containing borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliava, Janis; Edelman, Irina; Ivanova, Oxana; Ivantsov, Ruslan; Petrakovskaja, Eleonora; Hennet, Louis; Thiaudière, Dominique; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2011-03-01

    We report electron magnetic resonance (EMR) and magnetooptical studies of borate glasses of molar composition 22.5K 2O-22.5Al 2O 3-55B 2O 3 co-doped with low concentrations of Fe 2O 3 and MnO. In as-prepared samples the paramagnetic ions, as a rule, are in diluted state. However, in the case where the ratio of the iron and manganese oxides in the charge is 3/2, magnetic nanoparticles with characteristics close to those of manganese ferrite are formed already at the first stage of the glass preparation, as evidenced by both magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and EMR. After thermal treatment all glasses show characteristic MCD and EMR spectra, attesting to the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, predominantly including iron ions. Preliminary EXAFS measurements at the Fe K-absorption edge show an emergence of nanoparticles with a structure close to MnFe 2O 4 after annealing the glasses at 560 °C. By computer simulating the EMR spectra at variable temperatures, a superparamagnetic nature of relatively broad size and shape distribution with the average diameter of ca. 3-4 nm. The characteristic temperature-dependent shift of the apparent resonance field is explained by a strong temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in the nanoparticles. The formation of magnetic nanoparticles confers to the potassium-alumina-borate glasses magnetic and magneto-optical properties typical of magnetically ordered substances. At the same time, they remain transparent in a part of the visible and near infrared spectral range and display a high Faraday rotation value.

  20. Image based Monument Recognition using Graph based Visual Saliency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliatakis, Grigorios; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an image-based application aiming at simple image classification of well-known monuments in the area of Heraklion, Crete, Greece. This classification takes place by utilizing Graph Based Visual Saliency (GBVS) and employing Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) or Speeded......, the images have been previously processed according to the Graph Based Visual Saliency model in order to keep either SIFT or SURF features corresponding to the actual monuments while the background “noise” is minimized. The application is then able to classify these images, helping the user to better...

  1. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state

  2. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  3. Magnetic neutron scattering resonance of high-¤Tc¤ superconductors in external magnetic fields: An SO(5) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; Bruus, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic resonance at 41 meV observed in neutron scattering studies of YBa2Cu3O7 holds a key position in the understanding of high-T-c, superconductivity. Within the SO(5) model for superconductivity and antiferromagnetism, we have calculated the effect of an applied magnetic field on the neu......The magnetic resonance at 41 meV observed in neutron scattering studies of YBa2Cu3O7 holds a key position in the understanding of high-T-c, superconductivity. Within the SO(5) model for superconductivity and antiferromagnetism, we have calculated the effect of an applied magnetic field...

  4. Elevated brain lactate in schizophrenia: a 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, L M; Pradhan, S; Korenic, S; Wijtenburg, S A; Hong, L E; Edden, R A; Barker, P B

    2016-11-29

    Various lines of evidence suggest that brain bioenergetics and mitochondrial function may be altered in schizophrenia. On the basis of prior phosphorus-31 ( 31 P)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), post-mortem and preclinical studies, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that abnormal glycolysis leads to elevated lactate concentrations in subjects with schizophrenia. The high sensitivity of 7 Tesla proton ( 1 H)-MRS was used to measure brain lactate levels in vivo. Twenty-nine controls and 27 participants with schizophrenia completed the study. MRS scanning was conducted on a Philips 'Achieva' 7T scanner, and spectra were acquired from a voxel in the anterior cingulate cortex. Patients were assessed for psychiatric symptom severity, and all participants completed the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) and University of California, San Diego Performance-Based Skills Assessment (UPSA). The relationship between lactate, psychiatric symptom severity, MCCB and UPSA was examined. Lactate was significantly higher in patients compared with controls (P=0.013). Higher lactate was associated with lower MCCB (r=-0.36, P=0.01) and UPSA total scores (r=-0.43, P=0.001). We believe this is the first study to report elevated in vivo cerebral lactate levels in schizophrenia. Elevated lactate levels in schizophrenia may reflect increased anaerobic glycolysis possibly because of mitochondrial dysfunction. This study also suggests that altered cerebral bioenergetics contribute to cognitive and functional impairments in schizophrenia.

  5. Experimental aspect of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biomaterials such as bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Sinha, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly becoming a popular technique to probe micro-structural details of biomaterial such as bone with pico-meter resolution. Due to high-resolution structural details probed by SSNMR methods, handling of bone samples and experimental protocol are very crucial aspects of study. We present here first report of the effect of various experimental protocols and handling methods of bone samples on measured SSNMR parameters. Various popular SSNMR experiments were performed on intact cortical bone sample collected from fresh animal, immediately after removal from animal systems, and results were compared with bone samples preserved in different conditions. We find that the best experimental conditions for SSNMR parameters of bones correspond to preservation at -20 °C and in 70% ethanol solution. Various other SSNMR parameters were compared corresponding to different experimental conditions. Our study has helped in finding best experimental protocol for SSNMR studies of bone. This study will be of further help in the application of SSNMR studies on large bone disease related animal model systems for statistically significant results. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective study of ultrasound with perflutrene contrast compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Schmillevitch

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT:The incidence of hepatic hemangiomas ranges from 0.4% to 20% in the general population. Conventional ultrasound is usually the first diagnostic method to identify these hemangiomas, typically as an incidental finding. Ultrasonography with second generation contrast materials is being used in various areas of hepatology, yielding similar results to those obtained with computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the agreement between ultrasound with perflutrene contrast and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. METHODS: A total of 37 patients were prospectively examined between January 2006 and August 2008. A total of 57 hepatic nodules were documented in this group as incidental findings on routine ultrasound exams. The 37 patients were administered perflutrene contrast without adverse reactions, and were all submitted to magnetic resonance exams. RESULTS: Conventional ultrasound identified 15 patients with nodules typical of hemangiomas and 22 patients with other nodules. In 35 patients, the contrast characteristics were consistent with hepatic hemangiomas. CONCLUSION: Agreement between the data obtained from ultrasound with contrast and magnetic resonance was 94.5%. In discordant cases, the magnetic resonance diagnosis prevailed. In the case which presented indeterminate findings on contrast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance was repeated after 3 months, confirming the diagnosis of a hepatic hemangioma. A biopsy was performed on the suspected malignant nodule which also confirmed the presence of a hepatic hemangioma. Ultrasonography with contrast has the advantages of being more accessible to the public at large and lower cost than magnetic resonance. The results of our study highlight the need for a new protocol in hepatic nodules incidentally identified on conventional ultrasonography. In the case of typical hemangiomas

  7. New mobile methods for dietary assessment: review of image-assisted and image-based dietary assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushey, C J; Spoden, M; Zhu, F M; Delp, E J; Kerr, D A

    2017-08-01

    For nutrition practitioners and researchers, assessing dietary intake of children and adults with a high level of accuracy continues to be a challenge. Developments in mobile technologies have created a role for images in the assessment of dietary intake. The objective of this review was to examine peer-reviewed published papers covering development, evaluation and/or validation of image-assisted or image-based dietary assessment methods from December 2013 to January 2016. Images taken with handheld devices or wearable cameras have been used to assist traditional dietary assessment methods for portion size estimations made by dietitians (image-assisted methods). Image-assisted approaches can supplement either dietary records or 24-h dietary recalls. In recent years, image-based approaches integrating application technology for mobile devices have been developed (image-based methods). Image-based approaches aim at capturing all eating occasions by images as the primary record of dietary intake, and therefore follow the methodology of food records. The present paper reviews several image-assisted and image-based methods, their benefits and challenges; followed by details on an image-based mobile food record. Mobile technology offers a wide range of feasible options for dietary assessment, which are easier to incorporate into daily routines. The presented studies illustrate that image-assisted methods can improve the accuracy of conventional dietary assessment methods by adding eating occasion detail via pictures captured by an individual (dynamic images). All of the studies reduced underreporting with the help of images compared with results with traditional assessment methods. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to better delineate attributes with regards to age of user, degree of error and cost.

  8. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...

  9. AUGUSTO'S Sundial: Image-Based Modeling for Reverse Engeneering Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocchi, V.; Barbarella, M.; Del Pizzo, S.; Giannone, F.; Troisi, S.; Piccaro, C.; Marcantonio, D.

    2017-02-01

    A photogrammetric survey of a unique archaeological site is reported in this paper. The survey was performed using both a panoramic image-based solution and by classical procedure. The panoramic image-based solution was carried out employing a commercial solution: the Trimble V10 Imaging Rover (IR). Such instrument is an integrated cameras system that captures 360 degrees digital panoramas, composed of 12 images, with a single push. The direct comparison of the point clouds obtained with traditional photogrammetric procedure and V10 stations, using the same GCP coordinates has been carried out in Cloud Compare, open source software that can provide the comparison between two point clouds supplied by all the main statistical data. The site is a portion of the dial plate of the "Horologium Augusti" inaugurated in 9 B.C.E. in the area of Campo Marzio and still present intact in the same position, in a cellar of a building in Rome, around 7 meter below the present ground level.

  10. Image-based Exploration of Large-Scale Pathline Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Nagoor, Omniah H.

    2014-05-27

    While real-time applications are nowadays routinely used in visualizing large nu- merical simulations and volumes, handling these large-scale datasets requires high-end graphics clusters or supercomputers to process and visualize them. However, not all users have access to powerful clusters. Therefore, it is challenging to come up with a visualization approach that provides insight to large-scale datasets on a single com- puter. Explorable images (EI) is one of the methods that allows users to handle large data on a single workstation. Although it is a view-dependent method, it combines both exploration and modification of visual aspects without re-accessing the original huge data. In this thesis, we propose a novel image-based method that applies the concept of EI in visualizing large flow-field pathlines data. The goal of our work is to provide an optimized image-based method, which scales well with the dataset size. Our approach is based on constructing a per-pixel linked list data structure in which each pixel contains a list of pathlines segments. With this view-dependent method it is possible to filter, color-code and explore large-scale flow data in real-time. In addition, optimization techniques such as early-ray termination and deferred shading are applied, which further improves the performance and scalability of our approach.

  11. Magnetism in heterogeneous thin film systems: Resonant X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortright, J.B.; Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.; Hellwig, O.; Marguiles, D.T.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic and chemical heterogeneity are common in a broad range of magnetic thin film systems. Emerging resonant soft x-ray scattering techniques are well suited to resolve such heterogeneity at relevant length scales. Resonant x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements laterally average over heterogeneity but can provide depth resolution in different ways, as illustrated in measurements resolving reversible and irreversible changes in different layers of exchange-spring heterostructures. Resonant small-angle scattering measures in-plane heterogeneity and can resolve magnetic and chemical scattering sources in different ways, as illustrated in measurements of granular alloy recording media

  12. Third sound resonance studies of 3He-4He mixture films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrichs, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Third sound velocity and dissipation measurements were performed on 3 He- 4 He mixture films of 3.6 and 5.3 layers 4 He and up to 3 added layers 3 He in the temperature range 0.05-0.3 K using third sound resonance techniques. The 3 He concentration dependence of the velocity was in excellent agreement with a simple layered film model down to the lowest concentrations studied. At the higher 3 He concentrations, the velocity began to deviate from the model, rising above it. The concentration dependence of the dissipation showed some unique structure with a maximum at 0.3-0.5 layers added 3 He for both 4 He coverages. The third sound velocity in the low concentration mixture films had very little temperature dependence in the range studied. The dissipation, however, had some definite temperature dependent structure that evolved with concentration. This evolution was most pronounced at concentrations near the dissipation maximum and eventually became exponential at the higher coverages. Fitting these exponentials produced estimates of the difference in binding energy for the 3 He states in and on the film. In this higher 3 He concentration regime, a temperature dependence of the velocity was observed that began as a small peak at about 0.15 K and eventually became a step at the highest concentrations studied. The exponential nature of the dissipation became clouded when the velocity evolved into this last behavior

  13. Biochemical Support for the “Threshold” Theory of Creativity: A Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Flores, Ranee A.; Smith, Shirley M.; Caprihan, Arvind; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    A broadly accepted definition of creativity refers to the production of something both novel and useful within a given social context. Studies of patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders and neuroimaging studies of healthy controls have each drawn attention to frontal and temporal lobe contributions to creativity. Based on previous magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy studies demonstrating relationships between cognitive ability and concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a common neurometabolite, we hypothesized that NAA assessed in gray and white matter (from a supraventricular slab) would relate to laboratory measures of creativity. MR imaging and divergent thinking measures were obtained in a cohort of 56 healthy controls. Independent judges ranked the creative products of each participant, from which a “Composite Creativity Index” (CCI) was created. Different patterns of correlations between NAA and CCI were found in higher verbal ability versus lower verbal ability participants, providing neurobiological support for a critical “threshold” regarding the relationship between intelligence and creativity. To our knowledge, this is the first report assessing the relationship between brain chemistry and creative cognition, as measured with divergent thinking, in a cohort comprised exclusively of normal, healthy participants. PMID:19386928

  14. Noninvasive study of anatomic variations of the bile and pancreatic duct using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, E.; Falco, J.; Campo, R.; Martin, J.; Brullet, E.; Espinos, J.

    1999-01-01

    To identify anatomic variations of the bile duct and pancreatic duct and papillary anomalies by means of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and determine their correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. Eighty-five patients were selected by means of a prospective study comparing MRCP and ERCP. Coronal and axial HASTE images and coronal and oblique coronal RARE images were acquired in all the patients. Four of the studies (6%) were excluded because of poor technical quality. Anatomic variations were observed in 26 cases (30.5%), including trifurcation (n=7; 27%), right hepatic duct draining into left hepatic duct (n=2, 7.7%), right hepatic duct draining into common bile duct (n=4; 15.4%), extrahepatic confluence (n=2; 7.7%), medial cystic duct (n=2; 7.7%), parallel cystic duct (n=3; 11.5%), juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (n=3; 11.5%) and pancreas divisum (n=3; 11.5%). A good correlation was observed between the MRCP and ERCP findings. The introduction of MRCP into the noninvasive study of biliary disease may be useful in the detection of anatomic variations relevant to laparoscopic surgery and other endoscopic and interventional techniques. (Author) 11 refs

  15. Complexity Index as Applied to Magnetic Resonance: Study Based on a Scale of Relative Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelastegui, A.; Villanua, J.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the merit and repercussions of measuring magnetic resonance (MR) activity in units of radiological activity, and of using complexity index (CI) as an activity indicator. We studied the MR activity of Osatek, Inc. during an 8-year period (1994-2001). We measured this activity both in number of MR procedures performed and in units of radiological activity, such units being based on the scale of relative units published in the Radiological Services Administration Guidelines published by the Spanish Society or Medical Radiology. We calculated the annual complexity index, this being a quotient between the number of MR procedures performed and corresponding value in units of radiological activity. We also analyzed factors that can have an impact on the CI: type of exploration and power of the equipment's magnetic field. The CL stayed practically stable during the first 4 years of the study, while it increased during the second 4 years. There exists a direct relationship between this increase and the percentage of explorations that we term complex (basically, body-and angio-MR). The increasing complexity of MR studies in the last years is evident from a consideration of CI. MR productivity is more realistically expressed in units of radiological activity than in number of procedures performed by any one center. It also allows for making external comparisons. CI is a useful indicator that can be utilized as an administrative tool. (Author) 13 refs

  16. Comprehensive high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance studies of single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jonathan D.

    This dissertation presents research on a number of single molecule magnet (SMM) compounds conducted using high frequency, low temperature magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single crystals. By developing a new technique that incorporated other devices such as a piezoelectric transducer or Hall magnetometer with our high frequency microwaves, we were able to collect unique measurements on SMMs. This class of materials, which possess a negative, axial anisotropy barrier, exhibit unique magnetic properties such as quantum tunneling of a large magnetic moment vector. There are a number of spin Hamiltonians used to model these systems, the most common one being the giant spin approximation. Work done on two nickel systems with identical symmetry and microenvironments indicates that this model can contain terms that lack any physical significance. In this case, one must turn to a coupled single ion approach to model the system. This provides information on the nature of the exchange interactions between the constituent ions of the molecule. Additional studies on two similar cobalt systems show that, for these compounds, one must use a coupled single ion approach since the assumptions of the giant spin model are no longer valid. Finally, we conducted a collection of studies on the most famous SMM, Mn12Ac. Three different techniques were used to study magnetization dynamics in this system: stand-alone HFEPR in two different magnetization relaxation regimes, HFEPR combined with magnetometry, and HFEPR combined with surface acoustic waves. All of this research gives insight into the relaxation mechanisms in Mn12Ac.

  17. Toward a functional neuroanatomy of dysthymia: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Arun V; Smith, Andra; Cameron, Colin; Bhatla, Raj; Cameron, Ian; Georgescu, Tania M; Hogan, Matthew J

    2009-12-01

    Dysthymia is a common mood disorder. Recent studies have confirmed the neurobiological and treatment response overlap of dysthymia with major depression. There are no previous published studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in dysthymia. fMRI was used to compare neural processing of 17 unmedicated dysthymic patients with 17 age, sex, and education-matched control subjects in a mood induction paradigm using the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). Using a random effects analysis to compare the groups, the results revealed that the dysthymic patients had significantly reduced activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to controls. The dysthymic patients exhibited increased activation in the amygdala, anterior cingulate and insula compared to controls and these differences were more evident when processing negative than positive images. This study included both early and late subtypes of dysthymia, and participants were only imaged at one time point, which may limit the generalizability of the results. The findings suggest the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala, and insula in the neural circuitry underlying dysthymia. It is suggested that altered activation in some of these neural regions may be a common substrate for depressive disorders in general while others may relate specifically to symptom characteristics and the chronic course of dysthymia. These findings are particularly striking given the history of this deceptively mild disorder which is still confused by some with character pathology.

  18. The gymnasts' hip and groin: a magnetic resonance imaging study in asymptomatic elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, A.; Sykaras, E. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Sport Injuries Lab.; Siatras, T. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Excercise Physiology-Ergometry; Bintoudi, A. [Papageorgiu NHS General Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Milosis, D. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Physical Education and Sport Sciences; Lallas, V. [Euromedica Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Karantanas, A. [University Hospital Heraklion (Greece). Dept. of Medical Imaging

    2014-08-15

    Specific patterns of developmental adaptation of the proximal femur have been recognized in some sports. Gymnastics are characterized by repetitive axial loading and hip rotations in combination with extreme hip positions. It is unknown how and if these forces can affect an immature skeleton in the long term. We sought to evaluate this, by means of magnetic resonance imaging of the hip and groin of such elite asymptomatic athletes. We performed a case-control comparative MR imaging study of both hips and groin of 12 (7 male, 5 female) skeletally mature young (mean age 18.6 years) asymptomatic international level gymnasts with a minimum of 10 years' training with age-matched non-athletes. At the time of recruitment, none of the athletes had a recorded musculoskeletal complaint or injury in the anatomical area around the hip. The study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal and are considered to be the result of adaptational changes to the specific sport: high centre-column-diaphysis angle (coxa valga140 on average), ligamentum teres hypertrophy, friction of the iliotibial band with oedema surrounding the greater trochanter, and a high incidence (62.5 %) of radiological appearances of ischiofemoral impingement. Our study showed that elite gymnasts share four common morphological characteristics on MRI that deviate from normal. These findings were in asymptomatic subjects; hence, radiologists and sports physicians should be aware of them in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. (orig.)

  19. Cinematic study of temporomandibular joint motion using ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manière-Ezvan, A; Havet, T; Franconi, J M; Quémar, J C; de Certaines, J D

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are usually performed to study the opening/closing movements of the mandible and have up to now been pseudodynamic step-by-step images simulating condylar motion by post-processing reconstruction. The aim of this study was: 1. to optimize a TMJ cine-imaging method to give a better clinical result than the step-by-step methods; 2. to develop an ultra-fast MRI Gradient Echo (GE) sequence for this purpose; and 3. to analyze condylar movements in the sagittal, coronal and para-axial planes during border mandibular displacements and chewing. Both TM joints were studied in six asymptomatic volunteers. The method involved a compromise between in-plane resolution, slice thickness, signal-to-noise ratio and time resolution. Routine clinical use was found to be a GE pulse sequence providing three images per second with an isometric voxel resolution of approximately two millimeters in ridge. This did not allow visualization of the disk. Using this sequence enabled real and simultaneous condylar displacement observation in the three planes of space and therefore contributed to a better functional diagnosis of pathologic TMJ motions.

  20. Application of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hao; Wei Li; Liu Maili

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years, growing research interest and efforts have been directed to study the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles and substances alike. Despite the fact that significant progress has been made, this is still largely an uncharted field. Any advances in this field would certainly require thorough multi-disciplinary collaboration, in which the expertise and tools in nanoscience/nanotechnoloogy, physics, chemistry and biomedicine have to be combined. Due to their wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biomedicine, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy are among the most important and powerful research tools currently in use, mainly because these techniques can be used in situ and noninvasively to acquire dynamic and real-time information in various samples ranging from protein solution to the human brain. In this paper, the application of MR imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles is discussed. It is expected that these techniques will play important roles in 1) detecting the presence of nanoparticles in biological tissues and in vivo, 2) studying the interactions between the nanoparticles and biomolecules and 3) investigating the metabonomic aspect of the biological effects of nanoparticles. (authors)