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Sample records for resonance esr spectrum

  1. High-dose dosimetry using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji; Tanaka, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimeter capable of measuring large doses of radiation in radiotherapy and radiation processing is outlined. In particular, an alanine/ESR dosimeter is discussed, focusing on the development of elements, the development of the ESR dosimetric system, the application of alanine/ESR dosimeter, and basic researches. Rod elements for gamma radiation and x radiation and film elements for electron beams are described in detail. The following recent applications of the alanine/ESR dosimeter are introduced: using as a transfer dosimeter, applying to various types of radiation, diagnosing the deterioration of radiological materials and equipments, and applying to ESR imaging. The future subjects to be solved in the alanine/ESR dosimetric system are referred to as follows: (1) improvement of highly accurate elements suitable for the measurement of various types of radiation, (2) establishment of sensitive calibration method of the ESR equipment itself, and (3) calibration and standardization of radiation doses. (K.N.) 65 refs

  2. Study by electron spin resonance (ESR) of 60 Co irradiated grains and farinaceous derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catanni, Marta Mattos.

    1995-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is being pointed out as one of the most promising techniques to determine whether a food has been irradiated. In this work, the ESR spectrum of paramagnetic radicals produced by gamma irradiation of grains and flour derivatives using a 60 Co source was investigated. Samples of grains (wheat and barley), flours (wheat, maniac, rye, soy bean and maize), bran and starch have been irradiated with doses between 0.2 and 70 KGy. It was shown that all varieties of grains and flours presented similar ESR spectra with variation in the free radicals signal intensity. Measurements at 9.5 and 34.5 GHz shown that spectra were composed probably by the superposition of four paramagnetic species with g-factors closed to that of the free electron (2 triplets, 1 doublet and 1 singlet). Hyperfine interactions and the correspondingly line widths were estimated through an spectrum computer simulation. It was established that ESR signal intensities increased with the irradiation dose for all samples. Up to the commercial admissible dose limit (1 kGy), the increase of ESR signal shown a linear behavior with the dose. The signal stability varied significantly with storage conditions and sample humidity. For 1 kGy-irradiated samples stored at room temperature and 14% humidity, the ESR radiation signals were possible to be detected up to 5 days after irradiation. When the same samples were stored at low temperatures (0 0 C) or freeze-dried (almost 0% humidity) the ESR signals were detected until 6 months after irradiation. Similar ESR spectrum found for grains and flours was obtained for diverse starchy food products. It was verified that it is possible to identify for a long time irradiated starchy foods when they are commercialized dehydrated or frozen. (author). 66 refs., 35 figs., 17 tabs

  3. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies of returned comet nucleus samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay, Fundow; Kim, S.S.; Liang, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The most important objective of the Comet Nucleus Sample Returm Mission is to return samples which could reflect formation conditions and evolutionary processes in the early solar nebula. It is expected that the returned samples will consist of fine-grained silicate materials mixed with ices composed of simple molecules such as H 2 O, NH 3 , CH 4 as well as organics and/or more complex compounds. Because of the exposure to ionizing radiation from cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, and solar wind protons at low temperature, free radicals are expected to be formed and trapped in the solid ice matrices. The kind of trapped radical species together with their concentration and thermal stability can be used as a dosimeter as well as a geothermometer to determine thermal and radiation histories as well as outgassing and other possible alternation effects since the nucleus material was formed. Since free radicals that are known to contain unpaired electrons are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected and characterized in their native form by the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) method. In fact, ESR has been shown to be a non-destructive, highly sensitive tool for the detection and characterization of paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and radiation damage centers in terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological samples. The potential use of ESR as an effective method in the study of returned comet nucleus samples, in particular, in the analysis of fine-grained solid state icy samples is discussed

  4. Study on detection of electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy and comparison of the ESR spectrum of electron beams and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiming; Ha Yiming; Wang Feng

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted to detect electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy. The white pepper powder, paprika powder, cumin powder and pistachios were used as test materials to study the feature changes of ESR spectrum and the relationship between ESR intensity and irradiation dose in different doses, the shape variation of ESR spectrum in γ-rays and electron beams in the same sample was also compared. The results showed that the ESR spectrum of 4 kinds of irradiated samples was obviously different before and after irradiation, the intensity of ESR signal increased with the increasing of the absorbed dose. The dose above 432 Gy could be detected in white pepper powder and pistachios, the dose above 875 Gy could be detected in paprika powder and cumin powder. The ESR intensity of all samples decreased during the storage time (200 d), even after 200 days the ESR method could also be used to detect whether or not the samples have been irradiated. The same dosage of y-rays and electron beams has no significant influence on the shape of ESR spectrum, however, the difference of irradiation mechanism caused slight impact on ESR intensity. The results could provide the technical basis for the application of ESR method in detecting electron beam irradiated food. (authors)

  5. Study on detection of electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy and comparison of the ESR spectrum of electron beams and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiming; Ha Yiming; Wang Feng

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to detect electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy. The white pepper powder, paprika powder, cumin powder and pistachios were used as test materials to study the feature changes of ESR spectrum and the relationship between ESR intensity and irradiation dose in different doses, the shape variation of ESR spectrum in γ-rays and electron beams in the same sample was also compared. The results showed that the ESR spectrum of 4 kinds of irradiated samples was obviously different before and after irradiation, the intensity of ESR signal increased with the increasing of the absorbed dose. The dose above 432 Gy could be detected in white pepper powder and pistachios, the dose above 875 Gy could be detected in paprika powder and cumin powder. The ESR intensity of all samples decreased during the storage time (200 d), even after 200 days the ESR method could also be used to detect whether or not the samples have been irradiated. The same dosage of γ-rays and electron beams has no significant influence on the shape of ESR spectrum, however, the difference of irradiation mechanism caused slight impact on ESR intensity. The results could provide the technical basis for the application of ESR method in detecting electron beam irradiated food. (authors)

  6. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies on irradiated cocoa beans and niger seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangaonkar, S.R.; Natarajan, V.; Sastry, M.D.; Desai, S.R.P.; Kulkarni, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of irradiated (10kGy) and unirradiated cocoa beans and niger seeds have been compared. Unirradiated cocoa beans failed to give any ESR signal, whereas after irradiation (10kGy) an ESR signal at g = 2.0042 was observed. However, ESR signals are given by both irradiated and unirradiated niger seeds. The intensity of signal was found to be dose-dependent up to 10kGy for both seeds. The signals were stable up to 180 days in both cases. The results indicate the possibility of using ESR for distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated cocoa beans but not for niger seeds

  7. Simple method for quantification of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents using ESR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Keizo; Kinoshita, Shota; Okazaki, Shoko

    2012-01-01

    To develop an estimation method of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, the effect of concentration of Gd compounds on the ESR spectrum of nitroxyl radical was examined. A solution of either 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPONE) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) was mixed with a solution of Gd compound and the ESR spectrum was recorded. Increased concentration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid chelate (Gd-DTPA), an MRI contrast agent, increased the peak-to-peak line widths of ESR spectra of the nitroxyl radicals, in accordance with a decrease of their signal heights. A linear relationship was observed between concentration of Gd-DTPA and line width of ESR signal, up to approximately 50 mmol/L Gd-DTPA, with a high correlation coefficient. Response of TEMPONE was 1.4-times higher than that of TEMPOL as evaluated from the slopes of the lines. The response was slightly different among Gd compounds; the slopes of calibration curves for acua[N,N-bis[2-[(carboxymethyl)[(methylcarbamoyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]glycinato(3-)]gadolinium hydrate (Gd-DTPA-BMA) (6.22 μT·L/mmol) and gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate (Gd-DOTA) (6.62 μT·L/mmol) were steeper than the slope for Gd-DTPA (5.45 μT·L/mmol), whereas the slope for gadolinium chloride (4.94 μT·L/mmol) was less steep than that for Gd-DTPA. This method is simple to apply. The results indicate that this method is useful for rough estimation of the concentration of Gd contrast agents if calibration is carried out with each standard compound. It was also found that the plot of the reciprocal square root of signal height against concentrations of contrast agents could be useful for the estimation if a constant volume of sample solution is taken and measured at the same position in the ESR cavity every time.

  8. An Endogenous Electron Spin Resonance (ESR signal discriminates nevi from melanomas in human specimens: a step forward in its diagnostic application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cesareo

    Full Text Available Given the specific melanin-associated paramagnetic features, the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR, called also Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, EPR analysis has been proposed as a potential tool for non-invasive melanoma diagnosis. However, studies comparing human melanoma tissues to the most appropriate physiological counterpart (nevi have not been performed, and ESR direct correlation with melanoma clinical features has never been investigated. ESR spectrum was obtained from melanoma and non-melanoma cell-cultures as well as mouse melanoma and non-melanoma tissues and an endogenous ESR signal (g = 2.005 was found in human melanoma cells and in primary melanoma tissues explanted from mice, while it was always absent in non-melanoma samples. These characteristics of the measured ESR signal strongly suggested its connection with melanin. Quantitative analyses were then performed on paraffin-embedded human melanoma and nevus sections, and validated on an independent larger validation set, for a total of 112 sections (52 melanomas, 60 nevi. The ESR signal was significantly higher in melanomas (p = 0.0002 and was significantly different between "Low Breslow's and "High Breslow's" depth melanomas (p<0.0001. A direct correlation between ESR signal and Breslow's depth, expressed in millimetres, was found (R = 0.57; p<0.0001. The eu/pheomelanin ratio was found to be significantly different in melanomas "Low Breslow's" vs melanomas "High Breslow's" depth and in nevi vs melanomas "High Breslow's depth". Finally, ROC analysis using ESR data discriminated melanomas sections from nevi sections with up to 90% accuracy and p<0.0002. In the present study we report for the first time that ESR signal in human paraffin-embedded nevi is significantly lower than signal in human melanomas suggesting that spectrum variations may be related to qualitative melanin differences specifically occurring in melanoma cells. We therefore conclude that this ESR signal

  9. Irradiation detection of coffee mate by electron spin resonance (ESR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozsayin, Fulya [Physics Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Polat, Mustafa, E-mail: polat@hacettepe.edu.t [Physics Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-06-15

    Un-irradiated coffee mate samples do not exhibit any ESR signal. However, the samples exposed to UV and gamma radiation exhibit an ESR singlet and a large unresolved ESR signal, respectively. The dose-response curves of the samples exposed to UV and gamma radiations were found to be described well by an exponential and linear functions, respectively. Variable temperature and fading studies at room temperature showed that the radiation-induced radicals in coffee mate sample are very sensitive to temperature. The discrimination between un-irradiated and irradiated coffee mate samples can be done just comparing their ESR spectra. However, determination of the radiation dose received by the sample cannot be possible because of the fast decay of signal intensity at room temperature.

  10. DETECTION OF SOME IRRADIATED NUTS BY ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE (ESR) TECHNIQUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHALLAF, M.F.; YASIN, N.M.N.; EL-NASHABY, F.M.; ALI, H.G.M.; EL-SHIEMY, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to establish the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection method for identifying irradiated nuts (almond and pistachio). Samples were irradiated with 2, 4 and 6 kGy and stored at room temperature (25± 2 0 C) for six months to study the possibility of detecting its previous irradiation treatments by ESR spectroscopy. Analysis was carried out just after irradiation treatment and during ambient storage period. The ESR signal intensities of irradiated samples were markedly increased correspondingly with irradiation dose as a result of free radicals generated by gamma irradiation so, all irradiated samples under investigation could be differentiated from non-irradiated ones immediately after irradiation treatment. The decay in radicals responsible of ESR signals showed the identification of irradiated almond (shell or edible part) and pistachio (edible part) was impossible after six months of ambient storage

  11. DETECTION OF SOME IRRADIATED NUTS BY ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE (ESR) TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHALLAF, M F; YASIN, N M.N. [Food Science Dept., Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); EL-NASHABY, F M; ALI, H G.M.; EL-SHIEMY, S M [Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The present investigation was carried out to establish the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection method for identifying irradiated nuts (almond and pistachio). Samples were irradiated with 2, 4 and 6 kGy and stored at room temperature (25{+-} 2{sup 0}C) for six months to study the possibility of detecting its previous irradiation treatments by ESR spectroscopy. Analysis was carried out just after irradiation treatment and during ambient storage period. The ESR signal intensities of irradiated samples were markedly increased correspondingly with irradiation dose as a result of free radicals generated by gamma irradiation so, all irradiated samples under investigation could be differentiated from non-irradiated ones immediately after irradiation treatment. The decay in radicals responsible of ESR signals showed the identification of irradiated almond (shell or edible part) and pistachio (edible part) was impossible after six months of ambient storage.

  12. Radiation damage in bioapatites: the ESR spectrum of irradiated dental enamel revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, A.M.; Poupeau, G.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the ESR spectrum of enamel from fossil vertebrate teeth perpendicular = 2.0026 and g longitudinal = 1.9975; and species B, having an orthorhombic symmetry with g 1 = 2.0032, g 2 = 2.0018 and g 3 = 1.9975. Center A is probably located at an OH - site of the hydroxyapatite lattice. Centre B could be a distorted centre A. (author)

  13. New Approach For Detection Of Irradiated Spices Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FARAG, S.A.; SHAMS EL DIEEN, N.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Black pepper and anise samples were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (5, 10 and 20 kGy) then the irradiated samples were stored at room temperature (20 0 C, 70-75 % RH) for one year. The measurements of free radicals were carried out by electron spin resonance (ESR) at different intervals (3, 6, 9 and 12 months). A series of signals tentatively described as cellulose-like and complex radical observed at G values were 2.01027 for black pepper and 2.01019 for anise. The ESR signals of irradiated spices showed a directly proportional relationship for increasing dose with increasing intensity of signal. A relationship was noticed as polynomial regression analysis resulted between signals of ESR intensity and applied doses with significant values of correlation coefficient (R 2 ). All combination treatments of thermal and irradiation beside long storage caused significant reduction of ESR intensity of irradiated black pepper and anise. Upon using low doses as 1, 2 and 3 kGy for re-irradiation, the irradiated samples (10 and 20 kGy) increased the power of ESR intensity. The enhancement effect was markedly increased. For example, the irradiated black pepper (10 kGy) increased the ESR intensity with high percentages as 49.19%, 69.23% and 89.68% while the high dose (20 kGy) caused increase by 39.96%, 69.05% and 96.90% for irradiated black pepper samples. This approach with that technique can be used easily to overcome the main disadvantages of ESR signals fading especially at the end of storage period.

  14. Electron spin resonance (ESR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance of irradiated biocarbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.U.; Rossi, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several irradiated bicarbonates were studied by magnetic resonance techniques. Seven paramagnetic species, attributed to CO 2 - , SO 2 - and SO 3 - were identified. Comparison between radiation induced defects in bioaragonites and aragonite single-crystals show that isotropic and orthorhombic CO 2 - centers with broad line spectra are not produced in the latter samples. Vibrational and rotational properties of isotropic CO 2 - centers were studied from low temperature Q-band spectras. Vibrational frequency is determined from the 13 CO 2 - hyperfine spectrum and yielded ν 1.54 x 10 13 s -1 . The correlation time for isotropic CO 2 - , τc) = 1.2 x 10 -11 s (T = 300 K0, is typical of radicals rotating in liquids. ENDOR and General Triple spectroscopy show that orthorhombic CO 2 - centres are surrounded by water molecules located in the second nearest CO 2 2- sites at 5.14, 5.35 and 6.02 A. Water molecules replacing carbonates or as liquid inclusion of growth solution in local crystal imperfections may be responsible for the variety of orthorhombic and isotropic CO 2 - species, respectively. (author)

  15. Variability of electron spin resonance (ESR) signal of γ -irradiated starches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Gilberto D.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2017-01-01

    Food preservation is one of the practical applications of radiation processing of materials. Starch is an abundant and cheap nutritious biopolymer and also is the material for appropriate food systems and for technical industries. Starch granules are partially crystalline structures composed mainly of two types of starch: amylose, an essentially linear polymer, and amylopectin, with 3-44% of branch points. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a very powerful and sensitive method for the characterization of the electronic structures of materials with unpaired electrons. The aim of the present work was to monitor the disappearance of the short life and long-life free radicals formed during γ-irradiation of 3 different starches. Corn, potato and fermented cassava starches were irradiated in a "6"0Co source Gammacell 220 with 20 kGy, dose rate around 1 kGy h"-"1. EPR spectra were obtained at room temperature using a Bruker EMX plus model, X band equipment. The main type of ESR signal from irradiated starch is a singlet with a g-value of about 2.0. The fading of ESR signals was followed for 350 hours, and presents differences among the different starch type reflecting differences in molecular arrangements of starch crystalline and amorphous fractions, although ESR spectra seemed to be common for all starches. (author)

  16. Variability of electron spin resonance (ESR) signal of γ -irradiated starches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gilberto D.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Food preservation is one of the practical applications of radiation processing of materials. Starch is an abundant and cheap nutritious biopolymer and also is the material for appropriate food systems and for technical industries. Starch granules are partially crystalline structures composed mainly of two types of starch: amylose, an essentially linear polymer, and amylopectin, with 3-44% of branch points. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a very powerful and sensitive method for the characterization of the electronic structures of materials with unpaired electrons. The aim of the present work was to monitor the disappearance of the short life and long-life free radicals formed during γ-irradiation of 3 different starches. Corn, potato and fermented cassava starches were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co source Gammacell 220 with 20 kGy, dose rate around 1 kGy h{sup -1}. EPR spectra were obtained at room temperature using a Bruker EMX plus model, X band equipment. The main type of ESR signal from irradiated starch is a singlet with a g-value of about 2.0. The fading of ESR signals was followed for 350 hours, and presents differences among the different starch type reflecting differences in molecular arrangements of starch crystalline and amorphous fractions, although ESR spectra seemed to be common for all starches. (author)

  17. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Thermoluminescence (TL) studies of stalagmitic floors of the Caune de de L'Arago at Tautavel (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Teles, M.M.; Rossi, A.; Zuleta, E.; Yokoyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The geological radiation dose to the stalagmites of various stratigraphic levels of the Caune de L'Arago at Tautavel has been measured by Thermoluminescence (TL) and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR). In all samples the TL natural spectrum a well developped 280 0 C peak and a subordinate 350 0 C peak, while the ESR line spectrum may present the h 1 , h 2 and h 3 radiative lines of Yokoyama et al.) or only h 2 . All TL peaks and ESR lines do increase with the laboratory applied radiation (β or γ) doses. The activated h 2 line is visibly unstable in laboratory conditions as well as apparently the h 3 line in one sample. Within the experimental precision, the geological doses determined from the 280C peak and h 3 line on one band and the 350 0 C peak and h 1 line (after thermal treatment of the later, see Yokoyama et al. on the other hand are identical. When the 280C natural peak is visibly affected by natural fading as shown by the plateau test, so is h 3 , and the geological doses of the 280 0 C-h 3 peaks are lowered by the same factor as compared to those of the 350 0 C-h 1 peaks. Annealing experiments show that the relationships between the TL and ESR peaks may be difficult to analyse in some samples due to the possible occurence of non radiative components in some ESR lines. Such components appear clearly at temperatures above approx. 180-200 0 C and might possibly be present below. This may have important implications for the selection of samples to be dated by ESR. (Author) [pt

  18. Detection of electron beam irradiated crude drugs by electron spin resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Aoki, Kenji; Nishimoto, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Perillae Herba, Sennae Folium, Cinnamomi Cortex, Phellodendri Cortex, Ginseng Radix, Glycyrrhizae Radix, Paeoniae Radix, and Zingiberis Rhizoma were irradiated with electron beam (5 MeV) and organic radicals were detected by ESR measurement, before and after irradiation (10 kGy). A single line spectrum was detected at around g=2.005 in non-irradiated crude drugs, and radical concentrations were high in the leaf varieties of crude drugs. After irradiation, the signal intensity around g=2.005 increased, and a new subsignal was detected as a 3 mT shoulder of this signal. Broad, asymmetrically divided signals were also detected in irradiated root varieties of crude drugs. The free radical localized on the organic components of irradiated crude drugs tended to decrease with the water content. After irradiation, signal intensity reduced and reached a steady state after about 1 to 2 months. However, specificity of the ESR signal shape appearing after irradiation continued to be detectable for 6 months in leaf varieties and for a year in bark and root varieties of crude drugs. Consequently, it was concluded that ESR could be applied as an initial screening procedure to detect irradiated crude drugs. (author)

  19. ESR (Electronic Spin Resonance Spectroscopy) study of irradiated paper for biomedical material wrapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huarte, Monica; Rubin de Celis, Emilio; Kairiyama, Eulogia; Zapata, Miguel; Santoro, Natalia; Magnavacca, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Ionising radiation treatments are used for sterilization, microbiological decontamination, disinfection, insect disinfestation and food preservation. This ionising radiation generates free radicals (FR) in matter, which can be detected by Electronic Spin Resonance Spectroscopy (ESR). For this work it had analysed different kind of irradiated package papers of syringes, surgical gloves and dressings by ESR. These were irradiated with doses between 20 and 35 kGy of gamma radiation (Cobalt 60). The processed samples were measured in a Bruker ECS 106 spectrometer. The obtained results were: 1-) The irritated samples showed a central peak and two satellites induced by the applied radiation; 2-) The non-irradiated samples did not show the characteristic satellite peaks of the irritated ones; 3-) A linear relationship between the signal heights per unit mass and the applied doses was found; and 4-) The signals were highly stable, with half-time values between 240 and 370 days for 20 and 30 kGy, permitting more than one year of monitoring proceedings. In conclusion, the ESR allows the detection, quantification and time monitoring processes of this kind of irradiated materials. (author) [es

  20. ESR spectroscopy of blood serum in thalassemia: computer simulation of methemalbumin spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V.; Schianchi, G.; Giori, D.C.; Pedrazzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    In pathological states with severe hemolysis such as homozygous β-thalassemia, human serum albumin (HSA) binds ferric heme to form the methemalbumin (MHA) molecular complex. Low-temperature X-band ESR monitored MHA in patients' serum, while in vitro studies prompted a molecular model for the complex. On the assumption of axial symmetry with small rhombic distortion for high spin Fe (III) in MHA, we used a simulation program written in FORTRAN V for ESR spectra of vitreous samples containing subsystems with effective electronic spin S' = 1/2 and nuclear spin I ≥ 0. We have take also into account the individual resonance line shape and half-width, and the magnetic field dependence of the transition probability. Two distinct forms of MHA were found in patients' serum, the second one showing a stronger rhombic distortion around Fe (III) as compared to the in-vitro complex. This suggested a conformational change of HSA around heme binding site, possibly produced by free radicals occurring in thalassemia intense oxidative stress; these could generate more forms of MHA. (authors)

  1. Retrospective Dosimetry: Dose Analysis From Tooth Enamel Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rodzi Ali; Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Noraisyah Yusof; Syed Asraf Fahlawi Wafa Syed Mohd Ghazi; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Rehir Dahalan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation dose should be accurately measured in order to relate its effect to the cells. The assessment of dose usually performed using biological dosimetry techniques. However, the reduction of lymphocytes (white blood cells) after the time period results in inaccuracy of dose measurement. An alternative method used is the application of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) using tooth enamel. In this study, tooth enamels were evaluated and used to measure the individual absorbed dose from the background. The basic tooth features that would affect dose measurement were discussed. The results show this technique is capable and effective for retrospective dose measurement and useful for the study of radiation effect to human. (author)

  2. Identification of. gamma. -irradiated spices by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Sadao; Kawamura, Yoko; Saito, Yukio (National Inst. of Hygienic Sciences, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry spectra of white (WP), black (BP) and red (Capsicum annuum L. var. frutescerns L., RP) peppers each had a principal signal with a g-value of 2.0043, and the intensities of the principal signals were increased not only by {gamma}-irradiation but also by heating. Irradiated RP also showed a minor signal -30G from the principal one, and the intensity of the minor signal increased linearly with increasing dose from 10 to 50 kGy. Since the minor signal was observed in RP irradiated at 10 kGy and stored for one year, but did not appear either after heating or after exposure to this signal is unique to {gamma}-irradiated RP and should therefore be useful for the identification of {gamma}-irradiated spices of Capsicum genus, such as paprika and chili pepper. The computer simulation of the ESR spectra suggested that the minor signal should be assigned to methyl radical and the principal signal mainly to a combination of phenoxyl and peroxyl radicals. Such minor signals were found in {gamma}-irradiated allspice and cinnamon among 10 kinds of other spices. (author).

  3. Identification of γ-irradiated spices by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Sadao; Kawamura, Yoko; Saito, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry spectra of white (WP), black (BP) and red (Capsicum annuum L. var. frutescerns L., RP) peppers each had a principal signal with a g-value of 2.0043, and the intensities of the principal signals were increased not only by γ-irradiation but also by heating. Irradiated RP also showed a minor signal -30G from the principal one, and the intensity of the minor signal increased linearly with increasing dose from 10 to 50 kGy. Since the minor signal was observed in RP irradiated at 10 kGy and stored for one year, but did not appear either after heating or after exposure to this signal is unique to γ-irradiated RP and should therefore be useful for the identification of γ-irradiated spices of Capsicum genus, such as paprika and chili pepper. The computer simulation of the ESR spectra suggested that the minor signal should be assigned to methyl radical and the principal signal mainly to a combination of phenoxyl and peroxyl radicals. Such minor signals were found in γ-irradiated allspice and cinnamon among 10 kinds of other spices. (author)

  4. Origin of the ESR spectrum in the Prussian blue analog RbMn[Fe(CN)(6)]center dot H2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antal, A.; Janossy, A.; Forro, L.; Vertelman, E. J. M.; van Koningsbruggen, P. J.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present an electron spin resonance (ESR) study at excitation frequencies of 9.4 and 222.4 GHz of powders and single crystals of a Prussian blue analog (PBA), RbMn[Fe(CN)(6)]center dot H2O in which Fe and Mn undergoes a charge-transfer transition between 175 and 300 K. The ESR of PBA powders, also

  5. The use of sugar pellets in ESR [electron spin resonance] dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchen, A.; Greenstock, C.L.; Trivedi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Table sugar (sucrose) is a convenient, common, tissue-equivalent material suitable for electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry of ionising radiation. The simple free radical signal in irradiated sugar is stabilised if the sugar is made into pellets using an inert silicone elastomer (Dow Corning 732). Such pellets, which offer greater convenience and signal stability and reproducibility, have been prepared and tested for their radiation response, sensitivity and post-irradiation stability. Irradiated sugar is detectable at ≥0.1 Gy, the signal intensity is linear with dose, and the fading of the signal, post-irradiation, is minimal for samples kept under ambient conditions. These pellets themselves, given sufficient post-irradiation signal stability, may be useful for environmental monitoring to determine long-term exposures in remote areas or at strategic locations. (Author)

  6. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy applied to radiation dosimetry and other fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, C.C.J.

    1994-12-01

    A short introduction to the theory and practice of ESR spectroscopy is given. ESR alanine dosimetry for low and high LET (linear energy transfer) ionising radiation is described, indicating its advantages over traditional methods. Problems arising in the therapy dose range (below 5 Gy), and possible future developments, are mentioned. The application of ESR to the radiation processing of materials and foodstuffs, to geological dating, biology, molecular chemistry and to medicine is discussed. Some examples of chemical analyses are also presented. (orig.)

  7. Detection of irradiation treatment in crustacea by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, E.M. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Food Science; Stevenson, M.H. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Food Science]|[Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland, Belfast (United Kingdom); Gray, R. [Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    When the Food (Control of Irradiation) Regulations 1990 came into force in the United Kingdom in January 1991 they included provision for the irradiation of Crustacea to an overall average dose of 3 kGy. The treatment of Crustacea with ionising radiation would reduce numbers of potential pathogens and spoilage organisms thus giving a microbiologically safer product with a longer shelf-life at chill temperatures. At present the process is being used in countries such as France and The Netherlands for the decontamination/shelf-life extension of shrimp. Therefore, as for other food products such as poultry, liquid whole egg and fruit, which are also treated with ionising radiation, it is desirable that a suitable test should be available to help in the control of the irradiation process. One such detection method which has been applied to irradiated Crustacea is that of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy due to the fact that the rigid exoskeleton has a relatively high dry matter so free radicals produced by ionising irradiation can be trapped and are, therefore, sufficiently stable to be detected. (author).

  8. Detection of irradiation treatment in crustacea by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.M.; Gray, R.

    1996-01-01

    When the Food (Control of Irradiation) Regulations 1990 came into force in the United Kingdom in January 1991 they included provision for the irradiation of Crustacea to an overall average dose of 3 kGy. The treatment of Crustacea with ionising radiation would reduce numbers of potential pathogens and spoilage organisms thus giving a microbiologically safer product with a longer shelf-life at chill temperatures. At present the process is being used in countries such as France and The Netherlands for the decontamination/shelf-life extension of shrimp. Therefore, as for other food products such as poultry, liquid whole egg and fruit, which are also treated with ionising radiation, it is desirable that a suitable test should be available to help in the control of the irradiation process. One such detection method which has been applied to irradiated Crustacea is that of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy due to the fact that the rigid exoskeleton has a relatively high dry matter so free radicals produced by ionising irradiation can be trapped and are, therefore, sufficiently stable to be detected. (author)

  9. Electron spin resonance (ESR dose measurement in bone of Hiroshima A-bomb victim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Explosion of the bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki corresponds to the only historical moment when atomic bombs were used against civilians. This event triggered countless investigations into the effects and dosimetry of ionizing radiation. However, none of the investigations has used the victims' bones as dosimeter. Here, we assess samples of bones obtained from fatal victims of the explosion by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR. In 1973, one of the authors of the present study (SM traveled to Japan and conducted a preliminary experiment on the victims' bone samples. The idea was to use the paramagnetism induced in bone after irradiation to measure the radiation dose. Technological advances involved in the construction of spectrometers, better knowledge of the paramagnetic center, and improvement in signal processing techniques have allowed us to resume the investigation. We obtained a reconstructed dose of 9.46 ± 3.4 Gy from the jawbone, which was compatible with the dose distribution in different locations as measured in non-biological materials such as wall bricks and roof tiles.

  10. Electron spin resonance (ESR) dose measurement in bone of Hiroshima A-bomb victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Explosion of the bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki corresponds to the only historical moment when atomic bombs were used against civilians. This event triggered countless investigations into the effects and dosimetry of ionizing radiation. However, none of the investigations has used the victims’ bones as dosimeter. Here, we assess samples of bones obtained from fatal victims of the explosion by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR). In 1973, one of the authors of the present study (SM) traveled to Japan and conducted a preliminary experiment on the victims’ bone samples. The idea was to use the paramagnetism induced in bone after irradiation to measure the radiation dose. Technological advances involved in the construction of spectrometers, better knowledge of the paramagnetic center, and improvement in signal processing techniques have allowed us to resume the investigation. We obtained a reconstructed dose of 9.46 ± 3.4 Gy from the jawbone, which was compatible with the dose distribution in different locations as measured in non-biological materials such as wall bricks and roof tiles. PMID:29408890

  11. A study on the characteristics of enamel to electron spin resonance spectrum for retrospective dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dae Seok; Lee, Kun Jai

    2003-01-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is one of the methods applicable to retrospective dosimetry. The retrospective dosimetry is a part of dose reconstruction for estimation of exposed dose occurred years before the estimation. A tooth can be separated as enamel, dentine and cementum. Among the three parts, enamel is known as to show the best sensitivity to the absorbed dose and is most widely used. Since the later 80s, ESR dosimetry with tooth enamel has been studied and applied for the retrospective dosimetry. There are some factors affecting the sensitivity of enamel to absorbed dose. One of the factors is a size of enamel. Grain size of the 1.0mm∼0.1mm range is commonly used and 0.6mm∼0.25mm is recommended in other study. But the sensitivity can be varied by the grain size. In this study, the granular effect of enamel to the sensitivity is examined for application to retrospective dosimetry. In the enamel separation, to minimize the physically induced ESR spectrum, only chemical separation method was used. Separated enamels were divided by their size. The sizes of each sample is 1.0mm∼0.71mm, 0.5mm∼0.3mm, and below 0.1mm, respectively. All enamel samples show ESR spectrum related to the absorbed dose and the ESR spectrum shows linearity to the absorbed dose. The sensitivities are similar for each sample. But the enamel of size below 0.1mm shows poor characteristics relative to other enamel size. So, it is not recommended to use enamel samples below 0.1mm

  12. ESR spectrometer with a loop-gap resonator for cw and time resolved studies in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ferenc; Murányi, Ferenc

    2005-04-01

    The design and performance of an electron spin resonance spectrometer operating at 3 and 9 GHz microwave frequencies combined with a 9-T superconducting magnet are described. The probehead contains a compact two-loop, one gap resonator, and is inside the variable temperature insert of the magnet enabling measurements in the 0-9T magnetic field and 1.5-400 K temperature range. The spectrometer allows studies on systems where resonance occurs at fields far above the g approximately 2 paramagnetic condition such as in antiferromagnets. The low quality factor of the resonator allows time resolved experiments such as, e.g., longitudinally detected ESR. We demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer on the NaNiO2 antiferromagnet, the MgB2 superconductor, and the RbC60 conducting alkaline fulleride polymer.

  13. Missing baryonic resonances in the Hagedorn spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man Lo, Pok [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland); GSI, Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Marczenko, Michal; Sasaki, Chihiro [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland); Redlich, Krzysztof [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland); GSI, Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The hadronic medium of QCD is modeled as a gas of point-like hadrons, with its composition determined by the Hagedorn mass spectrum. The spectrum consists of a discrete and a continuous part. The former is determined by the experimentally confirmed resonances tabulated by the Particle Data Group (PDG), while the latter can be extracted from the existing lattice data. This formulation of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) provides a transparent framework to relate the fluctuation of conserved charges as calculated in the lattice QCD approach to the particle content of the medium. A comparison of the two approaches shows that the equation of state is well described by the standard HRG model, which includes only a discrete spectrum of known hadrons. The corresponding description in the strange sector, however, shows clear discrepancies, thus a continuous spectrum is added to incorporate the effect of missing resonances. We propose a method to extract the strange-baryon spectrum from the lattice data. The result is consistent with the trend set by the unconfirmed strange baryons resonances listed by the PDG, suggesting that most of the missing interaction strength for the strange baryons reside in the S = 1 sector. This scenario is also supported by recent lattice calculations, and might be important in the energy region covered by the NICA accelerator in Dubna, where in the heavy-ion collisions, baryons are the dominating degrees of freedom in the final state. (orig.)

  14. Preliminary study on the detection of irradiated food containing bone by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongfu; Ha Yiming; Liu Ting; Wang Rongfu; Wang Changbao

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is one of the most effective technique for detection of irradiated food containing bone. It was found that the radiation -induced ESR signal (Spectrum, g factor and peak-to-peak line width AH) in bone before and after irradiation was significantly different and could be easily distinguished from the endogenous ESR signal. Sample preparation studies showed vacuum drying and grinding at frozen temperature was an ideal method. A linear relationship was observed between ESR signal intensity and the absorbed dose (0.3-10.1kGy). It can be proposed that 0.5kGy absorbed doses can be detected by ESR for irradiated food containing bone though detecting sensitivity is very different at the same irradiated dosage with different food such as pork, beef, duck, chicken and fish. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish a national criterion for detection of irradiated foodstuffs by use of ESR. (authors)

  15. Detection of prior irradiation in dried fruits by electron spin resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, M.P.; Andrade, M.E.; Empis, J.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Dried almonds, raisins, dates and pistachio were irradiated using gamma radiation and electron beam with an average absorbed dose of 5 kGy. The radiation treatment was detected by ESR spectroscopy. Different parts of the dried fruits were analysed as follows: almonds: skin; raisins: dried pulp (at 30 deg C for one week); dates: dried pulp (at 30 deg C for one week) and stone; pistachio: nutshell. A Bruker ECS 106 EPR Spectrometer, at a microwave power of 0.4 mW, at room temperature was used. The analysis were carried out 2-3 months and 6 months after irradiation. A series of signals, tentatively described as 'cellulose-like', 'sugar-like' and 'complex' were observed, and some slight differences between spectra recorded from samples irradiated with gamma and electrons were evident

  16. Detection of prior irradiation in dried fruits by electron spin resonance (ESR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, M P [Instituto Nacional de Investigacao Agraria (EAN), Oeiras (Portugal); Andrade, M E [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Sacavem (Portugal); Empis, J [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-12-31

    Complete text of publication follows. Dried almonds, raisins, dates and pistachio were irradiated using gamma radiation and electron beam with an average absorbed dose of 5 kGy. The radiation treatment was detected by ESR spectroscopy. Different parts of the dried fruits were analysed as follows: almonds: skin; raisins: dried pulp (at 30 deg C for one week); dates: dried pulp (at 30 deg C for one week) and stone; pistachio: nutshell. A Bruker ECS 106 EPR Spectrometer, at a microwave power of 0.4 mW, at room temperature was used. The analysis were carried out 2-3 months and 6 months after irradiation. A series of signals, tentatively described as `cellulose-like`, `sugar-like` and `complex` were observed, and some slight differences between spectra recorded from samples irradiated with gamma and electrons were evident.

  17. ESR Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffa, Oswaldo; Rossi, Bruno; Graeff, Carlos; Kinoshita, Angela; Chen Abrego, Felipe; Santos, Adevailton Bernardo dos

    2004-01-01

    ESR dosimetry is widely used for several applications such as dose assessment in accidents, medical applications and sterilization of food and other materials. In this work the dosimetric properties of natural and synthetic Hydroxyapatite, Alanine, and 2-Methylalanine are presented. Recent results on the use of a K-Band (24 GHz) ESR spectrometer in dosimetry are also presented

  18. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Grossman, W.E.L.; Killough, P.M

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene (DPB) in its ground state and the resonance Raman spectrum (RRS) of DPB in its short-lived electronically excited triplet state are reported. Transient spectra were obtained by a pump-probe technique using two pulsed lasers...

  19. An ESR study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammed S.; Morishita, Norio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study was performed on the radicals induced irradiated fresh mangoes. Fresh Philippine mangoes were irradiated by the γ-rays, lyophilized and powdered. The ESR spectrum of the dry specimen showed a strong main peak at g=2.004 and a pair of peaks at both magnetic fields of the main peak. The main peak detected from flesh and skin specimens faded away in a few days after the irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose response even 9 days after the irradiation. The side-peak is a useful mean to define the irradiation on fresh mangoes. (author)

  20. Study Free Radical Of Irradiated Pulasari (Alexyia reinwadrtii BI) By Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erizal; Chosdu, Rahayu

    2000-01-01

    In the effort to develop the application of gamma irradiation for medicinal plant preservation especially for seeds i.e. pulasari (Alyxia reinwardtii Bi), the characteristic of free radical of irradiated pulasari (water content 4-6%) at doses of 10; 20; 30 kGy after storage time ranged 0-70 days were studied by using electron spin resonance. It was found that with increasing irradiation dose, the yield of free radicals formation increase. The yield of free radical of pulasari powder more lower than in a chips state. With increasing storage time up 5 days, the yield of free radical decrease up to 60-70 %. At storage time up to 70 days, the free radical remained ranged 10-20%, relatively

  1. ESR study of free radicals in mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammad S.; Morishita, Norio; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mangoes was performed. Mangoes in the fresh state were irradiated with γ-rays, lyophilized and then crushed into a powder. The ESR spectrum of the powder showed a strong main peak at g = 2.004 and a pair of peaks centered at the main peak. The main peak was detected from both flesh and skin specimens. This peak height gradually decreased during storage following irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose-response relationship even at 9 days post-irradiation. The side peaks therefore provide a useful means to define the irradiation of fresh mangoes.

  2. Free radicals in cellulose containing food detected by ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Aika; Yogo, Satsuki; Ichii, Akane; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2003-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed three radical species in cellulose containing foods, pepper and green tea. These are commercially available in Japan. The representative ESR spectrum is composed of a sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at the same g-value, and a singlet at g=4.0. The first one is attributable to a signal with hyperfine (hf) interactions of Mn 2+ ion (hf constant: 7.4 mT). The second one is due to an organic free radical, the third one may be originated from Fe 3+ ion. The progressive saturation behavior (PSB) of the ESR at various microwave power levels were indicated different relaxation behaviors of in those radicals. Namely, the peak intensity of the organic free radical component decreases in a monotonic fashion, whereas the Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ESR signals substantially keep constant. This reflects the evidence of three independent radical species. The ESR spectrum of the cellulose containing foods shows the same spectral feature irrespective of the tea or pepper. Upon gamma irradiation, a new pair of signals appeared. The PSB of the pair peaks after the irradiation showed a quite different as compared with the free radical centered at g=2. (author)

  3. ESR identification of gamma-irradiated albendazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Seyda

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is a well-established technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma-irradiated solid albendazole samples is investigated at different temperatures in the dose range of 3-34 kGy by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiation with gamma radiation produced two different radical species in albendazole. They were fairly stable at room temperature but relatively unstable above room temperature, giving rise to an unresolved ESR spectrum consisting of three resonance peaks centered at g=2.0057. Decay activation energies of the contributing radical species were calculated to be 47.8 (±13.5) and 50.5 (±9.7) kJ/mol using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to best describe the experimental dose-response data. Albendazole does not present the characteristics of good dosimetric materials. However, the discrimination of irradiated albendazole from its unirradiated form was possible even 6 months after storage in normal conditions. Based on these findings, it is concluded that albendazole and albendazole-containing drugs can be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  4. Spectrum of resonant plasma oscillations in long Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, T.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the amplitude of the plasma oscillations in the zero-voltage state of a long and narrow Josephson tunnel junction. The calculation is valid for arbitrary normalized junction length and arbitrary bias current. The spectrum of the plasma resonance is found numerically as solutions to an analytical equation. The low-frequency part of the spectrum contains a single resonance, which is known to exist also in the limit of a short and narrow junction. Above a certain cutoff frequency, a series of high-frequency standing wave plasma resonances is excited, a special feature of long Josephson junctions. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. LiSr4(BO3)3:Ce3+ phosphor as a new material for ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, L.H.; Zhang, Y.L.; Gong, X.M.; Pang, R.; Zhang, S.; Li, C.Y.; Su, Q.

    2014-01-01

    LiSr 4 (BO 3 ) 3 :0.01Ce 3+ phosphor was investigated to assess its potential as a material for measurements of radiotherapeutic doses with electron spin resonance (ESR). The ESR spectrum of the phosphor irradiated with 60 Co features five ESR signals. An isochronal annealing experiment has shown that the strongest of these signals is associated with the same trap center as the 473 K peak on the TL glow curve of this material. The dose–response is linear in the studied range from 0.89 to 90.30 Gy. Fading of the signal was also investigated. - Highlights: • LiSr 4 (BO 3 ) 3 :Ce 3+ phosphor can be used as an ESR dosimeter for radiation therapy. • The ESR signal originates from the same traps as the TL. • Dose–response is linear, and the fading is slow

  6. Dosimetric calibration of humidity chamber inside the 60Co-PANBIT irradiator using alanine ESR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, S.; Venkataramani, R.; Pushparaja; Natarajan, V.; Sastry, M.D.; Bora, J.S.; Venkatacharyulu, K.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work the suitability of the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique, using DL - α - alanine sample is examined. It is well documented that radiation induced free radicals in alanine give strong ESR spectrum which can be used for dosimetry purposes. The aspects that are relevant to the present work are: (I) stability of the radicals in temperature and humidity conditions in which the experiments were carried out; (II) linearity at high doses; and (III) establishing the utility of alanine ESR dosimeter by cross checking the dose values with more established dosimeters. The details of these investigations are presented and it is shown that alanine ESR dosimeter will meet all the required conditions satisfactorily

  7. NRSC, Neutron Resonance Spectrum Calculation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The NRSC system is a package of four programs for calculating detailed neutron spectra and related quantities, for homogeneous mixtures of isotopes and cylindrical reactor pin cells, in the energy resonance region, using ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data pre-processed with NJOY or Cullen's codes up to the Doppler Broadening and unresolved resonance level. 2 - Methods: NRSC consists of four programs: GEXSCO, RMET21, ALAMBDA and WLUTIL. GEXSCO prepares the nuclear data from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data pre-processed with NJOY or Cullen's codes up to the Doppler Broadening or unresolved resonance level for RMET21 input. RMET21 calculates spectra and related quantities for homogeneous mixtures of isotopes and cylindrical reactor pin cells, in the energy resonance region, using slowing-down algorithms and, in the case of pin cells, the collision probability method. ALAMBDA obtains lambda factors (Goldstein-Cohen intermediate resonance factors in the formalism of WIMSD code) of different isotopes for including on WIMSD-type multigroup libraries for WIMSD or other cell-codes, from output of RMET21 program. WLUTIL is an auxiliary program for extracting tabulated parameters related with RMET21 program calculations from WIMSD libraries for comparisons, and for producing new WIMSD libraries with parameters calculated with RMET21 and ALAMBDA programs. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: GEXSCO program has fixed array dimensions that are suitable for processing all reasonable outputs from nuclear data pre-processing programs. RMET21 program uses variable dimension method from a fixed general array. ALAMBDA and WLUTIL programs have fixed arrays that are adapted to standard WIMSD libraries. All programs can be easily modified to adapt to special requirements

  8. Investigation of radiosterilization feasibility of sulfamethoxazole by ESR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Şeyda

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, the spectroscopic features of the radiolytic intermediates that were produced in gamma-irradiated (5, 10, 25 and 50 kGy) sulfamethoxazole (SMX) have been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and the radiation sterilization feasibility of SMX by ionizing radiation was examined. Gamma-irradiated SMX exhibited a complex ESR spectrum consisting of 13 resonance lines where spectral parameters for the central resonance line were found to be g = 2.0062 and ΔHpp = 0.6 mT. The radiation yield of SMX was calculated to be relatively low (G = 0.1) by ESR spectroscopy and no meaningful difference was observed in the comparison of unirradiated and 50 kGy gamma irradiated SMX by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) technique, confirming that SMX is a radioresistive material. Although SMX could not be accepted to be a good dosimetric material, the identification of irradiated SMX from the unirradiated sample was possible even for the low absorbed radiation doses and for a relatively long time (three months) after the irradiation process. Decay activation energy of the radical species, which is mostly responsible for the central intense resonance line, is calculated to be 45.15 kJ/mol by using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies. Four radical species with different spectroscopic properties were accepted to be responsible for the ESR spectra of gamma-irradiated SMX, by simulation calculations. It is concluded that SMX and SMX-containing drugs can be sterilized by gamma radiation and ESR spectroscopy is an appropriate technique for the characterization of these induced radical intermediates during the gamma irradiation process of SMX. Toxicology tests should also be done for its safe usage.

  9. ESR technique for noninvasive way to quantify cyclodextrins effect on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammenos, A.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Guelluy, P.H.; Lismont, M.; Piel, G.; Hoebeke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → ESR: a new tool for cyclodextrins study on living cells. → Cholesterol and phospholipid extraction by Rameb in a dose- and time-dependent way. → Extracted phospholipids and cholesterol form stable aggregates. → ESR spectra show that lipid rafts are damaged by Rameb. → Quantification of the cholesterol extraction on cell membranes in a noninvasive way. -- Abstract: A new way to study the action of cyclodextrin was developed to quantify the damage caused on cell membrane and lipid bilayer. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the action of Randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on living cells (HCT-116). The relative anisotropy observed in ESR spectrum of nitroxide spin probe (5-DSA and cholestane) is directly related to the rotational mobility of the probe, which can be further correlated with the microviscosity. The use of ESR probes clearly shows a close correlation between cholesterol contained in cells and cellular membrane microviscosity. This study also demonstrates the Rameb ability to extract cholesterol and phospholipids in time- and dose-dependent ways. In addition, ESR spectra enabled to establish that cholesterol is extracted from lipid rafts to form stable aggregates. The present work supports that ESR is an easy, reproducible and noninvasive technique to study the effect of cyclodextrins on cell membranes.

  10. Regeneration of phenolic antioxidants from phenoxyl radicals: An ESR and electrochemical study of antioxidant hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars V.; Madsen, Helle L.; Thomsen, Marianne K.

    1999-01-01

    Radicals from the flavonoids quercetin, (+)-catechin, (+/-)-taxifolin and luteolin, and from all-rac-alpha-tocopherol have been generated electrochemically by one-electron oxidation in deaerated dimethylformamide (DMF), and characterised by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) after spin......-trapping by 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Simulations of the ESR spectrum based on estimated coupling constants of the spin-trapped quercetin radical, confirmed that this antioxidant radical is oxygen-centered. The complex mixture of radicals, quinoid intermediates and stable two-electron oxidation...

  11. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  12. ESR signals of irradiated insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Kameya, Hiromi; Imamura, Taro; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Todoriki, Setsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of irradiated insects using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was reported. The insects were maize weevil, red flour beetle, Indian meal moth and cigarette beetle that are hazardous to crops. The ESR spectra were consisted of a singlet at g=2 and a sextet centered at the similar g-value. The singlet signal is due to an organic free radical. The sextet signal is attributable to the hyperfine interactions from Mn 2+ ions. Upon irradiation, new signals were not detected. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , showed no variations before and after irradiation. (author)

  13. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan; Iacoviello, Giuseppina; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna; Dondi, Daniele; Gueli, Anna Maria; Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora; Marrale, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 registered ) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 registered is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Iacoviello, Giuseppina [Hospital ARNAS-Civico, Medical Physics Department, Palermo (Italy); Panzeca, Salvatore [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Dondi, Daniele [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Chemistry, Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Gueli, Anna Maria [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PH3DRA Laboratories, Catania (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics Department, Novara (Italy); Marrale, Maurizio [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Advanced Technologies Network Center (ATeN Center), Palermo (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered}) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered} is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  15. Resonance Spectrum Characteristics of Effective Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of High-Overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-overtone bulk acoustic resonator (HBAR consisting of a piezoelectric film with two electrodes on a substrate exhibits a high quality factor (Q and multi-mode resonance spectrum. By analyzing the influences of each layer’s material and structure (thickness parameters on the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient (Keff2, the resonance spectrum characteristics of Keff2 have been investigated systematically, and the optimal design of HBAR has been provided. Besides, a device, corresponding to one of the theoretical cases studied, is fabricated and evaluated. The experimental results are basically consistent with the theoretical results. Finally, the effects of Keff2 on the function of the crystal oscillators constructed with HBARs are proposed. The crystal oscillators can operate in more modes and have a larger frequency hopping bandwidth by using the HBARs with a larger Keff2·Q.

  16. ESR dosimetric properties of modern coral reef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, M.A. E-mail: mokhtar_sharaf@yahoo.com; Hassan, Gamal M

    2004-06-01

    Modern coral reef samples from Egypt were irradiated with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-rays to study radicals for dosimetric materials with electron spin resonance (ESR). The ESR spectrum for the radical species in unirradiated coral is characterized by four signals with spectroscopic splitting factors of g=2.0056, 2.0030, 2.0006 and 1.997. The signal at g=2.0006{+-}0.0005 is ascribed to free rotation CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals and used as a dosimetric one. The response to {gamma}-ray doses ranging from 5 to 10{sup 3} Gy and the thermal stability has been studied. The number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-value) was found to be 0.45 {+-} 0.1 and 0.9 {+-} 0.18 for coral and alanine, respectively. The lifetime of radicals and the activation energy were estimated from Arrhenius plots to be approximately 8 x 10{sup 5} {+-} 1.6 x 10{sup 5} years, and 1.12 eV, respectively.

  17. [Identification of irradiated abalone by ESR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeping; Wang, Chuanxian; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhong, Weike; Geng, Jinpei; Lu, Di; Ding, Zhuoping

    2012-05-01

    To establish an analytical method for the detection and identification of irradiated abalone by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to study the spectral characteristics of abalone and the characteristic peak for quantitation. There were obvious different ESR spectra between unirradiated and irradiated abalone. The g factor for unirradiated abalone was 2.0055-2.0060, the g1 and g2 factor for irradiated abalone were (2.0027 +/- 0.0001) and (1.9994 +/- 0.0001), respectively. The ESR signal intensity of characteristic peak was positively correlated with absorbed dose in the range of 0.5 - 10 kGy, left peak was the characteristic peak for quantitation and the detection limit was abalone. ESR spectroscopy is an effective method to determine whether the abalone being irradiated or not.

  18. ESR dating of tooth enamel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tiemei; Yang quan; Wu En

    1993-01-01

    Five tooth samples from the palaeoanthropological site of Jinniushan were dated with both electron-spin-resonance (ESR) and uranium-series techniques. The ESR age of about 230 ka is in good agreement with the U-series dating result, which confirms the hypothesis of possible coexistence of Homo erect us and Homo sapiens in China. Problems in ESR dating are discussed such as: 1) inappropriate of simple exponential extrapolation for accumulated dose determination; 2)experimental measurement of alpha detection efficiency and radon emanation and 3)selection of U-uptake model

  19. Interpretation of cw-ESR spectra of p-methyl-thio-phenyl-nitronyl nitroxide in a nematic liquid crystalline phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collauto, Alberto; Zerbetto, Mirco; Brustolon, Marina; Polimeno, Antonino; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante

    2012-03-07

    In this paper we report on the characterization by continuous wave electron spin resonance spectroscopy (cw-ESR) of a nitronyl nitroxide radical in a nematic phase. A detailed analysis is performed by exploiting an innovative modeling strategy alternative to the usual spectral simulation approach: most of the molecular parameters needed to calculate the spectrum are evaluated a priori and the ESR spectrum is obtained by direct application of the stochastic Liouville equation. Allowing a limited set of fitting parameters it is possible to reproduce satisfactorily ESR spectra in the temperature range 260 K-340 K including the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition (325.1 K). Our results open the way to a more quantitative understanding of the ordering and mobility of nitronyl nitroxide radicals in nanostructured environments.

  20. A consistent response spectrum analysis including the resonance range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, D.; Simmchen, A.

    1983-01-01

    The report provides a complete consistent Response Spectrum Analysis for any component. The effect of supports with different excitation is taken into consideration, at is the description of the resonance ranges. It includes information explaining how the contributions of the eigenforms with higher eigenfrequencies are to be considered. Stocking of floor response spectra is also possible using the method described here. However, modified floor response spectra must now be calculated for each building mode. Once these have been prepared, the calculation of the dynamic component values is practically no more complicated than with the conventional, non-consistent methods. The consistent Response Spectrum Analysis can supply smaller and larger values than the conventional theory, a fact which can be demonstrated using simple examples. The report contains a consistent Response Spectrum Analysis (RSA), which, as far as we know, has been formulated in this way for the first time. A consistent RSA is so important because today this method is preferentially applied as an important tool for the earthquake proof of components in nuclear power plants. (orig./HP)

  1. ESR and TL studies of irradiated Anatolian laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe Çam, Semra; Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Rabia Yüce, Ülkü; Aydın, Talat; Polat, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    Laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.) samples that originated from Turkey were analyzed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques before and after γ-irradiation. Unirradiated (control) laurel leaf samples exhibit a weak ESR singlet centered at g=2.0020. Besides this central signal were two weak satellite signals situated about 3 mT left and right to it in radiation-induced spectra. The dose-response curve of the radiation-induced ESR signal at g=2.0187 (the left satellite signal) was found to be described well by a power function. Variation of the left satellite ESR signal intensity of irradiated samples at room temperature with time in a long term showed that cellulosic free radicals responsible for the ESR spectrum of laurel leaves were not stable but detectable even after 100 days. Annealing studies at four different temperatures were used to determine the kinetic behavior and activation energy of the radiation-induced cellulosic free radicals responsible from the left satellite signal (g=2.0187) in laurel leaves. TL measurements of the polymineral dust isolated from the laurel leaf samples allowed distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated samples.

  2. Photoluminescence and ESR of glasses of the Ge-S system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernoskova, E.; Cernosek, Z.; Holubova, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the chalcogenide glasses were studied by photoluminescence, electron spin resonance (ESR) as well as optically induce ESR (LESR) methods. Dependence of energy of luminescence and Stokes shift on glass composition was determined

  3. An ESR study on biological dosimeters: Human hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Seyda; Ozbey, Turan

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, characteristic features of the radicals found in untreated, gamma and UV-irradiated and mechanical damaged human hair samples were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Heights of the resonance peaks measured with respect to the spectrum base line were used to monitor microwave power, dose-response, storage time and temperature dependent kinetic features of the radical species contributing to the formation of recorded experimental ESR spectra. Peak heights and g-values (2.0037-2.0052) determined from recorded spectra of hair were color dependent with ΔHpp-0.47 mT. The act of cutting hair samples gene rates sulfur centered radicals which are found in the a-keratin structure of hair. The variations of the peak heights with temperature were related with the water content found in the hair samples. In the 6-1100 Gy dose range, a linear + quadratic dose-response curve was recorded for hair and the mean radiation yield (G mean ) was calculated to be 0.4. The gamma radiation induced radicals were stable for a several hours at room temperature storage conditions. Based on these findings it was concluded that human hair samples could be used as biological/personnel dosimeters and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring its dosimetric behaviours.

  4. Ultra-small v-shaped gold split ring resonators for biosensing using fundamental magnetic resonance in the visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauluidy Soehartono, Alana; Mueller, Aaron David; Tobing, Landobasa Yosef Mario; Chan, Kok Ken; Zhang, Dao Hua; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2017-10-01

    Strong light localization within metal nanostructures occurs by collective oscillations of plasmons in the form of electric and magnetic resonances. This so-called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has gained much interest in the development of low-cost sensing platforms in the visible spectrum. However, demonstrations of LSPR-based sensing are mostly limited to electric resonances due to the technological limitations for achieving magnetic resonances in the visible spectrum. In this work, we report the first demonstration of LSPR sensing based on fundamental magnetic resonance in the visible spectrum using ultrasmall gold v-shaped split ring resonators. Specifically, we show the ability for detecting adsorption of bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c biomolecules at monolayer levels, and the selective binding of protein A/G to immunoglobulin G.

  5. ESR analysis of irradiated frogs' legs and fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.; Agnel, J.-P.; Evans, J.C.; Rowlands, C.C.; Lesgards, G.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral analysis of different parts (bones, scales, jaw, etc.) from ionized (irradiated) frozen frogs' legs and fishes (brown trout and sardine) were recorded. There is always present, after treatment, a signal due to the irradiation. ESR and ENDOR experiments lead us to assign it to h 1 centers from hydroxyapatite, as in the case of other irradiated meat bones. The use of ESR to prove whether one of these foods has been irradiated or not is discussed. (author)

  6. Application of ESR to identification of irradiated foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J. [Aix-Marseille-3 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France); Agnel, J.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Physiologie Vegetale et Ecosystemes; Belliardo, J.J. [BCR, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1994-11-01

    The conditions required to use Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) in identification of irradiated foods is first described. Then we present the results of an intercomparison sponsored by the Community Bureau of Reference involving 22 european laboratories on meat and fish bones and fruits. Then the ESR protocols given to the BCR are described. (authors). 14 refs., 8 figs., 5 annexes.

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2012-01-01

    This review presents an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging findings in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), Although there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to results across studies, common themes have emerged, including: (i) hypoactivation in nodes of the “social brain” during social processing tasks, including regions within the prefrontal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus, the amygdala, and the fusiform gyrus; (ii) aberrant frontostriatal activation during cognitive control tasks relevant to restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests, including regions within the dorsal prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia; (iii) differential lateralization and activation of language processing and production regions during communication tasks; (iv) anomalous mesolimbic responses to social and nonsocial rewards; (v) task-based long-range functional hypoconnectivity and short-range hyper-connectivity; and (vi) decreased anterior-posterior functional connectivity during resting states. These findings provide mechanistic accounts of ASD pathophysiology and suggest directions for future research aimed at elucidating etiologic models and developing rationally derived and targeted treatments. PMID:23226956

  8. ESR Dating Research of Glacial Tills in Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, W.; Yi, C.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, Quaternary Glacial-chronology has been made remarkable progress in the Tibetan Platean(TP) with the development of several numeric dating techniques, such as cosmogenic nuclides(NC), optically stimulated luminescence(OSL) and 14C. In constrast, the dating of Quaternary glacial tills in 100,000 years even more than million-year has been a challenge, just because the techniques has defects themselves and the sediments were stransformed during the geological and geomorphology progress later. Electron Spin Resonance(ESR) has been becoming one of the key methods of Quaternary Glacial-chronology with wide range of dating, expecially for the sample older than 100,000 years up to million-year scale. The accurate measurement of equivalent dose significantly impacts on accuracy and reliability of ESR dating method. Therefore, the study of the mechanisms of resetting processes is fundamental for accurate and reliable ESR dating. To understand the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signal resetting of different samples, a series of laboratory simulation and field observation studies were carried out, which made lots of important breakthrough. But the research in quartz ESR signal of moraines is less and the test of ESR dating method is still in the qualitative investigation. Therefor, we use ESR dating and study on the mechanism and characteristics of quartz ESR signals in tills in the Tibetan Platean. In the adjust method of Modern, the quartz ESR signals in Modern glacial tills represent residual values which can be adjusted signals in the older glacial tills. As a consequence, ESR dating of the quartz in moraines needs to be explored in deep with building models to adjust ages which are measured by ESR dating. Therefore, ESR dating will become the trusted one of the cross dating methods in Quaternary Glacial-chronology with the adjust mothod improving the accuracy of ESR dating ages.

  9. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.

    1993-01-01

    The conditions required to use Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) in identification of irradiated foods is first described. Then we present the results of an intercomparison sponsored by the Community Bureau of Reference involving 22 european laboratories. Qualitative identification of irradiated beef bones, dried grapes and papaya is very easy. Kinetical studies are necessary in case of fish species. Further researches are required in case of pistachio-nuts. Although all laboratories could distinguish between the two dose ranges used in case of meat bones (i.e. 1-3 and 7-10 kGy), there is an overlap of the results from the different laboratories. 2 tabs., 3 figs

  10. ESR dosimetric properties of some biomineral materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Gamal M.; Sharaf, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of g-irradiated modern coral and bioactive glass (Bio-G) samples analyzed with electron spin resonance (ESR) have been separately reported (Hassan et al., 2004; Sharaf and Hassan, 2004) and compared with alanine. These are combined here to allow a three-way comparison between these materials

  11. ESR dosimetric properties of some biomineral materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Gamal M. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street, El-Haram, El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)]. E-mail: gamalhassan65@hotmail.com; Sharaf, M.A. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street, El-Haram, El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)

    2005-02-01

    Dosimetric properties of g-irradiated modern coral and bioactive glass (Bio-G) samples analyzed with electron spin resonance (ESR) have been separately reported (Hassan et al., 2004; Sharaf and Hassan, 2004) and compared with alanine. These are combined here to allow a three-way comparison between these materials.

  12. Modeling membrane protein structure through site-directed ESR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavalenka, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a
    relatively new biophysical tool for obtaining structural information about proteins. This
    thesis presents a novel approach, based on powerful spectral analysis techniques (multicomponent
    spectral

  13. An ESR protocol based on relaxation phenomena of irradiated Japanese pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2006-03-01

    We found various free radicals in a commercially available pepper in Japan before and after irradiation using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The typical ESR spectrum of the pepper consists of a sextet centered at g = 2.0, a singlet at the same g-value and a singlet at g = 4.0. Upon gamma ray irradiation, a new pair of signals appeared in the pepper. The progressive saturation behavior (PSB) at various microwave power levels indicated quite different relaxation behaviors of those radicals. Namely, the peak intensity of the organic free radical component decreases in a monotonic fashion, whereas the Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ESR signals substantially keep constant. This reflects the evidence of three independent radicals in the pepper before irradiation. The PSB of the pair peaks as induced by irradiation possessed quite different PSB from that of the free radical located at g = 2.0. We proposed a new protocol for the ESR detection of irradiated foods by the PSB method at different microwave power levels. This would call for a major modification of the CEN protocol in European Union.

  14. Miniaturization of metamaterial electrical resonators at the terahertz spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Theodosios D.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.

    2014-05-01

    An efficient methodology for the modification of electrical resonators in order to be readily applicable at the terahertz regime is developed in this paper. To this aim, the proposed miniaturization technique starts from the conventional resonator which, without any change, exhibits the lowest possible electrical resonance for minimum dimensions. Subsequently, a set of interdigital capacitors is embedded in the original structure to increase capaci- tance, while their impact on the main resonance is investigated through computational simulations. Furthermore, to augment the inductance of the initial resonator, and, hence reduce the resonance frequency, the concept of spiral inductor elements is introduced. Again, results for the featured configuration with the additional elements are numerically obtained and all effects due to their presence are carefully examined. Finally, the new alterations are combined together and their in influence on the resonance position and quality is thoroughly studied.

  15. ESR measurements and the detection of radiosterilization of drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibella, M.; Crucq, A.S.; Tilquin, B.

    1993-01-01

    The ESR spectrum of trapped radicals in irradiated solid antibiotics could permit the detection of the radiosterilization. The ESR signal is detected only after radiolysis; at room temperature, this ESR spectrum is observable for a few hours or until several years. The rate of the metathesis reactions can be fast or very slow, the reaction path is unknown,. However, in many cases, the polycrystalline solid phase exhibits its ability to keep radicals for a long period of time and the detection of the radiolysis is possible during this period. 10 figs., 1 tab

  16. Use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kremer (Stephane); F. Renard (Felix); S. Achard (Sophie); M.A. Lana-Peixoto (Marco A.); J. Palace (Jacqueline); N. Asgari (Nasrin); E.C. Klawiter (Eric C.); S. Tenembaum (Silvia); B. Banwell (Brenda); B.M. Greenberg (Benjamin M.); J.L. Bennett (Jeffrey); M. Levy (Michael); P. Villoslada (Pablo); A. Saiz (Albert Abe); K. Fujihara (Kazuo); K.H. Chan (Koon Ho); S. Schippling (Sven); F. Paul (Friedemann); H.J. Kim (Ho Jin); J. De Seze (Jerome); J.T. Wuerfel (Jens T.); P. Cabre (Philippe); R. Marignier (Romain); T. Tedder (Thomas); E.D. van Pelt - Gravesteijn (Daniëlle); S. Broadley (Simon); T. Chitnis (Tanuja); D. Wingerchuk (Dean); L. Pandit (Lekha); M.I. Leite (M. Isabel); M. Apiwattanakul (Metha); I. Kleiter (Ingo); N. Prayoonwiwat (Naraporn); M. Han (May); K. Hellwig (Kerstin); K. Van Herle (Katja); G. John (Gareth); D.C. Hooper (D. Craig); I. Nakashima (Ichiro); D. Sato (Douglas); M.R. Yeaman (Michael R.); E. Waubant (Emmanuelle); S. Zamvil (Scott); O. Stüve (Olaf); O. Aktas (Orhan); T.J. Smith (Terry J.); A. Jacob (Anu); K. O'Connor (Kevin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other

  17. Identification of irradiated pepper by ESR measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Norio; Kume, Tamikazu; Kawakami, Waichiro; Ishigaki, Isao

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using electron spin resonance (ESR) for identification of irradiated black and white pepper was examined. The ESR spectra induced by irradiation with 10 kGy are clearly distinguishable from that of unirradiated samples. The intensity of signal induced by irradiation was markedly reduced during 2 weeks storage but it was slowly reduced on further storage. The difference of intensity between the irradiated and unirradiated samples can be distinguished after 13 weeks storage. In this experiment, ground black pepper, ground white pepper and whole white pepper can be identified after 13 weeks. On the other hand, whole black pepper cannot be identified after 8 weeks because of the variation of values. It suggests that the suitable method for sample preparation such as separation of pellicle of whole black pepper is required before ESR measurement. (author)

  18. The nitrogen acceptor in 2H-Polytype synthetic MoS2. Frequency and temperature dependent ESR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenaers, Ben; Stesmans, Andre; Afanas'ev, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    In extending on recent electron spin resonance (ESR) work which has revealed the N acceptor (N substituting for S site) in 2H-polytype bulk synthetic MoS 2 , the dopant is extensively analyzed in terms of its frequency, temperature (T), and magnetic field B angular dependent ESR spectral characteristics. For B parallel c-axis, the multi-frequency analysis confirms the ESR spectrum as being composed of a 14 N hyperfine (hf) triplet with hf splitting constant A parallel = 14.7 ± 0.2 G (B parallel c-axis) and making up ∼74% of the total spectrum intensity, superimposed on a central line centered at about equal g-value [g parallel = 2.032(2)]. The presence of the latter signal, points to some non-uniformity in dopant distribution, that is, clustering, with about ∼26% of the total N response not originating from N incorporated in the preferred ''isolated'' dopant configuration. Angular dependent measurements reveal distinct anisotropy of the hf matrix, whereas ESR probing over a wide T-range exposes drastic signal broadening with increasing T above ∼150 K. Detailed study of the N acceptor signal intensity versus T at Q-band reveals an activation energy E a = 50 ± 10 meV, herewith consolidating the value reported initially. Besides unveiling the S-site substitutional N impurity as an appropriate p-type dopant for MoS 2 , the total of the ESR work establishes a basic frame of the N acceptor ESR characteristics, giving way for further in-depth theoretical perusal. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs: LARQUA research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.

    1996-01-01

    As electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is the leading method for identification of irradiated foodstuffs, meat and fish bones, fruit and relative products (of vegetable origin), sea-food etc. were studied. In order to prepare a large co-trial on ESR identification of irradiation of irradiated foodstuffs, experiments were carried out at LARQUA, especially on fruits and vegetables. The radicals induced in the fruit pulp are not stable because the water content of fruit is generally high, but ESR can be used with dried fruit or dry components such as achenes, pips or stones. Different responses are observed, depending on the fruit. In ''sugatype'' fruits (papaya, dried grapes), an ESR multicomponent signal is radio-induced, but the non-irradiated fruit presents no ESR signal or a single-line, while in ''cellulose type'' fruits (pistachio nut, berries), a triplet is induced. But a six line signal due to Mn 2+ and a central single line may also be present both in irradiated and non-irradiated samples. In the case of aromatic herbs, the proposed official CEN protocol for irradiated food containing cellulose was used. (author)

  20. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs: LARQUA research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    As electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is the leading method for identification of irradiated foodstuffs, meat and fish bones, fruit and relative products (of vegetable origin), sea-food etc. were studied. In order to prepare a large co-trial on ESR identification of irradiation of irradiated foodstuffs, experiments were carried out at LARQUA, especially on fruits and vegetables. The radicals induced in the fruit pulp are not stable because the water content of fruit is generally high, but ESR can be used with dried fruit or dry components such as achenes, pips or stones. Different responses are observed, depending on the fruit. In ``sugatype`` fruits (papaya, dried grapes), an ESR multicomponent signal is radio-induced, but the non-irradiated fruit presents no ESR signal or a single-line, while in ``cellulose type`` fruits (pistachio nut, berries), a triplet is induced. But a six line signal due to Mn{sup 2+} and a central single line may also be present both in irradiated and non-irradiated samples. In the case of aromatic herbs, the proposed official CEN protocol for irradiated food containing cellulose was used. (author).

  1. Resonance chains in open systems, generalized zeta functions and clustering of the length spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhofen, S; Faure, F; Weich, T

    2014-01-01

    In many non-integrable open systems in physics and mathematics, resonances have been found to be surprisingly ordered along curved lines in the complex plane. In this article we provide a unifying approach to these resonance chains by generalizing dynamical zeta functions. By means of a detailed numerical study we show that these generalized zeta functions explain the mechanism that creates the chains of quantum resonance and classical Ruelle resonances for three-disk systems as well as geometric resonances on Schottky surfaces. We also present a direct system-intrinsic definition of the continuous lines on which the resonances are strung together as a projection of an analytic variety. Additionally, this approach shows that the existence of resonance chains is directly related to a clustering of the classical length spectrum on multiples of a base length. Finally, this link is used to construct new examples where several different structures of resonance chains coexist. (paper)

  2. ESR studies on degradation processes in polyethyleneterephtalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipara, M.; Chipara, M.D.; Georgescu, L.; Constantinescu, L.; Morosanu, C.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The generation of free radicals by degradation processes (thermal, plasma and radiation induced) is analyzed. Details regarding the generation of free radicals, their interactions, and kinetics, as revealed by electron spin resonance (ESR), with emphasis on laser beam degradation, are discussed. Some ESR lines of laser-irradiated polyethyleneterephtalate (PET), recorded at room temperature, are shown in Figure 1. The lines are narrow singlets located around g=2.003. The resonance line amplitude, width and double integral of the resonance line are affected by the power of the incident beam. The common features of these degradation processes (universal behavior) as well as the fingerprints of each degradation process are analyzed in detail

  3. Current topics in ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    After over 25 years, the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) is well-established in dating sites of geological, paleontological and archaeological interest. Like any scientific technique, there have been changes in understanding and in methodology. Improvements have not, however, changed the observation that external dose calculations are still a significant source of uncertainty in ages. Examples from Europe, Africa and the Americans illustrate this point. For Pradayrol Cave (France), the occupation age, 330 ka, is unchallenged, making this the oldest known Neanderthal site in France. For Roc de Marsal, also in France, on the other hand, discrepancies between TL and sedimentary dose rates imply substantial differences in interpretation. In the Western Egyptian Desert, where artifacts and datable material are not well-correlated, the dating results show consistency with expectations based on global climate change, even in deflated sites. Climate change is also the question in geological studies in the Bahamas where, despite concerns about cosmic dose history, ESR dates confirm other evidence for sea level changes. We show that an uncertain age is not the same as an impossible one.

  4. Non-linear effects in the radiolysis-optically detected ESR of radical-ion pairs in liquid and glassy solutions. Reactions and motion of organic radicals as studied by ESR and OD ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antzutkin, O.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis is divided into two sections. The first part covers an introduction to the Optically Detected Electron Spin Resonance (OD ESR) spectroscopy and a short description of the OD ESR spectrometer built in Linkoeping University in 1991. In the second section the following topics are discussed: Non-linear effects in OD ESR spectroscopy and Reactions and motion of organic radicals trapped in freon matrices. (19 refs.)

  5. Electric-Field Effects in ESR Spectrum of Low-Spin Center Ni3+ in KTaO3 Crystals (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sochava, L. S; Basun, S. A; Bursian, V. E; Razdobarin, A. G; Evans, Dean R

    2007-01-01

    ...+ was studied in KTaO3 single crystals. Orientation of the centers as well as splitting of the resonance lines was found resulting from the external E-field interaction with the electric dipole moment of the center...

  6. Analgesic effect of the electromagnetic resonant frequencies derived from the NMR spectrum of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginadis, Ioannis I; Simos, Yannis V; Velalopoulou, Anastasia P; Vadalouca, Athina N; Kalfakakou, Vicky P; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Evangelou, Angelos M

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to various types of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) affects pain specificity (nociception) and pain inhibition (analgesia). Previous study of ours has shown that exposure to the resonant spectra derived from biologically active substances' NMR may induce to live targets the same effects as the substances themselves. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential analgesic effect of the resonant EMFs derived from the NMR spectrum of morphine. Twenty five Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control group; intraperitoneal administration of morphine 10 mg/kg body wt; exposure of rats to resonant EMFs of morphine; exposure of rats to randomly selected non resonant EMFs; and intraperitoneal administration of naloxone and simultaneous exposure of rats to the resonant EMFs of morphine. Tail Flick and Hot Plate tests were performed for estimation of the latency time. Results showed that rats exposed to NMR spectrum of morphine induced a significant increase in latency time at time points (p spectrum of morphine. Our results indicate that exposure of rats to the resonant EMFs derived from the NMR spectrum of morphine may exert on animals similar analgesic effects to morphine itself.

  7. The Hagedorn Spectrum and the Dual Resonance Model: An Old Love Affair

    CERN Document Server

    Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution I recall how people working in the late 1960s on the dual resonance model came to the surprising discovery of a Hagedorn-like spectrum, and why they should not have been surprised. I will then turn to discussing the Hagedorn spectrum from a string theory viewpoint (which adds a huge degeneracy to the exponential spectrum). Finally, I will discuss how all this can be reinterpreted in the new incarnation of string theory through the properties of quantum black holes.

  8. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  9. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated cereal flour using ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shoei; Kishita, Keigo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed radicals induced in cereal flour irradiated with gamma-ray or electron beam. Sample was wheat and rice. We detected a broad singlet signal at g = 2.0. It consists of a singlet signal and a triplet signal. It suggested that the singlet signal is originated from organic free radicals and the triplet signal is from 14 N. There were no differences of ESR spectra between irradiated wheat flour and rice flour. The signal intensity of radiation induced radical was tend to increase following with the increase of radiation dose level. After radiation treatment, relaxation time of radiation induced radical was changed during storage. T 1 was decreased and T 2 was increased. In this study, the relaxation time is calculated using the parameters obtained from the ESR signal. It is necessary to analyze the relaxation time directly with pulsed ESR spectroscopy in future. (author)

  10. Oxidation of spin-traps by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) radical in aqueous solutions: first ESR evidence of formation of new nitroxide radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Miura, Y; Ueda, J

    1996-01-01

    The reactivities of the chlorine dioxide (ClO2), which is a stable free radical towards some water-soluble spin-traps were investigated in aqueous solutions by an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ClO2 radical was generated from the redox reaction of Ti3+ with potassium chlorate (KClO3) in aqueous solutions. When one of the spin-traps, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system, ESR spectrum due to the ClO2 radical completely disappeared and a new ESR spectrum [aN(1) = 0.72 mT, aH(2) = 0.41 mT], which is different from that of DMPO-ClO2 adduct, was observed. The ESR parameters of this new ESR signal was identical to those of 5,5-dimethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (DMPOX), suggesting the radical species giving the new ESR spectrum is assignable to DMPOX. The similar ESR spectrum consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.69 mT] was observed when the derivative of DMPO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (M4PO) was included in the Ti3+-KClO3 reaction system. This radical species is attributed to the oxidation product of M4PO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidone-(2)-oxyl-(1) (M4POX). When another nitrone spin-trap, alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN) was used as a spin-trap, the ESR signal intensity due to the ClO2 radical decreased and a new ESR signal consisting of a triplet [aN(1) = 0.76 mT] was observed. The similar ESR spectrum was observed when N-t-butyl-alpha- nitrone (PBN) was used as a spin-trap. This ESR parameter [a(N)(1) = 0.85 mT] was identical to the oxidation product of PBN, PBNX. Thus, the new ESR signal observed from POBN may be assigned to the oxidation product of POBN, POBNX. These results suggest that the ClO2, radical does not form the stable spin adducts with nitrone spin-traps, but oxidizes these spin-traps to give the corresponding nitroxyl radicals. On the other hand, nitroso spin-traps, 5,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate (DBNBS), and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) did not trap

  11. Resonance Raman Spectrum of the Transient (SCN)2 Free Radical Anion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the transient species (λmax = 475 nm, τ½ = 1.6 μs) formed by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of thiocyanate, SCN2−, is reported. The spectrum is discussed in terms of the previous assignment of this transient to the radical anion, (SCN)−2. The observed...... vibrational frequencies of the radical anion are consistent with substantial weakening of the S---S and the Ctriple bond; length as m-dashN bonds are compared with neutral thiocyanogen....

  12. ESR teleradiology survey: results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    With recent developments of teleradiology technology and services, it has become necessary to better evaluate its extent and use among different countries in Europe. With this goal in mind, the ESR launched two specific surveys intended to gather the current state of adoption and implementation of teleradiology in clinical practice. A special focus on differentiating between insourcing teleradiology services among partners of the same organisation and outsourcing to external services was an essential part of the design of these surveys. The first survey was addressed to 44 national societies of different countries in Europe, while the second survey was intended for all practicing radiologist ESR members. While the results of these surveys reported here may provide a wealth of information to better understand the trends in adoption of teleradiology in Europe, they only represent a snapshot at a certain point in time. The rapid development of telecommunication tools as well as a fundamental change in practice and healthcare economics will certainly influence these observations in the upcoming years. These data, however, will provide objective and relevant parameters for supporting the efforts of experts and policy makers in promoting appropriate criteria and guidelines for adequate use of teleradiology in clinical practice. Main Messages • Understand concepts and challenges of teleradiology • Provide insight into current trends and solutions for teleradiology • Compare differences in teleradiolgy strategies between countries in Europe • Establish a reference on statistical data of usage of teleradiology in Europe.

  13. Detection of gamma-irradiated peanuts by ESR spectroscopy and GC analysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Mingli; An Li [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Yi Mingha, E-mail: wangyilwm@163.co [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Feng Wang [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Yan Lizhang [Division of Metrology in Ionizing Radiation and Medicine, National Institute of Metrology, 100013 Beijing (China)

    2011-03-15

    Peanuts were analyzed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography (GC) before and after gamma irradiation. Using European protocols, the validity and effectiveness of these two techniques were compared with regard to sample preparation, sample and solvent consumption and dose-response curves after irradiation. The results showed the possibility of using ESR and GC for distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated peanuts. A radiation dose of 0.1 kGy could be detected by ESR but not by GC. The results also indicated that GC is an effective method for qualitative analysis of irradiated peanut, while ESR is suitable for the rapid detection of irradiated peanuts.

  14. ESR Spectroscopy for the Study of Oxidative Processes in Food and Beverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mogens Larsen; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2018-01-01

    Radicals are intermediates in many reactions that deteriorate foods. The detection of radicals by electron spin resonance, ESR, can provide mechanistic and uantitative information about these reactions, which has led to ESR-based methods for early prediction of shelf life of foods and beverages....... ESR is also used for monitoring irradiated foods, since the generated radicals are often quite stable. ESR can moreover give important information about oxidation mechanisms and microscopic physical structural aspects, which is useful for developing protective measures against oxidation in food....

  15. ESR detection of irradiated seashells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Hasbany, C. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France)]|[Laboratoire de Chimie des Produits Naturels, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Lesgards, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Produits Naturels, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Ochin, D. [Institut Agricol et Alimentaire de Lille (France). Lab. de Microbiologie et d`Hygiene Alimentaire

    1996-11-01

    Among the protocols for identification of irradiated foodstuffs submitted to the European Committee of Standardization, two using ESR (food containing bone or cellulose) were finally accepted as official `draft European standards` in Berlin on 9-10 June 1994. We present here some new results for oyster and mussel shells, and an ESR draft protocol is proposed. (author).

  16. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, S.; Renard, F.; Achard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them uneqtaivcally from lesions caused by other disorders have...... not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR voltametry, and ultrahigh...... diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MR I techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes hi NMO spectrum disorders and may...

  17. Development of an ESR/MR dual-imaging system as a tool to detect bioradicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hirotada; Aoki, Masaaki; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Kouichi; Sakata, Motomichi

    2006-01-01

    A system combining electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) with another imaging modality capable of enabling visualization of the distribution of bioradicals on an anatomical map of the specimens would be a superior biomedical imaging system. We describe the development of an electron spin resonance ESR/MR dual-imaging system with one permanent magnet and the biomedical applications of this system. The magnetic circuit developed for the ESR/MR dual-imaging system consisted of the permanent magnet made of Fe-Nd-B, pole pieces, and poke. The permanent magnet was installed on the MR side only, and the ESR side was made of pole pieces only. The magnetic field was adjusted to 0.5T at MR and to 0.042T at ESR. The overall dimensions of the magnet developed for the ESR/MR imaging system were 460 (W) x 440 (D) x 460 (H) mm, and it weighed 220 kg. The distance of each center for the magnet for ESR and MR imaging could be set as close as 200 mm. The entire ESR/MR imaging system can be installed in a common laboratory without magnetic shielding. MR images of plants (myoga) and small animals (mice and rats) were successfully acquired with or without ESR operation. ESR spectra of nitroxyl spin probes were also measured, even with MRI operation. ESR signals of triarylmethyl derivatives with narrow line-width (0.026 mT) were observed in living mice while MRI was operating. The ESR/MR imaging dual functions work properly with no electric or magnetic interference. The ESR/MR dual images demonstrate that this system enables visualization of the distribution of bioradicals on the anatomical map of the object. (author)

  18. Evaluation of flux-trapping and magneto-resistibility of superconductors by ESR spectroscopy; ESR ho ni yoru chodendotai no jisoku hosoku to taijiba tokusei no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumori, T; Matsuura, K; Muto, H [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-09-28

    The abnormal sisal, which was observed in the ESR measurement of superconductors, was confirmed to be a non-ESR (non resonant) signal, from an ESR experiment applying parallel and vertically polarized microwave fields and from the calculation of the ESR transition probabilities. The field modulation dependence of the spectra revealed that the signal was composed of two components. From the modulation-scheme analysis and a study of type I and II superconductors, two components were assigned to the microwave responses to magnetizations trapped in the crystalline portion and at intergranular Josephson junctions. The former B and the batter J components are observed in the first derivative and absorption a form, respectively, and their polarities differently behave for the field sweep reversal. Based on these results, we have improved an ESR spectrometer, which makes it possible to measure separately two kinds of magnetization and to study the trapping ability and quantum flux. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Electron spin resonance of particulate soot samples from automobiles to help environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.; Matsuda, T.; Ikeya, M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of electron spin resonance (ESR) was studied for diesel soot samples and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from automobile engines. Soot samples or diesel exhaust particles (DEP) were recovered at various points: in the exhaust pipe of a diesel engine, at the dust sampler of a highway tunnel (standard DEP), on the soundproofing wall alongside a heavy traffic road, and on the filters of a dust sampler for SPM. The diesel soot samples apparently showed two ESR spectra: one was a broad spectrum at g=2.1 with a line width of ca. 80-120mT and the other was a sharp signal of a carbon radical at g=2.003 with a line width of 0.4mT. Annealing experiments with a DEP sample at 250 deg. C revealed drastic enhancement of the sharp ESR signal, which suggested a thermal process of carbonization of remnant organics. An oximetric study by ESR showed an enhancement of the broad signal in the diesel soot sample as well as in the sharp ESR signal. Therefore, the main part of the broad ESR signal would be attributed to carbon radicals, which form a different configuration, probably closely interacting aggregates. Enhancement of the sharp ESR signal was not observed in the standard DEP sample under vacuum condition, which suggested less adsorption sites on the surface of DEP samples

  20. Coupled superconducting qudit-resonator system: Energy spectrum, state population, and state transition under microwave drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Y.; Xu, H. K.; Su, F. F.; Li, Z. Y.; Tian, Ye; Han, Siyuan; Zhao, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    Superconducting quantum multilevel systems coupled to resonators have recently been considered in some applications such as microwave lasing and high-fidelity quantum logical gates. In this work, using an rf-SQUID type phase qudit coupled to a microwave coplanar waveguide resonator, we study both theoretically and experimentally the energy spectrum of the system when the qudit level spacings are varied around the resonator frequency by changing the magnetic flux applied to the qudit loop. We show that the experimental result can be well described by a theoretical model that extends from the usual two-level Jaynes-Cummings system to the present four-level system. It is also shown that due to the small anharmonicity of the phase device a simplified model capturing the leading state interactions fits the experimental spectra very well. Furthermore we use the Lindblad master equation containing various relaxation and dephasing processes to calculate the level populations in the simpler qutrit-resonator system, which allows a clear understanding of the dynamics of the system under the microwave drive. Our results help to better understand and perform the experiments of coupled multilevel and resonator systems and can be applied in the case of transmon or Xmon qudits having similar anharmonicity to the present phase device.

  1. Effect of surfactant coating on magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles: ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeseoglu, Yueksel

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic properties of surfactant-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, Fe 3 O 4 (SPION) were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. For all samples, a strong and broad single ESR signal has been observed at all temperatures. A strong temperature dependence of ESR linewidth and resonance field is observed. Also, there is a strong effect of surfactant coating on magnetic properties of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. While the resonance field is decreasing by coating, the linewidth of the ESR spectra is increasing. These changes in resonance field and the linewidth are attributed to the decrease in effective magnetic moment due to a non-collinear spin structure originated from the pinning of the surface spins and coated surfactant at the interface of nanoparticles. Also, the changes are due to the contribution of the volume of the diamagnetic coating mass to the sample volume

  2. ESR dating studies on fossil of elaphurus davidianus horn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shiming; Wang Hong; Tang Jingjuan; Yan Xiaomin; Guo Shiqing

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of studies on elephant tooth fossil, ESR dating of elaphurus davidianus horn fossil found in Anhui Province was reported. The sample examined by TEM electron spectrum is composed of hydroxyapatite. ESR experiments showed that the solid bone sample can be chosen as dating material. According to the contents of U, Th and K in the sample determined by ICP, the annual dose of radiation was calculated by using the linear uranium accumulation model and disequilibrium decay. The age of this fossil was determined to be 2.5 x 10 4 years

  3. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2002-03-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene

  4. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  5. An ESR study of defects in irradiated hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, T.; Shiraishi, K.; Ebina, Y.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation-induced defects in synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) of six different origins have been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and IR measurements. The orthorhombic CO 2 - radicals were detected in almost all of the samples examined, but the isotropic CO 2 - was produced only in water-containing HAp with low crystallinity. The doublet signal due to H 0 was clearly detected in HAp with extreme calcium deficiency as compared to the stoichiometry. The results of ESR and FTIR suggest that water molecules in low crystalline HAp are not on the surface but embedded in the HAp crystalline lattice. (author)

  6. The continuous spectrum and the effect of parametric resonance. The case of bounded operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skazka, V V

    2014-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the Mathieu-type differential equation u ″ =−A 2 u+εB(t)u in a Hilbert space H. It is assumed that A is a bounded self-adjoint operator which only has an absolutely continuous spectrum and B(t) is almost periodic operator-valued function. Sufficient conditions are obtained under which the Cauchy problem for this equation is stable for small ε and hence free of parametric resonance. Bibliography: 10 titles

  7. Is the resonance C(1480) in the φπ0 mass spectrum a new meson?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achasov, N.N.; Kozhevnikov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the recently discovered resonance structure C (1480) in the φπ 0 mass spectrum of the reaction π - p → φπ 0 n can originate from the rare decay p' (1600) → φπ 0 arising as a result of the OZI-rule violation via intermediate processes p' (1600) → K * anti K+anti K * K → φπ 0 . The study of the reaction e + e - → p' (1600) → φπ 0 is the crucial test of this explanation. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of ESR measurement parameters for detecting irradiated spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Shoji; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    The side signals from irradiated cellulose radical are used for detecting irradiated spices with the electron spin resonance (ESR). The side signals are two signals observed on both sides of a singlet signal (g≒2.00) from organic free radicals. Since the intensities of the side signals are weak, if the width of the singlet signal is large, these signals are covered and cannot be observed. In this study, we analyzed ESR measurement parameters of seven kinds spices (oregano, basil, parsley, coriander, cumin, white pepper, and black pepper) that would lead to narrow width of the singlet signal for detecting side signals. The results were as follows: 4 mW microwave power for basil, parsley, oregano, coriander, and cumin, and 8 mW for white pepper and black pepper, while modulation amplitude of 4 G, time constant of 20 ms were determined to be the optimal ESR measurement parameters. (author)

  9. Dose determination by ESR in an accident, using cotton fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, R.; Mehta, S.K.; Iyer, M.R.; Natarajan, V.; Sastry, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Accidental exposure dose assessment by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique from the free radicals generated in a cotton handkerchief has been attempted in this investigation. The cotton handkerchief, a common material carried by individuals, was taken as the medium for free radical estimation. About 55 mg of the irradiated piece of cloth was loaded into a quartz tube and the dose dependence of the ESR signal at g = 2.0026 was measured at room temperature, using a Bruker ESP-300 ESR spectrometer in X-band (9.74 GHz). The intensity of this signal was found to be proportional to the dose in the range of 1-1000 Gy. The stability of the free radicals with time of storage was followed. Dependence of dose rate as well as the presence of water on the yield of free radicals were also investigated. (author) 5 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Calculation of the fine spectrum and integration of the resonance cross sections in the cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The code BOXER is used for the neutronics calculations of two-dimensional LWR arrays. During the calculation of the group constants of the cells (pin, clad and moderator), the program SLOFIN, a BOXER module, allows taking into account the self-shielding of the resonances. The resonance range is devided into two parts: - above 907 eV the cross sections are condensed into groups by the library code ETOBOX. In SLOFIN, these values are interpolated over the equivalent cross section and the temperature. The interpolation formula chosen gives an accuracy better than 1% for values of the equivalent cross section larger than 5 barns. - between 4 and 907 eV, the cross sections are given in pointwise form as a function of the lethargy. At first a list of pointwise macroscopic cross section is established. Then the fine spectrum in the cell is calculated in 2 or 3 zones by means of the collision probability theory. In the central zone one resonant pseudo-nuclide is considered for the calculation of the scattering source, while the light nuclides are explicitly treated but under the assumption of energy independent cross sections. The fine spectrum is then used as a weihting function for the condensation of the pointwise cross sections of the resonant nuclides into energy groups. The procedure was checked on the basis of the TRX-1 to -4 and BAPL-UO 2 -1 to -3 experiments which are used as benchmarks for the tests of the ENDF/B libraries. The comparisons with other calculation results show that the deviations observed are typical for the basic cross sections. The method proposed shows a good accuracy in the application range foreseen for BOXER. It is also fast enough to be used as a standard method in a cell code. (author)

  11. ESR in a disordered network of nanographene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, M.; Tsugeno, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Joly, V. L. J.; Takai, K.; Enoki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Randomly networked nanographene sheets have been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) technique at 20 GHz (K-band) and 35 GHz (Q-band). Nanographene has spin-polarized non-bonding π-electron states (edge-state spins) localized in the zigzag edge region. We have investigated the temperature dependence of an ESR signal of activated carbon fibers at two different microwave powers for each frequency. The signal intensity smoothly increases with decreasing temperature at any microwave power. The line width of ESR signal with a Lorentzian line shape decreases linearly upon cooling, and then increases steeply after taking a minimum at about 20 K irrespective of microwave power. The former is interpreted as the Korringa relation in the localized edge spins and conduction π carriers. The latter may be caused by inhomogeneous line broadening of the ESR signal from randomly distributed nanographene sheets with different sizes due to the suppression of electron hopping between nanographene sheets, i.e. electron localization. The discontinuous line broadening and the signal intensity drop at around 20 K reported in the previous X-band ESR at 1 μW were not observed, probably because of either higher microwave power than 1 μW or some amount of oxygen adsorption in our sample in the present study.

  12. Electron spin resonance study of a-Cr2O3 and Cr2O3·nH2O quasi-spherical nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khamlich, S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The quasi-spherical nanoparticles of hydrated Cr2O3 · nH2O, and crystalline -Cr2O3, have been synthesized by reduction of the first row (3d) transition metal complex of K2Cr2O7. The temperaturedependence of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum...

  13. Quantitative detection of absorbed dose of irradiated dried fruit by ESR spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiming; Ha Yiming; Zhao Yongfu; Zhang Yanli

    2011-01-01

    Sunflower seeds, walnuts, pistachios, and hazelnuts were used as experimental materials which were irradiated at 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy, respectively. The relationships and correlations between ESR signal intensity and irradiation dosages were studied. The results showed that ESR spectra of irradiated samples were obviously different from that of CK, and the ESR signal intensity was positively related with the irradiation dose. After irradiation, the ESR intensity and spectrum shapes all changed and all four samples were clearly identified irradiated or unirradiated. The appearances of the two weak satellite lines which situated left and right to the intense singlet line in walnuts and pistachios proved the existence of cellulose radical. The detection dose limit of irradiated walnut was 1 kGy, and the detection limits of the other three samples were lower than 1 kGy. In conclusion, the ESR method could be used to irradiated. (authors)

  14. Relaxation behavior of radicals produced in irradiated black pepper under various moisture conditions by ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Kawauchi, Risa; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kaeda, Yoko; Ogawa, Satoko; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2008-01-01

    Black pepper is easy to be contaminated by microorganism and often processed to γ-irradiation. ESR has been used for the detection of radicals induced in irradiated spices. Using ESR, we revealed the effects of moisture condition during storage of irradiated black pepper on the saturation behavior of ESR signal. The ESR spectrum of black pepper consists of a broad sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet as same g-value and a singlet at g=4.0. The irradiation causes two new signals, one is the strong and sharp singlet signal at g=2.0 and the other is the side signal. We found that the signal intensity originated by the radicals of black pepper with and without radiation decayed in the high humidity condition during storage. The ESR signal intensity of irradiated black pepper decayed during storage and showed almost the same intensity level as that of non-irradiated black pepper during storage. (author)

  15. ESR dating of fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2003-02-01

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene

  16. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene.

  17. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C.; Tenembaum, Silvia N.; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  18. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Rita de Cassia Ferreira; Vasconcelos, Marcio Moacyr; Faleiros, Leticia Oliveira; Brito, Adriana Rocha; Werner Junior, Jairo; Herdy, Gesmar Volga Haddad [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina], e-mail: rcgonc@hotmail.com; Cruz Junior, Luiz Celso Hygino da; Domingues, Romeu Cortes [Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    To analyze the metabolic constitution of brain areas through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children affected with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder compared with normal children. Method: The sample of this case-control study included eight boys with epidemiologic history of in utero exposure to alcohol (median age 13.6{+-}3.8 years) who were diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, and eight controls (median age 12.1{+-}3,4 years). An 8 cm{sup 3} single voxel approach was used, with echo time 30 ms, repetition time 1500 ms, and 128 acquisitions in a 1.5T scanner, and four brain areas were analyzed: anterior cingulate, left frontal lobe, left striatum, and left cerebellar hemisphere. Peaks and ratios of metabolites N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine, and myo-inositol were measured. Results: Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder showed a decrease in choline/creatine ratio (p=0.020) in left striatum and an increase in myo-inositol/creatine ratio (p=0.048) in left cerebellum compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference in all peaks and ratios from the anterior cingulate and frontal lobe between the two groups. Conclusion: This study found evidence that the left striatum and left cerebellum are affected by intrauterine exposure to alcohol. Additional studies with larger samples are necessary to expand our knowledge of the effects of fetal exposure to alcohol. (author)

  19. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Rita de Cassia Ferreira; Vasconcelos, Marcio Moacyr; Faleiros, Leticia Oliveira; Brito, Adriana Rocha; Werner Junior, Jairo; Herdy, Gesmar Volga Haddad

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the metabolic constitution of brain areas through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children affected with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder compared with normal children. Method: The sample of this case-control study included eight boys with epidemiologic history of in utero exposure to alcohol (median age 13.6±3.8 years) who were diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, and eight controls (median age 12.1±3,4 years). An 8 cm 3 single voxel approach was used, with echo time 30 ms, repetition time 1500 ms, and 128 acquisitions in a 1.5T scanner, and four brain areas were analyzed: anterior cingulate, left frontal lobe, left striatum, and left cerebellar hemisphere. Peaks and ratios of metabolites N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine, and myo-inositol were measured. Results: Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder showed a decrease in choline/creatine ratio (p=0.020) in left striatum and an increase in myo-inositol/creatine ratio (p=0.048) in left cerebellum compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference in all peaks and ratios from the anterior cingulate and frontal lobe between the two groups. Conclusion: This study found evidence that the left striatum and left cerebellum are affected by intrauterine exposure to alcohol. Additional studies with larger samples are necessary to expand our knowledge of the effects of fetal exposure to alcohol. (author)

  20. The high-frequency ESR spectra of the syntetic diamond and nanodiamonds type Ib at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsko, E.; Kobets, M.; Dergachev, K.; Kulbickas, A.; Rasteniene, L.; Vaisnoras, R.

    2013-01-01

    The ESR absorption spectra of nonirradiated and irradiated (by electrons with an energy of 2 MeV) bulk diamond and nanodiamond powder of type Ib have been studied at a wide range of frequencies (70-20 GHz) and temperature (4.2-0 K) by ESR method. It is shown, that in the ESR spectrum of bulk diamond absorption lines of ion nickel catalyst Ni +a nd a paramagnetic single center of the nitrogen N 0 is observed. Absorption lines of the paramagnetic centers with dangling bonds on the nanodiamond surface (surface defects) in the ESR spectra are obtained.

  1. Time-resolved ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckert, D.

    1986-06-01

    The time-resolved ESR spectroscopy is one of the modern methods in radiospectroscopy and plays an important role in solving various problems in chemistry and biology. Proceeding from the basic ideas of time-resolved ESR spectroscopy the experimental equipment is described generally including the equipment developed at the Central Institute of Isotope and Radiation Research. The experimental methods applied to the investigation of effects of chemically induced magnetic polarization of electrons and to kinetic studies of free radicals in polymer systems are presented. The theory of radical pair mechanism is discussed and theoretical expressions are summarized in a computer code to compute the theoretical polarization for each pair of the radicals

  2. Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum.......The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum....

  3. ESR signal features of 60Co γ-ray irradiated bone tissue and its dose response relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ke; Sun Zunpu; Shi Yuanming

    1993-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to study the radiation-induced ESR signal features of different paramagnetic species of 60 Co γ-ray irradiated bone tissue. The results showed that the intensity of an ESR signal at that the intensity of an ESR signal at g 2.0022 of human bones exposed to a dose range of 0-50 Gy had linear dose response relationships. The lower limit of detectable dose was about 2 Gy and the detecting error was about 10%. The signal was stable at room temperature during 60 days, and the effect of radiation dose rate of 0.5-8.0 Gy/min could be neglected. This signal was insensitive to microwave power and temperature, which was suitable for rapid and direct detection with ESR technique. These features suggest that human bones could be used for radiation accident dose evaluation by ESR

  4. Cantilever-detected high-frequency ESR measurement using a backward travelling wave oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Y; Hirano, S; Ohmichi, E; Ohta, H

    2012-01-01

    Our cantilever-detected electron spin resonance (ESR) technique is motivated for terahertz ESR spectroscopy of a tiny single crystal at low temperature. In this technique, ESR signal is detected as deflection of a sample-mounted cantilever, which is sensitively detected by built-in piezoresistors. So far, ESR detection at 315 GHz was succeeded using Gunn oscillator. In this study, we combine our ESR technique with a backward traveling wave oscillator (BWO), which can cover a wide frequency range 120-1200 GHz, to achieve better spectral resolution. Experiments were carried out at 4.2 K for a single crystal of Co Tutton salt with a newly constructed optical system. We successfully observed two ESR absorption lines in BWO frequencies up to 370 GHz. From multi-frequency measurements, the observed ESR lines shifted linearly with BWO frequency, being consistent with paramagnetic resonance. The estimated g values are g 1 = 3.00 and g 2 = 3.21. The spin sensitivity was estimated to ∼10 12 spins/gauss at 370 GHz.

  5. Electron energy spectrum produced in radio sources by turbulent, resonant acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilek, J.A.; Henriksen, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    We consider relativistic particle acceleration by resonant Alfven waves which are driven internally in a radio source from fully developed fluid turbulence. We find that self-similar behavior as described by Lacombe, f(p)proportionalp - /sup s/ but with sroughly-equal4.5, arises self-consistently when this turbulent wave driving coexists with synchrotron losses. The coupling of the wave and particle distributions provides feedback which drives an arbitrary initial distribution to the form-stable, self-similar form. The model predicts that turbulent plasma in a radio source should evolve toward a synchrotron spectral index, 0.5< or approx. =α< or approx. =1.0 in one particle lifetime, and that the average spectrum of most sources should also be in this range. The theory may also be applicable to other turbulent sites, such as cosmic-ray reaccelertion in the interstellar medium

  6. Waves on fluid-loaded shells and their resonance frequency spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, X.L.; Uberall, H.; Raju, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    , or axially propagating waves both in the shell material, and in the fluid loading. Previous results by Bao et al. (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105 (1999) 2704) were obtained for the circumferential-wave dispersion curves on doubly loaded aluminum shells; the present study extends this to fluid-filled shells in air......Technical requirements for elastic (metal) cylindrical shells include the knowledge of their natural frequency spectrum. These shells may be empty and fluid-immersed, or fluid-filled in an ambient medium of air, or doubly fluid-loaded inside and out. They may support circumferential waves....... For practical applications, steel shells are most important and we have here obtained corresponding results for these. To find the natural frequencies of cylindrical shells, one may invoke the principle of phase matching where resonating standing waves are formed around the circumference, or in the axial...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Tunneling induced dark states and the controllable resonance fluorescence spectrum in quantum dot molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing and manipulating quantum dots (QDs), has been used to investigate the resonance fluorescence spectrum from linear triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling, using atomic physics methods. Interesting features such as quenching and narrowing of the fluorescence are observed. In such molecules the tunneling between the quantum dots can also induce a dark state. The results are explained by the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the laser and the tunneling. Unlike the atomic system, in such quantum dot molecules quantum coherence can be induced using tunneling, requiring no coupling lasers, which will allow tunneling controllable quantum dot molecules to be applied to quantum optics and photonics. (paper)

  9. ESR studies of high-energy phosphorus-ion implanted synthetic diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoya, J [University of Library and Information Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanda, H; Morita, Y; Ohshima, T

    1997-03-01

    Phosphorus is among potential n-type dopants in diamond. High pressure synthetic diamond crystals of type IIa implanted with high energy (9-18 MeV) phosphorus ions have been studied by using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The intensity and the linewidth of the ESR signal attributed to the dangling bond of the amorphous phase varied with the implantation dose, suggesting the nature of the amorphization varies with the dose. The ESR signals of point defects have been observed in the low dose as-implanted crystals and in the high dose crystals annealed at high temperature and at high pressure. (author)

  10. μSR spectroscopy on free radicals: a complement to ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.F.J.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1986-12-01

    The paper on ''μSR spectroscopy on free radicals'' was presented to the conference on ''Muon spin, rotation, relaxation and resonance'' Uppsala, 1986. The spectroscopic techniques for both ESR and μSR are described, along with the interpretation of the spectra, hyperfine coupling constants and radical structure. A comparison of ESR and μSR data is carried out with respect: to 1) isotope effects in organic radicals, 2) isotope effects in solids, -the isotropic muonium defect centres, and 3) the muonium defect centres in semiconductors. Radical categories examined using ESR and μSR are discussed, including new species, formation mechanisms, and ionic species. (U.K.)

  11. Adaptation of closed cycle refrigeration system spectrum to radiation cryochemistry: γ-irradiation, ESR and optical absorption spectroscopy, ITL and RTL of frozen matrices at temperatures down to 14 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, J.; Plonka, A.; Ratajski, A.; Suwalski, J.P.; Wypych, M.

    1978-01-01

    The adaptation of the commercially available closed cycle refrigeration system Spectrim sup(TM) for radiation cryochemistry experiments with frozen matrices down to 14 K is described. The cold head of Spectrim sup(TM), equipped with vacuum shroud extensions and sample holders proper for the given type of experiments, was contained in lead shields, provided with special entrances for irradiation of samples with 60 Co γ-rays. The shroud extensions used for ESR and optical absorption measurements and the sample holders for isothermal luminescence and radiothermolumininescence measurements are described. (U.K.)

  12. Luminescence and ESR properties of Brazilian feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, J.F.S.; Silva, D.M.; Silva, P.H.; Kinoshita, A.; Munita, C.S.; Tatumi, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    The IRSL and TL responses of three different feldspar crystals have been analysed. TL measurements were taken in the ultraviolet UV (290-370nm) and the visible VIS (340-610nm) regions of the spectrum. For the UV region and for a natural sample, peaks were observed at 283, 287 and 310 deg. C for grey, white and pink crystals, respectively. For samples irradiated after prior preheating, it was noted that TL peaks occurred at about 200 deg. C for all the samples; irradiation with high doses above 500Gy induced the formation of one additional peak at 170 deg. C. The VIS region results were similar to those for the UV. ESR experiments have been developed to verify the influence of radiation and heat treatments on the centres and preliminary results showed great variation in the intensities of [TiO 4 ] - , Al-O - -Al and Fe 3+ centres

  13. SDSL-ESR-based protein structure characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strancar, Janez; Kavalenka, Aleh; Urbancic, Iztok; Ljubetic, Ajasja; Hemminga, Marcus A

    2010-03-01

    As proteins are key molecules in living cells, knowledge about their structure can provide important insights and applications in science, biotechnology, and medicine. However, many protein structures are still a big challenge for existing high-resolution structure-determination methods, as can be seen in the number of protein structures published in the Protein Data Bank. This is especially the case for less-ordered, more hydrophobic and more flexible protein systems. The lack of efficient methods for structure determination calls for urgent development of a new class of biophysical techniques. This work attempts to address this problem with a novel combination of site-directed spin labelling electron spin resonance spectroscopy (SDSL-ESR) and protein structure modelling, which is coupled by restriction of the conformational spaces of the amino acid side chains. Comparison of the application to four different protein systems enables us to generalize the new method and to establish a general procedure for determination of protein structure.

  14. Elaboration And Study Of Transfer Alanine/ESR Dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres G, Luz A.

    1996-01-01

    The dosimetry is the dose measure imparted by the energy from the ionizing radiation to the matter. The dosemeters is the means used for the determination of such a dose. Diverse dosimetric classes exist, this classification depends in essence of the energy involved in the irradiation process and of its application necessity. It is as well as in radiological protection movie dosemeter is used, and TLD, in the calibration of units, as those of cobalt, the ionization cameras are used, in the detection of superficial contamination the accountants Geiger Muller and proportional etc. The transfer dosimeter Alanine/ESR is used, object of the present work, is characterized because after reading the registered dose, the information is conserved and it can be transferred and read in any team of ESR. Likewise the following dose that is imparted will be added to the previous one registered, this indicates that the dosemeters is of integral character. In the spectra taken ESR, it is determined that the integral double or area under the curve of the spectrum ESR is proportional to the concentration of free radicals generated by the radiation ionization and in turn this concentration is proportional to the dose received by the pills; in last, these proportionality relationships take to that the area under the curve of the spectrum main ESR is proportional to the radiation dose received by the alanine dosemeters. This dosemeter seeks to be an economic alternative that it will lend the calibration service that today offers the ionization Cameras or the acrylic red industrial dosemeters

  15. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  16. Electron beam dose measurements with alanine/ESR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, O. Jr.; Galante, O.L.; Campos, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    When the aminoacid alanine, CH 3 -CH(NH 2 )-COOH, is exposed to radiation field, stable free radicals are produced. The predominant paramagnetic specie found at room temperature is the CH 3 -CH-COOH. Electron Spin Resonance - ESR is a technique used for quantification and analysis of radicals in solid and liquid samples. The evaluation of the amount of produced radicals can be associated with the absorbed dose . The alanine/ESR is an established dosimetry method employed for high doses evaluation, it presents good performance for X-rays, gamma, electrons, and protons radiation detection. The High Doses Dosimetry Laboratory of Ipen developed a dosimetric system based on alanina/ESR that presents good characteristics for use in gamma fields such as: wide dose range from 10 to 10 5 Gy, low fading, low uncertainty (<5%), no dose rate dependence and non-destructive ESR single readout. The detector is encapsulated in a special polyethylene tube that reduces the humidity problems and improves the mechanical resistance. The IPEN dosimeter was investigated for application in electron beam fields dosimetry

  17. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  18. Revisiting the spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases with snake eyes appearance on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebouteux, M-V; Franques, J; Guillevin, R; Delmont, E; Lenglet, T; Bede, P; Desnuelle, C; Pouget, J; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Pradat, P-F

    2014-09-01

    The 'snake eyes' sign refers to bilateral hyperintensities of the anterior horns on axial spinal cord imaging. Based on sporadic reports, it has been associated with a range of lower motor neuron (LMN) syndromes, such as spondylotic amyotrophy and Hirayama disease, as well as spinal cord infarction. The objective of our study was to comprehensively characterize the full diagnostic spectrum of LMN syndromes with this radiological clue and discuss potential aetiological factors. A large patient cohort with snake eyes sign and upper limb LMN degeneration was recruited from three French neuromuscular units. Patients underwent detailed electrophysiological, radiological, clinical and anamnestic profiling. Twenty-nine patients were ascertained and followed up for 9.5 ± 8.6 years. The majority of the patients were male (86.2%) with a mean age of 37.3 ± 14.4 years. Symptoms were bilateral in most cases (86.2%). Patients with predominantly proximal and distal deficits were equally represented (44.8% and 55.2%, respectively). A history of preceding trauma or intense physical activity was confirmed in 58.6% of the cases; 27.6% of the patients were given an initial clinical diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and 51.7% were originally suspected to have multifocal motor neuropathy. None of the patients developed ALS on longitudinal follow-up. The snake eyes sign on magnetic resonance imaging is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological conditions and is more common in young men with a history of strenuous activity or antecedent trauma. The recognition of this syndrome is crucial as many of these patients are initially misdiagnosed with ALS. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  19. Expanding the spectrum of human ganglionic eminence region anomalies on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Izzo, Giana [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Cesaretti, Claudia [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Medical Genetics Unit, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); Frassoni, Carolina; Inverardi, Francesca [Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura [San Paolo Hospital, Division of Human Pathology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, Mariangela [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Prenatal Diagnosis, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Ganglionic eminence (GE) is a transient fetal brain structure that harvests a significant amount of precursors of cortical GABA-ergic interneurons. Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of GE anomalies (i.e., cavitations) have already been reported associated with severe micro-lissencephaly. The purpose of this report was to illustrate the MR imaging features of GE anomalies in conditions other than severe micro-lissencephalies. Among all the fetuses submitted to prenatal MR imaging at our center from 2005 to 2014, we collected eight cases with GE anomalies and only limited associated brain anomalies. The median gestational age at the time of MR imaging was 21 weeks ranging from 19 to 29 weeks. Two senior pediatric neuroradiologists categorized the anomalies of the GE region in two groups: group one showing cavitation in the GE region and group two showing enlarged GE region. For each fetal case, associated cranial anomalies were also reported. Five out of the eight cases were included in group one and three in group two. Besides the GE region abnormality, all eight cases had additional intracranial anomalies, such as mild partial callosal agenesis, vermian hypoplasia and rotation, cerebellar hypoplasia, ventriculomegaly, enlarged subarachnoid spaces, molar tooth malformation. Ultrasound generally detected most of the associated intracranial anomalies, prompting the MR investigation; on the contrary in none of the cases, GE anomalies had been detected by ultrasound. Our observation expands the spectrum of human GE anomalies, demonstrating that these may take place also without associated severe micro-lissencephalies. (orig.)

  20. Interpersonal motor resonance in autism spectrum disorder: Evidence against a global ‘mirror system’ deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eEnticott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mirror neuron hypothesis of autism is highly controversial, in part because there are conflicting reports as to whether putative indices of mirror system activity are actually deficient in autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Recent evidence suggests that a typical putative mirror system response may be seen in people with an ASD when there is a degree of social relevance to the visual stimuli used to elicit that response. Individuals with ASD (n = 32 and matched neurotypical controls (n = 32 completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS experiment in which the left primary motor cortex was stimulated during the observation of static hands, individual (i.e., one person hand actions, and interactive (i.e., two person hand actions. Motor-evoked potentials (MEP were recorded from the contralateral first dorsal interosseous, and used to generate an index of interpersonal motor resonance (IMR; a putative measure of mirror system activity during action observation. There was no difference between ASD and NT groups in the level of IMR during the observation of these actions. These findings provide evidence against a global mirror system deficit in ASD, and this evidence appears to extend beyond stimuli that have social relevance. Attentional and visual processing influences may be important for understanding the apparent role of IMR in the pathophysiology of ASD.

  1. Resonance fluorescence spectrum of a p-doped quantum dot coupled to a metallic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, F.; Antón, M. A.; Arrieta-Yáñez, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum (RFS) of a hybrid system consisting of a p-doped semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to a metallic nanoparticle (MNP) is analyzed. The quantum dot is described as a four-level atomlike system using the density matrix formalism. The lower levels are Zeeman-split hole spin states and the upper levels correspond to positively charged excitons containing a spin-up, spin-down hole pair and a spin electron. A linearly polarized laser field drives two of the optical transitions of the QD and produces localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticle, which act back upon the QD. The frequencies of these localized plasmons are very different along the two principal axes of the nanoparticle, thus producing an anisotropic modification of the spontaneous emission rates of the allowed optical transitions, which is accompanied by very minor local field corrections. This manifests into dramatic modifications in the RFS of the hybrid system in contrast to the one obtained for the isolated QD. The RFS is analyzed as a function of the nanoparticle's aspect ratio, the external magnetic field applied in the Voigt geometry, and the Rabi frequency of the driving field. It is shown that the spin of the QD is imprinted onto certain sidebands of the RFS, and that the signal at these sidebands can be optimized by engineering the shape of the MNP.

  2. Multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography of the brain reveals tissue degeneration in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Fehlner, Andreas; Sack, Ingolf; Pache, Florence; Lacheta, Anna; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Brandt, Alexander; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Ruprecht, Klemens; Braun, Juergen; Paul, Friedemann; Wuerfel, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Application of multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography (MMRE) of the brain parenchyma in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) compared to age matched healthy controls (HC). 15 NMOSD patients and 17 age- and gender-matched HC were examined using MMRE. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, the magnitude G* and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by simultaneous inversion of full wave-field data in 1.9-mm isotropic resolution at 7 harmonic drive frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz. In NMOSD patients, a significant reduction of G* was observed within the white matter fraction (p = 0.017), predominantly within the thalamic regions (p = 0.003), compared to HC. These parameters exceeded the reduction in brain volume measured in patients versus HC (p = 0.02 whole-brain volume reduction). Volumetric differences in white matter fraction and the thalami were not detectable between patients and HC. However, phase angle φ was decreased in patients within the white matter (p = 0.03) and both thalamic regions (p = 0.044). MMRE reveals global tissue degeneration with accelerated softening of the brain parenchyma in patients with NMOSD. The predominant reduction of stiffness is found within the thalamic region and related white matter tracts, presumably reflecting Wallerian degeneration. (orig.)

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Praveena; Hanson, James V M; Olbert, Elisabeth D; Egger, Christine; Wicki, Carla; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Landau, Klara; Schippling, Sven

    2016-11-15

    Irreversible disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is largely attributed to neuronal and axonal degeneration, which, along with inflammation, is one of the major pathological hallmarks of these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that has been used in MS, NMOSD, and other diseases to quantify damage to the retina, including the ganglion cells and their axons. The fact that these are the only unmyelinated axons within the central nervous system (CNS) renders the afferent visual pathway an ideal model for studying axonal and neuronal degeneration in neurodegenerative diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to obtain anatomical information about the CNS and to quantify evolving pathology in MS and NMOSD, both globally and in specific regions of the visual pathway including the optic nerve, optic radiations and visual cortex. Therefore, correlations between brain or optic nerve abnormalities on MRI, and retinal pathology using OCT, may shed light on how damage to one part of the CNS can affect others. In addition, these imaging techniques can help identify important differences between MS and NMOSD such as disease-specific damage to the visual pathway, trans-synaptic degeneration, or pathological changes independent of the underlying disease process. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of the visual pathway using OCT and MRI in patients with MS and NMOSD. Emphasis is placed on studies that employ both MRI and OCT to investigate damage to the visual system in these diseases.

  4. Multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography of the brain reveals tissue degeneration in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology with Experimental Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Fehlner, Andreas; Sack, Ingolf [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Pache, Florence [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology with Experimental Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Lacheta, Anna; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Brandt, Alexander [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Bellmann-Strobl, Judith [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Ruprecht, Klemens [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology with Experimental Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Braun, Juergen [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Medical Informatics, Berlin (Germany); Paul, Friedemann [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology with Experimental Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Wuerfel, Jens [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Medical Image Analysis Center (MIAC AG), Basel (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    Application of multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography (MMRE) of the brain parenchyma in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) compared to age matched healthy controls (HC). 15 NMOSD patients and 17 age- and gender-matched HC were examined using MMRE. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, the magnitude G* and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by simultaneous inversion of full wave-field data in 1.9-mm isotropic resolution at 7 harmonic drive frequencies from 30 to 60 Hz. In NMOSD patients, a significant reduction of G* was observed within the white matter fraction (p = 0.017), predominantly within the thalamic regions (p = 0.003), compared to HC. These parameters exceeded the reduction in brain volume measured in patients versus HC (p = 0.02 whole-brain volume reduction). Volumetric differences in white matter fraction and the thalami were not detectable between patients and HC. However, phase angle φ was decreased in patients within the white matter (p = 0.03) and both thalamic regions (p = 0.044). MMRE reveals global tissue degeneration with accelerated softening of the brain parenchyma in patients with NMOSD. The predominant reduction of stiffness is found within the thalamic region and related white matter tracts, presumably reflecting Wallerian degeneration. (orig.)

  5. Interpersonal motor resonance in autism spectrum disorder: evidence against a global "mirror system" deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G; Kennedy, Hayley A; Rinehart, Nicole J; Bradshaw, John L; Tonge, Bruce J; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    The mirror neuron hypothesis of autism is highly controversial, in part because there are conflicting reports as to whether putative indices of mirror system activity are actually deficient in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recent evidence suggests that a typical putative mirror system response may be seen in people with an ASD when there is a degree of social relevance to the visual stimuli used to elicit that response. Individuals with ASD (n = 32) and matched neurotypical controls (n = 32) completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment in which the left primary motor cortex (M1) was stimulated during the observation of static hands, individual (i.e., one person) hand actions, and interactive (i.e., two person) hand actions. Motor-evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from the contralateral first dorsal interosseous, and used to generate an index of interpersonal motor resonance (IMR; a putative measure of mirror system activity) during action observation. There was no difference between ASD and NT groups in the level of IMR during the observation of these actions. These findings provide evidence against a global mirror system deficit in ASD, and this evidence appears to extend beyond stimuli that have social relevance. Attentional and visual processing influences may be important for understanding the apparent role of IMR in the pathophysiology of ASD.

  6. Expanding the spectrum of human ganglionic eminence region anomalies on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Izzo, Giana; Cesaretti, Claudia; Conte, Giorgio; Frassoni, Carolina; Inverardi, Francesca; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura; Rustico, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Ganglionic eminence (GE) is a transient fetal brain structure that harvests a significant amount of precursors of cortical GABA-ergic interneurons. Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of GE anomalies (i.e., cavitations) have already been reported associated with severe micro-lissencephaly. The purpose of this report was to illustrate the MR imaging features of GE anomalies in conditions other than severe micro-lissencephalies. Among all the fetuses submitted to prenatal MR imaging at our center from 2005 to 2014, we collected eight cases with GE anomalies and only limited associated brain anomalies. The median gestational age at the time of MR imaging was 21 weeks ranging from 19 to 29 weeks. Two senior pediatric neuroradiologists categorized the anomalies of the GE region in two groups: group one showing cavitation in the GE region and group two showing enlarged GE region. For each fetal case, associated cranial anomalies were also reported. Five out of the eight cases were included in group one and three in group two. Besides the GE region abnormality, all eight cases had additional intracranial anomalies, such as mild partial callosal agenesis, vermian hypoplasia and rotation, cerebellar hypoplasia, ventriculomegaly, enlarged subarachnoid spaces, molar tooth malformation. Ultrasound generally detected most of the associated intracranial anomalies, prompting the MR investigation; on the contrary in none of the cases, GE anomalies had been detected by ultrasound. Our observation expands the spectrum of human GE anomalies, demonstrating that these may take place also without associated severe micro-lissencephalies. (orig.)

  7. Identification of irradiated sage tea (Salvia officinalis L.) by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepe Cam, Semra; Engin, Birol

    2010-01-01

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately distinguish irradiated from unirradiated sage tea was examined. Before irradiation, sage tea samples exhibit one asymmetric singlet ESR signal centered at g=2.0037. Besides this central signal, two weak satellite signals situated about 3 mT left and right to it in radiation-induced spectra. Irradiation with increasing doses caused a significant increase in radiation-induced ESR signal intensity at g=2.0265 (the left satellite signal) and this increase was found to be explained by a polynomial varying function. The stability of that radiation-induced ESR signal at room temperature was studied over a storage period of 9 months. Also, the kinetic of signal at g=2.0265 was studied in detail over a temperature range 313-353 K by annealing samples at different temperatures for various times.

  8. ESR analysis of natural and gamma irradiated coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, M. Özgür; Kaplan, Necati; Sayin, Ulku

    2017-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a powerful technique to detect radicals trapped in cellulosic food products and has been suggested as a useful method for identification of irradiated herbal foodstuffs. Coriander spice which has important medicinal properties was investigated using ESR spectroscopy. Radicals in natural and irradiated coriander samples were determined at room temperature. ESR spectra of natural sample were characterized by a single central signal with ? value and gamma irradiation produced satellite peaks attributed to cellulose-like radical which is used as a marker for detection of irradiated cellulosic plant products. The spectroscopic splitting values of radicals were determined. Dose dependency and stability of this center were analyzed by dose response and kinetic measurements. The reported results about activation energy, thermal life time and dose response relationship of the cellulose-like radical accurately prove that ESR can be used for identification of irradiated coriander spice seeds.

  9. Identification of irradiated sage tea (Salvia officinalis L.) by ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepe Cam, Semra, E-mail: stepe06@gmail.co [Gazi University, Faculty of Medicine, Biophysics Department, 06500 Besevler, Ankara (Turkey); Engin, Birol [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately distinguish irradiated from unirradiated sage tea was examined. Before irradiation, sage tea samples exhibit one asymmetric singlet ESR signal centered at g=2.0037. Besides this central signal, two weak satellite signals situated about 3 mT left and right to it in radiation-induced spectra. Irradiation with increasing doses caused a significant increase in radiation-induced ESR signal intensity at g=2.0265 (the left satellite signal) and this increase was found to be explained by a polynomial varying function. The stability of that radiation-induced ESR signal at room temperature was studied over a storage period of 9 months. Also, the kinetic of signal at g=2.0265 was studied in detail over a temperature range 313-353 K by annealing samples at different temperatures for various times.

  10. ESR accident dosimetry using medicine tablets coated with sugar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, A.; Miki, T.; Ikeya, M.

    1990-01-01

    Properties of radiation-induced radicals in medicine tablets were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). A sharp ESR signal sensitive to gamma ray irradiation was observed in the sugar coating part of the tablets. The signal has anisotropic g values of g 1 = 2.0009, g 2 = 2.0007 and g 3 = 2.0002. The signal grows linearly with dose at least up to about 20 Gy. No fading was observed at room temperature even when exposed to sunlight. The dose to artificially irradiated tablets was estimated using the signal intensity and a previously determined calibration curve. The signal in sugar coated tablets can be utilised for dose measurements. In particular, the wide distribution of sugar coated tablets allows the use of the tablets as accident dosemeters. (author)

  11. ESR signal changes recorded in γ-irradiated bovine livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    After fresh raw livers of bovine were exposed to γ-rays on ice, radiation-induced radicals in the livers were measured in liquid nitrogen using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In the magnetic field of 320.5 to 335.5 mT, the signals responsible to absorbed doses were found. The signal intensity from a main peak was increased up to 5 kGy. The side peaks existing both low and high magnetic field of the main peak showed linear responses as increasing absorbed doses. Radiation-induced radicals were found in a tissue without bones from animals. Without complicated sample preparations, the raw bovine livers can be easily measured on ESR at liquid nitrogen temperature. The ESR method may be applicable to distinguish irradiated fresh raw livers within a few days after irradiation. (author)

  12. The Uncertainty estimation of Alanine/ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Rum; An, Jin Hee; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Young Ki

    2008-01-01

    Machinery, tools and cable etc are in the nuclear power plant which environment is very severe. By measuring actual dose, it needs for extending life expectancy of the machinery and tools and the cable. Therefore, we estimated on dose (gamma ray) of Wolsong nuclear power division 1 by dose estimation technology for three years. The dose estimation technology was secured by ESR(Electron Spin Resonance) dose estimation using regression analysis. We estimate uncertainty for secure a reliability of results. The uncertainty estimation will be able to judge the reliability of measurement results. The estimation of uncertainty referred the international unified guide in order; GUM(Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement). It was published by International Standardization for Organization (ISO) in 1993. In this study the uncertainty of e-scan and EMX those are ESR equipment were evaluated and compared. Base on these results, it will improve the reliability of measurement

  13. Spectrum of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearances of Juvenile Temporomandibular Joints (TMJ) in Non-Rheumatic Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzaribachev, N. (Dept. of Hematology, Oncology, and General Pediatrics, Univ. Children' s Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany)). e-mail. tzari@o2online.de; Fritz, J. (Russell H. Morgan Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany))

    2009-12-15

    Background: Temporomandibular joints (TMJ) are frequently involved in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only modality for an early diagnosis. However, only very few data exist on the appearance of contrast-enhanced MRI of normal juvenile TMJ. Purpose: To define the spectrum of normal MRI findings of juvenile TMJ, and to assess a possible overlap with findings typical for active synovitis in JIA. Material and Methods: 96 children (192 TMJ), 51 boys and 45 girls with a median age of 7.8 years (range 3-13 years), underwent a head MRI. The presence of autoimmune disease, including JIA, was excluded via chart history, available laboratory findings, and the absence of known typical pathological MRI changes (degree of synovial enhancement, hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images in the synovia or bone marrow, and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle) of the TMJ affected by JIA. Results: In 90 (94%) children, the TMJ showed no MRI abnormalities compatible with arthritis. In three children (3%), the only abnormal MRI finding was a small bilateral joint effusion. A further three children (3%) had a mild synovial enhancement seen on both axial and coronal MR planes in one child and only in the axial plane in the other two children. Signal hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and other corresponding characteristics of TMJ inflammation were lacking in all these six patients. Conclusion: The vast majority of juvenile TMJ in non-rheumatic children shows no MRI abnormalities. Exceptions, including a discrete enhancement of the synovial membrane (3%) or small joint effusions (3%), can occur in a minority of patients, but none of them are accompanied by other signs of inflammation or morphological changes of the TMJ

  14. Atypical Learning in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Transitive Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Marjorie; Ragland, J Daniel; Niendam, Tara A; Lesh, Tyler A; Beck, Jonathan S; Matter, John C; Frank, Michael J; Carter, Cameron S

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying impairments in generalizing learning shown by adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A total of 21 high-functioning individuals with ASD aged 12 to 18 years, and 23 gender-, IQ-, and age-matched adolescents with typical development (TYP), completed a transitive inference (TI) task implemented using rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were trained on overlapping pairs in a stimulus hierarchy of colored ovals where A>B>C>D>E>F and then tested on generalizing this training to new stimulus pairings (AF, BD, BE) in a "Big Game." Whole-brain univariate, region of interest, and functional connectivity analyses were used. During training, the TYP group exhibited increased recruitment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas the group with ASD showed greater functional connectivity between the PFC and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Both groups recruited the hippocampus and caudate comparably; however, functional connectivity between these regions was positively associated with TI performance for only the group with ASD. During the Big Game, the TYP group showed greater recruitment of the PFC, parietal cortex, and the ACC. Recruitment of these regions increased with age in the group with ASD. During TI, TYP individuals recruited cognitive control-related brain regions implicated in mature problem solving/reasoning including the PFC, parietal cortex, and ACC, whereas the group with ASD showed functional connectivity of the hippocampus and the caudate that was associated with task performance. Failure to reliably engage cognitive control-related brain regions may produce less integrated flexible learning in individuals with ASD unless they are provided with task support that, in essence, provides them with cognitive control; however, this pattern may normalize with age. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Comparative Study of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    significant difference between the ESR values obtained using trisodium citrate and whole blood (P< 0.05). Males had lower ESR ... The ESR is governed by the balance between pro- ... 1999). When an inflammatory process is present, the.

  16. A study of the chlorine nuclear quadrupole resonance frequency spectrum in potassium hexachloro-osmate by Fourier transform methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintz, D.J.; Armstrong, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the chlorine nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrum of K 2 OsCl 6 in the vicinity of the structural phase transition using Fourier transform techniques is reported. At high temperatures a single symmetric line spectrum is observed as expected from the high temperature cubic antifluorite structure. Below T(sub)c = 45 K the two symmetric line spectrum characteristic of a tetragonal distortion is seen. At intermediate temperatures, 45< T<150 K the spectrum consists of a single asymmetric line. A detailed analysis reveals that for the single crystal sample the asymmetric line is composed of two symmetric components, a main line, and a weak satellite shifted - 1.5 kHz relative to the main line. This feature is unaffected by changes in temperature near T(sub)c. It is attributed to the influence of interstitial impurities on neighbouring chlorine ions. For the powder sample, the asymmetry is qualitatively different. A detailed analysis shows that the line is a superposition of three components. In addition to the two components present in the single crystal, a third, broad component develops as the temperature approaches T(sub)c. This feature of the spectrum is the cluster induced order-disorder manifestation of the local dynamics. The most probable reason that this third component is not observed in the single crystal spectrum is because it is too broad due to a difference in the detailed dynamics of two samples. (auth)

  17. The characteristics of ESR and 3-D TL spectra of diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shunsheng; Lu Xu; Fu Huifang

    2003-01-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and 3-dimensional Thermoluminescence (3-D TL) spectra of natural diamond, high temperature-high pressure artificial diamond and high temperature-low pressure chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond were determined. The characteristics of spectra have been studied. It is found that isolated nitrogen, nitrogen exchange pair and nitrogen atom pair (S=1) are main forms of electron spin resonance nitrogen in natural and high temperature-high pressure artificial diamonds. The spectrum of CVD diamond is sampler, and contains only one peak caused by suspended bond of unsaturated carbon ones. For 3-D TL spectra, natural diamond has two peaks (∼370 nm and ∼510 nm) in 100-200 degree C temperature range, high temperature-high pressure artificial diamond only has ∼370 nm peak, and CVD diamond only has ∼500 nm peak. These characteristics would be useful for the quality inspection and classification of diamonds, as well as for the study of geologic actions associated with natural diamond

  18. Estimation of dose in irradiated chicken bone by ESR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Hougetu, Daisuke

    1998-01-01

    The author studied the conditions needed to routinely estimate the radiation dose in chicken bone by repeated re-irradiation and measuring ESR signals. Chicken meat containing bone was γ-irradiated at doses of up to 3kGy, accepted as the commercially used dose. The results show that points in sample preparation and ESR measurement are as follows: Both ends of bone are cut off and central part of compact bone is used for experiment. To obtain accurate ESR spectrum, marrow should be scraped out completely. Sample bone fragments of 1-2mm particle size and ca.100mg are recommended to obtain stable and maximum signal. In practice, by re-irradiating up to 5kGy and extrapolating data of the signal intensity to zero using linear regression analysis, radiation dose is estimated. For example, in one experiment, estimated doses of chicken bones initially irradiated at 3.0kGy, 1.0kGy, 0.50kGy and 0.25kGy were 3.4kGy, 1.3kGy, 0.81kGy and 0.57kGy. (author)

  19. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM 14 N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments

  20. Rapid screening for anthocyanins in cane sugars using ESR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamaphat, Kheamrutai; Goodman, Bernard A; Limsuwan, Pichet; Smith, Siwaporn Meejoo

    2015-03-15

    Anthocyanin, which is soluble in water and released into sugar steam during extraction, was investigated in this study. The anthocyanin content in refined sugar, plantation white sugar, soft brown sugar and raw sugar was determined using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, which was operated at room temperature, and compared with spectra from standard anthocyanin. The ESR spectra of red and violet anthocyanins was predominantly g ≈ 2.0055, which corresponded to an unpaired electron located in the pyrylium ring. Signals for Fe(III) and Mn(II), which naturally occur in plants, were found in raw sugar, soft brown sugar and standard anthocyanin but were absent from refined sugar and plantation white sugar due to the refining process. In addition, the ESR results were correlated with the apparent colour of the sugar, which was determined using the method of the International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High Energy Electron Dosimetry by Alanine/ESR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry based on electron spin resonance(ESR) analysis of radiation induced free radicals in amino acids is relevant to biological dosimetry applications. Alanine detectors are without walls and are tissue equivalent. Therefore, alanine ESR dosimetry looks promising for use in the therapy level. The dose range of the alanine/ESR dosimetry system can be extended down to l Gy. In a water phantom the absorbed dose of electrons generated by a medical linear accelerator of different initial energies (6-21 MeV) and therapeutic dose levels(1-60 Gy) was measured. Furthermore, depth dose measurements carried out with alanine dosimeters were compared with ionization chamber measurements. As the results, the measured absorbed doses for shallow depth of initial electron energies above 15 MeV were higher by 2-5% than those calculated by nominal energy CE factors. This seems to be caused by low energy scattered beams generated from the scattering foil and electron cones of beam projecting device in medical linear accelerator

  2. Dose determination in irradiated chicken meat by ESR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this work, the properties of the radicals produced in chicken bones have been investigated by ESR technique to determine the amount of dose applied to the chicken meats during the food irradiation. For this goal, the drumsticks from 6-8 weeks old chickens purchased from a local market were irradiated at dose levels of 0; 2; 4; 6; 8 and 10 kGy. Then, the ESR spectra of the powder samples prepared from the bones of the drumsticks have been investigated. Unirradiated chicken bones have been observed to show a weak ESR signal of single line character. CO-2 ionic radicals of axial symmetry with g=1.9973 and g=2.0025 were observed to be produced in irradiated samples which would give rise to a three peaks ESR spectrum. In addition, the signal intensities of the samples were found to depend linearly on the irradiation dose in the dose range of 0-10 kGy. The powder samples prepared from chicken leg bones cleaned from their meats and marrow and irradiated at dose levels of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, B, 10, 12,14, 16, 1B, 20 and 22 kGy were used to get the dose-response curve. It was found that this curve has biphasic character and that the dose yield was higher in the 12-1B kGy dose range and a decrease appears in this curve over 18 kGy. The radical produced in the bones were found to be the same whether the irradiation was performed after stripping the meat and removing the marrow from the bone or before the stripping. The ESR spectra of both irradiated and non irradiated samples were investigated in the temperature range of 100 K-450 K and changes in the ESR spectra of CO-2 radical have been studied. For non irradiated samples (controls). the signal intensities were found to decrease when the temperature was increased. The same investigation has been carried out for irradiated samples and it was concluded that the signal intensities relative to the peaks of the radical spectrum increase in the temperature range of 100 K-330 K, then they decrease over 330 K. The change in the

  3. ESR study on the interaction between carbon blacks and oxygen molecules; ESR ho ni yoru carbon black to sanso bunshi tono sogo sayo no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, M.; Toriyama, K.; Konishi, Y. [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-02-24

    Interaction between carbon blacks and oxygen molecules has been studied by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ESR spectra of the carbon blacks appears at the g-value of free spin, which are contributed by both isolated electrons and conduction electrons. Upon introducing oxygen to the system the ESR linewidth was broadened in proportion to the partial pressure of oxygen. In case of lampblack (LB 101, Degussa) the interaction was not so strong that it took a tong time at 77K for the linewidth to reach the maxmum value. In case of gassblack (P 140 V, Degussa), on the other hand, the oxygen was easily adsorbed at 298K and the linewidth at 77K became its maximum immediately after cooling. The number of unpaired electrons decreased when the system was kept at 298 K and the decrease was prominent for the local spins. These phenomena have been explained with a simple band model for the electron. (author)

  4. ESR dating a quaternary travertine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Carranza, E.; Amosse, J.; Bouchez, R.

    1987-10-01

    To study the chronology of the quarternary glaciations in the high Peruvian Andes (3.5-4.0 Km high) a number of samples of travertines was collected in the Oroya-Tarma-Huancayo region. We report, in particular, the ESR measurements realized on samples from Santa Rosa de Sacco, which contain 99% of calcite and show a line of g=2.0046 and of width 8.3G, stable, at least, until ∼ 270 deg C. Using the additive dose method to obtain the paleodose and measuring the annual dose by spectrometry gamma of high resolution we obtain for the samples, as a preliminary result, an age between 260,000 and 340,000 a. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs

  5. ESR study of thermal demagnetization processes in ferromagnetic nanoparticles with Curie temperatures between 40 and 60 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com; Sorokina, Olga N. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Leontiev, Vladimir G. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shlyakhtin, Oleg A. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kovarski, Alexander L. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2007-04-15

    Thermal demagnetization in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of silver and sodium manganite nanoparticles, as well as copper-nickel and palladium-nickel alloy nanoparticles were studied by both static magnetic measurements and by electron spin resonance (ESR). ESR data indicate that some magnetic ordering remains even above the Curie temperature, determined by static magnetometry. Mechanisms of thermal demagnetization in alloy nanoparticles appear to be different from that in manganites.

  6. ESR study of thermal demagnetization processes in ferromagnetic nanoparticles with Curie temperatures between 40 and 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Sorokina, Olga N.; Leontiev, Vladimir G.; Shlyakhtin, Oleg A.; Kovarski, Alexander L.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal demagnetization in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of silver and sodium manganite nanoparticles, as well as copper-nickel and palladium-nickel alloy nanoparticles were studied by both static magnetic measurements and by electron spin resonance (ESR). ESR data indicate that some magnetic ordering remains even above the Curie temperature, determined by static magnetometry. Mechanisms of thermal demagnetization in alloy nanoparticles appear to be different from that in manganites

  7. Many-electron effect in the resonant L23-M23V Auger-electron spectrum of Ti metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    Above the L23 absorption edge the L 23 -M 23 V resonant Auger-electron spectroscopy (RAES) spectrum of Ti metal shows a normal L 23 -M 23 V Auger decay spectrum at a constant kinetic energy (K.E.). Here LX and MY are the atomic shells Lx and My, respectively. Apart from a weak spectral feature of the L2-M23V Auger transition appearing around the L2 edge, the RAES spectra of Ti meal show a very little difference between the L2 and L3 regions [P. Le Fevre, J. Danger, H. Magnan, D. Chandesris, J. Jupille, S. Bourgeois, M.-A. Arrio, R. Gotter, A. Verdini, A. Morgante, Phys. Rev. B69 (2004) 155421]. It is shown that the time scale of relaxation of the resonantly excited L23-hole state to the L23-electron ionized state is much shorter than that of the L23-hole decay so that the L 23 -M 23 V RAES spectrum of Ti metal resembles much the normal L 23 -M 23 V Auger decay spectrum. The relaxation of the resonantly excited L23-hole state to the fully relaxed L23-hole state before the L23-hole decays, explains the extra width which is the primary cause of the discrepancy between the experimental high resolution near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectrum of Ti metal and the one calculated by the particle-hole Green's function including the Coulomb exchange interaction between the 2p hole and the 3d electron. The time scale of relaxation of the L3V two-hole state created by the L2-L3V Coster-Kronig (CK) decay to the single L3-hole state is much shorter than that of the L3-hole decay so that the L2-L3V-L3-M23V CK preceded Auger decay spectrum resembles much the L3-M23V Auger decay one

  8. Development of portable ESR spectrometer as a reader for alanine dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, T.; Haruyama, Y.; Tachibana, H.; Tanaka, R.; Okamoto, J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype portable electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer was designed and tested, and its feasibility as a reader of alanine dosimeters was studied from the two standpoints of reproducibility of readings and sensitivity sufficient for dosimetry in the absorbed dose range 1-100 kGy. It has two main components: a permanent magnet and resonator; and a unit box with a microwave and auto-frequency control (AFC) circuit, a sweep controller of magnetic field, display, etc. In the present preliminary study, reproducibility values are measured with the same ESR parameters and alanine-polystyrene (alanine-PS) dosimeter at a dose of 1 kGy: repeatedly measuring without removing dosimeter from the cavity; individual measurement with removing and inserting again into the cavity with readjustment of ESR parameters. Alanine/ESR dosimetry using this spectrometer has a measurable dose range from 1 to 100 kGy with relatively high precision within ± 3% (1σ) as a preliminary result. The portable ESR spectrometer may also be modified as an automatic, more precise, dedicated alanine dosimeter reader. (author)

  9. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION AFTER ASBESTOS INSTILLATION: AN ESR SPIN TRAPPING INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been postulated that the in vivo toxicity of asbestos results from its catalysis of free radical generation. We examined in vivo radical production using electron spin resonance (ESR) coupled with the spin trap alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (4-POBN); 180 d...

  10. Effects of sphingosine and sphingosine analogues on the free radical production by stimulated neutrophils: ESR and chemiluminescence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mouithys-Mickalad

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids inhibit the activation of the neutrophil (PMN NADPH oxidase by protein kinase C pathway. By electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR and chemiluminescence (CL, we studied the effects of sphingosine (SPN and ceramide analogues on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 5 × 10-7M stimulated PMN (6 × 106 cells. By ESR with spin trapping (100 mM DMPO: 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-Noxide, we showed that SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M, C2-ceramide (N-acetyl SPN and C6-ceramide (N-hexanoyl SPN at the final concentration of 2 × 10-5 and 2 × 10-4M inhibit the production of free radicals by stimulated PMN. The ESR spectrum of stimulated PMN was that of DMPO-superoxide anion spin adduct. Inhibition by 5 × 10-6M SPN was equivalent to that of 30 U/ml SOD. SPN (5 to 8 × 10-6M has no effect on in vitro systems generating superoxide anion (xanthine 50 mM/xanthine oxidase 110 mU/ml or hydroxyl radical (Fenton reaction: 88 mM H2O2, 0.01 mM Fe2+ and 0.01 mM EDTA. SPN and N-acetyl SPN also inhibited the CL of PMA stimulated PMN in a dose dependent manner (from 2 × 10-6 to 10-5M, but N-hexanoyl SPN was less active (from 2 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-4M. These effects were compared with those of known PMN inhibitors, superoxide dismutase, catalase and azide. SPN was a better inhibitor compared with these agents. The complete inhibition by SPN of ESR signal and CL of stimulated PMN confirms that this compound or one of its metabolites act at the level of NADPH-oxidase, the key enzyme responsible for production of oxygen-derived free radicals.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging is often misleading when used as an adjunct to ultrasound in the management of placenta accreta spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einerson, Brett D; Rodriguez, Christina E; Kennedy, Anne M; Woodward, Paula J; Donnelly, Meghan A; Silver, Robert M

    2018-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is reported to have good sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of placenta accreta spectrum disorders, and is often used as an adjunct to ultrasound. But the additional utility of obtaining magnetic resonance imaging to assist in the clinical management of patients with placenta accreta spectrum disorders, above and beyond the information provided by ultrasound, is unknown. We aimed to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging provides data that may inform clinical management by changing the sonographic diagnosis of placenta accreta spectrum disorders. In all, 78 patients with sonographic evidence or clinical suspicion of placenta accreta spectrum underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis in orthogonal planes through the uterus utilizing T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences at the University of Utah and the University of Colorado from 1997 through 2017. The magnetic resonance imaging was interpreted by radiologists with expertise in diagnosis of placenta accreta spectrum who had knowledge of the sonographic interpretation and clinical risk factors for placenta accreta spectrum disorders. The primary outcome was a change in diagnosis from sonographic interpretation that could alter clinical management, which was defined a priori. Diagnostic accuracy was verified by surgical and histopathologic diagnosis at the time of delivery. A change in diagnosis that could potentially alter clinical management occurred in 28 (36%) cases. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly changed the diagnosis in 15 (19%), and correctly confirmed the diagnosis in 34 (44%), but resulted in an incorrect change in diagnosis in 13 (17%), and an incorrect confirmation of ultrasound diagnosis in 15 (21%). Magnetic resonance imaging was not more likely to change a diagnosis in the 24 cases of posterior and lateral placental location compared to anterior location (33% vs 37%, P = .84). Magnetic resonance imaging resulted in overdiagnosis in

  12. Search for Resonances in the Dijet Mass Spectrum from 7 TeV pp Collisions at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for narrow resonances with a mass of at least 1 TeV in the dijet mass spectrum is performed using pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 inverse femtobarn, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. No resonances are observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are presented on the product of the resonance cross section, branching fraction into dijets, and acceptance, separately for decays into quark-quark, quark-gluon, and gluon-gluon pairs. The data exclude new particles predicted in the following models at the 95% confidence level: string resonances with mass less than 4.00 TeV, E6 diquarks with mass less than 3.52 TeV, excited quarks with mass less than 2.49 TeV, axigluons and colorons with mass less than 2.47 TeV, and W' bosons with mass less than 1.51 TeV.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cu(II) and vibrational spectrum of chalcanthite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, B.J.; Sreeramulu, P.; Ramesh, K.; Reddy, Y.P.; Botto, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    The EPR spectrum of Cu(II) in Chalcanthite has the characteristic features of D 4h symmetry. Optical and EPR results are correlated. The parameters g parallel, g perpendicular, k parallel and k perpendicular are evaluated. The nature of the bonding between the metal ion and the ligand environment is analized. On the other hand, the vibrational spectrum confirms the information about the site symmetry of the SO 4 group in the lattice. (Author) [es

  14. Effects of alpha radiation on plutonium incorporated in dosimetric materials by ESR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhide, M.K.; Kadam, R.M.; Mohapatra, Manoj; Godbole, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    The in situ alpha irradiation effects of some ESR dosimetric materials namely alanine, 2-methyl alanine and ammonium tartrate were studied by incorporating 1% plutonium by weight in them. The radical intensity was monitored as a function of alpha dose. It was found that in the dose region 1-35 kGy ammonium tartrate showed better signal intensity, linearity and dose response as compared to the other materials. This was attributed to the single radical produced in case of the tartrate giving a sharp spectrum and the fast relaxation times owing to less saturation of ESR signals. (author)

  15. ESR dating of the fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs, grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Ulzin nuclear reactor. ESR signals of quartz grains separated from fault rocks collected from the E-W trend fault are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of these faults had occurred before the quaternary period. ESR dates from the NW trend faults range from 300ka to 700ka. On the other hand, ESR date of the NS trend fault is about 50ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity near the Ulzin nuclear reactor continued into the pleistocene.

  16. Reflectivity quenching of ESR multilayer polymer film reflector in optically bonded scintillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loignon-Houle, Francis; Pepin, Catherine M.; Charlebois, Serge A.; Lecomte, Roger

    2017-04-01

    The 3M-ESR multilayer polymer film is a widely used reflector in scintillation detector arrays. As specified in the datasheet and confirmed experimentally by measurements in air, it is highly reflective (> 98 %) over the entire visible spectrum (400-1000 nm) for all angles of incidence. Despite these outstanding characteristics, it was previously found that light crosstalk between pixels in a bonded LYSO scintillator array with ESR reflector can be as high as ∼30-35%. This unexplained light crosstalk motivated further investigation of ESR optical performance. Analytical simulation of a multilayer structure emulating the ESR reflector showed that the film becomes highly transparent to incident light at large angles when surrounded on both sides by materials of refractive index higher than air. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a considerable fraction (∼25-35%) of scintillation photons are incident at these leaking angles in high aspect ratio LYSO scintillation crystals. The film transparency was investigated experimentally by measuring the scintillation light transmission through the ESR film sandwiched between a scintillation crystal and a photodetector with or without layers of silicone grease. Strong light leakage, up to nearly 30%, was measured through the reflector when coated on both sides with silicone, thus elucidating the major cause of light crosstalk in bonded arrays. The reflector transparency was confirmed experimentally for angles of incidence larger than 60 ° using a custom designed setup allowing illumination of the bonded ESR film at selected grazing angles. The unsuspected ESR film transparency can be beneficial for detector arrays exploiting light sharing schemes, but it is highly detrimental for scintillator arrays designed for individual pixel readout.

  17. Investigation and dating of gypsum crystals from Sivrihisar region in Eskisehir by ESR and TL techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Gypsum crystals taken from Sivrihisar-Eskisehir district were investigated and dated by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The natural ESR spectra of gypsum samples had also the signals of Mn 2 + in addition to the signal at g=2.009. It was observed that the intensity of ESR signal at g=2.009 increased with gamma irradiation dose. This ESR signal (g=2.009) was used as a dating signal in dating of gypsum samples. The only one TL peak at about 278 degree Celsius was observed in TL glow curves of nonirradiated gypsum sample. In the case of irradiated sample, TL peak at 157 degree Celsius was observed in addition of TL peak at 278 degree Celsius. Gypsum samples were irradiated with a 6 0Co gamma source. The ESR spectra and TL glow curve of gypsum samples were recorded by X-band ESR spectrometer and Risφ TL/OSL reader, respectively. For samples, ESR/TL dose-response curves was constructed. Dose-response curves were fitted with an exponential saturation function. Based on this model, accumulated dose (AD) values for dating are determined. 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis was carried out for gypsum crystals and dolomite which enveloped these gypsum crystals. The internal dose rate was calculated from 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis results of gypsum sample. The external dose rate was calculated by using 2 38U, 2 32Th and 4 0K analysis results of dolomite and cosmic dose rate. Internal and external gamma dose-rate was used for dating calculations. Because of successive recrystallization of gypsum sample after formation, calculated age values of gypsum is smaller than expected formation age.

  18. An ESR study of the spectra of paint pigments in 'drying' linseed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slogett, R.; Troup, G.; Hutton, D.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Since previous ESR work on the identification of RAW paint pigments, mainly mineral, looked promising, we decided to examine the spectra when the pigments were applied, in oil, to a non-reactive, microwave transparent polymer. The polymer used shows no significant ESR signals in the range 2000-4000 gauss at ∼9.1 GHz and room temperature. The oil used is Winsor and Newton Drying Linseed Oil, and contains 'manganese driers'. The spectrum of the pure liquid oil is shown, as well as that of the dried oil on the substrate. Many of the pigment spectra shown are so strong that not a trace of the oil Mn(2+) can be seen at the pigment concentrations used. The effect of the linseed oil on modern synthetic indigo, an organic pigment still available made from plants, is also shown. ESR still looks to be a useful supplementary technique for paint pigment identification

  19. Scattering anomalies in a resonator above the thresholds of the continuous spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, S A [St. Petersburg State Politechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We consider the Dirichlet spectral problem for the Laplace operator in a multi-dimensional domain with a cylindrical outlet to infinity, a Helmholtz resonator. Using asymptotic analysis of the scattering matrix we demonstrate different types of reflection of high-amplitude near-threshold waves. One scattering type or another, unstable or stable with respect to variations of the resonator shapes, is determined by the presence or absence of stabilizing solutions at the threshold frequency, respectively. In a waveguide with two cylindrical outlets to infinity, we discover the effect of almost complete passage of the wave under 'fine tuning' of the resonator. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  20. Researches and Applications of ESR Dosimetry for Radiation Accident Dose Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, K.; Guo, L.; Cong, J.B.; Sun, C.P.; Hu, J.M.; Zhou, Z.S.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Shi, Y.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish methods suitable for practical dose assessment of people involved in ionising radiation accidents. Some biological materials of the human body and materials possibly carried or worn by people were taken as detection samples. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques, the basic dosimetric properties of selected materials were investigated in the range above the threshold dose of human acute haemopoietic radiation syndrome. The dosimetric properties involved included dose response properties of ESR signals, signal stabilities, distribution of background signals, the lowest detectable dose value, radiation conditions, environmental effects on the detecting process, etc. Several practical dose analytical indexes and detecting methods were set up. Some of them (bone, watch glass and tooth enamel) had also been successfully used in the dose assessment of people involved in three radiation accidents, including the Chernobyl reactor accident. This work further proves the important role of ESR techniques in radiation accident dose estimation. (author)

  1. ESR imaging investigations of two-phase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Werner; Stösser, Reinhard; Borchert, Hans-Hubert

    2007-06-01

    The possibilities of electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI) for investigating the properties of the spin probes TEMPO and TEMPOL in two-phase systems have been examined in the systems water/n-octanol, Miglyol/Miglyol, and Precirol/Miglyol. Phases and regions of the phase boundary could be mapped successfully by means of the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants, and, moreover, the quantification of rotational and lateral diffusion of the spin probes was possible. For the quantitative treatment of the micropolarity, a simplified empirical model was established on the basis of the Nernst distribution and the experimentally determined isotropic hyperfine coupling constants. The model does not only describe the summarized micropolarities of coexisting phases, but also the region of the phase boundary, where solvent molecules of different polarities and tendencies to form hydrogen bonds compete to interact with the NO group of the spin probe. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. ESR dating at K and X band of northeastern Brazilian megafauna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Angela; Magnolia Franca, Alcina; Augusto Costa de Almeida, Jose; Maria Figueiredo, Ana; Nicolucci, Patricia; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-01-01

    The archaeological dose (AD) was measured in three tooth samples of giant mammals that belonged to Brazilian megafauna using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy at X-band (ν ∼9.5GHz) and K-band (ν ∼24GHz). Samples were collected in Lagoa de Dentro, Puxinana city in Paraiba, a northeast state in Brazil and were identified as Haplomastodon waringi (Holland) (two teeth) and one tooth sample of Xenorhinotherium bahiense (Cartele and Lessa). The average AD led to an age for the Haplomastodon samples of 11.6kybp. For one sample (Haplomastodon) K-band was also employed to evaluate the AD. The K-band spectrum had three components, determined using spectral simulation as follows: a wide isotropic line with g factor 2.0048, an orthorhombic line with gx=2.0034, gy=2.0022 and gz=1.9974, and another isotropic line with g factor 2.0008. The amplitude of these three signals increase with the added dose and the average dose found was 26+/-5Gy. This result is compatible with the AD determined with X-band 21+/-3Gy

  3. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  4. Electromagnetic resonance modes on a two-dimensional tandem grating and its application for broadband absorption in the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sunwoo; Lee, Bong Jae

    2016-01-25

    In this work, we numerically investigate the electromagnetic resonances on two-dimensional tandem grating structures. The base of a tandem grating consists of an opaque Au substrate, a SiO(2) spacer, and a Au grating (concave type); that is, a well-known fishnet structure forming Au/SiO(2)/Au stack. A convex-type Au grating (i.e., topmost grating) is then attached on top of the base fishnet structure with or without additional SiO(2) spacer, resulting in two types of tandem grating structures. In order to calculate the spectral reflectance and local magnetic field distribution, the finite-difference time-domain method is employed. When the topmost Au grating is directly added onto the base fishnet structure, the surface plasmon and magnetic polariton in the base structure are branched out due to the geometric asymmetry with respect to the SiO(2) spacer. If additional SiO(2) spacer is added between the topmost Au grating and the base fishnet structure, new magnetic resonance modes appear due to coupling between two vertically aligned Au/SiO(2)/Au stacks. With the understanding of multiple electromagnetic resonance modes on the proposed tandem grating structures, we successfully design a broadband absorber made of Au and SiO(2) in the visible spectrum.

  5. Dating of aragonite and dolomite from Devil's cave - SP, by dosimetric thermoluminescent method (DTL) and ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatumi, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated TL (Thermoluminescence) and ESR (electron spin resonance) properties of aragonite and dolomite found at ''Caverna do Diabo (Devil's cave)'' in the state of Sao Paulo to determine the ages of these geological materials. The aragonite, which is not a thermoluminescent material, shows one ESR signal whit g = 2.003. We obtained the age of 1.1 x 10 5 years and the growth rate of 1 μ m/year by the sample calibration with additional Y irradiation. The dolomite gives a TL glow curve with three distinct peaks at 261, 334 and 395 0 C. We found that the fit for the TL glow curve to second-order kinetics can be considerered as very acceptable. Using the second TL peak we obtained the age of 9.4 x 10 5 years and the compatible values of the activation energy (1.90 ± 0,07 eV) by the following methods: Hyperbolic heating, isothermal decay and fractional glow technique. We observed many ESR absorption signals in the dolomite. Three principal signal com g = 2.002, 2.003 and 2.005 were studied. We found that the first and second ESR signals were atributed to the CO 2 - and/or CO 3 3- centers and the last to the CO 3 - centers, and observed that the first ESR signal might related with the second TL peak and the TL sensitivity were associated with the concentration of Mn 2+ [pt

  6. The result of Alanine/ESR dosimetry at Wolsung unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byeong Ryong; Choi, Hoon; Lim, Young Khi

    2008-01-01

    It needs accurate estimation of radiation level for verifying machinery and cable in Nuclear Power Plant. Therefore, in this study, we used ESR(Electron Spin Resonance) system for estimate dose of Alanine dosimeter. Alanine/ESR dosimetry, already known as a dosimetric method in medical and industrial field, was applied to estimate dose quantity at cable locations within a nuclear power plant as a part of equipment qualification program. Alanine/ESR dosimetry of absorbed dose range is 1 - 100 KGy. The alanine dosimeter is not significantly affected by temperature and fading is limited to 1% per year. The alanine dosimeters were fixed on the targeted cable or nearest position to measure dose quantity to get accurate value. Alanine dosimeters were scanned by commercially used two different ESR systems, e-scan and EMX series for alanine dosimeters. To estimate more accurate dose, two environmental correction factors, irradiation temperature and dosimeter weight, were used in calculation of absorbed dose quantity. In this study, dose values which are alinine dosimeter from Wolsong unit 1 are measured by two ESR systems. And then the results was compared each other

  7. ESR investigation of L-α-alanine and sucrose radicals produced by heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Sato, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated sucrose and L-α-alanine radicals produced by heavy (particle) ion irradiation with various LETs (linear energy transfer). The impact of the heavy ions on the samples produced stable free radicals, which were analyzed by ESR (electron spin resonance). Identical spectra were measured after one year. The obtained spectral patterns were the same as those for helium (He), carbon (C), and neon (Ne) ions irradiation. The absorbed dose dependences for the irradiated sucrose and alanine samples were examined. The ESR response has a linear relation with the absorbed dose. The ESR response at 60 Gy was slightly lower than a linear line for sucrose; however, the response showed good linearity for the alanine. In addition, the total spin concentration obtained by heavy-ion irradiation correlated logarithmically with the LET. Qualitative ESR analyse showed that the production of sucrose and alanine radicals depended on both different particle irradiation and the LET under the same dose. Thus, the present ESR results imply that sucrose together with L-α-alanine can be used to monitor LET as well as the number of ionizing particle for the production of stable free radicals. (author)

  8. Development of force-detected THz-ESR measurement system and its application to metal porphyrin complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Tsubasa; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy in the terahertz region (THz-ESR) is a promising technique to study biological materials such as metalloproteins because it directly probes the metal ion sites that play an important role in the emergence of functionality. By combining THz-ESR with force detection, the samples mass is reduced to the order of ng. This feature is of great advantage because the sample preparation process of biological materials is time-consuming. We developed a force-detected THz-ESR system utilizing optical interferometry for precise cantilever displacement measurement. In order to suppress the sensitivity fluctuation and instability of cantilever dynamics under high magnetic field, the tuning of interferometer is feedback-controlled during a measurement. By using this system, we successfully observed the ESR signal of hemin, which is a model substance of hemoglobin and myoglobin, in THz region.

  9. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fuerst, Josef U.; Förtsch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMR...

  10. Detailed analysis of the resonant backscattering spectrum for deeply penetrating protons in carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo; Ito, Shin; Maeda, Nobuhiro

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the spectral response in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) for deeply penetrating ions in matter, the resonant backscattering spectra for 5.05-, 5.5- and 6.0-MeV proton incidence on solid carbon material have been measured at a scattering angle of 179.2 deg. (in lab.). Prominent peaks resulting from the sharp 4.8-MeV resonance in 12 C(p,p) 12 C nuclear elastic scattering are observed, even for a penetration depth of 79 μm. Detailed numerical calculations based on an algorithm of straightforward step-by-step evaluation have been made to simulate the observed spectra. The algorithm enables one to rigorously treat both the effect of sharp resonance structure and that of energy-dependent energy loss. Calculations with the SIMNRA code are also made. Through comparison of these calculations with the measured results, some conclusions on the two effects above are presented. In addition, it is demonstrated that the peak profile due to a sharp resonance is very sensitive to the degree of energy straggling

  11. Resonance fluorescence spectrum in a two-band photonic bandgap crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ray-Kuang; Lai, Yinchieh

    2003-05-01

    Steady state resonance fluorescence spectra from a two-level atom embedded in a photonic bandgap crystal and resonantly driven by a classical pump light are calculated. The photonic crystal is considered to be with a small bandgap which is in the order of magnitude of the Rabi frequency and is modeled by the anisotropic two-band dispersion relation. Non-Markovian noises caused by the non-uniform distribution of photon density states near the photonic bandgap are taken into account by a new approach which linearizes the optical Bloch equations by using the Liouville operator expansion. Fluorescence spectra that only exhibit sidebands of the Mollow triplet are found, indicating that there is no coherent Rayleigh scattering process.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of fresh fruits processed by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    Pulp of irradiated kiwi fruits, after extraction by ethyl alcohol of part of the water and sugars, has been analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance in order to study the possibility of identifying irradiated fruits. The results allow to confirm that for a period of approximately 12 weeks a triplet with a coupling isotropic constant of 3.05 mT, intensity ratio 1:2:1 and a factor g=2,0026 is visible in irradiated fruits

  13. ESR dating of the fault rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Kwon

    2005-01-01

    We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the nuclear reactor. The Upcheon fault zone is exposed close to the Ulzin nuclear reactor. The space-time pattern of fault activity on the Upcheon fault deduced from ESR dating of fault gouge can be summarised as follows : this fault zone was reactivated between fault breccia derived from Cretaceous sandstone and tertiary volcanic sedimentary rocks about 2 Ma, 1.5 Ma and 1 Ma ago. After those movements, the Upcheon fault was reactivated between Cretaceous sandstone and fault breccia zone about 800 ka ago. This fault zone was reactivated again between fault breccia derived form Cretaceous sandstone and Tertiary volcanic sedimentary rocks about 650 ka and after 125 ka ago. These data suggest that the long-term(200-500 k.y.) cyclic fault activity of the Upcheon fault zone continued into the Pleistocene. In the Ulzin area, ESR dates from the NW and EW trend faults range from 800 ka to 600 ka NE and EW trend faults were reactivated about between 200 ka and 300 ka ago. On the other hand, ESR date of the NS trend fault is about 400 ka and 50 ka. Results of this research suggest the fault activity near the Ulzin nuclear reactor fault activity continued into the Pleistocene. One ESR date near the Youngkwang nuclear reactor is 200 ka

  14. Positron annihilation and electron spin resonance studies of defects in electron-irradiated 3C-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisayoshi; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Nashiyama, Isamu; Misawa, Shunji; Okumura, Hajime; Yoshida, Sadafumi.

    1992-01-01

    Defects induced by 1 MeV electron-irradiation in cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition have been studied with positron annihilation and electron spin resonance (ESR). Doppler broadened energy spectra of annihilation γ-rays obtained by using variable-energy positron beams showed the formation of vacancy-type defects in 3C-SiC by the electron-irradiation. An ESR spectrum labeled Tl, which has an isotropic g-value of 2.0029 ± 0.001, was observed in electron-irradiated 3C-SiC. The Tl spectrum is interpreted by hyperfine interactions of paramagnetic electrons with 13 C at four carbon sites and 29 Si at twelve silicon sites, indicating that the Tl center arises from a point defect at a silicon site. Both the results can be accounted for by the introduction of isolated Si vacancies by the irradiation. (author)

  15. Effects of mutation on the downfield proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the 5S RNA of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gewirth, D.T.; Moore, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    The imino proton spectra of several mutants of the 5S RNA of Escherichia coli are compared with that of the wild type. Three of the variants discussed are point mutations, and the fourth is a deletion mutant lacking bases 11-69 of the parent sequence, all obtained by site-directed mutagenesis techniques. The spectroscopic effects of mutation are limited in all cases, and the differences between normal and mutant spectra can be used to make or confirm the assignments of resonances. Several new assignments in the 5S spectrum are reported. Spectroscopic differences due to sequence differences permit the products of single genes within the 5S gene family to be distinguished and their fates followed by NMR

  16. ESR study on free radicals trapped in crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Seguchi, Tadao

    1997-01-01

    Free radicals in crosslinked PTFE which formed by 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at 77 K and at room temperature were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The crosslinked PTFE specimens with different crosslinking density were prepared by electron beam irradiation in the molten state. The ESR spectra observed in the irradiated crosslinked PTFE are much different from those in non-crosslinked PTFE (virgin); a broad singlet component increases with increasing the crosslinking density, G-value of radicals is much higher in crosslinked PTFE than in non-crosslinked one. Free radicals related to the broad component are trapped in the non-crystalline region of crosslinked PTFE and rather stable at room temperature, whereas radicals trapped in amorphous non-crosslinked PTFE are unstable at room temperature. It is thought that most of free radicals trapped in the crosslinked PTFE are formed in the crosslinked amorphous region. The trapped radicals decays around 383 K (110 o C) due to the molecular motion of α-relaxation. (Author)

  17. Application of ENDOR-induced electron spin resonance to the study of point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, J.R.; Spaeth, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of ENDOR-induced ESR (EI-ESR) is applied to the investigation of several point defects in insulating crystals. It is shown that the lineshape of the EI-ESR spectrum depends on the ENDOR line used for the experiment. The EI-ESR technique allows the separation of overlapping ESR spectra in the presence of several defects. New applications are the selection of spin states and the determination of relative signs of spin-Hamiltonian parameters, the selection of centre orientations and the assignment of nuclei in complex ENDOR spectra, and the determination of quadrupole interactions which are not resolved in the ENDOR spectrum. (author)

  18. Resonance spectrum of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental resonances of rapidly rotating Kerr black holes in the eikonal limit are derived analytically. We show that there exists a critical value, μ c =√((15-√(193))/2 ), for the dimensionless ratio μ≡m/l between the azimuthal harmonic index m and the spheroidal harmonic index l of the perturbation mode, above which the perturbations become long lived. In particular, it is proved that above μ c the imaginary parts of the quasinormal frequencies scale like the black-hole temperature: ω I (n;μ>μ c )=2πT BH (n+1/2 ). This implies that for perturbations modes in the interval μ c I of the black hole becomes extremely long as the extremal limit T BH →0 is approached. A generalization of the results to the case of scalar quasinormal resonances of near-extremal Kerr-Newman black holes is also provided. In particular, we prove that only black holes that rotate fast enough (with MΩ≥2/5 , where M and Ω are the black-hole mass and angular velocity, respectively) possess this family of remarkably long-lived perturbation modes.

  19. Search for heavy resonance in the top-antitop invariant mass spectrum at the ATLAS experiment in the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechenaux, B.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the analysis conducted with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC and searching for resonant production of new particles decaying into a pair of top quarks. Top quark reconstruction is mainly build upon the notion of hadronic jets, whose identification and reconstruction is a crucial issue for any measure trying to sign top quark decays from proton-proton collisions processes. After a general description of the theoretical and experimental features of jet reconstruction in the ATLAS detector, we present a first attempt to validate the local hadronic calibration method, which aim at correcting the measurement of these objects from inaccuracies caused by detector effects. In the second part, we present the analysis conducted on 14 fb -1 of proton-proton collision data at √(s)=8 TeV collected during the year 2012 and searching for resonant creation of new heavy particles in top-anti-top invariant mass spectrum. For heavy particles, the quarks produced in the decay of the latter have a high impulsion with respect to their mass and those top quark decays often results in a so called 'boosted topology', where the hadronic-decaying top quark is often reconstructed as a single jet of large radius parameter. In this context, we present a preliminary study to reconstruct and identify as precisely as possible this type of boosted topologies, based on the study of jet substructure. (author)

  20. Gear Tooth Failure Detection by the Resonance Demodulation Technique and the Instantaneous Power Spectrum Method – A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghasemloonia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of gears in industry for speed and torque variation purposes is obvious. The gearbox diagnostic methods have been improved quickly in recent years. In this paper, two of the newest methods, the resonance demodulation technique (R.D, and the instantaneous power spectrum technique (IPS are applied to gearbox vibration signals and their capabilities in fault detection are compared. Yet, the important role of time averaging should not be dispensed with, as it is the primary step for both techniques. In the present study, the mathematical method of these techniques, according to the mathematical vibration model of gears, is introduced, these techniques are applied to the test rig data, and finally the results of both methods are compared. The results indicate that in each method, the location of fault can be estimated and it is located in the same angular position in both methods. The IPS method is applicable to severe faults, whereas the resonance demodulation technique is a simple tool to recognize the fault at each severity and at the early stages of fault generation.

  1. ESR application to radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwabara, H.

    1988-01-01

    Important results obtained in our group in the field of ESR application to the study of irradiated polymers are summarized. They are the analysis of the decay reaction of the free radicals, spur-like trapping of the free radicals and the related discussions. A diffusion controlled bimolecular reaction scheme was a good way of analyzing the data of the decay reaction. Power saturation phenomenon of ESR spectra of the free radicals showed a circumstance of the spur-like trapping of the free radicals in irradiated polyethylene. The phenomenon of spur-like trapping was quite consistent with the interpretation of the decay reaction of the free radicals. (author)

  2. Submillimeter wave ESR of copper-oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hitoshi; Motokawa, Mitsuhiro

    1993-01-01

    Since the discovery of high T c superconductors the magnetism of various copper-oxides has attracted much interest. Especially the magnetism of strong spin correlation systems in various CuO 4 networks is of great interest because it is well known that the superconductivity is occurring in the CuO 2 plane of the high T c superconductors. Here the authors will show some of their work done on copper-oxides by submillimeter wave ESR. The submillimeter wave ESR can provide the frequency region of 90 ∼ 3,100 GHz and the pulse magnetic field up to 30T

  3. The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF3CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woetzel, Ulf; Maeder, Heinrich; Harder, Hauke; Pracna, Petr; Sarka, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF 3 CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2 has been measured by means of waveguide microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy in the range 8-26 GHz. Two types of direct l-type resonance transitions induced by the (Δk = ±2, Δl = ±2) interaction could be observed: 262 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 2 selection rule covering values of J = 17-64 and G vertical bar k - l vertical bar from 2 to 15, and 75 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 4 selection rule covering values of J = 44-70 and G up to 3. The strong (2, 2) resonance furthermore allowed the observation of A 1 -A 2 splittings of the k = l = ±2 states from J = 63-70. The transitions with G = 3 showed splittings due to the (4, -2) and (0, 6) interactions. The corresponding energy level systems and part of the Hamiltonian matrix are discussed. Strong perturbations due to Δ(k - l) = 3 interactions coupling the states k = ±1, l = ±2 and k = ±4, l ±2 made possible the observation of perturbation-allowed transitions with selection rule k = ±1, l =± 2 ↔ k = 0, l = ±2. Additionally, the J = 2-1 and 3-2 rotational transitions have been measured. A multiple fitting analysis has been performed in which the experimental data have been fitted using five reduced forms of the effective Hamiltonian as proposed by Sarka and Harder [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 254]. Parameters up to sixth order have been determined including the axial rotational constant A for both values of vertical bar l vertical bar and the unitary equivalence of the determined parameter sets has been demonstrated

  4. Flattening of the resonance spectrum of hadrons from κ-deformed Poincare algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, J.; Ferreira, P.L.; Tomio, L.; Choudhury, R.R.

    1994-02-01

    It was recently defined by Lukierski a κ-deformed Poincare algebra which is characterized by having the energy-momentum and angular momentum sub-algebras not deformed. Further Biedenharn showed that on gauging the κ-deformed electron with the electromagnetic field, one can set a limit on the allowed value of the deformation parameter ε ≡ 1/κ < 1 fm. It is shown that one gets Regge like angular excitations, J, of the mesons, non-strange and strange baryons, with a value of ε ∼ 0.082 fm and predict a flattening with J of the corresponding trajectories. The Regge fit improves on including deformation, particularly for the baryon spectrum. (author)

  5. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Förtsch, Michael; Strekalov, Dmitry V; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs. The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p = ℓ-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers ℓ are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination of the geometry and the refractive index at different temperatures of the WGMR. For future applications in classical and quantum optics, this mode analysis enables one to control the narrow-band phase-matching conditions in nonlinear processes such as second-harmonic generation or parametric down-conversion.

  6. Factors Affecting Detection Of Irradiated Bone Meat By Using Electron Spine Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FARAG, S.A.; ATIA, A.I.; HASSAN, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Different types of bone meats were purchased locally such as camel, cow and sheep. The bones were removed, cleaned and irradiated with gamma rays at different doses (5, 10 and 20 kGy). The bone samples were stored in a refrigerator for five months for studying their stability of radiation-induced free radicals using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The effect of thermal treatment at 50 o C at intervals was studied besides effect of storage period and re-irradiation process on ESR signal intensity. The ESR spectrum for radical species in irradiated samples was characterized by signal with spectroscopic splitting factor (g factor) of g1=2.0025 and g2=1.9973 for camel, cow and sheep bones, respectively. The signal at g = 2.0025 was ascribed to free radical rotation CO -2 that was derived from radiation-induced hydroxyapatite. Generally, the results proved that all above mentioned factors under investigation can affect ESR signal intensity but not prevent the recognize of irradiated bones, therefore, it must be taken in mind when calculating the absorbed dose.

  7. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  8. A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Study in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a 3-Tesla Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) System: The Anterior Cingulate Cortex and the Left Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi; Hisaoka, Sonoka; Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Tatsuo; Goji, Aya; Abe, Yoko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-07-01

    The pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not fully understood. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate metabolite concentration ratios in the anterior cingulate cortex and left cerebellum in ASD. In the ACC and left cerebellum studies, the ASD group and intelligence quotient- and age-matched control group consisted of 112 and 114 subjects and 65 and 45 subjects, respectively. In the ASD group, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)+/ creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr) was significantly decreased in the anterior cingulate cortex, and glutamate (Glu)/Cr was significantly increased and GABA+/Cr was significantly decreased in the left cerebellum compared to those in the control group. In addition, both groups showed negative correlations between Glu/Cr and GABA+/Cr in the left cerebellum, and positive correlations between GABA+/Cr in the anterior cingulate cortex and left cerebellum. ASD subjects have hypoGABAergic alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex and hyperglutamatergic/hypoGABAergic alterations in the left cerebellum.

  9. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does Neuroimaging Support the DSM-5 Proposal for a Symptom Dyad? A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Fraguas, David; Boada, Leticia; Janssen, Joost; Navas-Sanchez, Francisco J.; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of 208 studies comprising functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data in patients with "autism spectrum disorder" (ASD) was conducted, in order to determine whether these data support the forthcoming DSM-5 proposal of a social communication and behavioral symptom dyad. Studies consistently reported…

  10. ESR analyses for teeth from the open-air site at Attirampakkam, India: Clues to complex U uptake and paleoenvironmental change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, Bonnie A.B.; Montoya, Andres; Blickstein, Joel I.B.; Skinner, Anne R.; Pappu, Shanti; Gunnell, Yanni; Taieb, Maurice; Kumar, Akhilesh; Lundberg, Joyce A.

    2007-01-01

    In open-air sites, diagenetic alteration makes teeth difficult to analyze with electron spin resonance (ESR). Despite strong diagenetic alteration, three ungulate teeth from Pleistocene fluvial sediment in the open-air Paleolithic site at Attirampakkam, Tamil Nadu, India, were analyzed using standard and isochron ESR. Diagenetic alteration features in two teeth indicated rapid submergence in quiet saline to hypersaline water, following a short subaerial exposure, while the third remained constantly buried under reducing conditions. Geochemical signatures and ESR data all indicate that the teeth experienced at least three independent U uptake events during diagenesis, including two that occurred long after burial

  11. Investigations of radical primary processes by ESR pulse radiolysis and ESR laser photolysis experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K.; Naumann, W.

    1984-08-01

    The Chemically Induced Magnetic Polarization of Electrons (CIDEP) describes the anomalies of ESR intensities of free radicals which react chemically. In this paper the fundamentals and some experimental results of the CIDEP effect are summarized. (author)

  12. Progress in ESR dating of fossils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeya, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this review the progress of ESR dating is briefly described together with its historical development. Examples of fossil dating include shells and corals in geological sediments, fossil bones and teeth in anthropology and fossil woods in geology. The total dose of natural radiation (TD) equivalent to the archaeological dose in TL dating was obtained by the additive dose method. Initially, the TDs were plotted against the known ages; using the apparent annual dose-rate thus obtained gives the ESR age within a factor of 2 or 3 for a fossil. Precise assessment of the radiation environment was made later taking the disequilibrium of uranium series disintegration into account. ESR ages of corals agreed well with those obtained by radiocarbon and uranium-thorium methods. The time-independent accumulation rate or a linear accumulation or uranium was adopted as a first sensible model for the opensystem fossil bones: the relation between the TD and the age explains the ages of anthropologically important bones. Lastly, geological assessment of fossil woods was made by ESR based on the organic radicals and electron traps in the silicified part. (author)

  13. Radiation dosimetry by ESR in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, R. (Universidad de San Agustin de Arequipa (Peru)); Marticorena, B. (Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima)

    1983-05-01

    The absorption speed in bovine bone samples irradiated with a /sup 90/Sr ..beta..-source of 45 mCi is studied with ESR. The signal changes linearly with the absorbed quantity of radiation to a maximum dose of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ rads. This positive result allows to foresee the use of bone as a radiation dosimeter.

  14. Radiation dosimetry by ESR in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, R.; Marticorena, B.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption speed in bovine bone samples irradiated with a 90 Sr β-source of 45 mCi is studied with ESR. The signal changes linearly with the absorbed quantity of radiation to a maximum dose of 1.5 x 10 6 rads. This positive result allows to foresee the use of bone as a radiation dosimeter

  15. ESR dating of marine fossil shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, U.; Mangini, A.; Gruen, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to establish the relatively new ESR dating method for marine shells a detailed comparison with the independent U-series technique was carried out. Agreement of both dating methods with the geological classification is strongly dependent on the species investigated and environmental conditions. Several problems encountered in the determination of the accumulated dose as well as the annual dose are discussed. (author)

  16. ESR dating of marine fossil shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, U; Mangini, A; Gruen, R

    1985-01-01

    In order to establish the relatively new ESR dating method for marine shells a detailed comparison with the independent U-series technique was carried out. Agreement of both dating methods with the geological classification is strongly dependent on the species investigated and environmental conditions. Several problems encountered in the determination of the accumulated dose as well as the annual dose are discussed.

  17. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Polyakov, A.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Zashkvara, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  18. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabikin, Yu A; Polyakov, A I; Petukhov, Yu V; Bitenbaev, M I; Zashkvara, O V [Physical-Technical Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  19. Gaussian mixture models for detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Javier; Velasco, Nelson; Alvarez, Charlens; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological condition characterized by a triad of signs: stereotyped behaviors, verbal and non-verbal communication problems. The scientific community has been interested on quantifying anatomical brain alterations of this disorder. Several studies have focused on measuring brain cortical and sub-cortical volumes. This article presents a fully automatic method which finds out differences among patients diagnosed with autism and control patients. After the usual pre-processing, a template (MNI152) is registered to an evaluated brain which becomes then a set of regions. Each of these regions is the represented by the normalized histogram of intensities which is approximated by mixture of Gaussian (GMM). The gray and white matter are separated to calculate the mean and standard deviation of each Gaussian. These features are then used to train, region per region, a binary SVM classifier. The method was evaluated in an adult population aged from 18 to 35 years, from the public database Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Highest discrimination values were found for the Right Middle Temporal Gyrus, with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) the curve of 0.72.

  20. Changes in molecular structure and properties of irradiated polymers of different compositions - ESR and NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carswell-Pomerantz, T.; Babanalbandi, A.; Dong, L.; Hill, D.J.T.; Perera, M.C.S.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of molecular structural changes in polymers during exposure to high energy radiation is the long term interest of the Polymer Materials and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland. Recently, the group had looked at a range of polymers including natural and synthetic rubbers, methacrylates and polyesters. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including gamma radiation. This report will focus on the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of the effects of gamma irradiation on these polymers. Other methods such as Gas Chromatography (GC), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) have also been used as these methods combine with ESR and NMR, to provide a more complete picture of the mechanism of the structural changes. (author)

  1. Analysis of γ-ray irradiated pasteurized agaricus (Agaricus blazei Murill) by ESR in oxygen-free atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeya, Hiromi; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2007-01-01

    Agaricus (Agaricus blazei Murill) is one of a popular crude drug in Japan and East Asia countries. The crude drugs originating from natural raw products are easy to be contaminated by microorganism. Radiation method has been introduced as the sterilization technology for crude drugs. ESR has been used for the detection of radicals in irradiated drugs. Using ESR, we detected radical species in Agaricus before and after the gamma ray pasteurization. The ESR spectrum consists of a broad sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at same g-value and a singlet at g=4.0. We found that relaxation times of radicals in Agaricus varied by the presence of oxygen. Upon substitution of air by Ar, i.e., the absent of oxygen in the ESR sample tube, the T 1 value became 10 times larger than the presence of oxygen. Accordingly, the progressive saturation curve indicates more immediate saturation under the Ar than air atmosphere. Radicals, produced by the γ-ray irradiation to Agaricus, are very sensitive to oxygen. We concluded that ESR spectrum of irradiated Agaricus sample in the absence of oxygen is useful for the detection of dose level of γ-ray irradiation. (author)

  2. Low cost ESR based X-ray beamline for lithography experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, S.; Doumas, A.; Truncale, M. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Space and Electronics Div.)

    1992-08-01

    Any application of the electron storage ring (ESR) based X-ray lithography technology requires an X-ray radiation transport system to transfer the synchrotron radiation into a spectrum defined by the lithography process requirements. Structure of this transport system (i.e. the beamline) depends on the nature of the application. In this paper a beamline conceptual design will be discussed. The beamline is intended for the developmment of X-ray lithography technology. (orig.).

  3. Parametric resonances in the amplitude-modulated probe-field absorption spectrum of a two-level atom driven by a resonance amplitude- and phase-modulated pumping field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushilov, N.V.; Kholodkevich, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the polarization induced by a weak probe field with periodically modulated amplitude in a two-level medium saturated by a strong amplitude-and phase-modulated resonance field. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of the probe field includes parametric resonances, the maxima corresponding to the condition δ= 2nΓ-Ω w and the minima to that of δ= (2n + 1)Γ- w , where δ is the probe-field detuning front the resonance frequency, Ω w is the modulation frequency of the probe-field amplitude, and Γ is the transition line width, n = 1, 2, 3, hor-ellipsis. At the specific modulation parameters, a substantial region of negative values (i.e., the region of amplification without the population inversion) exists in the absorption spectrum of the probe field

  4. Effects of gamma-irradiation on the erythrocyte membrane: ESR, NMR and biochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantafora, A.; Ceccarini, M.; Guidoni, L.; Ianzini, F.; Minetti, M.; Viti, V.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiation on resealed erythrocyte ghosts have been examined with different techniques. Phospholipid analysis reveals peroxidative damage on the polyunsaturated chains of phosphatidylethanolamine. Gel electrophoresis and ESR measurements indicate modifications of the cytoskeletal proteins. 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance data show bilayer modifications that can be interpreted as changes in lipid-protein interactions. The overall picture from the present results favours interaction between lipids and proteins in the inner monolayer of the membrane. (author)

  5. Detection of organic free radicals in irradiated pepper by electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2002-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed various free radicals in a Japanese commercially available black pepper before and after γ-irradiation. The representative ESR spectrum of the pepper is composed of a sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at the same g-value and a singlet at g=4.0. The first one is attributable to a signal with hyperfine interactions of Mn 2+ ion (7.4 mT). The second one is due to an organic free radical. The third one may be originated from Fe 3+ ion of the non-hem Fe in proteins. A pair of signals appeared in the black pepper after γ-irradiation. The progressive saturation behavior reconfirmed the signal identification for the radicals in the black pepper. (author)

  6. Identification of irradiated peppers by electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polonia, I.; Esteves, M.P.; Andrade, M.E.; Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Sacavem; Empis, J.

    1995-01-01

    White and black pepper purchased in local retailers were analysed by electron spin resonance (ESR), thermoluminescence (TL) and viscosimetry (VISC) in order to establish a viable method for identifying possibly irradiated peppers. Samples studied were non irradiated or irradiated in a cobalt-60 plant with the absorbed doses of 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. Confirming the data found in the literature TL was revealed by our results the best method to identify irradiated peppers. Nevertheless, the dose received by the samples could not be estimated. The ESR signal of irradiated peppers is similar to the spectrum of cellulose radical but very short lived at ambient temperature. The study on the alteration of viscosity of heat-treated alkaline pepper suspensions indicate that VISC is a very promising method for detection of irradiated peppers. (Author)

  7. Crystal field effects in the ESR spectra of Dysup(3+), Ersup(3+) and Ybsup(3+) in YPd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, C.; Weber, E.; Donoso, J.P.; Gandra, F.C.G.; Barberis, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Low temperature ESR experiments of diluted Dy, Er and Yb in YPd 3 are reported. The host cubic crystal field leaves a GAMMA 7 ground state in the case of Yb 3+ , a GAMMA 7 excited state for Er 3+ and a broad and undefined resonance for Dy 3+ . A comparison with Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Magnetic Susceptibility data is given. (orig.)

  8. ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal activities using barite in sulfide deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, S.; Fujiwara, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Isono, Y.; Uchida, A.; Takamasa, A.; Nakai, S.

    2012-12-01

    The temporal change of submarine hydrothermal activities has been an important issue in the aspect of the evolution of hydrothermal systems which is related with ore formation (Urabe, 1995) and biological systems sustained by the chemical species arising from hydrothermal activities (Macdonald et al., 1980). Determining the ages of the hydrothermal deposit will provide essential information on such studies. Dating methods using disequilibrium between radioisotopes such as U-Th method (e.g. You and Bickle, 1998), 226}Ra-{210Pb and 228}Ra-{228Th method (e.g. Noguchi et al., 2011) have been applied to date submarine hydrothermal deposits. ESR (electron spin resonance) dating method is commonly applied to fossil teeth, shells, and quartz of Quaternay period where the natural accumulated dose is obtained from the intensities of the ESR signals which are created by natural radiation. The natural dose is divided by the dose rate to the mineral/sample to deduce the age. Okumura et al., (2010) made the first practical application of ESR (electron spin resonance) dating technique to a sample of submarine hydrothermal barite (BaSO4) to obtain preliminary ages, where Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that barite can be used for ESR dating. Knowing that ESR dating of barite is promising, in this paper, we will present how we have investigated each factor that contributes ESR dating of barite in submarine hydrothermal sulfide deposition. (1) The best ESR condition for measuring the SO3- signal in barite is with the microwave power of 1mW and modulation amplitude of 0.1mT. (2) As results of heating experiments, the signal was found to be stable for the dating age range of several thousands. (3) 226Ra replacing Ba in barite is the source of the radiation. The amount of radioactive elements in sulfide mineral surrounding barite is negligible. (4) The external radiation from the sea water is negligible even in the submarine hydrothermal area where the radiation level is much

  9. ESR Spectra of Some Silicate Minerals: A Search For New Dosimetric Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A.A.; Abdel-Razek, Y.A.; Rasheed, G. M.; Hassan, G.M.; Eissa, H.M.; Morsy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Two silicate minerals talc (Mg 3 Si 4 O 1 0 (OH) 2 ) and zircon (ZrSiO 4 ) having different crystal lattice structures were subjected to ESR dosimetric studies. Zircon shows anisotropic ESR signals at g xx =2.0168, g yy =2.0076 and g zz =2.0033, which have been identified as a hole center associated with Y 3+ substituted at Zr 4+ sites. Other characteristic signals have been observed and identified. The ESR signal at g=2.0033 showed positive response to γ-irradiation at 110 Gy and is suitable to be used for dosimetry and dating of natural zircons. Talc a magnesium sheeted silicate exhibits ESR derivative spectrum characterized the presence of Fe 3+ at g=4.28 and the HF-sixtet Mn 2+ signals due to possible substitution of Fe 3+ and Mn 2+ in the Mg 2+ octahedral sites, respectively. The enhancement of the Mn 2+ sixtet by γ-irradiation increases the area occupied by the signals which makes it difficult to use for dosimetric applications

  10. Unconventional spin dynamics in the honeycomb-lattice material α -RuCl3 : High-field electron spin resonance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomaryov, A. N.; Schulze, E.; Wosnitza, J.; Lampen-Kelley, P.; Banerjee, A.; Yan, J.-Q.; Bridges, C. A.; Mandrus, D. G.; Nagler, S. E.; Kolezhuk, A. K.; Zvyagin, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    We present high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of the honeycomb-lattice material α -RuCl3 , a prime candidate to exhibit Kitaev physics. Two modes of antiferromagnetic resonance were detected in the zigzag ordered phase, with magnetic field applied in the a b plane. A very rich excitation spectrum was observed in the field-induced quantum paramagnetic phase. The obtained data are compared with the results of recent numerical calculations, strongly suggesting a very unconventional multiparticle character of the spin dynamics in α -RuCl3 . The frequency-field diagram of the lowest-energy ESR mode is found consistent with the behavior of the field-induced energy gap, revealed by thermodynamic measurements.

  11. Recognition of malignant processes with neural nets from ESR spectra of serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Gurachevsky, A.; Muravsky, V.; Schnurr, K.; Seibt, G. [Medinnovation GmbH, Wildau (Germany); Matthes, G. [Inst. of Transfusion Medicine, Univ. Hospital Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Cancer diseases are the focus of intense research due to their frequent occurrence. It is known from the literature that serum proteins are changed in the case of malignant processes. Changes of albumin conformation, transport efficiency, and binding characteristics can be determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). The present study analysed the binding/dissociation function of albumin with an ESR method using 16-doxyl stearate spin probe as reporter molecule and ethanol as modifier of hydrophobic interactions. Native and frozen plasma of healthy donors (608 samples), patients with malignant diseases (423 samples), and patients with benign conditions (221 samples) were analysed. The global specificity was 91% and the sensitivity 96%. In look-back samples of 27 donors, a malignant process could be detected up to 30 months before clinical diagnosis. To recognise different entities of malignant diseases from the ESR spectra, Artificial neural networks were implemented. For 48 female donors with breast cancer, the recognition specificity was 85%. Other carcinoma entities (22 colon, 18 prostate, 12 stomach) were recognised with specificities between 75% and 84%. Should these specificity values be reproduced in larger studies, the described method could be used as a new specific tumour marker for the early detection of malignant processes. Since transmission of cancer via blood transfusion cannot be excluded as yet, the described ESR method could also be used as a quality test for plasma products. (orig.)

  12. ESR dating of laterite from Ban Tha Ta Suea, Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limsuwan, S.; Vichaidid, T.; Limsuwan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating was carried out on laterite samples collected from Ban Tha Ta Suea, the original deposit of the laterite used in the construction of Muang Sing Historical Park. Ban Tha Ta Suea is about 6 km east of Muang Sing Historical Park in Kanchanaburi province (181 km far from Bangkok). The dose response of the g=2.0028 ESR signal was found to be suitable for age determination. An exponential saturation function was fitted to the ESR signal growth on additional γ-irradiation. Extrapolation of this function resulted in the accumulated dose 144±5 Gy. Gamma spectroscopy and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were used to determine concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in the samples from which the annual dose rate 16±2 mGy was calculated. In addition, the dose rate of cosmic rays was taken into account. The ESR age of laterite samples was found to be 9.0±0.9 ka. This age falls within the Holocene epoch of the Quaternary on the geological time scale. Samples from Muang Sing Historical Park were assigned to the same epoch. Both results agree with the geological map.

  13. Direct access to dithiobenzoate RAFT agent fragmentation rate coefficients by ESR spin-trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Kayte; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Junkers, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The β-scission rate coefficient of tert-butyl radicals fragmenting off the intermediate resulting from their addition to tert-butyl dithiobenzoate-a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent-is estimated via the recently introduced electron spin resonance (ESR)-trapping methodology as a function of temperature. The newly introduced ESR-trapping methodology is critically evaluated and found to be reliable. At 20 °C, a fragmentation rate coefficient of close to 0.042 s(-1) is observed, whereas the activation parameters for the fragmentation reaction-determined for the first time-read EA = 82 ± 13.3 kJ mol(-1) and A = (1.4 ± 0.25) × 10(13) s(-1) . The ESR spin-trapping methodology thus efficiently probes the stability of the RAFT adduct radical under conditions relevant for the pre-equilibrium of the RAFT process. It particularly indicates that stable RAFT adduct radicals are indeed formed in early stages of the RAFT poly-merization, at least when dithiobenzoates are employed as controlling agents as stipulated by the so-called slow fragmentation theory. By design of the methodology, the obtained fragmentation rate coefficients represent an upper limit. The ESR spin-trapping methodology is thus seen as a suitable tool for evaluating the fragmentation rate coefficients of a wide range of RAFT adduct radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Recognition of malignant processes with neural nets from ESR spectra of serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, P.; Gurachevsky, A.; Muravsky, V.; Schnurr, K.; Seibt, G.; Matthes, G.

    2005-01-01

    Cancer diseases are the focus of intense research due to their frequent occurrence. It is known from the literature that serum proteins are changed in the case of malignant processes. Changes of albumin conformation, transport efficiency, and binding characteristics can be determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). The present study analysed the binding/dissociation function of albumin with an ESR method using 16-doxyl stearate spin probe as reporter molecule and ethanol as modifier of hydrophobic interactions. Native and frozen plasma of healthy donors (608 samples), patients with malignant diseases (423 samples), and patients with benign conditions (221 samples) were analysed. The global specificity was 91% and the sensitivity 96%. In look-back samples of 27 donors, a malignant process could be detected up to 30 months before clinical diagnosis. To recognise different entities of malignant diseases from the ESR spectra, Artificial neural networks were implemented. For 48 female donors with breast cancer, the recognition specificity was 85%. Other carcinoma entities (22 colon, 18 prostate, 12 stomach) were recognised with specificities between 75% and 84%. Should these specificity values be reproduced in larger studies, the described method could be used as a new specific tumour marker for the early detection of malignant processes. Since transmission of cancer via blood transfusion cannot be excluded as yet, the described ESR method could also be used as a quality test for plasma products. (orig.)

  15. Aggregate frequency width, nuclear hyperfine coupling and Jahn-Teller effect of Cu2+ impurity ion ESR in SrLaAlO4 dielectric resonator at 20 millikelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, M. A.; Le Floch, J.-M.; Krupka, J.; Tobar, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    The impurity paramagnetic ion, Cu2+ substitutes Al in the SrLaAlO4 single crystal lattice, this results in a CuO6 elongated octahedron, and the resulting measured g-factors satisfy four-fold axes variation condition. The aggregate frequency width of the electron spin resonance with the required minimum level of impurity concentration has been evaluated in this single crystal SrLaAlO4 at 20 millikelvin. Measured parallel hyperfine constants, A\\Vert Cu , were determined to be -155.7×10-4~cm-1, ~ -163.0×10-4~cm-1, ~ -178.3×10-4~cm-1 and -211.1×10-4~cm-1 at 9.072~GHz~(WGH4, 1, 1) for the nuclear magnetic quantum number M_I=+\\frac{3}{2}, +\\frac{1}{2}, -\\frac{1}{2} , and -\\frac{3}{2} respectively. The anisotropy of the hyperfine structure reveals the characteristics of the static Jahn-Teller effect. The second-order-anisotropy term, ˜ (\\fracspin{-orbit~coupling}{10D_q}){\\hspace{0pt}}2 , is significant and cannot be disregarded, with the local strain dominating over the observed Zeeman-anisotropy-energy difference. The Bohr electron magneton, β=9.23× 10-24 JT-1 , (within -0.43% so-called experimental error) has been found using the measured spin-Hamiltonian parameters. Measured nuclear dipolar hyperfine structure parameter P\\Vert=12.3×10-4~cm-1 shows that the mean inverse third power of the electron distance from the nucleus is ≃ 5.23 a.u. for Cu2+ ion in the substituted Al3+ ion site assuming nuclear electric quadruple moment Q=-0.211 barn.

  16. Glutamate and GABA in autism spectrum disorder-a translational magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in man and rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horder, Jamie; Petrinovic, Marija M; Mendez, Maria A; Bruns, Andreas; Takumi, Toru; Spooren, Will; Barker, Gareth J; Künnecke, Basil; Murphy, Declan G

    2018-05-25

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental syndrome with a high human and economic burden. The pathophysiology of ASD is largely unclear, thus hampering development of pharmacological treatments for the core symptoms of the disorder. Abnormalities in glutamate and GABA signaling have been hypothesized to underlie ASD symptoms, and may form a therapeutic target, but it is not known whether these abnormalities are recapitulated in humans with ASD, as well as in rodent models of the disorder. We used translational proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) to compare glutamate and GABA levels in adult humans with ASD and in a panel of six diverse rodent ASD models, encompassing genetic and environmental etiologies. [1H]MRS was performed in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex, of the humans, mice, and rats in order to allow for direct cross-species comparisons in specific cortical and subcortical brain regions implicated in ASD. In humans with ASD, glutamate concentration was reduced in the striatum and this was correlated with the severity of social symptoms. GABA levels were not altered in either brain region. The reduction in striatal glutamate was recapitulated in mice prenatally exposed to valproate, and in mice and rats carrying Nlgn3 mutations, but not in rodent ASD models with other etiologies. Our findings suggest that glutamate/GABA abnormalities in the corticostriatal circuitry may be a key pathological mechanism in ASD; and may be linked to alterations in the neuroligin-neurexin signaling complex.

  17. Spectrum of findings on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with neurological manifestations of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejeshwar Singh Jugpal

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in patients with neurological manifestations of dengue. Materials and Methods: We included nine patients with dengue fever (three females and six males; age range, 9–30 years, all of whom presented with neurological manifestations. The MRI examinations, performed in 1.5 T or 3 T scanners, included T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient mapping was also employed. Fast low-angle shot and susceptibility-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequences, as well as contrast-enhanced T1-weighted scans, were also obtained in order to assess parenchymal enhancement. MRI scans were analyzed for lesion distribution and imaging features. Results: All patients showed areas of altered signal intensity that appeared as hyperintensity on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The most commonly affected site was the basal ganglia-thalamus complex. Other affected sites were the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, white matter, and brainstem. In all cases, we observed patchy areas of restricted diffusion and focal areas of hemorrhage. Conclusion: Dengue encephalitis commonly affects the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and white matter. Therefore, MRI should be an indispensable part of the evaluation of patients with neurological complications of dengue fever.

  18. The participant Coster-Kronig preceded Auger transition in the resonant L2,3-M2,3V Auger electron spectrum of Ti metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V resonant Auger electron spectroscopy (RAES) spectrum of Ti metal measured by Le Fevre et al. [P. Le Fevre, J. Danger, H. Magnan, D. Chandesris, J. Jupille, S. Bourgeois, M.-A. Arrio, R. Gotter, A. Verdini, A. Morgante, Phys. Rev. B69 (2004) 155421] is analyzed in the light of relaxation and decay of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole states. The relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole state to the fully relaxed (screened) one is much shorter than the L 2,3 -hole Auger decay time, whereas the participant Coster-Kronig (CK) decay time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed L 3 -hole state at the L 2 resonance is as short as the relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed one. The excited electron is predominantly either rapidly decoupled from the L 2,3 -hole decay or annihilated by the participant CK decay. Thus, near the L 2,3 edges the L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectral peak appears at constant kinetic energy. The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectrum shows a normal L 2,3 -M 2,3 V Auger decay profile not modulated by the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. Not only the relaxation time but also the participant CK decay time depends on photon energy because they depend on the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. As a result, the L 2,3 X-ray absorption spectroscopy spectral line broadening depends on photon energy

  19. ESR, thermoelectrical and positron annihilation Doppler broadening studies of CuZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-BaTiO{sub 3} composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemeda, O.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Mahmoud, K.R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafr El-Sheikh (Egypt); Sharshar, T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafr El-Sheikh (Egypt); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Taif University, Al-Hawiah, Taif, P.O. Box 888 Zip Code 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Elsheshtawy, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Hamad, Mahmoud A., E-mail: m_hamad76@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); King Marriott Academy for Engineering & Technology, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2017-05-01

    Composite materials of Cu{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CZF) and barium titanate (BT) with different concentrations were prepared by high energy ball milling method. The composite samples of CZF and BT were studied using Infrared, ESR and positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) spectroscopy techniques as well as thermo-electric power measurements. The results confirm formation of the composite, and presence of two ferrimagnetic and ferroelectric phases, simultaneously. In addition, Fe–O bond for both tetrahedral and octahedral sites, population and distribution of cations at A and B sites are varied with BT content. The values of resonance field, line width of ESR spectrum and charge carrier concentration increase by increasing BT content. The value of the g factor for our samples with low BT content is greater than g-factor value of the isolated free electron. On the contrary, the g-factor values for samples with high BT content are smaller than the free isolated electron. PADB line-shape S-parameter suggests that there are increases of the density of the delocalized electrons, defect size and concentration caused by highly adding BT phase. In addition, PADB results confirm the homogeneity of composite phases and same structure of defects in BT-CZF composite samples. - Highlights: • Composite materials of Cu{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CZF) and barium titanate (BT) were prepared. • The resonance field and charge carrier concentration increase by increasing BT. • there is increase of the density of delocalized electrons by highly adding BT. • In addition, PADB results confirm the homogeneity of composite phases.

  20. The influence of surface modification, coating agents and pH value of aqueous solutions on physical properties of magnetite nanoparticles investigated by ESR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, Bernadeta, E-mail: benia@amu.edu.pl [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Krzyminiewski, Ryszard [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Kurczewska, Joanna; Schroeder, Grzegorz [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of electron spin resonance (ESR) studies for aqueous solutions of functionalized superparamagnetic iron(II,III) oxide nanoparticles. The samples studied differed in type of organic ligands at the magnetite surface, type of coating agent and pH value of aqueous solutions. The ESR spectra of the samples were obtained at room temperature and at 230 K. The field cooling (FC) experiment was performed for selected samples, and the effective anisotropy field (H{sub K2}) and the first order magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) was calculated. The process of the nanoparticles diffusion in different environments (human blood, human serum) forced by an inhomogeneous magnetic field was monitored and their interactions with different solvents have been discussed. It has been shown that ESR method is useful to observe the impact of organic ligands at the magnetite surface, type of coating agent and pH value of aqueous solutions on the properties of iron(II,III) oxide nanoparticles. - Highlights: • The influence of different organic ligands, coatings and pH values of aqueous solutions on the physical properties of the magnetite nanoparticles studied by ESR method. • Nanoparticles diffusion forced by inhomogeneous magnetic field monitored by ESR and explained. • A narrow line separated in ESR spectra by CREM. • The influence of different coatings and pH values of aqueous solutions on ESR spectra of TEMPO attached to the magnetite core.

  1. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  2. IAEA reference dosimeter: Alanine-ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1985, the IAEA has been using alanine-ESR as a transfer dosimeter for its dose quality audit service, namely the International Dose Assurance Service. The alanine dosimeters are rod-type containing 70 wt% DL--α-alanine and 30 wt% polystyrene. We have two self-shielded gamma facilities for the calibration of the dosimetry system, where the temperature within the irradiation chamber can be controlled by a specially designed unit. A 4th order polynomial is fitted to the 16 data points in the dose range of 100 Gy to 50 kGy. The measured value of the irradiation temperature coefficient at two dose values (15 and 45 kGy) is 0.23 %/deg. C. Also, the ESR-response was followed for several dosimeters for about 8 months to study the post-irradiation effect. A value of 0.008 %/day was observed for the fading of the response for two dose values (15 and 45 kGy) and three irradiation temperatures (15, 27 and 40 deg. C). The effect of the analysis temperature on the ESR response was also studied. The combined relative uncertainty for the IAEA alanine-ESR dosimetry system is 1.5% (k=1). This includes that transferred from the primary laboratory for the dose rate measurements of the gamma facilities, dosimetry system calibration uncertainties, batch variability and uncertainty in the curve fitting procedure. This value however does not include the contribution due to the irradiation temperature correction which is applied when it differs from that during calibration; this component being specific for each dose measurement. (author)

  3. A simple method for the rapid assessment of the qualitative ESR response of fossil samples to laboratory irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    A simple and effective method is proposed for the analysis of the qualitative response of ESR spectra to dosing. The method comprises of the alignment of the spectra, and subtraction of the natural spectrum from those that were subsequently irradiated in the laboratory. In that way, the ESR response to environmental radiation can be compared to the ESR response to laboratory radiation. As illustrated on some tooth enamel and mollusk shell samples, both materials are frequently used in dating and accident dosimetry, the method is very effective for the identification of regions where the two radiation regimes generate qualitatively the same dose response as well as for the isolation of radiation insensitive signals that interfere with those used for dose estimation

  4. Estimation of accumulated dose of radiation by the method of ESR-spectrometry of dental enamel of mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhenkov, V.A.; Moroz, I.A.; Vanin, A.F.; Klevezal, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    ESR-spectrometry was used to investigate radiation-induced paramagnetic centers in enamel of mammals: carnivores (polar bear and fox), ungulates (reindeer, European bison, moose), and man. Values at half the microwave power saturation of the radiation signal, P 1/2 , evaluated at room temperature, was found to range from 16 to 26 mW for animals and man. A new approach to discrimination of the radiation induced signal from the total ESR spectrum of reindeer enamel is proposed. ''Dose-response'' dependencies of enamel of different species mammals were measured within the dose range from 0.48 up to 10.08 Gy. Estimations of ''radiosensitivity'' enamel of carnivores and ungulates showed good agreement with radiosensitivity enamel of man by ESR method. (Author)

  5. A method to improve application technique in Alanine/ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoon; Ha, Ju Hee; Choi, Won; Lim, Young Khi

    2008-01-01

    Full text: For long-term radiation monitoring to assess the cable aging in harsh condition of nuclear power plant, ESR dosimetry method using alanine dosimeters was already recommended in many technical document and paper. Several ESR dosimetry systems were already produced and used widely, but the actual application of these systems for industrial dosimetry needs careful consideration of error sources in process of dose measurement. The alanine dosimeters were measured by E-scan alanine analyzer system or EMX ESR spectrometer. For the accurate measurement of the dosimeters, we have studied various source of errors. First, this paper discusses sources of inaccuracy related to data processing. To make a meaningful dose assessment, the dosimeter measurements need to be compared with measurements made using certified dosimeters of known dose. This is achieved by performing the routine calibration procedure which creates a calibration curve and corresponding fit coefficients from measurements made with a set of dosimeters with known certified dose. The calibration curves in ESR dosimetry are usually constructed by means of the least-squares technique in its simplest variant. The recommended alternative linearity several replicate measurements of Y at each used X value. Also, measurement is subject to error, so repeat measurements will not be identical. A technical description of a linear calibration is assumed that the dispersion of the measurements is the same for each standard. But in some cases, the standard deviation has to be specified separately for each value of concentration. In this case, it used the WLS (Weighted Least-Squared Regression) method instead of the OLS (Ordinary Least-Squared Regression) method. Second, the precision of the ESR spectrum was showed as a reproducibility test for the two ESR systems. The reproducibility test was performed at an absorbed dose of 1 k Gy, which is at least three orders of magnitude above the background reading of an

  6. Detection of irradiated strawberries by identifying ESR peak of irradiated cellulose component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Michiko; Tanabe, Hiroko

    2002-01-01

    The method of detecting low-dose irradiated strawberries by identifying ESR peak of irradiated cellulose component was studied. Ratio of peak height (S) of high magnetic field cellulose component, and noise width (N) of either irradiated or unirradiated seeds of strawberries were compared. In this study, sample was identified to be irradiated when S/N ratio of ESR spectrum of 4 min. sweep time was above 0.7. In the case of S/N ratio below 0.7, when the S/N ratio of integrated ESR spectrum, obtained from measuring 10 times with 1 min. sweep time was above 1.0, the sample was identified to be irradiated. The result suggests that S/N ratio is a good marker to detect the irradiation. The strawberries irradiated above 0.5kGy was able to be detected after 3 days storage at room temperature, after 21 days refrigeration and after 60 days freezing, respectively. (author)

  7. ESR Study of the polyvinyl alcohol gamma-ray induced free-radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosas S, E.

    1994-01-01

    This work reports the findings of the molecular weight effect on the electron spin resonance saturation curve of the gamma-ray irradiated polyvinyl alcohol, G-RIPVA. It has been noted that Pva of a lower molecular weight, between 13,000-23,000, show some noticeable differences in the electron spin resonance, ESR, response as a function of the gamma-ray dose in the 1-100 k Gy range than the one reported in the literature with molecular weight of 108,000. Results show a linear response in the log-log plot of the dose vs ESR signal intensity for samples based on G-RIPVA of the lower molecular weight as contrasted with the non-linear ESR response of G-RIPVA of higher molecular weight in the above named dose range. Such a result has been assumed to arise from the shorter molecular chains for the case of the lower molecular weight samples making this to increase the production of Pva free radicals with respect to the absorbed studied doses. Also, a discussion on the nature and stability of the Pva free radicals will be given. (Author)

  8. Development of multi-frequency ESR system for high-pressure measurements up to 2.5 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Matsui, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Okubo, S.; Ohta, H.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2015-10-01

    A new piston-cylinder pressure cell for electron spin resonance (ESR) has been developed. The pressure cell consists of a double-layer hybrid-type cylinder with internal components made of the ZrO2-based ceramics. It can generate a pressure of 2 GPa repeatedly and reaches a maximum pressure of around 2.5 GPa. A high-pressure ESR system using a cryogen-free superconducting magnet up 10 T has also been developed for this hybrid-type pressure cell. The frequency region is from 50 GHz to 400 GHz. This is the first time a pressure above 2 GPa has been achieved in multi-frequency ESR system using a piston-cylinder pressure cell. We demonstrate its potential by showing the results of the high-pressure ESR of the S = 1 system with the single ion anisotropy NiSnCl6 · 6H2O and the S = 1 / 2 quantum spin system CsCuCl3. We performed ESR measurements of these systems above 2 GPa successfully.

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstration of the spectrum of morphological phenotypes and patterns of myocardial scarring in Anderson-Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deva, Djeven Parameshvara; Hanneman, Kate; Li, Qin; Ng, Ming Yen; Wasim, Syed; Morel, Chantal; Iwanochko, Robert M; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Crean, Andrew Michael

    2016-03-31

    Although it is known that Anderson-Fabry Disease (AFD) can mimic the morphologic manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) on echocardiography, there is a lack of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) literature on this. There is limited information in the published literature on the distribution of myocardial fibrosis in patients with AFD, with scar reported principally in the basal inferolateral midwall. All patients with confirmed AFD undergoing CMR at our center were included. Left ventricular (LV) volumes, wall thicknesses and scar were analyzed offline. Patients were categorized into 4 groups: (1) no wall thickening; (2) concentric hypertrophy; (3) asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH); and (4) apical hypertrophy. Charts were reviewed for clinical information. Thirty-nine patients were included (20 males [51%], median age 45.2 years [range 22.3-64.4]). Almost half (17/39) had concentric wall thickening. Almost half (17/39) had pathologic LV scar; three quarters of these (13/17) had typical inferolateral midwall scar. A quarter (9/39) had both concentric wall thickening and typical inferolateral scar. A subgroup with ASH and apical hypertrophy (n = 5) had greater maximum wall thickness, total LV scar, apical scar and mid-ventricular scar than those with concentric hypertrophy (n = 17, p < 0.05). Patients with elevated LVMI had more overall arrhythmia (p = 0.007) more ventricular arrhythmia (p = 0.007) and sustained ventricular tachycardia (p = 0.008). Concentric thickening and inferolateral mid-myocardial scar are the most common manifestations of AFD, but the spectrum includes cases morphologically identical to apical and ASH subtypes of HCM and these have more apical and mid-ventricular LV scar. Significant LVH is associated with ventricular arrhythmia.

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Goal-Directed Reaching in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. G. Salowitz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An unanswered question concerning the neural basis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD is how sensorimotor deficits in individuals with ASD are related to abnormalities of brain function. We previously described a robotic joystick and video game system that allows us to record functional magnetic resonance images (FMRI while adult humans make goal-directed wrist motions. We anticipated several challenges in extending this approach to studying goal-directed behaviors in children with ASD and in typically developing (TYP children. In particular we were concerned that children with autism may express increased levels of anxiety as compared to typically developing children due to the loud sounds and small enclosed space of the MRI scanner. We also were concerned that both groups of children might become restless during testing, leading to an unacceptable amount of head movement. Here we performed a pilot study evaluating the extent to which autistic and typically developing children exhibit anxiety during our experimental protocol as well as their ability to comply with task instructions. Our experimental controls were successful in minimizing group differences in drop-out due to anxiety. Kinematic performance and head motion also were similar across groups. Both groups of children engaged cortical regions (frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital while making goal-directed movements. In addition, the ASD group exhibited task-related correlations in subcortical regions (cerebellum, thalamus, whereas correlations in the TYP group did not reach statistical significance in subcortical regions. Four distinct regions in frontal cortex showed a significant group difference such that TYP children exhibited positive correlations between the hemodynamic response and movement, whereas children with ASD exhibited negative correlations. These findings demonstrate feasibility of simultaneous application of robotic manipulation and functional imaging to study goal

  11. ESR detection of free radicals produced in irradiated fresh fruits and dried foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos G, E.; Gomes, V.; Garcia, F.; Azorin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to measure the stability of free radicals produced by the irradiation treatment in mangoes and in four spices: black pepper, oregano, 'guajillo' chili and 'morron' chili. The ESR spectra for mangoes were scanned in three different parts from the seeds and were recorded in fresh and dried tissues. The ESR spectra in fresh tissue of no irradiated mangoes, were a sextet line signal produced by Mn 2+ ion and a singlet centered at g = 2.00 produced by the endogenous radical. New resonances were observed in the irradiated samples at 1.5 mT and 3 mT respects to the center line for right and left side. These new resonance signals were-observed for eight days in mangoes treated at 1.00 kGy, and for three days at 0.15 kGy. The resonance due to the irradiation was observed in Iyophilized mangoes only one day after the treatment, in the vacuum dried samples, no new resonances were observed. The triplet signal, as well as the central single line appeared after irradiation in black pepper, morron chili and guajillo chili. These signals were also observed in the irradiated spices at any radiation dose higher than 1.0 kGy. The signals decrease promptly, in ten days after the 'irradiation. It was not possible to observe the triplet signal in oregano, even when the samples were analyzed immediately after irradiation treatment. The only signal observed in irradiated spice was the endogenous radical. This signal increased as the radiation dose increased and decreased during storage time at room temperature. Results showed that free radicals produced in irradiated fresh fruits or dried foods have a quick recombination. It was observed that in the spices the signal remains for several weeks meanwhile only eight days in mangoes. (Author)

  12. Correlation of ESR with lyoluminescence dosimetry using some sugars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin, Juan; Gutierrez, Alicia; Munoz, Eduardo; Gleason, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    Most applications involving ESR dosimetry currently center on aminoacids because of their relative tissue equivalence. Sugars, however, in addition to possessing high sensitivity and stability in their ESR and LL responses, are widely available as chemical reagents and as commercial sugar. In the present study, dosimetric characteristics of mannose, trehalose, sucrose and commercial sugar obtained by means of ESR and LL techniques are reported. Doses measured by both methods showed agreement within 5%. (author)

  13. ESR study of advanced materials with new parameters frequency and pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Mizoguchi, K

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful technique to investigate the magnetic properties of electrons in condensed matter. The frequency, as an additional parameter to the temperature, gives us the possibility to study the anisotropic dynamics of charge carriers with spin, even in polycrystalline materials. Furthermore, the pressure provides us a way to discuss how interactions between the electrons and their environments are responsible for the novel physical properties in these advanced materials, such as ferromagnetisms, charge-density waves, superconductivity, and so on. Results obtained by using ESR with these parameters are overviewed. Studies as a function of the frequency are demonstrated, especially for the conductive polymers, polyacetylene, polyaniline, and polypyrrole with various dopants for which single crystals are not available yet. Alkali-electro-sodalite (AES), a kind of zeolite with a regular electron lattice known as an s-electron Mott insulator, and fullerene compo...

  14. ESR dating of an ancient goat tooth from Nuoro, Sardinia, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffa, O.; Kinoshita, A.; Figueiredo, A. M. G.; Brunetti, A.; Ginesu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The dating of fossil teeth of an ancient goat (Nesogoral melonii) using the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique is reported. This animal was found in the fossiliferous site at Orosei (Nuoro, Sardinia, Italy) and was endemic in the region. Molar teeth were cleaned and enamel was completely removed from dentine. Enamel was irradiated with a 60 Co gamma source and measured with an ESR spectrometer (X-band) to obtain the signal vs. dose curve and fitted with an exponential function. The archaeological dose obtained by the fitting was 211 ± 34 Gy. Uranium and thorium concentrations were determined by neutron activation analysis. With the software ROSY the age estimates were 195 ± 30 ky for early uptake, 247 ± 40 ky for linear uptake and 243 ± 40 ky for a combination of uptake processes. (authors)

  15. TL and ESR based identification of gamma-irradiated frozen fish using different hydrolysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Akram, Kashif; Shahbaz, Hafiz Muhammad; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Frozen fish fillets (walleye Pollack and Japanese Spanish mackerel) were selected as samples for irradiation (0-10 kGy) detection trials using different hydrolysis methods. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL)-based screening analysis for gamma-irradiated frozen fillets showed low sensitivity due to limited silicate mineral contents on the samples. Same limitations were found in the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis on mineral samples isolated by density separation method. However, acid (HCl) and alkali (KOH) hydrolysis methods were effective in getting enough minerals to carry out TL analysis, which was reconfirmed through the normalization step by calculating the TL ratios (TL1/TL2). For improved electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis, alkali and enzyme (alcalase) hydrolysis methods were compared in separating minute-bone fractions. The enzymatic method provided more clear radiation-specific hydroxyapatite radicals than that of the alkaline method. Different hydrolysis methods could extend the application of TL and ESR techniques in identifying the irradiation history of frozen fish fillets.

  16. The application of Alanine/ESR dosimetry in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Lee, Byung Il [Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Alanine/Electron spin resonance(ESR) has been proven very effective tool which dosimetric characteristics is better suitable than generally used personnel dosimeter for long term dose estimation. L-α-alanine has unusual stability of radiation induced radicals. The fading is known as about 1% a year by IAEA technical documentary. It also has linear signal response on gamma rays over the wide range of dose quantity. Alanine is a kind of unnecessary amino acid in 20 amino acids. Estimation of the accumulated gamma dose is important to predict the life expectancy of cables. However, exact estimation of gamma dose at containment building of NPP is very difficult, because the variability of estimation value is apparently depending on the each installation position in containment building. Especially, some installation positions near reactor change extremely. So, the data from ESR measurement should be checked to the details on referring installation map and pictures.

  17. ESR of Gd3+ in magnetically ordered Eu2CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettori, C.; Oseroff, S.B.; Rao, D.; Valdivia, J.A.; Barberis, G.E.; Martins, G.B.; Sarrao, J.; Fisk, Z.; Tovar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments of Gd 3+ in the antiferromagnetic (AF) ordered phase (T N ) of Eu 2 CuO 4 can be interpreted in terms of four magnetically nonequivalent rare-earth sites with local internal fields H i =±310(30) Oe along the [100] and [010] directions. The internal field is well described by a dipolar magnetic field of a noncollinear AF array of 0.35(4) μ B per Cu moment aligned along the [100] and [010] directions. This is consistent with recent results of magnetic-field-dependent neutron-diffraction experiments. From the ESR and magnetic susceptibility data, the crystal field parameters for Gd 3+ and Eu 3+ in Eu 2 CuO 4 are determined. The exchange parameters between the rare earths are also estimated. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. High-resolution wave number spectrum using multi-point measurements in space – the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new analysis method is presented that provides a high-resolution power spectrum in a broad wave number domain based on multi-point measurements. The analysis technique is referred to as the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR and it benefits from Capon's minimum variance method for obtaining the proper power spectral density of the signal as well as the MUSIC algorithm (Multiple Signal Classification for considerably reducing the noise part in the spectrum. The mathematical foundation of the analysis method is presented and it is applied to synthetic data as well as Cluster observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Using the MSR technique for Cluster data we find a wave in the solar wind propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field with relatively small amplitude, which is not identified by the Capon spectrum. The Cluster data analysis shows the potential of the MSR technique for studying waves and turbulence using multi-point measurements.

  19. ULF hydromagnetic oscillations with the discrete spectrum as eigenmodes of MHD-resonator in the near-Earth part of the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mazur

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A new concept is proposed for the emergence of ULF geomagnetic oscillations with a discrete spectrum of frequencies (0.8, 1.3, 1.9, 2.6 ...mHz registered in the magnetosphere's midnight-morning sector. The concept relies on the assumption that these oscillations are MHD-resonator eigenmodes in the near-Earth plasma sheet. This magnetospheric area is where conditions are met for fast magnetosonic waves to be confined. The confinement is a result of the velocity values of fast magnetosonic waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet which differ greatly from those in the magnetotail lobes, leading to turning points forming in the tailward direction for the waves under study. To compute the eigenfrequency spectrum of such a resonator, we used a model magnetosphere with parabolic geometry. The fundamental harmonics of this resonator's eigenfrequencies are shown to be capable of being clustered into groups with average frequencies matching, with good accuracy, the frequencies of the observed oscillations. A possible explanation for the stability of the observed oscillation frequencies is that such a resonator might only form when the magnetosphere is in a certain unperturbed state.

  20. ULF hydromagnetic oscillations with the discrete spectrum as eigenmodes of MHD-resonator in the near-Earth part of the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mazur

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A new concept is proposed for the emergence of ULF geomagnetic oscillations with a discrete spectrum of frequencies (0.8, 1.3, 1.9, 2.6 ...mHz registered in the magnetosphere's midnight-morning sector. The concept relies on the assumption that these oscillations are MHD-resonator eigenmodes in the near-Earth plasma sheet. This magnetospheric area is where conditions are met for fast magnetosonic waves to be confined. The confinement is a result of the velocity values of fast magnetosonic waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet which differ greatly from those in the magnetotail lobes, leading to turning points forming in the tailward direction for the waves under study. To compute the eigenfrequency spectrum of such a resonator, we used a model magnetosphere with parabolic geometry. The fundamental harmonics of this resonator's eigenfrequencies are shown to be capable of being clustered into groups with average frequencies matching, with good accuracy, the frequencies of the observed oscillations. A possible explanation for the stability of the observed oscillation frequencies is that such a resonator might only form when the magnetosphere is in a certain unperturbed state.

  1. Electron spin resonance of Fe4+ in amethyst quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.T.

    1975-01-01

    The ESR spectrum of Fe 4+ was looked for in amethyst quartz. Besides saturated Fe 3+ lines, ESR lines of a new paramagnetic center whose spin-lattice relaxation time is relatively short were observed. They could be attributed to Fe 4+ [fr

  2. Electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasson, J.R.; Salinas, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Published literature concerning electron spin resonance (ESR) from July 1977 to July 1979 is reviewed. The 108 literature sources cited were chosen from literally thousands and are intended to serve as a guide to the current literature and to provide an eclectic selection of publications cited for their contributions to the advance and/or applications of ESR spectroscopy. 40 of the sources are reviews, and a table is included to indicate the topic(s) mainly covered in each review. Other divisions of the material reviewed are apparatus and spectral analysis, analytical applications, and selected paramagnetic materials

  3. Identification of irradiated mangoes by means of ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, M.E.; Romero, M.E.; Gutierrez, A.; Azorin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of mango varieties Tommy Atkins, Haiden and Ataulfo were irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation at doses in the range 0.15-1.0 kGy, and stored at room temperature for lapses of time up to 72 h. They were then studied by ESR spectrometry. Results show that the ESR signal of the irradiated samples is higher than that of the unirradiated samples, and this is found even at the minimum radiation dose of 0.15 kGy. The ESR signal remained stable during the storage time. The ESR signals obtained for hydroheated mangoes show insignificant differences with respect to the control samples. (author)

  4. Multi-frequency ESR studies on a Haldane magnet in a field-induced phase at ultra-low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Idutsu, Yuichi; Honda, Zentaro; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Harada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of multi-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements on single crystals of Ni(C 5 H 14 N 2 ) 2 N 3 (PF 6 ) which is regarded as the one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet with spin one, namely the Haldane magnet, at very low temperatures down to about 100 mK. We observed the lowest resonance branch below about 500 mK for the field along the chain direction (H||c), which was observed previously only in an inelastic neutron scattering experiment at 30 mK. We compare the resonance branch with that calculated by a phenomenological field theory, and discuss the field dependence and the temperature sensitivity of this ESR branch.

  5. Metal ion-organic compound for high sensitive ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, G.M.; Ikeya, Motoji

    2000-01-01

    A systematic study to find a tissue equivalent and high sensitive dosimeter material has been made to stimulate the field of ESR dosimetry. Lithium acetate dihydrate (Li-Ac·2H 2 O:CH 3 COOLi·2H 2 O) and lithium phosphate (Li-phosphate:Li 3 PO 4 ) were irradiated by γ-rays to study radicals with (ESR) in addition to magnesium lactate (Mg-lactate (CH 3 CH(OH)COO) 2 Mg) doped with nominal pure lithium lactate (Mg(Li)-lactate) and lithium lactate (CH 3 CH(OH)COOLi) doped with Mg-lactate (Li(Mg)-lactate). A triplet spectrum with intensity ratio of 1:2:1 in Li-Ac·2H 2 O was ascribed to acetate radical which has g=2.0031±0.0004 and hyperfine splitting of A/gβ=2.12±0.1 mT. The Li-phosphate spectrum shows splitting due to anisotropic g-factors of g par =2.0190±0.0005 and g perp =1.9974±0.0004. Quartet spectra with the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 in Mg(Li)-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate were ascribed to lactate radicals with g-factors of 2.0032 ± 0.0004 and 2.0029 ± 0.0004 and the intensity ratio of 1:3:3:1 and A/gβ=1.92±0.06 and 1.82 ± 0.06 mT, respectively. The response to γ-ray dose and the thermal stability as well as the effect of UV-illumination have been studied. The obtained number of free radicals per 100 eV (G-values) were 0.4 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.31, 1.35 ± 0.35 and 0.78 ± 0 for Li-Ac.2H 2 O, Li-phosphate, Mg(Li)-lactate, and Li(Mg)-lactate, respectively. The lifetimes were estimated from Arrhenius plots to be approximately 2.0 ± 0.6, 50.7 ± 20 and 10 ± 3.5 years for Li-phosphate, Mg(Li)-lactate and Li(Mg)-lactate, respectively. The lifetime for Li-Ac·2H 2 O cannot be estimated because of the decomposition by heating

  6. ESR Study of PE, HDPE and UHMWPE Irradiated with Ion Beams and Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Romero, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the Electron Spin Resonance (RES) studies on the effects produced by bombarding with accelerated Sulfur ions, Protons and Neutrons on the Polyethylene, PE, (Hostalen and Romanian), ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE, ( GUR 1050, medical grade Lennite), and high density polyethylene, HDPE, (HDPE-7000F, Polinter de Venezuela, PDVSA). The resonance spectra have been recorded using a Varian E-line-X ESR spectrometer at 100 KHz modulation frequency. In thin films of Polyethylene (Hostalen and UHMWPE) have been irradiated with Sulfur ions, S, accelerated at about 7 MeV/nucleons, and Protons at about 5 MeV/nucleons (IFIN, Romania). Samples of Polyethylene ( HDPE 7000-F) were irradiate with neutrons from a Pu-Be source (flux of 1.19 x 10 6 n/s. cm 2 , 5.65 MeV, IVIC, Venezuela) from 0 to 8 hours in the presence of air and at room temperature (RT). The ESR measurements were performed after a storage time of about 7 months, in air at room temperature. The nature of the free radicals induced by irradiation as well as the dependence of resonance line, resonance line shape and radicals concentration has been studied

  7. Use of the entire spectrum of irradiated alanine for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolo, J.M.; Moignau, F.

    2005-01-01

    Alanine is an amino acid commonly used in ESR dosimetry as a reference detector. The classic approach for the measurement of irradiated samples is to determine the amplitude of the central peak of the first derivative spectrum. It is generally considered that this technique represents the best and most reproducible solution for achieving an accurate proportionality between the concentration of free radicals inside the resonant cavity, characterized by the amplitude, and the dose. It is also accepted that this central peak corresponds to the free radical CH 3 .CHCOO - . The hyperfine structure of this radical in the spectrum shows five main peaks with the approximate ratios 1:4:6:4:1 as regards coupling. This paper presents another approach featuring analysis of the entire spectrum: (i) ratios of identified peaks (ii) ratio variation vs time with regard to several parameters affecting fading. These variations in the alanine spectrum are probably correlated with the variation of the concentrations of different free radical species. These variations and their positions in the spectrum are very important constraints that increase the uncertainty of this type of measurement

  8. Electron spin resonance for the detection of long-range spin nematic order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Shunsuke C.; Momoi, Tsutomu

    2018-03-01

    Spin nematic phase is a quantum magnetic phase characterized by a quadrupolar order parameter. Since the quadrupole operators are directly coupled to neither the magnetic field nor the neutron, currently, it is an important issue to develop a method for detecting the long-range spin nematic order. In this paper, we propose that electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements enable us to detect the long-range spin nematic order. We show that the frequency of the paramagnetic resonance peak in the ESR spectrum is shifted by the ferroquadrupolar order parameter together with other quantities. The ferroquadrupolar order parameter is extractable from the angular dependence of the frequency shift. In contrast, the antiferroquadrupolar order parameter is usually invisible in the frequency shift. Instead, the long-range antiferroquadrupolar order yields a characteristic resonance peak in the ESR spectrum, which we call a magnon-pair resonance peak. This resonance corresponds to the excitation of the bound magnon pair at the wave vector k =0 . Reflecting the condensation of bound magnon pairs, the field dependence of the magnon-pair resonance frequency shows a singular upturn at the saturation field. Moreover, the intensity of the magnon-pair resonance peak shows a characteristic angular dependence and it vanishes when the magnetic field is parallel to one of the axes that diagonalize the weak anisotropic interactions. We confirm these general properties of the magnon-pair resonance peak in the spin nematic phase by studying an S =1 bilinear-biquadratic model on the square lattice in the linear flavor-wave approximation. In addition, we argue applications to the S =1/2 frustrated ferromagnets and also the S =1/2 orthogonal dimer spin system SrCu2(BO3)2, both of which are candidate materials of spin nematics. Our theory for the antiferroquadrupolar ordered phase is consistent with many features of the magnon-pair resonance peak experimentally observed in the low

  9. Evidence of dithionite contribution to the low-frequency resonance Raman spectrum of reduced and mixed-valence cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, J A

    1992-02-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of deoxygenated solutions of mixed-valence cyanide-bound and fully reduced cytochrome oxidase derivatives that have been reduced in the presence of aqueous or solid sodium dithionite exhibit two new low-frequency lines centered at 474 and 590 cm-1. These lines were not observed when the reductant system was changed to a solution containing ascorbate and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). Under enzyme turnover conditions, the addition of dithionite to the reoxidized protein (the 428-nm or "oxygenated" form) increases the intensity of these lines, while reoxidation and rereduction of the enzyme in the presence of ascorbate/TMPD resulted in the absence of both lines. Our data suggest that both lines must have contributions from species formed from aqueous dithionite, presumably the SO2 species, since these two lines are also observed in the Raman spectrum of a solution of aqueous dithionite, but not in the spectrum of an ascorbate/TMPD solution. Since heme metal-ligand stretch vibrations are expected to appear in the low-frequency region from 215 to 670 cm-1, our results indicate that special care should be exercised during the interpretation of the cytochrome a3 resonance Raman spectrum.

  10. Time-resolved resonance raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in the lowest excited singlet state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; Langkilde, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrwn of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in its lowest excited S1 state excited in resonance with the S1 → Sn absorption band at 650 nm in non-polar solvents is reported. Three vibrational bands at 1572, 1481 and 1165 cm−1 are observed. A possible assignment of the the 1481 cm−...

  11. The discrimination of some dermal dischromias using the ESR and NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, Rodica; Saidel, Alice; Cristodulo, Tania; Saidel, M.

    1997-01-01

    The information provided by the electron spin resonance (ESR) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) seem to complete each other most of time. ESR is applied in biology, due to its significant sensitivity and selectivity in the detection of paramagnetic states of free radicals implied in many physiological processes. Many enzymatic systems, photosynthesis intermediates or electrons transporting chain species are paramagnetic. On the other hand, free radicals are involved in the protection against ionic radiation, in immunity reactions and pathological processes including the oncogenesis. ESR spectroscopy informs about the quantity, interactions and dynamics of paramagnetic centres of the systems through spectral parameters as: the intensity, the g factor, the form and the width of line, hyperfine splitting, etc. NAA allows simultaneous determination of the concentration of essential microelements in tissues involved in the major biological pathways. In the present work we have tested the possibility of using the ESR and NAA investigations techniques combined with the factorial statistic analysis of the data, in the aim to discriminate some dermal dischromias of human skin. Having in view that the hyper- and hipochromia are due to an excess and deficit in melanin, respectively, we used ESR to observe the radical species from the skin samples. We studied the skin samples that represent different dischromias (malign melanoma, epithelioma, pigmentary nevus, vitiligo) in comparison with normal skin. On the same samples we have determined by NAA the concentrations of elements (Cu, Na, Mg, Mn, and Al) which could be involved in the mechanisms of producing and releasing the melanin. The signal ESR intensities and widths and the NAA elemental concentration values of the skin samples have been processed by a STATCF program to develop differences between dischromic and normal skin. The signification level of the differences observed among the sample groups has been evaluated

  12. Status and outlook of the CRYRING@ESR project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, W., E-mail: w.geithner@gsi.de; Andelkovic, Z.; Beck, D.; Bräuning, H.; Bräuning-Demian, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Danared, H. [European Spallation Source ESS (Sweden); Dimopoulou, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Engström, M. [Fysikum, Stockholm University (Sweden); Fedotova, S.; Gorda, O.; Herfurth, F.; Hess, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Germany); Källberg, A. [Fysikum, Stockholm University (Sweden); Kleffner, C.; Kotovskiy, N.; Kraus, I.; Lestinsky, M.; Litvinov, S.; Nolden, F.; Reiter, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Germany); and others

    2017-11-15

    Once operational, CRYRING@ESR will store and decelerate ions delivered by the experimental storage ring ESR at energies well below those of ESR. In addition to that, CRYRING@ESR has an electron cooler operating with an ultracold electron beam, allowing to provide cooled ion beams for precision experiments. These ions will be delivered to a broad range of experiments presently in preparation; either in-ring or extracted to a dedicated beamline for experiments. An overview and status report of the installation and commissioning of the CRYRING-@ESR storage ring for highly charged ions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung is presented. The installation of this storage ring started in 2014 and was completing end of 2016, when this publication was written.

  13. Screening of irradiated food using ESR measurement of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Michiko; Yamazaki, Masao

    2005-01-01

    As paper has high content of cellulose, sensibility of ESR measurements of paper should be high. We examined stability of ESR signals in irradiated recycled copying paper, and estimated the possibility to utilize ESR measurement of paper for the detection of irradiated food. Cellulose radicals in paper irradiated at 1kGy and stored at 40degC in water was detected for 20 days. Cellulose radicals in irradiated paper stored at 90degC in water were more stable than that stored in air. ESR measurements of 50mg paper are simple and easy, so ESR measurement of rapping paper or corrugated box is good screening method for the detection of irradiated food. (author)

  14. Establishment of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1)-knockout medaka: ESR1 is dispensable for sexual development and reproduction in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Saki; Ogino, Yukiko; Lange, Anke; Myosho, Taijun; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hirano, Yu; Yamada, Gen; Sato, Tomomi; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Tyler, Charles R; Iguchi, Taisen; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2017-08-01

    Estrogens play fundamental roles in regulating reproductive activities and they act through estrogen receptor (ESR) in all vertebrates. Most vertebrates have two ESR subtypes (ESR1 and ESR2), whereas teleost fish have at least three (Esr1, Esr2a and Esr2b). Intricate functionalization has been suggested among the Esr subtypes, but to date, distinct roles of Esr have been characterized in only a limited number of species. Study of loss-of-function in animal models is a powerful tool for application to understanding vertebrate reproductive biology. In the current study, we established esr1 knockout (KO) medaka using a TALEN approach and examined the effects of Esr1 ablation. Unexpectedly, esr1 KO medaka did not show any significant defects in their gonadal development or in their sexual characteristics. Neither male or female esr1 KO medaka exhibited any significant changes in sexual differentiation or reproductive activity compared with wild type controls. Interestingly, however, estrogen-induced vitellogenin gene expression, an estrogen-responsive biomarker in fish, was limited in the liver of esr1 KO males. Our findings, in contrast to mammals, indicate that Esr1 is dispensable for normal development and reproduction in medaka. We thus provide an evidence for estrogen receptor functionalization between mammals and fish. Our findings will also benefit interpretation of studies into the toxicological effects of estrogenic chemicals in fish. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  15. ESR analysis of irradiated red peppers and commercial red peppers in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2011-01-01

    ESR analysis of γ-ray irradiated and being treated with different processing red pepper was studied. All the red peppers were commercial expect irradiated one. Processing treatment of red pepper was sun drying, mechanical processing (heating sterilization and powdering treatment). All the samples were weighted and analyzed. The ESR spectrum of the red pepper is composed of a singlet at g=2.00. This signal was originated from organic free radical. It is suggested the effect of heating treatment on the radical formation is not so large and powdering treatment will promote the radical formation of red pepper. ESR singlet signal of the irradiated red pepper showed the large signal intensity and the dose-dependence. The singlet signal intensity of irradiated powder sample showed the almost same value as compared with that of the powder sample with heating treatment. Relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) of the singlet signal were calculated. The relaxation behavior and relaxation times of the irradiated sample were different from that of the non-irradiated sample. The value of T 1 , the spin lattice relaxation time, of irradiated sample was increased and T 2 , the spin-spin relaxation time, of irradiated sample was decreased. We concluded that the radical formation of the red pepper is mainly depended on the powdering treatment and irradiation. (author)

  16. ESR modes in a Strong-Leg Ladder in the Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvyagin, S.; Ozerov, M.; Maksymenko, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Honecker, A.; Landee, C. P.; Turnbull, M.; Furuya, S. C.; Giamarchi, T.

    Magnetic excitations in the strong-leg quantum spin ladder compound (C7H10N)2CuBr4 (known as DIMPY) in the field-induced Tomonaga-Luttinger spin liquid phase are studied by means of high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The presence of a gapped ESR mode with unusual non-linear frequency-field dependence is revealed experimentally. Using a combination of analytic and exact diagonalization methods, we compute the dynamical structure factor and identify this mode with longitudinal excitations in the antisymmetric channel. We argue that these excitations constitute a fingerprint of the spin dynamics in a strong-leg spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladder and owe its ESR observability to the uniform Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. This work was partially supported by the DFG and Helmholtz Gemeinschaft (Germany), Swiss SNF under Division II, and ERC synergy UQUAM project. We acknowledge the support of the HLD at HZDR, member of the European Magnetic Field Laboratory (EMFL).

  17. TL and ESR based identification of gamma-irradiated frozen fish using different hydrolysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jae-Jun; Akram, Kashif; Shahbaz, Hafiz Muhammad; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Frozen fish fillets (walleye Pollack and Japanese Spanish mackerel) were selected as samples for irradiation (0–10 kGy) detection trials using different hydrolysis methods. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL)-based screening analysis for gamma-irradiated frozen fillets showed low sensitivity due to limited silicate mineral contents on the samples. Same limitations were found in the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis on mineral samples isolated by density separation method. However, acid (HCl) and alkali (KOH) hydrolysis methods were effective in getting enough minerals to carry out TL analysis, which was reconfirmed through the normalization step by calculating the TL ratios (TL 1 /TL 2 ). For improved electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis, alkali and enzyme (alcalase) hydrolysis methods were compared in separating minute-bone fractions. The enzymatic method provided more clear radiation-specific hydroxyapatite radicals than that of the alkaline method. Different hydrolysis methods could extend the application of TL and ESR techniques in identifying the irradiation history of frozen fish fillets. - Highlights: • Irradiation has potential to improve hygienic quality of raw and processed seafood. • Detection of irradiated food is important to enforce the applied regulations. • Different techniques were compared to separate silicate minerals from frozen fish. • Limitations were observed in TL analysis on minerals isolated by density separation. • Hydrolysis methods provided more clear identification using TL and ESR techniques

  18. In vivo dose evaluation during gynaecological radiotherapy using L-alanine/ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burg Rech, Amanda; Baffa, Oswaldo; Barbi, Gustavo Lazzaro; Almeida Ventura, Luiz Henrique; Silva Guimaraes, Flavio; Oliveira, Harley Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The dose delivered by in vivo 3-D external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was verified with L-alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry for patients diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. Measurements were performed with an X-band ESR spectrometer. Dosemeters were positioned inside the vaginal cavity with the assistance of an apparatus specially designed for this study. Previous phantom studies were performed using the same conditions as in the in vivo treatment. Four patients participated in this study during 20-irradiation sessions, giving 220 dosemeters to be analysed. The doses were determined with the treatment planning system, providing dose confirmation. The phantom study resulted in a deviation between -2.5 and 2.1 %, and for the in vivo study a deviation between -9.2 and 14.2 % was observed. In all cases, the use of alanine with ESR was effective for dose assessment, yielding results consistent with the values set forth in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reports. (authors)

  19. Quantifying the impact of µCT-scanning of human fossil teeth on ESR age results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Mathieu; Martín-Francés, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Fossil human teeth are nowadays systematically CT-scanned by palaeoanthropologists prior to any further analysis. It has been recently demonstrated that this noninvasive technique has, in most cases, virtually no influence on ancient DNA preservation. However, it may have nevertheless an impact on other techniques, like Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating, by artificially ageing the apparent age of the sample. To evaluate this impact, we µCT-scanned several modern enamel fragments following the standard analytical procedures employed by the Dental Anthropology Group at CENIEH, Spain, and then performed ESR dose reconstruction for each of them. The results of our experiment demonstrate that the systematic high-resolution µCT-scanning of fossil hominin remains introduces a nonnegligible X-ray dose into the tooth enamel, equivalent to 15-30 Gy depending on the parameters used. This dose may be multiplied by a factor of ∼8 if no metallic filter is used. However, this dose estimate cannot be universally extrapolated to any µCT-scan experiment but has instead to be specifically assessed for each device and set of parameters employed. The impact on the ESR age results is directly dependent on the magnitude of the geological dose measured in fossil enamel but could potentially lead to an age overestimation up to 40% in case of Late Pleistocene samples, if not taken into consideration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Insight on agglomerates of gold nanoparticles in glass based on surface plasmon resonance spectrum: study by multi-spheres T-matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, L. A.; Heinz, M.; Skidanenko, A. V.; Yablunovski, K. A.; Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Patzig, C.; Dubiel, M.; Bugaev, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrum of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles in the surface layer of silicate float glass, generated and implanted by UV ArF-excimer laser irradiation of a thin gold layer sputter-coated on the glass surface, was studied by the T-matrix method, which enables particle agglomeration to be taken into account. The experimental technique used is promising for the production of submicron patterns of plasmonic nanoparticles (given by laser masks or gratings) without damage to the glass surface. Analysis of the applicability of the multi-spheres T-matrix (MSTM) method to the studied material was performed through calculations of SPR characteristics for differently arranged and structured gold nanoparticles (gold nanoparticles in solution, particles pairs, and core-shell silver-gold nanoparticles) for which either experimental data or results of the modeling by other methods are available. For the studied gold nanoparticles in glass, it was revealed that the theoretical description of their SPR spectrum requires consideration of the plasmon coupling between particles, which can be done effectively by MSTM calculations. The obtained statistical distributions over particle sizes and over interparticle distances demonstrated the saturation behavior with respect to the number of particles under consideration, which enabled us to determine the effective aggregate of particles, sufficient to form the SPR spectrum. The suggested technique for the fitting of an experimental SPR spectrum of gold nanoparticles in glass by varying the geometrical parameters of the particles aggregate in the recurring calculations of spectrum by MSTM method enabled us to determine statistical characteristics of the aggregate: the average distance between particles, average size, and size distribution of the particles. The fitting strategy of the SPR spectrum presented here can be applied to nanoparticles of any nature and in various

  1. ESR Studies and Dating of Egyptian Gypsum at Ras Mala'ab, Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Monem, A. A.; Abdei-Razek, Y. A.; Rasheed, N. M.; Hassan, G.M.; Eissa, H.M.; El-Morsy, M.

    2007-01-01

    A gypsum sample from the famous gypsum-anhydrite evaporitic deposit composing the Ras Mala'ab Formation, Upper Miocene, occurring at Ras Mala'ab, on the east coast of the Gulf of Suez, was subjected to (ESR) dosimetric studies. Also, (ESR) was used to date the formation or most recent recrystallization of that gypsum. The gypsum derivative (ESR) spectrum is characterized by the large broad Fe 2+ signal (g=2.50) and HF-sixtet Mn 2+ signals. Only the characteristic gypsum signal (G l, g=2.0040) was detected between the third and fourth lines of the HF-Mn 2+ which is attributed to the electron-center SO 3 - . This signal was sensitive to artificial γ-irradiation and showed significant enhancement using a γ-dose of 550 Gy. Also, the signal was very stable up to 400 o C. The gypsum sample with a total dose (TD) of 1500 Gy, determined graphically by extrapolating the linear relationship between defect concentration and the artificial γ-doses for (G l, g=2.0040) and an annual dose (D) due to cosmic rays (0.3 mGy), yielded an age of 5.00 Ma. This could mean the age of formation or latest recrystallization of this gypsum deposit. The geologic age assignment of the Ras Mala'ab Group including the evaporitic gypsum unit, is Middle to Late Miocene. It is directly overlain by the Pliocene elastics at the locality of Ras Mala'ab. This might suggest that these evaporitic gypsum facies represent the top of the Miocene in the Gulf of Suez area, since the Miocene-Pliocene boundary is now put at 5.00-5.50 Ma ago. Therefore, the ESR age of the Ras Mala'ab gypsum is consistent with the geologic age assignment

  2. An electron spin resonance study of γ-ray irradiated pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Hamaya, Naruki; Ichii, Akane; Abe, Aika

    2003-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed four radical species in the irradiated pepper. The representative ESR spectrum of the pepper is composed of a sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at the same g-value, a singlet at g=4.0 and side peaks near g=2.0. The first one is attributable to a signal with hyperfine (hf) interactions of Mn 2+ ion (hf constant=7.4 mT). The second one is due to an organic free radical that may be induced by the (γ-ray irradiation. The third one may be originated from Fe 3+ ion in the non-hem proteins. Those three signals were found in the pepper sample before irradiation. The fourth signals were found at the symmetric position of the organic free radical, i.e., the second signal. The progressive saturation method of the ESR microwave power indicated quite different relaxation behaviors of those radicals. The method reflects four independent radical species in the irradiated pepper. Relaxation time for the singlet signal centered at g=2.0 revealed that the signal is due to the typical organic free radical. (author)

  3. ESR studies of radiation induced radical products from linoleic acid and linolenic acid and the radioprotective effect by α-tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Younan; Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Zhang Jiashan; Li Nianyun

    1993-01-01

    Primary radicals from the γ-radiolysis of air-saturated linoleic acid and linolenic acid at 77 K, and the subsequent secondary radicals appeared during the course of variable temperature elevation were investigated by ESR. The ESR spectrum from samples irradiated and observed at 77 K shows the presence of the radical anion doublet arise from the electron adducts of the carboxy groups and the poorly resolved broad singlet results from some carbon-centered radicals. Annealing to approximately 125 K which allows for molecular oxygen migration results in the formation of peroxyl radicals. At 247 K, the ESR spectrum is a multi-line pattern which is attributable to structure of the α-carbon radical superimposed on the pentadienyl radicals. The ESR spectra from linoleic acid-α-tocopherol and linolenic acid-α-tocopherol binary systems irradiated at 77 K and recorded at 140 K or 215 K revealed the characteristic similarity to that from α-tocopherol alone, no trace of ESR signal from either peroxyl or the composite pattern from superposition of pentadienyl radical and α-carbon radicals can be found out. Therefore α-tocopherol has exerted radioprotection effect on peroxidation of linoleic acid and linolenic acid

  4. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs. Detection par RPE d'aliments ionises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Physiologie Vegetale et Ecosystemes); Belliardo, J.J. (Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-04-01

    The conditions required to use Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) in identification of irradiated foods is first described. Then we present the results of an intercomparison sponsored by the Community Bureau of Reference involving 22 european laboratories. Qualitative identification of irradiated beef bones, dried grapes and papaya is very easy. Kinetical studies are necessary in case of fish species. Further researches are required in case of pistachio-nuts. Although all laboratories could distinguish between the two dose ranges used in case of meat bones (i.e. 1-3 and 7-10 kGy), there is an overlap of the results from the different laboratories. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  5. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs. Detection par RPE d'aliments ionises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Physiologie Vegetale et Ecosystemes; Belliardo, J J [Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium)

    1993-04-01

    The conditions required to use Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) in identification of irradiated foods is first described. Then we present the results of an intercomparison sponsored by the Community Bureau of Reference involving 22 european laboratories. Qualitative identification of irradiated beef bones, dried grapes and papaya is very easy. Kinetical studies are necessary in case of fish species. Further researches are required in case of pistachio-nuts. Although all laboratories could distinguish between the two dose ranges used in case of meat bones (i.e. 1-3 and 7-10 kGy), there is an overlap of the results from the different laboratories. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Quality assessment of coffee beans with ESR and gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeya, Motoji; Baffa, F.O.; Mascarenhas, Sergio

    1989-01-01

    Peroxy radical formation in raw coffee beans of different qualities and origins from all over the world has been studied with electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis. The γ-ray equivalent absorbed dose (ED) which creates the same concentration of radicals is obtained by the additive γ-ray irradiation of the coffee beans. The ED and the cup quality is somewhat inversely related suggesting that the peroxidation of the unsaturated fatty acid is somewhat indicative of the degree of the aromatic decomposition and rancidity. (author)

  7. Electron cooling experiments at the ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.; Beller, P.; Beckert, K.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of electron cooled beams of highly charged ions have been studied at the ESR. New experiments using a beam scraper to determine the transverse beam size provide the beam parameters in the intrabeam scattering dominated intensity regime, but also at very low intensity when the ion beam enters into an ultra-cold state. Extremely low values of longitudinal and transverse beam temperature on the order of meV were achieved for less than 1000 stored ions. An experiment with bunched ultra-cold beam showed a limit of the line density which agrees with the one observed for coasting beams. Cooling of decelerated ions at a minimum energy of 3 MeV/u has been demonstrated recently

  8. Cooled heavy ion beams at the ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, M.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Klepper, O.; Nolden, F.; Reich, H.; Schlitt, B.; Spaedtke, P.; Winkler, T.

    1996-01-01

    The storage ring ESR has been used in various operational modes for experiments with electron cooled heavy ion beams. Besides the standard storage mode including injection and beam accumulation the deceleration of highly charged ions has been demonstrated. Beams of highly charged ions have been injected and accumulated and finally decelerated to a minimum energy of 50 MeV/u. An ultraslow extraction method using charge changing processes is now also available for cooled beams of highly charged ions. For in ring experiments the internal gas jet and the cold electron beam of the cooling system are applied as targets. High precision mass spectrometry by Schottky noise detection has been demonstrated. Operation at transition energy has been achieved with cooled beams opening the field for experiments which require an isochronous revolution of the ions. (orig.)

  9. Criticality accident dosimetry with ESR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, F; Fattibene, P; Onori, S; Pantaloni, M

    1996-01-01

    The suitability of the ESR alanine and sugar detectors for criticality accident dosimetry was experimentally investigated during an intercomparison of dosimetry techniques. Tests were performed irradiating detectors both free-in-air and on-phantom during controlled critcality excursions at the SILENE reactor in Valduc, France. Several grays of absorbed dose were imparted in neutron gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions. Analysed results confirmed the potential of these systems which can immediately provide an acute dose assessment with an average underestimate of 30%in the various fields. This performance allows for the screening of severely exposed individuals and meets the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of accident absorbed doses.

  10. Computation of ESR spectra from the time evolution of the magnetization : Comparison of autocorrelation and Wiener-Khinchin-relation-based methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroki; De Raedt, Hans; Bertaina, Sylvain; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of finite temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra for concrete specified crystal configurations is a very important issue in the study of quantum spin systems. Although direct evaluation of the Kubo formula by means of numerical diagonalization yields exact results, memory

  11. Detection of irradiated ingredients included in low quantity in non-irradiated food matrix. 2. ESR analysis of mechanically recovered poultry meat and TL analysis of spices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchioni, Eric; Horvatovich, Péter; Charon, Helène; Kuntz, Florent

    2005-01-01

    Protocols EN 1786 and EN 1788 for the detection of irradiated food by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) were not conceived for the detection of irradiated ingredients included in low concentration in nonirradiated food. An enzymatic hydrolysis method, realized at

  12. Detection of irradiated ingredients included in low quantity in non-irradiated food matrix. 1. Extraction and ESR analysis of bones from mechanically recovered poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchioni, Eric; Horvatovich, Péter; Charon, Helène; Kuntz, Florent

    2005-01-01

    Protocol EN 1786 for the detection of irradiated food by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was not conceived for the detection of irradiated bone-containing ingredients included in low concentration in non-irradiated food. An enzymatic hydrolysis method, realized at 55 degrees C, has been

  13. Assessment of the lower ESR dating range in Greek speleothems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiakos, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Pilot ESR dating studies on geologically young calcitic sinters were carried out, aiming at assessment of the lower ESR dating range in characteristic Greek speleoenvironments. Five stalactites were dated, coming from an ancient mining gallery, idle for the last 2,500 years, found on Siphnos island (Aegean). The calculated ages range between 1,7-2,0 ka. Medium to low measured external dose rates (aprox. 900 μGy/a) and very low measured radioelement concentration in samples are very usual in the Mediterranean environments. The study concludes that ESR dating of speleothems younger than two millenia is practically unattainable. Some geoarchaeological implications of the obtained ages are discussed. (author)

  14. Radicals in DNA as seen by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, M.C.R.

    1997-01-01

    This is a review of ESR studies, mainly of DNA systems, after exposure to ionising radiation at low temperatures. Under this conditions 'direct' damage is of major significance, and ESR evidence for the concept of the initial formation of electron-gain and electron-loss centers localised within DNA bases, and deeply trapped by proton-gain and loss, will be discussed. It is stressed that 'negative' evidence, showing that various phosphate and sugar centred radicals are not detected, is of major importance since the ESR 'fingerprints' of base-radicals are relatively ill defined. (author)

  15. ESR spectroscopy of blood serum in thalassemia: discrimination of iron overload severity in deferoxamine-cured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Schianchi, G.; Giori, D.C.; Pedrazzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron impairments in homozygous β-thalassemia include iron overload syndrome, partially prevented by deferoxamine (DF) and methemalbumin (MHA) in serum. The latter has been studied by electron spin resonance ESR before the clinical use of DF and recently in DF cured subjects. We monitored by X-band ESR at 163 K, the Fe (III) bound in MHA and transferrin (Tf) in serum from transfused, DF-cured patients. Plotting MHA/Tf versus individual DF dose divided the patients into two subgroups, A and B; A with the two variables correlated linearly and B presenting no correlation. The patients in B presented a higher incidence and severity of clinical complications and lower therapy responsiveness as compared to subjects in A. The ratio MHA/Tf evidenced a quadratic dependence on the mass of transfused erythrocytes (TE) in A, and no regularity in B. Similar patterns appeared in plots of ferritin (FT) and hemoglobin (Hb) vs. DF and TE, but all correlation become visible only after A vs. B discrimination by ESR. The results point to a heavier iron overload in B than in A patients, suggesting different Hb degradation pathways in the two subgroups with more toxic 'free' iron produced in B than in A. Therefore, ESR of serum might serve for improving the precision of diagnosis, for prognosis of dissimilar therapeutic efficiency of DF in patients and for monitoring the long-term efficiency of therapy in homozygous β-thalassemia. (authors)

  16. Suitability of thermoluminescence, chemiluminescence, ESR and viscosity measurements as detection method for the irradiation of medicinal herbs; Eignung von Thermolumineszenz-, Chemilumineszenz-, ESR- und Viskositaetsmessungen zur Identifizierung strahlenbehandelter Arzneidrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C.; Gebhardt, G.; Stock, A.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Chemiluminescence, electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity measurements have been investigated for their suitability as detection method for the irradiation of the medicinal herbs anise seeds (anisi fructus), valerian roots (valerianae radix), redberry leaves (uvae ursi folium), birch leaves (betulae folium), greek hay seeds (foenugraeci semen), cayenne pepper (capsici fructus acer), black-aldertee bark (frangulae cortex), fennel fruits (feoniculi fructus), rose hip shells (cynosbati fructus), coltsfoot (farfarae folium), acorus roots (calami rhizoma), chamomile flowers (matricariae flos), caraway (carvi fructus), lavender flowers (lavandulae flos), linseed (lini semen), lime tree flowers (tiliae flos), St. Mary`s thistle fruit (cardui mariae herba), lemon balm (melissae folium), java tea (orthosiphonis folium), peppermint (menthae piperitae folium), sage leaves (salviae folium), scouring rush (equiseti herba), senna leaves (sennae folium), plantain herbs (plantaginis lanceolata herba), thyme herbs (thymi herba), juniper berries (juniperi fructus), hawthorne herbs (crataegi folium), wheat starch (amylum tritici) and wormwood (absinthii herba). Depending on the herbs, the methods used were more or less suitable. Chemiluminescence measurements showed the smallest differences between untreated and irradiated samples whereas thermoluminescence measurements on isolated minerals from the vegetable drugs gave better results. In some herbs radiation-specific radicals could be identified by ESR spectroscopy. Viscosity measurement is suitable for some herbs as fast and inexpensive method for screening. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Eignung von Chemilumineszenz-, ESR-, Thermolumineszenz- und Viskositaetsmessungen als Nachweismethode fuer die Behandlung von Arzneidrogen mit ionisierenden Strahlen wurde an Anis, Baldrianwurzel, Baerentraubenblaettern, Birkenblaettern, Bockshornsamen, Cayennepfeffer, Faulbaumrinde, Fenchel, Hagebuttenschalen, Huflattichblaettern

  17. Ribavirin restores ESR1 gene expression and tamoxifen sensitivity in ESR1 negative breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sappok Anne

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor growth is estrogen independent in approximately one-third of all breast cancers, which makes these patients unresponsive to hormonal treatment. This unresponsiveness to hormonal treatment may be explained through the absence of the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1. The ESR1 gene re-expression through epigenetic modulators such as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and/or histone deacetylase inhibitors restores tamoxifen sensitivity in ESR1 negative breast cancer cell lines and opens new treatment horizons in patients who were previously associated with a poor prognosis. In the study presented herein, we tested the ability of ribavirin, which shares some structural similarities with the DNA-methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine and which is widely known as an anti-viral agent in the treatment of hepatitis C, to restore ESR1 gene re-expression in ESR1 negative breast cancer cell lines. In our study we identified ribavirin to restore ESR1 gene re-expression alone and even more in combination with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA - up to 276 fold induction. Ribavirin and analogs could pave the way to novel translational research projects that aim to restore ESR1 gene re-expression and thus the susceptibility to tamoxifen-based endocrine treatment strategies.

  18. Status report of the ESR/alanine project of the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girzikowsky, R.

    1990-01-01

    The main tasks of the Dosimetry Laboratory of the IAEA are in the field of therapy-level dosimetry. Other dose ranges, i.e. protection-level standardization and calibration, are partly covered, too. On high-dose level the laboratory has been offering a Fricke-dosimetry service to Member States on request since 1965. In 1985 the Dosimetry Section has initiated an International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS). This service is an important part of the Agency's high-dose standardization programme and is based on Electron-Spin-Resonance (ESR) analysis of radiation-induced free radicals in alanine. This ESR/alanine dosimetry system was initially developed for high-dose application by GSF/Munich as the Agency's outside contractor. Although efforts were undertaken to equip the Agency Laboratory with an ESR analyzer since 1984, the purchase of an adequate unit was postponed until the end of 1988. From the date of establishment of the IDAS programme until today, the handling of all technical aspects, i.e. dosimeter production and evaluation was and is carried out by GSP/Munich under IAEA contract. As mentioned above, the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory is in possession of its own ESR analyzer since December 1988. It was then installed in May 1989. Only one staff member of the laboratory was assigned to this project. He made himself acquainted with the analyzer, the measuring technique, and the application of alanine as dosimeter material. The ESR spectrometric analyzer is a CW ESR type ESP 300 manufactured by Bruker GmbH/FRG. It consists of a 9''/2,7 kW magnet, an X-band microwave bridge, a field regulator unit, a signal channel unit and a data system ESP 1620 based on the 68020 CPU. The probe material selected for measurement of concentration of radiation-induced free radicals is L-Alanine. This amino acid is a suitable material for transfer dosimeters due to its properties, i.e. wide sensitivity range (10 Gy to 100 kGy), energy independence for high-energy photons and electron

  19. Vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle at room temperature: picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, L.; Jäger, F.; Popp, A.; Atkinson, G. H.

    1996-12-01

    The vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate, thought to contribute significantly to the energy storage and transduction mechanism in the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle, is measured at room temperature using picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS). The room-temperature BR photocycle is initiated by the 3 ps, 570 nm excitation of the ground-state species, BR-570, prepared in both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR. PTR/CARS data, recorded 50 ps after BR-570 excitation, at which time only BR-570 and K-590 are present, have an excellent S/N which provides a significantly more detailed view of the K-590 vibrational degrees of freedom than previously available. Two picosecond (6 ps FWHM) laser pulses, ω1 (633.4 nm) and ωS (675-700 nm), are used to record PTR/CARS data via electronic resonance enhancement in both BR-570 and K-590, each of which contains a distinct retinal structure (assigned as 13- rans, 15- anti, 13- cis, respectively). To obtain the vibrational spectrum of K-590 separately, the PTR/CARS spectra from the mixture of isomeric retinals is quantitatively analyzed in terms of third-order susceptibility ( η(3)) relationships. PTR/CARS spectra of K-590 recorded from both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR are compared with the analogous vibrational data obtained via spontaneous resonance Raman (RR) scattering at both low (77 K) and room temperature. Analyses of these vibrational spectra identify temperature-dependent effects and changes assignable to the substitution of deuterium at the Schiff-base nitrogen not previously reported.

  20. Landau Quasi-energy Spectrum Destruction for an Electron in Both a Static Magnetic Field and a Resonant Electromagnetic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Free nonrelativistic electrons in both a static magnetic field and an electromagnetic wave are considered. A plane-polarized wave propagates along a magnetic field, its frequency is close to the electron rotation frequency in a magnetic field. Electron spin is taken into account. An electron quasi energy spectrum and steady states (quasi energy states) are constructed. 6 refs

  1. Role of scattering processes in spectrum formation of multi-quantum resonant fluorescence of a hydrogen-like system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepelitsa, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The two-level system with degenerated excitation state, interacting with a coherent electromagnetic field, is considered. It is shown that the fluorescence spectrum consists of the multitude of Mollow triplets. The intensities of components of each triplet are the nonlinear functions of the electromagnetic field intensity. 11 refs

  2. Influence of manganese concentration on the electron magnetic resonance spectrum of Mn{sup 2+} in CdO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-10-19

    Electron magnetic resonance spectra of manganese-doped cadmium oxide (CdO) have been studied at room temperature for Mn concentrations between 0.10 and 1.00 mol%. The results suggest that the range of the exchange interaction between Mn{sup 2+} ions is about 0.56 nm.

  3. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR): MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR); p. 267– ...

  4. Study on identification of irradiated food containing cellulose by ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Xiaojuan; Dou Daying; Xu Gang; Jiao Zheng; Wang Jia; Zheng Jianfei; Jiao Zheng; Wu Minghong; Ding Guoji

    2008-01-01

    The fast development and application of food irradiation technology signify the necessity and urgency to research on effective detection method for irradiated food. In this paper, we report a preliminary study in this area with dried chili powder, peanuts and strawberry seeds. The food samples were irradiated to 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy by 60 Co gamma rays. The relation between ESR intensity and irradiation dose, and correlation R 2 , were studied. The results showed that the ESR signal intensity is positively related with the dose. ESR intensity of the strawberry increased the slowest with the dose, and the chili powder had the most accurate calculation. Accurate dose-effect curves, however, require repeating tests and further studies are needed to verify the ESR results. (authors)

  5. ESR and TL age determination of caliche nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezer, A.M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Wieser, A.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Mueller, P.; Regulla, D.F. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz); Erol, O. (Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). School of Geography and Marine Sciences)

    1989-01-01

    Feasibility of dating caliche nodules by ESR and TL is investigated. For both methods the properties of the dating signal are described. Chemical composition as well as TL glow curves of caliches originating from different localities exhibit some differences. Due to the complexity of the TL glow curves, some samples required a special post-annealing procedure in order to resolve the main TL peak for age determination. Typical ESR calcite signals do not exist in caliche, therefore usefulness of the g=2.0040 ESR signal is studied. The results of TL and ESR ages are found to be compatible except for two samples. Possible causes of the discrepancy in these samples are discussed. It is shown that, with proper treatment of the radiation-induced signals, it was possible to date caliche formations older than 350 ka, which is not achievable with other methods like uranium series disequilibrium and/or radiocarbon dating. (author).

  6. ESR and TL age determination of caliche nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezer, A.M.; Wieser, A.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Mueller, P.; Regulla, D.F.; Erol, O.

    1989-01-01

    Feasibility of dating caliche nodules by ESR and TL is investigated. For both methods the properties of the dating signal are described. Chemical composition as well as TL glow curves of caliches originating from different localities exhibit some differences. Due to the complexity of the TL glow curves, some samples required a special post-annealing procedure in order to resolve the main TL peak for age determination. Typical ESR calcite signals do not exist in caliche, therefore usefulness of the g=2.0040 ESR signal is studied. The results of TL and ESR ages are found to be compatible except for two samples. Possible causes of the discrepancy in these samples are discussed. It is shown that, with proper treatment of the radiation-induced signals, it was possible to date caliche formations older than 350 ka, which is not achievable with other methods like uranium series disequilibrium and/or radiocarbon dating. (author)

  7. HPLC-ESR techniques for detection of complex trapped radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Tiecheng; Dong Jirong; Lin Nianyun; Xie Leidong; Liu Rengzhong

    1992-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ESR combined examination of radical species is an advanced techniques for separation and identification of complex radical species. At SRCL, Waters 990 HPLC has been used to separate the complex trapped radicals and Varian E-112 ESR spectrometer to record the spectra of single trapped radicals after HPLC separation. The advantages of the combined techniques are described as bellow: HPLC is used to separate the long-lived complex trapped radicals derived from reaction of short-lived radicals with spin trap. ESR spectra from single trapped radicals, obtained following HPLC separation of complex trapped radicals, are recorded one by one and well resolved. The structures of short-lived radicals can be inferred from the ESR spectra of the long-lived trapped radicals

  8. The effect of processing treatments on the radiation-induced ESR signal in the cuticle of irradiated Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.M.; Stevenson, M.H.; Gray, R.; McMurray, C.H.

    1993-01-01

    Cooked, frozen or chilled whole tails of Norway lobster were either not irradiated or given doses of 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 kGy using cobalt 60 source. The cuticle was removed, freeze-dried and ground before determination of the free radical concentration using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ESR signal strength increased linearly with increasing irradiation dose. In comparison to the chilled samples, cooking before irradiation significantly increased (69%) signal intensity whereas cooking after irradiation decreased (27%) signal strength. Irradiating the samples in the frozen state did not significantly alter the free radical concentration in the cuticle. (author)

  9. Primary Angiitis of the Central Nervous System: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectrum of Parenchymal, Meningeal, and Vascular Lesions at Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Grégoire; de Boysson, Hubert; Zuber, Mathieu; Guillevin, Loïc; Meary, Eric; Costalat, Vincent; Pagnoux, Christian; Naggara, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system remains challenging. To report an overview and pictorial review of brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system and to determine the distribution of parenchymal, meningeal, and vascular lesions in a large multicentric cohort. Adult patients from the French COVAC cohort (Cohort of Patients With Primary Vasculitis of the Central Nervous System), with biopsy or angiographically proven primary angiitis of the central nervous system and brain magnetic resonance imaging available at the time of diagnosis were included. A systematic imaging review was performed blinded to clinical data. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 45 years (±12.9). Patients initially presented focal deficit(s) (83%), headaches (53%), cognitive disorder (40%), and seizures (38.3%). The most common magnetic resonance imaging finding observed in 42% of patients was multiterritorial, bilateral, distal acute stroke lesions after small to medium artery distribution, with a predominant carotid circulation distribution. Hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hemorrhages were also frequently found in the cohort (55%). Acute convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage was found in 26% of patients and 42% demonstrated pre-eminent leptomeningeal enhancement, which is found to be significantly more prevalent in biopsy-proven patients (60% versus 28%; P =0.04). Seven patients had tumor-like presentations. Seventy-seven percent of magnetic resonance angiographic studies were abnormal, revealing proximal/distal stenoses in 57% and 61% of patients, respectively. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system is a heterogenous disease, with multiterritorial, distal, and bilateral acute stroke being the most common pattern of parenchymal lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings suggest a higher than previously thought prevalence of hemorrhagic transformation and other hemorrhagic

  10. Investigations of structure, bonding, and reactions of radiation-induced free radicals in the solid state using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been used to study the structure, bonding, and reactions of several types of free radicals produced by γ irradiation of solids at 77K. Well-defined spectral patterns and the use of photolysis and annealing treatments assisted the analyses and interpretations. The radical anion BF 3 - was generated and identified unequivocally in a matrix of tetramethylsilane at 77K. Both the ESR data and theoretical calculations support a pyramidal structure with a bond angle of about 110 0 . The present experiments showed that BF 3 - has ESR parameters consistent with those of the isoelectronic radicals CF 3 , NF 3 + , and F 2 NO. γ irradiation of polycrystalline trimethyl borate at 77K gave an ESR spectrum which was assigned to the dimer radical anion [(MeO) 3 B.B(OMe) 3 ] - . Radical anions of dialkyl carbonates were observed for the first time and found to undergo a β-scission reaction to produce alkyl radicals. This free radical reaction is unusual in that it proceeds both thermally and photochemically. For the dimethyl carbonate radical anion, 13 C parameters were obtained from a 13 C enriched sample. The photolysis of trapped radicals in γ irradiated carboxylic esters, RC(O)OR', was studied by ESR spectroscopy and two different reactions were characterized. Two hypervalent silicon radical anions were prepared and examined in SI(OCH 3 ) 4 . The results of the present work thus represent the first complete sets of data on the silicon 3s and 3p spin densities for such species. The first PL 3 - radical anion was prepared by the γ irradiation of crystalline trimethylphosphite, and identified through its photolysis reactions and from the results of radiation chemical experiments

  11. Lactose and ''tris'' lyoluminescence dosimetry systems and ESR correlation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oommen, I.K.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Sengupta, S.; Rao, T.K.G.; Ravikumar, M.

    1989-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) dosimeters have been developed using lactose monohydrate (disaccharide) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (''Tris'') systems and attempts have been made to understand the LL mechanism through ESR correlation studies. Tris LL dosimeter has a γ-ray sensitivity with a linear response in the absorbed-dose range 0.05-200 Gy (5-2 x 10 4 rad), while the lactose response extends to a higher range from 1 to 10 4 Gy (10 2 -10 6 rad). The LL output of lactose and Tris did not show any appreciable decay for a period of 6 months after irradiation. ESR measurements show that free-radical concentration in both the systems increases with γ-ray dose in the range 10 2 -10 5 Gy. The minimum dose required to measure the radiation-induced ESR signal for Tris is ∼ 500 Gy, the dose at which the LL output saturates, while lactose shows a radiation-induced ESR signal right at the minimum dose where LL could be detected. The estimated spin density on the radical carbon atom is 0.7. ESR signal stabilities of lactose and Tris were also studied. Lactose did not show any appreciable ESR decay for a period of 3 months after irradiation, while, for Tris, one of the radicals showed a decay of 45% for the same period. (author)

  12. Basic ESR studies on recent corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Ralf; Barabas, Michael; Mangini, Augusto

    Experiments on recent corals ( Acropora palmata, Barbados) were carried out to study the dating relevant properties of the characteristic ESR signals. Highly resolved signal growth curves (55 aliquots of a sieve fraction 125-250 μm) were obtained by γ-irradiation in small steps up to 20 kGy. The signal growth curve of the 'dating signal' at g = 2.0006 can only be approximated by a single exponential saturation function in a certain dose range. Thus, ADs derived with this function tend to be overestimated. A better analytical description by two different functions was tested. Isothermal annealing experiments were carried out at various temperatures before and after irradiation with a definite γ-dose respectively. The thermal decay of the dating signal is not 1st order. Furthermore, the decay process is strongly influenced by the decay of the traps themselves. The behaviour of the signals at g = 2.0057 and g = 2.0031 was compared with that of the dating signal. A surprising result was the growth of the signal at g = 2.0057 with γ-irradiation.

  13. ESR investigation of radicals formed in γ-irradiated vinylidene fluoride based copolymer: P(VDF-co-HFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, Ludovic; Albela, Belén; Bonneviot, Laurent; Portinha, Daniel; Fleury, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Samples of copolymer based on vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropene P(VDF-co-HFP) were exposed to γ-radiation performed under an inert atmosphere and the total amount of radicals was quantified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). An in-depth study of recorded ESR spectra allowed the identification of several types of radical species formed during radiolysis. Starting from an ESR simulation model established for irradiated PVDF, seven radical species have been identified in the case of P(VDF-co-HFP): five of them are related to the VDF units while the two others are derived from the HFP unit. The model used to simulate the complex superimposed ESR signals is presented. The proportions of each species are discussed and correlated to the amount of HFP units contained in the copolymer, and to the stability of each species depending on their local environment. Furthermore, the evolution of radical density with radiation dose and the decay resulting from annealing at a given temperature are presented. Corresponding spectral evolution shows the progressive predominance of most stable species. - Highlights: ► ESR signal of γ-irradiated P(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) containing 6 wt% of hexafluoropropene is modeled. ► The formation of seven major radical species is proposed for the first time. ► Despite a low comonomer content, 43% of radicals are localized on hexafluoropropene. ► Effect of dose and annealing highlight radical stability. ► Radical stability is found to depend on both chemical environment and chain location

  14. A point of view about identification of irradiated foods by electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Lebe, L.; Raffi, J.

    1986-11-01

    Principles and conditions required for using electron spin resonance (ESR) in identifying irradiated foods are first put forth. After a literature review, examples of irradiated cereals and French prunes are described in order to derive general conclusions concerning the future of ESR in this field

  15. Thermal behavior of organic free radicals in γ-ray irradiated pepper studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichii, Akane; Abe, Aika; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2003-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed heating effects on irradiated pepper. The representative ESR spectrum of the irradiated pepper is consisted of four components a sextet centered at g=2.0, a singlet at the same g-value, a singlet at g=4.0 and side peaks near g=2.0. The first one is attributable to a signal with hyperfine (hf) interactions of Mn 2+ (hf constant=7.4 mT). The second one is due to an organic free radical that is induced by the γ-ray irradiation. The third one may originated from Fe 3+ in the nonhem proteins. The fourth signal was found at the symmetric positions of the organic free radical, i.e., the second signal. Upon heating, the forth signals decreased monotonicaly. The ESR signal of the pepper heated for more than 10 min was essentially the same as that before the irradiation. On the other hand, the second signal increased and then leveled off at a constant value by further heating. This is indicative the occurrence of some biochemical reactions such as Maillard reaction during heating procedures. (author)

  16. Measurement of electron paramagnetic resonance using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuki, Kohei; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori

    2011-12-05

    We present a frequency-domain electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement system using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. A crossed polarizer technique is utilized to increase the sensitivity in detecting weak ESR signals of paramagnets caused by magnetic dipole transitions between magnetic sublevels. We demonstrate the measurements of ESR signal of paramagnetic copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate with uniaxial anisotropy of the g-factor under magnetic fields up to 10 T. The lineshape of the obtained ESR signals agrees well with the theoretical predictions for a powder sample with the uniaxial anisotropy.

  17. Mitochondrial NAD(PH in vivo: identifying natural indicators of oxidative phosphorylation in the 31P magnetic resonance spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eConley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural indicators provide intrinsic probes of metabolism, biogenesis and oxidative protection. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolites (NAD(P are one class of indicators that have roles as co-factors in oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and anti-oxidant protection, as well as signaling in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. These many roles are made possible by the distinct redox states (NAD(P+ and NAD(PH, which are compartmentalized between cell and mitochondria. Here we provide evidence for detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in separate mitochondrial and cell pools in vivo in human tissue by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS. These NAD(P pools are identified by chemical standards (NAD+, NADP+ and NADH and by physiological tests. A unique resonance reflecting mitochondrial NAD(PH is revealed by the changes elicited by elevation of mitochondrial oxidation. The decline of NAD(PH with oxidation is matched by a stoichiometric rise in the NAD(P+ peak. This unique resonance also provides a measure of the improvement in mitochondrial oxidation that parallels the greater phosphorylation found after exercise training in these elderly subjects. The implication is that the dynamics of the mitochondrial NAD(PH peak provides an intrinsic probe of the reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in elderly muscle. Thus non-invasive detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in cell vs. mitochondria yield natural indicators of redox compartmentalization and sensitive intrinsic probes of the improvement of mitochondrial function with an intervention in human tissues in vivo. These natural indicators hold the promise of providing mechanistic insight into metabolism and mitochondrial function in vivo in a range of tissues in health, disease and with treatment.

  18. Spectrum of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Murakami, Koji; Kaji, Yasushi; Kita, Masato; Suzuki, Kayo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a variety of benign, malignant, and borderline malignant ovarian tumors. It is advantageous to become familiar with the wide variety of FDG-PET/CT findings of this entity. Benign ovarian tumors generally have faint uptake, whereas endometriomas, fibromas, and teratomas show mild to moderate uptake. Malignant ovarian tumors generally have intense uptake, whereas tumors with a small solid component often show minimal uptake.

  19. U-Th/ESR combined dating of faunal remains from the Mousterian open site of Beauvais (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, V.; Masaoudi, H.; Falgueres, Ch.; Yokoyama, Y.; Locht, J.L.; Antoine, P.

    1999-01-01

    Faunal remains from the Beauvais open site 'La Justice' (Oise) are the subject of an U-Th dating (disequilibrium of the uranium chain) and an ESR dating (electronic spin resonance). This study was performed in order to identify the chronological situation of the Middle Paleolithic levels of this site located in the north of France, supposedly aged stage 4 after stratigraphic correlations. U-Th ages of bones and dentine are between 20 and 200 ka and are scattered; however, the combined ESR/U-Th ages of rhinoceros dental enamels are homogeneous and indicate that the archaeological levels were deposited between 60 to 40 ka. This period corresponds to the end of the oxygen isotopic stage 4 to the beginning of stage 3. (authors) stage 3. (authors)

  20. Observation of ESR spin flip satellite lines of trapped hydrogen atoms in solid H2 at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Iwata, Nobuchika; Fueki, Kenji; Hase, Hirotomo

    1990-01-01

    ESR spectra of H atoms, produced in γ-irradiated solid H 2 , were studied at 4.2 K. Two main lines of the ESR spectra of H atoms that are separated by about 500 G accompanied two weak satellite lines. Both satellite lines and main lines decrease with the same decay rate. In the D 2 -H 2 mixtures, the satellite-line intensity depends upon the number of matrix protons. The spacing of the satellites from the main lines is equal to that of the NMR proton resonance frequency. It was concluded that the satellite lines were not ascribable to paired atoms but to spin flip lines due to an interaction of H atoms with matrix protons. The analysis of the spin flip lines and the main lines suggests that H atoms in solid H 2 are trapped in the substitutional site

  1. Contrasts between the vibronic contributions in the tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl)osmium(II) emission spectrum and the implications of resonance-Raman parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondongo, Onduru S; Endicott, John F

    2009-04-06

    The emission spectrum of the tris-(2,2'-bipyridine)osmium(II) metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited-state frozen solution at 77 K differs qualitatively from that expected based on its reported resonance-Raman (rR) parameters in that (1) the dominant vibronic contributions to the emission spectrum are in the low frequency regime (corresponding to nuclear displacements in largely to metal-ligand vibrational modes) and these contributions are negligible in the rR; and (2) the amplitude of the emission sideband components that correspond to envelopes of largely bpy centered vibrational modes is about 40% of that expected (relative to the amplitude observed for the band origin) for a simple vibronic progression in these modes. The distortions in low frequency vibrational modes are attributable to configurational mixing between metal centered (LF) and MLCT excited states, and the small amplitudes of the bpy-mode vibronic components may be a consequence of some intrinsic differences of the distortions of the (3)MLCT and (1)MLCT excited states such as the zero-field splitting of the (3)MLCT excited state and the different distortions of these excited-state components.

  2. A prominent lactate peak as a potential key magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS feature of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML: Spectrum pattern observed in three patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duško Kozić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a rare, often fatal, opportunistic infection, associated with demyelinating process. PML is caused by John Cunningham (JC polyomavirus, and predominantly affects patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection or other immunocompromised patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in establishing the diagnosis of PML. MRS with long and short echo time was performed in two patients with PML associated with HIV infection and in one PML patient associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The most prominent peak on the obtained spectra was for lactate; it showed 2-3 times higher concentration of lactate compared to choline, almost 4-6 times higher lactate concentration compared to creatine, and 4-11 times higher lactate in comparison to N-acetylaspartate concentration. Similar spectrum pattern was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is a new finding that might be useful in early diagnosis of PML. Nevertheless, further confirmation of our results is needed, since we analyzed the spectrum pattern only in three patients. Overall, our results could help in early detection of PML, especially in non-HIV patients, and thus prevent the fatal outcome of the disease. MRS could also be useful in detecting “tumefactive” demyelinating lesions in PML patients, associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, to avoid misdiagnosis of neoplasm.

  3. Dependence of the Ratio between the Resonance Integral and Thermal Neutron Cross Section on the Deviation of the Epithermal Neutron Spectrum from the 1/E Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    In k 0 - Neutron Activation Analysis (k 0 -NAA), the conversion from the tabulated Q 0 (ratio of the resonance integral to thermal neutron cross-section)to Q 0 (α) (α is the shape factor of the epithermal neutron flux, indicating the deviation of the epithermal neutron spectrum from the ideal 1/E shape) are calculated using a FORTRAN program. The calculations are done for most elements that can be detected by neutron activation using different values of the parameter (α) ranging from -0.1≤α≤+0.1. The obtained data are used to study the dependence of the values (α) on the irradiation position factor in (k 0 -NAA)equation for some selected isotopes differ in their resonance energy and its Q 0 values. The results show that, the irradiation factor is affective mainly for low thermal tro epithermal flux ratio f especially for Q 0 value greater than 50. so consequently determining the irradiation parameters α value is not needed for irradiation positions that rich with thermal neutron. But for high f values the irradiation position factor should be taken into account. On the other hand the constructed FORTRAN program can be used to calculate the value Q 0 (α) directly for different value of α

  4. Detection Characteristics of Gamma-Irradiated Seeds by using PSL, TL, ESR and GC/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Shon, J.H.; Kang, Y.J.; Jo, T.Y.; Park, H.Y.; Kwak, J.Y.; Lee, J.H.; Park, Y.C.; Kim, J.I.; Lee, H.J.; Lee, S.J.; Han, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the applicability of the photostimulated luminescence (PSL), thermoluminescence (TL), electron spin resonance (ESR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods for 5 seeds which are not allowed to be irradiated in Korea. All 5 seeds including evening primrose seed, safflower seed, rape seed, sunflower seed and flax seed were analyzed. Samples were irradiated at 1~10 kGy using a 60 Co gamma-ray irradiator. In PSL study, the photon counts of all the unirradiated samples showed negative (lower than 700). The photon counts of irradiated (1, 5, 10 kGy) samples showed positive (higher than 5,000). In TL analysis, results showed that it is possible to apply TL method to all foods containing minerals. In ESR measurements, the ESR signal (single-line) intensity of irradiated foods was higher than non-irradiated foods. The hydrocarbons 1,7-hexadecadiene (C 16:2 ) and 8-heptadecene (C 17:1 ) from oleic acid were detected only in the irradiated samples before and after the treatment at doses ≥ 1 kGy, but they were not detected in non-irradiated samples before and after treatment. These two hydrocarbons could be used as markers to identify irradiated safflower seed, rape seed, Sunflower seed and flax seed. And then, the hydrocarbons 1,7,10-hexadecatriene (C 16:3 ) and 6,9-heptadecadiene (C 17:2 ) from linoleic acid were detected in the evening primrose seed, safflower seed and sunflower seed. According to the results, PSL, TL and GC/ MS methods were successfully applied to detect the irradiated foods. It is concluded that PSL, TL and GC/MS methods are suitable for detection of irradiated samples and a combined method is recommendable for enhancing the reliability of detection results. (author)

  5. [Relations between plasma-erythrocyte viscosity factors and ESR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Crippa, M; Bosoni, T; Moratti, R

    1992-09-01

    The ESR is usually put in relationship: to the real density of the RBCs (erythrocytes) (difference between the RBC specific gravity and the plasma one), and to the resistance that the RBCs meet moving in a medium, which is due to the plasma viscosity and to the total external RBC surface. When the RBCs take shape of aggregates, their external surface is decreased and ESR increases. The most important plasma factor causing changes in ESR is the fibrinogen level followed by the plasma globulins and by the products arising from the tissue damage. The resistance that the RBCs meet moving in the plasma is well expressed by the measurement of the plasma-RBC viscosity considering that is inclusive of both factors that are the plasma viscosity and the external RBC surface. The plasma-RBC viscosity is the resultant of several factors: Fa = Fb - Fe - Fs - Fm, were: Fa is the resultant, Fb the attracting forces due to the proteic macromolecules, Fe the repulsing forces due the negative charges. Fs the repulsing forces due to the shear-stress, Fm the force which opposes itself against the surface tension of the aggregation; it depends on the RBC morphology and on the RBC rigidity. The ESR has been recently used like an index of the RBC aggregation. The Authors study the relationship between several hemorheological parameters and the ESR in infective and inflammatory processes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Studies on electronic spectrum and electron spin resonance of vanadium (IV) complexes with organophosphorus compounds and high molecular weight amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Taichi; Nakamura, Takato

    1981-01-01

    In the extraction of vanadium (IV) from aqueous solutions containing hydrochloric acid and/or a mixture of hydrochloric acid and lithium chloride by bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogenphosphate (DEHPA; HX), trioctylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat-336), trioctylamine (TOA), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and tributyl phosphate (TBP), the complexes formed in the organic phases have been examined by spectrophotometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. It is found that in the extraction by DEHPA, the vanadium in the organic phase exists as the monomeric species, VO(X 2 H) 2 , or the polymeric one, (VOX 2 )sub(n), and that in the extractions by Aliquat-336, TOA, TOPO, and TBP, tetravalent vanadium complexes are stable in the organic phases extracted from a mixed solution of hydrochloric acid and lithium chloride, while complexes containing pentavalent vanadium and VOV 4+ ions are formed in the organic phases extracted from hydrochloric acid solutions. (author)

  7. Energy spectrum and thermal properties of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based on the resonant-phonon depopulation scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabibullin, R. A., E-mail: khabibullin@isvch.ru; Shchavruk, N. V.; Klochkov, A. N.; Glinskiy, I. A.; Zenchenko, N. V.; Ponomarev, D. S.; Maltsev, P. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Ultrahigh Frequency Semiconductor Electronics (Russian Federation); Zaycev, A. A. [National Research University of Electronic Technology (MIET) (Russian Federation); Zubov, F. I.; Zhukov, A. E.; Cirlin, G. E.; Alferov, Zh. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The dependences of the electronic-level positions and transition oscillator strengths on an applied electric field are studied for a terahertz quantum-cascade laser (THz QCL) with the resonant-phonon depopulation scheme, based on a cascade consisting of three quantum wells. The electric-field strengths for two characteristic states of the THz QCL under study are calculated: (i) “parasitic” current flow in the structure when the lasing threshold has not yet been reached; (ii) the lasing threshold is reached. Heat-transfer processes in the THz QCL under study are simulated to determine the optimum supply and cooling conditions. The conditions of thermocompression bonding of the laser ridge stripe with an n{sup +}-GaAs conductive substrate based on Au–Au are selected to produce a mechanically stronger contact with a higher thermal conductivity.

  8. Ultra-fast all-optical plasmonic switching in near infra-red spectrum using a Kerr nonlinear ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmohammadi, Tofiq; Abbasian, Karim; Yadipour, Reza

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, an all-optical plasmonic switch based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) nanoplasmonic waveguide with a Kerr nonlinear ring resonator is introduced and studied. Two-dimensional simulations utilizing the finite-difference time-domain algorithm are used to demonstrate an apparent optical bistability and significant switching mechanisms (in enabled-low condition: T(ON/OFF) =21.9 and in enabled-high condition: T(ON/OFF) =24.9) of the signal light arisen by altering the pump-light intensity. The proposed all-optical switching demonstrates femtosecond-scale feedback time (90 fs) and then ultra-fast switching can be achieved. The offered all-optical switch may recognize potential significant applications in integrated optical circuits.

  9. ESR dating: is it still an 'experimental' technique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Motoji Ikeya demonstrated the potential of ESR dating. From a single substance (stalagmitic carbonate) and a single site (Akiyoshi Cavern), the field has grown to include materials from all over the world and time periods from a few thousand years ago to several million years ago. A vigorous program of instrumentation development has increased the precision of measurements as well as opening up new ways of collecting and interpreting spectra. Yet there are still references to ESR dating as an 'experimental' technique, one which cannot be trusted to produce dates that are accurate or precise. This paper discusses areas for which this is true and suggests what should be done to convince skeptics. Other areas for which the evidence suggests that ESR is at least as reliable as 'standard' methods will also be covered

  10. Electronic structure of radiation damage centre in zinc silicate from ESR hyperfine data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, C.; Chakravarty, Sulata

    1979-01-01

    The occurrence of an ESR spectrum with six hyperfine components in X-irradiated zinc silicate, Zn 2 SiO was reported earlier. It is known that by the use of the experimental ESR data it is possible to work out the electronic structure of the paramagnetic damage center. The values of the hyperfine parameters A and B have been utilized to calculate the values of f'sub(s) and fsub(sigma), the fractional occupation of the 3s and 3psub(sigma) orbitals of the metal atom by the unpaired electron. The metal atom is 27 Al (I = 5/2, n.a. = 100%) which is present as an impurity in the lattice and occupies silicon sites. The bonding between the metal atom and each of the surrounding oxygen atom is assumed to be of the sigma-type. The values obtained for the fractional occupation are : f'sub(s) = 0.71 x 10sup(-2), fsub(sigma) = 14.65 x10sup(-2). The unpaired electron appears to belong to the ligand atom and is moderately delocalised on the Al atom where it occupies mainly the 3psup(sigma) orbital and not the 3s orbital. (auth.)

  11. Assignment of histidine resonances in the 1H NMR (500 MHz) spectrum of subtilisin BPN' using site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bycroft, M.; Fersht, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A spin-echo pulse sequence has been used to resolve the six histidine C-2H protons in the 500-MHz NMR spectrum of subtilisin BPN'. Five of these residues have been substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, and this has enabled a complete assignment of these protons to be obtained. Analysis of the pH titration curves of these signals has provided microscopic pK a 's for the six histidines in this enzyme. The pK a 's of the histidine residues in subtilisin BPN' have been compared with the values obtained for the histidines in the homologous enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis (subtilisin Carlsberg). Four of the five conserved histidines titrate with essentially identical pK a 's in the two enzymes. It therefore appears that the assignments made for these residues in subtilisin BPN' can be transferred to subtilisin Carlsberg. On the basis of these assignments, the one histidine that titrates with a substantially different pK a in the two enzymes can be assigned to histidine-238. This difference in pK a has been attributed to a Trp to Lys substitution at position 241 in subtilisin Carlsberg

  12. Connectopathy in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Evidence from Visual Evoked Potentials and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Yamasaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD show superior performance in processing fine details; however, they often exhibit impairments of gestalt face, global motion perception, and visual attention as well as core social deficits. Increasing evidence has suggested that social deficits in ASD arise from abnormal functional and structural connectivities between and within distributed cortical networks that are recruited during social information processing. Because the human visual system is characterized by a set of parallel, hierarchical, multistage network systems, we hypothesized that the altered connectivity of visual networks contributes to social cognition impairment in ASD. In the present review, we focused on studies of altered connectivity of visual and attention networks in ASD using visual evoked potentials (VEPs, event-related potentials (ERPs, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. A series of VEP, ERP, and DTI studies conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated complex alterations (impairment and enhancement of visual and attention networks in ASD. Recent data have suggested that the atypical visual perception observed in ASD is caused by altered connectivity within parallel visual pathways and attention networks, thereby contributing to the impaired social communication observed in ASD. Therefore, we conclude that the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of ASD constitutes a “connectopathy.”

  13. ESR detection of free radicals in gamma irradiated spices and other foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilbrow, J.R.; Troup, G.J.; Hutton, D.R. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Hunter, C.R. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Astronomy

    1996-12-31

    Irradiation of various food products, including vegetables, fruits, meats, seafoods, herbs, spices and seeds by appropriate doses of {gamma}-rays has for many years been suggested as a means of killing or sterilizing bacteria, viruses and pests and, therefore, as a means of preserving the foods. The position of food irradiation has been under review in Australia generally, through consumer organisations and by a Federal Government (House of Representatives) inquiry. From these reviews and inquiries, recommendations for irradiation, packaging, and labelling etc., are emerging with, for example, an NH and MRC recommended maximum dose of 10 kGy for Australia, with 6 kGy being a minimum dose for grains and spices. In early studies, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect stable free radicals in bone and cuticle and it was demonstrated that {gamma}-irradiation breaks down proteins and DNA. Earlier studies suggested that induced free radical signals in spices rapidly decayed to negligible levels after three weeks, especially if some moisture was present. Although the members of the Monash group do not carry out research formally in the area of food technology, participation in the ADMIT program was appropriate given the availability of suitable ESR and {sup 137}Cs irradiation facilities and interest both politically and amongst consumer groups regarding food irradiation. (author).

  14. Estimation of background radiation doses for the Peninsular Malaysia's population by ESR dosimetry of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodzi, Mohd; Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ohtaki, Megu; Ivannikov, Alexander; Bhattacharjee, Deborshi; Fukumura, Akifumi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2011-08-01

    Background radiation dose is used in dosimetry for estimating occupational doses of radiation workers or determining radiation dose of an individual following accidental exposure. In the present study, the absorbed dose and the background radiation level are determined using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method on tooth samples. The effect of using different tooth surfaces and teeth exposed with single medical X-rays on the absorbed dose are also evaluated. A total of 48 molars of position 6-8 were collected from 13 district hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. Thirty-six teeth had not been exposed to any excessive radiation, and 12 teeth had been directly exposed to a single X-ray dose during medical treatment prior to extraction. There was no significant effect of tooth surfaces and exposure with single X-rays on the measured absorbed dose of an individual. The mean measured absorbed dose of the population is 34 ± 6.2 mGy, with an average tooth enamel age of 39 years. From the slope of a regression line, the estimated annual background dose for Peninsular Malaysia is 0.6 ± 0.3 mGy y(-1). This value is slightly lower than the yearly background dose for Malaysia, and the radiation background dose is established by ESR tooth measurements on samples from India and Russia.

  15. ESR detection of free radicals in gamma irradiated spices and other foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilbrow, J.R.; Troup, G.J.; Hutton, D.R.; Hunter, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiation of various food products, including vegetables, fruits, meats, seafoods, herbs, spices and seeds by appropriate doses of γ-rays has for many years been suggested as a means of killing or sterilizing bacteria, viruses and pests and, therefore, as a means of preserving the foods. The position of food irradiation has been under review in Australia generally, through consumer organisations and by a Federal Government (House of Representatives) inquiry. From these reviews and inquiries, recommendations for irradiation, packaging, and labelling etc., are emerging with, for example, an NH and MRC recommended maximum dose of 10 kGy for Australia, with 6 kGy being a minimum dose for grains and spices. In early studies, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to detect stable free radicals in bone and cuticle and it was demonstrated that γ-irradiation breaks down proteins and DNA. Earlier studies suggested that induced free radical signals in spices rapidly decayed to negligible levels after three weeks, especially if some moisture was present. Although the members of the Monash group do not carry out research formally in the area of food technology, participation in the ADMIT program was appropriate given the availability of suitable ESR and 137 Cs irradiation facilities and interest both politically and amongst consumer groups regarding food irradiation. (author)

  16. Use of signal subtraction methods in ESR dating of burned flint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porat, Naomi; Schwarcz, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    Geological samples of chert display some of the characteristics of electron spin resonance (ESR) signals of quartz. When chert is heated in a fireplace, most of these signals are annealed. The signals grow again in fire-heated chert buried in archaeological sites, as a result of internal and external radiation doses. The date of the heating event can be determined from the acquired dose (AD) and the dose rate. The E' and Al signals are best suited for dating. Although many cherts, when heated to a sufficient temperature, acquire a carbon radical (C) signal that largely obscures the E' signal, it can be subtracted from digitized spectra. The E' signal also appears to saturate at relatively low doses, restricting the time range of dating to between 200 and 600 ka, depending on the dose rates. The Al signal shows no saturation, but is also interfered with by organic signals, present in burnt and unburned flint. These can also be subtracted to reveal the ''pure'' Al signal. Applying the E' signal to date flint from Yabroud, we obtain an age between 100 and 125 ka, while both thermoluminescence (TL) dating of the flint and ESR dating of tooth enamel give 195 and 225 ka, respectively; the discrepancy may be due to an overestimate of the α-efficiency. At Nahr Ibrahim, the age (c. 80 ka) is consistent with archaeological estimates. (author)

  17. Determination of alpha effectiveness in ESR dating using nuclear accelerator techniques: methods and energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    An important parameter in calculating the environmental dose rate for electron spin resonance (ESR) age estimates is the relative effectiveness of alpha and gamma radiation. A small research accelerator is used as a source of alpha particles of various pre-selected energies, corresponding to those found in the environment, to determine the effectiveness of alpha radiation of different energies. Preparation of sample targets is discussed, including the use of absolute ethanol, thorough etching and deposition by centrifuge. Preliminary results show that the alpha/gamma effectiveness ratio, k, depends on the energy of the incident alpha and must therefore be expressed in terms of a reference energy. The effectiveness of an alpha particle in causing ESR damage is found to vary linearly with its range or path length, not with its energy, a fact which must be considered when calculating effective dose-rates from environmental radionuclide concentrations. Failure to do so may lead to serious systematic errors in the effective alpha contribution to environmental dose-rates and consequently in age estimates. (author)

  18. Improvement of photoneutron spectrum measurement produced by bombardment of 2 GeV electrons above giant dipole resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. S.; Park, J. S.; Choi, H. D.; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Shin, Kasuo; Ban, Syuichi

    2000-01-01

    Above the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) region, high energy photoneutron spectra produced by irradiation of 2.04 GeV electrons into Pb target were measured by Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique. The differential photoneutron yields were obtained at a fixed angle of 90 degrees to the electron beam direction. The TOF system consists of Pilot-U plastic scintillation detector, which has fast response time, and the high speed multiscaler or CAMAC TDC. In the improvement of experimental setup to extend the flight distance to 10.4 m lead to make the measurable energy to 500 MeV from 300 MeV. And using the TDC based electronics lead to use a veto counter. The results were compared with the calculated one by using EGS4 and Modified PICA95. The characteristics of this TOF system was introduced in this paper and the results for several measuring conditions, which are flight distance, TOF electronics, and type of neutron detector, were discussed to improve the accuracy of this measurement

  19. Alanine-ESR dosimetry for radiotherapy IAEA experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.; )

    1997-01-01

    At present, the most commonly used transfer dosimeters for radiotherapy applications are TL dosemeters. They are being used for intercomparison between SSDLs (about 70) and the IAEA dosimetry laboratory. However, there are some undesirable characteristics of this dosimetry system. We have a study in progress at the IAEA to evaluate the alanine-ESR systems as an alternative to TLDs. There are several desirable qualities which make alanine an attractive dosemeter. Preliminary data suggest that the alanine-ESR dosimetry system has the potential to replace TLDs for intercomparison amongst SSDLs in the therapy-level dose regions. (Author)

  20. Attempt at ESR dating of tooth enamel of French middle pleistocene sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahain, J.J.; Sarcia, M.N.; Falgueres, C.; Yokoyama, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Tooth enamel samples from four important French middle Pleistocene sites are analyzed by the ESR method. ESR ages were calculated using uranium uptake mathematical models and compared with U-series results. (author)

  1. Proton location in metal hydrides using electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) of dilute paramagnetic ions establishes the site symmetry of these ions. In the case of metal hydrides the site symmetry is determined by the number and location of neighboring protons. Typical ESR spectra for trivalent erbium in scandium and yttrium hydrides are presented and analyzed, and this technique is shown to be a versatile microscopic probe of the location, net charge and occupation probability of nearby protons

  2. ESR studies on the influence of physiological dissolution and digestion media on the lipid phase characteristics of SEDDS and SEDDS pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed; Mäder, Karsten

    2009-02-09

    The aim of the current study is the evaluation of a recently optimized SEDDS, composed of Solutol HS15 and medium chain glycerides, and self-emulsifying pellets by means of ESR. Tempol-benzoate (TB)-loaded SEDDS were produced and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to evaluate the diluted self-emulsifying mixtures. Moreover, ESR in vitro digestion experiments were carried out to have an insight on the characteristics of the different phases formed during the digestion process and to evaluate the distribution and the localization of TB in these phases. In addition, self-emulsifying pellets were produced using nitroxide-loaded SEDDS and the microenvironment within the pellets during release process was monitored in an online process using ESR spectroscopy. After dilution of nitroxide-loaded SEDDS, the percent of TB localized in the lipophilic compartment was decreasing with increasing the surfactant fraction in the mixture. Moreover, it was found that different phases with variable viscosity and polarity were produced as a result of the enzymatic digestion of SEDDS in physiologically relevant media. This change in lipid composition has largely affected the distribution and the localization of the spin probe during the digestion process. A rapid increase in the mobility of the spin probe inside the pellets was noticed after exposure to the release media. Additionally, TB was localized within the self-emulsifying mixture environment for the time of the experiment. ESR is considered a powerful non-invasive tool to assess the microenvironment of the diluted SEDDS and to monitor in vitro digestion process. Digestion induces a change in lipid composition which can affect the solubilization capacity of the administered drug. Therefore, monitoring in vitro digestion process using ESR spectroscopy will help in providing greater understanding of the interaction between the administered drug and the digested lipid vehicles.

  3. Elevated seminal plasma estradiol and epigenetic inactivation of ESR1 and ESR2 is associated with CP/CPPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesheim, Nils; Ellem, Stuart; Dansranjavin, Temuujin; Hagenkötter, Christina; Berg, Elena; Schambeck, Rupert; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Pilatz, Adrian; Risbridger, Gail; Weidner, Wolfgang; Wagenlehner, Florian; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga

    2018-04-13

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is associated with urinary tract symptoms and hormonal imbalances amongst others. The heterogeneous clinical presentation, unexplored molecular background and lack of prostate biopsies complicate therapy. Here, using liquid biopsies, we performed a comprehensive translational study on men diagnosed with CP/CPPS type III ( n = 50; median age 39.8, range 23-65) and age-matched controls ( n = 61; median age 36.8, range 20-69), considering biochemical parameters of blood and ejaculates, and epigenetic regulation of the estrogen receptor genes ( ESR1 and ESR2 ) in leukocytes isolated from blood (systemic regulation) and in somatic cells isolated from ejaculates (local regulation). We found elevated 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) levels in seminal plasma, but not in blood plasma, that was significantly associated with CP/CPPS and impaired urinary tract symptoms. In ejaculated somatic cells of CP/CPPS patients we found that ESR1 and ESR2 were both significantly higher methylated in CpG-promoters and expressionally down-regulated in comparison to controls. Mast cells are reported to contribute to CP/CPPS and are estrogen responsive. Consistent with this, we found that E 2 -treatment of human mast cell lines (HMC-1 and LAD2) resulted in altered cytokine and chemokine expression. Interestingly, in HMC-1 cells, possessing epigenetically inactivated ESR1 and ESR2, E 2 -treatment led to a reduced transcription of a number of inflammatory genes. Overall, these data suggest that elevated local E 2 levels associate with an epigenetic down-regulation of the estrogen receptors and have a prominent role in CP/CPPS. Investigating E 2 levels in semen could therefore serve as a promising biomarker to select patients for estrogen targeted therapy.

  4. Radiolysis of methylene blue studied by ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contineau, M.; Iliescu, C.; Ciureanu, M.

    1983-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectra have been used to gain information on the mechanism of radiolysis of aqueous solutions of methylene blue. The identity and behaviour of the semiquinone radicals formed as intermediate reduction products were discussed for strongly acid and for alcaline solutions. In order to obtain information on the radiolytic mechanism in strongly acidic media, irradiation was performed in the presence of various types of scavengers: sodium formate, glucose, succinic acid, hydroquinone and D,L-α alanine. (author)

  5. The perturbation of backscattered fast neutrons spectrum caused by the resonances of C, N and O for possible use in pyromaterial detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal, E-mail: firdaus087@gmail.com; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Abdullah, Abqari Luthfi Albert [Department of Defence Science, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, Kuala Lumpur 57000 (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Neutron radiation is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on backscattering energy spectrum of landmine. In this study, the Monte Carlo simulation of backscattered fast neutrons was performed on four basic elements of land mine; hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and carbon. The moderation of fast neutrons to thermal neutrons and their resonances cross-section between 0.01 eV until 14 MeV were analysed. The neutrons energies were divided into 29 groups and ten million neutrons particles histories were used. The geometries consist of four main components: neutrons source, detectors, landmine and soil. The neutrons source was placed at the origin coordinate and shielded with carbon and polyethylene. Americium/Beryllium neutron source was placed inside lead casing of 1 cm thick and 2.5 cm height. Polyethylene was used to absorb and disperse radiation and was placed outside the lead shield of width 10 cm and height 7 cm. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of Helium-3 was used for neutron detection as it has high absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. For the anomaly, the physical is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. The results show that the energy spectrum for the four basic elements of landmine with specific pattern which can be used as indication for the presence of landmines.

  6. The perturbation of backscattered fast neutrons spectrum caused by the resonances of C, N and O for possible use in pyromaterial detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Abdullah, Abqari Luthfi Albert

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on backscattering energy spectrum of landmine. In this study, the Monte Carlo simulation of backscattered fast neutrons was performed on four basic elements of land mine; hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and carbon. The moderation of fast neutrons to thermal neutrons and their resonances cross-section between 0.01 eV until 14 MeV were analysed. The neutrons energies were divided into 29 groups and ten million neutrons particles histories were used. The geometries consist of four main components: neutrons source, detectors, landmine and soil. The neutrons source was placed at the origin coordinate and shielded with carbon and polyethylene. Americium/Beryllium neutron source was placed inside lead casing of 1 cm thick and 2.5 cm height. Polyethylene was used to absorb and disperse radiation and was placed outside the lead shield of width 10 cm and height 7 cm. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of Helium-3 was used for neutron detection as it has high absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. For the anomaly, the physical is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The anomaly is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. The results show that the energy spectrum for the four basic elements of landmine with specific pattern which can be used as indication for the presence of landmines

  7. Permeability studies of redox-sensitive nitroxyl spin probes in corn oil using an L-band ESR spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jebaraj, D. David [Department of Physics, The American College, Madurai-625 002, Tamilnadu (India); Utsumi, Hideo [Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Asath, R. Mohamed; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Madurai-625 019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM {sup 14}N labeled {sup 2}H enriched 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) and 3–carboxy-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (carboxy-PROXYL) in pure water and various concentrations of corn oil. The ESR parameters, such as the line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, rotational correlation time, partition parameter and permeability were reported for the samples. The line width broadening was observed for both nitroxyl radicals in corn oil solutions. The partition parameter for permeable MC-PROXYL in corn oil increases with increasing concentration of corn oil, which reveals that the nitroxyl spin probe permeates into the oil phase. From the results, the corn oil concentration was optimized as 50 % for phantom studies. The rotational correlation time also increases with increasing concentration of corn oil. The permeable and impermeable nature of nitroxyl spin probes was demonstrated. These results will be useful for the development of ESR/OMR imaging modalities in in vivo and in vitro studies.

  8. ESR and X-ray diffraction studies on thin films of poly-3-hexylthiophene: Molecular orientation and magnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Keisuke; Kojima, Takashi; Fukuda, Hisashi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Matsuura, Toshihiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    Poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron spin resonance (ESR) to reveal the film structure and molecular organization. The XRD data showed a diffraction pattern with a plane separation between the planes containing thiophene rings of 16.0 A. Comparison between the XRD patterns of powder and thin films of P3HT suggests that the main chains are folded on the substrate. Angular variation of the line position (g-value) of ESR spectra revealed that thiophene ring of P3HT orients along the substrate normal axis. The ESR linewidth varied by the angular rotation, indicating the one-dimensional spin-chain interactions in the P3HT thin films with a linear network of spin-chains. An organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) with P3HT film as a channel layer was then demonstrated. The P3HT films showed conducting characteristics with holes as carriers. The OTFTs indicated a field-effect mobility of 4.93 x 10 -3 cm 2 /Vs and an on/off ratio of 73 in the accumulation mode

  9. Permeability studies of redox-sensitive nitroxyl spin probes in corn oil using an L-band ESR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jebaraj, D. David; Utsumi, Hideo; Asath, R. Mohamed; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM 14 N labeled 2 H enriched 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) and 3–carboxy-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (carboxy-PROXYL) in pure water and various concentrations of corn oil. The ESR parameters, such as the line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, rotational correlation time, partition parameter and permeability were reported for the samples. The line width broadening was observed for both nitroxyl radicals in corn oil solutions. The partition parameter for permeable MC-PROXYL in corn oil increases with increasing concentration of corn oil, which reveals that the nitroxyl spin probe permeates into the oil phase. From the results, the corn oil concentration was optimized as 50 % for phantom studies. The rotational correlation time also increases with increasing concentration of corn oil. The permeable and impermeable nature of nitroxyl spin probes was demonstrated. These results will be useful for the development of ESR/OMR imaging modalities in in vivo and in vitro studies.

  10. Estimate of landslide deformation and failure time by ESR technique of. alpha. -quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xingzhong, Liang; Mingdong, Chen [Chengdu Coll. of Geology, SC (China); Jiyong, Chen; Jiamin, Feng [Sichuan Univ., Chengdu, SC (China)

    1991-02-01

    ESR dating has been applied to study landslides. A method of dose-difference to determine the landslide age has been developed. The ESR spectra of annealled quartz grain samples and the optimum conditions of thermal activation were studied. The signifcance of ESR dating of landslide in geological research was discussed.

  11. Estimation of radiation exposed area by the nuclear accident occurred at Tokai village using ESR measurements of household sugar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzuya, Masayuki; Kondo, Shinichi; Ito, Kousuke; Sawa, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The area of radiation exposure by the nuclear accident occurred at Tokai village in 1999 was estimated by the ESR measurement of 95 household sugar samples collected from the accident area. These samples were roughly classified into three types of sugar, fine white sugar, fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar. The control fine white sugar showed no radical in the ESR spectrum, while those of fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar showed the presence of a small amount of radicals. It was also shown that, among these three kinds of sugar, the radical concentration of fine white sugar sampled from wooden houses at the area similar to each other did not vary much with the samples, while those of fine brown sugar and coarse brown sugar varied to a considerable extent. Thus, the fine white sugar is considered to be more suitable for the estimation of the level of radiation exposure. The radical concentration of each fine white sugar sample was plotted against the distance from the site of the nuclear accident with a correction of the difference in the shielding effect between concrete houses and wooden houses. The samples obtained at more than 2 km north of the site of nuclear accident showed no ESR spectral signal to a detectable extent. On the other hand, the ESR spectra were observed from the samples obtained within 10 km south and 4 km west of the accident site. These results suggest that the radiation exposure by the contaminant blown by the northeast wind blowing on the day of the accident may occur at the south and west areas. (author)

  12. ESR characterization of point defects in amber colored c-BN super abrasive powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, S.V.; Ghica, D.; Stefan, M.; Bouwen, A.; Goovaerts, E.

    2004-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystalline superabrasive powder (Borazon ** CBN 400), consisting of 200-300 microns sized amber colored crystallites prepared by HP/HT synthesis, has been examined from 2.1 K to 293 K by X-band ESR spectroscopy. The observed spectrum consists of a component line A1, visible in the whole temperature range, and two component lines A2 and A3, visible at high and low temperatures, respectively. The A1 and A3 lines originate from transitions inside S = 1/2 ground states of distinct paramagnetic species and A2 from transitions inside an excited state of another paramagnetic center. The intensity of the A1 and A3 lines changes differently during in situ low temperature illumination in the UV-VIS range. * Borazon is a registered trademark of Diamond Innovations, Inc. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurachevsky, Andrey; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains

  14. Combined ESR/U-series chronology of Acheulian hominid-bearing layers at Trinchera Galeria site, Atapuerca, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgueres, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Shao, Qingfeng; Bischoff, James L.; Perez-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Ortega, Ana Isabel; Bermudez de Castro, Jose Maria; Olle, Andreu; Vallverdu, Josep; Quiles, Anita; Ghaleb, Bassam; Moreno, Davinia; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Vallverdu, Josep; Carbonell, Eudald; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain, is known from many prehistoric and paleontologic sites documenting human prehistory in Europe. Three major sites, Gran Dolina, Galeria and Sima del Elefante, range in age from the oldest hominin of Western Europe dated to 1.1 to 1.3 Ma (millions of years ago) at Sima del Elefante to c.a. 0.2 Ma on the top of the Galeria archaeological sequence. Recently, a chronology based on luminescence methods (Thermoluminescence [TL] and Infrared Stimulated Luminescence [IRSL]) applied to cave sediments was published for the Gran Dolina and Galeria sites. The authors proposed for Galeria an age of 450 ka (thousands of years ago) for the units lower GIII and GII, suggesting that the human occupation there is younger than the hominid remains of Sima de los Huesos (≥530 ka) around 1 km away. In this paper, we present new results obtained by combined Electron Spin Resonance/Uranium-series (ESR/U-series) dating on 20 herbivorous teeth from different levels at the Galeria site. They are in agreement with the TL results for the upper part of the stratigraphic sequence (GIV and GIIIb), in the range of between 200 and 250 ka. But for the GIIIa to GIIb levels, the TL ages become abruptly older by 200 ka while ESR ages remain relatively constant. Finally, the TL and ESR data agree in the lowest part of the section (GIIa); both fall in the range of around 350-450 ka. Our results suggest a different interpretation for the GII, GIII and GIV units of Galeria and the upper part of Gran Dolina (TD10 and TD11) than obtained by TL. The ESR/U-series results are supported by a Bayesian analysis, which allows a better integration between stratigraphic information and radiometric data. (authors)

  15. Investigation of free radicals in paprika with the ESR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kispeter, J.; Szabo, I.; Horvath, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The ESR method is the one of the most successfully applied method among the physical methods for the identification of radiation or ionising treatment of foods. The identification of free radicals having short and long lifetimes is the base of the measurement. The quantitative determination makes possible the determination of the absorbed dose deriving from 60 Co radiation treatment. It has to be noted that the treatment of the foods with ionising radiation and other treatments (milling, frying, baking) and the oxidative process result free radicals in paprika samples as a function of absorbed radiation dose (2.5; 5 and 10 kGy) on the different particle size and on storage time. The intensities of the samples given after each of the seven stages of the paprika milling increased till the fifth stage corresponding to the effect of a 2 kGy absorbed dose. After conditioning and increasing the water content by 5-8% the ESR intensity shows significant lowering. This value characterises the ESR intensity of not irradiated sample. As an effect of the irradiation the ESR intensities increased along with the increase of the absorbed dose. The samples having lower particle size are more sensible for the identification of the irradiation. Evaluating the art of the decline we concluded that there are free radicals having short and long shelf lifetimes in paprika samples at the same time

  16. Absolute rate measurement by light modulation - ESR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K Y; Gaspar, P P

    1977-01-01

    A rate constant is deduced for the reaction of tert-butoxy radicals and trimethylsilane from the measurement of the phase shift between the modulated light source and the ESR signal of trimethylsilyl radical. The rate constant was found to be 3 x 10/sup -2/M/sup -1/. sec/sup -1/ at -50/sup 0/C.

  17. Computer enhancement of ESR spectra of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobosz, B.; Krzyminiewski, R. [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Koralewski, M. [Optics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Hałupka-Bryl, M. [Medical Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); The PhD Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Nanobiomedical Centre, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2016-06-01

    We present ESR measurements of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticle systems. Temperature and orientational dependence of ESR spectra were measured for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle coated by dextran or oleic acid, frozen in different magnetic field. Several parameters describing magnetic properties such as g-factor, line width, the anisotropy constant were calculated and discussed. The ESR spectra of investigated nanoparticles were also subjected to Computer Resolution Enhancement Method (CREM). This procedure allows to separate a narrow line on the background of the broad line, which presence in this type of materials was recognized in the recent literature and have been further discussed in the paper. CREM is a valuable tool for monitoring of changes on the surface of magnetic core of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • CREM – a new tool for monitoring of changes on the surface of magnetic core of nanoparticles. • CREM allows to separate a narrow line on the background of the broad line. • Temperature and orientational dependence of ESR spectra of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were measured. • Parameters describing magnetic properties were calculated and discussed.

  18. ESR spectroscopy - an analytical tool for the glass industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvers, A.; Weissmann, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, wet chemical methods have been developed for the quantitative analysis of polyvalent elements in glasses. The major disadvantage of these chemical methods is that all structural information is lost during analysis. In addition, the analysis of species by wet chemical methods is unreliable due to possible redox reactions during the decomposition process. Therefore, the emphasis is on the physical methods which can directly detect species in bulk glasses. Especially optical and ESR spectroscopy are suitable methods due to their wide range of applications and sensitivity. Concerning quantitative measurements, no comparison between ESR results and chemical analysis of species has been published so far. This work discusses the possible application of ESR spectroscopy in the glass industry by focussing on routine interpretation, the correlation to chemical procedures and quantitative analysis. Results are presented and discussed for iron and chromium in packaging glasses. For example an excellent correlation was found between the Fe 3+ ESR signal and the chemically determined Fe 3+ concentration in glass. (orig.)

  19. The chemistry of Li/SOCl2 cells - An ESR study of carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. S.; Carter, B. J.; Tsay, F. D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon electrodes from Li/SOCl2 cells were studied by electron spin resonance after various stages of discharge. Different behavior was observed in the temperature-dependent part of the ESR linewidth, defined as 'intrinsic linewidth', Delta H(int), when two different electrolytes were used. With one electrolyte, 1.5M LiAlCl4/SoCl2, the Delta H(int) value stayed constant or slightly decreased whereas with another electrolyte, 1.0M LiAlCl4/14 percent BrClin SOCl2, the value increased as discharge progressed. The carbon electrodes are modified differently during discharge with these two electrolytes, and it is speculated that this may be due to changes in the carbon matrix functional groups. This difference in the carbon electrodes may explain the claimed differences in safety performance of the cells.

  20. ESR investigation of gamma-irradiated Aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozar, O.; Chis, V.; David, L.; Damian, G.; Barbur, I.

    1997-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate the radiation damage in a powder of 2-acetoxybenzoic acid (Aspirin). Three types of radicals occur by γ-irradiation of Aspirin at room temperature. Two of them are result of hydrogen abstraction while the third is produced by hydrogen addition at one of the carbon atoms of the ring. The relative yielding of the free radicals as a function of absorbed dose in the range of 2.4 kGy to 160 kGy is also discussed. (author)

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  2. ESR as a method for the characterization of alluvial sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissoux, H.; Voinchet, P.; Lacquement, F.; Despriée, J.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using the parameters involved in the ESR dating of optically bleached quartz grains in a purpose of source determination was checked. In that aim, samples previously taken in different sedimentary formations of the Middle Loire Basin (Central France) and dated by ESR have been observed. First discrimination was made using the thorium and potassium content in the sediments obtained by gamma spectrometry. The plot of these 119 data on the Th/K Schlumberger diagram clearly demonstrated that it was possible to discriminate the clays associations included in the sediment from which the dated quartz are extracted. Clay's nature could then be indicative of the geological nature of the substratum of rivers from their sources. Second discrimination was made using the ESR intensities calculated from Al, Ti–H and Ti–Li paramagnetic centres on 18 samples. It appears that the combination of the non-bleachable aluminum trap (DAT) saturation intensity and the Ti–H/Ti–Li ratio intensities make possible the discrimination of the two main sources of the sediment: Massif Central and Paris Basin. More deeply, The Ti/OBAT (Optically bleachable aluminum traps) intensities made possible the discrimination of quartz grains of different geological sources or with different geothermal history within the Massif Central group. - Highlights: • We used ESR and gamma spectrometry for source determination of alluvial quartz grains. • Th/K ratio distinguishes sediments from rivers flowing in various geological contexts. • Al, Ti–H and Ti–Li ESR centers discriminate quartz of different geological sources.

  3. Resonator Sensitivity Optimization in Magnetic Resonance and the Development of a Magic Angle Spinning Probe for the NMR Study of Rare Spin Nuclei on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Francis David

    The sensitivity of an arbitrary resonator for the detection of a magnetic resonance signal is derived from basic energy considerations, and is shown to be dependent on V(,s)/t(,90)P(' 1/2). The radiation damping time constant is shown to be inversely dependent on the rf filling factor. Several resonators are analyzed in detail. The optimum solenoid is shown to have a length of about 1.5 times the diameter. The multilayer solenoid and the capacitively shortened slotted line resonator are shown to have advantages for samples with high dielectric losses. The capacitively shortened slotted line resonator is shown to substantially reduce acoustic ringing problems. Efficient methods are discussed for double and triple tuning these resonators. A slotted cylindrical resonator is described which gives higher sensitivity and faster response time than conventional cavities for very small samples at X-band ESR frequencies. Double tuned circuits using lumped elements are shown to be generally more efficient than those using transmission lines in generating rf fields. The optimum inductance ratio of the two coils in a ('13)C, ('1)H CP experiment is about 3. The high speed cylindrical sample spinner is analyzed in terms of compressible fluid dynamics, resonant modes, and structural analysis to arrive at optimum air bearing and spinner design recommendations. The optimum radial clearance is shown to depend on the 1/3 power of the rotor diameter. The required air bearing hole diameter has a square root dependence on the rotor diameter. Air pockets are shown to increase the resonant frequencies. Relevant data for a number of high strength insulators including hard ceramics are tabulated, and limiting speeds are calculated. CP MAS experiments on a 5% monolayer of n-butylamine absorbed on (gamma)-alumina reveal six lines. By comparison with the liquid phase spectrum it was determined that at least two types of chemically different surface species were present and that surface

  4. Electron spin resonance investigaton of semiconductor materials for application in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Lihong

    2012-07-01

    to slight n-type character of undoped a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H. Therefore ESR evaluation leads to an underestimation of N{sub D} in the annealed states of highly crystalline {mu}c-Si:H. It has been concluded that N{sub S} in the exposed states represents N{sub D} more adequately than in the annealed states. 2. As the transparent conductive window layer, nominally undoped and Al-doped {mu}c-SiC:H thin films were prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Samples with a wide range of crystallinity from highly crystalline (I{sup IR}{sub C} > 90%) to amorphous (I{sup IR}{sub C} = 0%) have been prepared with variation of the Monomethylsilane concentration (c{sub MMS}), the substrate and filament temperature (T{sub S}, T{sub F}), the gas pressure (p) and the Al-doping concentration (p{sub TMAl}/p{sub MMS}). In the nominally undoped {mu}c-SiC:H material, a high N{sub S} is observed over a wide range of crystallinity, whereas {sigma}{sub D} increases by 10 orders of magnitude up to 10{sup -2} S/cm as the material becomes more crystalline. The dramatic increase of {sigma}{sub D} has been attributed to both the higher material crystallinity and unintentional donor doping. The ESR spectrum changes from a broad featureless resonance in the low crystallinity material to a sharp line with a pair of distinct satellites in highly crystalline n-type {mu}c-SiC:H. The resonance center is constant at g = 2.003. The central resonance is associated with the paramagnetic states of Si- and/or C-vacancies (V{sub Si}, V{sub C}) at different charge states and dangling bonds (dbs) in disordered phases, and the observed hyperfine structure is speculated to be related to the unintentionally doped nitrogen. Al-doping leads to a compensation of donors. {sigma}{sub D} firstly dropped to the minimum of 10{sup -11} S/cm before increasing up to 4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm, while N{sub S} decreased to 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and then increased up to 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Meanwhile, Al

  5. ESR-dosimetry in thermal and epithermal neutron fields for application in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Tobias

    2016-01-22

    Dosimetry is essential for every form of radiotherapy. In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mixed neutron and gamma fields have to be considered. Dose is deposited in different neutron interactions with elements in the penetrated tissue and by gamma particles, which are always part of a neutron field. The therapeutic dose in BNCT is deposited by densely ionising particles, originating from the fragmentation of the isotope boron-10 after capture of a thermal neutron. Despite being investigated for decades, dosimetry in neutron beams or fields for BNCT remains complex, due to the variety in type and energy of the secondary particles. Today usually ionisation chambers combined with metal foils are used. The applied techniques require extensive effort and are time consuming, while the resulting uncertainties remain high. Consequently, the investigation of more effective techniques or alternative dosimeters is an important field of research. In this work the possibilities of ESR-dosimeters in those fields have been investigated. Certain materials, such as alanine, generate stable radicals upon irradiation. Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry the amount of radicals, which is proportional to absorbed dose, can be quantified. Different ESR detector materials have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany, with five setups, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been conducted in two epithermal neutron beams. The detector response, however, strongly depends on the dose depositing particle type and energy. It is hence necessary to accompany measurements by computational modelling and simulation. In this work the Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to calculate absorbed doses and dose components. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using amorphous track models. For the simulation, detailed models of

  6. Broadband electron spin resonance experiments using superconducting coplanar waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, Conrad; Bogani, Lapo; Scheffler, Marc; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Bothner, Daniel; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut - Experimentalphysik II and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In recent years superconducting coplanar devices operating at microwave/GHz frequencies are employed in more and more experimental studies. Here, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments using a superconducting coplanar waveguide to provide the RF field to drive the spin flips. In contrast to conventional ESR studies this allows broadband frequency as well as magnetic field swept observation of the spin resonance. We show experimental data of the spin resonance of the organic radical NitPhoMe (2-(4'-methoxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetra-methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) for frequencies in the range of 1 GHz to 40 GHz and corresponding magnetic fields up to 1.4 T (for g=2). In addition we show the temperature dependence of the ESR signals for temperatures up to 30 K, which is well above the critical temperature of the niobium superconductor.

  7. Electron Spin Resonance Measurement with Microinductor on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kitagawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of radicals on a chip is demonstrated. The proposed method is based on electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and the measurement of high-frequency impedance of the microinductor fabricated on the chip. The measurement was by using a frequency sweep of approximately 100 MHz. The ESR spectra of di(phenyl-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyliminoazanium (DPPH dropped on the microinductor which is fabricated with CMOS 350-nm technology were observed at room temperature. The volume of the DPPH ethanol solution was 2 μL, and the number of spins on the micro-inductor was estimated at about 1014. The sensitivity is not higher than that of the standard ESR spectrometers. However, the result indicates the feasibility of a near field radical sensor in which the microinductor as a probe head and ESR signal processing circuit are integrated.

  8. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4.5H2O)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Ueno, Takehiro; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Katsura, Makoto; Ikeya, Motoji

    2005-01-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu 2+ ) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO 4 .5H 2 O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction

  9. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Atsushi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: atani@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueno, Takehiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamanaka, Chihiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Katsura, Makoto [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu{sup 2+}) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  10. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Atsushi; Ueno, Takehiro; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Katsura, Makoto; Ikeya, Motoji

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400 mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu2+) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  11. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulation of electron spin resonance spectroscopy in diverse environments: An integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Barone, Vincenzo

    2009-12-01

    We discuss in this work a new software tool, named E-SpiReS (Electron Spin Resonance Simulations), aimed at the interpretation of dynamical properties of molecules in fluids from electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. The code implements an integrated computational approach (ICA) for the calculation of relevant molecular properties that are needed in order to obtain spectral lines. The protocol encompasses information from atomistic level (quantum mechanical) to coarse grained level (hydrodynamical), and evaluates ESR spectra for rigid or flexible single or multi-labeled paramagnetic molecules in isotropic and ordered phases, based on a numerical solution of a stochastic Liouville equation. E-SpiReS automatically interfaces all the computational methodologies scheduled in the ICA in a way completely transparent for the user, who controls the whole calculation flow via a graphical interface. Parallelized algorithms are employed in order to allow running on calculation clusters, and a web applet Java has been developed with which it is possible to work from any operating system, avoiding the problems of recompilation. E-SpiReS has been used in the study of a number of different systems and two relevant cases are reported to underline the promising applicability of the ICA to complex systems and the importance of similar software tools in handling a laborious protocol. Program summaryProgram title: E-SpiReS Catalogue identifier: AEEM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL v2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 311 761 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 039 531 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C (core programs) and Java (graphical interface) Computer: PC and Macintosh Operating system: Unix and Windows Has the code been vectorized or

  13. The ESR dating of the Nanjing Homo erectus stratigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tiemei; Wu En; Yang Quan; Hu Yanqiu

    1997-01-01

    Five fossil tooth enamel samples collected from the stratum of the Nanjing Homo erectus were ESR dated. The average age is 355 +- 42 ka, based on the early uranium-uptake model. Additional uranium series measurement of fossil teeth confirms the appropriateness of the early uranium-uptake model for these ESR samples. Considering also the uranium-series ages of two calcite samples from the flow stone covering the fossil-containing stratum, an age value of 350 +- 50 ka for the Nanjing Homo erectus stratum is evaluated, which means that the Nanjing Homo erectus appeared in the late stage of Peking Man and also in the stage of human evolution earlier than Hexian Homo erectus

  14. Lyoluminescence and ESR correlation studies of trehalose dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Anand E-mail: anandr@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Oommen, Issac K.; Gundu Rao, T.K.; Sharma, D.N

    2002-07-01

    ESR studies of irradiated lyoluminescence (LL) phosphor, trehalose dihydrate showed a linear free radical growth up to a dose of 11 kGy. The LL output measured under oxygen equilibrated conditions showed an extension of the dosimetric response from 0.6 to 6 kGy. ESR spectral analysis indicates the formation of two radical species viz., 'a' and 'b' and their involvement in the LL process. The estimated free radical concentrations of radicals 'a' and 'b' were found to be 6.81x10{sup 15} and 1.35x10{sup 16} g{sup -1}, respectively, for a gamma dose of 10.8 kGy.

  15. ESR studies of the radiation effects on polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.W.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the polystyrene system (both pure and commercial samples) to elucidate the type and percentage of each paramagnetic species upon exposure to various irradiation doses. The size of dose plays a vital role in the type of spectra obtained. Upon irradiation in vacuo, polystyrene displays ESR spectra which are basically triplet in character but the line spacing and intensities of components are observed to depend on the magnitude of the irradiation dose. G value for the total radicals present and for the individual species present as a function of dose have been obtained. The relative concentration of each paramagnetic species has been determined through computer simulation of the observed ESR spectra. The relative stability of the different species with respect to temperature is discussed. The results for deuterated polystyrene is used to support those obtained for the unsubstituted polystyrene system. (author)

  16. Experimental Progress in Fast Cooling in the ESR

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, Markus; Beller, Peter; Franzke, Bernhard; Nolden, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    The ESR storage ring at GSI is operated with highly charged heavy ions. Due to the high electric charge the ions interact much stronger with electromagnetic fields. Therefore both cooling methods which are applied to stored ions in the ESR, stochastic cooling and electron cooling, are more powerful than for singly charged particles. The experimental results exhibit cooling times for stochastic cooling of a few seconds. For cold ion beams, electron cooling provides cooling times which are one to two orders of magnitude smaller. The beams are cooled to beam parameters which are limited by intrabeam scattering. At small ion numbers, however, intrabeam scattering is suppressed by electron cooling, clear evidence was found that the ion beam forms a one-dimensional ordered structure, a linear chain of ions. The strengths of stochastic cooling and electron cooling are complementary and can be combined favorably. Stochastic cooling is employed for pre-cooling of hot secondary beams followed by electron cooling to pro...

  17. ESR spectroscopic investigations of the radiation-grafting of fluoropolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, G; Roduner, E [University of Stuttgart (Germany); Brack, H P; Scherer, G G [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    ESR spectroscopic investigations have clarified the influence of several preparative parameters on the reaction rates and yields obtained in the radiation-grafting method used at PSI to prepare proton-conducting polymer membranes. At a given irradiation dose, a higher concentration of reactive radical sites was detected in ETFE films than in FEP films. This higher concentration explains the higher grafting levels and rates of the ETFE films found in our previous grafting experiments. Taken together, the in-situ ESR experiments and grafting experiments show that the rates of disappearance of radical species and grafting rates and final grafting levels depend strongly on the reaction temperature and the oxygen content of the system. Average grafted chain lengths were calculated to contain about 1,000 monomer units. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  18. The nuclear physics program at SIS/ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1991-01-01

    The present workshop discusses the physics program to be addressed with the new photon spectrometer TAPS. Part of this program will be carried out at the new accelerator facility SIS/ESR at GSI Darmstadt. To put the TAPS activities at SIS into perspective, an overview is given in the following discussing the new GSI facility, the research program under consideration and the various experimental facilities besides TAPS to carry out these studies. (orig.)

  19. Ferromagnetic resonance characterization of nano-FePt by electron spin resonance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements at room temperature and X-band microwave frequency were performed on highly crystalline FePt system thin films. Fairly high DC static magnetic field absorption of about 300 mT was observed in these films...

  20. ESR signals in quartz for the studies of earth surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, S.; Shimada, A., , Dr; Takada, M.

    2017-12-01

    Various ESR (electron spin resonance) signals are observed in quartz. As they are formed by natural radiation, the signals are useful in dating of geological events, such as volcanic eruption, faulting and sedimentation. It was also found that those paramagnetic defects can be fingerprints of sediments, to be used for studies in sediment provenance. The signal of the E1' center, unpaired electron at an oxygen vacancy, was first used for such studies. A method was proposed to estimate the number of the precursors (oxygen vacancies) from the E1' center intensity. The number of oxygen vacancies in quartz was found to have positive correlation with the crystallization age. Using this feature, studies were quite successful in aeolian dust. It was shown that the sources of aeolian dust deposited in northern part of Japanese Islands were different between in MIS1 and MIS 2. In combination with crystallinity index, the contributions of the dust components from three origins were quantitatively obtained. After these, the provenance studies on river sediments have started where the impurity centers in quartz were employed, which are the Al center, the Ti centers, and the Ge centers. Sediments of Kizu River, Mie to Nara prefectures in Central Japan are most extensively studied. Firstly, it was shown that each of possible sources of granitic quartz around the reaches has respective characteristics in the number of oxygen vacancies and the signal intensities of impurity centers. Secondary, by the artificial mixing experiments, the impurity signal intensities have the values consistent with the mixing ratio of the two samples of quartz with different intensities. At river junctions, the mixing ratios were calculated from the ESR signals. At some locations, the mixing ratio values obtained from one signal were consistent with the ones from another signal while at some locations they were not. The latter inconsistent results would indicate that the river sediments are

  1. Investigating electron spin resonance spectroscopy of a spin-½ compound in a home-built spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jit; Roy, Subhadip; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Singh, Sourabh; Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Mitra, Chiranjib

    2018-05-01

    In this work we report electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements performed on NH4CuPO4.H2O, a Heisenberg spin ½ dimer compound. We carried out the experiments both at room temperature and at 78 K, which are well above the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of the system where the paramagnetic spins have a dominant role in determining its magnetic behavior. We performed the measurements in a home built custom designed continuous wave electron spin resonance (CW-ESR) spectrometer. By analyzing the experimental data, we were able to quantify the Landé g-factor and the ESR line-width of the sample.

  2. Characterization of WO3-doped borophosphate glasses by optical, IR and ESR spectroscopic techniques before and after subjecting to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouis, M.A.; EI-Batal, H.A.; Azooz, M.A.; Abdelghany, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Borophosphate glasses containing increasing WO 3 within the doping level (0.16-1.33%) have been prepared and investigated by UV-visible, infrared spectral measurements. These glasses have been exposed to gamma rays with a dose of 8 Mrad for studying the effect of gamma radiation on the combined studied spectra of such glasses. The optical spectrum of undoped borophosphate glass reveals strong UV absorption but with no visible bands. This strong UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the chemicals used for the preparation of this borophosphate glass. The WO 3 -doped samples show two additional UV and visible bands at about 380 and 740 nm due to the presence of both W 6+ and W 5+ ions in noticeable content. The calculated induced spectra reveal the appearance of an ultraviolet band at 320 nm and two visible bands centered at 390 and 540 nm which are related to the combined presence of W 6+ and W 5+ ions. The FTIR spectra show vibrational bands due to characteristic constitutional phosphate and borate groups but the phosphate groups are predominant due to the high P 2 O 5 content (50%). The effect of the addition of WO 3 with the dopant level reveals limited changes in the IR spectra. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra show specified signals in the high WO 3 content glass but on gamma irradiation the signals are disappeared. This result confirms the decrease of the W 5+ ions by photochemical oxidation to paired W 6+ ions. This result is also observed in optical absorption of WO 3 doped glasses after gamma irradiation through the disappearance of the visible band at 740 nm. (author)

  3. The importance of pre-annealing treatment for ESR dating of mollusc shells: A key study for İsmil in Konya closed Basin/Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Gamze; Sayin, Ulku; Aydin, Hulya; Isik, Mesut; Kapan, Sevinc; Demir, Ahmet; Engin, Birol; Delikan, Arif; Orhan, Hukmu; Biyik, Recep; Ozmen, Ayhan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the geological ages of fossil mollusc shells systematically collected from two different geological splitting at İsmil Location (37.72769° N, 33.17781° E) in eastern part of Konya. According to the assessment of obtained ESR ages, the importance of pre-annealing treatment emphasize in the case of g=2.0007 dating signal is overlapped with the other signals arisen from short lived radicals that cause the wrong age calculation. To overcome this problem, the samples are pre-annealed at 180°C for 16 minutes and, in this case ESR ages are re-calculated for g=1.9973 dating signal. Dose response curves are obtained using 1.9973 signals after pre-annealing treatments for each samples. ESR ages of samples are obtained in the range of 138 ± 38 ka and 132 ± 30 ka (Upper Pleistocene) according to the Early Uranium Uptake model and the results are in good agreement with the estimated ages from stratigraphic and paleontological correlation by geologists. Thus, it is suggested that especially in the case of 2.0007 dating signal cannot been used due to superimposition case, the signal with 1.9973 g value can be used for dating after pre-annealing treatment. The results reports the first ESR ages on shells collected from İsmil Location and highlight the importance of pre-annealing treatment. This study is supported by TUBITAK 114Y237 research project.

  4. Uncertainties in low γ-dose determinations by means of ESR using the biomaterial modern coral reef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Gamal M.; Sharaf, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The ESR spectrum of unirradiated modern aragonite coral (CaCO 3 ) material from the Red Sea (Hurgada area) is characterized by four signals with spectroscopic splitting factors of g=2.0056, 2.0030, 2.0006 and 1.997. The most intensive and stable line in this spectrum is attributed to CO 2 - radicals at g=2.0006+/-0.0005. The dose response from 50mGy to 20Gy, energy dependence and effective atomic number are calculated so as to investigate coral as a dosimeter material in the clinical dose range. The lower experimental γ-dose limit was found to be 50mGy with signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 15. The combined and expanded uncertainties accompanying these measurements are 1.72% and 3.44%, respectively

  5. Uncertainties in low {gamma}-dose determinations by means of ESR using the biomaterial modern coral reef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Gamal M. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street El-Haram El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)]. E-mail: gamalhassan65@hotmail.com; Sharaf, M.A. [Department of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Tersa Street El-Haram El-Giza, P.O. Box 136 Giza, El-Giza (Egypt)

    2006-01-15

    The ESR spectrum of unirradiated modern aragonite coral (CaCO{sub 3}) material from the Red Sea (Hurgada area) is characterized by four signals with spectroscopic splitting factors of g=2.0056, 2.0030, 2.0006 and 1.997. The most intensive and stable line in this spectrum is attributed to CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals at g=2.0006+/-0.0005. The dose response from 50mGy to 20Gy, energy dependence and effective atomic number are calculated so as to investigate coral as a dosimeter material in the clinical dose range. The lower experimental {gamma}-dose limit was found to be 50mGy with signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 15. The combined and expanded uncertainties accompanying these measurements are 1.72% and 3.44%, respectively.

  6. Evolution of ESR Technology and Equipment for Long Hollow Ingots Manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medovar, Lev; Stovpchenko, Ganna; Dudka, Grigory; Kozminskiy, Alexander; Fedorovskii, Borys; Lebid, Vitalii; Gusiev, Iaroslav

    In this paper development of both ESR technology and equipment for hollow ingot manufacture review and analysis are presented. The real complications of hollow ingot manufacture and some tendentious issues which restrict process dissemination are discussed. An actual data of modern manufacture of as-cast pipes for heat and power engineering by traditional ESR with consumable electrode are given. Results of microstructure and nonmetal inclusion investigations have shown the high quality of as-cast ESR pipes. On the basis of these results the possibility to produce huge ESR hollows (up 5000 mm in dia) with final goal drastically to reduce setting ratio on forged shells and rings or even replace it by ESR hollows as-cast is grounded. Two new ESR technologies — consumable electrodes change and liquid metal usage — have passed pilot tests for heavy hollow production and shown very prospective results to be presented.

  7. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  8. From dating to biophysics -- 20 years of progress in applied ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    ESR spectroscopy represents a tool for quantitative radiation analysis that was developed somehow simultaneously for dating purposes in Japan and in Germany for high-level standardization, in the mid-seventies. Meanwhile, ESR dosimetry has reached an established metrology level. Present research fields of ESR dosimetry consider post-accident dose reconstruction in the environment, and biophysical dosimetry using human tissues. The latter promises a re-definition of radiation risk for chronicle exposure to be derived from individuals of the early nuclear facilities in Russia, and hopefully United States in the future. An attempt is made to sketch development and potential future of the ESR technique

  9. Influences of different sample preparation methods on tooth enamel ESR signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenyi; Jiao Ling; Zhang Liang'an; Pan Zhihong; Zeng Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the influences of different sample preparation methods on tooth enamel ESR signals in order to reduce the effect of dentine on their sensitivities to radiation. Methods: The enamel was separated from dentine of non-irradiated adult teeth by mechanical, chemical, or both methods. The samples of different preparations were scanned by an ESR spectrometer before and after irradiation. Results: The response of ESR signals of samples prepared with different methods to radiation dose was significantly different. Conclusion: The selection of sample preparation method is very important for dose reconstruction by tooth enamel ESR dosimetry, especially in the low dose range. (authors)

  10. Broadband electron spin resonance from 500 MHz to 40 GHz using superconducting coplanar waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Conrad; Bothner, Daniel; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Bogani, Lapo; Scheffler, Marc; Dressel, Martin

    2013-04-01

    We present non-conventional electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments based on microfabricated superconducting Nb thin film waveguides. A very broad frequency range, from 0.5 to 40 GHz, becomes accessible at low temperatures down to 1.6 K and in magnetic fields up to 1.4 T. This allows for an accurate inspection of the ESR absorption position in the frequency domain, in contrast to the more common observation as a function of magnetic field. We demonstrate the applicability of frequency-swept ESR on Cr3+ atoms in ruby as well as on organic radicals of the nitronyl-nitroxide family. Measurements between 1.6 and 30 K reveal a small frequency shift of the ESR and a resonance broadening below the critical temperature of Nb, which we both attribute to a modification of the magnetic field configuration due to the appearance of shielding supercurrents in the waveguide.

  11. Electron spin resonance from NV centers in diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delord, T; Nicolas, L; Schwab, L; Hétet, G

    2017-01-01

    We report observations of the electron spin resonance (ESR) of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamonds that are levitating in an ion trap. Using a needle Paul trap operating under ambient conditions, we demonstrate efficient microwave driving of the electronic spin and show that the spin properties of deposited diamond particles measured by the ESR are retained in the Paul trap. We also exploit the ESR signal to show angle stability of single trapped mono-crystals, a necessary step towards spin-controlled levitating macroscopic objects. (paper)

  12. Lifetime-broadening-suppressed X-ray absorption spectrum of β-YbAlB4 deduced from Yb 3d → 2p resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Naomi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Kanai, Noriko; Hayashi, Hisashi; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Kuga, Kentaro; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Watanabe, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the Yb 3d → 2p (Yb Lα 1,2 ) resonant X-ray emission spectrum of β-YbAlB 4 was acquired using excitation energies around the Yb L 3 -edge, at 2 K. Subsequently, the lifetime-broadening-suppressed (LBS) X-ray absorption structure (XAS) spectrum was obtained using the SIM-RIXS program. This spectrum was found to exhibit clearly resolved pre-edge and shoulder structures. Resonant Lα 1 emission spectra were well reproduced from LBS-XAS profiles over wide ranges of excitation and emission energies. In contrast, noticeable discrepancies appeared between the experimental and simulated Lα 2 emission spectra, suggesting an effect resulting from M 4 M 5 O 1 Coster-Kronig transitions. LBS-XAS, in conjunction with partial fluorescence yield (PFY) XAS and transmission XAS, determined a value for the Yb valence (v) in β-YbAlB 4 of 2.76 ± 0.08 at 2 K. Despite this relatively large uncertainty in v, each method provided a consistent variation in valence (δv) as the temperature was raised from 2 to 280 K: 0.060 ± 0.004 (LBS-XAS), 0.061 ± 0.005 (PFY-XAS) and 0.058 ± 0.007 (transmission XAS). The smaller δv associated with LBS-XAS demonstrates the greater precision of this method. (author)

  13. Different Aberrant Mentalizing Networks in Males and Females with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence from Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have found that individuals with autism spectrum disorders show impairments in mentalizing processes and aberrant brain activity compared with typically developing participants. However, the findings are mainly from male participants and the aberrant effects in autism spectrum disorder females and sex differences are still…

  14. Association with litter size of new polymorphisms on ESR1 and ESR2 genes in a Chinese-European pig line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Carmen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to search for polymorphisms in the coding region of the estrogen receptors 1 and 2 (ESR1 and ESR2 and to analyze the effects of these variants and the well known intronic ESR1 Pvu II polymorphism on litter size in a Chinese-European pig line. We identified five silent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in the ESR1 cDNA: c.669T > C (exon 3, c.1227C > T (exon 5, c.1452C > T (exon 7, c.1665T > C and c.1755A > G (exon 8. One pair of these SNP (c.1665T > C and c.1755A > G co-segregated in the analyzed line, and the SNP c.669T > C showed the same segregation pattern as the Pvu II polymorphism. These polymorphisms were tested in this study, although the c.1452C > T SNP within exon 7 was not analyzed due to its low informativeness. In the ESR2 cDNA, one missense SNP was found within exon 5, which caused an amino acid substitution in the coded protein: "c.949G > A (p.Val317Met" and was tested on sow litter size. Information on 1622 litter records from 408 genotyped sows was analyzed to determine whether these SNP influenced the total number of piglets born (TNB or the number of born alive (NBA. The polymorphisms ESR1: [Pvu II; c.669T > C], ESR1: [c.1665T > C; c.1755A > G] and ESR2: c.949G > A showed no statistically significant association with litter size. However, the ESR1: c.1227T allele was significantly associated with TNB. The additive substitution effect was estimated to be 0.40 piglets born per litter (P

  15. Physics book: CRYRING'a'ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestinsky, M.; Aurand, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Andrianov, V.

    2016-01-01

    CRYRING is a heavy ion storage ring, formerly located in Stockholm University. During close to two decades of operation in Sweden, many significant scientific contributions to atomic and molecular physics were achieved using CRYRING. To further leverage its capabilities into the realm of intense beams of highly charged ions, of exotic isotopes, and antiprotons, it has for long been proposed to relocate CRYRING from Sweden to GSI/FAIR, which is the CRYRING'a'ESR project. In Darmstadt, the ring is being modernized and adapted to the GSI/FAIR standards and set up downstream of ESR. In the different chapters we sketch out a broad scientific program in the fields of atomic and nuclear physics and at their intersection. The realization will allow for exciting high-precision spectroscopy studies of atomic systems and their dynamics where special emphasis is given to the effects of quantum electrodynamics (QED) and electron-correlation in the strong field domain (Chap. 2). The intersection of atomic and nuclear physics is addressed where the imprint of nuclear effects on the electronic shell are investigated with spectroscopic methods (Chap. 3), and exploring the nuclear structure, nuclear dynamical processes and quantitative measurements of astrophysically relevant (p, γ)-reaction rates (Chap. 4). These experiments are of prime interest for testing modern theoretical methods on fundamental processes as well as for applications in astrophysics and for modelling plasmas. In the domain of slow collisions in of heavy ions at highest charge-states where atomic processes are prevailed by large perturbations, these studies are expected to refine substantially our understanding of the physics of extreme electromagnetic fields. Also, CRYRINGaESR will offer extracted high-quality ion beams, thus enabling novel research opportunities for external-target experiments with slow highly-charged ions. The experimental boundary conditions and suggested future instrumentation

  16. Dose evaluation due to electron spin resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dosimeter has been developed with free radical created in sucrose. Free radical was observed with using the electron spin resonance (ESR) equipment. The ESR absorption due to free radical in sucrose appeared at the magnetic field between the third and fourth ESR ones of Mn +2 standard sample. Sucrose as radiation dosimeter can linearly measure the dose from 5 x 10 -3 Gy to 10 5 Gy. If the new model of the ESR equipment is used and ESR observation is carried out at lower temperature such as liquid nitrogen or liquid helium temperature, the sucrose ESR dosimeter will be detectable about 5 x 10 -4 Gy or less. Fading of the free radicals in the irradiated sucrose was scarcely obtained about six months after irradiation and in the irradiated sucrose stored at 55deg C and 100deg C for one hour or more also scarcely observed. It is concluded from these radiation property that sucrose is useful for the accidental or emergency dosimeter for the inhabitants. (author)

  17. Mechanical detection of electron spin resonance beyond 1 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) in the terahertz (THz) region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever. The ESR absorption of a tiny single crystal of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH 4 ) 2 (SO 4 ) 2 ⋅6H 2 O, was observed in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz using a backward travelling wave oscillator as a THz-wave source. This is the highest frequency of mechanical detection of ESR till date. The spectral resolution was evaluated with the ratio of the peak separation to the sum of the half-width at half maximum of two absorption peaks. The highest resolution value of 8.59 ± 0.53 was achieved at 685 GHz, while 2.47 ± 0.01 at 80 GHz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging

  18. Angular dependant micro-ESR characterization of a locally doped Gd3+:Al2O3 hybrid system for quantum applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisby, I. S.; de Graaf, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Meeson, P. J.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Lindstrom, T.

    Rare-earth doped crystals interfaced with superconducting quantum circuitry are an attractive platform for quantum memory and transducer applications. Here we present a detailed characterization of a locally implanted Gd3+ in Al2O3 system coupled to a superconducting micro-resonator, by performing angular dependent micro-electron-spin-resonance (micro-ESR) measurements at mK temperatures. The device is fabricated using a hard Si3N4 mask to facilitate a local ion-implantation technique for precision control of the dopant location. The technique is found not to degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remains above 105 (1). We find the measured angular dependence of the micro-ESR spectra to be in excellent agreement with the modelled Hamiltonian, supporting the conclusion that the dopant ions are successfully integrated into their relevant lattice sites whilst maintaining crystalline symmetries. Furthermore, we observe clear contributions from individual microwave field components of our micro-resonator, emphasising the need for controllable local implantation. 1 Wisby et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 102601 (2014)

  19. Distribution of free radical products among the bases of x-irradiated DNA model systems: an ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalletta, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of solid state DNA to ionizing radiation results in an ESR spectrum that has been attributed to a nonstoichiometric distribution of free radicals among the bases. At low temperatures radical cations appear to be stabilized on the purines while radical anions are stabilized on the pyrimidines. This distribution could arise from at least two different mechanisms. The first, charge transfer, involves the transfer of electrons and/or holes between stacked bases. In the second, saturation asymmetry, the free radical distribution arises from differences in the dose saturation characteristics of individual bases. The present study addresses the relative importance of charge transfer versus saturation asymmetry in the production of these population differences. Radicals formed by dissolving irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidines in aqueous solutions containing NtB or PBN spin traps were analyzed using ESR. The relative importance of the two free radical production and distribution mechanisms was assessed using DNA model systems. Saturation asymmetry plays a significant role in determining the free radical population while charge transfer was unambiguously observed in only one, the complex of dAMP and TMP. The results demonstrate that any quantitative analysis of charge transfer must take saturation asymmetry into account

  20. Self-assembled organic radicals on Au(111) surfaces: a combined ToF-SIMS, STM, and ESR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Matteo; Sorace, Lorenzo; Gorini, Lapo; Piras, Federica M; Caneschi, Andrea; Magnani, Agnese; Menichetti, Stefano; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-02-27

    Electron spin resonance (ESR), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) have been used in parallel to characterize the deposition on gold surface of a series of nitronyl nitroxide radicals. These compounds have been specifically synthesized with methyl-thio linking groups suitable to interact with the gold surface to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), which can be considered relevant in the research for molecular-based spintronics devices, as suggested in recent papers. The degree of the expected ordering on the surface of these SAMs has been tuned by varying the chemical structure of synthesized radicals. ToF-SIMS has been used to support the evidence of the occurrence of the deposition process. STM has shown the different qualities of the obtained SAMs, with the degree of local order increasing as the degree of freedom of the molecules on the surface is decreased. Finally, ESR has confirmed that the deposition process does not affect the paramagnetic characteristics of radicals and that it affords a complete single-layered coverage of the surface. Further, the absence of angular dependence in the spectra indicates that the small regions of local ordering do not give rise to a long-range order and suggests a quite large mobility of the radical on the surface, probably due to the weak interaction with gold provided by the methyl-thio linking group.

  1. Dynamic crossovers and activated regimes in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate): an ESR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, Laura; Autiero, Ciro; Faetti, Massimo; Giordano, Marco; Zulli, Fabio [Department of Physics ' E Fermi' , University of Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); polyLAB-CNR, largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2006-07-19

    The rotational dynamics of the spin probe cholestane dissolved in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate) sample has been investigated via electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The measurements were carried out in a wide temperature range: different dynamic regions have been recognized, and the coupling of the probe dynamics to the {alpha} and secondary relaxations has been revealed. In particular, the coupling with the structural relaxation is ruled by two fractionary Vogel-Fulcher laws (VF). The crossover from one VF region to the other occurs at the temperature T{sub C} = 1.17T{sub g}, signalling the onset of the cooperativity in the dynamics and confirming a behaviour previously observed in ESR studies carried out on polymeric glass-formers. Furthermore, in this work we discuss the activated regime at the highest temperatures and show that the activation energy does not depend on the length of the polymer main- and side-chains, while its onset temperature linearly depends on the chain length.

  2. Dynamic crossovers and activated regimes in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate): an ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, Laura; Autiero, Ciro; Faetti, Massimo; Giordano, Marco; Zulli, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of the spin probe cholestane dissolved in a narrow distribution poly(n-butyl acrylate) sample has been investigated via electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The measurements were carried out in a wide temperature range: different dynamic regions have been recognized, and the coupling of the probe dynamics to the α and secondary relaxations has been revealed. In particular, the coupling with the structural relaxation is ruled by two fractionary Vogel-Fulcher laws (VF). The crossover from one VF region to the other occurs at the temperature T C = 1.17T g , signalling the onset of the cooperativity in the dynamics and confirming a behaviour previously observed in ESR studies carried out on polymeric glass-formers. Furthermore, in this work we discuss the activated regime at the highest temperatures and show that the activation energy does not depend on the length of the polymer main- and side-chains, while its onset temperature linearly depends on the chain length

  3. Structure of very heavy few-electron ions - new results from the heavy ion storage ring, ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokler, P.H.; Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Moshammer, R.; Rymuza, P.; Bosch, F.; Kandler, T.

    1993-08-01

    The heavy ion synchrotron/storage ring facility at GSI, SIS/ESR, provides intense beams of cooled, highly-charged ions up to naked uranium (U 92+ ). By electron capture during ion-atom collisions in the gas target of the ESR or by recombination at ion-electron encounters in the ''electron cooler'' excited states are populated. The detailed structure of very heavy one-, two- and three-electron ions is studied. The different mechanisms leading to the excited states are described, as well as the new experimental tools now available for a detailed spectroscopy of these interesting systems. Special emphasis is given to X-ray transitions to the groundstates in H- and He-like systems. For the heaviest species the groundstate Lambshift can now be probed on an accuracy level of better than 10% using solid-state X-ray detectors. Applying dispersive X-ray analyzing techniques, this accuracy will certainly be improved in future. However, utilizing the dielectronic resonances for a spectroscopy, the structure in Li-like heavy ions can already be probed now on the sub eV level. (orig.)

  4. arXiv Search for narrow resonances in the b-tagged dijet mass spectrum in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correia Silva, Gilson; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Medina Jaime, Miguel; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Calligaris, Luigi; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Kucher, Inna; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lattaud, Hugues; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Zhang, Sijing; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Danilov, Vladyslav; De Wit, Adinda; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Damiani, Daniela; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Elwood, Adam; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Knolle, Joscha; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Meyer, Mareike; Missiroli, Marino; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Tholen, Heiner; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Kutzner, Viktor; Lange, Johannes; Marconi, Daniele; Multhaup, Jens; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Reimers, Arne; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Iemmi, Fabio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; 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Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; 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Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; 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Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Rekovic, Vladimir; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-05-15

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to bottom quark-antiquark pairs is presented, using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The search is extended to masses lower than those reached in typical searches for resonances decaying into jet pairs at the LHC, by taking advantage of triggers that identify jets originating from bottom quarks. No significant excess of events is observed above the background predictions. Limits are set on the product of cross section and branching fraction to bottom quarks for spin 0, 1, and 2 resonances in the mass range of 325-1200 GeV. These results significantly improve on the limits for resonances decaying into jet pairs in the 325-500 GeV mass range.

  5. Search for Narrow Resonances in the b -Tagged Dijet Mass Spectrum in Proton-Proton Collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

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M.; Rabady, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Selvaggi, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Stakia, A.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Verweij, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Caminada, L.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Backhaus, M.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Casal, B.; Chernyavskaya, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dorfer, C.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Klijnsma, T.; Lustermann, W.; Marionneau, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Reichmann, M.; Ruini, D.; Sanz Becerra, D. A.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Brzhechko, D.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Del Burgo, R.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Neutelings, I.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Schweiger, K.; Seitz, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Chang, Y. H.; Cheng, K. y.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Steen, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Bat, A.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Tok, U. G.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Atakisi, I. O.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E. A.; Agaras, M. N.; Atay, S.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Komurcu, Y.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Davignon, O.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Linacre, J.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Bloch, P.; Borg, J.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Komm, M.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Palladino, V.; Pesaresi, M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Strebler, T.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wardle, N.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Zahid, S.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Smith, C.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Hadley, M.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, J.; Mao, Z.; Morrison, T.; Narain, M.; Pazzini, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Stolp, D.; Taylor, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, F.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Regnard, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Karapostoli, G.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Gilbert, D.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Citron, M.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Gouskos, L.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; MacDonald, E.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Cheng, Y.; Chu, J.; Datta, A.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Quach, D.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, W.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Joshi, B. M.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Shi, K.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Dittmer, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hung, W. T.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Rogan, C.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Modak, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Eno, S. C.; Feng, Y.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bauer, G.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Harris, P.; Hsu, D.; Hu, M.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhaozhong, S.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Wadud, M. A.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Golf, F.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Freer, C.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Wamorkar, T.; Wang, B.; Wisecarver, A.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Bucci, R.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Li, W.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Siddireddy, P.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wightman, A.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Gutay, L.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Qiu, H.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xiao, R.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Dolen, J.; Parashar, N.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Freed, S.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Shi, W.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Zhang, A.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Poudyal, N.; Sturdy, J.; Thapa, P.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Rekovic, V.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to bottom quark-antiquark pairs is presented, using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The search is extended to masses lower than those reached in typical searches for resonances decaying into jet pairs at the LHC, by taking advantage of triggers that identify jets originating from bottom quarks. No significant excess of events is observed above the background predictions. Limits are set on the product of cross section and branching fraction to bottom quarks for spin 0, 1, and 2 resonances in the mass range of 325-1200 GeV. These results improve on the limits for resonances decaying into jet pairs in the 325-500 GeV mass range.

  6. Dating Of Remains Of Neanderthals And Homo Sapiens From Anatolian Region By ESR-US Combined Methods Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Farkh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We tried in the present study to apply the electron spin resonance method ESR combined with uranium-series method US for dating fossilized human teeth and found valuable archaeological sites such as Karain Cave in Anatolia. Karain Cave is a crucial site in a region that has yielded remains of Neanderthals and Homo sapiens our direct ancestors. The dating of these remains allowed us to trace the history since the presence of man on earth. Indeed Anatolia in Turkey is an important region of the world because it represents a passage between Africa the Middle East and Europe. Our study was conducted on faunal teeth found near human remains. The combination of ESR and US data on the teeth provides an understanding of their complex geochemical evolution and get better estimated results. Our samples were taken from the central cutting where geological layers are divided into archaeological horizons each 10 cm. The AH4 horizon of I.3 layer which represents the boundary between the Middle Paleolithic and Upper Paleolithic is dated to 29 4 ka by the ESR-US model. Below two horizons AH6 and AH8 in the same layer I.4 are dated respectively 40 6 and 45 7 ka using the ESR-US model. In layer II where a stalagmite floor was taken we made two U-Th dating at the base and on the top ages oscillated around 120 ka. Since human remains were collected from AH3 horizon for Homo sapiens and AH5 and AH7 horizons for the Neanderthal man so the dates obtained in AH4 AH6 and AH8 represent maximum ages. Thus they provide the disappearance of Neanderthal man between 45 and 40 ka and the appearance of Homo sapiens in 29 ka in Anatolia region. Undoubtedly there is a chronological gap between the Middle and Upper Paleolithic represented by the disappearance of Neanderthals and the appearance of sapiens and none of our results confirm the contemporaneity of these two species in this region.

  7. Phase transitions of natural corals monitored by ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vongsavat, V. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Rajathevi, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Winotai, P. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Rajathevi, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Meejoo, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Rajathevi, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)]. E-mail: scsmj@mahidol.ac.th

    2006-01-15

    The main purpose of this work is to present a systematic study of structure of marine exoskeletons, Acropora coral and its structural transformation upon heat treatments. The coralline sample was ground and characterized as powder throughout this work. Structural identifications of all samples have been confirmed using X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. It was clearly found that the fresh specimen is made of aragonite, a common phase of the mineral CaCO{sub 3}. Thermal analyses, DSC and TGA were used to monitor structural and thermal decompositions and an irreversible solid-state phase transition from aragonite to calcite of the marine carbonate. Next, the coral powder was annealed at specific temperatures over the range 350-900 deg. C, and the effects of heat treatment on the structure of coralline samples were carefully studied by Rietveld refinement method. In addition, we have examined Mn{sup 2+} paramagnetic ions and free radicals present in the coral and changes of those upon heating by using ESR spectroscopy. The local environments of Mn{sup 2+} ions were verified from the calculated ESR spectra using appropriate spin Hamiltonian parameters, i.e. gyromagnetic tensor g , zero-field splitting D and hyperfine tensor A . This work reported structures and compositions as well as physical, chemical and thermal properties of the coralline material upon heat treatments qualitatively and quantitatively.

  8. Phase transitions of natural corals monitored by ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vongsavat, V.; Winotai, P.; Meejoo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to present a systematic study of structure of marine exoskeletons, Acropora coral and its structural transformation upon heat treatments. The coralline sample was ground and characterized as powder throughout this work. Structural identifications of all samples have been confirmed using X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. It was clearly found that the fresh specimen is made of aragonite, a common phase of the mineral CaCO 3 . Thermal analyses, DSC and TGA were used to monitor structural and thermal decompositions and an irreversible solid-state phase transition from aragonite to calcite of the marine carbonate. Next, the coral powder was annealed at specific temperatures over the range 350-900 deg. C, and the effects of heat treatment on the structure of coralline samples were carefully studied by Rietveld refinement method. In addition, we have examined Mn 2+ paramagnetic ions and free radicals present in the coral and changes of those upon heating by using ESR spectroscopy. The local environments of Mn 2+ ions were verified from the calculated ESR spectra using appropriate spin Hamiltonian parameters, i.e. gyromagnetic tensor g , zero-field splitting D and hyperfine tensor A . This work reported structures and compositions as well as physical, chemical and thermal properties of the coralline material upon heat treatments qualitatively and quantitatively

  9. Second interlaboratory-comparison project on ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabas, M.; Walther, R.; Radtke, U.

    1993-01-01

    An intercomparison project on ESR dating in which 14 ESR groups participated was initiated. Each group was provided with two samples of a coral powder, one of which (Sample A) was a fossil coral with a mass spectrometric determined U/Th age. Sample B was a recent coral, irradiated with a definite γ-dose (checked by alanine dosimetry). In both cases the accumulated dose (AD) had to be determined (for sample A the U-content and age as well). Additionally, the chance of a calibration of γ-sources by alanine dosimeters was offered. The results show that the γ-source calibration is better then ± 5%, the mean value of the AD from sample A seems to agree with the expected AD but the mean AD value from sample B is overestimated, systematic errors occur due to the fitting procedure: the AD estimate depends on the maximum γ-dose used for the irradiation curve, the AD determination including the smallest systematic error gives correct values for sample B but too low values for sample A which may be caused by fading of the signal g = 2.0006. (author)

  10. Study of free-radical centers in lignin with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzina, S.I.; Demidov, S.V.; Brezgunov, A.Yu.; Poluehktov, O.G.; Grinberg, O.Ya.; Dubinskij, A.A.; Mikhajlov, A.I.; Lebedev, Ya.S.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of paramagnetic centers in pristine lignin and lignin, treated with molecular chlorine, aqueous solutions of acids and alkalis, and γ- and UV-irradiated, was studied with 2-mm band ESR spectroscopy. Most of the observed singlet ESR lines are accounted for by radicals with conjugated bonds. High reactivity of double bonds of polyconjugated systems was in the processes studied

  11. The Impact of ESR1 Mutations on the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejerrey, Sasha M; Dustin, Derek; Kim, Jin-Ah; Gu, Guowei; Rechoum, Yassine; Fuqua, Suzanne A W

    2018-05-07

    After nearly 20 years of research, it is now established that mutations within the estrogen receptor (ER) gene, ESR1, frequently occur in metastatic breast cancer and influence response to hormone therapy. Though early studies presented differing results, sensitive sequencing techniques now show that ESR1 mutations occur at a frequency between 20 and 40% depending on the assay method. Recent studies have focused on several "hot spot mutations," a cluster of mutations found in the hormone-binding domain of the ESR1 gene. Throughout the course of treatment, tumor evolution can occur, and ESR1 mutations emerge and become enriched in the metastatic setting. Sensitive techniques to continually monitor mutant burden in vivo are needed to effectively treat patients with mutant ESR1. The full impact of these mutations on tumor response to different therapies remains to be determined. However, recent studies indicate that mutant-bearing tumors may be less responsive to specific hormonal therapies, and suggest that aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy may select for the emergence of ESR1 mutations. Additionally, different mutations may respond discretely to targeted therapies. The need for more preclinical mechanistic studies on ESR1 mutations and the development of better agents to target these mutations are urgently needed. In the future, sequential monitoring of ESR1 mutational status will likely direct personalized therapeutic regimens appropriate to each tumor's unique mutational landscape.

  12. ESR study of weakly irradiated organic conductors: TMTSF-DMTCNQ and (TMTSF)2PF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forro, L.; Beuneu, F.

    1982-01-01

    ESR experiments are presented on irradiated TMTSF-DMTCNQ and (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . They suggest that a weak disorder extends the metallic phases to low temperatures. Surprisingly, disorder has no effect on the ESR linewidth of (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 between 20 and 30 K, where the d.c. conductivity changes a lot with disorder. (author)

  13. ESR/alanine dosimetry: Study of the kinetics of free radical formation. Evaluation of its contribution to the evolution of the signal after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolo, J.M.; Feaugas, V.; Hourdin, L.

    1999-01-01

    CH 3 C HCOOH is commonly accepted as the free radical responsible for the ESR signal detected in alanine after irradiation. The aim of this study is to find out the number of transient species leading to this radical and their kinetics of reaction. To do so, we follow the evolution of the ESR/alanine spectrum shape and correlate the response estimated from the central peak height to the absorbed dose. We use the theory of transformation systems. The first step is to make hypothesis on the number of equivalence classes and their content. From these hypotheses, we model the kinetics of free radical concentrations and check their fitting with experiment. We present comments on these different models, and their consequences on the evolution of the ESR signal on the first days after irradiation. The two successive reaction mechanisms (creation of free radicals and recombination reaction) are compared with the results obtained from a multiparametric study (experimental design) of combined effects (temperature and humidity before and after irradiation) which influence the reaction kinetics. (author)

  14. Joint analysis of ESR lineshapes and 1H NMRD profiles of DOTA-Gd derivatives by means of the slow motion theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, D.; Kowalewski, J.; Tipikin, D. S.; Freed, J. H.; Mościcki, M.; Mielczarek, A.; Port, M.

    2011-01-01

    The "Swedish slow motion theory" [Nilsson and Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000)] applied so far to Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) profiles for solutions of transition metal ion complexes has been extended to ESR spectral analysis, including in addition g-tensor anisotropy effects. The extended theory has been applied to interpret in a consistent way (within one set of parameters) NMRD profiles and ESR spectra at 95 and 237 GHz for two Gd(III) complexes denoted as P760 and P792 (hydrophilic derivatives of DOTA-Gd, with molecular masses of 5.6 and 6.5 kDa, respectively). The goal is to verify the applicability of the commonly used pseudorotational model of the transient zero field splitting (ZFS). According to this model the transient ZFS is described by a tensor of a constant amplitude, defined in its own principal axes system, which changes its orientation with respect to the laboratory frame according to the isotropic diffusion equation with a characteristic time constant (correlation time) reflecting the time scale of the distortional motion. This unified interpretation of the ESR and NMRD leads to reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the pseudorotational model indeed captures the essential features of the electron spin dynamics.

  15. The Evaluation of IL6 and ESR1 Gene Polymorphisms in Primary Dysmenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Asker Zeki; Karakus, Nevin; Yigit, Serbulent; Cakmak, Bulent; Nacar, Mehmet Can; Yılmaz Dogru, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecological complaint with painful menstrual cramps in pelvis without any pathology. It affects about half of menstruating women, and it causes significant disruption in quality of life. We investigated the association between IL6 gene promoter and ESR1 gene XbaI and PvuII polymorphisms and primary dysmenorrhea. In this case-control study, 152 unrelated young women with primary dysmenorrhea and 150 unrelated healthy age-matched controls participated. Genomic DNA was isolated and IL6 and ESR1 gene polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-based RFLP assay. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of IL6 gene promoter and ESR1 gene XbaI polymorphisms were not statistically different between patients and controls (p > 0.05). However, the genotype and allele frequencies of ESR1 gene PvuII polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between primary dysmenorrhea patients and controls (p = 0.009 and p = 0.021, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also observed between age and married status of primary dysmenorrhea patients and ESR1 gene PvuII polymorphism (p = 0.044 and p = 0.023, respectively). In combined genotype analyses, AG at ESR1 XbaI and TC at ESR1 PvuII loci encoded a p-value of 0.027. Thus, individuals who are heterozygote at both loci have a lower risk of developing primary dysmenorrhea. Our study suggests no strong association between IL6 gene promoter and ESR1 gene XbaI polymorphisms and primary dysmenorrhea in Turkish women. However, ESR1 gene PvuII polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between primary dysmenorrhea patients and controls. The potential association between ESR1 gene PvuII polymorphism and age and married status of dysmenorrhea patients deserves further consideration.

  16. Electron spin resonance dating of fault gouge from Desamangalam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The preliminary results from the electron spin resonance (ESR) dating on the quartz grains from the fault gouge indicate that the last major faulting in this site occurred 430 ± 43 ka ago. The experiments on different grain sizes of quartz from the gouge showed consistent decrease in age to a plateau of low values, indicating ...

  17. Study on the ternary mixed ligand complex of palladium(II)-aminophylline-fluorescein sodium by resonance Rayleigh scattering, second-order scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectrum and its analytical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peili; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Hu, Xiaoli

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between palladium(II)-aminophylline and fluorescein sodium was investigated by resonance Rayleigh scattering, second-order scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectrum. In pH 4.4 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer medium, aminophylline (Ami) reacted with palladium(II) to form chelate cation([Pd(Ami)]2+), which further reacted with fluorescein sodium (FS) to form ternary mixed ligand complex [Pd(Ami)(FS)2]. As a result, resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS), second-order scattering (SOS) and frequency doubling scattering spectrum (FDS) were enhanced. The maximum scattering wavelengths of [Pd(Ami)(FS)2] were located at 300 nm (RRS), 650 nm (SOS) and 304 nm (FDS). The scattering intensities were proportional to the Ami concentration in a certain range and the detection limits were 7.3 ng mL(-1) (RRS), 32.9 ng mL(-1) (SOS) and 79.1 ng mL(-1) (FDS), respectively. Based on it, the new simple, rapid, and sensitive scattering methods have been proposed to determine Ami in urine and serum samples. Moreover, the formation mechanism of [Pd(Ami)(FS)2] and the reasons for enhancement of RRS were fully discussed. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ESR investigation of NR and IR rubber vulcanized with different cross-link agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Posadas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the formation of radical species in natural rubber (NR and poly-isoprene rubber (IR during the vulcanization process and the uniaxial deformation of the formed networks by means of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR. Vulcanization of NR and IR always shows a radical pathway, where the different vulcanization systems dictate the concentration of radical species in the course of this complex process. The greatest concentration of radicals were detected during the vulcanization with sulfur/accelerator based on efficient systems (EV, followed by conventional (CV and sulfur donor systems, whereas azide and organic peroxide agents showed smaller concentration of radicals. Independently of the vulcanization system, certain amount of radicals was detected on the vulcanized samples after the end of the vulcanization process. Comparison between different matrices demonstrates that NR always shows higher concentration of radicals than IR in the vulcanization process as well as during uniaxial deformation, fact that could be associated to the presence of nonrubber components in NR.

  19. ESR, electrochemical and cyclodextrin-inclusion studies of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones and dipyridyl ketones derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea-Azar, C.; Abarca, B.; Norambuena, E.; Opazo, L.; Jullian, C.; Valencia, S.; Ballesteros, R.; Chadlaoui, M.

    2008-11-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of free radicals obtained by electrolytic reduction of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones and dipyridyl ketones derivatives were measured in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The hyperfine patterns indicate that the spin density delocalization is dependent of the rings presented in the molecule. The electrochemistry of these compounds was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, in DMSO as solvent. When one carbonyl is present in the molecule one step in the reduction mechanism was observed while two carbonyl are present two steps were detected. The first wave was assigned to the generation of the correspondent free radical species, and the second wave was assigned to the dianion derivatives. The phase-solubility measurements indicated an interaction between molecules selected and cyclodextrins in water. These inclusion complexes are 1:1 with βCD, and HP-βCD. The values of Ks showed a different kind of complexes depending on which rings are included. AM1 and DFT calculations were performed to obtain the optimized geometries, theoretical hyperfine constants, and spin distributions, respectively. The theoretical results are in complete agreement with the experimental ones.

  20. ESR dosimetry study for the residents of Kazakhstan exposed to radioactive fallout on 24, August 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhumadilov, K., E-mail: kassym@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Zharlyganova, D. [Astana Medical University, 51a, Beibitshilik str., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Zhumadilov, Zh. [Nazarbayev University, Life Sciences Center, D. Kunayev str., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Stepanenko, V. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Abralina, Sh.; Sadvokasova, L. [Semey State Medical Academy, Semey 071400, Abay str. 103 (Kazakhstan); Zhumadilova, A. [Astana Medical University, 51a, Beibitshilik str., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Toyoda, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, Okayama University of Science, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Endo, S. [Department of Quantum Energy Applications, Graduated School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Okamoto, T. [Department of Molecular Oral Medicine and Maxillofacial Surgery, Division of Frontier Medical Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    The method of electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry has been applied to human tooth enamel in order to obtain individual absorbed doses from the population of settlements within the vicinity of the central axis of the radioactive fallout trace from the contaminating nuclear surface test of 24, August 1956. Most of the settlements (Glubokoe, Tavriya, and Gagarino) are located near Ust-Kamenogorsk city, in Kazakhstan (about 400 km to the east from the epicenter of the explosion at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS)). It was found that the excess doses obtained after the subtraction of natural background radiation ranged up to about 120 mGy for the residents of Ust-Kamenogorsk city, whose tooth enamel was formed before 1956. For the residents of Gagarino, excess doses do not exceed 47 mGy for all ages. For the residents of Tavriya, the maximum of excess dose was determined as 54 mGy and for the residents of Glubokoe, the maximum excess dose was about 83 mGy. For the population of the Shemonaikha settlements (about 70 km from the centerline of the radioactive fallout trace) the highest excess dose is 110 mGy. Also for this study, Znamenka village (about 130 km from the epicenter) was included. The Kokpekty settlement was chosen as a control and not subjected to any radioactive contamination and is located 400 km to the Southeast from SNTS.

  1. A study of the red clover extract trinovin by ESR HPLC/MS and UVS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troup, G.; Hutton, D.; Hunter, C.; Hewitt, D.; Mulinacci, N.; Romani, A.; Pinelli, P.; Mancini, P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Trinovin is an extract of red clover, recently released on the dietary supplement market. It is recommended for 'Men's Health', because it contains the phenolics (isoflavones) genistein, biochanin, daidzein and formononetin, said to act as 'phytoestrogens', and is therefore a possible help in prostate gland problems. An Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) study (∼9.1Ghz, room temperature) revealed at least 3 different free radical lines, one with hyperfine structure, consistent with the listed molecules. Accordingly, HPLC/DAD (High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Diode Array Detector) and HPLC/Mass Spectroscopy analyses were performed in order to evaluate the quali-quantitative contents of flavonoidic compounds. The HPLC profile shows two main isoflavones and another three compounds, one of them being a quercetin glycoside. The quercetin glycosides are flavonoidic derivatives abundant in plant materials and present in wine. We can therefore say: even if the phytoestrogen properties claimed for Trinovin turn out to be less than hoped for, the antioxidants contained are very powerful, and so possibly helpful in protection against many diseases, including cancers, atherosclerosis, diabetic retinal bleeding, and non-alcoholic dementia

  2. Discrimination of radiation quality through second harmonic out-of-phase cw-ESR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Brai, Maria; Barbon, Antonio; Brustolon, Marina

    2014-02-01

    The ability to discriminate the quality of ionizing radiation is important because the biological effects produced in tissue strongly depends on both absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) of ionizing particles. Here we present an experimental electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis aimed at discriminating the effective LETs of various radiation beams (e.g., 19.3 MeV protons, (60)Co photons and thermal neutrons). The measurement of the intensities of the continuous wave spectrometer signal channel first harmonic in-phase and the second harmonic out-of-phase components are used to distinguish the radiation quality. A computational analysis, was carried out to evaluate the dependence of the first harmonic in-phase and second harmonic out-of-phase components on microwave power, modulation amplitude and relaxation times, and highlights that these components could be used to point out differences in the relaxation times. On the basis of this numerical analysis the experimental results are discussed. The methodology described in this study has the potential to provide information on radiation quality.

  3. Magnetic resonance studies of intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last three or four years, nearly tow hundred papers have been published that used NMR or ESR spectroscopy to study compounds formed by the intercalation of molecules or ions into the van der Waals gap of a layered hast compound. The host lattices have ranged from the simple, such as graphite, to the complex, such as clay. In many cases, magnetic resonance techniques now enable one to obtain quite detailed information on even fairly complex intercalated species, on the nature of the changes in the host lattice accompanying intercalation, and on the nature of the interactions between the intercalant species and the host lattice. Magnetic resonance is used in conunction with many other techniques to obtain a fuller picture of these interesting systems, but this review will limit its focus to the use of NMR and ESR techniques. (author). 51 refs

  4. Neutron diffraction and ESR studies of pseudocubic Nd0.75Ba0.25MnO3 and its unusual critical behavior above TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazuta, A.V.; Ryzhov, V.A.; Smirnov, O.P.; Kiselev, I.A.; Chernenkov, Yu.P.; Borisov, S.A.; Troaynchuk, I.O.; Khalyavin, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Results of structural neutron diffraction study and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements are presented for insulating Nd 1-x Ba x MnO 3 (x=0.25) with the Curie temperature T C ∼129K. Its pseudocubic structure reveals the definite distortions to a lower symmetry. Detailed analysis of the data is performed in the frame of Pbnm space group in a temperature range 4.2-300K. The compound is found to exhibit the Jahn-Teller (JT) transition at T JT ∼250K. Character of the coherent JT distortions and their temperature evolution differ from those of the x=0.23 manganite. The ESR results correspond to behavior of a 3D isotropic ferromagnet above T*∼143K (τ*∼0.12= C )/T C ). It is shown that an anisotropic exchange coupling of the Mn and Nd magnetic moments may give a substantial contribution in ESR linewidth masking its critical enhancement. The different temperature treatments (slow/fast cooling/heating with/without external magnetic field) of the sample reveal a temperature hysteresis of the ESR spectra below T* indicating an anomalous response in the paramagnetic region. The study of the magnetic phase transition in the x=0.23 and 0.25 NdBa manganites suggests a change in its character from the second to first order at T*. The conventional free energy including the magnetization and magnetic field failed to describe this first-order transition. The unconventional critical behavior is attributed to an orbital liquid metallic phase that begins to coexist with the initial orbital-ordered phases below T*

  5. The effect of irradiation dose and age of bird on the ESR signal in irradiated chicken drumsticks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.; Stevenson, M.H.; Kilpatrick, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Groups of 20 broiler chickens of the same genetic strain and reared under identical conditions were slaughtered at either 4, 5, 6, 7 or 8 weeks of age. Pairs of drumsticks were removed from each bird and groups were either not irradiated or irradiated at 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 or 10.0 kGy using a cobalt 60 source. Bone samples were excised, fragmented, freeze dried and ground prior to the determination of free radical concentration using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Increasing irradiation dose gave a highly significant increase in free radical concentration whilst for each irradiation dose, bones from younger birds gave significantly lower concentrations compared to those for older birds. Crystallinity coefficient increased linearly with age of bird and this may account in part for the increased signal observed as the birds aged. (author)

  6. ESR and spin-trapping study of room-temperature radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline pyrimidine nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Kuwabara, M.; Yoshii, G.

    1983-01-01

    Free radicals produced in γ-irradiated polycrystalline 5'-dCMP (free acid and 2Na), 3'-CMP (free acid and Li), and 5'-UMP (2Na) were studied by ESR and spin-trapping. The results were compared with those of previous single-crystal studies. Furthermore, attempts to identify free radicals in γ-irradiated 5'-dUMP (2Na), 5'-CMP (free acid and 2Na), and 3'-UMP (Na), which have not been the subject of single-crystal studies to date, were made. After γ-irradiation at room temperature to a dose of 100 kGy, the polycrystalline samples were dissolved in aqueous solutions of t-nitrosobutane in the presence or absence of oxygen. The presence or absence of oxygen was helpful in analyzing the presence of more than one radical species. Thus two types of radicals could be established for all samples. Radical -C 5 H-C 6 H 2 -, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was observed in the presence of oxygen, and radical -C/sub 5'/H 2 , formed by the transformation of the radical due to loss of an H atom at the C/sub 5'/ position of the sugar moiety, was observed in the absence of oxygen. In some cases, radicals located at the C/sub 1'/, C/sub 4'/, and C/sub 5'/ of the sugar moiety were tentatively identified. For the ESR spectrum associated with radical at C/sub 1'/ the possibility of another explanation was also discussed in relation to the spectrum due to radical at C 5 of the base. Radical -C 5 H 2 -C 6 H-, formed by H addition to the double bond of the base, was not identified

  7. Human estrogen receptor (ESR) gene locus: PssI dimorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R T; Taylor, J E; Frossard, P M [California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA); Shine, J J [Garvan Institute, Darlinghurst (Australia)

    1988-07-25

    pESR-2, a 2.1 kb partial cDNA containing the entire translated sequence of the human estrogen receptor mRNA isolated from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, was subcloned in the Eco RI site of pBR322. PssI (PuGGNCCPy) identifies a single two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.7 or 1.4 kb, as well as invariant bands at 12.6, 9.3, 4.1, 3.7, 2.4, 2.2, and 1.2 kb. Its frequency was studied in 77 unrelated North American Caucasians. The human estrogen receptor gene has been localized to 6q24 -- q27 by in situ hybridization. Co-dominant segregation is demonstrated in one family (8 individuals).

  8. Broadband lasercooling of relativistic ions at the ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, Danyal; Ullmann, Johannes; Clark, Colin; Dimopoulou, Christina; Nolden, Fritz; Steck, Markus [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Bussmann, Michael; Siebold, Mathias; Seltmann, Michael; Schramm, Ulrich [HZDR Dresden (Germany); Wen, Weiqiang [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); IMP CAS Lanzhou (China); Sanchez, Rodolfo; Lochmann, Matthias [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Uni Mainz (Germany); Beck, Tobias; Rein, Benjamin; Tichelmann, Sascha; Birkl, Gerhard; Walther, Thomas [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Zhang, Dacheng; Yang, Jie; Ma, Xinwen [IMP CAS Lanzhou (China); Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Uni Mainz (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Thomas [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Uni Mainz (Germany); HI Jena (Germany); Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Uni Jena (Germany); HI Jena (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We present new results on broadband laser cooling of stored relativistic C{sup 3+} ion beams at the ESR in Darmstadt. For the first time we could show laser cooling of bunched relativistic ion beams using a UV-laser which could scan over a very large range and thus cool all the ions in the 'bucket'. This scheme is much more versatile than a previous scheme, where the bunching frequency was scanned relative to a fixed laser frequency. We have also demonstrated that this cooling scheme works without pre-electron cooling, which is a prerequisite for its general application to future storage rings and synchrotrons, such as the HESR and the SIS100 at FAIR. We also present results from in vacuo VUV-fluorescence detectors, which have proven to be very effective.

  9. An ESR study on the detection of irradiated red lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, I.; Eken, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate in detail detection of irradiated red lentil. In this way, red lentil powder was analysed by using Bruker EMX ESR spectrometer before and after irradiation between the doses 1-9 kGy at ambient conditions. It was observed that seeds of non-irradiated and irradiated red lentil have a signal having six lines due to Mn''+''2 content. However hull of the red lentil has a single line whose origin is still unknown. Besides, this signal has superposed with the radiation induced one. It was also found that the intensity of radiation induced signal was decreased logarithmically in time, and the change in the intensity was minimal at low doses

  10. ESR studies of heat denaturation in Cu myoglobin complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, S.C.; Bemski, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made on the behaviour of Cu2 + and Fe3 + in copper doped myoglobin, subjected to heat treatment. ESR is observed at X-band. The amplitude of the g = 5.9 line of the high spin F 3 + in met-myoglobin is studied as a function of the temperature of the heat treatment, the pH and the length of time of exposure to the heat treatment. These experiments are performed for both the pure protein and for the copper-myoglobin complex, at pH between 5 and 8.5. Results concerning the decrease of the amplitude of Fe 3+ high spin signal are discussed in comparison with Hollocher's results in hemoglobin. The Cu spectra obtained are interpreted, with the aid of a computer program, Kivelson and Neiman's results being used to analyse the authors data

  11. A Rare Case of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder in Patient with Sjogren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supat Thongpooswan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 48-year-old female with the history of Sjogren’s syndrome who presented with 3-week history of tingling, numbness, and shooting back, waist, and bilateral leg pain and numbness in the pelvic region with urinary and bowel incontinence. Physical examination was remarkable for reduced motor power in both lower extremities with spasticity. Sensory deficit was noted at the T6 level. Laboratory investigation revealed elevated ESR and CRP and positive serum antiaquaporin-4 IgG. Thoracic and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormal patchy areas, leptomeningeal enhancement through the thoracic cord extending from T3 through T6 levels, without evidence of cord compression. Impression of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder was made and patient was treated with methylprednisolone intravenously followed by tapering oral prednisone. Neurological symptoms gradually improved with resolution of bowel and urinary incontinence. In a patient with Sjogren’s syndrome who presents with neurological complaints, the possibility of neuromyelitis optica or neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder should be considered. Awareness of the possibility of CNS disease is important due to the serious nature of CNS complications, some of which are treatable with immunosuppressants. Our patient with Sjogren’s syndrome who presented with myelopathy benefited from early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy.

  12. ESR evidence of octahedral site occupation in ScH/sub x/:Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.

    1978-01-01

    The Er 3+ electron spin resonance spectrum at low temperatures in powdered Sc 9988 Er 0012 H 1 91 contains a GAMMA 7 doublet and associated hyperfine components with cubic site symmetry plus four additinal resonances arising from two distinct transitions with axial site symmetry. The axial lines are attributed to octahedral site occupation by protons in the vicinity of some Er 3+ impurities. The two axial transitions may be associated with two different types of distortions of the GAMMA 7 wave functions or possibly a GAMMA 8 1 quartet state

  13. ESR concept paper on value-based radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The European Society of Radiology (ESR) established a Working Group on Value-Based Imaging (VBI WG) in August 2016 in response to developments in European healthcare systems in general, and the trend within radiology to move from volume- to value-based practice in particular. The value-based healthcare (VBH) concept defines "value" as health outcomes achieved for patients relative to the costs of achieving them. Within this framework, value measurements start at the beginning of therapy; the whole diagnostic process is disregarded, and is considered only if it is the cause of errors or complications. Making the case for a new, multidisciplinary organisation of healthcare delivery centred on the patient, this paper establishes the diagnosis of disease as a first outcome in the interrelated activities of the healthcare chain. Metrics are proposed for measuring the quality of radiologists' diagnoses and the various ways in which radiologists provide value to patients, other medical specialists and healthcare systems at large. The ESR strongly believes value-based radiology (VBR) is a necessary complement to existing VBH concepts. The Society is determined to establish a holistic VBR programme to help European radiologists deal with changes in the evolution from volume- to value-based evaluation of radiological activities. Main Messages • Value-based healthcare defines value as patient's outcome over costs. • The VBH framework disregards the diagnosis as an outcome. • VBH considers diagnosis only if wrong or a cause of complications. • A correct diagnosis is the first outcome that matters to patients. • Metrics to measure radiologists' impacts on patient outcomes are key. • The value provided by radiology is multifaceted, going beyond exam volumes.

  14. Search for heavy resonances in the W/Z-tagged dijet mass spectrum in pp collisions at 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; 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Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-06-25

    A search has been made for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson, qW or qZ, or a pair of vector bosons, WW, WZ, or ZZ, where each vector boson decays to hadronic final states. This search is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions collected in the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. For sufficiently heavy resonances the decay products of each vector boson are merged into a single jet, and the event effectively has a dijet topology. The background from QCD dijet events is reduced using recently developed techniques that resolve jet substructure. A 95% CL lower limit is set on the mass of excited quark resonances decaying into qW (qZ) at 2.38 TeV (2.15 TeV) and upper limits on the cross section for resonances decaying to qW, qZ, WW, WZ, or ZZ final states.

  15. Evaluation of electron spin resonance technique for the detection of irradiated mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Thomas, P.; Singh, B.B.

    1994-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was examined as a method for the detection of irradiated mango fruits. A symmetric ESR signal at g = 1.988 was detected in the hard seed cover (endocarp), the dry epidermal layer (testa) surrounding the kernel, and the soft kernel portions of the seed from four mango cultivars. the amplitude of the signal in the epidermal layer and seed cover showed a dose-dependent increase over control values. Qualitatively, however, no new signal was observed following irradiation, except that line width increased by 50%. Methyl cellosolve washing greatly reduced the intensity of the endogenous and radiation (1.0 kGy)-induced ESR signals in the seed cover; results suggest phenolic substances as the source of free radicals. the similarity of naturally occurring ESR signals to that induced by irradiation seems to restrict the practical utility of this method in irradiated mangoes

  16. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  17. 2 mm range ESR of the transmutation-produced phosphorus impurity in 6HSiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalabukhova, E.N.; Lukin, S.N.; Mokhov, E.N.

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorus impurity is introduced into 6HSiC monocrystals via neutron transmutation doping. Parameters of ESR two spectra referred to ESR spectra of separated phosphorus atoms in the lattice cubic and hexagonal position are detected and determined in the specimens at T=4.2 K. variation dynamics of ESR spectra of phosphorus and nitrogen within 4.2-73 K temperature range is studied. Ionization energies of phosphorus atoms are determined to be less, than those of nitrogen atoms, and ionization energy of phosphorus atoms in hexagonal position is higher, than that of phosphorus atoms in cubic position

  18. Complete Familial Currarino Triad in Association with Hirschsprung's Disease: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features and the Spectrum of Anorectal Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilickesmez, O.; Hakki Gol, I.; Uzun, M.; Oruk, C. [Diyarbakir Military Hospital (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-15

    Currarino syndrome, a rare hereditary condition, is defined as a partial sacral agenesis associated with a presacral mass and anorectal malformation. The authors present two siblings with complete Currarino triad and their mother with incomplete triad. The complete Currarino triad in the older sibling was associated with Hirschsprung's disease as the second reported case in the literature. Anorectal malformations, whether suspected of Currarino syndrome or not, should be examined with lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-02-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ∼34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  20. Spectra of resonance surface photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G. [Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The theory of nonactivated electron transfer between atoms interacting reasonantly with coherent radiation and a metal surface is developed. The spectral resonances in photoabsorption and surface photoionization are found to be related to nonlinear interference effects in the interaction between discrete atomic levels and the continuum formed by the quasi-continuous electron spectrum of a normal metal. The asymmetry in the resonance surface photoionization spectrum is shown to have a shape typical of the Fano autoionization resonances. 18 refs.

  1. Identification of irradiated chicken meat using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, S.P.; Thomas, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Studies were carried out on detection of irradiation treatment in chicken using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The effect of gamma- irradiation treatment on radiation induced signal in different types of chicken namely, broiler, deshi and layers was studied. Irradiation treatment induced a characteristic ESR signal that was not detected in non-irradiated samples. The shape of the signal was not affected by type of the bone. The intensity of radiation induced ESR signal was affected by factors such as absorbed radiation dose, bone type irradiation temperature, post-irradiation storage, post-irradiation cooking and age of the bird. Deep-frying resulted in the formation of a symmetric signal that had a different shape and was weaker than the radiation induced signal. This technique can be effectively used to detect irradiation treatment in bone-in chicken meat even if stored and/or subjected to various traditional cooking procedures. (author)

  2. Production of High Quality Die Steels from Large ESR Slab Ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xin; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Li, Hua-bing; Liu, Fu-bin; Li, Xing

    With the rapid development of manufacture industry in China, die steels are in great need of large slab ingot of high quality and large tonnage, such as P20, WSM718R and so on. Solidification structure and size of large slab ingots produced with conventional methods are not satisfied. However, large slab ingots manufactured by ESR process have a good solidification structure and enough section size. In the present research, the new slab ESR process was used to produce the die steels large slab ingots with the maximum size of 980×2000×3200mm. The compact and sound ingot can be manufactured by the slab ESR process. The ultra-heavy plates with the maximum thickness of 410 mm can be obtained after rolling the 49 tons ingots. Due to reducing the cogging and forging process, the ESR for large slab ingots process can increase greatly the yield and production efficiency, and evidently cut off product costs.

  3. Dose response of artificial irradiation of fluvial sediment sample for ESR dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunru; Yin Gongming; Gao Lu; Li Jianping; Han Fei; Lin Min

    2011-01-01

    ESR dating samples need be irradiated to obtain dose response curve and the equivalent dose. The artificial dose rate is about 1 x 10 -1 -1 x 10 2 Gy/min, whereas the natural dose rate is about 3 Gy/ka. Therefore, one must be sure whether the much higher artificial dose rate is suitable for the ESR dating study. In this paper, we use different artificial dose rate to irradiate the same fluvial sample and measure the quartz Al centre ESR signal under the same conditions. The dose response curves are compared, in an attempt to gain a preliminary knowledge on that problem and build a good foundation for our ESR dating studies on fluvial samples. (authors)

  4. ESR-spin trapping studies on the interaction between anthraquinone triplets and aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moger, G.; Rockenbauer, A.; Simon, P.

    1980-01-01

    The ESR spin trapping technique was used for the detection of transient C-centered radicals in the photochemical interaction between triplet anthraquinone and aromatic hydroperoxide and alcohol. (author)

  5. Characterization of functional LB films using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Shin-ichi

    1995-01-01

    The role of ESR spectroscopy in the characterization of functional LB films is discussed. Unpaired electrons in LB films are associated with isolated radical molecules produced by charge transfer, paramagnetic metallic ions such as Cu 2+ , strongly interacting spins in the mixed valence states in charge-transfer salts, and so on. These spins often manifest the functions of materials. They can also act as microscopic probes in the ESR analysis devoted for the elucidation of characteristic properties of LB films. In structural studies, ESR is of particular importance in the analysis of molecular orientation of LB films. ESR can unambiguously determine the orientation of molecules through g-value anisotropy: different g value, different resonance field. Two types of new control methods of molecular orientation in LB films originated from the ESR analysis: study of in-plane orientation in dye LB films which led to the discovery of flow-orientation effect, and observation of drastic change of orientation of Cu-porphyrin in LB films using the trigger molecule, n-hexatriacontane. In the studies of electronic properties, hyperfine interactions between electron and nuclear spins provide information about molecular orbitals and local structures. Stable isotopes have been successfully applied to the stable radicals in merocyanine LB films to identify hyperfine couplings. In conducting LB films composed of charge-transfer salts, quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnetism in semiconducting films and spin resonance of conduction electrons in metallic films are observed. Results provide microscopic evidence for the development of columnar structures of constituent molecules. Development of new functional LB films may provide more cases where ESR spectroscopy will clarify the nature of such films. (author)

  6. Correlation between the number of quantum-statistical modes of the exciting field and the number of lines in the resonance fluorescence spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryzhanovskii, Boris V; Sokolov, G B

    2000-01-01

    The quasi-energy wave functions of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic field, the state of which represents a superposition of coherent states, were found. The fluorescence spectrum of an atom excited by such a field was investigated. It was shown that a spectral fluorescence mode corresponds to each mode of the quantum-statistical distribution of the field incident on the atom. This means that the number of statistical modes of the incident field may be recorded as the number of data bits of the information carried by the light pulse. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. ESR/Alanine {gamma}-dosimetry in the 10-30 Gy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fainstein, C. E-mail: cfainstein@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Winkler, E.; Saravi, M

    2000-05-15

    We report Alanine Dosimeter preparation, procedures for using the ESR/Dosimetry method, and the resulting calibration curve for {gamma}-irradiation in the range from 10-30 Gy. We use calibration curve to measure the irradiation dose in {gamma}-irradiation of human blood, as required in Blood Transfusion Therapy. The ESR/Alanine results are compared against those obtained using the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) method.

  8. The influence of measurement and storage conditions on alanine ESR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, A.C.

    1992-01-01

    Alanine has several desirable properties as an ESR dosemeter e.g. tissue equivalence, low fading and an approximately linear response for doses up to 10 kGy. This work reports on a simple system to produce the alanine dosemeter, the signal intensity for a range of doses and energies, and the effect of the air humidity and the spectrometer settings on the ESR signal. (Author)

  9. Cooling history of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico using ESR dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogoh, K.; Toyoda, S.; Ikeda, S.; Ikeya, M.; Goff, F.

    1993-01-01

    ESR dating was made at the Valles caldera by using the Al center and Ti center in quartz grains separated from the layers of the Valles Rhyolite. Obtained ESR ages were much younger than those by other methods (fission track and 39 Ar- 40 Ar). A reported thermal event of about 10-40 ka ago might explain the difference between the above ages. (author)

  10. Expression of estrogen receptor α 36 (ESR36) in the hamster ovary throughout the estrous cycle: effects of gonadotropins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Prabuddha; Roy, Shyamal K

    2013-01-01

    Estradiol-17β (E) plays an important role in ovarian follicular development. Evidence indicates that some of the effect of E is mediated by the transmembrane estrogen receptor. In this study, we examined the spatio-temporal expression of recently discovered ERα36 (ESR36), a splice variant of Esr1 and a receptor for non-genomic E signaling, in the hamster ovary during the estrous cycle and the role of gonadotropins and ovarian steroid hormones in ESR36 expression. ESR36 expression was high on estrus (D1:0900 h) and declined precipitously by proestrus (D4:0900 h) and remained low up to D4:1600 h. Immunofluorescence findings corroborated immunoblot findings and revealed that ESR36 was expressed only in the cell membrane of both follicular and non-follicular cells, except the oocytes. Ovarian ESR36 was capable of binding to the E-affinity matrix, and have different molecular weight than that of the ESR1 or GPER. Hypophysectomy (Hx) resulted in a marked decline in ESR36 protein levels. FSH and LH, alone or combined, markedly upregulated ESR36 protein in Hx hamsters to the levels observed in D1 hamsters, but neither E nor P had any effect. Inhibition of the gonadotropin surge by phenobarbital treatment on D4:1100 h attenuated ESR36 expression in D1:0900 h ovaries, but the decline was restored by either FSH or LH replacement on D4 afternoon. This is the first report to show that ESR36, which is distinct from ESR1 or GPER is expressed in the plasma membrane of ovarian follicular and non-follicular cells, binds to E and its expression is regulated directly by the gonadotropins. In light of our previous findings, the results suggest that ovarian cells contain at least two distinct membrane estrogen receptors, such as GPER and ESR36, and strongly suggest for a non-genomic action of E regulating ovarian follicular functions.

  11. The 4π-collaboration at SIS/ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rami, F.

    1991-01-01

    A new generation of 4π experiments aiming at the investigation of the properties of compressed and heated nuclear matter produced in heavy-ion collisions in the incident energy range .1 to 2. GeV/nucleon, is presently starting at the SIS/ESR facility at GSI-Darmstadt. The new 4π-instrument is described. A first experiment was focused on the production of composite particles in central and semi central collisions of 197 Au+ 197 Au at incident energies between 100 and 800 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary results indicate that the charged particle multiplicity measurement alone cannot be used to select the most central collisions, and new selection criteria are suggested. They also show the ability of the detection system to sort out, with reasonable statistics, high degree multifragment events, i.e. events where a large fraction of the total initial charge is going into a few big clusters (Z≥6). (R.P.) 20 refs., 14 figs

  12. Dosimetry of blood irradiation using an alanine/ESR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.; Covas, D.T.; Baffa, O.

    2001-01-01

    A batch of 80 DL-alanine dosimeters was supplied to Hemocentro of the Hospital and Clinics of Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto (HC-FMRP) SP, Brazil for the purpose of quality control of the radiation dose delivered to blood bags. The irradiation was made using two (40x40) cm 2 parallel opposed radiation fields each with 80 cm of source to surface distance in the Radiotherapy Section of HC-FMRP with the 60 Co teletherapy unit. The calculated radiation absorbed dose at the center of the box was 20 Gy. The dosimeter readings were performed using a Varian E-4 ESR Spectrometer operating in X-band. For the 80 dosimeters and over the irradiation volume throughout a blood bag, the minimum and maximum doses were 14 and 23 Gy, respectively. The mean dose was (18±2) Gy (1σ), and the coefficient of variability was 11.1%. Alanine dosimeters demonstrated easy handling, good precision and adequate sensitivity for this application

  13. ESR dosimetry of optically bleached quartz grains extracted from Plio-Quaternary sediment: Evaluating some key aspects of the ESR signals associated to the Ti-centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, Mathieu; Guilarte, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating several key aspects of ESR dose reconstruction of quartz grains based on the analysis of the Ti-center: (i) the evaluation of the ESR intensity, (ii) its impact on measurements precision, and (iii) the potential of various fitting functions to describe the behavior of the signal with the radiation absorbed dose. In contrast with the Al center, the various Ti centers have quite low ESR signal intensities. It is thus crucial to adapt the experimental conditions for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio and to perform repeated measurements in order to take into consideration the uncertainty associated to angular dependence of the signal as well as day-to-day variations. Several options (named A to E) for evaluating the ESR intensity of the Ti–Li and Ti–H centers are explored and some of them yield too much experimental uncertainty (e.g. options C and E) and are apparently not suitable for accurate ESR dosimetry. In contrast, options A and D usually provide similar equivalent dose (D E ) results and can be used together for assessing the dose absorbed by the Ti–Li center. Our results show a systematic non-monotonic behavior of the ESR signal of the Ti center with the dose, which raise some questions about the suitability of the single saturating exponential (SSE) function that is classically used in ESR dating. Consequently, we explored the potential of other functions that can describe the “radiation bleaching” phenomenon observed at high doses. We recommend the use of a specific fitting function (called Ti-2 in the present paper) previously proposed by Woda and Wagner (2007) for any dose reconstruction, and define some criteria to ensure a good fitting. The SSE function provides D E results that are, in most cases, relatively consistent with those derived from the Ti-2, suggesting that the Ti centers apparently follow a SSE behavior up to, at least, 6.0–6.5 kGy However, the reliability of the D E values

  14. ESR study of the anion radicals of 5-nitropyrimidines: conversion to iminoxy radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.; Clark, C.; Failor, R.

    1976-01-01

    The anion radicals of a number of 5-nitropyrimidines have been investigated by ESR spectroscopy. The anions are formed by electrolysis in dimethylformamide and by electron attachment in aqueous glasses, 12 M LiCl--D 2 O and 8 M NaOD. The electrolysis of 5-nitrouracil and 5-nitro-6-methyluracil results in relatively stable anion radicals. The results for 5-nitrouracil give evidence for two or perhaps three anions which differ only by the degree of ring nitrogen protonation. The results for 5-nitro-6-methyluracil suggest that the nitro group of the anion is twisted so that it is coupled only weakly to the ring π-electron system. The anions of 5-nitrouracil, 5-nitroorotic acid, 5-nitrobarbituric acid, and 5-nitro-6-methyluracil have been produced in the alkaline and neutral aqueous glasses. The anisotropic spectra found have been analyzed with the aid of computer simulations which assume axial symmetry. For example, the analysis of the spectrum of 5-nitrouracil anion in 12 M LiCl yields A/sub parallel//sup N/ = 33; A/sub perpendicular to//sup N/ = 5, a 6 /sup H/ = 5.5 G, g/sub parallel/ = 2.0016, and g/sub perpendicular to/ = 2.0059. A concentration dependence in the splittings is noted and discussed. Ultraviolet photolysis of the anions of 5-nitro-6-methyluracil and 5-nitrobarbituric acid results in the formation of iminoxy radicals. Mechanisms of formation of the iminoxy radicals are discussed and results found in this work are compared to results found in single crystals and aqueous solution

  15. Detection of irradiated food: Electron spin resonance measurement of irradiated meat, fish and nuts. Elektronen-Spin-Resonanz-Messungen an bestrahltem Fleisch, Fisch und bestrahlten Nuessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, B [Fachgebiet Lebensmittelbestrahlung, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany); Helle, N [Fachgebiet Lebensmittelbestrahlung, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany); Mager, M [Fachgebiet Lebensmittelbestrahlung, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany); Schreiber, G A [Fachgebiet Lebensmittelbestrahlung, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany); Boegl, K W [Fachgebiet Lebensmittelbestrahlung, Bundesgesundheitsamt, Berlin (Germany)

    1993-09-01

    In an intercomparison study organized by the German Federal Health Office (BGA) the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a routine method according to paragraph 35 of the German Food Legislation (LMBG) was tested for bone containing meat, fish and nuts (shells). Each participating laboratory examined six chicken, six rainbow trout and four pistachio samples. The examinations were successful, only three samples were not identified correctly and moreover these mistakes were caused by misinterpretation of the ESR spectra. 13 out of 18 participating laboratories used a new routine ESR spectrometer and all samples were identified correctly with this instrument. (orig.)

  16. Thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance studies of irradiated biological single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Single crystals of x-irradiated L-alanine:Cr 3+ have been studied between 90 and 300K by electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. Ultraviolet (uv) photobleaching of the Cr 3+ electron traps and L-alanine radical centers was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the x-ray generated radical centers can be destroyed by uv-induced electron transport activity, and this destruction follows first order kinetics. Also, the transformation of the primary neutral radical species to a secondary radical in L-alanine was found not to be induced by intermolecular electron transport. The TL glow was determined to proceed by first-order kinetics at a temperature of 160K with an activation energy of 0.3 eV and a frequency factor of 1.0 x 10 8 s -1 . The emission spectrum consisted of a broad band (FWHM approx. = 100 nm) which peaked at approximately 420 nm. Scintillation activity was observed in the ferroelectric crystals triglycine sulfate (TGS), deuterated TGS, and TGS: L-alanine. The emission spectrum of TGS:L-alanine was obtained. New observations of scintillations and current pulses from glycine, a nonferroelectric crystal, which result from heating or cooling the sample between 77 and 300K with no previous irradiation were made. The scintillations and current pulses occur approximately in coincidence. Scintillations were also observed from the potent oncogen 3-hydroxyxanthine by cooling the sample from 300 to 90K with no previous irradiation

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation in cocrystals of DNA model compounds: ESR-ENDOR studies of X-irradiated imidazole:barbital and adenosine:5-bromouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, L.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques have been used to study radiation induced damage in cocrystalline complexes X-irradiated at 12 K. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether radiation induced damage is stabilized preferentially on one of the components of the cocrystalline system; and (2) whether charge transfer occurs between purine and pyrimidine bases in hydrogen bonded or stacked configurations. The cocrystals used in this study are imidazole:5,5-diethylbarbituric acid (barbital) and adenosine:5-bromouracil (AR:BU). Results indicate that (1) preferential stability of radiation damage may be observed in a cocrystal even in the absence of stacking interactions; (2) in the presence of purine:pyrimidine stacking electron transfer may occur, but hole transfer is not likely to be the mechanism of redistribution of radiation damage in cocrystalline systems. The radiation chemistry of AR:BU is used as a model to predict the effects of ionizing radiation on DNA

  18. ESR response of powder samples of clear fused quartz material to high doses of 10 MeV electrons: possible applications for industrial radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliabadi, R.; Amraei, R.; Ranjbar, A.H.; Rafieian, Sh.; Nasirimoghadam, S.

    2010-01-01

    Powder samples of clear fused quartz were irradiated by 10 MeV electrons at doses between 6-15 kGy and 25-37 kGy and analyzed with electron spin resonance. The reproducibility of the material dose response curve was studied, in which the irradiated samples were annealed and reused for further investigations. Results indicate a good linearity between the absorbed dose and the ESR intensity of the signals. They also showed that in the reuse processes, the electron spin resonance signal intensity, in both dose ranges was decreased. The thermal fading represented a relative sharp decay at room temperature through 15 days, after which the decay-rate was negligible for a measurement period of 60 days.

  19. Magnetization and ESR studies of La{sub 0.67}(Ca{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}){sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendil Kumar, A., E-mail: sendilphy@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500 046 (India); Ravinder Reddy, K [School of Engineering Sciences & Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500 046 (India); Bhatnagar, Anil K. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500 046 (India); School of Engineering Sciences & Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500 046 (India)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Mg substitution reduces the ferromagnetic strength. • Inhomogeneous broadening is due to phase separation. • Griffiths phase existence is probed. - Abstract: Magnetization studies and line shape analysis on Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectra of La{sub 0.67}(Ca{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}){sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} are carried out. In paramagnetic phase well above T{sub c}, the ESR spectra are single Lorentzian but below and near T{sup ∗}{sub ΔHPP}, (T{sup ∗}{sub ΔHPP} is temperature at which line width is minimum) inhomogeneous broadening with asymmetry in the signal is observed due to phase separation. The resonance field below T{sup ∗}{sub ΔHPP} decreases with decreasing temperature. Above T{sub c} the intensity of the ESR spectra obeys the thermally activated model (Arrhenius behavior). Substitution of Mg weakens the ferromagnetic interaction and evolution of change in lineshape near T{sub c} is an evidence of Griffiths phase (coexistence of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic) in Mg doped LCMO system.

  20. Electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yang; Li Jianmei; Lu Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is highly expected that the future informatics will be based on the spins of individual electrons. The development of elementary information unit will eventually leads to novel single-molecule or single-atom devices based on electron spins; the quantum computer in the future can be constructed with single electron spins as the basic quantum bits. However, it is still a great challenge in detection and manipulation of a single electron spin, as well as its coherence and entanglement. As an ideal experimental tool for such tasks, the development of electron spin resonance scanning tunneling microscope (ESR-STM) has attracted great attention for decades. This paper briefly introduces the basic concept of ESR-STM. The development history of this instrument and recent progresses are reviewed. The underlying mechanism is explored and summarized. The challenges and possible solutions are discussed. Finally, the prospect of future direction and applications are presented. (authors)

  1. ESR examination of food for treatment with ionizing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erning, D.

    1994-01-01

    The author reports on routine uses of electron spin resonance spectroscopy in order to detect treatment with ionizing rays of poultry, fish, shellfish, spices, currents, nuts, dehydrated fruit and packaging material. (vhe) [de

  2. l-Tryptophan Radical Cation Electron Spin Resonance Studies: Connecting Solution-derived Hyperfine Coupling Constants with Protein Spectral Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Henry D.; Sturgeon, Bradley E.; Mottley, Carolyn; Sipe, Herbert J.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Fast-flow electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been used to detect a free radical formed from the reaction of l-tryptophan with Ce4+ in an acidic aqueous environment. Computer simulations of the ESR spectra from l-tryptophan and several isotopically modified forms strongly support the conclusion that the l-tryptophan radical cation has been detected by ESR for the first time. The hyperfine coupling constants (HFCs) determined from the well-resolved isotropic ESR spectra support experimental and computational efforts to understand l-tryptophan's role in protein catalysis of oxidation-reduction processes. l-tryptophan HFCs facilitated the simulation of fast-flow ESR spectra of free radicals from two related compounds, tryptamine and 3-methylindole. Analysis of these three compounds' β-methylene hydrogen HFC data along with equivalent l-tyrosine data has led to a new computational method that can distinguish between these two amino acid free radicals in proteins without dependence on isotope labeling, electron nuclear double resonance or high-field ESR. This approach also produces geometric parameters (dihedral angles for the β-methylene hydrogens) which should facilitate protein site assignment of observed l-tryptophan radicals as has been done for l-tyrosine radicals. PMID:18433127

  3. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Singamaneni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW, pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs, which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH3 adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns and fast (39 ns components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and 13C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and 13C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  4. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Stesmans, Andre [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tol, Johan van [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Kosynkin, D. V. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tour, James M. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005, USA. (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH{sub 3} adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and {sup 13}C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and {sup 13}C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  5. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of optically levitated nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potential applications of NV centers in gas sensing.

  6. Comparison of ESR1 Mutations in Tumor Tissue and Matched Plasma Samples from Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takeshita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ESR1 mutation in circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA is emerging as a noninvasive biomarker of acquired resistance to endocrine therapy, but there is a paucity of data comparing the status of ESR1 gene in cfDNA with that in its corresponding tumor tissue. The objective of this study is to validate the degree of concordance of ESR1 mutations between plasma and tumor tissue. METHODS: ESR1 ligand-binding domain mutations Y537S, Y537N, Y537C, and D538G were analyzed using droplet digital PCR in 35 patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC (35 tumor tissue samples and 67 plasma samples. RESULTS: Of the 35 paired samples, 26 (74.3% were concordant: one patient had detectable ESR1 mutations both plasma (ESR1 Y537S/Y537N and tumor tissue (ESR1 Y537S/Y537C, and 25 had WT ESR1 alleles in both. Nine (25.7% had discordance between the plasma and tissue results: five had mutations detected only in their tumor tissue (two Y537S, one Y537C, one D538G, and one Y537S/Y537N/D538G, and four had mutations detected only in their plasma (one Y537S, one Y537N, and two Y537S/Y537N/D538G. Furthermore, longitudinal plasma samples from 19 patients were used to assess changes in the presence of ESR1 mutations during treatment. Eleven patients had cfDNA ESR1 mutations over the course of treatment. A total of eight of 11 patients with MBC with cfDNA ESR1 mutations (72.7% had the polyclonal mutations. CONCLUSION: We have shown the independent distribution of ESR1 mutations between plasma and tumor tissue in 35 patients with MBC.

  7. Combined ESR and U-series isochron dating of fossil tooth from Longgupo cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Fei; Yin Gongming; Liu Chunru; Jean-Jacques Bahain

    2012-01-01

    Background: In ESR and luminescence archaeological dating, the assessment of external radiation dose rate is one of the constant sources of uncertainty because of its variation in the past time and it cannot be determined accurately using the present-day measurements. Purpose: ESR isochron protocol was proposed to solve this uncertainty for the tooth samples. This protocol is applicable wherever multiple samples with different internal doses have all experienced a common external dose. The variable uranium concentration of tooth samples makes it possible to plot the equivalent dose versus the internal dose rate of each sample, and the slope of isochron line gives hence the age. For isochron dating of teeth, combined ESR/U-series dating analysis must be done together with isochron protocol. Methods: In this study, we try to use combined ESR/U-series isochron method on 5 tooth samples collected from immediate adjacent square in layer C Ⅲ'6 of Longgupo archaeological site, Chongqing, China. Combined ESR/U-series analysis with in situ external dose rate shows recent uranium uptake of all the samples. Results: The time-averaged external dose rate was iterative calculated by isochron protocol, and gives an isochron age of 1.77±0.09 Ma for layer C Ⅲ'6, which consistent with the mean US-ESR ages of 5 samples (1.64+0.16/-0.21 Ma) in the error range. The calculated time-averaged external dose rate(∼807 μGy/a) was basically in agreement with the in situ measured gamma dose rate value (8.50 μGy/a) in 2006, indicating the geochemical alterations may not occurred or do not affect the environmental dose rate obviously during the burial history. Conclusions: This study indicates the potential of solving both internal and external dose rate problems of ESR dating of fossil teeth by combining with U-series analysis and isochron protocol. (authors)

  8. Gene Expression Analyses of HER-2/neu and ESR1 in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Kheyri Nadergoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Her-2 and ESR1 genes, that interact in the cell signaling pathway, are the most important molecular markers of breast cancer, which have been amplified or overexpressed in 30% and 70%, respectively. This study was performed to evaluate the gene expression levels of Her-2 and ESR1 genes in tumor cells and its adjacent normal tissue of breast cancer patients and compared them whit clinical-pathological features. Methods: In total, 80 tissue specimens from 40 patients, with an average age of 48.47 years, were examined by Real-time PCR technique, and ultimately evaluated the expression level of Her-2 and ESR1genes. The data were analyzed by REST 2009 V2.0.13 statistical software. Results: HER2 and ESR1 overexpression was identified in 19 (48% and 12 (30% of 40 patients respectively, which was higher and lower than that recorded in international statistics, respectively. ESR1 overexpression was associated with Stage 3A and lymph node involvement 2 (N2 (P = 0.04 and P = 0.047, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between the expression of HER2 and ESR1 and other clinical-pathological features, however, the relative differences were identified in the expression levels of genes between main group and groups that were classified according to the clinical-pathological features and age. Conclusions: Overexpression of Her-2 and ESR1 genes in the patients of our study are higher and lower than international statistics, respectively, indicating the differences in genetic, environmental and ethnic factors that involved in the developing of breast cancer.

  9. Describing the brain in autism in five dimensions--magnetic resonance imaging-assisted diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder using a multiparameter classification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Mourão-Miranda, Janaina; Johnston, Patrick; Daly, Eileen M; Brammer, Michael J; Maltezos, Stefanos; Murphy, Clodagh M; Robertson, Dene; Williams, Steven C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2010-08-11

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition with multiple causes, comorbid conditions, and a wide range in the type and severity of symptoms expressed by different individuals. This makes the neuroanatomy of autism inherently difficult to describe. Here, we demonstrate how a multiparameter classification approach can be used to characterize the complex and subtle structural pattern of gray matter anatomy implicated in adults with ASD, and to reveal spatially distributed patterns of discriminating regions for a variety of parameters describing brain anatomy. A set of five morphological parameters including volumetric and geometric features at each spatial location on the cortical surface was used to discriminate between people with ASD and controls using a support vector machine (SVM) analytic approach, and to find a spatially distributed pattern of regions with maximal classification weights. On the basis of these patterns, SVM was able to identify individuals with ASD at a sensitivity and specificity of up to 90% and 80%, respectively. However, the ability of individual cortical features to discriminate between groups was highly variable, and the discriminating patterns of regions varied across parameters. The classification was specific to ASD rather than neurodevelopmental conditions in general (e.g., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Our results confirm the hypothesis that the neuroanatomy of autism is truly multidimensional, and affects multiple and most likely independent cortical features. The spatial patterns detected using SVM may help further exploration of the specific genetic and neuropathological underpinnings of ASD, and provide new insights into the most likely multifactorial etiology of the condition.

  10. Comparison of brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging features in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders patients with or without aquaporin-4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Moli; Fu, Ying; Su, Lei; Shen, Yi; Wood, Kristofer; Yang, Li; Liu, Yaou; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-04-01

    The spinal cord and brain measurements are rarely investigated in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients with and without antibodies to aquaporin-4 (AQP4), directly compared to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. To investigate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of both brain and spinal cord in NMO patients with and without antibodies to AQP4, compared with MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We recruited 55 NMO including 30 AQP4 (+) and 25 AQP4 (-), 25 MS and 25 HC. Brain and spinal cord MRIs were obtained for each participant. Brain lesions (BL), whole brain and deep grey matter volumes (DGMV), white matter diffusion metrics and spinal cord lesions were measured and compared among groups. The incidence of BL was lower in the AQP4 (+) group than in the AQP4 (-) and MS groups (p<0.05). In the AQP4 (+) group, there was a lower incidence of infratentorial lesi