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Sample records for resonance imaging survey

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  3. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Maher Tawfik Ismail

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitatenon-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employedto investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paperreviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI and diffusion tensorimaging (DTI, to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Main reported findings are sometimescontradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants,and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae,cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlightedthrough successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absenceof consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patientsunder two years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advancesin data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combineresting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTIshow good promise towards the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific information about your own examination. What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? What is MRI used for? How safe ... What is the MRI examination like? What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, is a ...

  5. Using magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing dementia: a Dutch outpatient memory clinics survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelaarts, Leo; Scheltens, Philip; de Jonghe, Jos

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, dementia syndromes are diagnosed in specialized memory outpatient clinics (MC). Many radiologists are not trained to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with respect to possible radiological changes that may indicate neurodegenerative disease. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. A survey was sent to all Dutch MC and included questions as to how MRI scans are assessed by radiologists and how these assessments are used in the diagnostic process. In most MC, radiologists report on typical Alzheimer pathology and large vessel disease. Small vessel disease and other anatomical changes signifying neurodegenerative disease frequently are not assessed. In the majority of MC, the radiological assessment is not standardized, and physicians assess MRI for themselves to use this information to discuss the consensus diagnosis subsequently. MRI assessment by radiologists in Dutch MC probably underestimates the presence of cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease. The validity of standardized assessment protocols in routine clinical practice deserves further study, as the implementation of standardization outside research settings could improve diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Geometric survey on magnetic resonance imaging of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Fujio, Shingo; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Apart from the radiologic features regarding size and invasiveness, we had noticed some differences in morphology among types of pituitary adenomas. We conducted this study to verify the differences in radiologic morphology between growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas (GHoma) and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFoma). Pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were assessed in 50 cases of GHoma and 50 cases of NFoma. Geometric parameters on MRI were set in accordance with sellar anatomy. Intensity of T1-weighted image was not different between the two groups, but hypo-intensity of T2-weighted image was more frequently seen in GHoma. Predominant inferior extension of tumor was seen mostly in GHoma (88 vs. 38%). Extension of the tumor to the superior compartment of cavernous sinus was more frequent in NFoma. Pituitary gland was generally located superior to GHoma and postero-superior to NFoma. Growth characteristics of pituitary adenoma were confirmed to differ between GHoma and NFoma.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging. 2. Radiofrequency FT-EPR Imaging. Sankaran Subramanian and Murali C Krishna. Keywords. FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2*. T2- and T1-based oximetry, co- registration ...

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unlike MRI which addresses the naturally occurring abundant water protons in vivo, EPRI re- quires the administration of non-toxic paramagnetic free radicals into the living system prior to monitoring their distribution. The principle behind imaging is to generate profiles of EPR spectra in presence ...

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  15. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  19. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... an IV line, into a vein in your hand or arm. A saline solution may be used ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... monitors so that your child may watch a movie or TV show during the exam. It is ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  7. The skeleton in congenital, generalized lipodystrophy: evaluation using whole-body radiographic surveys, magnetic resonance imaging and technetium-99m bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, J.L.; Bonte, F.J. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Garg, A. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine); Vuitch, M.F. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Pathology); Peshock, R.M. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiology Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare genetic disease characterized by the absence of body fat from birth. Focal bone lesions have also been reported, but their pathophysiology is poorly understood. To characterize skeletal abnormalities further in 3 patients with CGL, we employed whole-body radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, including gadolinium enhancement), and triple phase technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy. We conclude that the appendicular skeleton of patients with CGL is diffusely abnormal and is predisposed to focal osteolysis and cyst formation. (orig./DG).

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and ... no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  1. Clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging and surgical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders - a survey of 47 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustia, A.M. (Dept. of Prosthodontics and Stomatognathic Physiology, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ., Aapistie (Finland)); Pyhtinen, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland)); Pernu, H. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Inst. of Dentistry, Oulu Univ. (Finland))

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and correlate the clinical, magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in 47 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. 51 TMJs (24 right, 27 left) were operated on, because 4 patients underwent treatment of both TMJs. The best correlation between MRI and surgical findings was noted in connection with position of the disk. This was surgically confirmed altogether in 88% of cases (45/51). The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by surgical findings in 75% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk with reduction and 89% of cases of anterior dislocation of the disk without reduction. Bone changes noted by MRI were confirmed by surgery in 71% of cases. MRI was excellent especially relating to disk position and changes in disk morphology. The results show also that there are findings using MRI, e.g. of joint effusion, which cannot be confirmed during surgery. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Jin; Bai, Jianling; Tang, Pengyu; Chen, Jian; Luo, Yongjun; Zhou, Kuai; Cai, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives: Convincing evidence supporting the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an effective tool for evaluating cervical sagittal alignment is lacking. This study aims to analyze the differences and correlations between cervical sagittal parameters on x-ray and MRI in patients with cervical disc herniation and to determine whether MRI could substitute for cervical x-ray for measurement of cervical sagittal parameters. Methods: One hundred forty-three adults with cervical disc herniation were recruited. Each patient had both an x-ray and MRI examination of the cervical spine. The cervical sagittal parameters were measured and compared on x-ray and MRI including: C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 sagittal vertical axis (C2–C7 SVA), cervical tilt (CT), T1 Slope (T1S), and neck tilt (NT). The data were analyzed using a paired-samples t test, a Pearson correlation test, and linear regression. Results: The values of C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 SVA, CT and T1S on X-ray were larger than those on MRI (P sagittal parameters had a significant correlation with the corresponding one on MRI (r = 0.699, 0.585, 0.574, 0.579 and 0.613, respectively) (C2–C7 Cobb MRI = 0.957 + 0.721 C2–C7 Cobb X, C2–C7 SVA MRI = 6.423 + 0.500 C2–C7 SVAX, CT MRI = 3.121 + 0.718 CTX, T1S MRI = 7.416 + 0.613 T1SX, NT MRI = 22.548 + 0.601 NTX). Conclusion: Although MRI and x-ray measurements of cervical sagittal parameters were different, there were significant correlations between the results. MRI could be used to evaluate the sagittal balance of the cervical spine with great reliability. PMID:28953681

  3. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-12-22

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an ... take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. top of ...

  9. Accuracy of color Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of placenta accreta: A survey of 82 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayati, Sedigheh; Leila, Leila; Pezeshkirad, Masoud; Seilanian Toosi, Farokh; Nekooei, Sirous; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Golmohammadi, Mansoureh Sadat

    2017-04-01

    Placenta adhesive disorder (PAD) is one of the most common causes of postpartum hemorrhage and peripartum hysterectomy. The main risk factors are placenta previa and prior uterine surgery such as cesarean section. Diagnosis of placenta adhesive disorders can lead to a decrease of maternal mortality and morbidities. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of PADs. In this is cross-sectional study, Eighty-two pregnant women who were high risk for PAD underwent color Doppler ultrasound and MRI after 18 weeks of gestation. The sonographic and MRI findings were compared with the final pathologic or clinical findings. PDoppler sonography sensitivity was 87% and MRI sensitivity was 76% (p=0.37). Doppler sonography specificity was 63% and MRI specificity was 83% (p=0.01). Women with high-risk factors for PAD should undergo Doppler ultrasonography at first. When results on Doppler sonography are equivocal for PAD, MRI can be performed due to its high specificity.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Bruce Spottiswoode has a BSc in Electrical Engineering from the University of the Witwatersrand and a PhD in Biomedical Engineering on cardiac MRI from the. University of Cape Town. He has worked on developing electronics for the CSIR, on MRI image reconstruction for Siemens, and on X-ray imaging ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in hemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessing, P.H.L.; Falke, T.H.M.; Steiner, R.M.; Bloem, H.; Peters, A. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1985-01-15

    The case of a patient with iron deposition disease is presented to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of this entity. The image characteristics of MRI are discussed and the results are compared with those of computer tomography (CT). The importance of a decrease in T2 relaxation time as the determinant parameter for signal intensity in MRI of the liver in such patients is emphasized.

  12. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain caused by an injury or a stroke diagnose infectious or autoimmune diseases like encephalopathy or ... broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI is used to help diagnose ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  18. [Use of magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Larsen, Lone; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Møller, Jakob M; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the four imaging modalities used in radiology. In contrast to computed tomography (CT), it does not use radiation. MRI is still developing and the diagnostic capabilities are growing. There are many indications for MRI and in some fields it has replaced CT. With few exceptions MRI is used mainly for elective examinations, and because of the new techniques like diffusion and perfusion MRI in cancer imaging the use is increasing both with regard to work-up and follow-up. For non-malignant lesions MRI is increasingly used thanks to its great soft-tissue contrast capabilities.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What It ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Dynamic Pelvic Floor Dynamic pelvic floor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive test that uses a ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Child Cope With a Parent's Suicide? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A What's ... Child If You Have Questions What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe and painless ...

  3. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  9. Influence of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features on Surgical Decision-Making in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Results from a Global Survey of AOSpine International Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Nater, Anick; Witiw, Christopher D; Kato, So; Tetreault, Lindsay; Reihani-Kermani, Hamed; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-09-01

    We conducted a survey to understand how specific pathologic features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) influence surgeons toward an anterior or posterior surgical approach in degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). A questionnaire was sent out to 6179 AOSpine International members via e-mail. This included 18 questions on a 7-point Likert scale regarding how MRI features influence the respondent's decision to perform an anterior or posterior surgical approach. Influence was classified based on the mean and mode. Variations in responses were assessed by region and training. Of 513 respondents, 51.7% were orthopedic surgeons, 36.8% were neurosurgeons, and the remainder were fellows, residents, or other. In ascending order, multilevel bulging disks, cervical kyphosis, and a high degree of anterior cord compression had a moderate to strong influence toward an anterior approach. A high degree of posterior cord compression had a moderate to strong influence, whereas multilevel compression, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, ligamentum flavum enlargement, and congenital stenosis had a moderate influence toward a posterior approach. Neurosurgeons chose anterior approaches more and posterior approaches less in comparison with orthopedic surgeons (P < 0.01). Of note, 59.8% of respondents were equally comfortable performing multilevel (3 or more levels) anterior and posterior procedures, whereas 61.5% did not feel comfortable in determining the surgical approach based on MRI alone. Specific DCM pathology influences the choice for anterior or posterior surgical approach. These data highlight factors based on surgeon experience, training, and region of practice. They will be helpful in defining future areas of investigation in an effort to provide individualized surgical strategies and optimize patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine if intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging improves surgical resection and postoperative outcome of intracranial meningioma. Study design: Prospective, non-randomized, cohort study. Method: Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI) was used to evaluate patients with meningioma ...

  12. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  13. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine is used to: detect a variety ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT ... and Radiation Safety ...

  16. [Magnetic resonance tomography: potentials of molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Faber, Cornelius; Neuberger, Thomas; Köhler, Sascha; Stroh, Albrecht; Zimmer, Claus; Jakob, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging is "the in-vivo characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level" and allows the imaging of molecular abnormalities associated with diseases long before morphological changes can be detected. At present, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for molecular and cellular imaging is rapidly increasing. MRI is a very attractive candidate, since current MRI protocols already provide anatomic, functional, and biochemical information of excellent image quality and with high spatial resolution. Combining this high spatial resolution/high contrast imaging modality with specific MRI contrast imaging agents for molecular imaging is currently the focus of research in many laboratories worldwide. This paper summarizes the rationale for molecular MRI imaging and describes the basic features of modern molecular imaging strategies with MRI. Finally, a special focus is given to the growing field of applications, e.g., stem cell imaging, imaging of apoptosis, plaques, and other biological targets of interest.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of ... machine and in some cases, placed around the part of the body being imaged, send and receive ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an IV line, ... images in case additional images are needed. Your intravenous line will be removed. MRI exams generally include ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric ... with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... obtain clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... clarification with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be used to help you stay still and maintain the correct position during imaging. Devices that contain ... between imaging sequences, but will be asked to maintain your position without movement as much as possible. ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... images in case additional images are needed. Your child’s intravenous line will be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... is normal for the area of your child’s body being imaged to feel slightly ... still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... It is normal for the area of your body being imaged to feel slightly warm, but ... still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the ... imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can ... cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumours and the peritumoural oedema. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging increases the overall diagnostic accuracy in brain tumours: Correlation with histopathology. K Abul-Kasim, M Thurnher, S Puchner, P Sundgren. Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  7. Myocardial wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Dani�l; Kuijpers, D.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) provides important functional information about global and regional myocardial function. This review will give an overview of the current state of myocardial wall motion imaging, especially focusing on the clinical role of dobutamine

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant or other metallic object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images due to ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it difficult to lie still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant or other metallic object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images. Patient movement ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not recommended for ... Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the ... open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams ... ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  1. Spin echo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bernd André; Weigel, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The spin echo sequence is a fundamental pulse sequence in MRI. Many of today's applications in routine clinical use are based on this elementary sequence. In this review article, the principles of the spin echo formation are demonstrated on which the generation of the fundamental image contrasts T1, T2, and proton density is based. The basic imaging parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) and their influence on the image contrast are explained. Important properties such as the behavior in multi-slice imaging or in the presence of flow are depicted and the basic differences with gradient echo imaging are illustrated. The characteristics of the spin echo sequence for different magnetic field strengths with respect to clinical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  3. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  4. Surface coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, L; Hayes, C

    1985-12-01

    Detection of MR signals with surface coils provides increased signal-to-noise ratio for superficial structures relative to detection by circumferential coils, permitting improved spatial resolution. Different geometries of surface coils can be used for different regions. Coils that are flat or curved to fit body contours are good for general imaging, with a range of coil sizes useful for structures of different size or depth. Solenoidal coils are useful for imaging protruding structures such as breasts, while smaller versions of conventional circumferential coils that can be slipped over limbs are useful for imaging extremities.

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    Full Text Available ... patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of which shows ... tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide ...

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    Full Text Available ... for immediate assistance. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ... because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

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    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

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    Full Text Available ... imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... patients who have been acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... patients who have been acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will my ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... If your child has a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a ... structures of the body—such as the heart, liver and many other organs—is ... characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed ... in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal ... discs evaluate the bones of the spine for congenital or acquired abnormalities determine the condition of nerve tissue within the ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after trauma diagnose and monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is often the best choice for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence of an otherwise ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... ionizing radiation. MR imaging of the soft-tissue structures of the body—such as the heart, liver ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike ... (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike ... (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... there is a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these ... information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text ... Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... prior to sedation and the examination. For the safety of your child during the sedation, it is ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... interprets the results and how do we get them? A radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This ... the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x- ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If sedation has not ... acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This ... the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x- ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  3. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, France; Cognet, François; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krausé, Denis

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itabashi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kou; Yuyama, Takuo and others

    1988-02-01

    Forty-five patients with syringomyelia were studied with MR imaging. They were classified into four groups. Twenty-one patients were associated with Chiari malformation, and eight with intramedullary tumors. Nine patients had idiopathic syringomyelia, and seven had posttraumatic syringomyelia. Thirty-three of them were also studied with delayed CT myelography (DCTM). The results of DCTM had a good correlation with those of MR imaging except for five cases who did not show positive contrast accumulation in the cord. Fluid pulsation in the syrinx was shown with long-TR, long-TE pulse sequences as an area of signal void within the cord. These signs of signal void were visualized on sixteen out of twenty-one Chiari malformation associated cases, on four of nine idiopathic cases, on two of seven posttraumatic cases, and on none of eight tumor-associated cases. Cardiac gated multi-phase imaging was applied and reviewed on the cinemode display, and effects of CSF pulsatile motion were discussed. This technique clearly showed the fine changes of signal intensities from systolic phase to diastolic phase, and was expected to play a significant role on the investigation of CSF motion in syringomyelia.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions,. CC length and total brain volume ...

  6. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  8. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    ... these two signs,. 7. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2005. REVIEW ARTICLE. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses. P Corr. FFRad (D) SA. P Seolall. Nat Dip Rad (D). H Booth. Nat Dip Rad (D). Department of Radiology. Nelson Mandela School of Medicine and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital. Durban ...

  10. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions, CC length and total brain volume were compared ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance images of ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    To classify and describe the characteristic features of MRI of some ameloblastoma variants. The MR images, CT images, and panoramic radiographs in 5 cases were retrospectively examined as follows. First, the contents of ameloblastomas were divided into two portions of either solid or cystic components on the basis of MR signal intensities. The signal intensity within the solid or cystic portions was classified as homogeneous or heterogenous. Next, the characteristic internal feature of the lesion in T1W1 or T2W1 was described. The signal intensities were classified into low, intermediate, slightly high, high, and strong high signal intensity. Uni cystic lesion showed homogeneous high signal intensity (SI) on T2W2 and the rim enhancement of the surrounding area including the mural nodule and the thick wall except the central portion on Gd-T1W1. Solid type revealed heterogeneous and high SI area with strong high SI area on T2W2. On Gd-T1W1, the area corresponding to the low signal spot on T1W1 and the strong high signal spot on T2W1 showed low SI. Hybrid type showed slightly enhanced capsular structures and low SI for the round bony septa and the areas connecting the mixed and cystic lesions on T2W1 and Gd-T1W1. MRI could easily assess the relationship between the mixed and cystic findings in ameloblastoma.

  15. Different neural manifestations of two slow frequency bands in resting functional magnetic resonance imaging: a systemic survey at regional, interregional, and network levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shao-Wei; Li, Da; Weng, Xu-Chu; Northoff, Georg; Li, Dian-Wen

    2014-05-01

    Temporal and spectral perspectives are two fundamental facets in deciphering fluctuating signals. In resting state, the dynamics of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been proven to be strikingly informative (0.01-0.1 Hz). The distinction between slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) has been described, but the pertinent data have never been systematically investigated. This study used fMRI to measure spontaneous brain activity and to explore the different spectral characteristics of slow-4 and slow-5 at regional, interregional, and network levels, respectively assessed by regional homogeneity (ReHo) and mean amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (mALFF), functional connectivity (FC) patterns, and graph theory. Results of paired t-tests supported/replicated recent research dividing low-frequency BOLD fluctuation into slow-4 and slow-5 for ReHo and mALFF. Interregional analyses showed that for brain regions reaching statistical significance, FC strengths at slow-4 were always weaker than those at slow-5. Community detection algorithm was applied to FC data and unveiled two modules sensitive to frequency effects: one comprised sensorimotor structure, and the other encompassed limbic/paralimbic system. Graph theoretical analysis verified that slow-4 and slow-5 differed in local segregation measures. Although the manifestation of frequency differences seemed complicated, the associated brain regions can be grossly categorized into limbic/paralimbic, midline, and sensorimotor systems. Our results suggest that future resting fMRI research addressing the three above systems either from neuropsychiatric or psychological perspectives may consider using spectrum-specific analytical strategies.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  17. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  18. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cancer Theranostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Jin, Jiefu; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    With its exquisite anatomical resolution and wide-ranging functional imaging capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has found multiple applications in detection, staging, and monitoring treatment response in cancer. The metabolic information provided by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is being actively investigated to complement MRI parameters, as well as existing biomarkers, in cancer detection and in monitoring response to treatment. Located at the interface of detection and therapy, theranostic imaging is a rapidly expanding new field that is showing significant promise for precision medicine of cancer. Innovations in the development of novel nanoparticles decorated with imaging reporters that can be used to deliver therapeutic cargo to specific cells and environments have provided new roles for MRI and MRS in theranostic imaging.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? What ...

  3. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Adolescent Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GIEDD, JAY N

    2004-01-01

    A bstract : Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides accurate anatomical brain images without the use of ionizing radiation, allowing longitudinal studies of brain morphometry during adolescent development...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  6. Statistical normalization techniques for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Shinohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While computed tomography and other imaging techniques are measured in absolute units with physical meaning, magnetic resonance images are expressed in arbitrary units that are difficult to interpret and differ between study visits and subjects. Much work in the image processing literature on intensity normalization has focused on histogram matching and other histogram mapping techniques, with little emphasis on normalizing images to have biologically interpretable units. Furthermore, there are no formalized principles or goals for the crucial comparability of image intensities within and across subjects. To address this, we propose a set of criteria necessary for the normalization of images. We further propose simple and robust biologically motivated normalization techniques for multisequence brain imaging that have the same interpretation across acquisitions and satisfy the proposed criteria. We compare the performance of different normalization methods in thousands of images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, hundreds of patients with multiple sclerosis, and hundreds of healthy subjects obtained in several different studies at dozens of imaging centers.

  7. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD project...... with regard to optimal sampling strategy for detecting motion in four different anatomies on two different MRI scanner brands. A fully implemented interactive real-time MRI system was exploited in a group of healthy fetuses and proved its eligibility as an alternative diagnostic tool for fetal imaging...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel GONZALO-DOMÍNGUEZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim-University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology, Mannheim (Germany); Ley, Sebastian; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [University Hospitals Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a very common and potentially life-threatening disease. In comparison with CT, the clinical relevance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of PE is low. Nevertheless, as there are some potential advantages of MRI over CT (e.g. radiation free method, better safety profile of MR contrast media, capability of functional imaging). In certain patient, groups MRI might therefore be considered as a valuable alternative in the assessment of suspected PE. This article reviews the relevant MRI techniques for the evaluation of PE and gives an overview of the current literature for contrast-enhanced MR angiography of PE. (orig.)

  10. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... that were synthesized in project I and II. In project I, Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly (ethylene glycol)-Folate Pefluorooctyl Bromide/Indocyanine green/ Doxorubicin (PLGA-PEG-Folate PFOB/ICG/Dox) has been formulated for the dual imaging NIR and 19F MRI as well as in the combination of Dox...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  12. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  15. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...... operated at 77 K is designed and implemented for C imaging at 3 T (32.13 MHz), using off-the-shelves components. The design is based on a high electron mobility transistor (ATF54143) in a common source configuration. Required auxiliary circuitry for optimal cryogenic preamplifier performance is also...... presented consisting of a voltage regulator (noise free supply voltage and optimal power consumption), switch, and trigger (for active detuning during transmission to protect the preamplifier). A gain of 18 dB with a noise temperature of 13.7 K is achieved. Performing imaging experiments in a 3 T scanner...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  18. Quantitative Pulmonary Imaging Using Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washko, George R.; Parraga, Grace; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of lung function, including spirometry and body plethesmography, are easy to perform and are the current clinical standard for assessing disease severity. However, these lung functional techniques do not adequately explain the observed variability in clinical manifestations of disease and offer little insight into the relationship of lung structure and function. Lung imaging and the image based assessment of lung disease has matured to the extent that it is common for clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation to have a component dedicated to image analysis. There are several exciting imaging modalities currently being used for the non-invasive study of lung anatomy and function. In this review we will focus on two of them, x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief introduction of each method we detail some of the most recent work being done to characterize smoking-related lung disease and the clinical applications of such knowledge. PMID:22142490

  19. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal pelvic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontaki, Styliani; Vial, Yvan; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Meuli, Reto; Alamo, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The detection of fetal anomalies has improved in the last years as a result of the generalization of ultrasound pregnancy screening exams. The presence of a cystic imaging in the fetal pelvis is a relatively common finding, which can correspond to a real congenital cystic lesion or result from the anomalous liquid accumulation in a whole pelvic organ, mainly the urinary bladder, the uterus, or the vagina. In selected cases with poor prognosis and/or inconclusive echographic findings, magnetic resonance may bring additional information in terms of the characterization, anatomical location, and real extension of the pathology. This pictorial essay describes the normal pelvic fetal anatomy, as well as the most common pelvic cysts. It also describes the causes of an anomalous distension of the whole pelvic organs detected in utero, with emphasis on prenatal magnetic resonance imaging exams. Moreover, it proposes practical teaching points to reduce the differential diagnosis of these lesions based on the sex of the fetus, the division of the pelvis in anatomical spaces, and the imaging findings of the pathology. Finally, it discusses the real utility of complementary MRI.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Meira Castro Trindade

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right side. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularization. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  4. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging findings of prostatic pure leiomyomas

    OpenAIRE

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Costa,Yves Bohrer; Obara, Marcos Takeo; de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Longo, José Antonio Domingos Cianciarulo; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the imaging findings of prostatic tumors nonadenocarcinoma on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: A total of 200 patients underwented multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate for screening for prostate cancer, from August 2013 to September 2014, followed by biopsy with ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Results: We found three pathologic proved cases of prostatic pure leiomyomas (0.02%) in our series and describe...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  6. Fetal fat measurement by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deans, H.E.; Smith, F.W.; Law, A.N. (Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (UK)); Lloyd, D.J.; Sutherland, H.W. (Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (UK))

    1989-07-01

    A method to assess the average percentage of fetal fat with respect to other fetal tissue is described. This method was then used to assess the percentage of fat in 13 normal fetuses who had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination late in pregnancy (38-41 weeks). The scans of a further 13 fetuses of diabetic mothers and one case of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), all of whom had MRI examinations in the last 3 years, were reviewed and similar calculations were carried out. Whilst the percentage fat range in the normal group was large, it was still possible to discern a difference between the normal, diabetic and IUGR cases. (author).

  7. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of granulomatous mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Amanda N; Seiler, Stephen J; Hayes, Jody C; Wooldridge, Rachel; Porembka, Jessica H

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a benign chronic inflammatory condition of the breast. This study was performed to determine the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating GM from malignancy. MRI findings in 12 women with clinical or histopathologically-proven GM were retrospectively reviewed. Non-mass enhancement on MRI was present in all 12 patients with clustered ring enhancement being the most common pattern (n=7, 58%). Architectural distortion (n=10, 83%), skin thickening (n=10, 83%) and focal skin enhancement (n=10, 83%) were also very common. MRI features of GM are often identical to features considered suspicious for malignancy on MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  10. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Yuji; Hayashi, Minoru; Kubota, Toshihiko; Satoh, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Hidenori; Kawano, Hirokazu; Kabuto, Masanori; Okumura, Ryousuke

    1988-04-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) images of eight patients with pituitary macroadenoma, confirmed by means of CT, were evaluated retrospectively. The examinations were performed with a 0.35 T MR system using short repetition (TR) (T/sub 1/-weighted) and long TR (T/sub 2/-weighted) spin-echo sequences. T/sub 1/-weighted images were obtained on coronal, sagittal, or axial planes with all patients, while T/sub 2/-weighted images were routinely obtained on the axial plane with all patients and on the sagittal or coronal plane in some cases. Detailed information as to the size, configuration, and anatomical relationship, particularly to the optic tract, of the pituitary adenoma were well visualized on sagittal or coronal T/sub 1/-weighted images. The signal intensities from the tumor on T/sub 1/-weighted of T/sub 2/-weighted images were evaluated as iso-, hypo- or hyper-intense with respect to the cortical gray matter. The signal intensities from three non-functioning pituitary adenomas varied from low- to high-intense on the T/sub 1/- or T/sub 2/-weighted images. All the two growth-hormone-producing adenomas showed iso-intense signal intensities on both T/sub 1/- and T/sub 2/-weighted images. One of the two prolactine-producing adenomas were iso-intense on a T/sub 1/-weighted image and low-intense on a T/sub 2/-weighted image, while the other adenoma, when treated with bromocriptine, was iso-intense on both T/sub 1/- and T/sub 2/-weighted images. One adenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenoma was iso-intense on T/sub 1/-weighted and high-intense on T/sub 2/-weighted images. Although the signal intensities on the images, particularly the T/sub 2/-weighted images, were variable, regardless of the type of adenoma, it is presumed that the MR signal arising from a pituitary adenoma affected by the biological or pathological state of the tumor cells.

  12. Epidural fat image in lumbar magnetic resonance image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Yuichiro; Yamasaki, Yasuo; Higashida, Norihiko; Okada, Masato (Kanazawa Medical School, Ishikawa (Japan))

    1993-12-01

    To examine epidural fat images, lumbar magnetic resonance (MR) images were retrospectively reviewed in a total of 103 patients with surgically proven lumbar disc herniation (DH, n=57) and lumbar canal stenosis (LCS, n=46). Epidural fat images consisted of middorsal epidural fat (MDF), paramedian ventral fat (PVF) and intervertebral foraminal fat (IFF) ones. In the group of DH, the thickness of MDF image did not correlate with that of subcutaneous fat, suggesting that epidural fat was not affected by body fat. From the pathophysiological point of view, decrease and disappearance of MDF images correlated with compression of the epidural canal. Decrease and disappearance of PVF images lead to suspicious compression of the traversing root. In addition, asymmetrical PVF images were useful for the bilateral diagnosis of herniation. Abnormal findings of IFF images were suggestive of compression of the exiting nerve root at the intervertebral foramen. This was also seen frequently at the non-responsible level in patients over the age of 50. Degenerative and sequentrated spondylolistheses in the group of LCS were more frequently associated with a higher incidence of abnormal findings of IFF images, suggesting the presence of existing nerve root compression. (N.K.).

  13. Penetrating power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guilizzoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of revealing the presence and identifying the nature of conductive targets is of central interest in many fields, including security, medicine, industry, archaeology and geophysics. In many applications, these targets are shielded by external materials and thus cannot be directly accessed. Hence, interrogation techniques are required that allow penetration through the shielding materials, in order for the target to be identified. Electromagnetic interrogation techniques represent a powerful solution to this challenge, as they enable penetration through conductive shields. In this work, we demonstrate the power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging to penetrate through metallic shields (1.5-mm-thick and image targets (having conductivities σ ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm−1 concealed behind them.

  14. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori; Harada, Tsutomu; Ishida, Yoshikazu.

    1988-09-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients with cardiac tumor (1 with rhabdomyoma, 1 with left atrial myxoma, and 2 with tumor of the left ventricular wall) for morphological evaluation of the tumor. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo imaging technique using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. Spatial extension of the tumor was clearly demonstrated in all the patients. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), was used in the 2 patients with tumor of the left ventricular myocardium to enhance the contrast, and allowed clear visualization of the tumor. These findings show the usefulness of MRI and MRI with Gd-DTPA for morphological evaluation of cardiac tumor.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, K.S.; Brockwell, J.; Chan, F.L.; Janus, E.D.; Lam, K.S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare genetic disorder in which cholestanol and cholesterol accumulate in the nervous system and other tissues. It has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Most patients are of low intelligence with poor school performance. Specific clinical manifestations include xanthomas of the tendons. Furthermore, patients develop cataracts and a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. There is slight mental deterioration. Death usually occurs in the sixth or seventh decade and is often due to unrelated causes. Plasma cholesterol levels are normal or only moderately elevated. The pattern of serum lipids is normal, and only serum cholestanol is significantly increased. Radiological features of the disease are infrequently described in the literature. We report a case of CTX in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to image the brain, lumbar spine and the tendinous xanthomas of the lower limbs. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  18. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  19. Solid state proton imaging detected by quadrupole resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlo, J; Casanova, F; Robert, H; Pusiol, D J

    2001-06-01

    A double resonance method for imaging of solid materials containing quadrupole nuclei via the coupled protons is reported. The technique uses a static field gradient to encode the position on the protons and the method of double resonance spin-echo to detect the occurrence of proton resonances by affecting the zero-field echo signal from the quadrupole system. The double resonance imaging method offers the advantages of higher spatial resolution and straightforward image reconstruction for powder samples compared with rotating-frame and Zeeman-perturbated nuclear quadrupole resonance encoding techniques. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of navicular bursa adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowinski, Maureen E; Solano, Mauricio; Maranda, Louise; García-López, José M

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions occur in the navicular bursa between the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and other structures. Our objectives were to describe the appearance of navicular bursa adhesions on high-field magnetic resonance (MR) images, to compare these findings to findings at navicular bursoscopy, and to determine the prevalence of lesions in the remainder of the podotrochlear apparatus. Sixteen forelimbs from 14 horses that underwent MR imaging and navicular bursoscopy were evaluated. Adhesions were considered type 1 when characterized by a discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal between two structures, type 2 when the navicular bursa fluid signal was disrupted and ill-defined tissue was present between two structures, and type 3 when the fluid signal was disrupted and well-defined tissue was present between two structures. Twenty-six adhesions were suspected on MR images and nineteen were visualized at surgery. The positive predictive value was 50% for type 1 adhesions, 67% for type 2 adhesions, and 100% for type 3 adhesions. Additional lesions were detected in the navicular bursa in 15 limbs, the DDFT in 13, the navicular bone in 15, the collateral sesamoidean ligaments in 9, and the distal sesamoidean impar ligament in 8. A discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal with well-defined tissue between two structures detected on high-field MR images is diagnostic for a navicular bursa adhesion. Additional lesions in the podotrochlear apparatus are common in horses with navicular bursa adhesions. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Magnetic resonance advection imaging of cerebrovascular pulse dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Henning U; Dyke, Jonathan P; Tabelow, Karsten; Schiff, Nicholas D; Ballon, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the pulsatile signal component of dynamic echo planar imaging data from the brain by modeling the dependence between local temporal and spatial signal variability. The resulting magnetic resonance advection imaging maps depict the location of major arteries. Color direction maps allow for visualization of the direction of blood vessels. The potential significance of magnetic resonance advection imaging maps is demonstrated on a functional magnetic resonance imaging data set of 19 healthy subjects. A comparison with the here introduced pulse coherence maps, in which the echo planar imaging signal is correlated with a cardiac pulse signal, shows that the magnetic resonance advection imaging approach results in a better spatial definition without the need for a pulse reference. In addition, it is shown that magnetic resonance advection imaging velocities can be estimates of pulse wave velocities if certain requirements are met, which are specified. Although for this application magnetic resonance advection imaging velocities are not quantitative estimates of pulse wave velocities, they clearly depict local pulsatile dynamics. Magnetic resonance advection imaging can be applied to existing dynamic echo planar imaging data sets with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. It is discussed whether magnetic resonance advection imaging might have the potential to evolve into a biomarker for the health of the cerebrovascular system.

  2. Imaging of pulmonary pathologies: focus on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian

    2009-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung has shown tremendous progress in recent years. This includes parallel imaging, new contrast agents and mechanisms, ultrafast imaging, and respiratory gating. With these improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use. The main advantage for MRI of the lung is its unique combination of structural and functional assessment within a single imaging examination. This comprehensive imaging assessment is an asset when compared with computed tomography, which is complemented by the fact that MRI does not carry any exposure to ionizing radiation, making it especially advantageous in children, young adults, and for follow-up examinations either in disease surveillance or therapy monitoring. Clinical indications for MRI are: pulmonary vascular disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, airway diseases, especially cystic fibrosis; neoplastic disease, including staging of lung cancer as an alternative imaging modality; all pediatric indications (e.g., congenital anomalies); as well as follow-up examinations. Under investigation is the application of MRI for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as asthma. In this regard the additional benefit from MRI using hyperpolarized gases has to be determined.

  3. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  4. Historical survey of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1984-04-01

    We have recently celebrated the 10th birthday of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS), and this seems an appropriate time to review the history of its development. Basically, RIS is a photophysics process in which tunable light sources are used to remove a valence electron from an atom of selected atomic number, Z. If appropriate lasers are used as the light source, one electron can be removed from each atom of the selected Z in the laser pulse. This implies that RIS can be a very efficient, as well as selective, ionization process. In what we normally call RIS, laser schemes are employed which preserve both of these features. In contrast, multiphoton ionization (MPI) is more general, although not necessarily Z selective or very efficient because resonances are often not used. Early research completed in the USSR and described as selective two-step photoionization, employed resonances to ionize the rubidium atom and served to guide work on laser isotope separation. 29 references, 8 figures.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of primary vaginal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ben.taylor@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Dugar, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Davidson, S.E. [Radiation Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrington, B.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Aims: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of vaginal carcinoma and to suggest a role for MRI in its management. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with primary vaginal carcinoma treated at our institution between 1996 and 2005 were included in the study. The MRI examinations were reviewed and tumour dimensions, signal characteristics and involvement of pelvic structures were documented, as were sites of enlarged lymph nodes and metastases. Details of patient treatment and outcome were obtained from the clinical notes. Results: The median patient age was 54 years (range 31-86 years). Tumour maximum diameter ranged from 1.6-11.3 cm (mean 3.7 cm). Most tumours were of iso-intense signal to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyper-intense to muscle on T2-weighted images. Eighty-eight percent of patients had tumour extending beyond the vagina and 56% of patients had Figo stage III or above tumours. Sixteen patients were treated with radiotherapy (two with chemoradiotherapy), five with surgery and four with supportive care. Ten patients (40%) died of their disease during the study period. The MRI stage of the tumour correlated with survival. Conclusion: MRI identified over 95% of primary vaginal tumours in the present study, enabled radiological staging, which correlated with outcome, and provided information of use in treatment planning.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracavernous pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, Masaki; Yasui, Toshihiro; Yagura, Hisatsugu; Fu, Yoshihiko; Baba, Mitsuru (Baba Memorial Hospital, Sakai, Osaka (Japan)); Hakuba, Akira; Nishimura, Shuro

    1989-07-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of intracavernous pathology, T{sub 1}-weighted spin echo images of four vascular lesions and 10 neoplastic lesions with surgically confirmed cavernous sinus (CS) invasion were reviewed retrospectively. In one case of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) and one of dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM), the internal carotid artery (ICA) and rapid shunted flow were depicted as signal voids, and the relationship between the ICA and shunted flow was clearly shown. Normal venous flow appeared as a low-intensity area and was observed even in the presence of the CCF and dural AVM. In two cases of thrombosed aneurysms, the thrombosis was clearly demonstrated, along with patent arterial flow in one case; in the other case, however, it was impossible to differentiate patent arterial flow from calcification. The intensity of all neoplastic lesions was similar to that of the cerebral cortex. The relationship between the ICA and the tumors was clearly demonstrated. The visual pathways were also plainly shown unless they were involved, or markedly compressed, by tumor. CS invasion was strongly associated with four findings: (1) encasement of the ICA by the tumor; (2) marked displacement of the ICA; (3) absence of low intensity, which reflects normal venous flow, in the CS; and (4) extension of extrasellar tumors to the medial wall or of intrasellar tumors to the lateral wall. MR imaging was judged promising in the evaluation of intracavernous pathology. (author).

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for characterizing myocardial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Maythem; Liu, Hui; Liang, Chang-Hong; Wilson, Mark W

    2017-09-01

    The National Institute of Health defined cardiomyopathy as diseases of the heart muscle. These myocardial diseases have different etiology, structure and treatment. This review highlights the key imaging features of different myocardial diseases. It provides information on myocardial structure/orientation, perfusion, function and viability in diseases related to cardiomyopathy. The standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences can reveal insight on left ventricular (LV) mass, volumes and regional contractile function in all types of cardiomyopathy diseases. Contrast enhanced MRI sequences allow visualization of different infarct patterns and sizes. Enhancement of myocardial inflammation and infarct (location, transmurality and pattern) on contrast enhanced MRI have been used to highlight the key differences in myocardial diseases, predict recovery of function and healing. The common feature in many forms of cardiomyopathy is the presence of diffuse-fibrosis. Currently, imaging sequences generating the most interest in cardiomyopathy include myocardial strain analysis, tissue mapping (T1, T2, T2*) and extracellular volume (ECV) estimation techniques. MRI sequences have the potential to decode the etiology by showing various patterns of infarct and diffuse fibrosis in myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to aortic stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension. Integrated PET/MRI system may add in the future more information for the diagnosis and progression of cardiomyopathy diseases. With the promise of high spatial/temporal resolution and 3D coverage, MRI will be an indispensible tool in diagnosis and monitoring the benefits of new therapies designed to treat myocardial diseases.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute physeal injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, P.G. [Dept. of Radiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mah, J.Y. [Dept. of Orthopedics, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Friedman, L. [Dept. of Radiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1994-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits noninvasive evaluation of the cartilage of the growth plate and epiphysis. This paper reports three cases where MRI was used to supplement conventional radiography in the assessment of acute physeal injuries. In the first patient, MRI was used for postoperative assessment of a radial neck fracture, avoiding further surgical exploration. In the second case, MRI was compared with ultrasonography in the diagnosis of proximal humeral epiphyseal separation in a neonate. In the third case, MRI and computed tomography were compared in evaluation of a Salter-Harris type 4 distal femur fracture. In all cases MRI was diagnostic. MRI is the investigation of choice in acute complex physeal injuries, and is particularly appropriate for use prior to the appearance of the secondary ossification center. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of ovarian cystic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, Yukari; Kawana, Kouji; Iiyama, Motoko; Abe, Kimihiko; Yachida, Meri; Amino, Saburou; Kotake, Fumio

    1988-11-01

    Seventeen cases with cystic ovarian tumors were examined with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT scanning. The contents of the cysts were analyzed as for protein, fat, and iron. The intensity patterns of the cystic lesion were not directly related to the amount of protein, fat, nor iron. But an for the cystadenomas, protein concentration are the most responsible for their intensities, and as for the dermoid cysts, fat are the most responsible for. And in endemetrial cysts, it seems that variable amount of protein, fat, and iron make the unique intensity patterns. MRI was superior to CT in characterizing cyts especially for cystadenoma and endmetorial cysts. And with much more case studies, relationship between protein concentration and intensities will be proved.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Kollewe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disorder which is incurable to date. As there are many ongoing studies with therapeutic candidates, it is of major interest to develop biomarkers not only to facilitate early diagnosis but also as a monitoring tool to predict disease progression and to enable correct randomization of patients in clinical trials. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has made substantial progress over the last three decades and is a practical, noninvasive method to gain insights into the pathology of the disease. Disease-specific MRI changes therefore represent potential biomarkers for ALS. In this paper we give an overview of structural and functional MRI alterations in ALS with the focus on task-free resting-state investigations to detect cortical network failures.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of pericardial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori

    1988-10-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients, ranged from 4 to 15 years in age, with pericardial disease (1 with pericaditis with JRA, 1 with chylopericardium, and 2 with pericarditis) for morphological and histological evaluation of the percardial disease. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo method using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients pericardial diseases were clearly demonstrated. MRI visualized the thickened pericardium as 2 to 4 mm thick curvilinear line of high signal intensity in all the patients. Pericardial effusion was detected in all the patients. Two of them showed low signal intensity and 1 showed high signal intensity. Pericardial effusion in patient with chylopericardium had markedly high signal intensity, similar to that of the subcutaneous far tissue. MRI appears to be an important modality for the evaluation of pericardial disease.

  14. Imaging of Groin Pain: Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Endo, Yoshimi; Potter, Hollis G

    Evaluation of groin pain in athletes may be challenging as pain is typically poorly localized and the pubic symphyseal region comprises closely approximated tendons and muscles. As such, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) may help determine the etiology of groin pain. A PubMed search was performed using the following search terms: ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, and groin pain. Date restrictions were not placed on the literature search. Clinical review. Level 4. MRI is sensitive in diagnosing pathology in groin pain. Not only can MRI be used to image rectus abdominis/adductor longus aponeurosis and pubic bone pathology, but it can also evaluate other pathology within the hip and pelvis. MRI is especially helpful when groin pain is poorly localized. Real-time capability makes ultrasound useful in evaluating the pubic symphyseal region, as it can be used for evaluation and treatment. MRI and US are valuable in diagnosing pathology in athletes with groin pain, with the added utility of treatment using US-guided intervention. Strength-of Recommendation Taxonomy: C.

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ileocolonic Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Mie A; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Nathan, Torben

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dw- MRI) utilizes differences in the motion of water molecules between tissues for image formation without administration of contrast materials. Inflammation in the bowel wall slows water transit resulting in lower apparent diffusions...

  16. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast...

  17. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification

    OpenAIRE

    T.S. Murunya; S. Audithan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an image classification method for retrieval of images from a multi-varied MRI database. With the development of sophisticated medical imaging technology which helps doctors in diagnosis, medical image databases contain a huge amount of digital images. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique which picks signals from a body's magnetic particles spinning to magnetic tune and through a computer converts scanned data into pictures of internal organs...

  18. Imaging of surfaces by concurrent surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahber Thariani

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon induced fluorescent are sensitive tools for surface analysis. However, existing instruments in this area have provided limited capability for concurrent detection, and may be large and expensive. We demonstrate a highly cost-effective system capable of concurrent surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF imaging, allowing for simultaneous monitoring of reflectivity and fluorescence from discrete spatial regions. The instrument allows for high performance imaging and quantitative measurements with surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon induced fluorescence, with inexpensive off-the-shelf components.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, Wibke [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wibke.blaicher@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Schwindt, Jens [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Deutinger, Josef [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Bernaschek, Gerhard [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of oscillating electrical currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W; Bajaj, Vikram S; Teisseyre, Thomas Z; Pines, Alexander

    2010-05-11

    Functional MRI has become an important tool of researchers and clinicians who seek to understand patterns of neuronal activation that accompany sensory and cognitive processes. However, the interpretation of fMRI images rests on assumptions about the relationship between neuronal firing and hemodynamic response that are not firmly grounded in rigorous theory or experimental evidence. Further, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent effect, which correlates an MRI observable to neuronal firing, evolves over a period that is 2 orders of magnitude longer than the underlying processes that are thought to cause it. Here, we instead demonstrate experiments to directly image oscillating currents by MRI. The approach rests on a resonant interaction between an applied rf field and an oscillating magnetic field in the sample and, as such, permits quantitative, frequency-selective measurements of current density without spatial or temporal cancellation. We apply this method in a current loop phantom, mapping its magnetic field and achieving a detection sensitivity near the threshold required for the detection of neuronal currents. Because the contrast mechanism is under spectroscopic control, we are able to demonstrate how ramped and phase-modulated spin-lock radiation can enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the experiment. We further demonstrate the combination of these methods with remote detection, a technique in which the encoding and detection of an MRI experiment are separated by sample flow or translation. We illustrate that remotely detected MRI permits the measurement of currents in small volumes of flowing water with high sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author).

  2. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...... of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging....

  3. The VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey, VIPS for short, is a combined 5 GHz and 15 GHz survey with the Very Long Baseline Array of ~1100 active galactic nuclei...

  4. Normal perinatal and paediatric postmortem magnetic resonance imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Barber, Joy L. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Cardiorespiratory Division, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Department of Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    As postmortem imaging becomes more widely used following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the correct interpretation of images becomes imperative, particularly given the increased use of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging. Many pathological processes may have similar appearances in life and following death. A thorough knowledge of normal postmortem changes is therefore required within postmortem magnetic resonance imaging to ensure that these are not mistakenly interpreted as significant pathology. Similarly, some changes that are interpreted as pathological if they occur during life may be artefacts on postmortem magnetic resonance imaging that are of limited significance. This review serves to illustrate briefly those postmortem magnetic resonance imaging changes as part of the normal changes after death in fetuses and children, and highlight imaging findings that may confuse or mislead an observer to identifying pathology where none is present. (orig.)

  5. Breast magnetic resonance imaging for the interventionalist: magnetic resonance imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sandra B

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance Imaging-guided breast biopsy is an essential component of breast imaging practices offering breast magnetic resonance imaging. Careful planning and preparation allow for an efficient and successful biopsy. Deliberate positioning and controlled compression are keys to a comfortable and cooperative patient. The biopsy is only complete once imaging-histologic correlation has been made by the radiologist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  7. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution o...

  8. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefrova, Jana, E-mail: sefrova@post.cz [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paluska, Petr [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Belobradek, Zdenek [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brodak, Milos [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Dolezel, Martin [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Prosvic, Petr [Department of Urology, Regional Hospital Nachod, Nachod (Czech Republic); Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hoffmann, Petr [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Louda, Miroslav [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nejedla, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Minoru; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Satoru; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisatoshi.

    1988-04-01

    Nineteen patients with lumbosacral spina bifida were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were divided into two groups: those with lumbosacral lipoma and those with meningomyelocele. All of the patients with meningomyelocele underwent surgery soon after birth for closure of the skin defect. Whenever possible, examination was not confined to the lumbosacral area but also included the brain and other portions of the spinal cord. Certain similarities and differences in pathology were ascertained in the two groups. The tethered cords were the same in both groups. However, Chiari malformations were observed only in patients with meningomyelocele, and hydrocephalus occurred only in patients with Chiari malformations. Syringomyelia and scoliosis were detected in both groups, but scoliosis was more prevalent in the meningomyelocele group. There appeared to be a correlation between scoliosis and syringomyelia; in five of the seven cases of syringomyelia, the locations of the scoliosis and syringomyelia were the same. With MRI, these complex pathologies, including tethered cord, syringomyelia, scoliosis, Chiari malformations, and hydrocephalus, were easily visualized. The superiority of MRI over conventional X-ray technology has been well established. First, a direct image of the spinal cord is obtained. Second, there is no necessity for injection of contrast material into the intrathecal space. Third, any scanning field is possible. There are also some disadvantages with MRI. First, the spatial resolution is inferior to that of high-resolution computed tomography. Second, MRI cannot provide information concerning bone cortex. Therefore, bone involvement cannot be accurately diagnosed. However, in the assessment of spinal dysraphism, MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool and should be the preferred method of diagnosing spinal dysraphism.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of suspected atrial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegus, M A; Greenberg, M A; Spindola-Franco, H; Fayemi, A

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography has become the standard technique for evaluation of cardiac and paracardiac mass lesions. We have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an independent assessment of cardiac-associated masses in patients with echocardiograms demonstrating sessile atrial tumors. MRI was performed in seven patients, ages 33 to 84, whose echocardiographic diagnoses included left atrial mass (five), right atrial mass (one), and interatrial mass (one). In four of the patients with a diagnosis of left atrial mass, MRI showed extracardiac compression of the atrium, simulating a tumor (hiatal hernia, tortuous descending aorta, bronchogenic cyst). MRI was entirely normal in one patient with an apparent left atrial mass. MRI elucidated extension of an extracavitary mass into the interatrial septum in two patients. One of these patients with an echocardiographic right atrial mass had extension of a lipoma into the interatrial septum without atrial tumor. MRI confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis of an interatrial mass in the other patient. We conclude that MRI, because of its ability to define anatomic relationships and tissue characteristics, is a powerful noninvasive tool for evaluating suspected cardiac mass lesions. Although echocardiography remains the primary screening test for the detection of cardiac masses, MRI is a more specific modality for precise diagnosis. Correct MRI interpretation may obviate the need for invasive studies or surgery.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in 122 children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Karen L; Wong, Yiu C; Fong, Chek M; Wong, Sik N; So, Kwan T

    2004-09-01

    The interrelationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings, types of cerebral palsy, and gestation was studied. We analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging of brain in 122 children with spastic cerebral palsy. Forty-three patients had spastic hemiplegia, 61 had spastic diplegia, and 18 had spastic tetraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were observed in 75% of patients. Periventricular leukomalacia accounted for 66% of abnormalities observed in patients with spastic diplegia; other types of brain lesions were uncommon. In patients with spastic tetraplegia, two types of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities predominated: congenital brain anomalies and term-type brain injuries, 42% and 33% respectively. Types of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were more heterogeneous in patients with spastic hemiplegia. Preterm brain injuries (periventricular leukomalacia and posthemorrhagic porencephaly) were observed often in patients born at preterm but were also observed in patients born at term. Term-type brain injuries (term-type border-zone infarct, basal ganglia-thalamic lesion, subcortical leukomalacia, and multicystic encephalomalacia) were observed only in patients born at or near term. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging findings for patients with spastic cerebral palsy were closely related to types of cerebral palsy and gestation at birth. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with perinatal brain injury may reflect pathologic changes and is useful in understanding and evaluating cerebral palsy.

  14. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  15. NMRI: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; IRM: imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyon, D.; Cabanis, E.A.; Iba-Zizen, M.Th

    2001-07-01

    The harmlessness of NMR imaging make it the best examination technique for the brain, marrow, bones, joints, heart, vessels, liver, pelvis etc.. The improvement of images and their preciseness enlarges the field of investigation of interventional and functional NMRs. The basic principles, semiology in 3-D NMR, contra-indications, risks and cardiac pathology are analyzed. (J.S.)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Quirk, M E; Dohan, D

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently been introduced in the United States as an imaging technique for clinical use. Initially used by neurologists to view the brain stem, its indications have rapidly expanded to include spine, pelvis, bone marrow, and joints. This has raised concerns over the appropriate, cost-effective use of such an expensive technology. This paper examines MRI scanning patterns that have developed over time in central Massachusetts and surveys primary care knowledge, attitudes, and patterns of utilization. The two MRI centers in central Massachusetts were surveyed for information about the number and types of scans ordered and the specialties of the physicians who ordered the scans. Questionnaires were sent to primary care physicians in Worcester County to assess knowledge and attitudes about MRI and utilization. The data demonstrate changing patterns of MRI utilization over time. Orthopedics has been the specialty with the greatest increase in use, now slightly surpassing neurology in the total number of scans ordered. Primary care physician use has doubled over this same period. Not all primary care physicians utilize MRI, but those who have used the technology have familiarized themselves with its indications and problems and have a better knowledge about its costs. Utilization patterns of MRI have changed considerably in a short time, with primary care physicians requesting use of this new technology much more frequently than when it was first introduced.

  17. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  18. Dynamical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Micron-scale Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixta, Aimee; Choate, Alexandra; Maeker, Jake; Bogat, Sophia; Tennant, Daniel; Mozaffari, Shirin; Markert, John

    We report our efforts in the development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) for dynamical imaging of liquid media at the micron scale. Our probe contains microfluidic samples sealed in thin-walled (µm) quartz tubes, with a micro-oscillator sensor nearby in vacuum to maintain its high mechanical resonance quality factor. Using 10 µm spherical permalloy magnets at the oscillator tips, a 3D T1-resolved image of spin density can be obtained by reconstruction from our magnetostatics-modelled resonance slices; as part of this effort, we are exploring single-shot T1 measurements for faster dynamical imaging. We aim to further enhance imaging by using a 2 ω technique to eliminate artifact signals during the cyclic inversion of nuclear spins. The ultimate intent of these efforts is to perform magnetic resonance imaging of individual biological cells.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderKnaap, MS; Smit, LME; Barth, PG; CatsmanBerrevoets, CE; Brouwer, OF; Begeer, JH; deCoo, IFM; Valk, J.

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (QID) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, M. S.; Smit, L. M.; Barth, P. G.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C. E.; Brouwer, O. F.; Begeer, J. H.; de Coo, I. F.; Valk, J.

    1997-01-01

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  1. [Magnetic resonance imaging without sedation in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureta-Velasco, N; Martínez-de Aragón, A; Moral-Pumarega, M T; Núñez-Enamorado, N; Bergón-Sendín, E; Pallás-Alonso, C R

    2015-05-01

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without sedation in the neonatal period increases patient safety, availability and profitability of the diagnostic tool. The aim in this study was to evaluate a new protocol of MRI without sedation during a 20-month period. In the protocol, the patients are prepared in the neonatal unit. Prospective descriptive study, from May 2012 to December 2013. Patients included were neonates requiring MRI, clinically stable and not requiring ventilatory support. The method was based on the application of developmental centered care and the use of a vacuum matress to immobilize the baby. The principal outcome parameter of interest was the percentage of succesfully completed MRIs. The duration of the MRI and the number of interruptions, was also studied from October 2012. A total of 43 MRIs without sedation were carried out on 42 patients: 41 cerebral and 2 spinal. The success rate was 97.7% (42/43). The mean MRI time was 26.3 minutes (95% CI 23.3-29.3 mins; range 16-50 mins). MRIs were completed without interruption in 20 of the 34 cases (58%) in which the duration was recorded. The number of interruptions per procedure varied from 0 to 3, with a mean of 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-0.8) and a median of 0. The protocol had a success rate of over 90%. Thus MRI without sedation seems applicable in Spanish hospitals, with most of the preparation being performed in the neonatal unit, in order to reduce the occupation of the MRI unit, as well as minimizing stress to the baby. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Op 't Veld, Roel C.; de Graaf, Wolter; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Grüll, Holger

    2017-01-01

    The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a non-invasive technique to image heart function

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Window to a Watery World

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Window to a Watery World. Kavita Dorai. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 19-32. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/05/0019-0032 ...

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legchenko, A; Descloitres, M; Guyard, H [IRD/ UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS/G-INP, LTHE UMR 5564, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Vincent, C [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement and CNRS-LGGE, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Garambois, S [Institut des Sciences de la terre (ISTerre), Universite Joseph Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chalikakis, K [Universite d' Avignon, UMR EMMAH (UAPV-INRA), 33, rue Pasteur, 84000 Avignon (France); Ezersky, M, E-mail: anatoli.legtchenko@ird.fr [Geophysical Institute of Israel, BP182, Lod 71100 (Israel)

    2011-02-15

    The surface nuclear magnetic resonance method (SNMR) is an established geophysical tool routinely used for investigating one-dimensional (1D) and sometimes 2D subsurface water-saturated formations. We have expanded the tool by developing a 3D application. 3D-SNMR is a large-scale method that allows magnetic resonance imaging of groundwater down to about 80 m. Similar to most surface geophysical methods, 3D-SNMR has limited resolution, but it is effective for investigating water-saturated geological formations larger than several tens of meters. Because the performance of the method depends on variable survey conditions, we cannot estimate it in general. For demonstration purposes, we present an example of numerical modeling under fixed conditions. Results show that under certain conditions it is possible to detect a water volume as small as 500 m{sup 3} and the detection threshold depends on the ambient electromagnetic noise magnitude and on the location of the target volume relative to the SNMR loops. The 3D-SNMR method was used to investigate accumulated water within the Tete Rousse glacier (French Alps). Inversion of the field measurements made it possible to locate the principal reservoir in the central part of the glacier and estimate the volume of accumulated water. These results were verified by 20 boreholes installed after the 3D-SNMR results were obtained and by pumping water out of the glacier. Very good correspondence between the 3D-SNMR and borehole results was observed.

  5. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of central pontine myelinolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, CI; Wijdicks, EFM

    Central Pontine Myelinolysis (CPM) is a rare neurologic complication after liver transplantation. The true incidence of CPM after orthotopic liver tranplantation remains an estimate. However, with the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging, early recognition became feasible. In this report, we

  6. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of head and neck vascular anomalies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnetic resonance imaging of head and neck vascular anomalies: pearls and pitfalls. Shaimaa Abdelsattar Mohammad, Amr Abdelhamid Abou Zeid, Ahmed M. Fawzi, Mohamed M. Dahab, Iman A. Ragab, Osama El-Naggar ...

  8. Benefits and limitations of imaging multiples: Interferometric and resonant migration

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-07-01

    The benefits and limitations of imaging multiples are reviewed for interferometric migration and resonant migration. Synthetic and field data examples are used to characterize the effectiveness of the methods.

  9. The Dark Energy Survey Image Processing Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, E.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a five-year optical imaging campaign with the goal of understanding the origin of cosmic acceleration. DES performs a 5000 square degree survey of the southern sky in five optical bands (g,r,i,z,Y) to a depth of ~24th magnitude. Contemporaneously, DES performs a deep, time-domain survey in four optical bands (g,r,i,z) over 27 square degrees. DES exposures are processed nightly with an evolving data reduction pipeline and evaluated for image quality to determine if they need to be retaken. Difference imaging and transient source detection are also performed in the time domain component nightly. On a bi-annual basis, DES exposures are reprocessed with a refined pipeline and coadded to maximize imaging depth. Here we describe the DES image processing pipeline in support of DES science, as a reference for users of archival DES data, and as a guide for future astronomical surveys.

  10. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder through Brain Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder through Brain Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging THESIS MARCH 2016 Kyle A. Palko, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT...declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENC-MS-16-M-123 DIAGNOSING AUTISM SPECTRUM...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENC-MS-16-M-123 DIAGNOSING AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER THROUGH BRAIN FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING Kyle

  11. Lymphoma of uterine cervix: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaan, Daniel; Constantino, Carolina Pesce Lamas; Souza, Rodrigo Canellas de, E-mail: daniel.kanaan@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Parente, Daniella Braz [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Lymphoma of the cervix is a rare disease. About 1.0% to 1.5% of extranodal lymphomas originates in the female genital tract. The clinical presentation of this condition is nonspecific and magnetic resonance imaging is important for diagnostic elucidation. The present report describes the case of a 80-year-old patient with lumbar pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging showed a large uterine mass. The final diagnosis was lymphoma. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino, E-mail: marcello@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica; Sa, Jose Luiz de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cecilio Vieira de [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Tomoson, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Engel, Edgard Eduard [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biomecanica, Medicina e Reabilitacao do Aparelho Locomotor

    2010-07-15

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  13. Unusual Presentation of Popliteal Cyst on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Popliteal cyst commonly presents as an ellipsoid mass with uniform low signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Here, we describe a popliteal cyst with unusual appearance on magnetic resonance imaging, including heterogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Arthroscopic cyst decompression revealed that the cyst was filled with necrotic synovial villi, indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthroscopic enlargement of unidirectional valvular slits with synovectomy was useful for the final diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Functional Brain Imaging: A Comprehensive Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sarraf, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain imaging allows measuring dynamic functionality in all brain regions. It is broadly used in clinical cognitive neuroscience as, well as in research. It will allow the observation of neural activities in the brain simultaneously. From the beginning when functional brain imaging was initiated by the mapping of brain functions proposed by phrenologists, many scientists were asking why we need to image brain functionality since we have already structural information. Simply, their important question was including a great answer. Functional information of the human brain would definitely complement structural information, helping to have a better understanding of what is happening in the brain. This paper, which could be useful to those who have an interest in functional brain imaging, such as engineers, will present a quick review of modalities used in functional brain imaging. We will concentrate on the most used techniques in functional imaging which are functional magnetic resonance imaging (fM...

  15. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  16. Silicon nanoparticles as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptekar, Jacob W; Cassidy, Maja C; Johnson, Alexander C; Barton, Robert A; Lee, Menyoung; Ogier, Alexander C; Vo, Chinh; Anahtar, Melis N; Ren, Yin; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Cory, David G; Hill, Alison L; Mair, Ross W; Rosen, Matthew S; Walsworth, Ronald L; Marcus, Charles M

    2009-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei provides high image contrast with little or no background signal. To date, in vivo applications of prehyperpolarized materials have been limited by relatively short nuclear spin relaxation times. Here, we investigate silicon nanoparticles as a new type of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent. Nuclear spin relaxation times for a variety of Si nanoparticles are found to be remarkably long, ranging from many minutes to hours at room temperature, allowing hyperpolarized nanoparticles to be transported, administered, and imaged on practical time scales. Additionally, we demonstrate that Si nanoparticles can be surface functionalized using techniques common to other biologically targeted nanoparticle systems. These results suggest that Si nanoparticles can be used as a targetable, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent with a large range of potential applications.

  17. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  18. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast, perfusion weighted imaging uses tracers to exploit hemodynamic status, which enables researchers and clinicians to consider this imaging modality as an early biomarker of certain brain diseases. In this review, the fundamentals of physics for diffusion and perfusion MR imaging both of which are highly sensitive to microenvironmental alterations at the cellular level as well as their application in the treatment of aging, Alzheimer's disease, brain tumors and cerebral ischemic injury were discussed.

  19. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p histopathology were 0.949 (p histopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging can accurately estimate index tumor volume as determined by histology. Magnetic resonance imaging has better accuracy in predicting histopathology tumor volume in tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) than prostate specific antigen and age. Index tumor volume as

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of invasive breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    graphic findings, and screening for breast cancer in younger women with familial breast cancer. Interpretation of MR images requires a meticulous imaging technique including the use of contrast enhancement and fat suppression MR sequences using a good breast coil. Introduction. The role of MR imaging in the diagno-.

  1. Fast abdominal magnetic resonance imaging; Schnelle Abdomenbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Riffel, P. [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal imaging is the driving force that necessitates the development of numerous techniques for accelerated image acquisition in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Today, numerous techniques are available that enable rapid, high spatial resolution acquisition for both T1 and T2 weighted images. These techniques open new opportunities in the detection and classification of numerous pathologies in the abdomen. However, there is still ongoing progress in the development of fast and ultrafast sequences and promising techniques are currently close to clinical application. With these 4D-technologies, MRI is becoming the central imaging modality for dynamic, motion-compensated imaging of the parenchymal abdominal organs such as liver, pancreas and kidney.

  2. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both ...

  3. Calix[4]arenes as Molecular Platforms in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schühle, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool in medical diagnosis. It uses non-ionizing radio-frequency radiation and produces images with excellent resolution. To increase the contrast, Gd(III)-containing compounds are applied leading to a brightening of the area of interest. The

  4. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases...

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  6. Voriconazole-related periostitis presenting on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Derik L

    2015-01-01

    Painful periostitis is a complication of long-term antifungal therapy with voriconazole. A high clinical suspicion coupled with imaging and laboratory assessment is useful to establish the diagnosis. Prompt discontinuance of voriconazole typically results in the resolution of symptoms and signs. This report describes the presentation of voriconazole-related periostitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Ocular pursuit movement assessment by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadera, W; Karlik, S J; Viirre, E; Bloom, J N

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new technique for generating cinematic magnetic resonance images. This method produces more physiological imaging of extraocular muscles than our previous method. In addition, this technique provides more comfort for the study subject and results in less head movement artifact.

  8. Towards earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease using Magnetic Resonance images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes Simoes, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is essential to provide the patients with adequate and timely treatments and to help researchers monitor their effectiveness. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic tool that provides high-resolution images and a high brain tissue

  9. Image rendering and processing of magnetic resonance angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ooijen, P.M.A.; Kuijpers, Th.J.A.; Boeve, W.J.; De Groot, J.C.; Oudkerk, M.

    2000-01-01

    New imaging sequences with increasing spatial and temporal resolution are introduced frequently in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to perform noninvasive angiography both with and without contrast media for the enhancement of the vessels. These new sequences produce a growing amount of data to be

  10. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  11. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita

    2013-01-01

    which can characterize such features non-invasively and repeatedly will be of significant value in planning treatment as well as monitoring response to treatment. The three techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed here. Tumor pO2 can be measured by two MRI methods requiring...... an exogenous contrast agent: electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). Tumor metabolic profile can be assessed by a third method, hyperpolarized metabolic MR, based on injection of hyperpolarized biological molecules labeled with 13C or 15N and MR......The tumor microenvironment is distinct from normal tissue as a result of abnormal vascular network characterized by hypoxia, low pH, high interstitial fluid pressure and elevated glycolytic activity. This poses a barrier to treatments including radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Imaging methods...

  13. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...... standards of clinical examination and radiography, and allow direct visualisation of both joint inflammation and structural damage. Although measuring similar pathology, each of these imaging tools has its own benefits and limitations; understanding these will help researchers and clinicians to determine...

  14. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging: 2. Radiofrequency FT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FT-EPR, Hahn-echo, acquisition delay, single-point imaging (SPI), gradient-echo, k-space, echo-SPI, carbogen, oxygen relaxivity, T2* T2- and T1-based oximetry, coregistration, cycling hypoxia, blood volume, angiogram, Warburg effect, metabolic imaging.

  16. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination in a patient with non-magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical dilemmas arise when patients with a non-magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker are required to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We encountered a pacemaker patient with debilitating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease, who required an MRI prior to deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. MRI was performed safely without adverse events despite the presence of a conventional pacemaker.

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings of children with kernicterus

    OpenAIRE

    Sarı, Sahabettin; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Batur, Aabdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Caksen, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The term kernicterus, or bilirubin encephalopathy, is used to describe pathological bilirubin staining of the basal ganglia, brain stem, and cerebellum, and is associated with hyperbilirubinemia. Kernicterus generally occurs in untreated hyperbilirubinemia or cases where treatment is delayed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based studies have shown characteristic findings in kernicterus. The objective of our study was to describe the role of 1H magnetic resonance spectrosc...

  18. Asbestos-related pericardial thickening detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, N A; Underwood, S R; Rudd, R M

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in four male asbestos workers in whom the chest radiograph revealed pleural but not pulmonary or pericardial disease. Patients underwent thoracic multislice spin echo imaging, with measurement of left and right ventricular volumes at end-diastole and end-systole, and a study of the flow in the superior vena cava as an indirect measure to the filling of the right ventricle. Patients also underwent respiratory function tests and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Magnetic resonance, but not HRCT, showed pericardial thickening in two patients. Magnetic resonance demonstrated reduced diastolic flow in the superior vena cava in one patient, reflecting impaired right ventricular filling. All other magnetic resonance measurements of cardiac function were normal. HRCT demonstrated mild asbestosis in three patients in which neither the chest radiograph nor magnetic resonance showed signs of parenchymal disease, and pericardiac calcification without thickening in one patient. It is concluded that magnetic resonance is superior to HRCT in identifying pericardial thickening, but that HRCT is superior to magnetic resonance in identifying asbestos-related pleural and pulmonary disease.

  19. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools.

  20. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of ocular motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadera, W; Viirre, E; Karlik, S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a technique of generation of a cine motion picture of ocular movements in a patient with Duane Type II exotropia. With the magnetic resonance scanning unit, multiple scans can be sequenced to give a graphic animation to the eyes as targets are fixated across the visual field. With this technique, we were able to clearly view the contractility of the extraocular muscles and note the changes in pulling directions of the muscles in this patient. The restriction of movement due to the cocontraction of the horizontal rectus muscles was readily apparent.

  1. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Children With Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Aydin, Kursad; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Havali, Cengiz

    2015-08-01

    Increased intracranial hypertension is defined as elevated intracranial pressure with absence of hydrocephalus, vascular or structural abnormalities, and normal cerebrospinal fluid content. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities of the optic nerve and sheath that have been described in adults include increased nerve tortuosity, flattening in posterior aspect of globe, intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve, and enlarged optic nerve sheath. We evaluated accuracy of those proposed markers on magnetic resonance imaging in children with increased intracranial hypertension that are described in adults. Eleven patients between 3 and 15 years of age with intracranial hypertension were selected for re-evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging that had been previously described as normal to determine the presence of: (1) increased tortuosity and elongation of the optic nerve; (2) enlargement of the optic nerve sheath on axial and coronal T2 so called by us "target sign" and postcontrast T1 sequences; (3) flattening in posterior aspect of the globe; and (4) intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve head. Of the 11 patients, tortuosity of the optic nerve (10/11, 90.9%) and enlarged optic nerve sheath--target sign (7/11, 63.6%)--were the most common findings. Flattening in the posterior aspect of globe (5/11, 45.5%) and intraocular protrusion (3/11, 27.3%) were also detected as a novel magnetic resonance imaging findings. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the optic nerve and sheath include valuable signs of intracranial hypertension not only in adults but also in children. This is the first detailed analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with increased intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholesteatoma imaging using modified echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flook, E; Izzat, S; Ismail, A

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of cholesteatomas can be useful especially in cases of recurrent disease. Computed tomography scans have been recommended before primary surgery, but cholesteatoma tissue looks similar to inflammatory tissue. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is both sensitive and specific in detecting cholesteatoma, which appears as a bright signal on a dark background. Non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is superior to routine echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as it minimises susceptibility artefacts; however, the addition of this facility involves expensive magnetic resonance scanner upgrading. To avoid the cost of such upgrading, we modified our echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging parameters and then scanned 15 consecutive cases of suspected cholesteatoma or suspected recurrent cholesteatoma. Imaging results correlated well with clinical and/or operative findings. These results indicate that software adjustments can enable echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect cholesteatomas reliably, and as effectively as non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. This discovery has the potential to facilitate reliable delayed post-operative screening of canal wall up mastoidectomies, avoiding the need for a 'second look' procedure.

  3. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  4. Imaging of juvenile spondyloarthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile spondyloarthropathies are mainly manifested by symptoms of peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. Early involvement of sacroiliac joints and spine is exceptionally rare in children; this usually happens in adulthood. Conventional radiographs visualize late inflammatory lesions. Early diagnosis is possible with the use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the article presented classifications and radiographic presentation of juvenile spondyloarthropathies. This part discusses changes seen on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathies, these examinations are conducted to diagnose inflammatory lesions in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths, tendons and bursae. Moreover, magnetic resonance also shows subchondral bone marrow edema, which is considered an early sign of inflammation. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging do not show specific lesions for any rheumatic disease. Nevertheless, they are conducted for early diagnosis, treatment monitoring and identifying complications. This article presents a spectrum of inflammatory changes and discusses the diagnostic value of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Random forest regression for magnetic resonance image synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Amod; Carass, Aaron; Roy, Snehashis; Pham, Dzung L; Prince, Jerry L

    2017-01-01

    By choosing different pulse sequences and their parameters, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate a large variety of tissue contrasts. This very flexibility, however, can yield inconsistencies with MRI acquisitions across datasets or scanning sessions that can in turn cause inconsistent automated image analysis. Although image synthesis of MR images has been shown to be helpful in addressing this problem, an inability to synthesize both T2-weighted brain images that include the skull and FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) images has been reported. The method described herein, called REPLICA, addresses these limitations. REPLICA is a supervised random forest image synthesis approach that learns a nonlinear regression to predict intensities of alternate tissue contrasts given specific input tissue contrasts. Experimental results include direct image comparisons between synthetic and real images, results from image analysis tasks on both synthetic and real images, and comparison against other state-of-the-art image synthesis methods. REPLICA is computationally fast, and is shown to be comparable to other methods on tasks they are able to perform. Additionally REPLICA has the capability to synthesize both T2-weighted images of the full head and FLAIR images, and perform intensity standardization between different imaging datasets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Travelling Wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Marrufo, O; Rodriguez, A O

    2013-01-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transversal electric modes and it can propagate any frequency. To investigate the potential benefits for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 7 T, and 9 T via the propagation of the parallel-plate waveguide principal mode filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils. B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach at 3T. The point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance for the traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The principal mode shows very little field magni...

  7. Renal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Maythem; Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Steven W. Hetts; Wilson, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology for noninvasively ablating, quantifying and characterizing ablated renal tissue.

  8. The challenges of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Edwards, Andrea [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Austin, Topun [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    Improved neonatal survival rates and antenatal diagnostic imaging is generating a growing demand for postnatal MRI examinations. Neonatal brain MRI is now becoming standard clinical care in many settings, but with the exception of some research centres, the technique has not been optimised for imaging neonates and small children. Here, we review some of the challenges involved in neonatal MRI, including recent advances in overall MR practicality and nursing practice, to address some of the ways in which the MR experience could be made more neonate-friendly. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and tracking of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Castillo, Rostislav; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2013-01-01

    To date, several stem cell labeling protocols have been developed, contributing to a fast growing and promising field of stem cell imaging by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Most of these methods utilize iron oxide nanoparticles (MION, SPIO, USPIO, VSIOP) for cell labeling, which provide negative (dark) signal effects on T2-weighted MR images. The following protocol describes stem cell labeling techniques with commercially available gadolinium chelates, which provide positive contrast on T1-weighted MR images, which can be advantageous for specific applications.

  10. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina C Tsili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and measurement of blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, C H; Herfkens, R J; Norbash, A M; Rubin, G D

    1994-01-01

    Blood flow can be shown as a negative image with magnetic resonance spin-echo techniques or as a positive image with gradient-echo techniques. Phase contrast refers to techniques where structures can be seen because of flow-induced phase shifts. These techniques can show the presence (slow flow) and also the direction of flow. Gradient-echo techniques--including phase-contrast versions--can be used with cardiac synchronization to obtain multiple images during the cardiac cycle. These images c...

  12. Ruptured intracranial dermoids: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patkar D

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of intracranial dermoids tumour is rare and carries with it the risk of significant morbidity as well as fatality. Three cases that presented with varying symptoms ranging from headache to chiasmatic compression and suspected to have rupture of dermoid tumour are described. The importance of MR imaging in their diagnosis is discussed.

  13. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wang (Liang)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe high incidence of prostate cancer, combined with downstaging at diagnosis and the slow natural progression of the disease, has made its management a complex and controversial issue. Endorectal MRI is emerging as the most accurate imaging modality for the local anatomic

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of labyrinthine pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Vignaud, J. [Val de Grace, Hopital d`Instruction du Service de Sante des Armees, 75 - Paris (France); Mehdi, M. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Pharaboz, C. [Hopital Begin, Hopital d`Instruction des Armees, 94 - Saint-Mande (France); Meyer, B. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service d`ORL, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-10-01

    Membranous labyrinth pathologies are quite rare. They were until recently difficult to demonstrate by imaging technics, CT being the modality of choice. Our purpose was to stress the interest of MR examination for investigating patients complaining of vertigo, tinnitus, and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Normal anatomy as well as the main pathologically encountered changes are illustrated. (orig.)

  16. Endoluminal magnetic resonance imaging in fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Rociu (Elena)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractFecal incontinence is a chronic disability, has serious emotional impact and increased risk for social isolation. Imaging has become important in the diagnostic work-up of fecal incontinence. The research described in this thesis continues the line of efforts to improve the quality and

  17. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T. [Radiologian Klinikka, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord.

  18. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, France; Cognet, Francois; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krause, Denis [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Dijon Le Bocage University Hospital, 2 Blvd. Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, BP 1542, 21034 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Nonneoplastic Musculoskeletal Pathologies in the Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Sindhura; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Komarraju, Aparna; Guidry, Carey; Pandey, Tarun

    2017-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pathologies in the pelvis encompass a wide variety of lesions including femoroacetabular impingement, athletic pubalgia, ischiofemoral impingement, and apophyseal avulsion injuries. Magnetic resonance imaging is the noninvasive imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and management of these lesions. In this article, the authors discuss the nonneoplastic musculoskeletal lesions in the pelvis, with illustrations and relevant case examples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of vaginal and vulval pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, N.; Grant, L.A.; Sala, E. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Box 219, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    There are a number of conditions affecting the vagina and vulva that can be optimally assessed with the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper gives a suggested protocol for MRI technique and sequences for imaging the pelvis and perineum and reviews the MRI appearances of many of the common pathologies affecting the vagina and vulva. Congenital anomalies, inflammatory and neoplastic entities such as vaginal and vulval carcinoma are discussed, with rarer malignancies also reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of elephantiasis neuromatosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, K.J.; Sully, L.; Preston, B.J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ludman, C.N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]|[Division of Academic Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed elephantiasis neuromatosa of his left leg. The gross limb enlargement was extremely disfiguring, and resulted in such severe disability that he was only able to walk a very short distance using crutches. Previous debulking procedures had resulted in massive blood loss, and prior to attempting further surgical intervention MRI studies were requested. Taking advantage of the excellent tissue characterisation and multiplanar imaging capabilities of MRI, we were able to assess the extent of soft tissue and osseous involvement. The use of recently developed MR angiographic sequences enabled us to non-invasively provide detailed images to assess the relationship of the lesions to the major vessels, as well as the vascular supply and angiographic features of the lesions themselves. This article describes our MRI-based findings, which precluded debulking surgery in this unusual manifestation of neurofibromatosis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 23 refs.

  2. 3D imaging using magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Oh; Zho, Sang-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    To introduce an alternative approach to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using a method that is similar to x-ray tomosynthesis. Variable angle tilted-projection images are acquired using a multiple-oblique view (MOV) pulse sequence. Reconstruction is performed using three methods similar to that of x-ray tomosynthesis, which generate a set of tomographic images with multiple 2D projection images. The reconstruction algorithm is further modified to reformat to the practical imaging situations of MR. The procedure is therefore termed magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT). To analyze the characteristics of MRT, simulations are performed. Phantom and in vivo experiments were done to suggest potential applications. Simulation results show anisotropic features that are structurally dependent in terms of resolution. Partial blurrings along slice direction were observed. In phantom and in vivo experiments, the reconstruction performance is particularly noticeable in the low SNR case where improved images with lower noise are obtained. Reformatted reconstruction using thinner slice thickness and∕or extended field-of-view can increase spatial resolution partially and alleviate slice profile imperfection. Results demonstrate that MRT can generate adequate 3D images using the MOV images. Various reconstruction methods in tomosynthesis were readily adapted, while allowing other tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms to be incorporated. A reformatted reconstruction process was incorporated for applications relevant to MR imaging.

  3. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the pharynx during deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Milan R; Achlatis, Stratos; Lazarus, Cathy L; Branski, Ryan C; Storey, Pippa; Praminik, Bidyut; Fang, Yixin; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2013-03-01

    We utilized dynamic magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the pharynx and upper esophageal segment in normal, healthy subjects. A 3-T scanner with a 4-channel head coil and a dual-channel neck coil was used to obtain high-speed magnetic resonance images of subjects who were swallowing liquids and pudding. Ninety sequential images were acquired with a temporal resolution of 113 ms. Imaging was performed in axial planes at the levels of the oropharynx and the pharyngoesophageal segment. The images were then analyzed for variables related to alterations in the area of the pharynx and pharyngoesophageal segment during swallowing, as well as temporal measures related to these structures. All subjects tolerated the study protocol without complaint. Changes in the area of the pharyngeal wall lumen and temporal measurements were consistent within and between subjects. The inter-rater and intra-rater reliabilities for the measurement tool were excellent. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the swallow sequence is both feasible and reliable and may eventually complement currently used diagnostic methods, as it adds substantive information.

  4. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel

    2015-06-16

    Jun 16, 2015 ... etal lobes toward the frontal and temporal lobes. Sensory fibers myelinate before motor fibers, and projection pathways earlier than association pathways; sensitive, visual, and audi- tory tracts are already myelinated at birth.3. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) studies the diffusivity of water, i.e. ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in HTLV-I associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aílton Melo

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord were carried out for seventeen consecutive patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (HAM. Eight patients had brain abnormalities and four had decreased thoracic spinal cord diameter. Brain lesions were mostly located in subcortical and periventricular areas. Our data suggest that diffuse central nervous system lesions are present in patients with HAM.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of vessel wall morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröner, Eleanore Sophie Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    This thesis evaluates morphological and functional vessel wall properties measured by magnetic resonance imaging techniques in healthy volunteers and patients with various diseases (i.e. Marfan syndrome patients (MFS), patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm and patients with a previous myocardial

  7. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Shoulder pain is the most common and well-documented site of musculoskeletal pain in elite swimmers. Structural abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of elite swimmers' symptomatic shoulders are common. Little has been documented about the association between MRI findings in the ...

  8. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Visual Evoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: To report our experience in management of patients with optic neuritis. The effects of brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential on management were investigated. Methods: This is a four years clinical trial that included patients presenting with first attack of optic neuritis older than 16 years ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...

  10. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...

  11. Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sally Mahmood Mohamed Hussin Omar

    2015-07-10

    Jul 10, 2015 ... Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial collateral ligament of the ankle joint. Sally Mahmood Mohamed Hussin Omar a. , Fardos Ahmed El-Kalaa a. ,. El Sebai Farag Ali b. , Ali Ali Abd El-Karim c. , Nancy Mohamed El Sekily d,. * a Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of ...

  12. Monitoring of abdominal Staphylococcus aureus infection using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromrey, M L; Göhler, A; Friedrich, N

    2017-01-01

    To establish a routine workflow for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of mice infected with bacterial biosafety level 2 pathogens and to generate a mouse model for systemic infection with Staphylococcus aureus suitable for monitoring by MRI. A self-contained acrylic glass animal bed...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  14. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cortical lesions (CL) continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM...

  15. Update on the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials...

  16. Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical and magnetic resonance imaging study of the medial collateral ligament of the ankle joint. Sally Mahmood Mohamed Hussin Omar, Fardos Ahmed El-Kalaa, El Sebai Farag Ali, Ali Ali Abd El-Karim, Nancy Mohamed El Sekily ...

  17. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel

    2015-06-16

    Jun 16, 2015 ... The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of normal myelination in infantile brain. Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel. 1. , Moataz M. Montasser *, Ashraf N. Etaby. 2. ,. Reda M.A. Darweesh. 3. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt. Received 2 June ...

  18. Value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmad Hafez Ahmad Alsayed Afifi

    2012-10-12

    Oct 12, 2012 ... Value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the prediction of cancer prostate. Ahmad Hafez Ahmad Alsayed Afifi a,. *, Ashraf Naguib Etaby a. ,. Mohamad Alsayed Yousef Ahmad b. , Yasmin Tarek Farghaly a a Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt.

  19. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging basics for the prostate brachytherapist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jihong; Tanderup, Kari; Cunha, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in radiation therapy, and integration of MRI into brachytherapy in particular is becoming more common. We present here a systematic review of the basic physics and technical aspects of incorporating MRI into prostate brachytherapy. Termi...

  1. Does magnetic resonance imaging predict future low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, D; Hancock, M J; Maher, C G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to identify pathology responsible for low back pain (LBP). However, the importance of findings on MRI remains controversial. We aimed to systematically review whether MRI findings of the lumbar spine predict future LBP in different samples with a...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerosis : studies in visceral obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh Dehnavi, Reza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore the relation between visceral obesity and the accompanying metabolic disturbances, systemic inflammation and the atherosclerotic process. A newly developed magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging technique was implemented in phenotyping patients and as a

  3. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, M; Ostergaard, M; Jensen, K E

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one year...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging pattern recognition in hypomyelinating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenweg, M.E.; Vanderver, A.; Blaser, S.; Blizzi, A.; de Koning, T.J.; Mancini, G.M.S.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Barkhof, F.; Wolf, N.I.; van der Knaap, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Hypomyelination is observed in the context of a growing number of genetic disorders that share clinical characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the possible role of magnetic resonance imaging pattern recognition in distinguishing different hypomyelinating disorders, which would

  6. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological

  7. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.M.; Breur, J.M.; Budde, R.P.; Oorschot, J.W. van; Kimmenade, R.R. van; Sieswerda, G.T.; Meijboom, F.J.; Leiner, T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological

  8. Intracranial abnormalities in infantile esotropia detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kori, Yoshifumi [Kochi Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan); Hasebe, Satoru; Otsuki, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Nobuhiko; Sei, Tetsuro

    1996-10-01

    Twenty-one cases of infantile esotropia were examined for possible intracranial abnormalities by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI. Subnormal findings, which did not seem to be related to the development of infantile esotropia, were detected in 3 cases, 14%. All the three cases had a history of ischemic episodes during the perinatal period. (author)

  9. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Kumar Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant

    2013-04-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications.

  12. Development of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Magn. Reson. Imaging Clin. N. Am. 17, 47–61. Barth, M., Reichenbach, J.R., Venkatesan, R., Moser , E., Haacke, E.M., 1999. High-resolu- tion, multiple...Transcranial Doppler Sonography ( Christian et al. 2010). The clinical application of LDF is limited by a number of problems. It can only access a small volume

  13. Increased cerebral blood flow in preeclampsia with magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, Gerda G.; Hatab, MR; Twickler, DM

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare third trimester and nonpregnant cerebral blood flow of women with preeclampsia to normotensive control subjects with the use of magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Study design: Nine normotensive pregnant women and 12 untreated women with

  14. Multi-component quantitative magnetic resonance imaging by phasor representation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeldt, Frank J.; Prusova, Alena; Fereidouni, Farzad; Amerongen, Van Herbert; As, Van Henk; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Bader, Arjen N.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a versatile, non-destructive and non-invasive tool in life, material, and medical sciences. When multiple components contribute to the signal in a single pixel, however, it is difficult to quantify their individual contributions and characteristic

  15. Multi-component quantitative magnetic resonance imaging by phasor representation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeldt, F.J.; Prusova, A.; Fereidouni, F.; Amerongen, H.V.; As, H. Van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Bader, A.N.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a versatile, non-destructive and non-invasive tool in life, material, and medical sciences. When multiple components contribute to the signal in a single pixel, however, it is difficult to quantify their individual contributions and characteristic

  16. Fluorinated Polyurethane Scaffolds for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan; Mertens, Marianne E.; Schuster, Philipp; Rahimi, Khosrow; Shi, Yang; Schulz, Volkmar; Kuehne, Alexander J.C.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Researchers used fluorinated polyurethane scaffolds for 19F magnetic resonance imaging. They generated a novel fluorinated polymer based on thermoplastic polyurethane (19F -TPU) which possesses distinct properties rendering it suitable for fluorine-based MRI. The 19F -TPU is synthesized from a

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in acute cerebral infarct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, N; Butcher, K; Davis, SM; Kidwell, CS; Koroshetz, WJ; Rother, J; Schellinger, PD; Warach, S; Ostergaard, L

    Background and Purpose - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) selection of stroke patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy is an emerging application. Although the efficacy of therapy within 3 hours after onset of symptoms with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been proven for

  18. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Summary of OMERACT 6 MR Imaging Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning is a new method for imaging and quantifying joint inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over the past 4 years, the OMERACT MR Imaging Group has been developing and testing the RA-MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) for use in RA. The OMERACT filter...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Rosemary [Leeds General Infirmary, Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    MR imaging of the premature infant poses a number of challenges with regard to safety, sequence optimization and recognition of the normal appearances of the developing brain. In this paper we discuss these challenges, and review the common intracerebral abnormalities associated with premature birth. Although the outcome for very-low-birth-weight babies has improved over the last decade, there remains a significant risk of subsequent development of neurological disability. The relationship between MRI abnormalities and long-term outcome is considered. (orig.)

  20. Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: imaging contrast, sequence, and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Herzka, Daniel A; Wylie, John V; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig K; Yeon, Susan B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J

    2007-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T(2) preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T(2) preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzieri, C F; Bangert, B

    1990-09-01

    Imaging of the upper aerodigestive tract, mainly the nasopharynx and oropharynx, has always challenged the radiologist. It is clear that MRI has a leading role in the diagnosis and treatment planning of patients with diseases of the head and neck. This is especially true in the nasopharynx. Although improvements have been made in x-ray diagnosis through the years, subtle diagnoses have been difficult to make because of the variations in airway contour and the superimposition of areas of interest. CT allowed the deep soft tissue planes to be evaluated and provides a complement to the physical examination of the nasopharynx, oral pharynx, and skull base. MRI possesses many advantages over other imaging modalities. The ability to differentiate between inflammatory and neoplastic diseases is extremely important for tumor staging and patient management. At the present time it is not possible to predict the histology of a nasopharyngeal tumor, but the ability to differentiate between various histologic types would be of obvious importance. More experience is needed before this bridge can be crossed.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypertrophic olivary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Ulla, M; López Carballeira, A; Pumar Cebreiro, J M

    2015-01-01

    To review the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in hypertrophic olivary degeneration, with attention to epidemiologic and clinical aspects and especially to imaging findings. We reviewed 5 patients diagnosed with hypertrophic olivary degeneration at our center from 2010 through 2013, analyzing relevant clinical, epidemiologic, and radiologic findings. In all cases, a hyperintensity was seen in the inferior olivary nuclei in FLAIR and T2-weighted sequences. No signal alterations were seen on T1-weighted sequences, and no enhancement was seen after intravenous injection of contrast material. In the cases studied by diffusion-weighted imaging, no significant alterations were seen in these sequences. Olivary hypertrophy was seen in all patients except in one, in whom presumably not enough time had elapsed for hypertrophy to occur. The alterations were bilateral in two of the five cases. Only one case exhibited the typical clinical manifestations. Given that patients may not present clinical manifestations that can be attributed to hypertrophic olivary degeneration, it is important to recognize the characteristic radiologic signs of this entity. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Infantile encephalitic beriberi: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, Nisar A. [Government Medical College Srinagar, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Jammu and Kashmir, Pin (India); Qureshi, Umar A.; Ahmad, Kaiser; Ahmad, Waseem [Government Medical College Srinagar, Department of Pediatrics, Jammu and Kashmir (India); Jehangir, Majid [Government Medical College Srinagar, Department of Radiology, Jammu and Kashmir (India)

    2016-01-15

    Thiamine deficiency in infants is still encountered in developing countries. It may present with acute neurological manifestations of infantile encephalitic beriberi. To review brain MRI findings in infantile encephalitic beriberi from a single institution. A retrospective review of MRI scans in 22 infants with acute-onset beriberi encephalopathy was carried out. Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images were seen symmetrically in the putamen in all patients, in the caudate nuclei in 16/22 (73%), the thalami in 7/22 (32%) and the globi pallidi in 3/22 (14%) of the infants. Altered signal intensity lesions in the cerebral cortex were seen in 7/22 (32%). The mammillary bodies were seen in one infant and the periaqueductal gray matter in two. There was restricted diffusion in 14/22 (64%), and 6/8 children with no evidence of restriction had been imaged ≥10 days after presentation. MR spectroscopy showed increased lactate peak in 6/8 infants (75%). Recognition of symmetrical T2-W hyperintense lesions in the basal ganglia with restricted diffusion and prominent lactate peak may allow early diagnosis of encephalitic beriberi in at-risk infants. (orig.)

  4. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R Peter; Ley, Sebastian; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Eberle, Balthasar; Mayer, Eckhard; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Düber, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Examination of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Genova, Helen M; Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Deluca, John; Das, Abhijit; Binder, Allison; Arjunan, Aparna; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Wylie, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    .... In Experiment 1, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine where in the brain BOLD activity covaried with "state" fatigue, assessed during performance of a task designed to induce cognitive fatigue while in the...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camisao, Claudia C. [Hospital Sao Lucas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccamisao@inca.gov.br; Brenna, Sylvia M.F. [Hospital Maternidade Leonor Mendes de Barros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lombardelli, Karen V.P. [Hospital do Cancer (HCII), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Djahjah, Maria Celia R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Ginecologia

    2007-05-15

    Cervical cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related death of women, especially in developing countries. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics recommends staging during surgery, however, surgical-pathologic staging would not be feasible in cases of more advanced cancers. Generally, in these cases, the staging is performed by means of clinical and gynecological examination and basic imaging studies. However, such an approach fails to demonstrate the actual extent of the disease, and does not include significant prognostic factors such as tumor volume, stromal invasion and lymph node involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging has increasingly been utilized in cervical cancer staging, since at early stages of the disease its performance may be compared to intraoperative findings and, at advanced stages, it shows to be superior to the clinical evaluation. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging presents an excellent imaging resolution for the different densities of pelvic structures, does not require ionizing radiation, is comfortable for the patient, improves de staging, allowing the early detection of recurrence and the identification of reliable prognostic factors which contribute to the therapeutic decision making process and results prediction with an excellent cost-effectiveness. The present article is aimed at reviewing the most significant aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in the cervical cancer staging. (author)

  8. [Magnetic resonance imaging of tibial periostitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, X; Boscagli, G; Tavernier, T; Aczel, F; Weber, F; Legros, R; Charlopain, P; Martin, J P

    1998-01-01

    Tibial periostitis frequently occurs in athletes. We present our experience with MRI in a series of 7 patients (11 legs) with this condition. The clinical presentation and scintigraphic scanning suggested the diagnosis. MRI exploration of 11 legs demonstrated a high band-like juxta-osseous signal enhancement of SE and IR T2 weighted sequences in 6 cases, a signal enhancement after i.v. contrast administration in 4. Tibial periostitis is a clinical diagnosis and MRI and scintigraphic findings can be used to assure the differential diagnosis in difficult cases with stress fracture. MRI can visualize juxta-osseous edematous and inflammatory reactions and an increased signal would appear to be characteristic when the band-like image is fixed to the periosteum.

  9. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  10. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Schuch, Alice; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Chojniak, Rubens; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate. PMID:25741058

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the skeletal musculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Marc-Andre (ed.) [Univ. Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Intverventional Radiology

    2014-07-01

    Comprehensive overview of the value of cutting-edge MRI for the assessment of normal and diseased skeletal muscle. Presents research findings in respect of the role of modern morphological and functional MRI techniques. Provides examples of the added value provided by these techniques when evaluating muscular diseases. Although muscular diseases are a huge and heterogeneous group, in most cases of progressive disease the result is focal or general muscular weakness that presents as an unspecific symptom. Imaging techniques that offer differential diagnostic clues are therefore urgently needed. Despite this, MRI has to date often been assigned a subsidiary role in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases owing to the frequent inability of routine MRI protocols to detect pathognomonic findings. This situation is changing with the advent of modern MRI techniques that offer deeper insights into surrogate pathophysiologic parameters, such as muscular microcirculation, sodium homeostasis, energy and lipid metabolism, and muscle fiber architecture. Much higher levels of acceptance and demand by clinicians can be anticipated for these new techniques in the near future, and radiologists will have to face up to the increasing value of MRI of the skeletal musculature. In this book, recognized experts from around the world provide a comprehensive overview of the value of cutting-edge MRI for the assessment of normal and diseased skeletal muscle. A range of aspects are covered, from the general role of MRI in imaging the skeletal musculature, including in comparison with ultrasonography, through to the current value of MRI in the diagnostic work-up of different diseases. In addition, several chapters present research findings in respect of modern morphological and functional MRI techniques for assessment of the skeletal musculature and provide examples of the added value provided by these techniques when evaluating muscular diseases.

  13. Pictorial review: magnetic resonance imaging of colonic diverticulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Orla; Geoghegan, Tony; McAuley, Grainne; Persaud, Thara; Khosa, Faisal; Torreggiani, William C. [The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)

    2007-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rapidly emerging as a useful imaging modality for the evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract. Increasingly rapid sequences and improving hardware have significantly improved the visualisation of diseases of the colon. MRI has a major advantage over CT in that there is no ionising radiation. In our institution, MRI has increasingly been used as a complimentary imaging modality to CT in the diagnosis and evaluation of diverticulitis and its complications. In this review article, we illustrate the emerging role of MRI in the diagnosis and evaluation of colonic diverticulitis. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of posterior scleritis mimicking choroidal mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman Saatci, A.; Saatci, Isil E-mail: cekirgesaatci@superonline.com; Kocak, Niluefer; Durak, Ismet

    2001-08-01

    We present imaging findings in a case of posterior scleritis, which may mimic tumoral mass lesion resulting in unnecessary enucleation. Magnetic resonance imaging was remarkable for a subretinal mass hypointense on T2 and hyperintense on T1 weighted images. A peripheral rim of hypointensity was noteworthy, suggestive of sclerouveal thickening. There was an ill-defined area of increased T2 signal intensity adjacent to globe at the site of nodular lesion implying an inflammatory process. A linear contrast enhancement was seen within the bulbus oculi which may represent detached retina by exudation or displaced retina due to thickened sclera and choroidal layers. The CSF space around the optic nerve was enlarged.

  15. Dental magnetic resonance imaging; MRT der Zaehne und des Zahnhalteapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2016-03-15

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  16. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yong; Xie, Zhentian; Li, Ye; Xu, Duan; Vigneron, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-07-28

    In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF) field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  17. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden). Center for Surgical Sciences Divisions of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to evaluate and monitor the morphological response following treatment interventions in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy by using different MRI techniques. For this purpose, we investigated different types of sequences, including gadolinium contrast medium-enhanced T1-WI images (CME T1-WI), and developed a precise method to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal of the Achilles tendon. Study I aimed at evaluating 15 patients with chronic, painful Achilles tendinosis, before and 2 years after surgical treatment. There was marked regression of the intratendinous signal postoperatively. The most sensitive sequence for depicting an intratendinous lesion in this study was CME T1-WI images. They showed a regression of the intratendinous signal abnormality from 13/15 patients preoperatively to 4/15 postoperatively. The clinical outcome was excellent in eight, good in five, fair in one and poor in one patient. In study II, the early contrast agent enhancement in the dynamically enhanced MRI signal (DEMRI) was correlated with the histopathologic findings in 15 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Early contrast enhancement (within the first 72 s) was seen in DEMRI in the symptomatic Achilles tendons, with a significant difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral tendons. Increased severity of tendon changes, including fiber structure abnormality, increased vascularity, rounding of nuclei, and increased amount of glycosaminoglycans, correlated to CME. In study III, we developed a computerized 3-D seed-growing MRI technique to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal. This technique showed an excellent inter- and intra-observer reliability. The technique was also used to follow up prospectively the tendon adaptation and healing described in studies IV-VI. In study IV, using serial MRI during a period of 1 year, we evaluated the biological effect of tendon repair following iatrogenic

  19. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques for patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, John D

    2002-01-01

    To review the underlying causes, diagnostic issues, and treatment of hemifacial spasm, with emphasis on advanced MRI techniques. Brief technical note. High-resolution T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo and/or gradient echo imaging of the posterior fossa should be performed with the use of intravenous gadolinium for maximum contrast between CSF, vessel, and nerve. Magnetic resonance angiography is often useful, and new state-of-the-art sequences provide more detail. As MRI techniques improve, diagnosis and treatment of patients with hemifacial spasm will become easier. Ophthalmologists should be aware of these new magnetic resonance techniques.

  20. A comparison between clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of acute hamstring injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E.; Hoving, Jan Lucas; Warren, Price; Connell, David A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physicians evaluating hamstring strains in professional football players are increasingly turning to magnetic resonance imaging to support the clinical diagnosis and management of the injury. However, little information is available to assess how magnetic resonance imaging compares with