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Sample records for resistance tomography electrical

  1. Electrical resistance tomography used in environmental restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.; LaBrecque, D.

    1992-04-01

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes; ERT can also be used to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and clean-up processes (such as air injection in the saturated zone, steam injection, emplacement of subsurface barriers) can create changes in a soil's electrical properties that are readily measured. We use these measurements to calculate tomographs that show the spatial distribution of the subsurface resistivities. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: monitor the effectiveness of clean-up processes, characterize hydrologic processes affecting contaminant transport, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers

  2. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Karhunen, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  4. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  5. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks

  6. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography and magnetic surveys: applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The magnetic anomaly plots, have mapped the weak zones resulting from subsurface structures and the Euler depth map and 2d magnetic modelling specially depicting the depth of the magnetic sources that are associated with the bedrock. The correlation of the magnetic anomaly plot and 2d inverse model resistivity ...

  8. electrical resistivity tomography and magnetic surveys

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effect of such lateral changes can result in errors in the interpreted layer resistivity and/or thick- ness. In many ... of a sequence of readings uploaded on to the units' internal memory. The goal of this unit is to .... characterized by white color and fine-grained texture. The tuff unit of the study area is rela- tively soft and porous ...

  9. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  10. Offset-electrode profile acquisition strategy for electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Austin R.; Plattner, Alain

    2018-04-01

    We present an electrode layout strategy that allows electrical resistivity profiles to image the third dimension close to the profile plane. This "offset-electrode profile" approach involves laterally displacing electrodes away from the profile line in an alternating fashion and then inverting the resulting data using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography software. In our synthetic and field surveys, the offset-electrode method succeeds in revealing three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the profile plane, which we could not achieve using three-dimensional inversions of linear profiles. We confirm and explain the limits of linear electrode profiles through a discussion of the three-dimensional sensitivity patterns: For a homogeneous starting model together with a linear electrode layout, all sensitivities remain symmetric with respect to the profile plane through each inversion step. This limitation can be overcome with offset-electrode layouts by breaking the symmetry pattern among the sensitivities. Thanks to freely available powerful three-dimensional resistivity tomography software and cheap modern computing power, the requirement for full three-dimensional calculations does not create a significant burden and renders the offset-electrode approach a cost-effective method. By offsetting the electrodes in an alternating pattern, as opposed to laying the profile out in a U-shape, we minimize shortening the profile length.

  11. Fringe effect of electrical capacitance and resistance tomography sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jiangtao; Yang, Wuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Because of the ‘soft-field’ nature, all electrical tomography sensors suffer from electric field distortion, i.e. the fringe effect. In electrical resistance tomography (ERT) sensors, small pin electrodes are commonly used. It is well known that the pin electrodes result in severe electric field distortion or the fringe effect, and the sensing region of such an ERT sensor spreads out of the pin electrode plane to a large volume. This is also true for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensors, even though it is less severe because of larger electrodes and grounded end guards used. However, when the length of electrodes in an ECT sensor without guards is reduced to almost the same dimension as those in an ERT sensor, the fringe effect is equally obvious. To investigate the fringe effect of ERT and ECT sensors with and without guards, simulations were carried out with different length of electrodes and the results are compared with the corresponding 2D simulation. It is concluded that ECT and ERT sensors with longer electrodes have less fringe effect. Because grounded end guards are effective in reducing the fringe effect of ECT sensors, we propose to apply grounded guards in ERT sensors and integrate ECT and ERT sensors together. Simulation results reveal that ERT sensors with grounded guards have less fringe effect. While commonly current excitation is used with ERT sensors, we propose voltage excitation instead to apply the grounded guards. The feasibility of this approach has been verified by experiment. Finally, a common structure for reducing the fringe effect is proposed for ECT and ERT sensors for the first time to simplify the sensor structure and reduce the mutual interference in ECT/ERT dual-modality measurements. (paper)

  12. Electrical resistivity tomography at the DOE Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Halter, T.D.; Sweeney, M.D.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent work at the DOE Hanford site has established the potential of applying Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) for early leak detection under hazardous waste storage facilities. Several studies have been concluded to test the capabilities and limitations of ERT for two different applications. First, field experiments have been conducted to determine the utility of ERT to detect and map leaks from underground storage tanks during waste removal processes. Second, the use of ERT for long term vadose zone monitoring has been tested under different field conditions of depth, installation design, acquisition mode/equipment and infiltration chemistry. This work involves transferring the technology from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program at the DOE Hanford Site. This paper covers field training studies relevant to the second application for long term vadose zone monitoring. Electrical resistivity tomography is a cross-borehole, imaging technique for mapping subsurface resistivity variations. Electrodes are placed at predetermined depths in an array of boreholes. Electrical current is introduced into one electrode pair located in one borehole while the resulting voltage change is detected between electrode pairs in other boreholes similar to a surface dipole-dipole array. These data are tomographically inverted to image temporal resistivity contrasts associated with an infiltration event. Thus a dynamic plume is spatially mapped as a function of time. As a long-term vadose zone monitoring method, different field conditions and performance requirements exist than those for short term tank leak detection. To test ERT under these conditions, two vertical electrode arrays were constructed to a depth of 160 feet with a linear surface array between boreholes

  13. Electrical resistivity tomography at the DOE Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Halter, T.D.; Sweeney, M.D.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent work at the DOE Hanford site has established the potential of applying Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) for early leak detection under hazardous waste storage facilities. Several studies have been concluded to test the capabilities and limitations of ERT for two different applications. First, field experiments have been conducted to determine the utility of ERT to detect and map leaks from underground storage tanks during waste removal processes. Second, the use of ERT for long term vadose zone monitoring has been tested under different field conditions of depth, installation design, acquisition mode/equipment and infiltration chemistry. This work involves transferring the technology from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program at the DOE Hanford Site. This paper covers field training studies relevant to the second application for long term vadose zone monitoring

  14. Site Characterization during Bridge Foundation Construction Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra V. Varnavina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A shallow underground water-filled cavity was encountered in limestone bedrock during the construction of a new column footing for the Gasconade River Bridge over Interstate 44. Five electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and borehole control were acquired in immediate proximity to the existing and the new column footings in order to assess the integrity of the rock beneath the foundation columns and characterize the encountered cavity. Two parallel southwest- northeast trending fracture zones were identified on the acquired ERT profiles and competent rock was differentiated from more extensively fractured rock. The volumetric extent of the void was mapped based on the interpretation of the ERT, borehole and injected grout data. A conceptual model for the development of the water-filled cavity was proposed.

  15. Electrical resistivity tomography at the DOE Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent work at the DOE Hanford site has established the potential of applying Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) for early leak detection under hazardous waste storage facilities. Several studies have been concluded to test the capabilities and limitations of ERT for two different applications. First, field experiments have been conducted to determine the utility of ERT to detect and map leaks from underground storage tanks during waste removal processes. Second, the use of ERT for long term vadose zone monitoring has been tested under different field conditions of depth, installation design, acquisition mode/equipment and infiltration chemistry. This work involves transferring the technology from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program at the DOE Hanford Site. This paper covers field training studies relevant to the second application for long term vadose monitoring. Electrical resistivity tomography is a cross-borehole, imaging technique for mapping subsurface resistivity variations. Electrodes are placed at predetermined depths in an array of boreholes. Electrical current is introduced into one electrode pair located in one borehole while the resulting voltage change is detected between electrode pairs in other boreholes similar to a surface dipole-dipole array. These data are topographically inverted to image temporal resistivity contrasts associated with an infiltration event. Thus a dynamic plume is spatially mapped as a function of time. As a long-term vadose zone monitoring method, different field conditions and performance requirements exist than those for short term tank leak detection. To test ERT under these conditions, two vertical electrode arrays were constructed to a depth of 160 feet with a linear surface array between boreholes. The fielding was used to facilitate the technology transfer from LLNL to the Hanford RCRA program. Installation methods, commercial equipment and

  16. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  17. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwaly, M.; El-Qady, G.; Matsushima, J.; Szalai, S.; Al-Arifi, N. S. N.; Taha, A.

    2008-12-01

    Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic) landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and metal detector (MD) techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  18. Contribution of 3-D electrical resistivity tomography for landmines detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Metwaly

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Landmines are a type of inexpensive weapons widely used in the pre-conflicted areas in many countries worldwide. The two main types are the metallic and non-metallic (mostly plastic landmines. They are most commonly investigated by magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR, and metal detector (MD techniques. These geophysical techniques however have significant limitations in resolving the non-metallic landmines and wherever the host materials are conductive. In this work, the 3-D electric resistivity tomography (ERT technique is evaluated as an alternative and/or confirmation detection system for both landmine types, which are buried in different soil conditions and at different depths. This can be achieved using the capacitive resistivity imaging system, which does not need direct contact with the ground surface. Synthetic models for each case have been introduced using metallic and non-metallic bodies buried in wet and dry environments. The inversion results using the L1 norm least-squares optimization method tend to produce robust blocky models of the landmine body. The dipole axial and the dipole equatorial arrays tend to have the most favorable geometry by applying dynamic capacitive electrode and they show significant signal strength for data sets with up to 5% noise. Increasing the burial depth relative to the electrode spacing as well as the noise percentage in the resistivity data is crucial in resolving the landmines at different environments. The landmine with dimension and burial depth of one electrode separation unit is over estimated while the spatial resolutions decrease as the burial depth and noise percentage increase.

  19. Waste disposal mapping with electrical resistivity tomography case: Leuwigajah landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanti, Erisha; Ardi, Ahmad Puji; Almunziri, Muaz; Xanggam, Zael Yahd; Eleazar, Adino; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Leuwigajah landfill as administrative is located between district of Bandung and Cimahi citythat has an environmental and social problem that caused aquifer contamination due to the big amount of waste from Bandung city, Cimahi and Bandung regency. It is occupied in abandoned andesite mine site with an area of about 25 hectare. The aim of this research is to map the geology structure and to study the leachate towards aquifer layer below Leuwigajah landfill. Here, we present the study of Leuwigajah landfill subsurface using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). ERT is one of the most promising prospecting techniques mainly concerning its effective contribution to resolve several environmental problems, was applied for the geophysical modeling. ERT is a robust imaging method the theory and implementation of which are well documented in geophysical research literature. The geological setting comprises clayed weathered layer, fractured andesitic dike. Due to the above-mentioned geological singularity and in the light of the requirement for an environmentally safe construction of the landfill, an ERT survey was carried out with dipole-dipole array, 78 m of acquisition line and 6 m of electrode spacing. The model consists of 4 layers below the Leuwigajah landfill and andesitic fracture until depth of 18.7 m below the surface.

  20. Geophysical methods in protected environments. Electrical resistivity tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio Sánchez-Aguililla, F.M.; Ramiro-Camacho, A.; Ibarra Torre, P.

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong interest in protecting the environment with the aim of its long term preservation. Sometimes the heritage value of these natural areas is related to their biodiversity as there are restricted ecosystems that depend directly on them. In other cases there a singular geological record might exist, essential for the understanding of certain processes affecting the planet, such as volcanic events or glacial periods. To achieve the protection and conservation of these areas it is necessary to generate knowledge about the distribution of geological materials and groundwater masses, to study the parameters that dominate the behaviour of these systems and then define those elements that require special protection or attention. In these protected environments, research methods with a minimal environmental impact should be used. Therefore, indirect methods, such as geophysical techniques, are reliable and complementary tools with a minimum environmental impact and are therefore useful for research these unique areas. The IGME has conducted several geophysical surveys in different protected environments in Spain with the aim of achieving a better understanding, and thus facilitate their preservation and exploitation in a sustainable manner. In this paper we present a review of some case studies where geophysical methods have been used. In all the cases electrical resistivity tomography has been the axis of the geophysical research and stands out due to its great effectiveness. The main objective of this communication is to divulgate and increase awareness of the important role that these geophysical methods can play in the sustainable study of these unique places. [es

  1. Using DC electrical resistivity tomography to quantify preferential flow in fractured rock environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    May, F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available . This investigation aims to identify preferential flow paths in fractured rock environments. Time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (TLERT, Lund Imaging System), is regarded as a suitable method for identifying preferential water flow....

  2. In-mine electrical resistance tomography for imaging the continuity of tabular orebodies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the strengths of the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) technique is its flexibility in terms of survey geometries. In this paper an unconventional and novel ERT application that is geometrically analogous to in-seam seismic tomography...

  3. Investigation of Shallow Paleochannel in Banda Aceh based on Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzakir Zainal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pembentukan daratan pesisir sangat dipengaruhi oleh proses sedimentasi dari material hasil rombakan. Proses sedimentasi pada masa lampau dapat dikaji dengan mempelajari sungai purba sebagai media transportasi material. Survey geofisika metode electrical resistivty tomography dilakukan untuk investigasi sungai purba di Ulee Kareng Banda Aceh. Untuk memetakan sedimen dan geometri sungai purba, pengukuran electrical resistivity dilakukan di sepanjang dua lintasan dengan panjang 240 meter dan spasi elektroda 2 meter. Proses inversi model resistivitas 2D telah dilakukan pada masing – masing lintasan data yang terukur. Hasil electrical resistivity tomography mampu membedakan batas – batas antara setiap lapisan sedimen yang terendapkan di lokasi paleochannel. Sedimen paleochannel secara jelas diidentifikasi dari distribusi nilai resistivitas yang lebih tinggi (15.2–31.6 Ω.m. Berdasarkan interpretasi dari metode electrical resistivity tomography area persawahan merupakan lokasi sungai purba pada masa lampau.   The formation of coastal area is influenced by sedimentation process. The sedimentation process along the coastal line in the past one can be explained by studying existence of paleochannels located around the area. Deposition of the sediment along the coast is carried by river activities in the past. We have investigated paleochannel structure in Ulee Kareng, Banda Aceh using electrical resistivity tomography survey. The measurements were performed along two profiles with 240 meters and 2 meters spacing between electrodes crossing the paddy. The method measured apparent resistivity data along the profiles. The 2D resistivity models were inverted from the apparent resistivity data using Res2Div program. The inverted models clearly show indication of paleochannel structure based on distribution of resistivity values within the subsurface. The paleochannel area was characterize by high resistivity i.e. 15.2–31.6 Ω.m.

  4. Spatial and temporal monitoring of soil moisture using surface electrical resistivity tomography in Mediterranean soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alamry, Abdulmohsen S.; van der Meijde, Mark; Noomen, Marleen; Addink, Elisabeth A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/224281216; van Benthem, Rik; de Jong, Steven M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306

    2017-01-01

    ERT techniques are especially promising in (semi-arid) areas with shallow and rocky soils where other methods fail to produce soil moisture maps and to obtain soil profile information. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was performed in the Peyne catchment in southern France at four sites

  5. Direct observations of surface water-groundwater interaction using electrical resistivity tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noell, Ursula; Wießner, Claudia; Ganz, Christina; Westhoff, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography is a helpful tool to observe the infiltration process in and through the soil. Array 3-D measurements and 3-D inversion schemes are required for reliable interpretation of heterogeneous subsurface structures. Smoothing of the inversion can be minimized by using

  6. Electrical Resistivity Tomography Using Wenner β - Schlumberger Configuration for Anomaly Detection in The Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebriyanto, Y.; Dahlan, K.; Sari, Y. W.

    2017-03-01

    In the subsurface exploration investigations there are many methods used, one of them is Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). ERT method is able to measure the electrical properties of the material below the earth surface based on the value of the resistivity of the material by injecting electric current and measure the potential at the surface. Based on the data obtained then will be inputted into RES2DINV software for final processing of 2D image. This research has been created by testing 2 configurations Wenner-Schlumberger and Wenner β - Schlumberger for detecting anomalies in homogeneous soil. A wooden box containing homogeneous soil is used for the test. Three anomalies (wood, stone, and wet soil) were placed in different positions and the variation of resistivity was detected. We found that the Wenner β - Schlumberger configuration results in a smaller resistivity value error than the Wenner-Schlumberger configurations.

  7. Estimation of Recharge from Long-Term Monitoring of Saline Tracer Transport Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Binley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The movement of a saline tracer added to the soil surface was monitored in the unsaturated zone using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and subjected to natural rainfall conditions. The ERT data were inverted and corrected for subsurface temperature changes, and spatial moment...... methods. In September 2011, a saline tracer was added across a 142-m2 area at the surface at an application rate mimicking natural infiltration. The movement of the saline tracer front was monitored using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT); data were collected on a daily to weekly...... located only meters away from the cross-borehole ERT array. This suggests that long-term automated ERT monitoring of a surface-applied tracer is a promising technique for estimating groundwater recharge....

  8. Hydrogeophysical Characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a limestone mining area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H.; Qi, Z.; Li, X., Sr.; Ma, X.; Xue, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Karst is a kind of geological phenomenon under the chemical erosion process from water to soluble rock, such as limestone, gypsum, salt rock etc. Karst is widely distributed around the world and also in southwest of China. The Guangxi area is famous as the highly degree of karstification due to long time groundwater erosion and the development of fracture network. The hydrogeological units become complex involving subsurface karst pipes, caves, eroded groove, etc. Moreover, the complex system is hard to evaluate. The karst collapse may cause many kind of disaster which will influence the human activities. Classical hydrogeological methods, such as pumping tests and tracer tests, to estimate the hydraulic conductivity distribution in an aquifer are hard to finish in some condition with large area and high resolution required. Because a large number of wells are needed, which is uncommon because of the high drilling costs. However, geophysical method is cost-effective in mapping underground structures. And geophysical imaging is highly linked with the subsurface hydrological parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a widely used geophysical method in environmental and engineering applications. It detect and identify targets with different resistivity to the background by measuring the potential difference between different electric nodes. When the target has lower resistivity than the background, such as water resource, karst, evaluation of marine transgression etc., the acquired data show higher voltage corresponding to low resistivity. While when the target has higher resistivity than the background, such as empty holes, sliding surface for dry landslide and archaeological geophysics etc., the acquired data show opposite phenomenon. One can obtain the real resistivity profile of the subsurface by inverting the acquired data. We study the characterization of shallow karst using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) which is the most cost effective

  9. Non-invasive determination of absolute lung resistivity in adults using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Patterson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Lung resistivity is a physiological parameter that describes the electrical characteristics of the lungs. Lung composition changes due to changes in the lung tissues, fluid and air volume. Various diseases that can cause a change in lung composition may be monitored by measuring lung resistivity. Currently, there is no accepted non-invasive method to measure lung resistivity. In this study, we presented a method and framework to non-invasively determine lung resistivity using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). By comparing actual measurements from subjects with data from a 3D human thorax model, an EIT image can be reconstructed to show a resistivity difference between the model and the subject. By adjusting the lung resistivity in the model, the resistivity difference in the lung regions can be reduced to near zero. This resistivity value then is the estimation of the lung resistivity of the subject. Using the proposed method, the lung resistivities of four normal adult males (43 ± 13 years, 78 ± 10 kg) in the supine position at air volumes starting at functional residual capacity (FRC—end expiration) and increasing in 0.5 l steps to 1.5 l were studied. The averaged lung resistivity changes 12.59%, from 1406 Ω cm to 1583 Ω cm, following the inspiration of 1.5 l air from FRC. The coefficients of variation (CV) of precision for the four subjects are less than 10%. The experiment was repeated five times at each air volume on a subject to test the reproducibility. The CVs are less than 3%. The results show that it is feasible to determine absolute lung resistivity using an EIT-based method

  10. Geophysical investigation of earth dam using the electrical tomography resistivity technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Lemos Camarero

    Full Text Available Abstract Dams are structures that dam rivers and streams for a variety of purposes. These structures often need to be sturdy to withstand the force of the impoundment and the high values of accumulated water load. The constant maintenance of these structures is essential, since a possible accident can lead to damage of catastrophic proportions. This research presents an alternative cheap and quick application for investigating water seepage in earth dams, through the application of the DC resistivity geophysical method from the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT technique in Wenner array. Three ERT lines were placed parallel to the longitudinal axis of a dam formed by clay soil from the decomposition of diabase. The data are presented in 2D and pseudo-3D geophysical images with electrical resistivity values modeled. Based on the physical principle of electrolytic conduction, that is, decrease in electrical resistance in materials or siliceous minerals in moisture conditions as compared to the material in the dry state, the results revealed low-resistivity zones restricted to some points, associated with water infiltration in the transverse direction of the dam. The absence of evidence as water upwelling on the front of the dam together with geophysical evidence indicate saturation restricted to some points and low probability at the present time, for installation of piping processes.

  11. Electrical resistance tomography during gas injection at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-05-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is used to monitor some of the in situ remediation processes being evaluated for removal of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Integrated Demonstration for VOC's in Soils and Groundwater at Non Arid Sites, the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. Air was injected in the saturated zone and the intrained air was tomographically imaged by its effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The authors found that the flow paths are confined to a complex three dimensional network of channels, some of which extend as far as 30 m from the injection well. They conclude, based on these results, that the shape and extent of the air plume are controlled by spatial variations in the local gas permeability. These channels are somewhat unstable over a period of months and new channels appear to form with time

  12. Electrical resistance tomography during in-situ trichloroethylene remediation at the Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1995-04-01

    Electrical resistance tomography was used to monitor in-situ remediation processes for removal of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. This work was designed to test the feasibility of injecting a weak mixture of methane in air as a metabolic carbon source for natural microbial populations which are capable of trichloroethylene degradation. Electrical resistance tomograms were constructed of the subsurface during the test to provide detailed images of the process. These images were made using an iterative reconstruction algorithm based on a finite element forward model and Newton-type least-squares minimization. Changes in the subsurface resistivity distribution were imaged by a pixel-by-pixel subtraction of images taken before and during the process. This differential tomography removed all static features of formation resistivity but clearly delineated dynamic features induced by remediation processes. The air-methane mixture was injected into the saturated zone and the intrained air migration paths were tomographically imaged by the increased resistivity of the path as air displaced formation water. We found the flow paths to be confined to a complex three-dimensional network of channels, some of which extended as far as 30 m from the injection well. These channels were not entirely stable over a period of months since new channels appeared to form with time. Also, the resistivity of the air injection paths increased with time. In another series of tests, resistivity images of water infiltration from the surface support similar conclusions about the preferential permeability paths in the vadose zone. In this case, the water infiltration front is confined to narrow channels which have a three-dimensional structure. Here, similar to air injection in the saturated zone, the water flow is controlled by local variations in formation permeability. However, temporal changes in these channels

  13. Detection and localization of changes in two-dimensional temperature distributions by electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashetnia, Reza; Hallaji, Milad; Smyl, Danny; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of applying electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect changes in two-dimensional (2D) temperature distributions with potential applications in sensor development. The proposed sensor consists of a thin layer of porous metal film manufactured by spraying colloidal copper paint to a solid surface. A change of the temperature distribution on the surface changes the 2D distributed electrical conductivity of the metal film. The change of the electrical conductivity is localized and quantified with ERT, and further, to convert the estimated conductivity change of the sensor to temperature change, an experimentally developed model is used. The proposed temperature sensor is evaluated experimentally by applying it to a polymeric substrate, and exposing it to known temperature changes using heat sources of different shapes. The results demonstrate that the proposed sensor is capable of detecting and localizing temperature changes, and provides at least qualitative information on the magnitude of the temperature change.

  14. Late Quaternary activity along the Scorciabuoi Fault (Southern Italy as inferred from electrical resistivity tomographies

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    A. Loperte

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Scorciabuoi Fault is one of the major tectonic structures affecting the Southern Apennines, Italy. Across its central sector, we performed several electrical resistivity tomographies with different electrode spacing (5 and 10 m and using a multielectrode system with 32 electrodes. All tomographies were acquired with two different arrays, the dipole-dipole and the Wenner-Schlumberger. We also tested the different sensitivity of the two arrays with respect to the specific geological conditions and research goals. Detailed geological mapping and two boreholes were used to calibrate the electrical stratigraphy. In all but one tomography (purposely performed off the fault trace, we could recognise an abrupt subvertical lateral variation of the main sedimentary bodies showing the displacement and sharp thickening of the two youngest alluvial bodies in the hanging-wall block. These features are interpreted as evidence of synsedimentary activity of the Scorciabuoi Fault during Late Pleistocene and possibly as recently as Holocene and allow accurate location of the fault trace within the Sauro alluvial plain.

  15. Electrical resistance tomography to monitor unsaturated moisture flow in cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallaji, Milad [Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Seppänen, Aku [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad, E-mail: mpourghaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Traditionally the electrically-based assessment of the moisture flow in cement-based materials relies on two- or four-point measurements. In this paper, imaging of moisture distribution with electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is considered. Especially, the aim is to study whether ERT could give information on unsaturated moisture flows in cases where the flow is non-uniform. In the experiment, the specimens are monitored with ERT during the water ingress. The ERT reconstructions are compared with neutron radiographs, which provide high resolution information on the 2D distribution of the moisture. The results indicate that ERT is able to detect the moisture movement and to show approximately the shape and position of the water front even if the flow is nonuniform.

  16. Application of 2D electrical resistivity tomography to engineering projects: Three case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungroj Arjwech

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT is a non-invasive geophysical method of primary interest for addressing subsurface engineering problems. The method is based on the assumption that subsurface geological materials have significant resistivity contrasts that can be identified based on measurements on the surface. This paper presents three different case studies that have been carried out at different sites. The first case study visualizes the contrast between high resistivity zones of hard bedrocks and low resistivity zones of weathered rocks. Similar to the first case study, the second case study shows high resistivity contrasts that clearly distinguishes the shape of a footing located within the surrounding materials. The third case study shows no clear low resistivity zone that can be identified as a leaking zone. The 2D ERT survey method used in these three investigations has been shown to be useful as a cost-effective and rapid method to obtain wide area subsurface information that is relevant for subsurface engineering problems.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 Ωm. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities

  18. Electrical resistivity tomography investigation of coseismic liquefaction and fracturing at San Carlo, Ferrara Province, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Abu Zeid

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Massive surface fracturing and sand ejection took place during the main shock of the May 20, 2012, earthquake (Ml = 5.9 in the Emilia-Romagna region, northern Italy. These phenomena were induced by the liquefaction of water-saturated sand layers, and they damaged several buildings, as well as many roads and sidewalks. They were clustered between the villages of Sant'Agostino and Vigarano Mainarda, located along a paleo-reach of the Reno River [Papathanassiou et al. 2012, this volume]. The subsurface surrounding two major (several decameters long ground ruptures was investigated using electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT, as resistivity is strongly affected by the chemico-physical conditions of loose sediments. Italian regulations require the Municipalities within seismically active areas to develop maps of the potential liquefaction risk. Not all of the territories that are under this kind of risk have been investigated to date. A strong effort to improve this knowledge is therefore needed. Noninvasive geophysical methods can help to fill this gap, as high-resolution techniques are available with good result-to-cost ratios. Among the available methodologies, the most suitable are the methods based on electrical resistivity and permittivity, as they are highly sensitive to the presence of underground water. The ERT method has been carried out successfully across active faults, providing crucial paleoseismological information [Caputo et al. 2003, 2007]. […

  19. Use of small scale electrical resistivity tomography to identify soil-root interactions during deficit irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella, D.; Cassiani, G.; Busato, L.; Boaga, J.; Barbagallo, S.; Binley, A.; Consoli, S.

    2018-01-01

    Plant roots activity affect the exchanges of mass and energy between the soil and atmosphere. However, it is challenging to monitor the activity of the root-zone because roots are not visible from the soil surface, and root systems undergo spatial and temporal variations in response to internal and external conditions. Therefore, measurements of the activity of root systems are interesting to ecohydrologists in general, and are especially important for specific applications, such as irrigation water management. This study demonstrates the use of small scale three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to monitor the root-zone of orange trees irrigated by two different regimes: (i) full rate, in which 100% of the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is provided; and (ii) partial root-zone drying (PRD), in which 50% of ETc is supplied to alternate sides of the tree. We performed time-lapse 3-D ERT measurements on these trees from 5 June to 24 September 2015, and compared the long-term and short-term changes before, during, and after irrigation events. Given the small changes in soil temperature and pore water electrical conductivity, we interpreted changes of soil electrical resistivity from 3-D ERT data as proxies for changes in soil water content. The ERT results are consistent with measurements of transpiration flux and soil temperature. The changes in electrical resistivity obtained from ERT measurements in this case study indicate that root water uptake (RWU) processes occur at the 0.1 m scale, and highlight the impact of different irrigation schemes.

  20. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity

  1. Characterizing root system characteristics with Electrical resistivity Tomography: a virtual rhizotron simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sathyanarayan; Ehosioke, Solomon; Lesparre, Nolwenn; Nguyen, Frédéric; Javaux, Mathieu

    2017-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is more and more used for monitoring soil water content in a cropped soil. Yet, the impact of roots on the signal is often neglected and a topic of controversy. In several studies related to soil-root system, it has been showed that the measured root mass density statistically correlates with the electrical conductivity (EC) data obtained from ERT. In addition, some studies suggest that some roots are more electrically conductive than soil for most water content. Thus, higher EC of roots suggest that it might have a measurable impact on ERT signals. In this work, virtual rhizotrons are simulated using the software package called R-SWMS that solves water and solute transport in plant root-soil system, including root growth. The distribution of water content obtained from R-SWMS simulation is converted into EC data using pedo-physical models. The electrical properties of roots and rhizosphere are explicitly included in the EC data to form a conductivity map (CM) with a very detailed spatial resolution. Forward ERT simulations is then carried out for CM generated for various root architectures and soil conditions to study the impact of roots on ERT forward (current and voltage patterns) and inverse solutions. It is demonstrated that under typical injection schemes with lateral electrodes, root system is hardly measurable. However, it is showed that adding electrodes and constraints on the ERT inversion based on root architecture help quantifying root system mass and extent.

  2. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Algorithm in Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT): Phantom Experiment for Static Resistivity Images," IEEE Trans. on Medical Imaging...Tomography MREIT: Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography FEM: Finite Element Method EIS: Electrical Impedance Scanning OPAMP : Operational...transconductance amplifier was designed and built using three LM741 OPAMP circuits to convert the voltage from the signal generator into a current

  3. Electrical Resistivity Tomography using a finite element based BFGS algorithm with algebraic multigrid preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, A. L.; Gross, L.

    2018-03-01

    We present a new inversion method for Electrical Resistivity Tomography which, in contrast to established approaches, minimizes the cost function prior to finite element discretization for the unknown electric conductivity and electric potential. Minimization is performed with the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method (BFGS) in an appropriate function space. BFGS is self-preconditioning and avoids construction of the dense Hessian which is the major obstacle to solving large 3-D problems using parallel computers. In addition to the forward problem predicting the measurement from the injected current, the so-called adjoint problem also needs to be solved. For this problem a virtual current is injected through the measurement electrodes and an adjoint electric potential is obtained. The magnitude of the injected virtual current is equal to the misfit at the measurement electrodes. This new approach has the advantage that the solution process of the optimization problem remains independent to the meshes used for discretization and allows for mesh adaptation during inversion. Computation time is reduced by using superposition of pole loads for the forward and adjoint problems. A smoothed aggregation algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioned conjugate gradient is applied to construct the potentials for a given electric conductivity estimate and for constructing a first level BFGS preconditioner. Through the additional reuse of AMG operators and coarse grid solvers inversion time for large 3-D problems can be reduced further. We apply our new inversion method to synthetic survey data created by the resistivity profile representing the characteristics of subsurface fluid injection. We further test it on data obtained from a 2-D surface electrode survey on Heron Island, a small tropical island off the east coast of central Queensland, Australia.

  4. Electrical resistivity tomography data across the Hockai Fault Zone (Ardenne, Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lecocq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the result of a large-scale geophysical survey that had the objective of identifying the subsurface characteristics and the NE–SW extension of the Hockai Fault Zone: a major NNW–SSE oriented crustal-rooted fault zone crossing the Stavelot-Venn Massif (Eastern Belgium. 31 two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles are presented, resulting in 10,679 m of 2D sections. All profiles were acquired between 2008 and 2010 using a single channel ABEM Terrameter SAS1000 instrument connected to a 64 electrodes setup of maximum 315 m extent which was often extended using the roll-along technique. Major findings based on the data presented here are reported in the manuscript "A geophysical cross-section of the Hockai Fault Zone (Eastern Belgium" (Lecocq and Camelbeeck, Submitted for publication [1].

  5. Electrical resistivity tomography data across the Hockai Fault Zone (Ardenne, Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Thomas; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present the result of a large-scale geophysical survey that had the objective of identifying the subsurface characteristics and the NE-SW extension of the Hockai Fault Zone: a major NNW-SSE oriented crustal-rooted fault zone crossing the Stavelot-Venn Massif (Eastern Belgium). 31 two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles are presented, resulting in 10,679 m of 2D sections. All profiles were acquired between 2008 and 2010 using a single channel ABEM Terrameter SAS1000 instrument connected to a 64 electrodes setup of maximum 315 m extent which was often extended using the roll-along technique. Major findings based on the data presented here are reported in the manuscript "A geophysical cross-section of the Hockai Fault Zone (Eastern Belgium)" (Lecocq and Camelbeeck, Submitted for publication) [1].

  6. Application of Electrical Resistivity Tomography Technique for Characterizing Leakage Problem in Abu Baara Earth Dam, Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Al-Fares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT survey was carried out at Abu Baara earth dam in northwestern Syria, in order to delineate potential pathways of leakage occurring through the subsurface structure close to the dam body. The survey was performed along two straight measuring profiles of 715 and 430 m length in up- and downstream sides of the dam’s embankment. The analysis of the inverted ERT sections revealed the presence of fractured and karstified limestone rocks which constitute the shallow bedrock of the dam reservoir. Several subsurface structural anomalies were identified within the fractured bedrock, most of which are associated with probable karstic cavities, voids, and discontinuity features developed within the carbonates rocks. Moreover, results also showed the occurrence of a distinguished subsiding structure coinciding with main valley course. Accordingly, it is believed that the bedrock and the other detected features are the main potential causes of water leakage from the dam’s reservoir.

  7. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  8. A method to improve tree water use estimates by distinguishing sapwood from heartwood using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, A.; Ostergaard, K.; Lenkopane, M.; Fan, J.; Lockington, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating whole-plant water use in trees requires reliable and accurate methods. Measuring sap velocity and extrapolating to tree water use is seen as the most commonly used. However, deducing the tree water use from sap velocity requires an estimate of the sapwood area. This estimate is the highest cause of uncertainty, and can reach more than 50 % of the uncertainty in the estimate of water use per day. Here, we investigate the possibility of using Electrical Resistivity Tomography to evaluate the sapwood area distribution in a plantation of Pinus elliottii. Electric resistivity tomographs of Pinus elliottii show a very typical pattern of electrical resistivity, which is highly correlated to sapwood and heartwood distribution. To identify the key factors controlling the variation of electrical resistivity, cross sections at breast height for ten trees have been monitored with electrical resistivity tomography. Trees have been cut down after the experiment to identify the heartwood/sapwood boundaries and to extract wood and sap samples. pH, electrolyte concentration and wood moisture content have then been analysed for these samples. Results show that the heartwood/sapwood patterns are highly correlated with electrical resistivity, and that the wood moisture content is the most influencing factor controlling the variability of the patterns. These results show that electric resistivity tomography could be used as a powerful tool to identify the sapwood area, and thus be used in combination with sapflow sensors to map tree water use at stand scale. However, if Pinus elliottii shows typical patterns, further work is needed to identify to see if there are species - specific characterictics as shown in previous works (, electrolyte gradients from the bark to the heartwood). Also, patterns of high resistivity in between needles positions, which are not correlated with either wood moisture content or sapwood, appear to be artifacts. Thus, inversion methods have also to

  9. Time Domain Reflectometry and Electrical Resistivity Tomography applications for optimizing water use in irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriani, A.; Loperte, A.; Catalano, M.

    2012-04-01

    This abstract deals with the joint use of the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) for soil moisture monitoring and spatial distribution estimation in agriculture. In fact, an effective use of irrigation water for a sustainable agriculture helps to cut irrigation cost and the exploitation of technologies for water resource monitoring and management can help to achieve this objective. The work has regarded a flat experimental vegetable area of about 1000 m2 with the bean crop (Phaseolus vulgaris L), which was an subdivided in two adjacent plots of land five meters distant each from other. From sowing and for the whole cultural cycle, irrigation monitoring was performed by using non-invasive surveys, based on measurements of physical properties of the soil, as the dielectric constant and the electrical resistivity. A drip irrigation system was used with the water pumped by a nearby water reserve, represented by a small artificial lake, but a different irrigation treatment was performed for each plot. In the plot A, the irrigation water supply was managed by the farmer, with an intensive irrigation treatment. Differently, in the plot B, the irrigation water supply was decided on the basis of the results of the TDR and ERT surveys. In particular, the amount and the time of irrigation were determined on the basis of the measurements of physical properties of the soil using TDR and ERT, with a specific focus to the soil moisture content estimation and spatial distribution . In fact, during the crop cycle, the soil moisture was measured weekly before and after irrigation, by a 20 cm vertical time domain reflectometry probe located at the center and at the ends of the bean rows. Moreover, the soil water distribution was determined by an electrical resistivity tomography using a multielectrode method. On the basis of the TDR and ERT results, a reduced water supply was performed, which did not affect the bean yield, and moreover

  10. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... of aeolian and glacial sands near the surface and marine sands below 10m depth. 3-D time-lapse ERT inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can image the geochemical changes induced by the dissolved CO2 until the end of the acquisition, 120days after......-intrusive surface electrical resistivity tomography. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  11. Investigating Algal Reefs in Xinwu, Taiwan, by using Electrical Resistivity Tomography Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping-Yun; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2017-04-01

    The Guanxin algal reef, which is locating along the coastal line of Guanyin and Xinwu districts in the Taoyuan city, is the biggest and most complete algal reef in Taiwan. It is consisted of the calcified crustose coralline algae and is one of the most important ecosystems on the northwestern coast. Algal reefs grow extremely slow and expand only 0.1 to 80 mm annually; as a result, any investigation in the algal reef area must be implemented very carefully to reduce potential influence on the environment. Reefs have special electrical property; therefore, it is suitable for applications of electrical exploration methods. The Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a fast, non-destructive, and inexpensive surficial geophysical survey method, and therefore it is widely used to investigate reefs. In this study, we used ERT method to investigate the location, distribution area and depth of algal reefs in order to provide a reliable reference of coastal engineering and the establishment of ecosystem refuge. The study area is from the south coast of Fulin river to the south coast of Guanyin river. There are four ERT survey lines, three of them are 960m long and parallel to the shoreline, and the other one is 240m long and perpendicular to others. According to the Archie's Law, we calculated the porosity from the resistivity profile to estimate the depth of reefs beneath each survey line and verified the estimates with the data obtained from drilling well. The results show that the upper boundary of the algal reefs is 0-1.5m deep (there are sands above), and the lower boundary is 4-6m deep (there are gravels below) in the study area. In addition, all profiles obtained from the north-south survey lines show that the depth of the algal reef becomes shallower in the range of 100m in the southernmost end, which indicate the southern boundary of the reef distribution.

  12. Imaging Saltwater Intrusion Along the Coast of Monterey Bay Using Long-Offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, M.; Knight, R. J.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal regions represent a complex dynamic interface where saltwater intrusion moves seawater landward and groundwater discharge moves freshwater seaward. These processes can have a dramatic impact on water quality, affecting both humans and coastal ecosystems. The ability to map the subsurface distribution of fresh and salt water is a critical step in predicting and managing water quality in coastal regions. This is commonly accomplished using wells, which are expensive and provide point information, which may fail to capture the spatial complexity in subsurface conditions. We present an alternate method for acquiring data, long-offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which is non-invasive, cost effective, and can address the problem of poor spatial sampling. This geophysical method can produce continuous profiles of subsurface electrical resistivity to a depth of 300 m, with spatial resolution on the order of tens of meters. Our research focuses on the Monterey Bay region, where sustained groundwater extraction over the past century has led to significant saltwater intrusion. ERT was acquired along 40 kilometers of the coast using the roll along method, allowing for continuous overlap in data acquisition. Electrodes were spaced every 22.2 m, with a total of 81 electrodes along the 1.8 km active cable length. The data show a complex distribution of fresh and salt water, influenced by geology, groundwater pumping, recharge, and land-use. While the inverted ERT resistivity profiles correspond well with existing data sets and geologic interpretations in the region, the spatial complexity revealed through the ERT data goes beyond what is known from traditional data sources alone. This leads us to conclude that this form of data can be extremely useful in informing and calibrating groundwater flow models, making targeted management decisions, and monitoring changes in subsurface salinities over time.

  13. Comparison of Compressed Sensing Algorithms for Inversion of 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Ranjan, S.; Kbvn, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    Image reconstruction algorithms derived from electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) are highly non-linear, sparse, and ill-posed. The inverse problem is much severe, when dealing with 3-D datasets that result in large sized matrices. Conventional gradient based techniques using L2 norm minimization with some sort of regularization can impose smoothness constraint on the solution. Compressed sensing (CS) is relatively new technique that takes the advantage of inherent sparsity in parameter space in one or the other form. If favorable conditions are met, CS was proven to be an efficient image reconstruction technique that uses limited observations without losing edge sharpness. This paper deals with the development of an open source 3-D resistivity inversion tool using CS framework. The forward model was adopted from RESINVM3D (Pidlisecky et al., 2007) with CS as the inverse code. Discrete cosine transformation (DCT) function was used to induce model sparsity in orthogonal form. Two CS based algorithms viz., interior point method and two-step IST were evaluated on a synthetic layered model with surface electrode observations. The algorithms were tested (in terms of quality and convergence) under varying degrees of parameter heterogeneity, model refinement, and reduced observation data space. In comparison to conventional gradient algorithms, CS was proven to effectively reconstruct the sub-surface image with less computational cost. This was observed by a general increase in NRMSE from 0.5 in 10 iterations using gradient algorithm to 0.8 in 5 iterations using CS algorithms.

  14. Electrical resistivity tomography for early vadose leak detection under single shell storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narbutovshih, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes planned testing with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). It is prepared in support of TTP RL46WT51 Rev. 1, funded by the Tank Focus Area through the Office of Technology Integration. The primary goal of the testing for fiscal year 1996 (FY96) is to develop and demonstrate the ability to place vertical electrode arrays (VEA) with the cone penetrometer technology (CPT) to depths below existing single shell tanks (SST) at the DOE Hanford Site. It is desirable to have the capability to use CPT for this application for obvious reasons. First, current methods of emplacement, drilled boreholes, are expensive with respect to the rest of the ERT operation. Cone penetrometer VEA emplacements offer the opportunity to significantly reduce installation costs. Second, use of CPT will reduce emplacement time from weeks or months to just several days depending on the number of VEAs and the depth of placement. ERT is preferable to other monitoring methods since operation costs and turn around time are less than the current baselines of either groundwater sampling networks or borehole logging techniques. ERT cost savings can be substantial and will continue into the future. ERT can also provide complete coverage under a tank or other facility which is an important supplement to existing monitoring methods. Groundwater sampling provides one data point per well and borehole logging provides data along a line in the ground. Neither provide information from beneath a facility and thus, are not able to locate release points. These electrode arrays are used to acquire subsurface electrical resistance data in a manner appropriate for tomographic inversion. The resulting tomograms can then be used to detect, monitor and track contaminated moisture plumes leaking from underground storage tanks during waste retrieval operations

  15. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  16. Assessing the performance of a cold region evapotranspiration landfill cover using lysimetry and electrical resistivity tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, William E; Munk, Jens; Abichou, Tarek; Barnes, David; Lee, William; Pape, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the efficacy ofa cold-region evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover against a conventional compacted clay (CCL) landfill cover, two pilot scale covers were constructed in side-by-side basin lysimeters (20m x 10m x 2m) at a site in Anchorage, Alaska. The primary basis of comparison between the two lysimeters was the percolation of moisture from the bottom of each lysimeter. Between 30 April 2005 and 16 May 2006, 51.5 mm of water percolated from the ET lysimeter, compared to 50.6 mm for the the CCL lysimeter. This difference was not found to be significant at the 95% confidence level. As part of the project, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to measure and map soil moisture in ET lysimeter cross sections. The ERT-generated cross sections were found to accurately predict the onset and duration of lysimeter percolation. Moreover, ERT-generated soil moisture values demonstrated a strong linear relationship to lysimeter percolation rates (R-Squared = 0.92). Consequently, ERT is proposed as a reliable tool for assessing the function of field scale ET covers in the absence of drainage measurement devices.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring reveals groundwater storage in a karst vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, A.; Kaufmann, O.; Van Camp, M. J.; Triantafyllou, A.; Cisse, M. F.; Quinif, Y.; Meldrum, P.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Karst systems are among the most difficult aquifers to characterize, due to their high heterogeneity. In particular, temporary groundwater storage that occurs in the unsaturated zone and the discharge to deeper layers are difficult processes to identify and estimate with in-situ measurements. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring is meant to track changes in the electrical properties of the subsurface and has proved to be applicable to evidence and quantify hydrological processes in several types of environments. Applied to karst systems, it has particularly highlighted the challenges in linking electrical resistivity changes to groundwater content with usual approaches of petrophysical relationships, given the high heterogeneity of the subsurface. However, taking up the challenge, we undertook an ERT monitoring at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (Belgium) lasting from Spring 2014 to Winter 2016. This includes 3 main periods of several months with daily measurements, from which seasonal groundwater content changes in the first meters of the vadose zone were successfully imaged. The monitoring concentrates on a 48 electrodes profile that goes from a limestone plateau to the bottom of a sinkhole. 3D UAV photoscans of the surveyed sinkhole and of the main chamber of the nearby cave were performed. Combined with lithological observations from a borehole drilled next to the ERT profile, the 3D information made it possible to project karstified layers visible in the cave to the surface and assess their potential locations along the ERT profile. Overall, this helped determining more realistic local petrophysical properties in the surveyed area, and improving the ERT data inversion by adding structural constraints. Given a strong air temperature gradient in the sinkhole, we also developed a new approach of temperature correction of the raw ERT data. This goes through the solving (using pyGIMLI package) of the 2D ground temperature field and its temporal

  18. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  19. Degrading Discontinuous Permafrost Detected by Repeated Electrical Resistivity Tomography Surveys, Northwest Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, A.; Holloway, J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is causing permafrost to warm rapidly in most of the Arctic. In subarctic regions where permafrost is discontinuous, however, rates of frozen ground warming are slower. This is because net positive heat fluxes at the surface of the ground and geothermal heat are transformed into latent heat associated with increases in soil unfrozen moisture content, especially in fine-grained soils at temperatures just below 0°C. At such sites, monitoring of temperatures in boreholes may be insufficient to track progressive change both because thaw may occur laterally, and because the slow alteration of temperature may be less than the accuracy of the instrumentation. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) surveys represent an alternative technique to monitor permafrost change because the electrical properties of soils alter significantly as their unfrozen moisture contents increase. We present results from multi-year studies in Yukon, northern British Columbia and the Northwest Territories where repeated ERT surveys using permanent or temporary electrode arrays reveal progressive thaw of thin permafrost at undisturbed sites in the boreal forest, and at sites affected by recent forest fire or changes in surface drainage. These field observations not only show the impact of climate and surface change on permafrost, they also demonstrate the efficacy of ERT as a means of monitoring sites where frost tables are too deep to be probed or where taliks have developed. We conclude that ERT surveys should be incorporated into international monitoring networks such as the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost since they can reveal progressive change at sites where ground temperatures, in contrast, suggest stable permafrost conditions.

  20. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal for the Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) project is to develop a reliable portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional...

  1. Improved characterisation and modelling of measurement errors in electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Chak-Hau Michael; Kuras, Oliver; Wilkinson, Paul B.; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Meldrum, Philip I.; Graham, James; Sherlock, Emma F.; Binley, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Measurement errors can play a pivotal role in geophysical inversion. Most inverse models require users to prescribe or assume a statistical model of data errors before inversion. Wrongly prescribed errors can lead to over- or under-fitting of data; however, the derivation of models of data errors is often neglected. With the heightening interest in uncertainty estimation within hydrogeophysics, better characterisation and treatment of measurement errors is needed to provide improved image appraisal. Here we focus on the role of measurement errors in electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). We have analysed two time-lapse ERT datasets: one contains 96 sets of direct and reciprocal data collected from a surface ERT line within a 24 h timeframe; the other is a two-year-long cross-borehole survey at a UK nuclear site with 246 sets of over 50,000 measurements. Our study includes the characterisation of the spatial and temporal behaviour of measurement errors using autocorrelation and correlation coefficient analysis. We find that, in addition to well-known proportionality effects, ERT measurements can also be sensitive to the combination of electrodes used, i.e. errors may not be uncorrelated as often assumed. Based on these findings, we develop a new error model that allows grouping based on electrode number in addition to fitting a linear model to transfer resistance. The new model explains the observed measurement errors better and shows superior inversion results and uncertainty estimates in synthetic examples. It is robust, because it groups errors together based on the electrodes used to make the measurements. The new model can be readily applied to the diagonal data weighting matrix widely used in common inversion methods, as well as to the data covariance matrix in a Bayesian inversion framework. We demonstrate its application using extensive ERT monitoring datasets from the two aforementioned sites.

  2. Observing solute transport in the capillary fringe using image analysis and electrical resistivity tomography in laboratory experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Magnus; Dahlin, Torleif; Günther, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Five laboratory experiments were conducted to study solute transport in the capillary fringe in a sand filled glass tank containing an artificial groundwater zone, an unsaturated zone, and a capillary fringe in between. Dye stained water, applied at the soil surface, moved downwards through the unsaturated zone and then horizontally in the capillary fringe. The horizontal velocity of the dye plume front was calculated using optical image analysis and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) me...

  3. Anatomy of a lava dome using muon radiography and electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenat, J.

    2011-12-01

    For the TOMUVOL Collaboration Previous works (e.g. Tanaka et al., 2008) have demonstrated the capacity of muon radiography techniques to image the internal structure of volcanoes. The method is based on the attenuation of the flux of high energy atmospheric muons through a volcanic edifice, which is measured by a muon telescope installed at some distance from the volcano. The telescope is composed of three parallel matrices of detectors in order to record the angle of incidence of the muons. The aperture of the telescope and its resolution are determined by the distance between the matrices, their surface and their segmentation. TOMUVOL is a project, involving astroparticle and particle physicists and volcanologists, aimed at developing muon tomography of volcanoes. The ultimate goal is to construct autonomous, portable, remote controlled muon telescopes to study and monitor active volcanoes. A first experiment has been carried out on a large, 11000-year-old, trachytic dome, the Puy de Dôme, located in the French Central Massif. The telescope system is derived from particle physics experiments. The sensors are glass resistive plate chambers. The telescope has two 1 m2 and one 1/6 m2 planes. It is located 2 km away from the summit of Puy de Dôme (elevation 1465 m), at 868 m in elevation, Signals have been accumulated during several months. A high resolution LiDAR digital terrain model has been used in computing a density model of the dome, averaged along the path of the muons through the dome. In parallel, an electrical resistivity section of the dome has been obtained using a long (2.2 km) line of electrodes. The internal structure of the dome is thus described with two physical parameters (density and resistivity). This allows us to analyse jointly the results of the two types of measurements. At the time of writing, a new muon radiography campaign is being carried out from a different viewpoint. This is the first step towards a tomographic image of the volcano

  4. PILOT-SCALE FIELD VALIDATION OF THE LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASER DR; RUCKER DF; CROOK N; LOKE MH

    2011-07-14

    Field validation for the long electrode electrical resistivity tomography (LE-ERT) method was attempted in order to demonstrate the performance of the technique in imaging a simple buried target. The experiment was an approximately 1/17 scale mock-up of a region encompassing a buried nuclear waste tank on the Hanford site. The target of focus was constructed by manually forming a simulated plume within the vadose zone using a tank waste simulant. The LE-ERT results were compared to ERT using conventional point electrodes on the surface and buried within the survey domain. Using a pole-pole array, both point and long electrode imaging techniques identified the lateral extents of the pre-formed plume with reasonable fidelity, but the LE-ERT was handicapped in reconstructing the vertical boundaries. The pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays were also tested with the LE-ERT method and were shown to have the least favorable target properties, including the position of the reconstructed plume relative to the known plume and the intensity of false positive targets. The poor performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays was attributed to an inexhaustive and non-optimal coverage of data at key electrodes, as well as an increased noise for electrode combinations with high geometric factors. However, when comparing the model resolution matrix among the different acquisition strategies, the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays using long electrodes were shown to have significantly higher average and maximum values than any pole-pole array. The model resolution describes how well the inversion model resolves the subsurface. Given the model resolution performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays, it may be worth investing in tools to understand the optimum subset of randomly distributed electrode pairs to produce maximum performance from the inversion model.

  5. Electrical resistivity tomography survey for delineating uncharted mine galleries in West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillol, J.M.; Sen, N.

    1999-01-01

    The history of subsidence, fires, flooding and other kinds of environmental hazards related to shallow coal workings in India goes back to colonial times some 300 years ago. As coal production accelerated in modern times, so did the environmental and socio-economic drawbacks related to exploitation. In the mid-1980s, a hydropneumatic sand-stowing method was developed to fill in abandoned galleries but their exact location had to be known. Unfortunately, most of these old workings are uncharted and consequently large tracts of land cannot be stabilized. A research program making use of integrated surface, borehole and cross-hole geophysical methods was undertaken over a five-year span to try to solve this problem. Surface geophysical methods, being cheaper and faster than their cross- and downhole counterparts, were used to cover larger areas on an exploratory basis, while cross-hole methods were employed to locate more accurately one or a network of galleries to be perforated by drillhole(s) and used as a conduit for sand stowing. The authors report the results of one of the cross-hole geophysical methods: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). A pole-dipole configuration is used and both cross-hole and surface-borehole methodologies are tested. Forward modelling and inversion of synthetic data making use of downhole and surface physical and geometrical parameters are presented first. This phase is followed by the inversion of real data. It is concluded that ERT is not applicable for the detection of dry voids, but is effective in a waterlogged environment which is estimated to represent 85--90% of the cases. In waterlogged galleries, ERT is applicable in both cross-hole and surface-downhole modes, the latter allowing a larger surface coverage at low cost. ERT is thus a reliable geophysical tool to image water-filled voids and an adequate technique to address environmental and geotechnical problems

  6. Monitoring water flows with time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography on the Super-Sauze landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.; Grandjean, G.; Supper, R.; Jochum, B.; Ottowitz, D.

    2012-04-01

    in sub-surface soil temperature. Two high-resolution optical cameras are installed on stable crests on the side of the cross-sections and time-lapse stereoscopy is used to reconstruct the displacement field to locate the electrodes in space and time (in order to take into account changes in the dipole geometry). The apparent electrical resistivity values were inverted with a time-lapse approach using an initial model constructed from statistical analysis of resistivity data and a priori knowledge on the landslide structure from a previous geotechnical model. The near surface apparent resistivity can vary of ten percent without any input of water. This shows the importance of temperature effect on the measurement. The temperature correction is handled from a complete study of the soil temperature propagation solving the heat equation with several temperature probes placed at different depths in soil and in the water table. The results are interpreted in combination to hydrological data (rain, water table level). The acquisition of 8 ERT all over the studied area, in different directions permits to create by interpolation a 3D electrical resistivity model of the area. This model shows the importance of the bedrock topography because high water content areas are visible at the theoretical hydrological network computed from the 3D geotechnical model of Travelletti and Malet (2011). Transversal waterflow circulation not predicted are also visible and permit to interpret the results taking into account the 3D structure of the landslide. A 250 m long P-wave tomography acquired on the studied profile and inversed with a quasi-Newton algorithm that uses Fresnel wavepaths and the finite bandwidth of the source signal, specially developed for the study of very heterogeneous soils, shows a very good correlation with electrical resistivity and permits to propose a geotechnical model of the profile. Spatially heterogeneous water flow patterns are identified and the presence of a

  7. Using electrical resistivity tomography to assess the effectiveness of managed aquifer recharge in a salinized coastal aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Menéndez, Olga; Ballesteros, Bruno J; Renau-Pruñonosa, Arianna; Morell, Ignacio; Mochales, Tania; Ibarra, Pedro I; Rubio, Félix M

    2018-01-27

    Over 40 years, the detrital aquifer of the Plana de Castellón (Spanish Mediterranean coast) has been subjected to seawater intrusion because of long dry periods combined with intensive groundwater exploitation. Against this backdrop, a managed artificial recharge (MAR) scheme was implemented to improve the groundwater quality. The large difference between the electrical conductivity (EC) of the ambient groundwater (brackish water due to marine intrusion) and the recharge water (freshwater) meant that there was a strong contrast between the resistivities of the brackish water saturated zone and the freshwater saturated zone. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used for surveying similar settings to evaluate the effectiveness of artificial recharge schemes. By integrating geophysical data with lithological information, EC logs from boreholes, and hydrochemical data, we can interpret electrical resistivity (ER) with groundwater EC values and so identify freshwater saturated zones. Using this approach, ERT images provided a high-resolution spatial characterization and an accurate picture of the shape and extent of the recharge plume of the MAR site. After 5 months of injection, a freshwater plume with an EC of 400-600 μS/cm had formed that extended 400 m in the W-E direction, 250 m in the N-S direction, and to a depth of 40 m below piezometric level. This study also provides correlations between ER values with different lithologies and groundwater EC values that can be used to support other studies.

  8. Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Induced Polarization for Mapping the Subsurface of Alluvial Fans: A Case Study in Punata (Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Gonzales Amaya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models of aquifer systems can be refined and complemented with geophysical data, and they can assist in understanding hydrogeological properties such as groundwater storage capacity. This research attempts to use geoelectrical methods, Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Induced Polarization parameters, for mapping the subsurface in alluvial fans and to demonstrate its applicability; the Punata alluvial fan was used as a case study. The resistivity measurements proved to be a good tool for mapping the subsurface in the fan, especially when used in combination with Induced Polarization parameters (i.e., Normalized Chargeability. The Punata alluvial fan characterization indicated that the top part of the subsurface is composed of boulders in a matrix of finer particles and that the grain size decreases with depth; the electrical resistivity of these deposits ranged from 200 to 1000 Ωm, while the values of normalized chargeability were lower than 0.05 mS/m. The bottom of the aquifer system consisted of a layer with high clay content, and the resistivity ranged from 10 to 100 Ωm, while the normalized chargeability is higher than 0.07 mS/m. With the integration of these results and lithological information, a refined conceptual model is proposed; this model gives a more detailed description of the local aquifer system. It can be concluded that geoelectrical methods are useful for mapping aquifer systems in alluvial fans.

  9. Electrical resistivity tomography determines the spatial distribution of clay layer thickness and aquifer vulnerability, Kandal Province, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; Richards, Laura A.; Naden, Emma; Polya, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Despite being rich in water resources, many areas of South East Asia face difficulties in securing clean water supply. This is particularly problematic in regions with a rapidly growing population. In this study, the spatial variability of the thickness of a clay layer, controlling surface - groundwater interactions that affect aquifer vulnerability, was investigated using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Data were acquired along two transects, showing significant differences in the imaged resistivities. Borehole samples were analyzed regarding particle density and composition, and linked to their resistivity. The obtained relationships were used to translate the field electrical resistivities into lithologies. Those revealed considerable variations in the thickness of the clay layer, ranging from 0 m up to 25 m. Geochemical data, highlighting zones of increased ingress of surface water into the groundwater, confirmed areas of discontinuities in the clay layer, which act as preferential flow paths. The results may guide urban planning of the Phnom Penh city expansion, in order to supply the growing population with safe water. The presented approach of using geophysics to estimate groundwater availability, accessibility, and vulnerability is not only applicable to Kandal Province, Cambodia, but also to many other areas of fast urbanization in South East Asia and beyond.

  10. Electrical resistivity tomography investigations along the planned dykes of the HPP Brežice water accumulation basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazd Rajh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT along planned dykes of the HPP Brežice water accumulation basin. The ERT profile is 7.3 km long and is located on the right riverbank of the Sava River on the Kr{ko-Brežice field (E Slovenia. A purpose of the investigations was to determine a boundary between semipermeable Miocene and permeable Plio-Quaternary (Pl-Q and Quaternary (Q sediments for the proper design of the jet grouting sealing curtain, which will prevent lateral outflow of water from the accumulation basin. In this paper we present processing of the section between 5100 and 6100 m of the profile line. In this section the measurement template was set to 25 depth levels, because a significant increase in a thickness of the Pl-Q sediments was expected. Modelling of the measured apparent electrical resistivity data was carried out with RES2DINV and RESIX 2DI inversion software. Different inversion parameters were used to create 15 geoelectrical models for each program, which were then compared and evaluated based on borehole data and on previous geological investigations of the area. With the final geoelectrical models it was possible to successfully determine areas of three expected stratigraphic members and limit an electrical resistivity range for each one of them. The boundary is well defined between Q and Pl-Q and also between Q and Miocene sediments with sharp contrast in electrical resistivity between them. A boundary between Pl-Q and Miocene sediments was not that obvious, but it was possible to determine its shape by the use of different inversion parameters. We propose a simplified geological cross section based on the interpreted geoelectrical models and borehole data.

  11. In-mine (tunnel-to-tunnel) electrical resistance tomography in South African platinum mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available -linear (LN) approximation (Groom and Alvarez, 2002; Habashy et al., 1993; 205 Murray, 1997) that enables the 3D modelling of electrical resistivity (and induced 206 polarisation) responses. The Localized Non-linear approximation is an integral equation 207..., 21-34. Groom, R. W. & Alvarez, C. 2002. 3D EM Modelling - Application of the Localised non-linear approximator to near surface applications. Paper presented at the SAGEEP. Habashy, T. M., Groom, R. W., & Spies, B. R. 1993. Beyond the Born and Rytov...

  12. Comparison of smoothness-constrained and geostatistically based cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography for characterization of solute tracer plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Englert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have shown promising results in reducing the uncertainty of solute plume characteristics related to estimates based on the analysis of local point measurements only. To explore the similarities and differences between two cross-borehole ERT inversion approaches for characterizing salt tracer plumes, namely the classical smoothness-constrained inversion and a geostatistically based approach, we performed two-dimensional synthetic experiments. Simplifying assumptions about the solute transport model and the electrical forward and inverse model allowed us to study the sensitivity of the ERT inversion approaches towards a variety of basic conditions, including the number of boreholes, measurement schemes, contrast between the plume and background electrical conductivity, use of a priori knowledge, and point conditioning. The results show that geostatistically based and smoothness-constrained inversions of electrical resistance data yield plume characteristics of similar quality, which can be further improved when point measurements are incorporated and advantageous measurement schemes are chosen. As expected, an increased number of boreholes included in the ERT measurement layout can highly improve the quality of inferred plume characteristics, while in this case the benefits of point conditioning and advantageous measurement schemes diminish. Both ERT inversion approaches are similarly sensitive to the noise level of the data and the contrast between the solute plume and background electrical conductivity, and robust with regard to biased input parameters, such as mean concentration, variance, and correlation length of the plume. Although sophisticated inversion schemes have recently become available, in which flow and transport as well as electrical forward models are coupled, these schemes effectively rely on a relatively simple geometrical parameterization of the hydrogeological model

  13. Integrated electromagnetic (EM) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) geophysical studies of environmental impact of Awotan dumpsite in Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinowo, Olawale Olakunle; Falufosi, Michael Oluseyi; Omiyale, Eniola Oluwatosin

    2018-04-01

    This study attempts to establish the level of contamination caused by the decomposition of wastes by defining the lateral distribution and the vertical limit of leachate induced zone of anomalous conductivity distribution within the subsurface through the analyses of Electromagnetic (EM) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data, generated from the integrated geophysical survey over Awotan landfill dumpsite, in Ibadan, southwest Nigeria. Nine (9) EM and ERT profiles each were established within and around the Awotan landfill site. EM data were acquire at 5 m station interval using 10 m, 20 m and 40 m inter-coil spacings, while ERT stations were occupied at 2 m electrode spacing using dipole-dipole electrode configuration. The near perfect agreement between the two sets of data generated from the EM and ERT surveys over the Awotan landfill site as well as the subsurface imaging ability of these geophysical methods to delineate the region of elevated contamination presented in the form of anomalously high apparent ground conductivity and low subsurface resistivity distribution, suggest the importance of integrating electromagnetic and electrical resistivity investigation techniques for environmental studies and more importantly for selecting appropriate landfill dump site location such with ability to retain the generated contaminants and thus prevent environmental pollution.

  14. Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT as a tool in geotechnical investigation of the substrate of a highway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maślakowski Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geological and geotechnical engineering field tests, like structure drillings and dynamic (DPL, DPSH or static probing (CPT, are considered for a fundamental source of information about soil and water environments. Since Eurocode 7 has been introduced, it has become more common to use also dilatometers (DMT or pressure meters (PMT. Results obtained using all the mentioned tests are always of a discrete nature - information is provided in certain points in the field. However, they determine the basis for creating spatial models of geological structure and geotechnical condi- tions of a substratum. The range and number of investigations conducted (including drilling, probing and laboratory tests influence precision, in which a geological structure is identified and thus, also affect probability of compatibility between spatial model and real geological conditions of a substratum. In the paper, results of non-invasive electrical resistivity tomography (ERT method are presented, comprising 2-dimensional image of a soil medium resistance. Electrical resistance is a parameter that reflects diversification of a soil medium, considering its lithological aspect. In addition, when combined with drilling results, it can be used to accurate determination of boundaries between soil layers. Carrying out of ERT tests in the field during expressway construction contributed to identification of weak, low-strength soils like organic soils (peat, aggradated mud and of soft consistency cohesive soils. These kinds of soil are the main cause for unacceptable deformations appearing in the new road engineering structure.

  15. Electrical impedance tomography: topology optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Lenine Campos

    2013-01-01

    The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a study of body parts who use electric current. Is studied through computers resistance or conductivity of these parts, producing an image used for medical diagnosis. A body is wrapped in a blanket placed with small electrodes and receivers of electric current, potential difference. Based on data obtained from a series of measurements at the electrodes, one by one, sending and receiving, you can perform a numerical phantom, where each 'voxel' of the image formed computationally represents the impedance of biological tissue. In Brazil, studies on electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has not yet started. Such equipment are measured tensions - potential difference - between each electrode / sensor one by one, as a way to Simple Combinatorial Analysis. The sequence and the way it is measured strains are in the final image quality. Finite Element Method Interactive, whose algorithm is based on Dialectical Method. We use an initial function with the objective of maximizing the data quantitatively, for better qualitative analysis. Topology Optimization methods are used to improve the image reconstruction. Currently the study is quite primitive related to the theory that shows how to power the new science studied. The high quality images requires a difficulty in obtaining. This work is not intended for detailed for analysis in any tissue or organ specific, but in general terms. And the formation of the 2D image. 3D need a reconstructor to part. (author)

  16. Likelihood of Brine and CO2 Leak Detection using Magnetotellurics and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buscheck, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mansoor, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carroll, S. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The US DOE National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP), funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and NETL, is developing methods to evaluate the effectiveness of monitoring techniques to detect brine and CO2 leakage from legacy wells into underground sources of drinking water (USDW) overlying a CO2 storage reservoir. As part of the NRAP Strategic Monitoring group, we have generated 140 simulations of aquifer impact data based on the Kimberlina site in California’s southern San Joaquin Basin, Kimberlina Rev. 1.1. CO2 buoyancy allows some of the stored CO2 to reach shallower permeable zones and is detectable with surface geophysical sensors. We are using this simulated data set to evaluate effectiveness of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and magnetotellurics (MT) for leak detection. The evaluation of additional monitoring methods such as pressure, seismic and gravity is underway through a multi-lab collaboration.

  17. Gas-water two-phase flow characterization with Electrical Resistance Tomography and Multivariate Multiscale Entropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Zhao, Jia; Dong, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Flow behavior characterization is important to understand gas-liquid two-phase flow mechanics and further establish its description model. An Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) provides information regarding flow conditions at different directions where the sensing electrodes implemented. We extracted the multivariate sample entropy (MSampEn) by treating ERT data as a multivariate time series. The dynamic experimental results indicate that the MSampEn is sensitive to complexity change of flow patterns including bubbly flow, stratified flow, plug flow and slug flow. MSampEn can characterize the flow behavior at different direction of two-phase flow, and reveal the transition between flow patterns when flow velocity changes. The proposed method is effective to analyze two-phase flow pattern transition by incorporating information of different scales and different spatial directions. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eduardo L V; Lima, Raul Gonzalez; Amato, Marcelo B P

    2009-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive, radiation-free monitoring tool that allows real-time imaging of ventilation. The purpose of this article is to discuss the fundamentals of EIT and to review the use of EIT in critical care patients. In addition to its established role in describing the distribution of alveolar ventilation, EIT has been shown to be a useful tool to detect lung collapse and monitor lung recruitment, both regionally and on a global basis. EIT has also been used to diagnose with high sensitivity incident pneumothoraces during mechanical ventilation. Additionally, with injection of hypertonic saline as a contrast agent, it is possible to estimate ventilation/perfusion distributions. EIT is cheap, noninvasive and allows continuous monitoring of ventilation. It is gaining acceptance as a valuable monitoring tool for the care of critical patients.

  19. Monitoring a pilot CO2 injection experiment in a shallow aquifer using 3D cross-well electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Lassen, R. N.; Looms, M. C.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for monitoring the two opposing effects from gas-phase and dissolved CO2 in a shallow unconfined siliciclastic aquifer. Dissolved CO2 increases water electrical conductivity (EC) while gas phase CO2 reduce EC. We injected 45kg of CO2 into a shallow aquifer for 48 hours. ERT data were collected for 50 hours following CO2 injection. Four ERT monitoring boreholes were installed on a 5m by 5m square grid and each borehole had 24 electrodes at 0.5 m electrode spacing at depths from 1.5 m to 13 m. ERT data were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for bulk EC. 3D ERT successfully detected the CO2 plume distribution and growth in the shallow aquifer. We found that the changes of bulk EC were dominantly positive following CO2 injection, indicating that the effect of dissolved CO2 overwhelmed that of gas phase CO2. The pre-injection baseline resistivity model clearly showed a three-layer structure of the site. The electrically more conductive glacial sand layer in the northeast region are likely more permeable than the overburden and underburden and CO2 plumes were actually confined in this layer. Temporal bulk EC increase from ERT agreed well with water EC and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar data. ERT monitoring offers a competitive advantage over water sampling and GPR methods because it provides 3D high-resolution temporal tomographic images of CO2 distribution and it can also be automated for unattended operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL IM release#: LLNL-PROC-657944.

  20. Automated time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for improved process analysis and long-term monitoring of frozen ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Christian; Hilbich, Christin; Fuss, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Determining the subsurface ice and unfrozen water content in cold regions are important tasks in all kind of cryospheric studies, but especially on perennial (permafrost) or seasonal frozen ground, where little insights can be gained from direct observations at the surface. In the absence of boreholes, geophysical methods are often the only possibility for visualising and quantifying the subsurface characteristics. Their successful applications in recent years lead to more and more sophisticated approaches including 2- and 3-dimensional monitoring and even quantifying the ice and unfrozen water content evolution within the subsurface. Due to the strong sensitivity of electrical resistivity to the phase change between unfrozen water and ice, the application of electrical and electromagnetic techniques has been especially successful. Within these methods, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is often favoured due to its comparatively easy and fast data processing, its robustness against ambient noise and its good performance even in harsh, cold and heterogeneous environments. Numerous recent studies have shown that ERT is principally suitable to spatially delineate ground ice, differentiate between ice-poor and ice-rich occurrences, monitor freezing, thawing and infiltration processes. However, resistivity surveys have still to be made manually, which poses large constraints concerning the comparability of measurements at specific time instances, e.g. the choice of the date for end-of-summer measurements, and/or the possibility for measurements during winter, when many locations are inaccessible. Furthermore, many climate studies require the analysis of statistically meaningful properties, such as maximum/minimum values and monthly or annual mean values, which cannot be determined using temporally sparse and irregularly spaced measurements. As a new system for future automated measurements with regular time interval (e.g. 1 measurement per day), an automated ERT

  1. Identifying the changes of geo-engineering properties of dunites due to weathering utilizing electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ündül, Ömer; Tuğrul, Atiye; Özyalın, Şenol; Halil Zarif, İ.

    2015-04-01

    Weathering phenomena have an important role in many construction facilities with varying depths and grades. Due to the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of weathering profiles of some rocks, uncertainities exist in determining the geo-engineering properties. Geo-electrical studies have been utilized to overcome such uncertainities for various subsurface conditions including the determination of boundaries between weathered and unweathered parts of different rock types. In this study, the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) results were correlated with conventional methods in determining the effects of weathering on the geo-engineering properties of dunites. During the research, weathering grades were determined by field studies including discontinuity spacings, aperture and properties of fill materials. The detailed petrographical studies, determination of petrophysical properties (e.g. water absorption and effective porosity) and mechanical properties (e.g. unconfined compressive strength (UCS)) constitute the laboratory studies. ERT studies were carried out in a row of sixty electrodes with electrode spacings of 0.5 m utilizing a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration. According to the comparison of the inversion model sections with the weathering profiles obtained by field and laboratory studies it is concluded that the use of ERT with a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration supplies comparable data for wider subsurface areas from the view of weathering and its effect on geo-engineering properties of dunites. In addition, ERT techniques are very useful where conventional techniques are inadequate in determining the full weathering profile.

  2. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  3. Anatomy of terminal moraine segments and implied lake stability on Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal, from electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah S.; Kulessa, Bernd; Benn, Douglas I.; Mertes, Jordan R.

    2017-04-01

    Moraine-dammed lakes at debris-covered glaciers are becoming increasingly common and pose significant outburst flood hazards if the dam is breached. While moraine subsurface structure and internal processes are likely to influence dam stability, only few sites have so far been investigated. We conducted electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys at two sites on the terminal moraine complex of the Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal, to aid assessment of future terminus stability. The resistivity signature of glacier ice at the site (100-15 kΩ m) is more consistent with values measured from cold glacier ice and while this may be feasible, uncertainties in the data inversion introduce ambiguity to this thermal interpretation. However, the ERT data does provide a significant improvement to our knowledge of the subsurface characteristics at these sites, clearly showing the presence (or absence) of glacier ice. Our interpretation is that of a highly complex latero-terminal moraine, resulting from interaction between previous glacier advance, recession and outburst flooding. If the base-level Spillway Lake continues to expand to a fully formed moraine-dammed glacial lake, the degradation of the ice core could have implications for glacial lake outburst risk.

  4. Characterisation of Fractures and Fracture Zones in a Carbonate Aquifer Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Pricking Probe Methodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, Sandor; Kovacs, Attila; Kuslits, Lukács; Facsko, Gabor; Gribovszki, Katalin; Kalmar, Janos; Szarka, Laszlo

    2018-04-01

    Position, width and fragmentation level of fracture zones and position, significance and characteristic distance of fractures were aimed to determine in a carbonate aquifer. These are fundamental parameters, e.g. in hydrogeological modelling of aquifers, due to their role in subsurface water movements. The description of small scale fracture systems is however a challenging task. In the test area (Kádárta, Bakony Mts, Hungary), two methods proved to be applicable to get reasonable information about the fractures: Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Pricking-Probe (PriP). PriP is a simple mechanical tool which has been successfully applied in archaeological investigations. ERT results demonstrated its applicability in this small scale fracture study. PriP proved to be a good verification tool both for fracture zone mapping and detecting fractures, but in certain areas, it produced different results than the ERT. The applicability of this method has therefore to be tested yet, although its problems most probably origin from human activity which reorganises the near-surface debris distribution. In the test site, both methods displayed fracture zones including a very characteristic one and a number of individual fractures and determined their characteristic distance and significance. Both methods prove to be able to produce hydrogeologically important parameters even individually, but their simultaneous application is recommended to decrease the possible discrepancies.

  5. Gas-Liquid flow characterization in bubble columns with various gas-liquid using electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haibo; Yuhuan, Han; Suohe, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is an advanced and new detecting technique that can measure and monitor the parameters of two-phase flow on line, such as gas-liquid bubble column. It is fit for the industrial process where the conductible medium serves as the disperse phase to present the key bubble flow characteristics in multi-phase medium. Radial variation of the gas holdup and mean holdups are investigated in a 0.160 m i. d. bubble column using ERT with two axial locations (Plane 1 and Plane 2). In all the experiments, air was used as the gas phase, tap water as liquid phase, and a series of experiments were done by adding KCl, ethanol, oil sodium, and glycerol to change liquid conductivity, liquid surface tension and viscosity. The superficial gas velocity was varied from 0.02 to 0.2 m/s. The effect of conductivity, surface tension, viscosity on the mean holdups and radial gas holdup distribution is discussed. The results showed that the gas holdup decrease with the increase of surface tension and increase with the increase of viscosity. Meanwhile, the settings of initial liquid conductivity slightly influence the gas holdup values, and the experimental data increases with the increase of the initial setting values in the same conditions.

  6. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping

  7. 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Mise-à-la-Masse Method as Tools for the Characterization of Vine Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaga, J.; Mary, B.; Peruzzo, L.; Schmutz, M.; Wu, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Cassiani, G.

    2017-12-01

    The interest on non-invasive geophysical monitoring of soil properties and root architecture is rapidly growing. Despite this, few case studies exist concerning vineyards, which are economically one of the leading sectors of agriculture. In this study, we integrate different geophysical methods in order to gain a better imaging of the vine root system, with the aim of quantifying root development, a key factor to understand roots-soil interaction and water balance. Our test site is a vineyard located in Bordeaux (France), where we adopted the Mise-a-la-Masse method (MALM) and micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) on the same 3D electrode configuration. While ERT is a well-established technique to image changes in soil moisture content by root activity, MALM is a relatively new approach in this field of research. The idea is to inject current directly in the plant trunk and verify the resulting voltage distribution in the soil, as an effect of current distribution through the root system. In order to distinguish the root effect from other phenomena linked to the soil heterogeneities, we conducted and compared MALM measurements acquired through injecting current into the stem and into the soil near the stem. Moreover, the MALM data measured in the field were compared with numerical simulations to improve the confidence in the interpretation. Differences obtained between the stem and soil injection clearly validated the assumption that the whole root system is acting as a current pathway, thus highlighting the locations at depth where current is entering the soil from the fine roots. The simulation results indicated that the best fit is obtained through considering distributed sources with depth, reflecting a probable root zone area. The root location and volume estimated using this procedure are in agreement with vineyard experimental evidence. This work suggests the promising application of electrical methods to locate and monitor root systems. Further

  8. Permafrost Changes along the Alaska Highway Corridor, Southern Yukon, from Ground Temperature Measurements and DC Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguay, M. A.; Lewkowicz, A. G.; Smith, S.

    2011-12-01

    A natural gas pipeline running across permafrost terrain from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, through Canada to US markets was first proposed more than 30 years ago. In the intervening period, mean annual air temperatures in the region have risen by 0.5-1.0°C and it is probable that the ground has also warmed. Renewed interest in the pipeline has meant that information on permafrost and geotechnical conditions within the Alaska Highway Corridor of the southern Yukon must be updated for engineering design and the assessment of environmental impacts. To accomplish this goal, results from 1977-1981 drilling and ground temperature monitoring programs within the proposed pipeline corridor were used in combination with air photo analysis to select sites potentially sensitive to climate change. The sites are distributed across the extensive and sporadic discontinuous permafrost zones over a distance of 475 km between Beaver Creek and Whitehorse. To date, 11 targeted boreholes with permafrost have been found and cased to permit renewed ground temperature monitoring. By the end of summer 2011, it is expected that another 7 will have been instrumented. Measurable temperature increases relative to the 1970s are expected, except where values were previously just below 0°C. In the latter case, if the sites are still in permafrost, latent heat effects may have substantially moderated the temperature increase. Electrical resistivity tomography surveys are also being conducted to characterize the local permafrost distribution and geotechnical conditions. These 2D resistivity profiles will be used with the ground temperatures to examine current conditions and response to climate change and vegetation disturbance.

  9. Electrical Methods: Resistivity Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface electrical resistivity surveying is based on the principle that the distribution of electrical potential in the ground around a current-carrying electrode depends on the electrical resistivities and distribution of the surrounding soils and rocks.

  10. The application of electrical resistivity tomography and gravimetric survey as useful tools in an active tectonics study of the Sudetic Marginal Fault (Bohemian Massif, central Europe)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpančíková, Petra; Dohnal, J.; Pánek, T.; Lój, M.; Smolková, V.; Šilhán, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2011), s. 69-80 ISSN 0926-9851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP205/08/P521 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : electrical resistivity tomography * gravimetric survey * active tectonics Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.444, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0926985111000711

  11. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2015-01-01

    resulted in a small bulk EC increase. After raising the injection rate from 10 g/min to 20 g/min at the 24-h mark, the CO2 plume grew quickly. The bulk EC changes from ERT agreed partially with water sample EC and GPR data. The apparent disagreement between high CO2 gas saturation and prevailing positive...... bulk EC changes may be caused by limited and variable ERT resolution, low ERT sensitivity to resistive anomalies and uncalibrated CO2 gas saturation. ERT data show a broader CO2 plume while water sample EC had higher fine-scale variability. Our ERT electrode configuration can be optimized for more...

  12. Regolith properties under trees and the biomechanical effects caused by tree root systems as recognized by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Following previous findings regarding the influence of vascular plants (mainly trees) on weathering, soil production and hillslope stability, in this study, we attempted to test a hypothesis regarding significant impacts of tree root systems on soil and regolith properties. Different types of impacts from tree root system (direct and indirect) are commonly gathered under the key term of "biomechanical effects". To add to the discussion of the biomechanical effects of trees, we used a non-invasive geophysical method, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), to investigate the profiles of four different configurations at three study sites within the Polish section of the Outer Western Carpathians. At each site, one long profile (up to 189 m) of a large section of a hillslope and three short profiles (up to 19.5 m), that is, microsites occupied by trees or their remnants, were made. Short profiles included the tree root zone of a healthy large tree, the tree stump of a decaying tree and the pit-and-mound topography formed after a tree uprooting. The resistivity of regolith and bedrock presented on the long profiles and in comparison with the short profiles through the microsites it can be seen how tree roots impact soil and regolith properties and add to the complexity of the whole soil/regolith profile. Trees change soil and regolith properties directly through root channels and moisture migration and indirectly through the uprooting of trees and the formation of pit-and-mound topography. Within tree stump microsites, the impact of tree root systems, evaluated by a resistivity model, was smaller compared to microsites with living trees or those with pit-and-mound topography but was still visible even several decades after the trees were windbroken or cut down. The ERT method is highly useful for quick evaluation of the impact of tree root systems on soils and regolith. This method, in contrast to traditional soil analyses, offers a continuous dataset for the entire

  13. Macromixing hydrodynamic study in draft-tube airlift reactors using electrical resistance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumery, Farouza; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad; Dahman, Yaser

    2011-02-01

    The present study summarizes results of mixing characteristics in a draft tube airlift bioreactor using ERT. This technique offers the possibility for noninvasive and nonintrusive visualization of flow fields in the bioreactor and has rarely been utilized previously to analyze operating parameters and mixing characteristics in this type of bioreactors. Several operating parameters and geometric characteristics were examined. In general, results showed that the increase in superficial gas velocity corresponds to an increase in energy applied and thus, to a decrease in mixing time. This generally corresponded to an increase in liquid circulation velocity and shear rate values. Bottom clearances and draft tube diameters affected flow resistance and frictional losses. The influence of sparger configurations on mixing time and liquid circulation velocity was significant due to their effect on gas distribution. However, the effect of sparger configuration on shear rate was not significant, with 20% reduction in shear rates using the cross-shaped sparger. Fluid viscosity showed a marked influence on both mixing times and circulation velocity especially in the coalescing media of sugar and xanthan gum (XG) solutions. Results from this work will help to develop a clear pattern for operation and mixing that can help to improve several industrial processes, especially the ones related to emerging fields of technology such as the biotechnology industry.

  14. Deep electrical resistivity tomography along the tectonically active Middle Aterno Valley (2009 L'Aquila earthquake area, central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Villani, Fabio; Ricci, Tullio; Delcher, Eric; Finizola, Anthony; Sapia, Vincenzo; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Pantosti, Daniela; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Brothelande, Elodie; Gusset, Rachel; Mezon, Cécile; Orefice, Simone; Peltier, Aline; Poret, Matthieu; Torres, Liliana; Suski, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Three 2-D Deep Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) transects, up to 6.36 km long, were obtained across the Paganica-San Demetrio Basin, bounded by the 2009 L'Aquila Mw 6.1 normal-faulting earthquake causative fault (central Italy). The investigations allowed defining for the first time the shallow subsurface basin structure. The resistivity images, and their geological interpretation, show a dissected Mesozoic-Tertiary substratum buried under continental infill of mainly Quaternary age due to the long-term activity of the Paganica-San Demetrio normal faults system (PSDFS), ruling the most recent deformational phase. Our results indicate that the basin bottom deepens up to 600 m moving to the south, with the continental infill largely exceeding the known thickness of the Quaternary sequence. The causes of this increasing thickness can be: (1) the onset of the continental deposition in the southern sector took place before the Quaternary, (2) there was an early stage of the basin development driven by different fault systems that produced a depocentre in the southern sector not related to the present-day basin shape, or (3) the fault system slip rate in the southern sector was faster than in the northern sector. We were able to gain sights into the long-term PSDFS behaviour and evolution, by comparing throw rates at different timescales and discriminating the splays that lead deformation. Some fault splays exhibit large cumulative throws (>300 m) in coincidence with large displacement of the continental deposits sequence (>100 m), thus testifying a general persistence in time of their activity as leading splays of the fault system. We evaluate the long-term (3-2.5 Myr) cumulative and Quaternary throw rates of most of the leading splays to be 0.08-0.17 mm yr-1, indicating a substantial stability of the faults activity. Among them, an individual leading fault splay extends from Paganica to San Demetrio ne' Vestini as a result of a post-Early Pleistocene linkage of

  15. Why 1D electrical resistivity techniques can result in inaccurate siting of boreholes in hard rock aquifers and why electrical resistivity tomography must be preferred: the example of Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alle, Iboukoun Christian; Descloitres, Marc; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Yalo, Nicaise; Lawson, Fabrice Messan Amen; Adihou, Akonfa Consolas

    2018-03-01

    Hard rock aquifers are of particular importance for supplying people with drinking water in Africa and in the world. Although the common use of one-dimensional (1D) electrical resistivity techniques to locate drilling site, the failure rate of boreholes is usually high. For instance, about 40% of boreholes drilled in hard rock aquifers in Benin are unsuccessful. This study investigates why the current use of 1D techniques (e.g. electrical profiling and electrical sounding) can result in inaccurate siting of boreholes, and checks the interest and the limitations of the use of two-dimensional (2D) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Geophysical numerical modeling and comprehensive 1D and 2D resistivity surveys were carried out in hard rock aquifers in Benin. The experiments carried out at 7 sites located in different hard rock groups confirmed the results of the numerical modeling: the current use of 1D techniques can frequently leads to inaccurate siting, and ERT better reveals hydrogeological targets such as thick weathered zone (e.g. stratiform fractured layer and preferential weathering associated with subvertical fractured zone). Moreover, a cost analysis demonstrates that the use of ERT can save money at the scale of a drilling programme if ERT improves the success rate by only 5% as compared to the success rate obtained with 1D techniques. Finally, this study demonstrates, using the example of Benin, that the use of electrical resistivity profiling and sounding for siting boreholes in weathered hard rocks of western Africa should be discarded and replaced by the use of ERT technique, more efficient.

  16. Shallow Off-Shore Archaeological Prospection with 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography: The Case of Olous (Modern Elounda, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleanthis Simyrdanis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that nowadays as well as in the past the vast majority of human habitation and activities are mainly concentrated in littoral areas. Thus the increased attention to coastal zone management contributed to the development and implementation of shallow-water mapping approaches for capturing current environmental conditions. During the last decade, geophysical imaging techniques like electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been used in mapping onshore buried antiquities in a non-destructive manner, contributing to cultural heritage management. Despite its increased implementation in mapping on-shore buried archaeological remains, ERT has minimal to non-existent employment for the understanding of the past dynamics in littoral and shallow off-shore marine environments. This work presents the results of an extensive ERT survey in investigating part of the Hellenistic to Byzantine submerged archaeological site of Olous, located on the north-eastern coast of Crete, Greece. A marine area of 7100 m2 was covered with 178 densely spaced ERT lines having a cumulative length of 8.3 km. A combination of submerged static and moving survey modes were used to document potential buried and submerged structures. The acquired data from the marine environment were processed with two-dimensional and three-dimensional inversion algorithms. A real time kinematic global navigation satellite system was used to map the visible submerged walls and compile the bathymetry model of the bay. The adaptation of ERT in reconstructing the underwater archaeological remains in a shallow marine environment presented specific methodological and processing challenges. The in situ experience from the archaeological site of Olous showed that ERT provided a robust method for mapping the submerged archaeological structures related to the ancient built environment (walls, buildings, roads, signifying at the same time the vertical stratigraphy of the submerged sediments

  17. Detailed landfill leachate plume mapping using 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - with correlation to ionic strength measured in screens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurya, P.K.; Rønde, Vinni; Fiandaca, G.

    2017-01-01

    Leaching of organic and inorganic contamination from landfills is a serious environmental problem as surface water and aquifers are affected. In order to assess these risks and investigate the migration of leachate from the landfill, 2D and large scale 3D electrical resistivity tomography were used...... at a heavily contaminated landfill in Grindsted, Denmark. The inverted 2D profiles describe both the variations along the groundwater flow as well as the plume extension across the flow directions. The 3D inversion model shows the variability in the low resistivity anomaly pattern corresponding to differences...... in the ionic strength of the landfill leachate. Chemical data from boreholes agree well with the observations indicating a leachate plume which gradually sinks and increases in size while migrating from the landfill in the groundwater flow direction. Overall results show that the resistivity method has been...

  18. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuani, T; Giani, G P; d'Attoli, M; Fischanger, F; Morelli, G; Ranieri, G; Santarato, G

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness.

  19. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  20. Mapping a Pristine Glaciofluvial Aquifer on the Canadian Shield Using Ground-Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, L. W.; Shirokova, V.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    Our study aims to construct a 3D structural model of an unconfined pristine aquifer in Laurentian Hills, Ontario, Canada. The stratigraphy of the study site, which covers about 5400 square meters, features reworked glaciofluvial sands and glacial till on top of Canadian Shield bedrock. A network of 25 existing piezometers provides ground-truth. We used two types of geophysical surveys to map the water table and the aquifer basin. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) collected 40 profiles over distances up to 140 meters using 200MHz and 400MHz antennas with a survey wheel. The collected radargrams show a distinct reflective layer, which can be mapped to outcrops of glacial till within the area. This impermeable interface forms the aquitard. Depths of the subsurface features were calculated using hyperbolic fits on the radargrams in Matlab by determining wave velocity then converting measured two-way-time to depth. Electrical resistivity was used to determine the water table elevations because the unconfined water table did not reflect the radar waves. 20 resistivity profiles were collected in the same area using Wenner-Alpha and dipole-dipole arrays with both 24 and 48 electrodes and for 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 2.0 meter spacing. The inverted resistivity models show low resistivity values (system. GPR Profile with Glacial Till Interface.

  1. Geophysical Investigation using Two Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography method to delineate Subsurface Geological Structures at Dudhkoshi-II (230 MW) Hydroelectric Project, Solukhumbu District, Eastern Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, H.; Bhusal, U. C.; Khatiwada, B.; Pandey, D.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical investigation using two dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (2D-ERT) method plays a significant role in determining the subsurface resistivity distribution by making measurement on the ground surface. This method was carried out at Dudhkoshi-II (230 MW) Hydroelectric Project, lies on Lesser Himalayan region of the Eastern Nepal to delineate the nature of the subsurface geology to assess its suitability for the construction of dam, desanding basin and powerhouse. The main objective of the proposed study consists of mapping vertical as well as horizontal variations of electrical resistivity to enable detection of the boundaries between unconsolidated materials and rocks of the different resistivity, possible geologic structures, such as possible presence of faults, fractures, and voids in intake and powerhouse area. For this purpose, the (WDJD-4 Multi-function Digital DC Resistivity/IP) equipment was used with Wenner array (60 electrodes). To fulfill these objectives of the study, the site area was mapped by Nine ERT profiles with different profile length and space between electrodes was 5 m. The depth of the investigation was 50 m. The acquired data were inverted to tomogram sections using tomographic inversion with RES2DINV commercial software. The Tomography sections show that the subsurface is classified into distinct geo-electric layers of dry unconsolidated overburden, saturated overburden, fractured rock and fresh bedrock of phyllites with quartzite and gneiss with different resistivity values. There were no voids and faults in the study area. Thickness of overburden at different region found to be different. Most of the survey area has bedrock of phyllites with quartzite; gneiss is also present in some location at intake area. Bedrock is found at the varies depth of 5-8 m at dam axis, 20-32 m at desanding basin and 3-10 m at powerhouse area. These results are confirmed and verified by using several boreholes data were drilled on the

  2. Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography of the Solfatara Crater (Italy): Implication for the Multiphase Flow Structure of the Shallow Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Byrdina, Svetlana; Chiodini, Giovanni; Revil, André; Johnson, Timothy C.; Ricci, Tullio; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Lebourg, Thomas; Grangeon, Jacques; Bascou, Pascale; Metral, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    The Solfatara volcano is the main degassing area of the Campi Flegrei caldera, characterized by 60 years of unrest. Assessing such renewal activity is a challenging task because hydrothermal interactions with magmatic gases remain poorly understood. In this study, we decipher the complex structure of the shallow Solfatara hydrothermal system by performing the first 3-D, high-resolution, electrical resistivity tomography of the volcano. The 3-D resistivity model was obtained from the inversion of 43,432 resistance measurements performed on an area of 0.68 km2. The proposed interpretation of the multiphase hydrothermal structures is based on the resistivity model, a high-resolution infrared surface temperature image, and 1,136 soil CO2 flux measurements. In addition, we realized 27 soil cation exchange capacity and pH measurements demonstrating a negligible contribution of surface conductivity to the shallow bulk electrical conductivity. Hence, we show that the resistivity changes are mainly controlled by fluid content and temperature. The high-resolution tomograms identify for the first time the structure of the gas-dominated reservoir at 60 m depth that feeds the Bocca Grande fumarole through a 10 m thick channel. In addition, the resistivity model reveals a channel-like conductive structure where the liquid produced by steam condensation around the main fumaroles flows down to the Fangaia area within a buried fault. The model delineates the emplacement of the main geological structures: Mount Olibano, Solfatara cryptodome, and tephra deposits. It also reveals the anatomy of the hydrothermal system, especially two liquid-dominated plumes, the Fangaia mud pool and the Pisciarelli fumarole, respectively.

  3. Deep electrical resistivity tomography and geothermal analysis of Bradano foredeep deposits in Venosa area (Southern Italy: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lapenna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical surveys have been carried out to characterize the stratigraphical and structural setting and to better understand the deep water circulation system in the Venosa area (Southern Italy located in the frontal portion of the southern Appenninic Subduction. In this area there are some deep water wells from which a water conductivity of about 3 mS/cm and a temperature of about 35°C was measured. A deep geoelectrical tomography with dipole-dipole array has been carried out along a profile of 10000 m and an investigation depth of about 900 m. Furthermore a broad band magnetotelluric profile consisting of six stations was performed to infer the resistivity distribution up to some kilometres of depth. The MT profile was almost coincident with the geoelectrical outline. The applied methods allow us to obtain a mutual control and integrated interpretation of the data. The high resolution of the data was the key to reconstruct the structural asset of buried carbonatic horst whose top is located at about 600 m depth. The final results coming from data wells, geothermal analysis and geophysical data, highlighted a horst saturated with salted water and an anomalous local gradient of 60°C/km. The proposed mechanism is that of a mixing of fossil and fresh water circulation system.

  4. Combining indoors thermo-hygric survey, thermal imaging and Electrical Resistivity Tomography through GIS for the characterization of moisture in historic buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Garcia-Morales, Soledad; Lopez-Gonzalez, Laura; Ortiz de Cosca, Raquel Otero

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the combination, through a GIS, of environmental indoors thermo-hygric parameters and Electrical Resistivity Tomography in the hermit of "Humilladero", a small historic building in the city of Avila (Spain). The Hermit of "humilladero" was built 1548 - 1550 and it underwent several refurbishment works throughout its history until the present day. The hermit is formed by two rooms and a basement: The hermit per se, a sacristy which was added at a later stage towards the east of the hermit and the basement excavated under the sacristy in 1990. The south wall is nowadays half buried by the adjacent street pavement and a staircase attached to the east wall. The walls are built with granite ashlars and the whole building displays severe moisture-related damage, including granular disaggregation of mortars and some ashlars. The most affected areas are the ones buried under the street towards the south and the staircase towards the east where liquid water appears from time to time due to infiltrations through the ground. A mesh of thermo-hygric measurements of the indoors environment of the hermit was carried out to detect the humidity focal points, in addition to Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Infrared thermography on the walls. All these data was uploaded to a GIS (ArcGIS) together with a photogrammetric model of the decayed areas. The combination of the information in the GIS improved decay maps and allowed a better diagnosis of the building moisture distribution and causes. Research funded by Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914 and CEI Moncloa (UPM, UCM, CSIC) through a PICATA contract and the equipment from RedLAbPAt Network

  5. Ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography for mapping bedrock topography and fracture zones: a case study in Viru-Nigula, NE Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Sibul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Base Map (GBM, presenting an elongated buried valley running beneath the Varudi bog, triggered the geophysical studies near Viru-Nigula borough in northeastern Estonia. After the Geological Survey of Estonia had compiled the GBM map set, the course and extent of the valley still remained indistinct. Principally the morphology of the Varudi valley had been determined just by one borehole characterizing the 30 m thick Quaternary succession within the valley. The thickness of Quaternary sediments is, however, just a few metres in adjacent boreholes. We used ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT for acquiring extra knowledge about the extent and morphology of the Varudi structure. Ground-penetrating radar enabled us to specify the thickness and composition of Quaternary deposits, and to recognize dislocations of the bedrock blocks. As the radar images provided information on the topmost ~4 m only, ERT (Wenner and Wenner–Schlumberger arrays was applied to define deeper, down to 40 m, electrical resistivity anomalies. The ERT studies revealed two fracture zones where regular Ordovician carbonate beds have been crushed and replaced by Quaternary sediments. The Varudi valley coincides with the southern zone. Both fracture zones probably acted as groundwater flow channels and sediment pathways in the Late Pleistocene, and hence supported the creation of the Varudi bog.

  6. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  7. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Meir

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  8. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations. PMID:26039686

  9. Subsurface investigation on Quarter 27 of May 15th city, Cairo, Egypt using electrical resistivity tomography and shallow seismic refraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Awad Sultan Araffa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical tools such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT and shallow seismic (both P-wave seismic refraction and Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW are interesting techniques for delineating the subsurface configurations as stratigraphy, structural elements, caves and water saturated zones. The ERT technique is used to delineate the contamination, to detect the buried objects, and to quantify some aquifer properties. Eight 2-D (two dimensional electrical resistivity sections were measured using two different configurations (dipole–dipole and Wenner. The spread length is of 96 m and the electrodes spacing are 2, 4 and 6 m, respectively to reach a depth ranging from 13 to 17 m. The results indicate that, the subsurface section is divided into main three geo-electrical units, the first is fractured marl and limestone which exhibits high resistivity values ranging from 40 to 300 ohm m. The second unit is corresponding to marl of moderate resistivity values and the third unit, which is the deeper unit, exhibits very low resistivity values corresponding to clayey marl. The fourth layer is marly clay with water. The presence of clay causes the most geotechnical problems. Fourteen shallow seismic sections (both for P-wave and MASW were carried out using spread of 94 m and geophone spacing of 2 m for each P-wave section. The results demonstrate that the deduced subsurface section consists of four layers, the first layer exhibits very low P-wave velocity ranging from 280 to 420 m/s, the second layer reveals P-wave velocity ranging from 400 to 1200 m/s, the third layer has P-wave velocity ranging from 970 to 2000 m/s and the fourth layer exhibits high velocity ranging from 1900 to 3600 m/s. The ERT and shallow seismic results, reflect the presence of two parallel faults passing through Quarter 27 and trending NW-SE.

  10. Evaluation of surface water and groundwater contamination in a MSW landfill area using hydrochemical analysis and electrical resistivity tomography: a case study in Sichuan province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chengpeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    As a primary disposal mean of municipal solid waste in China, the landfill has been recognized as one of the major threats to the surrounding surface water and groundwater environment due to the emission of leachate. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of leachate on the surface water and groundwater environment of the region of the Chang'an landfill, which is located in Sichuan province, China. The surface water and groundwater were sampled for hydrochemical analysis. Three electrical resistivity tomography profiles were conducted to evaluate the impact of leachate on the groundwater environment, and several laboratory tests were carried out to build the relationship between the soil bulk resistivity and the void fluid resistivity. The results showed that a seasonal creek named Longfeng creek, which crosses the landfill site, was contaminated by the leachate. The concentrations of COD, BOD5, and chlorides (Cl) of surface water samples increased by 12.3-105.7 times. The groundwater quality in the surface loose sediments along the valley deteriorated obviously from the landfill to 500 m downstream area. The laboratory tests of soil samples indicated that the resistivity value of 13 Ωm is a critical value whether the groundwater in the loose sediments is polluted. The groundwater at the site adjacent to the spillway in the landfill was partially contaminated by the emission of leachate. The groundwater contamination zones at 580 m downstream of the landfill were recognized at the shallow zones from 60 m left bank to 30 m right bank of Longfeng creek. The improved understanding of groundwater contamination around the landfill is beneficial for the landfill operation and groundwater environment remediation.

  11. Dissolution rates of subsoil limestone in a doline on the Akiyoshi-dai Plateau, Japan: An approach from a weathering experiment, hydrological observations, and electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Sanae; Hattanji, Tsuyoshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at estimating the controlling factors for the denudation rates of limestone, which often forms solution dolines on karst tablelands. Our approaches include (1) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to reveal shallow subsurface structures and hydrological settings, (2) automated monitoring of volumetric water content in soil profiles and manual measurements of subsurface CO2 concentrations and soil water chemistry, and (3) a field weathering experiment using limestone tablets with the micro-weight loss technique for determining current denudation rates. The field experiment and monitoring were carried out over 768 days from 2009-2011 at four sites with varying topographic and hydrological conditions along the sideslope of a doline on the Akiyoshi-dai karst plateau in SW-Japan. The installation depths of the limestone tablets were 15 cm or 50 cm below the slope surface. The soil moisture conditions varied site by site. Water-saturated conditions continued for 40-50% of the whole experimental period at 50-cm depth of upper and middle sites, while only 0-10% of the experimental period was water-saturated at the other sites. Chemical analysis revealed that the soil water was chemically unsaturated with calcite for all the sites. Spatial differences in concentrations of CO2 in soil pore air were statistically less significant. The denudation rates of the buried limestone tablets were 17.7-21.9 mg cm- 2 a- 1 at the upper and middle slopes, where the soil was water-saturated for a long time after precipitation. The lowest denudation of 3.9 mg cm- 2 a- 1 was observed on lower slopes where soil was not capable of maintaining water at a near saturation level even after precipitation. Statistical analysis revealed that the denudation rates of the tablets were strongly controlled by the duration for which soil pores were saturated by water (the conditions defined here are degrees of water saturation greater than 97%). Electrical resistivity tomography

  12. A method for recording resistance changes non-invasively during neuronal depolarization with a view to imaging brain activity with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Ori; Ghosh, Anthony; Oh, Dongin; Holder, David S

    2009-05-30

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. The principle is that current remains in the extracellular space at rest but passes into the intracellular space during depolarization through open ion channels. As current passes into the intracellular space across the capacitance of cell membranes at higher frequencies, applied current needs to be below 100 Hz. A method is presented for its measurement with subtraction of the contemporaneous evoked potentials which occur in the same frequency band. Neuronal activity is evoked by stimulation and resistance is recorded from the potentials resulting from injection of a constant current square wave at 1 Hz with amplitude less than 25% of the threshold for stimulating neuronal activity. Potentials due to the evoked activity and the injected square wave are removed by subtraction. The method was validated with compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve. Resistance changes of -0.85+/-0.4% (mean+/-SD) occurred which decreased from -0.97+/-0.43% to -0.46+/-0.16% with spacing of impedance current application electrodes from 2 to 8 mm but did not vary significantly with applied currents of 1-10 microA. These tallied with biophysical modelling, and so were consistent with a genuine physiological origin. This method appears to provide a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could lead to the long-term goal of imaging of fast neural activity in the brain.

  13. Small scale characterization of vine plant root zone via 3D electrical resistivity tomography and Mise-à-la-Masse method: a case study in a Bordeaux Vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Benjamin; Peruzzo, Luca; Boaga, Jacopo; Schmutz, Myriam; Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan S.; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, best viticulture practices require the joint interpretation of climate and soils data. However, information about the soil structure and subsoil processes is often lacking, as point measurements, albeit precise, cannot ensure sufficient spatial coverage and resolution. Non-invasive methods can provide spatially extensive, high resolution information that, supported by traditional point-like data, help complete the complex picture of subsoil static and dynamic reality. So far very little emphasis has been given to investigating the role of soil properties and even less of roots activity on winegrapes. Vine plant's root systems play an important role in providing the minerals to the plants, but also control the water uptake and thus the water state of the vines, which is a key factor determining the grape quality potential. In this contribution we report about the measurements conducted since June 2016 in a vineyard near Bordeaux (France, Pessac Leognan Chateau). Two neighbor plants of different sizes have been selected. In order to spot small scale soil variations and root zone physical structure at the vicinity of the vine plants, we applied a methodology using longitudinal 2D tomography, 3D borehole-based electrical resistivity tomography and a variation of the mise-à-la-masse method (MALM) to assess the effect of plant roots on the current injection in the ground. Time-lapse measurements are particularly informative about the plant dynamics, and the focus is particularly applied on this approach. The time-lapse 3D ERT and MALM results are presented, and the potential to assimilate these data into a hydrological model that can account for the root water uptake as a function of atmospheric conditions is discussed.

  14. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherall, P.; Barber, D. C.; Smallwood, R. H.; Brown, B. H.

    1996-04-01

    THE electrical resistivity of mammalian tissues varies widely1-5 and is correlated with physiological function6-8. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can be used to probe such variations in vivo, and offers a non-invasive means of imaging the internal conductivity distribution of the human body9-11. But the computational complexity of EIT has severe practical limitations, and previous work has been restricted to considering image reconstruction as an essentially two-dimensional problem10,12. This simplification can limit significantly the imaging capabilities of EIT, as the electric currents used to determine the conductivity variations will not in general be confined to a two-dimensional plane13. A few studies have attempted three-dimensional EIT image reconstruction14,15, but have not yet succeeded in generating images of a quality suitable for clinical applications. Here we report the development of a three-dimensional EIT system with greatly improved imaging capabilities, which combines our 64-electrode data-collection apparatus16 with customized matrix inversion techniques. Our results demonstrate the practical potential of EIT for clinical applications, such as lung or brain imaging and diagnostic screening8.

  15. Modelling an induced thermal plume with data from electrical resistivity tomography and distributed temperature sensing: a case study in northeast Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Boaga, Jacopo; Di Sipio, Eloisa; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; De Seta, Massimiliano; Galgaro, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater tracer tests are often used to improve aquifer characterization, but they present several disadvantages, such as the need to pour solutions or dyes into the aquifer system and alteration of the water's chemical properties. Thus, tracers can affect the groundwater flow mechanics and data interpretation becomes more complex, hindering effective study of ground heat pumps for low enthalpy geothermal systems. This paper presents a preliminary methodology based on a multidisciplinary application of heat as a tracer for defining the main parameters of shallow aquifers. The field monitoring techniques electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) are noninvasive and were applied to a shallow-aquifer test site in northeast Italy. The combination of these measurement techniques supports the definition of the main aquifer parameters and therefore the construction of a reliable conceptual model, which is then described through the numerical code FEFLOW. This model is calibrated with DTS and validated by ERT outcomes. The reliability of the numerical model in terms of fate and transport is thereby enhanced, leading to the potential for better environmental management and protection of groundwater resources through more cost-effective solutions.

  16. Modelling an induced thermal plume with data from electrical resistivity tomography and distributed temperature sensing: a case study in northeast Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Boaga, Jacopo; Di Sipio, Eloisa; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; De Seta, Massimiliano; Galgaro, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater tracer tests are often used to improve aquifer characterization, but they present several disadvantages, such as the need to pour solutions or dyes into the aquifer system and alteration of the water's chemical properties. Thus, tracers can affect the groundwater flow mechanics and data interpretation becomes more complex, hindering effective study of ground heat pumps for low enthalpy geothermal systems. This paper presents a preliminary methodology based on a multidisciplinary application of heat as a tracer for defining the main parameters of shallow aquifers. The field monitoring techniques electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) are noninvasive and were applied to a shallow-aquifer test site in northeast Italy. The combination of these measurement techniques supports the definition of the main aquifer parameters and therefore the construction of a reliable conceptual model, which is then described through the numerical code FEFLOW. This model is calibrated with DTS and validated by ERT outcomes. The reliability of the numerical model in terms of fate and transport is thereby enhanced, leading to the potential for better environmental management and protection of groundwater resources through more cost-effective solutions.

  17. 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) methodologies applied on selected heavily urbanized areas of the basin of Mexico to detect buried fractures and subsidence problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Tejero, A.; Hernandez, E.

    2012-12-01

    Urban development in modern cities require of a more integral knowledge of the subsurface, mainly on those areas, where human concentrations increase. Mexico City is one of such an example, where it constitutes one of the largest concentrations of human activities in the world. Most of the urban area is underlain by lacustrine sediments of the former lakes, and confined by important volcanic ranges. Such sediments offer poor foundation conditions for constructive purposes. Therefore, high risk areas have to be identified to prevent accidents and disastrous events. Geophysical techniques can be employed to understand the physical characteristics of the subsurface. Two examples are presented in this investigation. A residential complex named La Concordia is located towards the central portion of the basin that consists of six four storey buildings in an area of 33x80 m2. Finally, a block of small houses (50x50 m2) is found to the southern limit of the basin; close to the Chichinautzin range within the town of Tecomitl. Both zones suffer of strong damage in their structures due to fractures and subsidence within the subsoil. Therefore, Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was carried out to characterize the subsoil beneath these urban complexes. A special array ('horse-shoe' geometry) 'L' employing Wenner-Schlumberger techniques, in addition to equatorial-dipole and minimum-coupling arrays were carried out to fully 'illuminate' beneath the constructions. Computed resistivity models for both examples depicted the buried fracture pattern affecting the urban complexes. Such patterns seem to extend beyond the limits of the surveyed areas, and are probably part of a more complex fracture system. It is very likely that fractures have been produced due to the poorly consolidated clays that cover most of the central part of the Valley of Mexico; the intense water extraction, that form 'voids' in the subsoil causing subsidence effects and finally the existence of regional

  18. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  19. Imaging the Mariánské Lázně Fault (Czech Republic) by 3-D ground-penetrating radar and electric resistivity tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Tomáš; Štěpančíková, Petra; Karousová, M.; Tábořík, P.; Flechsig, C.; Gaballah, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2012), s. 1019-1036 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515; CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fault tectonics * resistivity tomography * ground penetrating radar Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2012

  20. Cliff stability assessment using electrical resistivity tomography at the historic WWII D-Day invasion site, Pointe du Hoc, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Udphuay, S.; Warden, R.

    2007-05-01

    The 1944 D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc, Normandy, France is an important WWII battlefield and cultural resource but is at risk from chalk cliff collapse. The American Battle Monuments Commission tasked us to evaluate the geohazard to the observation post and other cliff-side buildings of historical significance. Geophysical multi-electrode resistivity profiling is used to study cliff stability and the condition of the observation- post foundations. Preliminary 2-D geological interpretations are provided of individual profiles. The copious steel, concrete and void spaces at the site renders hydrogeological interpretation challenging but tractable. The cliff face appears to be relatively intact and well-drained. Several routes taken by groundwater into fractures within the chalk were identified mainly on the western side of the site. The eastern side is drier and somewhat sheltered from the Atlantic storms but may contain large void spaces that could efficiently transmit groundwater flow during heavy precipitation events, thereby imperiling the major antiaircraft gun emplacement occupied by Col. Rudder in the early days of the Allied invasion. The forward German observation post perched close to the sea stack, which now hosts the U.S. Ranger memorial, may be moving with the soil and not securely anchored to bedrock. A complex failure mechanism is identified as a combination of groundwater dissolution of the fractured chalk and sea wave attack at the cliff base.

  1. Detection of sinkholes using 2D electrical resistivity imaging

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Sinkholes in dolomitic areas are notoriously difficult geophysical targets, and selecting an appropriate geophysical solution is not straightforward. Electrical resistivity imaging or tomography (RESTOM) is well suited to mapping sinkholes because...

  2. Water Repellent Soils: The use of electrical resistivity tomography in a small scale catchment model to evaluate the effectiveness of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Mary-Anne; Mathes, Falko; McGrath, Gavan; Leopold, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellence effects large areas of land in Western Australia causing large forfeits in agricultural profit. Surfactants are a potential management tool, however, in field trials they have had varied success and their impact on water movement is poorly understood. This study employs a novel approach to determine the effectiveness of surfactants at modifying infiltration into water repellent soils. Using a physical catchment model (0.6 m × 0.6 m) with soils arranged in a ridge and furrow topography, irrigation and runoff were quantified. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to measure changes in soil moisture patterns in two dimensions. Two sandy soils with contrasting severity of water repellence, as measured by the Molarity of Ethanol Droplet (MED) test, were assessed. The impact of two surfactants, at an equivalent rate of 1 L ha-1, and an untreated control were monitored over 5 wetting events. With surfactant application the very severely water repellent soil (MED 4.2 M) showed an increase in infiltration of up to 31%, which was concentrated under the area of surfactant application in the furrow. Volumetric water contents beneath the furrow increased up to 40% below 20 mm depth. Water infiltration into the untreated soil with low water repellence (MED 1.0 M) was 98%, and this did not significantly change with surfactant application. This physical catchment model, combined with hydrological and geophysical monitoring provides a useful tool to assess the effectiveness of surfactants in increasing water infiltration and subsurface soil moisture in water repellent soils. The work is part of the Australian CRC for Polymer project.

  3. Seawater intrusion mapping using electrical resistivity tomography and hydrochemical data. An application in the coastal area of eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakis, N., E-mail: kazanera@yahoo.com [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Geology, Lab. of Engineering Geology & Hydrogeology, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Pavlou, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Geology, Lab. of Engineering Geology & Hydrogeology, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Vargemezis, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Geology, Lab. of Applied Geophysics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Voudouris, K.S.; Soulios, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Geology, Lab. of Engineering Geology & Hydrogeology, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Pliakas, F. [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Civil Engineering, Xanthi 67100 (Greece); Tsokas, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Geology, Lab. of Applied Geophysics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and geometrical characteristics of seawater intrusion in the coastal aquifer of the eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece. Hydrochemical data and geoelectrical measurements were combined and supplemented to determine the hydrochemical regime of the study site in regard to seawater phenomena. Chemical analysis of groundwater was performed in 126 boreholes and fifteen electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT) were measured, whereas in two sites the ERT measurements were repeated following the wet season. The Cl{sup −} concentrations recorded reached 2240 mg/L indicating seawater intrusion which was also verified by ionic ratios. The ionic ratios were overlapped and a seawater intrusion map (SWIM) was produced. A significant part of the coastal aquifer (up to 150 km{sup 2}) is influenced by seawater intrusion. The areas with the most intensive salinization are located between Nea Kallikratia–Epanomi and Aggelochori–Peraia. According to the ERTs, in the influenced areas the salinization of the aquifer exceeds 1 km toward the mainland and its depth reaches 200 m. In the area surrounding Thessaloniki airport, the ERTs revealed salinization of the upper aquifer to depths of up to 40 m, whereas the lower aquifer is uninfluenced. This abnormal distribution of seawater intrusion demonstrates the value of geoelectrical methods in the study of seawater intrusion especially in areas with limited available hydrochemical data. - Highlights: • ERTs determined the geometrical characteristics of the saline aquifer. • An abnormal distribution of seawater intrusion was recorded. • Four ionic ratios overlapped and a seawater intrusion map was produced. • Cl{sup −} concentrations increased significantly from 2005 to 2010 by up to 1800 mg/L.

  4. Brine delineation and monitoring with electrical resistivity tomography and electromagnetic borehole logging at the Fort Knox well field near West Point, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rory; Unthank, Michael D.; Zettwoch, Douglas D.; Lane, John W.

    2010-01-01

    The potable water system at Fort Knox is threatened by brine contamination from improperly abandoned natural gas exploration wells. The Fort Knox well field is located near the town of West Point, Kentucky, in the flood plain of the Ohio River. At the site, unconsolidated sediments approximately 30 – 40 m thick, overlie shale and porous limestone. Brine is believed to flow vertically from the underlying formations to the unconsolidated aquifer through damaged or leaky well casings under a high hydraulic gradient from the artificially pressurized porous limestone, which is utilized for natural gas storage by a regional energy company. Upon reaching the unconsolidated aquifer, brinecontaminated groundwater enters water supply production wells under the pumping‐induced gradient. As part of the Fort Knox remediation strategy to reduce the impact of brine contamination, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and borehole electromagnetic (EM) logs are being collected annually to detect gross changes in subsurface conductivity. The 2009 ERT data show areas of high conductivity on the western (contaminated) side of the site with conductivities more than an order of magnitude higher than on the eastern (uncontaminated) side of the site. The areas of high conductivity are interpreted as brine contamination, consistent with known regions of brine contamination. Conductivities from the EM logs are consistent with the results from the ERT inversions. The EM logs show little change between 2008 and 2009, except for some small changes in the brine distribution in well PZ1. Yearly ERT surveys will be continued to detect new areas of brine contamination and monitor the remediation effort.

  5. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) evaluation of the Ohuka landslide, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Martin; Bevan, David; Prebble, Warwick; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Richards, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Globally, slope failures cause many thousands of deaths per year and damage infrastructure, costing billions of dollars to repair. There is a clear need for efficient and affordable techniques that can assess and evaluate ongoing slope instability. Of particular importance when assessing and evaluating ongoing landslide deformation is the availability of high-resolution Digital Surface Models (DSMs). Here, we applied the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) approach to low-altitude aerial images collected by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at the Ohuka coastal landslide on the North Island of New Zealand. The SfM image-based approach was selected as a mapping tool in order to provide a rapid, cost-effective, and highly automated method, generating high-resolution topography and coregistered texture (colour) from an unstructured set of overlapping photographs taken from varying viewpoints. This overcomes many of the cost, time, and logistical limitations of LiDAR and other topographic surveying methods. The SfM photogrammetry was undertaken in conjunction with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to image the subsurface and provide an interpretation of the hydrogeology, due to the technique's high sensitivity to lateral and vertical changes in moisture content. Landslide features include a large arcuate scarp, flanked by gullies, which indicate the lateral boundaries of initial slope failure. Other topographic features include a 200 m wide bench with uphill-facing scarps, pull-apart zones, and surface flows from ongoing reactivation. ERT has proved useful in imaging the near-surface moisture movement driving the landsliding processes. Failure mechanisms include block-sliding along a clay seam in the early-Miocene Koheroa siltstone, and weathered deposits of the c. 1 Ma Kidnappers tephra. Cyclic variation in moisture content and formation of perched water tables above clay and tephra seam aquitards plays a key role in reactivation.

  6. Seawater intrusion mapping using electrical resistivity tomography and hydrochemical data. An application in the coastal area of eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakis, N.; Pavlou, A.; Vargemezis, G.; Voudouris, K.S.; Soulios, G.; Pliakas, F.; Tsokas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and geometrical characteristics of seawater intrusion in the coastal aquifer of the eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece. Hydrochemical data and geoelectrical measurements were combined and supplemented to determine the hydrochemical regime of the study site in regard to seawater phenomena. Chemical analysis of groundwater was performed in 126 boreholes and fifteen electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT) were measured, whereas in two sites the ERT measurements were repeated following the wet season. The Cl − concentrations recorded reached 2240 mg/L indicating seawater intrusion which was also verified by ionic ratios. The ionic ratios were overlapped and a seawater intrusion map (SWIM) was produced. A significant part of the coastal aquifer (up to 150 km 2 ) is influenced by seawater intrusion. The areas with the most intensive salinization are located between Nea Kallikratia–Epanomi and Aggelochori–Peraia. According to the ERTs, in the influenced areas the salinization of the aquifer exceeds 1 km toward the mainland and its depth reaches 200 m. In the area surrounding Thessaloniki airport, the ERTs revealed salinization of the upper aquifer to depths of up to 40 m, whereas the lower aquifer is uninfluenced. This abnormal distribution of seawater intrusion demonstrates the value of geoelectrical methods in the study of seawater intrusion especially in areas with limited available hydrochemical data. - Highlights: • ERTs determined the geometrical characteristics of the saline aquifer. • An abnormal distribution of seawater intrusion was recorded. • Four ionic ratios overlapped and a seawater intrusion map was produced. • Cl − concentrations increased significantly from 2005 to 2010 by up to 1800 mg/L.

  7. Identification of different geologic units using fuzzy constrained resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand; Sharma, S. P.

    2018-01-01

    Different geophysical inversion strategies are utilized as a component of an interpretation process that tries to separate geologic units based on the resistivity distribution. In the present study, we present the results of separating different geologic units using fuzzy constrained resistivity tomography. This was accomplished using fuzzy c means, a clustering procedure to improve the 2D resistivity image and geologic separation within the iterative minimization through inversion. First, we developed a Matlab-based inversion technique to obtain a reliable resistivity image using different geophysical data sets (electrical resistivity and electromagnetic data). Following this, the recovered resistivity model was converted into a fuzzy constrained resistivity model by assigning the highest probability value of each model cell to the cluster utilizing fuzzy c means clustering procedure during the iterative process. The efficacy of the algorithm is demonstrated using three synthetic plane wave electromagnetic data sets and one electrical resistivity field dataset. The presented approach shows improvement on the conventional inversion approach to differentiate between different geologic units if the correct number of geologic units will be identified. Further, fuzzy constrained resistivity tomography was performed to examine the augmentation of uranium mineralization in the Beldih open cast mine as a case study. We also compared geologic units identified by fuzzy constrained resistivity tomography with geologic units interpreted from the borehole information.

  8. Application Of Two Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography Method For Delineating Cavities And Flowpath In Sinkhole Prone Area Of Armala Valley, Pokhara, Western Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusal, U. C.; Dwivedi, S.; Ghimire, H.; Ulak, P. D.; Khatiwada, B.; Rijal, M. L.; Neupane, Y.; Aryal, S.; Pandey, D.; Gautam, A.; Mishra, S.

    2017-12-01

    Sudden release of turbid groundwater through piping in the Kali Khola and subsequent formation of over one hundred twenty sinkholes since 18 November, 2013 to May, 2014 in Armala Valley in northern part of Pokhara created havoc to the local residents. The main objective of the work is to investigate subsurface anomalies so as to locate the subsurface cavities, groundwater movement and areas prone to sinkholes formation in the area. Findings of the several studies and observations carried out in area by the authors and preventive measures carried out by Department of Water Induced Disaster Management are presented in the paper. To fulfill the objective 2D-Electrical Resistivity Tomography Survey was carried out at sixty five profiles with minimum electrode spacing from 1 m to 5 m on different profiles using WDJD-4 Resistivity meter. Res2Dinv Software was used for processing and interpretation of the acquired data. Geological mapping, preparation of columnar section of the sinkholes and river bank were conducted. Hand auguring, tracer test and topography survey were also carried out in the area. Different geophysical anomalies were identified in 2D-ERT survey which indicates the presence of compositional difference in layered sediments, undulations in depositional pattern with top humus layer of thickness 0.5 m, loose unconsolidated gravel layer 0.5 m - 4 m and clayey silt/silty clay layer upto 75 m depth. The cavities were found both in clayey silt layer and gravel layer with size ranging from 1-2 m to 10-12 m in depth and 2 m-10 m in diameter either empty or water filled depending on locations. Fifteen cavities that were detected during survey were excavated and immediately filled up. Three major and four minor groundwater flow paths were detected which has been later confirmed by tracer test, formation of new sinkholes along the path and during excavation for construction of underground structures for blocking the underground flow. Major flow path was detected at

  9. Floodplain architecture of an actively meandering river (the Ploucnice River, the Czech Republic) as revealed by the distribution of pollution and electrical resistivity tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Tůmová, Štěpánka; Faměra, Martin; Balogh, M.; Kiss, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 254, FEB (2016), s. 41-56 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Floodplain architecture * Fades assignment * Electric resistivity imaging * Floodplain recyclation Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.958, year: 2016

  10. Detecting stochastic inclusions in electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Andrea; Harrach, Bastian; Hyvönen, Nuutti; Mustonen, Lauri

    2017-11-01

    This work considers the inclusion detection problem of electrical impedance tomography with stochastic conductivities. It is shown that a conductivity anomaly with a random conductivity can be identified by applying the factorization method or the monotonicity method to the mean value of the corresponding Neumann-to-Dirichlet map provided that the anomaly has high enough contrast in the sense of expectation. The theoretical results are complemented by numerical examples in two spatial dimensions.

  11. Comparison of soil thickness in a zero-order basin in the Oregon Coast Range using a soil probe and electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael S.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.; Revil, André; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the soil thickness distribution in steepland drainage basins is essential for understanding ecosystem and subsurface response to infiltration. One important aspect of this characterization is assessing the heavy and antecedent rainfall conditions that lead to shallow landsliding. In this paper, we investigate the direct current (DC) resistivity method as a tool for quickly estimating soil thickness over a steep (33–40°) zero-order basin in the Oregon Coast Range, a landslide prone region. Point measurements throughout the basin showed bedrock depths between 0.55 and 3.2 m. Resistivity of soil and bedrock samples collected from the site was measured for degrees of saturation between 40 and 92%. Resistivity of the soil was typically higher than that of the bedrock for degrees of saturation lower than 70%. Results from the laboratory measurements and point-depth measurements were used in a numerical model to evaluate the resistivity contrast at the soil-bedrock interface. A decreasing-with-depth resistivity contrast was apparent at the interface in the modeling results. At the field site, three transects were surveyed where coincident ground truth measurements of bedrock depth were available, to test the accuracy of the method. The same decreasing-with-depth resistivity trend that was apparent in the model was also present in the survey data. The resistivity contour of between 1,000 and 2,000 Ωm that marked the top of the contrast was our interpreted bedrock depth in the survey data. Kriged depth-to-bedrock maps were created from both the field-measured ground truth obtained with a soil probe and interpreted depths from the resistivity tomography, and these were compared for accuracy graphically. Depths were interpolated as far as 16.5 m laterally from the resistivity survey lines with root mean squared error (RMSE) = 27 cm between the measured and interpreted depth at those locations. Using several transects and analysis of the subsurface

  12. TOMOGRAFÍA DE RESISTIVIDAD ELÉCTRICA 3D EN LA CATEDRAL DE MORELIA, MÉXICO (3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography in Morelia Cathedral, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Cifuentes-Nava

    2017-12-01

    results from survey using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (TRE-3D carried out in 2014, 2016 and 2017, in Morelia Cathedral and along its northern front. The survey identified the location of deep structures which cannot be explained by geological context, suggesting the existence of a variety of subterranean structures of anthropogenic origin. The TRE-3D used in this study combines conventional and unconventional methodologies to offer insights into the distribution of subterranean structures at Morelia Cathedral, in accordance with both oral traditions and documented history.

  13. Geophysical methods in protected environments. Electrical resistivity tomography; Métodos geofísicos en entornos naturales protegidos. Tomografía eléctrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio Sánchez-Aguililla, F.M.; Ramiro-Camacho, A.; Ibarra Torre, P.

    2017-09-01

    There is a strong interest in protecting the environment with the aim of its long term preservation. Sometimes the heritage value of these natural areas is related to their biodiversity as there are restricted ecosystems that depend directly on them. In other cases there a singular geological record might exist, essential for the understanding of certain processes affecting the planet, such as volcanic events or glacial periods. To achieve the protection and conservation of these areas it is necessary to generate knowledge about the distribution of geological materials and groundwater masses, to study the parameters that dominate the behaviour of these systems and then define those elements that require special protection or attention. In these protected environments, research methods with a minimal environmental impact should be used. Therefore, indirect methods, such as geophysical techniques, are reliable and complementary tools with a minimum environmental impact and are therefore useful for research these unique areas. The IGME has conducted several geophysical surveys in different protected environments in Spain with the aim of achieving a better understanding, and thus facilitate their preservation and exploitation in a sustainable manner. In this paper we present a review of some case studies where geophysical methods have been used. In all the cases electrical resistivity tomography has been the axis of the geophysical research and stands out due to its great effectiveness. The main objective of this communication is to divulgate and increase awareness of the important role that these geophysical methods can play in the sustainable study of these unique places. [Spanish] Existe un marcado interés en la protección de los entornos naturales, con el objetivo de su conservación a largo plazo. En ocasiones el valor patrimonial de estas áreas está asociado a su biodiversidad, debido a que existen ecosistemas restringidos que dependen directamente de ellas

  14. Variational constraints for electrical-impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Kohn, R.V.

    1990-01-01

    The task of electrical-impedance tomography is to invert boundary measurements for the conductivity distribution of a body. This inverse problem can be formulated so the primary data are the measured powers dissipated across injection electrodes. Then, since these powers are minima of the pertinent (dual) variational principles, feasibility constraints can be found for the nonlinear inversion problem. When power may be measured accurately, the existence of these dual variational principles implies that any exact solution must lie at a point of intersection of the two feasibility boundaries

  15. Electrical resistivity and induced polarization tomography in identifying the plume of chlorinated hydrocarbons in sedimentary formation: a case study in Rho (Milan - Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Ettore; Di Filippo, Gerardina

    2009-09-01

    Resistivity and induced polarization surveying were originally developed for mineral exploration but are now finding new applications in the field of environmental and engineering geophysics. The present article reports the results of a geophysical survey performed with the aim of identifying a plume of chlorinated hydrocarbons in sedimentary formations of the Pandania plain. The tested site is characterized by three sand and gravel aquifers containing a quantity of clay particles which influence the overall bulk resistivity and chargeability. According to data obtained using shallow boreholes, mainly dense non-aqueous phase liquids were found as contaminants in the first and second aquifer. The aforementioned geo-electrical methods were applied in both two- and three-dimensional approaches. Steel and copper electrodes were used in the process of field data acquisition and the results of the survey were compared. The geophysical survey revealed some anomalies that could be explained by the presence of dense non-aqueous phase liquids in the soil medium. The concept of normalized chargeability facilitates the interpretation of detected induced polarization anomalies. The shape of the plume was inferred from maps of resistivity and chargeability to a depth of 25 m below the surface of the ground.

  16. A cable theory based biophysical model of resistance change in crab peripheral nerve and human cerebral cortex during neuronal depolarisation: implications for electrical impedance tomography of fast neural activity in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Adam; Bayford, Richard; Holder, David

    2012-05-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a medical imaging method with the potential to image resistance changes which occur during neuronal depolarisation in the brain with a resolution of milliseconds and millimetres. Most biomedical EIT is conducted with applied current over 10 kHz, as this reduces electrode impedance and so instrumentation artefact. However, impedance changes during neuronal depolarization are negligible at such frequencies. In order to estimate optimal recording frequency and specify instrumentation requirements, we have modelled their amplitude and frequency dependence during evoked activity using cable theory. Published values were used for the electrical properties and geometry of cell processes. The model was adjusted for the filtering effect of membrane capacitance and proportion of active neurons. At DC, resistance decreases by 2.8 % in crab nerve during the compound action potential and 0.6 % (range 0.06-1.7 %) locally in cerebral cortex during evoked physiological activity. Both predictions correlate well with independent experimental data. This encourages the view that true tomographic imaging of fast neural activity in the brain is possible, at least with epicortical electrodes in the first instance. It is essential to undertake this at low frequencies below about 100 Hz as above 1 kHz the signal becomes vanishingly small.

  17. Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography using spectral constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Emma; Sato Dos Santos, Gustavo; Holder, David; Arridge, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) exploits the dependence of tissue impedance on frequency to recover an image of conductivity. MFEIT could provide emergency diagnosis of pathologies such as acute stroke, brain injury and breast cancer. We present a method for performing MFEIT using spectral constraints. Boundary voltage data is employed directly to reconstruct the volume fraction distribution of component tissues using a nonlinear method. Given that the reconstructed parameter is frequency independent, this approach allows for the simultaneous use of all multifrequency data, thus reducing the degrees of freedom of the reconstruction problem. Furthermore, this method allows for the use of frequency difference data in a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm. Results from empirical phantom measurements suggest that our fraction reconstruction method points to a new direction for the development of multifrequency EIT algorithms in the case that the spectral constraints are known, and may provide a unifying framework for static EIT imaging.

  18. Neurocortical electrical activity tomography in chronic schizophrenics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga Heloisa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging of brain electrical activity was performed in 25 chronic medicated schizophrenics and 40 controls, analyzing the classical frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, and beta of 19-channel EEG during resting state to identify brain regions with deviant activity of different functional significances, using LORETA (Low Resolution Tomography and SPM99 (Statistical Parametric Mapping. Patients differed from controls due to an excess of slow activity comprising delta + theta frequency bands (inhibitory pattern located at the right middle frontal gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus, and right insula, as well as at the bilateral anterior cingulum with a left preponderance. The high temporal resolution of EEG enables the specification of the deviations not only as an excess or a deficit of brain electrical activity, but also as inhibitory (delta, theta, normal (alpha, and excitatory (beta activities. These deviations point out to an impaired functional brain state consisting of inhibited frontal and prefrontal areas that may result in inadequate treatment of externally or internally generated information.

  19. Emplacement of Zebín Hill, Jičín Volcanic Field, Bohemian Paradise, Czech Republic: Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, Ground Magnetometry, Electric Resistivity Tomography, and Paleomagnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, M. S.; Rapprich, , V.; Valenta, J.; Leman, J.; Brister, A. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2014-12-01

    A well-preserved set of mid-Miocene tuff-cones and their feeders outcrop in the Jičín Volcanic Field, Czech Republic. Zebín Hill is a tuff cone that has been quarried to reveal the volcanoes feeder system. This edifice offers the opportunity to understand how magma is transported through a monogenetic pyroclastic cone. Rock types include a coarse-grained basal phreatomagmatic layer and a stratified upper wall facies both of which are penetrated by feeder dikes. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and paleomagnetic data were collected at twenty-one sites from feeder dikes and the main conduit of the volcano. A high-resolution ground magnetometry survey, electric resistivity tomography and seismic tomography were also conducted. Magnetic susceptibility intensity indicates that the dominant magnetic mineral is a ferromagnetic phase with little contribution from paramagnetic minerals. AMS ellipsoids shapes are both oblate and prolate and inferred magma flow directions indicate magma flow away from the central vent area and subhorizontal flow towards and away from the axial conduit; both upward and downward magma flow is evident at some sites. Curie point estimates yield a spectrum of results indicating a mixture of high-Ti titanomagnetite, iron sulfide, and low-Ti titanomagnetite. Ground magnetometry data indicate that both normal and reverse polarity rocks are present at Zebín Hill. Paleomagnetic data confirm the ground magnetic data in that both normal and reverse polarity rocks are present. Most sites yield a single component magnetization that is well grouped at the site level and carried by pseudosingle domain titanomagnetite. The presence of both normal and reverse polarity magnetizations from the volcano indicate that significant time passed during the growth of this monogenic system. Complex system of branching dikes has been also observed from electric resistivity tomography. The simple external structure of monogenetic volcanoes hides a rather

  20. Design of electrical capacitance tomography sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wuqiang

    2010-01-01

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been developed since the late 1980s for visualization and measurement of a permittivity distribution in a cross section using a multi-electrode capacitance sensor. While the hardware and image reconstruction algorithms for ECT have been published extensively and the topics have been reviewed, few papers have been published to discuss ECT sensors and the design issues, which are crucial for a specific application. This paper will briefly discuss the principles of ECT sensors, but mostly will address key issues for ECT sensor design, with reference to some existing ECT sensors as a good understanding of the key issues would help optimization of the design of ECT sensors. The key issues to be discussed include the number and length of electrodes, the use of external and internal electrodes, implications of wall thickness, earthed screens (including the outer screen, axial end screens and radial screens), driven guard electrodes, dealing with high temperature and high pressure, twin planes for velocity measurement by cross correlation and limitations in sensor diameter. While conventional ECT sensors are circular with the electrodes in a single plane or in twin planes, some non-conventional ECT sensors, such as square, conical and 3D sensors, will also be discussed. As a practical guidance, the procedure to fabricate an ECT sensor will be given. In the end are summary and discussion on future challenges, including re-engineering of ECT sensors. (topical review)

  1. Joint inversion of lake-floor electrical resistivity tomography and boat-towed radio-magnetotelluric data illustrated on synthetic data and an application from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory site, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunguo; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Pedersen, Laust B.; Dahlin, Torleif; Meqbel, Naser

    2018-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method provides moderately good constraints for both conductive and resistive structures, while the radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) method is well suited to constrain conductive structures. Additionally, RMT and ERT data may have different target coverage and are differently affected by various types of noise. Hence, joint inversion of RMT and ERT data sets may provide a better constrained model as compared to individual inversions. In this study, joint inversion of boat-towed RMT and lake-floor ERT data has for the first time been formulated and implemented. The implementation was tested on both synthetic and field data sets incorporating RMT transverse electrical mode and ERT data. Results from synthetic data demonstrate that the joint inversion yields models with better resolution compared with individual inversions. A case study from an area adjacent to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in southeastern Sweden was used to demonstrate the implementation of the method. A 790-m-long profile comprising lake-floor ERT and boat-towed RMT data combined with partial land data was used for this purpose. Joint inversions with and without weighting (applied to different data sets, vertical and horizontal model smoothness) as well as constrained joint inversions incorporating bathymetry data and water resistivity measurements were performed. The resulting models delineate subsurface structures such as a major northeasterly directed fracture system, which is observed in the HRL facility underground and confirmed by boreholes. A previously uncertain weakness zone, likely a fracture system in the northern part of the profile, is inferred in this study. The fractures are highly saturated with saline water, which make them good targets of resistivity-based geophysical methods. Nevertheless, conductive sediments overlain by the lake water add further difficulty to resolve these deep fracture zones. Therefore, the joint inversion of RMT

  2. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Sapia, Vincenzo; Fierro, Elisa; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the central section of the 35 km long L'Aquila-Celano active normal fault-system in the central Apennines of Italy. Although palaeoseismic data document high Holocene vertical slip rates (˜1 mm yr-1) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time the shallow subsurface of a key section of the main Piano di Pezza fault splay by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time-domain electromagnetic soundings (TDEM). Our surveys cross a ˜5-m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images, which show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. Our data indicate that the upper fault termination has a sub-vertical attitude, in agreement with palaeoseismological trench evidence, whereas it dips ˜50° to the southwest in the deeper part. We recognize some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions in the fault hangingwall that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of some Holocene palaeo-earthquakes. We estimate a ˜13-15 m throw of this fault splay since the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (˜18 ka), leading to a 0.7-0.8 mm yr-1 throw rate that is quite in accordance with previous palaeoseismic estimation of Holocene vertical slip rates. The 1-D resistivity models from TDEM soundings collected along the trace of the electrical profile significantly match with 2-D resistivity images. Moreover, they indicate that in the fault hangingwall, ˜200 m away from the surface fault trace, the pre-Quaternary carbonate basement is at ˜90-100 m depth. We therefore provide a minimal ˜150-160 m estimate of the cumulative throw of the Piano di Pezza

  3. Resistivity tomography using line electrode; Sendenryugen wo tsukatta hiteiko tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y. [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Resistivity tomography (RT) using line electrode was studied. Although line electrode is available even for RT, in casing line electrode, only one kind of electrode data is obtained. The calculation method of potential and sensitivity distributions based on line electrode is not yet established. Since various data in various measurement arrangements are required for analysis of RT, the new measurement method was devised which measures resistivities while successively changing the tip depth of line electrode. Until now, although potential has been calculated under the assumption that outflow current per unit length of line electrode is uniform, this assumption is incorrect. The new potential distribution calculation method was thus proposed. Sensitivity distribution calculation for inverse analysis is also described. RT using line electrode could precisely obtain deep information which couldn`t be obtained only by measurement along the surface measuring line. Although RT is poorer in accuracy than the previous point electrode method, it will be probably improved by 3-electrode arrangement. RT is also useful in the case difficult to apply point electrode method. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Electrical resistivity study of insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liesegang, J.; Senn, B.C.; Holcombe, S.R.; Pigram, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Conventional methods of electrical resistivity measurement of dielectric materials involve the application of electrodes to a sample whereby a potential is applied and a current through the material is measured. Although great care and ingenuity has often been applied to this technique, the recorded values of electrical resistivity (p), especially for insulator materials, show great disparity. In earlier work by the authors, a method for determining surface charge decay [Q(t)], using a coaxial cylindrical capacitor arrangement interfaced to a personal computer, was adapted to allow the relatively straightforward measurement of electrical resistivity in the surface region of charged insulator materials. This method was used to develop an ionic charge transport theory, based on Mott-Gurney diffusion to allow a greater understanding into charge transport behaviour. This theory was extended using numerical analysis to produce a two dimensional (2-D) computational model to allow the direct comparison between experimental and theoretical charge decay data. The work also provided a means for the accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient (D) and the layer of thickness of surface charge (Δz) on the sample. The work outlined here involves an extension of the theoretical approach previously taken, using a computational model based more closely on the 3-D experimental set-up, to reinforce the level of confidence in the results achieved for the simpler 2-D treatment. Initially, a 3-D rectangular box arrangement similar to the experimental set-up was modelled and a theoretical and experimental comparison of voltage decay results made. This model was then transferred into cylindrical coordinates to allow it to be almost identical to the experiment and again a comparison made. In addition, theoretical analysis of the coupled non-linear partial differential equations governing the charge dissipation process has led to a simplification involving directly, the

  5. Electrical Resistance Tomography to Monitor Mitigation of Metal-Toxic Acid-Leachates Ruby Gulch Waste Rock Repository Gilt Edge Mine Superfund Site, South Dakota USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Heath, G.; Richardson, A.; Paul, D.; Wangerud, K.

    2003-12-01

    At a cyanide heap-leach open-pit mine, 15-million cubic yards of acid-generating sulfides were dumped at the head of a steep-walled mountain valley, with 30 inches/year precipitation generating 60- gallons/minute ARD leachate. Remediation has reshaped the dump to a 70-acre, 3.5:1-sloped geometry, installed drainage benches and runoff diversions, and capped the repository and lined diversions with a polyethylene geomembrane and cover system. Monitoring was needed to evaluate (a) long-term geomembrane integrity, (b) diversion liner integrity and long-term effectiveness, (c) ARD geochemistry, kinetics and pore-gas dynamics within the repository mass, and (d) groundwater interactions. Observation wells were paired with a 600-electrode resistivity survey system. Using near-surface and down-hole electrodes and automated data collection and post-processing, periodic two- and three-dimensional resistivity images are developed to reflect current and changed-conditions in moisture, temperature, geochemical components, and flow-direction analysis. Examination of total resistivity values and time variances between images allows direct observation of liner and cap integrity with precise identification and location of leaks; likewise, if runoff migrates from degraded diversion ditches into the repository zone, there is an accompanying and noticeable change in resistivity values. Used in combination with monitoring wells containing borehole resistivity electrodes (calibrated with direct sampling of dump water/moisture, temperature and pore-gas composition), the resistivity arrays allow at-depth imaging of geochemical conditions within the repository mass. The information provides early indications of progress or deficiencies in de-watering and ARD- mitigation that is the remedy intent. If emerging technologies present opportunities for secondary treatment, deep resistivity images may assist in developing application methods and evaluating the effectiveness of any reagents

  6. Determining the specific electric resistance of rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad' ko, V.Ia.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on perfecting the method of laboratory determination of the specific electric resistance of a rock formation. The average error in determining the specific electric resistance of the core at various locations is no more than two percent with low resistance values (2-5 ohms).

  7. Electrical capacity and resistance determination of emitting electric transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba Fernandez, J.; Ramis Soriano, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we calculate the electrical resistance and capacity of emitting electric transducer, which is mainly formed, in direct relationship with its properties, by a ceramic capacitor. Our aim is to motivate the students with an attractive element in order to carry out traditional measurements of the charge and discharge transients of a capacitor, implementing high resistance setups. (Author) 5 refs

  8. Estimation of the error made in Pole-Dipole Electrical Resistivity Tomography depending on the location of the remote electrode: Modeling and field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindratsima, Stephen; Lataste, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Then, the influence of the remote electrode location was studied considering PsPD (Pseudo-Pole-Dipole i.e. when the exact location of the remote electrode is used even when finite) in comparison to PDbias (Pole-Dipole bias i.e. remote electrode is considered at infinity even when finite). Anomaly Effect (AE) with new consideration of the averaged mean resistivity value was used for the illustration, results with L1 and L2-norms were compared and Forward/Reverse measurements were considered. Angle α around 30° was identified as giving homogeneous spread error between PsPD and PDbias data treatments. For α ~ 140°, the error made when the true coordinates of the remote electrode is not informed is higher near layer's interface if L1-norm is used. Whereas this error is more visible in deep level if L2-norm is used. Finally, experimental results showed the influence of the location of the remote electrode when “Forward” measurements are completed by “Reverse” ones.

  9. Evaluation of Unknown Tube Well Depth Using Electrical Resistivity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Mohd Hazreek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistivity method has increasingly adopted in engineering, environmental, mining and archaeological studies. Systematic and proper studies of unknown civil engineering structure evaluation particularly on tube well depth was rarely being established. Conventionally, camera test or string with weight approach has been used to evaluate unknown tube well depth thus exposed to several restriction due to its expensive and time consuming. Hence, this study focused on evaluation of unknown tube well depth using indirect test with particular reference to electrical resistivity method (ERM.A single spread line of electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS 4000 equipment set based on Wenner and Pole-dipole array in line with the tube well position. Electrical resistivity raw data was processed using RES2DINV software producing electrical resistivity tomography (ERT of the subsurface profile studied. Then, electrical resistivity value (ERV obtained from RES2DINV analyses (ERT was extracted and analysed using plotted graph (depth versus ERV specifically at tube well position based on electrical resistivity spread line performed. It was found that both array have shown some good similarity results in term of tube well depth (20 m thus able to verify the result interpreted. Both array have shown some good similarity of ERV representing groundwater (ERV = 10 – 100 Ωm and soil with water (ERV > 100 Ωm at depth of 0 – 20 m and >20 m respectively. All those interpretation have shown good agreement based on verification thru established ERV of earth materials references, geological map and nearest available boreholes data. Hence, this study has shown that the application of ERM was applicable in evaluation of unknown tube well depth which efficient in term of cost, time and environmental sustainable.

  10. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The prediction of Los Angeles (LA) abrasion loss from some indirect tests is useful for practical applications. For this purpose, LA abrasion, electrical resistivity, density and porosity tests were carried out on 27 different rock types. LA abrasion loss values were correlated with electrical resistivity and a good correlation ...

  11. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The prediction of Los Angeles (LA) abrasion loss from some indirect tests is useful for practical applications. For this purpose, LA abrasion, electrical resistivity, density and porosity tests were carried out on 27 different rock types. LA abrasion loss values were correlated with electrical resistivity and a good corre-.

  12. Numerical modeling to assess the sensitivity and resolution of long-electrode electrical resistance tomography (LEERT) surveys to monitor CO2 migration, Phase 1B area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-05-18

    This document describes the results of a numerical modeling study that evaluated whether LEERT could be used successfully to monitor CO2 distribution in the Weyburn- Midale reservoir, Phase 1B area. The magnitude of electrical resistivity changes and the technique’s resolution depend on many site-specific factors including well separation distances, casing lengths, reservoir depth, thickness, and composition, and the effect of CO2 on the electrical properties of the reservoir. Phase 1B-specific numerical modeling of the electrical response to CO2 injection has been performed to assess sensitivity and resolution of the electrical surveys.

  13. Electrical resistivity measurement to predict uniaxial compressive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Electrical resistivity values of 12 different igneous rocks were measured on core samples using a resistivity meter in the laboratory. The resistivity tests were conducted on the samples fully saturated with brine (NaCl solution) and the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), Brazilian tensile strength, density and.

  14. Acousto-electrical speckle pattern in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Destrempes, François; Mari, Jean-Martial; Souchon, Rémi; Catheline, Stefan; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound speckle is a granular texture pattern appearing in ultrasound imaging. It can be used to distinguish tissues and identify pathologies. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography is an ultrasound-based medical imaging technique of the tissue electrical conductivity. It is based on the application of an ultrasound wave in a medium placed in a magnetic field and on the measurement of the induced electric current due to Lorentz force. Similarly to ultrasound imaging, we hypothesized that a speckle could be observed with Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography imaging. In this study, we first assessed the theoretical similarity between the measured signals in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography and in ultrasound imaging modalities. We then compared experimentally the signal measured in both methods using an acoustic and electrical impedance interface. Finally, a bovine muscle sample was imaged using the two methods. Similar speckle patterns were observed. This indicates the existence of an ‘acousto-electrical speckle’ in the Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography with spatial characteristics driven by the acoustic parameters but due to electrical impedance inhomogeneities instead of acoustic ones as is the case of ultrasound imaging.

  15. Coke fouling monitoring by electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombardelli, Clovis; Mari, Livia Assis; Kalinowski, Hypolito Jose [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial (CPGEI)

    2008-07-01

    An experimental method to simulate the growth of the coke fouling that occurs in the oil processing is proposed relating the thickness of the encrusted coke to its electrical resistivity. The authors suggest the use of the fouling electrical resistivity as a transducer element for determining its thickness. The sensor is basically two electrodes in an electrically isolated device where the inlay can happen in order to compose a purely resistive transducer. Such devices can be easily constructed in a simple and robust form with features capable to face the high temperatures and pressures found in relevant industrial processes. For validation, however, it is needed a relationship between the electrical resistivity and the fouling thickness, information not yet found in the literature. The present work experimentally simulates the growth of a layer of coke on an electrically insulating surface, equipped with electrodes at two extremities to measure the electrical resistivity during thermal cracking essays. The method is realized with a series of consecutive runs. The results correlate the mass of coke deposited and its electrical resistivity, and it can be used to validate the coke depositions monitoring employing the resistivity as a control parameter. (author)

  16. Tomografía de resistividad eléctrica aplicada a la caracterización de sitios contaminados en tambos Electrical resistivity tomography applied to the characterization of contaminated sites at dairies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz N Losinno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La calidad del agua subterránea en los tambos, utilizada para consumo animal, puede tener incidencia en la calidad de la leche, por lo cual es importante conocer el efecto de los lixiviados sobre el suelo y el agua subterránea. El objetivo fue detectar anomalías de conductividad eléctrica (CE en zona no saturada y saturada por medio de la tomografía de resistividad eléctrica, en sitios potencialmente contaminados en dos tambos, uno en Venado Tuerto y otro en Carmen de Areco y su relación con las propiedades físico-químicas del suelo y agua subterránea. En Carmen de Areco, en un suelo franco limoso con la presencia de un horizonte arcilloso (Bt el sitio más comprometido resultó el corral de encierre cercano a la zona de ordeñe, con anomalía de conductividad eléctrica del 60% en la zona no saturada respecto a sondeos testigos, mientras que la zona de alimentación, que periódicamente se traslada de lote, no se vió afectada. En Venado Tuerto, en un suelo franco arenoso de textura más gruesa, la zona de alimentación, con una anomalía del 84% y con una carga animal prolongada en el tiempo y las inmediaciones de la laguna de efluentes, presentaron un alto contenido de sales. En ambos casos la salinidad estuvo asociada con alto contenido de nitratos, fósforo y sulfatos provenientes de los efluentes ganaderos.Groundwater quality at dairies, used for animal consumption, may have incidence on milk quality, for which it is important to know the effect of wastes lixiviation on soil and groundwater. The aim was to detect anomalies of electrical conductivity at non saturated and saturated zone, by means of electrical resistivity tomography, at potentially contaminated sites at two dairies at Venado Tuerto (Santa Fe Province, Argentina and at Carmen de Areco (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, and its relationship with physico-chemical properties of soil and groundwater. In Carmen de Areco, a silty laomy soil with clay horizon (Bt, the most

  17. Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil competence and soil corrosivity at and engineering site location in Akungba-Akoko, southwestern Nigeria. A I Idornigie, M O Olorunfemi, A A Omitogun ...

  18. Electrical resistivity of fast neutron irradiated bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quelard, G.

    1975-01-01

    The production and recovery of fast neutron radiation damage in bismuth, at 20K has been studied by means of electrical resistivity. Results are independent of crystallographic orientation and indicate a creation of carriers during irradiation [fr

  19. Electrical resistivity and structure of liquid Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, P.; Armagan, T.

    2002-01-01

    The static structure factors are considered as an important ingredient in the calculation of the electrical resistivity of liquid metals. In this work, the electrical resistivity for liquid Germanium is interpreted with the Zeeman formalism in terms of pseudopotential and structure factor within the framework of the Hasagewa - Watabe (HW) for the interionic interactions. The successes and failures of the Zeeman formula have been compared with the available experimental data

  20. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for determining electric field distribution during electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, Matej; Miklavcic, Damijan; Bajd, Franci; Serša, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon caused by externally applied electric field to cells that results in an increase of cell membrane permeability to various molecules. Accurate coverage of the tissue with a sufficiently large electric field presents one of the most important conditions for successful membrane permeabilization. Applications based on electroporation would greatly benefit with a method for monitoring the electric field, especially if it could be done in situ. As the membrane electroporation is a consequence of an induced transmembrane potential, which is directly proportional to the local electric field, we have been investigating current density imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography techniques to determine the electric field distribution during electroporation. In this paper, we present comparison of current density and electric field distribution in an agar phantom and in a liver tissue exposed to electroporation pulses. As expected, a region of increased electrical conductivity was observed in the liver tissue exposed to sufficiently high electric field but not in agar phantom.

  1. electrical resistivity measurements of downscaled homogenous

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Abstract. Knowledge of electrical resistivity for reservoir rocks is crucial for a number of reservoir engineering tasks such as the determination of oil-in-place and the cal- ibration of resistivity logs. Those properties can now be predicted by numerical calculations directly on micro-CT images taken from rock fragments typically ...

  2. Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Downscaled Homogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of electrical resistivity for reservoir rocks is crucial for a number of reservoir engineering tasks such as the determination of oil-in-place and the calibration of resistivity logs. Those properties can now be predicted by numerical calculations directly on micro-CT images taken from rock fragments typically having a ...

  3. A laboratory study of the correlation between the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaopei; Du, Lizhi

    2017-10-01

    Thermal conductivity k (Wm- 1 K- 1) and electrical resistivity ρ (Ω·m) depend on common parameters such as grain size, dry density and saturation, allowing the finding of a relationship between both parameters. In this paper, we found a linear quantitative formula between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil. To accomplish this, we measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of 57 soil samples in the laboratory; samples included 8 reconstructed soils from the Changchun area (clay, silt, and sand) with approximately 7 different saturation levels. A linear relationship between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity was found excluding the parameter of soil saturation, and the linear model was validated with undisturbed soils in Changchun area. To fully use this relationship (e.g., by imaging the thermal conductivity of soils with electrical resistivity tomography), further measurements with different soils are needed.

  4. Effect of fluid-filled boreholes on resistivity tomography; Hiteiko tomography ni okeru konaisui no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y. [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Theoretical discussions were given on the effect of fluid-filled boreholes on resistivity tomography. The discussions performed incorporation of earth resistance as a method to consider borehole diameters in an FEM calculation using wire elements. The numerical experiment conducted a simulation on the following two objects: resistivity tomography in a horizontal multi-layer structure consisted of layers with resistivity ranging from 10 to 10000 ohm-m, and a model with a slanted low resistivity band existing in a background of 5000 ohm-m. As a result of the discussions, it was made clear that the effect of the boreholes can be corrected by giving earth resistance between the wire elements and natural ground. An improved potential calculating program indicated that the effect of the fluid-filled boreholes in the resistivity tomography generates false images with high resistivity along the bores if the resistivity has high contrast. Incorporating the wire elements into an inverse analysis model reduces the false images and improves the accuracy. 1 ref., 12 figs.

  5. Surface electrical resistivity of insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senn, B. C.; Liesegang, J.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented here for measuring surface charge decay, and theory has been developed so as to produce determinations of resistivity in the surface region of insulator films or wafers. This method incorporates the use of a coaxial cylindrical capacitor arrangement and an electrometer interfaced to a PC. The charge transport theory given here is based on Mott-Gurney diffusion, and allows easy interpretation of the experimental data, especially for the initial phase of surface charge decay. Resistivity measurements are presented for glass, mica, perspex and polyethylene, covering a range of 10 9 to 10 18 Ωm, as an illustration of the useful range of the instrument for static and antistatic materials, particularly in film or sheet form. Values for the surface charge diffusion constants of the materials are also presented. The charge transport theory has also been extended to allow the experimental and computational theoretical comparison of surface charge decay not only over the initial phase of charge decay, but also over longer times. The theoretical predictions show excellent agreement with experiment using the values for the diffusion constants referred to above

  6. Monotonicity-based electrical impedance tomography for lung imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liangdong; Harrach, Bastian; Seo, Jin Keun

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a monotonicity-based spatiotemporal conductivity imaging method for continuous regional lung monitoring using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The EIT data (i.e. the boundary current-voltage data) can be decomposed into pulmonary, cardiac and other parts using their different periodic natures. The time-differential current-voltage operator corresponding to the lung ventilation can be viewed as either semi-positive or semi-negative definite owing to monotonic conductivity changes within the lung regions. We used these monotonicity constraints to improve the quality of lung EIT imaging. We tested the proposed methods in numerical simulations, phantom experiments and human experiments.

  7. Development of Image Reconstruction Algorithms in electrical Capacitance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Marron, J. L.; Alberdi Primicia, J.; Barcala Riveira, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) has not obtained a good development in order to be used at industrial level. That is due first to difficulties in the measurement of very little capacitances (in the range of femto farads) and second to the problem of reconstruction on- line of the images. This problem is due also to the small numbers of electrodes (maximum 16), that made the usual algorithms of reconstruction has many errors. In this work it is described a new purely geometrical method that could be used for this purpose. (Author) 4 refs

  8. Anastomotic leak detection by electrolyte electrical resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Daniel T; Cline, Adam M; Johnson, Scott B

    2010-08-01

    To characterize a new method of postoperative gastrointestinal leak detection based on electrical resistance changes due to extravasated electrolyte contrast. Postoperative gastrointestinal leak results in increased patient morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs that can be mitigated by early diagnosis. A sensitive and specific diagnostic test that could be performed at the bedside has the potential to shorten the time to diagnosis and thereby improve the quality of treatment. Anaesthetized rats underwent celiotomy and creation of a 5-mm gastrotomy. In experimental animals, electrical resistance changes were measured with a direct current ohmmeter after the introduction of 5 cc of 23.4% NaCl electrolyte solution via gavage and measured with a more sensitive alternating current ohmmeter after the gavage of 1-5 cc of 0.9% NaCl. Comparison was made to negative controls and statistical analysis was performed. Leakage from the gastrotomy induced by as little as 1 cc of gavage-delivered 0.9% NaCl contrast solution was detectable as a statistically significant drop in electrical resistance when compared to results from negative controls. Electrical resistance change associated with electrolyte-gated leak detection is highly sensitive and specific and has the potential to be rapidly translated into clinical settings.

  9. Environmental Sciences Electrical resistivity soundings to determine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite this contrast, models generated from electrical resistivity soundings are reasonably accurate in their depictions of internal structure of the dump site. The hydrochemical analysis of the surface and groundwater samples collected within the vicinity of the dump site were analysed for physico-chemical parameters.

  10. Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrical resistivity determination of subsurface layers, subsoil competence and soil corrosivity at and engineering site location in Akungba-Akoko, ... The study concluded that the characteristics of the earth materials in the site would be favourable to normal engineering structures/materials that may be located on it.

  11. 2D electrical resistivity tommorgraphy for environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The application of geophysical method in subsurface investigation at several locations in Igarra, Nigeria has revealed detailed information about the hydrogeological and geotechnical implication of the surveyed locations. Electrical resistivity survey using the wenner-schlumberger array configuration used to characterize a ...

  12. Integrated VLF - Electromagnetic And Electrical Resistivity Survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) and Electrical Resistivity (ER) methods were integrated in a feasibility study of a basement complex area for groundwater development. Linear features, suspected to be basement fractures, inferred from the VLF - EM anomaly curves, were confirmed by subsurface geoelectric ...

  13. electrical resistivity investigation of the groundwater potential in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    electric sections with varied thicknesses and resistivity. The lateritic clay ... locate areas of high groundwater potential characterized with thick weathered and fractures zones. The electrical resistivity survey involved vertical electrical sounding. (VES) within ... resistivity is nearly the resistivity of the surface material, but as the ...

  14. Electrical impedance tomography of the 1995 OGI gasoline release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) was used to image the plume resulting from a release of 378 liters (100 gallons) of gasoline into a sandy acquifer. Images were made in 5 planes before and 5 times during the release, to generate a detailed picture of the spatial as well as the temporal development of the plume as it spread at the water table. Information of the electrical impedance (both in phase and out of phase voltages) was used or several different frequencies to produce images. We observed little dispersion in the images either before or after the gasoline entered the acquifer. Likewise, despite some laboratory measurements of impedances, there was no evidence of a change in the reactance in the soil because of the gasoline

  15. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  16. DETERMINATION OF RESOLUTION LIMITS OF ELECTRICAL TOMOGRAPHY ON THE BLOCK MODEL IN A HOMOGENOUS ENVIRONMENT BY MEANS OF ELECTRICAL MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franjo Šumanovac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The block model in a homogenous environment can generally serve for presentation of some geological models: changes of facies, changes of rock compactness-fragmentation, underground cavities, bauxite deposits, etc. Therefore, on the block model of increased resistivities in a homogenous environment of low resistivity, the potentials of the electrical tomography method were tested for the purpose of their detection. Regarding potentials of block detection, resolution methods depend on: depth of block location, ratio between block resistivity and the environment in which it is located as well as applied survey geometry, i.e. electrode array. Thus the analyses carried out for the most frequently used electrode arrays in the investigations are the following: the Wenner, Wenner-Schlumberger, dipole-dipole and pole-pole arrays. For each array, maximum depths at which a block can be detected relative to the ratio between block resistivity and parent rock environment were analyzed. The results are shown in the two-dimensional graphs, where the ratio between the block resistivity and the environment is shown on the X-axis, and the resolution depth on the Y-axis, after which the curves defining the resolution limits were drawn. These graphs have a practical use, since they enable a fast, simple determination of potentials of the method application on a specific geological model.

  17. Interference resisting design for guided wave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Liang; Hua, Jiadong; Shi, Wen; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    RAPID (reconstruction algorithm for the probabilistic inspection of damage) is a new promising tomography approach for the detection and monitoring of critical areas in a structure. With the sensors permanently installed on or embedded in structures, changes in effective thickness and material properties caused by structural damage can be detected and mapped to the tomogram. However, in this method, the tomographic feature SDC (signal difference coefficient) captures the overall change of the received ultrasonic signals, which makes it sensitive to environmental factors (e.g. rain, changes in temperature and humidity). As a result, the approach is restricted in the laboratory environment. In this paper, the influence of measurement data length on the SDC and the tomogram are investigated, and a new strategy is established on how to choose the measurement data to obtain good reconstruction by matching the coverage zone of each transmitter–receiver pair with the corresponding affected zone. The proposed method is then applied to identify defects of the specimen in the presence of external sources of interference, such as water droplets and structural variations outside the critical area. The results demonstrate its capability of improved robustness in the presence of external sources of interference. (paper)

  18. Feasibility of electric property tomography of pelvic tumors at 3T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balidemaj, Edmond; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Crezee, Hans; Nederveen, Aart J.; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Van Den Berg, Cornelis A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Investigation of the validity of the "transceive phase assumption" for Electric Property Tomography of pelvic tumors at 3T. The acquired electric conductivities of pelvic tumors are beneficial for improved specific absorption rate determination in hyperthermia treatment planning. Methods

  19. Feasibility of electric property tomography of pelvic tumors at 3T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balidemaj, Edmond; van Lier, Astrid L. H. M. W.; Crezee, Hans; Nederveen, Aart J.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the validity of the "transceive phase assumption" for Electric Property Tomography of pelvic tumors at 3T. The acquired electric conductivities of pelvic tumors are beneficial for improved specific absorption rate determination in hyperthermia treatment planning. Electromagnetic

  20. (VLF-EM) and electrical resistivity survey for evaluation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENSEMBLES

    2016-05-26

    May 26, 2016 ... Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted at. Modomo/Eleweran ... Key words: Weathered layer, geological fissures, aquifer, electrical resistivity, geoelectric section, electromagnetic. ..... 1745 Meyerside drive, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Naghibi SA ...

  1. Imaging wet granules with different flow patterns by electrical capacitance tomography and microwave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H G; Zhang, J L; Mao, M X; Ye, J M; Ramli, M F; Yang, W Q; Wu, Z P

    2016-01-01

    The moisture content of granules in fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating processes can typically be between 1%∼25%, resulting in the change of permittivity and conductivity during the processes. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used for this purpose, but has a limit because too much water can cause a problem in capacitance measurement. Considering that microwave tomography (MWT) has a wide range of frequency (1∼2.5 GHz) and can be used to measure materials with high permittivity and conductivity, the objective of this research is to combine ECT and MWT together to investigate the solids concentration with different moisture content and different flow patterns. The measurement results show that both ECT and MWT are functions of moisture content as well as flow patterns, and their measurements are complementary to each other. This is the first time that these two tomography modalities have been combined together and applied to image the complex solids distribution. The obtained information may be used for the process control of fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating to improve operation efficiency. (paper)

  2. Electrical resistance of dysprosium under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, B; Tolpygo, V K

    2014-01-01

    The electrical resistance of dysprosium metal has been measured as a function of hydrostatic pressure up to 1.2 GPa at temperatures from 300 K to 700 K, and at atmospheric pressure from 80 to 700 K. Our data at atmospheric pressure and at room temperature agree well with literature data. The total pressure coefficient of resistance at 300 K is found to be dlnR/dp = −2.98·10 −2 GPa −1 and to decrease slightly with increasing temperature. The results are discussed in terms of simple free-electron type models.

  3. Applications of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT): A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanti Bera, Tushar

    2018-03-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a tomographic imaging method which solves an ill posed inverse problem using the boundary voltage-current data collected from the surface of the object under test. Though the spatial resolution is comparatively low compared to conventional tomographic imaging modalities, due to several advantages EIT has been studied for a number of applications such as medical imaging, material engineering, civil engineering, biotechnology, chemical engineering, MEMS and other fields of engineering and applied sciences. In this paper, the applications of EIT have been reviewed and presented as a short summary. The working principal, instrumentation and advantages are briefly discussed followed by a detail discussion on the applications of EIT technology in different areas of engineering, technology and applied sciences.

  4. Image Reconstruction Algorithm For Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko

    2001-01-01

    ). Most image reconstruction algorithms for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) use sensitivity maps as weighting factors. The computation is fast, involving a simple multiply-and- accumulate (MAC) operation, but the resulting image suffers from blurring due to the soft-field effect of the sensor. This paper presents a low cost iterative method employing proportional thresholding, which improves image quality dramatically. The strategy for implementation, computational cost, and achievable speed is examined when using a personal computer (PC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP). For PC implementation, Watcom C++ 10.6 and Visual C++ 5.0 compilers were used. The experimental results are compared to the images reconstructed by commercially available software. The new algorithm improves the image quality significantly at a cost of a few iterations. This technique can be readily exploited for online applications

  5. Regularization iteration imaging algorithm for electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Guowei; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Xueyao

    2018-03-01

    The image reconstruction method plays a crucial role in real-world applications of the electrical capacitance tomography technique. In this study, a new cost function that simultaneously considers the sparsity and low-rank properties of the imaging targets is proposed to improve the quality of the reconstruction images, in which the image reconstruction task is converted into an optimization problem. Within the framework of the split Bregman algorithm, an iterative scheme that splits a complicated optimization problem into several simpler sub-tasks is developed to solve the proposed cost function efficiently, in which the fast-iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm is introduced to accelerate the convergence. Numerical experiment results verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in improving the reconstruction precision and robustness.

  6. Electrical impedance tomography of the 1995 OGI perchloroethelyne release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1996-10-01

    Goal is to determine if electrical impedance tomography (EIT) might be useful to map free product DNAPL (dense nonaqueous phase liquids) contamination. EIT was used to image the plume resulting from a release of 189 liters (50 gallons) of perchloroethylene (PCE) into a saturated aquifer constructed of sand with two layers of bentonite. Images were made in 4 planes, before, during, and after the release, to generate a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal development of the plume. Information of the EI (both in phase and out of phase voltages) was used at several different frequencies to produce images. Some frequency dispersion was observed in the images before and after the PCE release. Laboratory measurements of organic contamination in soil indicate detectable dispersion. A search for this effect in EIT images reveals weak evidence, the signal appearing just above the measurement uncertainty, of a change in the reactance in the soil because of the PCE.

  7. Duality reconstruction algorithm for use in electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.Z.; Dickin, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    A duality reconstruction algorithm for solving the inverse problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is described. In this method, an algorithm based on the Geselowitz compensation (GC) theorem is used first to reconstruct an approximate version of the image. It is then fed as a first guessed data to the modified Newton-Raphson (MNR) algorithm which iteratively correct the image until a final acceptable solution is reached. The implementation of the GC and MNR based algorithms using the finite element method will be discussed. Reconstructed images produced by the algorithm will also be presented. Consideration is also given to the most computationally intensive aspects of the algorithm, namely the inversion of the large and sparse matrices. The methods taken to approximately compute the inverse ot those matrices will be outlined. (author)

  8. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T; Katashima, M; Maki, K

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements

  9. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, O.; Bernard, J.; Vermeersch, F.

    2007-01-01

    For a few years, the evolution of measuring equipment and of interpretation software have permitted to develop a new electrical resistivity technique called resistivity imaging where the equipment, which includes a large number of electrodes located along a line at the same time, carries out an automatic switching of these electrodes for acquiring profiling data. The apparent resistivity pseudo sections measured with such a technique are processed by an inversion software which gives interpreted resistivity and depth values for the anomalies detected along the profile. The multi-electrode resistivity technique consists in using a multi-core cable with as many conductors (24, 48, 72, 96) as electrodes plugged into the ground at a fixed spacing, every 5m for instance. In the resistivitymeter itself are located the relays which ensure the switching of those electrodes according to a sequence of readings predefined and stored in the internal memory of the equipment. The various combinations of transmitting (A,B) and receiving (M,N) pairs of electrodes construct the mixed sounding / profiling section, with a maximum investigation depth which mainly depends on the total length of the cable. The 2D resistivity images obtained with such a multi-electrode technique are used for studying the shallow stuctures of the underground located a few tens of metres down to about one hundred metres depth; these images supply an information which complements the one obtained with the more traditionnal Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) technique, which mainly aims at determining the depths of horizontal 1D structures from the surface down to several hundreds metres depths. Several examples are presented for various types of applications: groundwater (intrusion of salt water in fresh water), geotechnics (detection of a fault in a granitic area), environment (delineation of a waste disposal area) and archaeology (discovery of an ancient tomb)

  10. Applications for Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and Electrical Properties of the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Georgios; Lymperopoulos, Panagiotis; Alikari, Victoria; Dafogianni, Chrisoula; Zyga, Sofia; Margari, Nikoletta

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a promising application that displays changes in conductivity within a body. The basic principle of the method is the repeated measurement of surface voltages of a body, which are a result of rolling injection of known and small-volume sinusoidal AC current to the body through the electrodes attached to its surface. This method finds application in biomedicine, biology and geology. The objective of this paper is to present the applications of Electrical Impedance Tomography, along with the method's capabilities and limitations due to the electrical properties of the human body. For this purpose, investigation of existing literature has been conducted, using electronic databases, PubMed, Google Scholar and IEEE Xplore. In addition, there was a secondary research phase, using paper citations found during the first research phase. It should be noted that Electrical Impedance Tomography finds use in a plethora of medical applications, as the different tissues of the body have different conductivities and dielectric constants. Main applications of EIT include imaging of lung function, diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, detection of tumors in the chest area and diagnosis and distinction of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. EIT advantages include portability, low cost and safety, which the method provide, since it is a noninvasive imaging method that does not cause damage to the body. The main disadvantage of the method, which blocks its wider spread, appears in the image composition from the voltage measurements, which are conducted by electrodes placed on the periphery of the body, because the injected currents are affected nonlinearly by the general distribution of the electrical properties of the body. Furthermore, the complex impedance of the skin-electrode interface can be modelled by using a capacitor and two resistor, as a result of skin properties. In conclusion, Electrical Impedance Tomography is a promising method for the

  11. Electrical impedance tomography system: an open access circuit design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Manuchehr

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports a simple 2-D system for electrical impedance tomography EIT, which works efficiently and is low cost. The system has been developed in the Sharif University of Technology Tehran-Iran (for the author's MSc Project. Methods The EIT system consists of a PC in which an I/O card is installed with an external current generator, a multiplexer, a power supply and a phantom with an array of electrodes. The measurement system provides 12-bit accuracy and hence, suitable data acquisition software has been prepared accordingly. The synchronous phase detection method has been implemented for voltage measurement. Different methods of image reconstruction have been used with this instrument to generate electrical conductivity images. Results The results of simulation and real measurement of the system are presented. The reconstruction programs were written in MATLAB and the data acquisition software in C++. The system has been tested with both static and dynamic mode in a 2-D domain. Better results have been produced in the dynamic mode of operation, due to the cancellation of errors. Conclusion In the spirit of open access publication the design details of this simple EIT system are made available here.

  12. Magnetic-resonance-based electrical properties tomography: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical properties (EPs; conductivity and permittivity) of biological tissues provide important diagnostic information (e.g., tumor characterization), and also play an important role in quantifying radiofrequency (RF) coil induced specific absorption rate (SAR), which is a major safety concern in high- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. Cross-sectional imaging of EPs has been pursued for decades. Recently introduced electrical properties tomography (EPT) approaches utilize the measurable RF magnetic field induced by the RF coil in an MRI system to quantitatively reconstruct the EP distribution in vivo and noninvasively with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters or less. This paper reviews the EPT approach from its basic theory in electromagnetism to the state-of-the-art research outcomes. Emphasizing on the imaging reconstruction methods rather than experimentation techniques, we review the developed imaging algorithms, validation results in physical phantoms and biological tissues, as well as their applications in in vivo tumor detection and subject-specific SAR prediction. Challenges for future research are also discussed.

  13. Fourier-based magnetic induction tomography for mapping resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography is used as an experimental tool for mapping the passive electromagnetic properties of conductors, with the potential for imaging biological tissues. Our numerical approach to solving the inverse problem is to obtain a Fourier expansion of the resistivity and the stream functions of the magnetic fields and eddy current density. Thus, we are able to solve the inverse problem of determining the resistivity from the applied and measured magnetic fields for a two-dimensional conducting plane. When we add noise to the measured magnetic field, we find the fidelity of the measured to the true resistivity is quite robust for increasing levels of noise and increasing distances of the applied and measured field coils from the conducting plane, when properly filtered. We conclude that Fourier methods provide a reliable alternative for solving the inverse problem.

  14. Electrical resistivity of sputtered molybdenum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, J.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of r.f. sputtered molybdenum films of thickness 5-150 nm deposited on oxidized silicon substrates was resolved into the three electron scattering components: isotropic background scattering, scattering at grain boundaries and scattering at surfaces. It was concluded that the isotropic background scattering is almost equal to that of bulk molybdenum and is not influenced by sputtering and annealing conditions. When the film thickness is sufficient that surface scattering can be ignored, the decrease in film resistivity after annealing is caused by the decrease in scattering at the grain boundaries for zero bias sputtered films, and is caused by an increase of the grain diameter for r.f. bias sputtered films. (Auth.)

  15. Imaging fast electrical activity in the brain with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristovich, Kirill Y; Packham, Brett C; Koo, Hwan; Santos, Gustavo Sato Dos; McEvoy, Andy; Holder, David S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of neuronal depolarization in the brain is a major goal in neuroscience, but no technique currently exists that could image neural activity over milliseconds throughout the whole brain. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an emerging medical imaging technique which can produce tomographic images of impedance changes with non-invasive surface electrodes. We report EIT imaging of impedance changes in rat somatosensory cerebral cortex with a resolution of 2ms and brain so this technique, uniquely, has the potential to image functional connectivity of cortical and subcortical structures. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  17. Video rate electrical impedance tomography of vascular changes: preclinical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, Ryan; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral vasculature disease is strongly correlated with cardiovascular-associated mortality. Monitoring circulation health, especially in the peripheral limbs, is vital to detecting clinically significant disease at a stage when it can still be addressed through medical intervention. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) maps the electrical properties of tissues within the body and has been used to image dynamically varying physiology, including blood flow. Here, we suggest that peripheral vasculature health can be monitored with EIT by imaging the hemodynamics of peripheral vessels and the surrounding tissues during reactive hyperemia testing. An analysis based on distinguishability theory is presented that indicates that an EIT system capable of making measurements with a precision of 50 µV may be able to detect small changes in vessel size associated with variations in blood flow. An EIT system with these precision capabilities is presented that is able to collect data at frame rates exceeding 30 fps over a broad frequency range up to 10 MHz. The system's high speed imaging performance is verified through high contrast phantom experiments and through physiological imaging of induced ischemia with a human forearm. Region of interest analysis of the induced ischemia images shows a marked decrease in conductivity over time, changing at a rate of approximately −3 × 10 −7 S m −1 s −1 , which is the same order of magnitude as reported in the literature. The distinguishability analysis suggests that a system such as the one developed here may provide a means to characterize the hemodynamics associated with blood flow through the peripheral vasculature

  18. A comparison between compressed sensing algorithms in electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, André

    2010-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) calculates the internal conductivity distribution within a body using electrical contact measurements. Conventional EIT reconstruction methods solve a linear model by minimizing the least squares error, i.e., the Euclidian or L2-norm, with regularization. Compressed sensing provides unique advantages in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) [1] when the images are transformed to a sparse basis. EIT images are generally sparser than MRI images due to their lower spatial resolution. This leads us to investigate ability of compressed sensing algorithms currently applied to MRI in EIT without transformation to a new basis. In particular, we examine four new iterative algorithms for L1 and L0 minimization with applications to compressed sensing and compare these with current EIT inverse L1-norm regularization methods. The four compressed sensing methods are as follows: (1) an interior point method for solving L1-regularized least squares problems (L1-LS); (2) total variation using a Lagrangian multiplier method (TVAL3); (3) a two-step iterative shrinkage / thresholding method (TWIST) for solving the L0-regularized least squares problem; (4) The Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) with tracing the Pareto curve, which estimates the least squares parameters subject to a L1-norm constraint. In our investigation, using 1600 elements, we found all four CS algorithms provided an improvement over the best conventional EIT reconstruction method, Total Variation, in three important areas: robustness to noise, increased computational speed of at least 40x and a visually apparent improvement in spatial resolution. Out of the four CS algorithms we found TWIST was the fastest with at least a 100x speed increase.

  19. Sparsity reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography: An experimental evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Gehre, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) inverse problem of inferring the distributed conductivity based on boundary potential measurements. In sparsity reconstruction, inhomogeneities of the conductivity are a priori assumed to be sparse with respect to a certain basis. This prior information is incorporated into a Tikhonov-type functional by including a sparsity-promoting ℓ1-penalty term. The functional is minimized with an iterative soft shrinkage-type algorithm. In this paper, the feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements. The reconstructions are computed both with sparsity constraints and with a more conventional smoothness regularization approach. The results verify that the adoption of ℓ1-type constraints can enhance the quality of EIT reconstructions: in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity constraints are both qualitatively and quantitatively more feasible than that with the smoothness constraint. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mathematical framework for a new microscopic electrical impedance tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eunjung; Seo, Jin Keun; Zhang, Tingting; Woo, Eung Je

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical framework of a new microscopic electrical impedance tomography (micro-EIT) system which aims to produce cross-sectional conductivity images of a biological tissue sample or cells inside a small hexahedral container. Unlike conventional micro-EIT systems which have much in common with a standard EIT system, the proposed micro-EIT system has a unique electrode configuration and associated data collection method. The first pair of driving electrodes are located on the left and right sides of the container facing each other. They fully cover the sides so that the induced current density is uniform and parallel when the container contains no anomaly. The second pair of driving electrodes are thin and long and located at the middle of the front and back sides. There are many miniature electrodes on the front, bottom and back sides for voltage measurements. The top of the container is open for sample manipulations. This electrode configuration provides a large number of voltage measurements from the three surfaces subject to two current injections. In this paper, we provide a mathematical framework of this micro-EIT system for the development of image reconstruction algorithms. We construct an inversion formula of the conductivity from the acquired boundary voltage data. Numerical simulations show that the proposed algorithm successfully reconstructs conductivity images of multiple anomalies. In terms of the image quality, the new micro-EIT system is advantageous over a conventional EIT method adopting multiple current injection patterns

  1. A high-performance digital system for electrical capacitance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Ziqiang; Chen, Zengqiang; Wang, Huaxiang; Xu, Yanbin; Yang, Wuqiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a recently developed digital-based data acquisition system for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT). The system consists of high-capacity field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) and fast data conversion circuits together with a specific signal processing method. In this system, digital phase-sensitive demodulation is implemented. A specific data acquisition scheme is employed to deal with residual charges in each measurement, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at high excitation frequency. A high-speed USB interface is employed between the FPGA and a host PC. Software in Visual C++ has been developed to accomplish operational functions. Various tests were performed to evaluate the system, e.g. frame rate, SNR, noise level, linearity, and static and dynamic imaging. The SNR is 60.3 dB at 1542 frames s −1 for a 12-electrode sensor. The mean absolute error between the measured capacitance and the linear fit value is 1.6 fF. The standard deviation of the measurements is in the order of 0.1 fF. The dynamic imaging test demonstrates the advantages of high temporal resolution of the system. The experimental results indicate that the digital signal processing devices can be used to construct a high-performance ECT system

  2. [Assessment of differential lung function by electrical impedance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lema, J Bruno; Serrano, Ernesto; Feixas, Teresa; Calaf, Núria; Camacho, María Valle; Riu, Pere J; Casan, Pere

    2008-08-01

    To compare unilateral lung function estimated by 2 methods: electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and ventilation-perfusion lung scintigraphy. This prospective clinical study was carried out in the pulmonary function laboratory of a general hospital. Twenty patients diagnosed with lung cancer (17 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 25 to 77 years) who were candidates for lung resection underwent ventilation-perfusion lung scanning breathing a radioactive gas. Differential lung function was estimated based on images taken at 2 intercostal spaces in which ventilation and perfusion were represented by changes in bioelectrical impedance. Each lung's contribution to overall respiratory function was also calculated based on scintigraphy. The right lung contributed a mean (SD) of 54% (9%) of ventilation (range, 32%-71%) according to EIT. Scintigraphy similarly estimated the right lung's contribution to be 52% (10%) of total ventilation (range, 31%-80%) and 50% (9%) of perfusion (range, 37%-71%). The difference between the 2 estimates was not significant (t test), and the correlation coefficients between them were r=0.90 for ventilation and r=0.72 for perfusion (P< .05 in both cases). The analysis of agreement showed that the mean difference between the methods was 1.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5% to -6.8%) for ventilation and 3.4% (95% CI, 17.1% to -10.3%) for perfusion. EIT is able to estimate differential lung function as accurately as ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy.

  3. Estimation of electrical conductivity of a layered spherical head model using electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Corazza, M.; von-Ellenrieder, N.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive method that aims to create an electrical conductivity map of a volume. In particular, it can be applied to study the human head. The method consists on the injection of an unperceptive and known current through two electrodes attached to the scalp, and the measurement of the resulting electric potential distribution at an array of sensors also placed on the scalp. In this work, we propose a parametric estimation of the brain, scalp and skull conductivities using EIT over an spherical model of the head. The forward problem involves the computation of the electric potential on the surface, for given the conductivities and the injection electrode positions, while the inverse problem consists on estimating the conductivities given the sensor measurements. In this study, the analytical solution to the forward problem based on a three layer spherical model is first described. Then, some measurements are simulated adding white noise to the solutions and the inverse problem is solved in order to estimate the brain, skull and scalp conductivity relations. This is done with a least squares approach and the Nelder-Mead multidimensional unconstrained nonlinear minimization method.

  4. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using electric...

  5. Efficiency of a Marine Towed Electrical Resistivity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to marine sediments, because of large electrical resistivity anomalies found in sulfide deposits and methane hydrates, resistivity measurements such as marine towed electrical resistivity (MTER might be a feasible method for discovering those natural minerals. To determine the feasibility of the MTER method we examined arrays consisting of a pole electrical dipole (PED, vertical electrical dipole (VED and horizontal electrical dipole (HED. The VED array showed a maximum difference in electric fields of 36 o/o and 105 o/o in the resistive and conductive models, respectively, while the PED and HED arrays yielded worse results of around 13 o/o to 19 o/o, respectively. The VED array showed a higher difference in electric fields than both the HED and PED arrays in the two models. Therefore, we suggest that a VED array with a large electrical current would be most conducive leading to the discovery of such minerals during MTER surveys.

  6. Optimal electrolytic chloriding of silver ink electrodes for use in electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, E T; Henry, P; Anderson, J M; Jossinet, J

    1992-01-01

    The electrode-electrolyte interface impedance may be simplistically modelled by an equivalent circuit comprising a resistance, RTOTAL, in series with an empirical, constant phase angle impedance, ZCPA. This pseudo-capacitance can be thought of as representing empirically the non-faradaic, double layer capacitance in the presence of specific adsorption and surface roughness effects. RTOTAL is the sum of the lead and electrolyte resistances. Depositing a thin layer of silver chloride on silver electrodes can yield improved electrical performance characteristics (potential and impedance) when used in conjunction with a chloride gel. An electrolytically deposited AgCl layer tends to have a rough surface profile thus leading to an increase in the effective interface area. This gives rise to a decrease in RTOTAL and ZCPA, both of which are desirable. Unfortunately AgCl is a relatively poor conductor. Increasing layer thickness causes RTOTAL to increase, thus adversely affecting the inter-electrode impedance at high frequencies. Electrode systems for use in electrical impedance tomography therefore require only relatively thin layers of AgCl.

  7. Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shojiro; Suzuki, Shota

    2014-01-01

    The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface.

  8. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography with High-Contrast Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) system has been designed to complement the tools created to sense the presence of water in nonconductive spacecraft materials, by helping to not only find the approximate location of moisture but also its quantity and depth. The ECVT system has been created for use with a new image reconstruction algorithm capable of imaging high-contrast dielectric distributions. Rather than relying solely on mutual capacitance readings as is done in traditional electrical capacitance tomography applications, this method reconstructs high-resolution images using only the self-capacitance measurements. The image reconstruction method assumes that the material under inspection consists of a binary dielectric distribution, with either a high relative dielectric value representing the water or a low dielectric value for the background material. By constraining the unknown dielectric material to one of two values, the inverse math problem that must be solved to generate the image is no longer ill-determined. The image resolution becomes limited only by the accuracy and resolution of the measurement circuitry. Images were reconstructed using this method with both synthetic and real data acquired using an aluminum structure inserted at different positions within the sensing region. The cuboid geometry of the system has two parallel planes of 16 conductors arranged in a 4 4 pattern. The electrode geometry consists of parallel planes of copper conductors, connected through custom-built switch electronics, to a commercially available capacitance to digital converter. The figure shows two 4 4 arrays of electrodes milled from square sections of copper-clad circuit-board material and mounted on two pieces of glass-filled plastic backing, which were cut to approximately square shapes, 10 cm on a side. Each electrode is placed on 2.0-cm centers. The parallel arrays were mounted with the electrode arrays approximately 3 cm apart. The open ends

  9. A comparison study of electrodes for neonate electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Mohamad; Khor, Joo Moy; Demosthenous, Andreas; Tizzard, Andrew; Bayford, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging technique that has the potential to be used for studying neonate lung function. The properties of the electrodes are very important in multi-frequency EIT (MFEIT) systems, particularly for neonates, as the skin cannot be abraded to reduce contact impedance. In this work, the impedance of various clinical electrodes as a function of frequency is investigated to identify the optimum electrode type for this application. Six different types of self-adhesive electrodes commonly used in general and neonatal cardiology have been investigated. These electrodes are Ag/AgCl electrodes from the Ambu Cardiology Blue sensors range (BR, NF and BRS), Kendall (KittyCat and ARBO) and Philips 13953D electrodes. In addition, a textile electrode without gel from Textronics was tested on two subjects to allow comparison with the hydrogel-based electrodes. Two- and four-electrode measurements were made to determine the electrode-interface and tissue impedances, respectively. The measurements were made on the back of the forearm of six healthy adult volunteers without skin preparation with 2.5 cm electrode spacing. Impedance measurements were carried out using a Solartron SI 1260 impedance/gain-phase analyser with a frequency range from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. For the electrode-interface impedance, the average magnitude decreased with frequency, with an average value of 5 kOmega at 10 kHz and 337 Omega at 1 MHz; for the tissue impedance, the respective values were 987 Omega and 29 Omega. Overall, the Ambu BRS, Kendall ARBO and Textronics textile electrodes gave the lowest electrode contact impedance at 1 MHz. Based on the results of the two-electrode measurements, simple RC models for the Ambu BRS and Kendall-ARBO and Textronics textile electrodes have been derived for MFEIT applications.

  10. A comparison study of electrodes for neonate electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, Mohamad; Demosthenous, Andreas; Khor, Joo Moy; Tizzard, Andrew; Bayford, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging technique that has the potential to be used for studying neonate lung function. The properties of the electrodes are very important in multi-frequency EIT (MFEIT) systems, particularly for neonates, as the skin cannot be abraded to reduce contact impedance. In this work, the impedance of various clinical electrodes as a function of frequency is investigated to identify the optimum electrode type for this application. Six different types of self-adhesive electrodes commonly used in general and neonatal cardiology have been investigated. These electrodes are Ag/AgCl electrodes from the Ambu® Cardiology Blue sensors range (BR, NF and BRS), Kendall (KittyCat(TM) and ARBO®) and Philips 13953D electrodes. In addition, a textile electrode without gel from Textronics was tested on two subjects to allow comparison with the hydrogel-based electrodes. Two- and four-electrode measurements were made to determine the electrode-interface and tissue impedances, respectively. The measurements were made on the back of the forearm of six healthy adult volunteers without skin preparation with 2.5 cm electrode spacing. Impedance measurements were carried out using a Solartron SI 1260 impedance/gain-phase analyser with a frequency range from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. For the electrode-interface impedance, the average magnitude decreased with frequency, with an average value of 5 kΩ at 10 kHz and 337 Ω at 1 MHz; for the tissue impedance, the respective values were 987 Ω and 29 Ω. Overall, the Ambu BRS, Kendall ARBO® and Textronics textile electrodes gave the lowest electrode contact impedance at 1 MHz. Based on the results of the two-electrode measurements, simple RC models for the Ambu BRS and Kendall-ARBO and Textronics textile electrodes have been derived for MFEIT applications

  11. [Monitoring of breathing pattern at rest by electrical impedance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleza, Marco; Fornos, Jaume; Calaf, Núria; Feixas, Teresa; González, Mercedes; Antón, Daniel; Riu, Pere; Casan, Pere

    2007-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) involves the application of a small alternating current to produce a series of chest images that can be used to monitor breathing pattern. The relation between chest images and tidal volume has not been sufficiently validated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between EIT images and the volume-time signal measured with a pneumotachometer in 13 healthy volunteers. The following measurement devices were used: a) MedGraphics preVent Pneumotach, with special software for recording the volume-time signal (reference test), and b) EIT-4, a fourth-generation prototype unit designed by the Department of Electronic Engineering at the Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Spain that records the volume-time signal and produces a graphic depiction of a cross section of the thorax at the sixth intercostal space. The mean (SD) tidal volume measured by the pneumotachometer and the EIT-4 was 0.523 (0.102) L and 0.527 (0.106) L, respectively (P value not significant). The linear correlation coefficient between the 2 measurements was 0.923 (P=.001), and the mean of the differences between the 2 procedures was -0.003 L (95% confidence interval, -0.045 to 0.038). The greatest differences were associated with female gender, body mass index, and chest circumference. In view of these differences, a different equation based on these variables was needed for calibration of the EIT-4. The EIT-4 provides an alternative means of monitoring breathing pattern, although a number of issues related to the circumference of the rib cage need to be resolved.

  12. Electrical impedance tomography in anisotropic media with known eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Juan-Felipe P. J.; Lionheart, William R. B.; Arridge, Simon R.; Schweiger, Martin; Atkinson, David; Holder, David S.

    2011-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is an imaging method, with which volumetric images of conductivity are produced by injecting electrical current and measuring boundary voltages. It has the potential to become a portable non-invasive medical imaging technique. Until now, most implementations have neglected anisotropy even though human tissues like bone, muscle and brain white matter are markedly anisotropic. The recovery of an anisotropic conductivity tensor is uniquely determined by boundary measurements only up to a diffeomorphism that fixes the boundary. Nevertheless, uniqueness can be restored by providing information about the diffeomorphism. There are uniqueness results for two constraints: one eigenvalue and a multiple scalar of a general tensor. A useable constraint for medical applications is when the eigenvectors of the underlying tissue are known, which can be approximated from MRI or estimated from DT-MRI, although the eigenvalues are unknown. However there is no known theoretical result guaranteeing uniqueness for this constraint. In fact, only a few previous inversion studies have attempted to recover one or more eigenvalues assuming certain symmetries while ignoring nonuniqueness. In this work, the aim was to undertake a numerical study of the feasibility of the recovery of a piecewise linear finite element conductivity tensor in anisotropic media with known eigenvectors from the complete boundary data. The work suggests that uniqueness holds for this constraint, in addition to proposing a methodology for the incorporation of this prior for general conductivity tensors. This was carried out by performing an analysis of the Jacobian rank and by reconstructing four conductivity distributions: two diagonal tensors whose eigenvalues were linear and sinusoidal functions, and two general tensors whose eigenvectors resembled physiological tissue, one with eigenvectors spherically orientated like a spherical layered structure, and a sample of DT-MRI data of

  13. Accurate position estimation methods based on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Samuel; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Johansen, T. A.

    2017-08-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a technology that estimates the electrical properties of a body or a cross section. Its main advantages are its non-invasiveness, low cost and operation free of radiation. The estimation of the conductivity field leads to low resolution images compared with other technologies, and high computational cost. However, in many applications the target information lies in a low intrinsic dimensionality of the conductivity field. The estimation of this low-dimensional information is addressed in this work. It proposes optimization-based and data-driven approaches for estimating this low-dimensional information. The accuracy of the results obtained with these approaches depends on modelling and experimental conditions. Optimization approaches are sensitive to model discretization, type of cost function and searching algorithms. Data-driven methods are sensitive to the assumed model structure and the data set used for parameter estimation. The system configuration and experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), also have an impact on the results. In order to illustrate the effects of all these factors, the position estimation of a circular anomaly is addressed. Optimization methods based on weighted error cost functions and derivate-free optimization algorithms provided the best results. Data-driven approaches based on linear models provided, in this case, good estimates, but the use of nonlinear models enhanced the estimation accuracy. The results obtained by optimization-based algorithms were less sensitive to experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and SNR, than data-driven approaches. Position estimation mean squared errors for simulation and experimental conditions were more than twice for the optimization-based approaches compared with the data-driven ones. The experimental position estimation mean squared error of the data-driven models using a 16-electrode setup was less

  14. Accurate position estimation methods based on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, Samuel; Sbarbaro, Daniel; Johansen, T A

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a technology that estimates the electrical properties of a body or a cross section. Its main advantages are its non-invasiveness, low cost and operation free of radiation. The estimation of the conductivity field leads to low resolution images compared with other technologies, and high computational cost. However, in many applications the target information lies in a low intrinsic dimensionality of the conductivity field. The estimation of this low-dimensional information is addressed in this work. It proposes optimization-based and data-driven approaches for estimating this low-dimensional information. The accuracy of the results obtained with these approaches depends on modelling and experimental conditions. Optimization approaches are sensitive to model discretization, type of cost function and searching algorithms. Data-driven methods are sensitive to the assumed model structure and the data set used for parameter estimation. The system configuration and experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), also have an impact on the results. In order to illustrate the effects of all these factors, the position estimation of a circular anomaly is addressed. Optimization methods based on weighted error cost functions and derivate-free optimization algorithms provided the best results. Data-driven approaches based on linear models provided, in this case, good estimates, but the use of nonlinear models enhanced the estimation accuracy. The results obtained by optimization-based algorithms were less sensitive to experimental conditions, such as number of electrodes and SNR, than data-driven approaches. Position estimation mean squared errors for simulation and experimental conditions were more than twice for the optimization-based approaches compared with the data-driven ones. The experimental position estimation mean squared error of the data-driven models using a 16-electrode setup was less

  15. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. 3D reconstruction for partial data electrical impedance tomography using a sparsity prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Henrik; Knudsen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    In electrical impedance tomography the electrical conductivity inside a physical body is computed from electro-static boundary measurements. The focus of this paper is to extend recent results for the 2D problem to 3D: prior information about the sparsity and spatial distribution of the conductiv...

  17. Studies of electrical properties of low-resistivity sandstones based on digital rock technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weichao; Sun, Jianmeng; Zhang, Jinyan; Yuan, Weiguo; Zhang, Li; Cui, Likai; Dong, Huaimin

    2018-02-01

    Electrical properties are important parameters to quantitatively calculate water saturation in oil and gas reservoirs by well logging interpretation. It is usual that oil layers show high resistivity responses, while water layers show low-resistivity responses. However, there are low-resistivity oil zones that exist in many oilfields around the world, leading to difficulties for reservoir evaluation. In our research, we used digital rock technology to study different internal and external factors to account for low rock resistivity responses in oil layers. We first constructed three-dimensional digital rock models with five components based on micro-computed tomography technology and x-ray diffraction experimental results, and then oil and water distributions in pores were determined by the pore morphology method. When the resistivity of each component was assigned, rock resistivities were calculated by using the finite element method. We collected 20 sandstone samples to prove the effectiveness of our numerical simulation methods. Based on the control variate method, we studied the effects of different factors on the resistivity indexes and rock resistivities. After sensitivity analyses, we found the main factors which caused low rock resistivities in oil layers. For unfractured rocks, influential factors arranged in descending order of importance were porosity, clay content, temperature, water salinity, heavy mineral, clay type and wettability. In addition, we found that the resistivity index could not provide enough information to identify a low-resistivity oil zone by using laboratory rock-electric experimental results. These results can not only expand our understandings of the electrical properties of low-resistivity rocks from oil layers, but also help identify low-resistivity oil zones better.

  18. Electrical resistivities of rocks from Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsube, T.J.; Hume, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Bulk rock resistivity and bulk surface resistivity measurements have been obtained for 40 gneissic rock samples from Chalk River, Ontario. Though bulk rock resistivity is a function of pore structure, pore-fluid resistivity and pore-surface resistivity, the amount of data documented for pore-surface resistivity is small compared to that for pore structure and pore-fluid resistivity. This study indicates that pore-surface resistivity has a significant effect on bulk rock resistivity. It is important that this fact be considered when interpreting resistivity data obtained by geophysical methods. In addition, a group of mafic gneiss samples had pore-surface resistivity values that were much lower than those reported for clays, glass beads or petroleum reservoir rocks. This is thought to be due to metallic minerals lining the pore walls. Other rock samples collected from the same area showed pore-surface resistivity value similar to those reported in the literature

  19. New hardware and software design for electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharian, Mehran

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging technique that reconstructs the internal electrical properties of an object from boundary voltage measurements. In this technique a series of electrodes is attached to the surface of an object and alternating current is passed via these electrodes and the resulting voltages are measured. Reconstruction of internal conductivity images requires the solution of an ill-conditioned nonlinear inverse problem from the noisy boundary voltage measurements. Such unreliable boundary measurements make the solutions unstable. To obtain stable and meaningful solutions regularization is used. This thesis deals with the EIT problem from the perspective of both image reconstruction and hardware design. This thesis consists of two main parts. The first part covers the development of 3D image reconstruction algorithms for single and multi-frequency EIT. The second part relates to the design of novel multi-frequency hardware and performance testing of the hardware using the designed phantom. Three different approaches for image reconstruction of EIT are presented: (1) The dog-leg algorithm is introduced as an alternative method to Levenberg-Marquardt for solving the EIT inverse problem. It was found that the dog leg technique requires less computation time to converge to the same result as the Levenberg-Marquardt. (2) We propose a novel approach to build a subspace for regularization using a spectral and spatial multi-frequency analysis approach. The approach is based on the construction of a subspace for the expected conductivity distributions using principal component analysis (PCA). The advantage of this technique is that priori information for regularization matrix is determined from the statistical nature of the multi-frequency data. (3) We present a quadratic constrained least square approach to the EIT problem. The proposed approach is based on the trust region subproblem (TRS), which uses L-curve maximum curvature criteria

  20. A bio-electromechanical imaging technique with combined electrical impedance and ultrasound tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, G; Watzenig, D; Soleimani, M

    2008-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) seeks to image the electrical conductivity of an object using electrical impedance measurement data at its periphery. Ultrasound reflection tomography (URT) is an imaging modality that is able to generate images of mechanical properties of the object in terms of acoustic impedance changes. Both URT and EIT have the potential to be used in various medical applications. In this paper we focus on breast tumour detection. Both URT and EIT belong to soft field tomography and suffer from the small amounts of available data and the inherently ill-posed nature of the inverse problems. These facts result in limited achievable reconstruction accuracy and resolution. A dual bio-electromechanical tomography system using ultrasound and electrical tomography is proposed in this paper to improve the detection of the small-size tumour. Data fusion techniques are implemented to combine the EIT/URT data. Based on simulations, we demonstrate the improvement of detection of small size anomalies and improved depth detection compared to single modality soft field tomography

  1. Comparing two electrical impedance tomography algorithms: Gauss-Newton and topology optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mello, L. A.; Lima, C. R.; Aya, J. C.; Pai, C. N.; Moura, F. S.; Silva, E. C. N.; Gonzalez-Lima, R.

    2006-03-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) seeks to recover the impedance distribution within a body using boundary data. More specifically, given the measured potentials, the model of the body - an elliptic partial differential equation - and the boundary conditions, this technique solves a non-linear inverse problem for the unknown impedance. In this work, an algorithm called Topology Optimization Method (TOM) is applied to EIT and compared to the Gauss-Newton Method (GNM). The Topology Optimization has solved some non-linear inverse problems and some of its procedures were not investigated for EIT, for instance, the use of Sequential Linear Programming. Assuming a pure resistive medium, the static resistivity distribution of a phantom was estimated using a 2-D finite element model. While the first method (GNM) essentially solves several algebraic systems, the second (TOM) solves several linear programming problems. Results using experimental data are shown and the quality of the images obtained, time and memory used are compared for both algorithms. We intend to use these methods, in future works, for the visualization of a human lung subjected to mechanical ventilation.

  2. Characterizations of Soil Profiles Through Electric Resistivity Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chik Z

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents how near surface soil characteristics are obtained through soil electric resistivity ratio from soil apparent resistivity profile. In recent advances of electrical sensors, soil apparent resistivity is implemented as nondestructive method for obtaining near surface soil profile. Although geo-electric techniques offer an improvement to traditional soil sampling methods, the resulting data are still often misinterpreted for obtaining soil characteristics through apparent electrical resistivity in the field. Because, soil resistivity as before rain and after rain are changeable due to the presence of more moisture contents in field investigations. In this study, the parameter of soil electric resistivity ratio is incorporated to obtain reliable near surface soil profiles from apparent resistivity of adjacent two layers in soil. The variations of potential differences are taken into account for using four probes method to get the soil apparent resistivity profile. The research is significant for simpler and faster soil characterizations using resistivity ratio of apparent resistivity in soil investigations.

  3. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Observations on the electrical resistivity of steel fibre reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Geiker, Mette Rica; Edvardsen, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is in many ways a well-known construction material, and its use has gradually increased over the last decades. The mechanical properties of SFRC are well described based on the theories of fracture mechanics. However, knowledge on other material properties...... fraction and the moisture content of the SFRC on its electrical resistivity. The electrical resistivity was measured by alternating current (AC) at 126 Hz. Moreover, an analytical model for the prediction of the electrical resistivity of SFRC is presented. The analytical model is capable of predicting...

  5. Electric capacitance tomography and two-phase flow for the nuclear reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Young

    2008-01-01

    Recently electric capacitance tomography has been developed to be used in the analysis of two-phase flow. Although its electric field is not focused as the hard ray tomography such as the X-ray or gamma ray, its convenience of easy access to the system and easy maintenance due to no requirement of radiation shielding benefits us in its application in the two-phase flow study, one of important area in the nuclear safety analysis. In the present paper, the practical technologies in the electric capacitance tomography are represented in both parts of hardware and software. In the software part, both forward problem and inverse problem are discussed and the method of regularization. In the hardware part, the brief discussion of the electronics circuits is made which provides femto farad resolution with a reasonable speed (150 frame/sec for 16 electrodes). Some representative ideal cases are studied to demonstrate its potential capability for the two-phase flow analysis. Also, some variations of the tomography such as axial tomography, and three dimensional tomography are discussed. It was found that the present ECT is expected to become a useful tool to understand the complicated three dimensional two-phase flow which may be an important feature to be equipped by the safety analysis codes. (author)

  6. Mechanism for detecting NAPL using electrical resistivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halihan, Todd; Sefa, Valina; Sale, Tom; Lyverse, Mark

    2017-10-01

    The detection of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) related impacts in freshwater environments by electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) has been clearly demonstrated in field conditions, but the mechanism generating the resistive signature is poorly understood. An electrical barrier mechanism which allows for detecting NAPLs with ERI is tested by developing a theoretical basis for the mechanism, testing the mechanism in a two-dimensional sand tank with ERI, and performing forward modeling of the laboratory experiment. The NAPL barrier theory assumes at low bulk soil NAPL concentrations, thin saturated NAPL barriers can block pore throats and generate a detectable electrically resistive signal. The sand tank experiment utilized a photographic technique to quantify petroleum saturation, and to help determine whether ERI can detect and quantify NAPL across the water table. This experiment demonstrates electrical imaging methods can detect small quantities of NAPL of sufficient thickness in formations. The bulk volume of NAPL is not the controlling variable for the amount of resistivity signal generated. The resistivity signal is primarily due to a zone of high resistivity separate phase liquid blocking current flow through the fully NAPL saturated pores spaces. For the conditions in this tank experiment, NAPL thicknesses of 3.3 cm and higher in the formation was the threshold for detectable changes in resistivity of 3% and greater. The maximum change in resistivity due to the presence of NAPL was an increase of 37%. Forward resistivity models of the experiment confirm the barrier mechanism theory for the tank experiment.

  7. Electrical Resistivity Survey For Conductive Soils At Gas Turbine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten (10) vertical electrical soundings (VES) using Schlumberger configuration were carried out to delineate subsurface conductive soils for the design of earthling grid for electrical materials installation at the Gas Turbine Station, Ajaokuta, SW Nigeria. Interpretation of the resistivity data revealed three major geoelectric ...

  8. 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of injected CO2 in a shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph A. J.A.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5...... inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can follow the CO2 plume as it spreads and moves with the groundwater...... and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 surface electrodes on a 126 m × 20 m grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis for data quality and noise estimation. A baseline...

  9. A Deformable Smart Skin for Continuous Sensing Based on Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Visentin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a low-cost, adaptable, and flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as a smart skin over both stiff and deformable media. The sensor can be easily adapted for use in applications related to the fields of robotics, rehabilitation, or costumer electronic devices. In order to remove most of the stiff components that block the flexibility of the sensor, we based the sensing capability on the use of a tomographic technique known as Electrical Impedance Tomography. The technique allows the internal structure of the domain under study to be inferred by reconstructing its conductivity map. By applying the technique to a material that changes its resistivity according to applied forces, it is possible to identify these changes and then localise the area where the force was applied. We tested the system when applied to flat and curved surfaces. For all configurations, we evaluate the artificial skin capabilities to detect forces applied over a single point, over multiple points, and changes in the underlying geometry. The results are all promising, and open the way for the application of such sensors in different robotic contexts where deformability is the key point.

  10. A Deformable Smart Skin for Continuous Sensing Based on Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Francesco; Fiorini, Paolo; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a low-cost, adaptable, and flexible pressure sensor that can be applied as a smart skin over both stiff and deformable media. The sensor can be easily adapted for use in applications related to the fields of robotics, rehabilitation, or costumer electronic devices. In order to remove most of the stiff components that block the flexibility of the sensor, we based the sensing capability on the use of a tomographic technique known as Electrical Impedance Tomography. The technique allows the internal structure of the domain under study to be inferred by reconstructing its conductivity map. By applying the technique to a material that changes its resistivity according to applied forces, it is possible to identify these changes and then localise the area where the force was applied. We tested the system when applied to flat and curved surfaces. For all configurations, we evaluate the artificial skin capabilities to detect forces applied over a single point, over multiple points, and changes in the underlying geometry. The results are all promising, and open the way for the application of such sensors in different robotic contexts where deformability is the key point. PMID:27854325

  11. A shape-based quality evaluation and reconstruction method for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Pikkemaat, Robert; Leonhardt, Steffen; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Linear methods of reconstruction play an important role in medical electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and there is a wide variety of algorithms based on several assumptions. With the Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT), a novel linear reconstruction algorithm as well as a standardized framework for evaluating and comparing methods of reconstruction were introduced that found widespread acceptance in the community.In this paper, we propose a two-sided extension of this concept by first introducing a novel method of evaluation. Instead of being based on point-shaped resistivity distributions, we use 2759 pairs of real lung shapes for evaluation that were automatically segmented from human CT data. Necessarily, the figures of merit defined in GREIT were adjusted. Second, a linear method of reconstruction that uses orthonormal eigenimages as training data and a tunable desired point spread function are proposed.Using our novel method of evaluation, this approach is compared to the classical point-shaped approach. Results show that most figures of merit improve with the use of eigenimages as training data. Moreover, the possibility of tuning the reconstruction by modifying the desired point spread function is shown. Finally, the reconstruction of real EIT data shows that higher contrasts and fewer artifacts can be achieved in ventilation- and perfusion-related images. (paper)

  12. Geological and Electrical Resistivity Sounding of Olokonla Area in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geological mapping and Electrical resistivity sounding were carried out in Olokonla area in Moro Local Government of Kwara State in order to determine the apparent resistivities of the subsurface lithologies and correlate them with the exposed rocks observed during the geological mapping. The studies also delineate the ...

  13. Effect of pressure on electrical resistance of WSe single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of pressure on electrical resistance of WSe. 2 ... Pressure dependence of resistance; transition metal dichalcogenides; WSe2 single crys- ... friction and wear. With lamellar solids such as TMDCs, shearing takes place more easily when loads are high. So lamellar solids are well-suited to extreme pressure lubrication.

  14. Electrical resistivity of liquid Ag-Au alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis Alam, M.; Tomak, M.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of the dependence of the electrical resistivity in liquid Ag-Au binary alloy on composition are reported. The structure of the binary alloy is described as a hard-sphere system. A one-parameter local pseudopotential, which incorporates s-d hybridization effects phenomenologically, is employed in the resistivity calculation. A reasonable agreement with experimental trend is observed. (author)

  15. Electrical resistivity measurement to predict uniaxial compressive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and multiple regression analysis. It was seen that the ... The correlation coefficients are generally higher for the multiple regression models than that .... for each regression. A strong linear relation between UCS and resistivity values was found (figure 2). UCS values increase with increasing resistivity values. The equation of ...

  16. Vertical electrical resistivity investigation of foundation conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The topmost layer is followed in succession by clayey layer, clay/silt, fine sand and coarse sand. The topsoil and clay layers resistivities range between 28.8 to 168 ohm's meters and 115.3 to 120.5 ohm's meters respectively. The maximum resistivity obtained for the fine sand layer ranges between 421 to 885 ohm's meters.

  17. Groundwater potential evaluation using electrical resistivity method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plot of the aquifer resistivity against the coefficient of anisotropy shows that the basement in the study area is underlain by three types of rocks: Quartzite with aquifer resistivity in the range of 50 – 430m and coefficient of anisotropy between 1.01 and 1.18. This weathered mainly to sand with good to high groundwater ...

  18. Resistance switching induced by electric fields in manganite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villafuerte, M; Juarez, G; Duhalde, S; Golmar, F; Degreef, C L; Heluani, S P

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the polarity-dependent Electric Pulses Induced Resistive (EPIR) switching phenomenon in thin films driven by electric pulses. Thin films of 0.5 Ca 0.5 MnO 3 (manganite) were deposited by PLD on Si substrate. The transport properties at the interface between the film and metallic electrode are characterized in order to study the resistance switching. Sample thermal treatment and electrical field history are important to be considered for get reproducible EPIR effect. Carriers trapping at the interfaces are considered as a possible explanation of our results

  19. Effects of resistive bodies on DC electrical soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfano

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Some deep DC electrical soundings, performed in alpine and apenninic areas with the continuous polar dipole-dipole spread, show apparent resistivity curves with positive slopes. Measured values of apparent resistivity reach 30000 Wm. Applying the "surface charges" method we developed three dimensional mathematical models, by means of which we can state simple rules for determining the minimum extensions of the deep resistive bodies, fundamental information for a more precise interpretation of the field results.

  20. Compensation for geometric modeling errors by positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyvönen, N.; Majander, H.; Staboulis, Stratos

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography aims at reconstructing the conductivity inside a physical body from boundary measurements of current and voltage at a finite number of contact electrodes. In many practical applications, the shape of the imaged object is subject to considerable uncertainties...

  1. Polynomial Collocation for Handling an Inaccurately Known Measurement Configuration in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyvönen, Niina; Kaarnioja, V.; Mustonen, L.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of electrical impedance tomography is to reconstruct the internal conductivity of a physical body based on measurements of current and potential at a finite number of electrodes attached to its boundary. Although the conductivity is the quantity of main interest in impedance...

  2. Sensitivity analysis of magnetic field measurements for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Cihan; Scheffler, Klaus; Ehses, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical use of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) still requires significant sensitivity improvements. Here, the measurement of the current-induced magnetic field (DBz,c) is improved using systematic efficiency analyses and optimization of multi-echo spin echo...

  3. Electrical impedance tomography in the assessment of extravascular lung water in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Raaijmakers, E.; Bakker, J.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To establish the value of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in assessing pulmonary edema in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure (ARF), as compared to the thermal dye double indicator dilution technique (TDD). DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: ICU of a general

  4. Electrical Resistivity of Concrete for Durability Evaluation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Azarsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation processes in reinforced concrete structures that affect durability are partially controlled by transport of aggressive ions through the concrete microstructure. Ions are charged and the ability of concrete to hold out against transfer of ions greatly relies on its electrical resistivity. Hence, a connection could be expected between electrical resistivity of concrete and the deterioration processes such as increase in permeability and corrosion of embedded steel. Through this paper, an extensive literature review has been done to address relationship between concrete electrical resistivity and its certain durability characteristics. These durability characteristics include chloride diffusivity and corrosion of reinforcement as these have major influence on concrete degradation process. Overall, there exists an inverse or direct proportional correlation between these parameters. Evaluated results, from measuring the concrete electrical resistivity, can also be used as a great indicator to identify early age characteristics of fresh concrete and for evaluation of its properties, determination of moisture content, connectivity of the micropores, and even condition assessment of in-service structures. This paper also reviews and assesses research concerning the influential parameters such as environmental conditions and presence of steel rebar and cracks on measuring electrical resistivity of concrete. Moreover, concrete resistivity concept, application, and its various measurement techniques are introduced.

  5. Electrical resistivity measurements to predict abrasion resistance of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    39⋅0. 2⋅29. 4⋅04. Figure 1. Resistivity measurement system. pore fluid salinity, pore fluid saturation, temperature and pressure were kept the same. Resistivity measurements were performed on cylindri- cal samples of 54⋅4 mm diameter and ~ 50 mm length. Axial end surfaces of the samples were ground flat and parallel.

  6. Phase boundary estimation in electrical impedance tomography using the Hooke and Jeeves pattern search method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Kim, Kyung Youn; Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Lee, Jeong Seong; Kim, Sin

    2010-01-01

    In industrial processes, monitoring of heterogeneous phases is crucial to the safety and operation of the engineering structures. Particularly, the visualization of voids and air bubbles is advantageous. As a result many studies have appeared in the literature that offer varying degrees of functionality. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has already been proved to be a hallmark for process monitoring and offers not only the visualization of the resistivity profile for a given flow mixture but is also used for detection of phase boundaries. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms, such as the modified Newton–Raphson (mNR) method, are commonly used as inverse solvers. However, their utility is problematic in a sense that they require the initial solution in close proximity of the ground truth. Furthermore, they also rely on the gradient information of the objective function to be minimized. Therefore, in this paper, we address all these issues by employing a direct search algorithm, namely the Hooke and Jeeves pattern search method, to estimate the phase boundaries that directly minimizes the cost function and does not require the gradient information. It is assumed that the resistivity profile is known a priori and therefore the unknown information will be the size and location of the object. The boundary coefficients are parameterized using truncated Fourier series and are estimated using the relationship between the measured voltages and injected currents. Through extensive simulation and experimental result and by comparison with mNR, we show that the Hooke and Jeeves pattern search method offers a promising prospect for process monitoring

  7. An Experimental Study of the Electrical Contact Resistance in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Electrical contact resistance is of critical importance in resistance welding. In this article, the contact resistance is experimentally investigated for welding mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum to themselves. A parametric study was carried out on a Gleeble® machine, investigating...

  8. ON THE APPLICATION OF THE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements involving vertical electrical sounding (VES) and horizontal profiling (EHP) techniques were taken along three traverses. The results were presented as geoelectric sections, pseudosections and maps. The geoelectric sections reveal three subsurface layers, namely the topsoil, the weathered layer and the ...

  9. Influence of electrical resistivity and machining parameters on electrical discharge machining performance of engineering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  10. Influence of Electrical Resistivity and Machining Parameters on Electrical Discharge Machining Performance of Engineering Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 Ω·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 Ω·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 Ω·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge

  11. Measure of tissue resistivity in experimental electrical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilbert, M; Maiman, D; Sances, A; Myklebust, J; Prieto, T E; Swiontek, T; Heckman, M; Pintar, K

    1985-03-01

    Studies were conducted in 14 mongrel dogs to compare resistivities in normal muscle with those from muscle subjected to electrical burns. One-ampere, 60-Hz currents were passed between the hind limbs of the dogs producing injury in three measurement regions of the gracilis muscle. Histology, heart rate, body temperature, arterial and pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, hematocrit, leukocyte counts, fibrinogen levels, and platelet levels were determined. Muscle resistivity associated with severe tissue necrosis was 70% lower than control values. Resistivity in tissue showing edema and minimal necrosis decreased 20 to 40% from control values. Muscle showing only edema had a 10 to 30% decrease in resistivity.

  12. Electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy method for characterising particles in solid-liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yanlin [Department of Thermal Energy Engineering, College of Mechanical and Transportation Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, 102249 (China); Wang, Mi [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (China); Yao, Jun [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is one of the process tomography techniques to provide an on-line non-invasive imaging for multiphase flow measurement. With EIT measurements, the images of impedance real part, impedance imaginary part, phase angle, and magnitude can be obtained. However, most of the applications of EIT in the process industries rely on the conductivity difference between two phases in fluids to obtain the concentration profiles. It is not common to use the imaginary part or phase angle due to the dominant change in conductivity or complication in the use of other impedance information. In a solid-liquid two phases system involving nano- or submicro-particles, characterisation of particles (e.g. particle size and concentration) have to rely on the measurement of impedance phase angle or imaginary part. Particles in a solution usually have an electrical double layer associated with their surfaces and can form an induced electrical dipole moment due to the polarization of the electrical double layer under the influence of an alternating electric field. Similar to EIT, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement can record the electrical impedance data, including impedance real part, imaginary part and phase angle (θ), which are caused by the polarization of the electrical double layer. These impedance data are related to the particle characteristics e.g. particle size, particle and ionic concentrations in the aqueous medium, therefore EIS method provides a capability for characterising the particles in suspensions. Electrical impedance tomography based on EIS measurement or namely, electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy (EITS) could image the spatial distribution of particle characteristics. In this paper, a new method, including test set-up and data analysis, for characterisation of particles in suspensions are developed through the experimental approach. The experimental results on tomographic imaging of colloidal particles

  13. Resistance noise in electrically biased bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2009-03-27

    We demonstrate that the low-frequency resistance fluctuations, or noise, in bilayer graphene are strongly connected to its band structure and display a minimum when the gap between the conduction and valence band is zero. Using double-gated bilayer graphene devices we have tuned the zero gap and charge neutrality points independently, which offers a versatile mechanism to investigate the low-energy band structure, charge localization, and screening properties of bilayer graphene.

  14. Resistivity of flame plasma in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized Ohm's law is obtained for a flame plasma in an electric field for the study of arc resistivity in an electromagnetic launcher (EML). The effective resistivity of flame plasma is reduced by the source, which suggests the injection of premixed combustible fuel into the arc plasma in EML in order to reduce the electron energy of the arc. The reduction of electron energy in the arc is desirable to minimize the damage of electrodes in EML. (author)

  15. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the drift scale test in Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.

    1997-01-01

    Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Eight boreholes, containing a total of 140 ERT electrodes, were drilled above and below the Heated Drift (HD) to form vertical planes parallel to the drift. In addition, 4 boreholes, containing 60 electrodes, drilled from the Access Observation Drift (AOD) form vertical planes at right angles to the HD. Four ERT surveys, three before and one after heating began, were conducted during the first quarter of FY 98. Tomographic images of absolute electrical resistivity have been calculated using these data and are presented in this report. The report also presents the coordinates of the electrodes used for the ERT surveys. Future reports will include images of electrical resistivity change calculated using data collected before and during the heating episode. The changes to be recovered will then be used in combination with temperature maps of the region to calculate maps of saturation change around the HD

  16. Weighted least-squares criteria for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallman, J.S.; Berryman, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are developed for design of electrical impedance tomographic reconstruction algorithms with specified properties. Assuming a starting model with constant conductivity or some other specified background distribution, an algorithm with the following properties is found: (1) the optimum constant for the starting model is determined automatically; (2) the weighted least-squares error between the predicted and measured power dissipation data is as small as possible; (3) the variance of the reconstructed conductivity from the starting model is minimized; (4) potential distributions with the largest volume integral of gradient squared have the least influence on the reconstructed conductivity, and therefore distributions most likely to be corrupted by contact impedance effects are deemphasized; (5) cells that dissipate the most power during the current injection tests tend to deviate least from the background value. The resulting algorithm maps the reconstruction problem into a vector space where the contribution to the inversion from the background conductivity remains invariant, while the optimum contributions in orthogonal directions are found. For a starting model with nonconstant conductivity, the reconstruction algorithm has analogous properties

  17. Real-time imaging and detection of intracranial haemorrhage by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C H; Wang, L; Shi, X T; You, F S; Fu, F; Liu, R G; Dai, M; Zhao, Z W; Gao, G D; Dong, X Z

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to detect and image acute intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in an animal model. Blood was infused into the frontal lobe of the brains of anaesthetized piglets and impedance was measured using 16 electrodes placed in a circle on the scalp. The EIT images were constructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. The mean of all the pixel intensities within a region of interest--the mean resistivity value (MRV)--was used to evaluate the relative impedance changes in the target region. A symmetrical index (SI), reflecting the relative impedance on both sides of the brain, was also calculated. Changes in MRV and SI were associated with the injection of blood, demonstrating that EIT can successfully detect ICH in this animal model. The unique features of EIT may be beneficial for diagnosing ICH early in patients after cranial surgery, thereby reducing the risk of complications and mortality.

  18. Electrical resistivity of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the book is to give an actual survey on the resistivity of thin metal and semiconductor films interacting with gases. We discuss the influence of the substrate material and the annealing treatment of the films, presenting our experimental data as well as theoretical models to calculate the scattering cross section of the conduction electrons in the frame-work of the scattering hypothesis. Main emphasis is laid on the comparison of gold and silver films which exhibit nearly the same lattice structure but differ in their chemical activity. In conclusion, the most important quantity for the interpretation is the surface charging z while the correlation with the optical data or the frustrated IR vibrations seems the show a more material-specific character. Z can be calculated on the basis of the density functional formalism or the self-consistent field approximation using Mulliken’s population analysis.

  19. Imaging Physiological and Pathological Activity in the Brain using Electric Impedance Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Vongerichten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Electric Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a promising medical imaging technique that reconstructs the internal conductivity of an object from boundary measurements. EIT is currently being used to monitor the lung during ventilation clinically. Amongst other suggested uses for imaging it can also be used to image neuronal function. There are different ways on how EIT can image neuronal function and two of these are tested in this thesis. The overall aim of our work was to advance imaging of physi...

  20. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the thermomechanical heater test in Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Buettner, M.; LaBrecque, L

    1996-01-01

    A test is being conducted in the densely welded Topopah Springs tuff within Yucca Mountain, Nevada to study the thermomechanical and hydrological behavior of this horizon when it is heated. A single 4 kW heater, placed in a horizontal borehole, was turned on August, 1996 and will continue to heat the rockmass until April 1997. Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Four boreholes, containing a total of 30 ERT electrodes, were drilled to form the sides of a 30 foot square with the heater at the center and perpendicular to the plane. Images of resistivity change were calculated using data collected before and during the heating episode. The changes recovered show a region of decreasing resistivity approximately centered around the heater. The size this region grows with time and -the resistivity decreases become stronger. The changes in resistivity are caused by both temperature and saturation changes. The observed resistivity changes suggest that the rock adjacent to the heater dries as heating progresses. This dry region is surrounded by a region of increased saturation where steam recondenses and imbibes into the rock

  1. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the thermomechanical heater test in Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Buettner, M.

    1997-01-01

    A test is being conducted in the densely welded Topopah Springs tuff within Yucca Mountain, Nevada to study the thermomechanical and hydrological behavior of this horizon when it is headed. A single 4 kW heater, placed in a horizontal borehole, was turned on August, 1996 and will continue to heat the rockmass until April 1997. Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Four boreholes, containing a total of 30 ERT electrodes, were drilled to form the sides of a 30 foot square with the heater at the center and perpendicular to the plane. Images of resistivity change were calculated using data collected before and during the heating episode. The changes recovered show a region of decreasing resistivity approximately centered around the heater. The size this region grows with time and the resistivity decreases become stronger. The changes in resistivity are caused by both temperature and saturation changes. The observed resistivity changes suggest that the rock adjacent to the heater dries as heating progresses. This dry region is surrounded by a region of increased saturation where steam recondenses and imbibes into the rock

  2. Electrical resistivity testing for as-built concrete performance assessment of chloride penetration resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of concrete can provide information about its transport properties, which is relevant for durability performance. For example, resistivity is inversely proportional to chloride diffusion, at least within similar concrete compositions. A methodology is proposed for on-site

  3. Evaluation of electrical resistivity anisotropy in geological mapping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2Department of Earth Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria. Accepted 8 June, 2011. The study ... resistivity and other electrical or electromagnetic based methods very versatile geophysical .... Field trials show that the anisotropic analysis not only accounts for the major part of the observed ...

  4. Laboratory Measurement of the Electrical Resistivity of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electrical resistivity of fresh Pre-Cambrian to Upper Cambrian crystalline basement rocks in southwestern Nigeria, hitherto inferred from sounding interpretation, has been determined from laboratory measurements. The rock types consist of granite gneiss, banded gneiss, augen gneiss, biotite granite, charnockite, ...

  5. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electron–electron interactions in lithium metal have been examined keeping in view the recent developments. The contribution of the electron–electron Umklapp scattering processes in the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures has been evaluated using a simplified spherical Fermi surface model with ...

  6. Leaching of Conductive Species: Implications to Measurements of Electrical Resistivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spragg, R; Jones, S; Bu, Y; Lu, Y; Bentz, D; Snyder, K; Weiss, J

    2017-05-01

    Electrical tests have been used to characterize the microstructure of porous materials, the measured electrical response being determined by the contribution of the microstructure (porosity and tortuosity) and the electrical properties of the solution (conductivity of the pore solution) inside the pores of the material. This study has shown how differences in concentration between the pore solution (i.e., the solution in the pores) and the storage solution surrounding the test specimen leads to significant transport (leaching) of the conductive ionic species between the pore solution and the storage solution. Leaching influences the resistivity of the pore solution, thereby influencing electrical measurements on the bulk material from either a surface or uniaxial bulk resistance test. This paper has three main conclusions: 1.) Leaching of conductive species does occur with concentration gradients and that a diffusion based approach can be used to estimate the time scale associated with this change. 2.) Leaching of ions in the pore solution can influence resistivity measurements, and the ratio of surface to uniaxial resistivity can be used as a method to assess the presence of leaching and 3.) An estimation of the magnitude of leaching for standardized tests of cementitious materials.

  7. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electron–electron interactions in lithium metal have been examined keeping in view the recent developments. The contribution of the electron–electron Umklapp scattering processes in the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures has been evaluated using a simplified spherical Fermi surface model with ...

  8. Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity Survey Pre-modeling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical tools have much to offer users in environmental, water resource, and geotechnical fields; however, techniques such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) are often oversold and/or overinterpreted due to a lack of understanding of the limitations of the techniques, su...

  9. Evaluation on electrical resistivity of silicon materials after electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This research deals with the study of electron beam melting (EBM) methodology utilized in melt- ing silicon material and subsequently discusses on the effect of oxygen level on electrical resistivity change after EBM process. The oxygen content was reduced from 6.177 to less than 0.0517 ppmw when refining time.

  10. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fermi velocity (= hkF/m∗), E∗. F is the Fermi energy, kF is the Fermi wave vector and kB is the Boltzmann constant. Further, * (asterisk) on the symbols denotes that the value is evaluated with the effective mass of the electron in lithium. In deriving the electrical resistivity ρee(T) from eq. (10), certain assumptions were made.

  11. Effect of pressure on electrical resistance of WSe single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The results of electrical resistance measurements under pressure on single crystals of. WSe2 are reported. Measurements up to 8.5 GPa are carried out using Bridgman anvil set up and beyond it using diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to a pressure of 27 GPa. There is no clear indication of any phase transition till the ...

  12. Effect of pressure on electrical resistance of WSe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results of electrical resistance measurements under pressure on single crystals of WSe2 are reported. Measurements up to 8.5 GPa are carried out using Bridgman anvil set up and beyond it using diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to a pressure of 27 GPa. There is no clear indication of any phase transition till the highest ...

  13. Application of Three Electrical Resistivity Arrays to Evaluate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study further revealed that the Wenner array is less susceptible to edge effect at shallow depth while Dipole-dipole is more susceptible to edge effect at deeper depth followed by the Pole-dipole array. 2D electrical resistivity field measurements were carried out to confirm the results of the numerical simulation in the ...

  14. Mechanical and electrical properties of resistance welds at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S T; Kim, S H; Kim, N S; Ludwig, H

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of resistance welds at cryogenic temperatures for the large superconducting magnet such as the superconducting MHD Dipole system for the National Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF SCMS) at the U. of Tennessee Space Institute are reported.

  15. Superconductivity and electrical resistivity in alkali metal doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Fullerenes; alkali-C60 phonon; on-ball-C60 phonon; pressure effect; electrical resistivity. 1. Introduction. Buckminsterfullerenes are known to make compounds with alkali metals intensively studied mainly due to superconductivity and the variation of compounds (Hebard et al 1991; Holczer et al 1991; Tanigaki et al 1991).

  16. Temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships in municipal solid waste for the interpretation of bulk electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilawski, Tamara; Dumont, Gaël; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    . We made corrections according to the temperature profile and to volumetric water contents obtained previously on undisturbed samples. Corrected values tended to be superimposed on those obtained in the field. Then, we calculated the water content of the different reworked waste samples using the correlation between volumetric water content correlation and electrical resistivity and we compared this value to the one measured at the laboratory. Both values were correlated satisfactorily. In conclusion, we show that bulk electrical resistivity measurements are very promising to quantify water content in landfills if temperature can be estimated independently. In future applications, electrical resistivity tomography coupled with distributed temperature sensing could give important estimates of water content of the waste and thus helping in dealing with problematics such as boosting biodegradation and stabilization of the waste, reducing risks of soil and aquifers pollution, landfill mining, and controlled production of methane.

  17. On the computation of electrical resistance of hydrodynamic journal bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Pop

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches the mathematical model of electrical resistance of hydrodynamic journal bearing under different parameters of operation so as to predict bearing performance and safe load carrying capacity. The currents circulating in the journal bearing of electrical machine causes reducing of lifespan by appearance of pitting on their surface and the degradation of the lubricant. In a hydrodynamic journal bearing, the zone of minimum film thickness, load-carrying oil film varies along the circumference of a bearing through its length. This has been found to form a capacitor of varying capacitance between the journal and the bearings dependent on permittivity of the lubricant used, the bearing length, the eccentricity ratio and the clearance ratio. Besides this, load-carrying on oil film offers resistance that depends on operating parameters and resistivity of the lubricant.

  18. Development of an Arduino-based electrical impedance tomography system with application to dam internal erosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Matteo; Ferdos, Farzad; Losito, Gabriella; Solari, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a technique for the imaging of the electrical properties of conductive materials. In EIT, the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity or electrical conductivity within a domain is reconstructed using measurements made with electrodes placed at the boundaries of the domain. Data acquisition is typically made by applying an electrical current to the object under investigation using a set of electrodes, and measuring the developed voltage between the other electrodes. The tomographic image is then obtained using an inversion algorithm. This work describes the implementation of a simple and low cost 3D EIT measurement system suitable for laboratory-scale studies. The system was specifically developed for the time-lapse imaging of soil samples subjected to erosion processes during laboratory tests. The tests reproduce the process of internal erosion of soil particles by water flow within a granular media; this process is one of the most common causes of failure of earthen levees and embankment dams. The measurements needed strict requirements of speed and accuracy due to the varying time scale and magnitude of these processes. The developed EIT system consists of a PC which controls I/O cards (multiplexers) through the Arduino micro-controller, an external current generator, a digital acquisition device (DAQ), a power supply and the electrodes. The ease of programming of the Arduino interface greatly helped the implementation of custom acquisition software, increasing the overall flexibility of the system and the creation of specific acquisition schemes and configurations. The system works with a multi-electrode configuration of up to 48 channels but it was designed to be upgraded to an arbitrary large number of electrodes by connecting additional multiplexer cards (> 96 electrodes). The acquisition was optimized for multi-channel measurements so that the overall time of acquisition is dramatically reduced compared to

  19. Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity survey pre-modeling tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Neil; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Robinson, Judith L.; Slater, Lee D.; Halford, Keith J.; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.; Werkema, Dale D.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical tools have much to offer users in environmental, water resource, and geotechnical fields; however, techniques such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) are often oversold and/or overinterpreted due to a lack of understanding of the limitations of the techniques, such as the appropriate depth intervals or resolution of the methods. The relationship between ERI data and resistivity is nonlinear; therefore, these limitations depend on site conditions and survey design and are best assessed through forward and inverse modeling exercises prior to field investigations. In this approach, proposed field surveys are first numerically simulated given the expected electrical properties of the site, and the resulting hypothetical data are then analyzed using inverse models. Performing ERI forward/inverse modeling, however, requires substantial expertise and can take many hours to implement. We present a new spreadsheet-based tool, the Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER), which features a graphical user interface that allows users to manipulate a resistivity model and instantly view how that model would likely be interpreted by an ERI survey. The SEER tool is intended for use by those who wish to determine the value of including ERI to achieve project goals, and is designed to have broad utility in industry, teaching, and research.

  20. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the single heater test in Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.

    1997-10-01

    Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response in the Single Heater Test, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Images of resistivity change were calculated using data collected before, during and after the heating episode. This report will concentrate on the results obtained after heating ceased; previous reports discuss the results obtained during the heating phase. The changes recovered show a region of increasing resistivity approximately centered around the heater as the rock mass cooled. The size of this region grows with time and the resistivity increases become stronger. The increases in resistivity are caused by both temperature and saturation changes. The Waxman Smits model has been used to calculate rock saturation after accounting for temperature effects. The saturation estimates suggest that during the heating phase, a region of drying forms around the heater. During the cooling phase, the dry region has remained relatively stable. Wetter rock regions which developed below the heater during the heating phase, are slowly becoming smaller in size during the cooling phase. The last set of images indicate that some rewetting of the dry zone may be occurring. The accuracy of the saturation estimates depends on several factors that are only partly understood

  1. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Application of Electrical Resistivity Method for Detecting Shallow Old Gold Mine Workings: An Example from Boksburg, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, S.; Chirenje, E.

    2011-12-01

    Subsidence has been observed at several locations along the northern perimeter of the Central Witwatersrand Mining Basin south of Johannesburg, South Africa. Previous studies have defined the extent and distribution of hundreds of open ventilation shafts and surface collapses linked to areas of known and suspected shallow undermining. Many collapses appear to be in a meta-stable state prone to further collapse, which could and have led to casualties. Identification of zones of incipient instability is therefore an urgent state responsibility to protect life and property, as much of these abandoned mine lands have been invaded by shack dwellers. This paper outlines the results of an investigation using 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in combination with a standard geotechnical engineering drilling exploration, with the aim of identifying areas of incipient instability and possible future collapse. The electrical resistivity data were acquired via a network of intersecting survey lines using a SYSCAL Pro multimode resistivity imaging system equipped with 72 electrodes. The dipole-dipole and the Schlumberger arrays with an electrode spacing of 5 and 10 m were used. Inversion of the data was carried out using the commercially available software package RES2DINV. Analysis of the electrical resistivity data and conventional site investigation data proved to be a highly effective means of characterizing dangerous, abandoned mine openings of various sizes, depths and origins. Survey results also successfully confirmed the position of known shafts and shallow underground workings. These appeared as electrically well-defined features corresponding extremely closely to both underground plans and invasive site investigation data. The findings obtained from this study offer practical considerations for modeling shallow subsurface conditions, along the Boksburg area; to enable the reliable identification of hazardous areas constituting a potential threat to human

  3. Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Seawater Intrusion into the Monterey Bay Aquifer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, A; Moran, T; Hansen, B; Knight, R

    2016-03-01

    We use electrical resistivity tomography to obtain a 6.8-km electrical resistivity image to a depth of approximately 150 m.b.s.l. along the coast of Monterey Bay. The resulting image is used to determine the subsurface distribution of saltwater- and freshwater-saturated sediments and the geologic controls on fluid distributions in the region. Data acquisition took place over two field seasons in 2011 and 2012. To maximize our ability to image both vertical and horizontal variations in the subsurface, a combination of dipole-dipole, Wenner, Wenner-gamma, and gradient measurements were made, resulting in a large final dataset of approximately 139,000 data points. The resulting resistivity section extends to a depth of 150 m.b.s.l., and is used, in conjunction with the gamma logs from four coastal monitoring wells to identify four dominant lithologic units. From these data, we are able to infer the existence of a contiguous clay layer in the southern portion of our transect, which prevents downward migration of the saltwater observed in the upper 25 m of the subsurface to the underlying freshwater aquifer. The saltwater and brackish water in the northern portion of the transect introduce the potential for seawater intrusion into the hydraulically connected freshwater aquifer to the south, not just from the ocean, but also laterally from north to south. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  4. Quantification of nasal airflow resistance in English bulldogs using computed tomography and computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostnik, Eric T; Scansen, Brian A; Zielinski, Rachel; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2017-09-01

    Stenotic nares, edematous intranasal turbinates, mucosal swelling, and an elongated, thickened soft palate are common sources of airflow resistance for dogs with brachycephalic airway syndrome. Surgery has focused on enlarging the nasal apertures and reducing tissue of the soft palate. However, objective measures of surgical efficacy are lacking. Twenty-one English bulldogs without previous surgery were recruited for this prospective, pilot study. Computed tomography was performed using conscious sedation and without endotracheal intubation using a 128 multidetector computed tomography scanner. Raw multidetector computed tomography data were rendered to create a three-dimensional surface mesh model by automatic segmentation of the air-filled nasal passage from the nares to the caudal soft palate. Three-dimensional surface models were used to construct computational fluid dynamics models of nasal airflow resistance from the nares to the caudal aspect of the soft palate. The computational fluid dynamics models were used to simulate airflow in each dog and airway resistance varied widely with a median 36.46 (Pa/mm)/(l/s) and an interquartile range of 19.84 to 90.74 (Pa/mm)/(/s). In 19/21 dogs, the rostral third of the nasal passage exhibited a larger airflow resistance than the caudal and middle regions of the nasal passage. In addition, computational fluid dynamics data indicated that overall measures of airflow resistance may significantly underestimate the maximum local resistance. We conclude that computational fluid dynamics models derived from nasal multidetector computed tomography can quantify airway resistance in brachycephalic dogs. This methodology represents a novel approach to noninvasively quantify airflow resistance and may have utility for objectively studying effects of surgical interventions in canine brachycephalic airway syndrome. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Characterization and quantification of preferential flow in fractured rock systems, using resistivity tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    May, F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain Group (TMG) aquifer system. WRC Report No. 1327/1/08. Water Research Commission. LOKE, M., 2001. A practical guide to RES2DINV ver. 3.4; Rapid 2-D Resistivity & IP inversion using the least squares method. Geoelectrical Imaging 2-D & 3D..., N Jovanovic2 and A Rozanov1 University of Stellenbosch1 and Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)2 Characterization and quantification of preferential flow in fractured rock systems, using resistivity tomography Introduction...

  6. Electrical resistivity response due to elastic-plastic deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of many materials is sensitive to changes in the electronic band configurations surrounding the atoms, changes in the electron-phonon interaction cross-sections, and changes in the density of intrinsic defect structures. These changes are most directly dependent on interatomic measures of relative deformation. For this reason, a model for resistivity response is developed in terms of interatomic measures of relative deformation. The relative deformation consists of two terms, a continuous function to describe the recoverable displacement between two atoms in the atomic lattice structure and a functional to describe the nonrecoverable displacement between two atoms as a result of interatomic discontinuities from dislocation kinetics. This model for resistivity extends the classical piezoresistance representation and relates electric resistance change directly to physical mechanisms. An analysis for the resistivity change of a thin foil ideally embedded in a material that undergoes elastic-plastic deformation is presented. For the case of elastic deformations, stress information in the material surrounding the thin foil is inferred for the cases of pure strain coupling boundary conditions, pure stress coupling boundary conditions, and a combination of stress-strain coupling boundary conditions. 42 refs., 4 figs

  7. Electrical resistivity of liquid binary and ternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornat, M.; Paja, A.

    2011-01-01

    New method of calculation of the electrical resistivity of liquid and amorphous alloys is presented. The method is based on the Morgan-Howson-Saub (MHS) model but the pseudopotentials are replaced by the scattering matrix operators. The Fermi energy is properly determined by the accurate values of the phase shifts. The model depends on a very small number of universal parameters and gives stable results. The calculated values of the resistivity agree well with available experimental data for a substantial number of binary alloys. Moreover, the results for some ternary alloys were also obtained. (orig.)

  8. Electrical resistivity discontinuity of iron along the melting curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2018-04-01

    Discontinuous changes of electrical resistivity ρel (increase), density ϱ and isothermal compressibility βT (decrease) occur across the melting temperature of metals and can be directly related by Ziman's theory in the long-wavelength approximation. By evaluating experimental data at ambient pressure, we show that Ziman's approximation holds for iron and other simple and transition metals. Using a thermodynamic model to determine βT for γ-, ɛ- and liquid Fe and a previously published model for ρel of liquid Fe, we apply Ziman's approximation to calculate ρel of solid Fe along the melting curve. For pure Fe, we find the discontinuity in ρel to decrease with pressure and to be negligibly small at inner core boundary conditions. However, if we account for light element enrichment in the liquid outer core, the electrical resistivity decrease across the inner core boundary is predicted to be as large as 36 per cent.

  9. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sodium and potassium, however, did not show a T2-term. More refined later measurements [2,3] for the electrical resistivity of sodium and potassium in the temperature region 0.5 K to 4.2 K have, however, indicated that these metals also have a T2-term. The experimental results for lithium [4–6] clearly show a T2-term.

  10. Negative differential electrical resistance of a rotational organic nanomotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A robust, nanoelectromechanical switch is proposed based upon an asymmetric pendant moiety anchored to an organic backbone between two C60 fullerenes, which in turn are connected to gold electrodes. Ab initio density functional calculations are used to demonstrate that an electric field induces rotation of the pendant group, leading to a nonlinear current–voltage relation. The nonlinearity is strong enough to lead to negative differential resistance at modest source–drain voltages.

  11. Electrical resistivity of V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Gubbi, A.N.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on vanadium alloys containing 3-6%Cr and 3-6%Ti in order to evaluate the microstructural stability of these alloys. A nonlinear dependence on Cr and Ti concentration was observed, which suggests that either short range ordering or solute precipitation (perhaps in concert with interstitial solute clustering) has occurred in V-6Cr-6Ti

  12. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for quantification of pulmonary edema in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, Constantin J C; Phillips, Charles R; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Haas, Sebastian A; Rapin, Michael; Böhm, Stephan H; Reuter, Daniel A

    2016-01-22

    Assessment of pulmonary edema is a key factor in monitoring and guidance of therapy in critically ill patients. To date, methods available at the bedside for estimating the physiologic correlate of pulmonary edema, extravascular lung water, often are unreliable or require invasive measurements. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel approach to reliably assess extravascular lung water by making use of the functional imaging capabilities of electrical impedance tomography. Thirty domestic pigs were anesthetized and randomized to three different groups. Group 1 was a sham group with no lung injury. Group 2 had acute lung injury induced by saline lavage. Group 3 had vascular lung injury induced by intravenous injection of oleic acid. A novel, noninvasive technique using changes in thoracic electrical impedance with lateral body rotation was used to measure a new metric, the lung water ratioEIT, which reflects total extravascular lung water. The lung water ratioEIT was compared with postmortem gravimetric lung water analysis and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution measurements. A significant correlation was found between extravascular lung water as measured by postmortem gravimetric analysis and electrical impedance tomography (r = 0.80; p pulmonary edema.

  13. Diffusivity and electrical resistivity measurements in rock matrix around fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, H.; Uusheimo, K.

    1989-12-01

    Microfracturing of rock matrix around permeable fractures was studied experimentally from drill core samples around major fractures. The methods used were diffusion measurements using a 36 Cl-tracer and electrical resistivity measurements. Rock samples were from the Romuvaara investigation site, the granite specimen around a partially filled carbonate fracture (KR4/333 m) and gneiss specimen around a slickenside fracture (KR1/645 m). A consistent difference of one to two orders of magnitude in the levels of the methods with regard to the effective diffusion coefficients for Cl - -ion was found, the electrical resistivity measurement giving higher values. On the basis of the diffusion measurements the diffusion porosities could be calculated but these remained one to two orders of magnitude lower than that expected for granitic rocks using the water saturation method. A possible reason for these differences could have been the low, in some cases 0.004 M NaC1-concentration in the diffusion experiments vs. the 1 M NaCl-concentration used in the electrical resistivity measurements. Due to the small number of specimens and cross sectional areas of only 2 cm 2 , rock inhomogeneity effects were significant making the interpretation of the results somewhat troublesome. Porosities on fracture surfaces seemed to be higher than in the deeper, more intact rock matrix

  14. Design of current source for multi-frequency simultaneous electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography has been evolving from the frequency-sweep approach to the multi-frequency simultaneous measurement technique which can reduce measuring time and will be increasingly attractive for time-varying biological applications. The accuracy and stability of the current source are the key factors determining the quality of the image reconstruction. This article presents a field programmable gate array-based current source for a multi-frequency simultaneous electrical impedance tomography system. A novel current source circuit was realized by combining the classic current mirror based on the feedback amplifier AD844 with a differential topology. The optimal phase offsets of harmonic sinusoids were obtained through the crest factor analysis. The output characteristics of this current source were evaluated by simulation and actual measurement. The results include the following: (1) the output impedance was compared with one of the Howland pump circuit in simulation, showing comparable performance at low frequencies. However, the proposed current source makes lower demands for resistor tolerance but performs even better at high frequencies. (2) The output impedance in actual measurement below 200 kHz is above 1.3 MΩ and can reach 250 KΩ up to 1 MHz. (3) An experiment based on a biological RC model has been implemented. The mean error for the demodulated impedance amplitude and phase are 0.192% and 0.139°, respectively. Therefore, the proposed current source is wideband, biocompatible, and high precision, which demonstrates great potential to work as a sub-system in the multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system.

  15. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Already widely accepted in medicine, tomography can also be useful in industry. The theory behind tomography and a demonstration of the technique to inspect a motorcycle carburetor is presented. To demonstrate the potential of computer assisted tomography (CAT) to accurately locate defects in three dimensions, a sectioned 5 cm gate valve with a shrink cavity made visible by the sectioning was tomographically imaged using a Co-60 source. The tomographic images revealed a larger cavity below the sectioned surface. The position of this cavity was located with an in-plane and axial precision of approximately +-1 mm. The volume of the cavity was estimated to be approximately 40 mm 3

  16. Use of electrical tomography methods to determinate the extension and main migration routes of uncontrolled landfill leachates in fractured areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, Ismael; Mahjoub, Himi; Lovera, Raul; Fernández, Jesús; Casas, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the uses of the electrical tomography and its relationship with hydrochemical data in order to characterize contaminated groundwater flows in fractured aquifers. The studied area is contaminated with different hazardous substances like lyndanes, organochlorinated compounds and benzenes coming from the old non-controlled Sardas landfill. The enormous volumes of wastes filling the landfill have generated a convoluted mixture of leachates. Due to the lack of a landfill liner, the leachates have migrated through the fractured Eocene marls towards the Gallego River. The striking correlation between high concentrations of polluted groundwater and low electrical resistivity of the subsurface (< 8 Ω·m) allows defining the principal contaminant migration route thanks to the distribution of these conductive anomalies. This mapping verifies that there is intense tectonical–structural control of the leachate migration, because the deep migration presents the same direction as the geological axis fold. - Highlights: • The outcrop topographic reconstruction is done using cores and aerial photographs. • Hydrochemical and geophysical data allow defining two leachate migration paths. • Conductive anomalies in ERT are linked to high contaminant concentration. • The distribution of conductive anomalies defines the fractured basement migration. • The plume direction reflects important tectonic control in the migration process

  17. Absolute electrical impedance tomography (aEIT) guided ventilation therapy in critical care patients: simulations and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaï, Mouloud A; Mahfouf, Mahdi; Mohamad-Samuri, Suzani; Panoutsos, George; Brown, Brian H; Mills, Gary H

    2010-05-01

    Thoracic electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive, radiation-free monitoring technique whose aim is to reconstruct a cross-sectional image of the internal spatial distribution of conductivity from electrical measurements made by injecting small alternating currents via an electrode array placed on the surface of the thorax. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the fundamentals of EIT and demonstrate the principles of mechanical ventilation, lung recruitment, and EIT imaging on a comprehensive physiological model, which combines a model of respiratory mechanics, a model of the human lung absolute resistivity as a function of air content, and a 2-D finite-element mesh of the thorax to simulate EIT image reconstruction during mechanical ventilation. The overall model gives a good understanding of respiratory physiology and EIT monitoring techniques in mechanically ventilated patients. The model proposed here was able to reproduce consistent images of ventilation distribution in simulated acutely injured and collapsed lung conditions. A new advisory system architecture integrating a previously developed data-driven physiological model for continuous and noninvasive predictions of blood gas parameters with the regional lung function data/information generated from absolute EIT (aEIT) is proposed for monitoring and ventilator therapy management of critical care patients.

  18. Versatile possibilities for the use of geo-electrical 2D-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holub, P.

    2011-01-01

    This article takes a look at two-dimensional electrical imaging that has been increasingly used over the last 15 years in geophysical practice worldwide. The author states that this method is suitable for detailed and medium scale investigations where a profile network is considered to be advantageous. A comprise must nevertheless be made between investigation-depth and resolution as these parameters depend on pre-configured electrode spacing. The paper describes some typical applications in the fields of hydrogeology, engineering geology, resource prospecting and environmental engineering. Some of the possibilities of using 2D-tomography and the limitations of this technology are discussed

  19. Simultaneous reconstruction of outer boundary shape and conductivity distribution in electrical impedance tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hyvönen, Nuutti

    2016-01-05

    The simultaneous retrieval of the exterior boundary shape and the interior admittivity distribution of an examined body in electrical impedance tomography is considered. The reconstruction method is built for the complete electrode model and it is based on the Frechet derivative of the corresponding current-to-voltage map with respect to the body shape. The reconstruction problem is cast into the Bayesian framework, and maximum a posteriori estimates for the admittivity and the boundary geometry are computed. The feasibility of the approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements.

  20. An analysis of electrical impedance tomography with applications to Tikhonov regularization

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-01-16

    This paper analyzes the continuum model/complete electrode model in the electrical impedance tomography inverse problem of determining the conductivity parameter from boundary measurements. The continuity and differentiability of the forward operator with respect to the conductivity parameter in L p-norms are proved. These analytical results are applied to several popular regularization formulations, which incorporate a priori information of smoothness/sparsity on the inhomogeneity through Tikhonov regularization, for both linearized and nonlinear models. Some important properties, e.g., existence, stability, consistency and convergence rates, are established. This provides some theoretical justifications of their practical usage. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  1. Image reconstruction method for electrical capacitance tomography based on the combined series and parallel normalization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Xiangyuan; Guo, Shuqing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a novel image reconstruction method for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) based on the combined series and parallel model is presented. A regularization technique is used to obtain a stabilized solution of the inverse problem. Also, the adaptive coefficient of the combined model is deduced by numerical optimization. Simulation results indicate that it can produce higher quality images when compared to the algorithm based on the parallel or series models for the cases tested in this paper. It provides a new algorithm for ECT application

  2. Quantitative conductivity and permittivity imaging of the human brain using electric properties tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Tobias; Katscher, Ulrich; Doessel, Olaf

    2011-08-01

    The electric properties of human tissue can potentially be used as an additional diagnostic parameter, e.g., in tumor diagnosis. In the framework of radiofrequency safety, the electric conductivity of tissue is needed to correctly estimate the local specific absorption rate distribution during MR measurements. In this study, a recently developed approach, called electric properties tomography (EPT) is adapted for and applied to in vivo imaging. It derives the patient's electric conductivity and permittivity from the spatial sensitivity distributions of the applied radiofrequency coils. In contrast to other methods to measure the patient's electric properties, EPT does not apply externally mounted electrodes, currents, or radiofrequency probes, which enhances the practicability of the approach. This work shows that conductivity distributions can be reconstructed from phase images and permittivity distributions can be reconstructed from magnitude images of the radiofrequency transmit field. Corresponding numerical simulations using finite-difference time-domain methods support the feasibility of this phase-based conductivity imaging and magnitude-based permittivity imaging. Using this approximation, three-dimensional in vivo conductivity and permittivity maps of the human brain are obtained in 5 and 13 min, respectively, which can be considered a step toward clinical feasibility for EPT. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Feature-space assessment of electrical impedance tomography coregistered with computed tomography in detecting multiple contrast targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Kalpagam; Liu, Jeff; Kohli, Kirpal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fusion of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with computed tomography (CT) can be useful as a clinical tool for providing additional physiological information about tissues, but requires suitable fusion algorithms and validation procedures. This work explores the feasibility of fusing EIT and CT images using an algorithm for coregistration. The imaging performance is validated through feature space assessment on phantom contrast targets. Methods: EIT data were acquired by scanning a phantom using a circuit, configured for injecting current through 16 electrodes, placed around the phantom. A conductivity image of the phantom was obtained from the data using electrical impedance and diffuse optical tomography reconstruction software (EIDORS). A CT image of the phantom was also acquired. The EIT and CT images were fused using a region of interest (ROI) coregistration fusion algorithm. Phantom imaging experiments were carried out on objects of different contrasts, sizes, and positions. The conductive medium of the phantoms was made of a tissue-mimicking bolus material that is routinely used in clinical radiation therapy settings. To validate the imaging performance in detecting different contrasts, the ROI of the phantom was filled with distilled water and normal saline. Spatially separated cylindrical objects of different sizes were used for validating the imaging performance in multiple target detection. Analyses of the CT, EIT and the EIT/CT phantom images were carried out based on the variations of contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeneity, using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). A reference image of the phantom was simulated using EIDORS, and the performances of the CT and EIT imaging systems were evaluated and compared against the performance of the EIT/CT system using various feature metrics, detectability, and structural similarity index measures. Results: In detecting distilled and normal saline water in bolus medium, EIT as a stand

  4. Experimental validation of a novel reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography based on backprojection of Lagrange multipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayford, R; Hanquan, Y; Boone, K; Holder, D S

    1995-08-01

    A novel approach to image reconstruction for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been developed. It is based on a constrained optimization technique for the reconstruction of difference resistivity images without finite-element modelling. It solves the inverse problem by optimizing a cost function under constraints, in the form of normalized boundary potentials. Its application to the neighboring data collection method is presented here. Mathematical models are developed according to specified criteria. These express the reconstructed image in terms of one-dimensional Lagrange multiplier functions. The reconstruction problem becomes one of estimating these functions from normalized boundary potentials. This model is based on a cost criterion of the minimization of the variance between the reconstructed and the true resistivity distributions. The algorithm was tested on data collected in a cylindrical saline-filled tank. A polyacrylamide rod was placed in various positions with or without a peripheral plaster of Paris ring in place. This was intended to resemble the conditions during EIT of epileptic seizures recorded with scalp or cortical electrodes in the human head. One advantage of this approach is that compensation for non-uniform initial conditions may be made, as this is a significant problem in imaging cerebral activity through the skull.

  5. Inside-out electrical capacitance tomography for downhole multiphase flow evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard-Rasmussen, Jimmy

    of information available. The objective of the work presented in this report was to develop a method for providing high quality mobile measurements from the inside of oil wells. It is shown that electrical capacitance tomography is a suitable method for the purpose. The conventional methods are only partially...... for the electric field inside the sensor is derived and subsequently an analytical expression for the sensitivity matrix is found. The analytical solution is for a slightly idealized geometry, so numerical methods are applied to obtain the sensitivity matrix for the exact sensor geometry. The numerical methods...... and the sections with water could be clearly identified. It was concluded that the system is ready for field-test. Three sensors were shipped for offshore field test, but unfortunately the test was canceled because of problems with the well....

  6. 2D and 3D reconstructions in acousto-electric tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2011-04-18

    We propose and test stable algorithms for the reconstruction of the internal conductivity of a biological object using acousto-electric measurements. Namely, the conventional impedance tomography scheme is supplemented by scanning the object with acoustic waves that slightly perturb the conductivity and cause the change in the electric potential measured on the boundary of the object. These perturbations of the potential are then used as the data for the reconstruction of the conductivity. The present method does not rely on \\'perfectly focused\\' acoustic beams. Instead, more realistic propagating spherical fronts are utilized, and then the measurements that would correspond to perfect focusing are synthesized. In other words, we use synthetic focusing. Numerical experiments with simulated data show that our techniques produce high-quality images, both in 2D and 3D, and that they remain accurate in the presence of high-level noise in the data. Local uniqueness and stability for the problem also hold. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Design and development of electrical impedance tomography system with 32 electrodes and microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansory, Achmad; Prajitno, Prawito; Wijaya, Sastra Kusuma

    2018-02-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is an imaging method that is able to estimate electrical impedance distribution inside an object. This EIT system is developed by using 32 electrodes and microcontroller based module. From a pair of electrodes, sinusoidal current of 3 mA is injected and the voltage differences between other pairs of electrodes are measured. Voltage measurement data are then sent to MATLAB and EIDORS software; the data are used to reconstruct two dimensions image. The system can detect and determine the position of a phantom in the tank. The object's position is accurately reconstructed and determined with the average shifting of 0.69 cm but object's area cannot be accurately reconstructed. The object's image is more accurately reconstructed when the object is located near to electrodes, has a larger size, and when the current injected to the system has a frequency of 100 kHz or 200kHz.

  8. Modeling of Potential Distribution of Electrical Capacitance Tomography Sensor for Multiphase Flow Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sathiyamoorthy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT was used to develop image of various multi phase flow of gas-liquid-solid in a closed pipe. The principal difficulties to obtained real time image from ECT sensor are permittivity distribution across the plate and capacitance is nonlinear; the electric field is distorted by the material present and is also sensitive to measurement errors and noise. This work present a detailed description is given on method employed for image reconstruction from the capacitance measurements. The discretization and iterative algorithm is developed for improving the predictions with minimum error. The author analyzed eight electrodes square sensor ECT system with two-phase water-gas and solid-gas.

  9. Specificity of the tomography implementation in electric arc domain - Validity in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benech, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The aim of these works was to implement a new experimental method to characterize 3D thermal plasmas by emission spectroscopy. The method used is based on tomographic technique which is widely used in medical imaging nowadays. However, tomography that we have developed and applied to electric arc is specific as the number of accessible projections angles is strongly limited: 4 projections our case against basically 64 in medical imaging. The particularity of our experimental tomographic system is that measurements are resolved both spectrally and spatially. The spectral resolution is necessary to determine the temperature values from method based on atomic line intensity. The spatial resolution is needed to simultaneously acquire the whole width of the plasma and so to reconstruct a whole cross-section in only one acquisition. One of the principal objective was to realize the experimental system of four-view tomography for thermal plasmas. Thanks to this device, we showed that the characterization of non-axisymmetric plasma is possible and that it enables to reconstruct 3D temperature maps. Finally, our tomographic method is applied with medical imaging data acquired in SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). These tests allowed validating the use of our tomographic reconstruction technique in SPECT, particularly the used iterative algebraic algorithm and the limited-view configuration. (author) [fr

  10. Resistivity tomography using borehole of 500m in depth at the seaside site; 500m shin boring wo mochiita kaigan fukin deno hiteiko tomography tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kono, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Center, Tokyo (Japan); Chiba, A. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    With an objective to verify exploration methods to identify geological structures to a depth of about 500 m and continuity of fissure zones, a case study was carried out on a resistivity tomography method using ground surface exploration by means of the resistivity method and boreholes of 500 m in depth. The investigated area is consisted of abyssal rocks of the Cretaceous period, where granodiorites of coarse grain and intrusive rocks of small scale are distributed. Fissures on the ground surface have gentle inclination, and are of opening type showing high water permeability. The data analysis has derived apparent resistivities in the Wenner electrode arrangement, the Eltran electrode arrangement and the pole-pole electrode arrangement. The resistivity tomography has derived apparent resistivity in the pole-dipole electrode arrangement which is relatively high in accuracy and strong against noise. As a result of inputting these resistivities and performing an analysis on a two-dimensional resistivity structure, a structure of 100-m scale was made clear, in which difference of the resistivity values is distinct. The result of the resistivity tomography may be thought to have identified the resistivity anomaly of a small scale, although the absolute values show some variation. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The study of mudrocks resistivity in Northwestern Peninsula Malaysia using electrical resistivity survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Hazrul; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; Jia, Teoh Ying

    2017-07-01

    Mudrock is a type of sedimentary rock whose original constituents are clays and muds. Mudrocks are fine grained siliciclastic which include mudstone and claystone depending on the grain size. The colour of mudstone is a function of its minerology content and geochemistry processes. One common sedimentary structure of mudrocks is lamination due to variations in grain size and composition changes. The importance of mudrocks is as a mixture for cement and to produce brick used for building structure. This research emphasizes on the resistivity value of mudrocks; claystone and mudstone which exist in northwestern of Peninsula Malaysia. Mudstone of Kubang Pasu Formation, red mudstone and grey mudstone of Chepor Member and claystone of Semanggol Formation were chose as the study area as each of the mudrock was formed in a different environmental condition. Electrical resistivity survey was conducted on top of the outcrops using Wenner - Schlumberger array with 1.5 m and 1 m electrode spacing with respect to localities. The data was processed using Res2Dinv software to get the inversion model resistivity and the results were imported to Surfer10 software for labelling purposes. The mudstone resistivity value of Kubang Pasu Formation formed by depositional of calm water gives resistivity value from 20 - 120 Ωm. The red mudstone of Chepor Member formed at high oxidation environment gives resistivity value of 15 - 100 Ωm contrast to grey mudstone which formed under low oxidizing condition gives 120 - 500 Ωm resistivity value. The claystone of Semanggol Formation formed from shallow depositional environment gives resistivity value from 400 - 1000 Ωm. As a conclusion, electrical resistivity survey was successfully applied in differentiating the type of mudrocks. Also, mudrocks formed from different depositional environment gives different values of resistivity.

  12. Forward solving in Electrical Impedance Tomography with algebraic multigrid wavelet based preconditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsic, A.; Bayford, R.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography is a soft-field tomography modality, where image reconstruction is formulated as a non-linear least-squares model fitting problem. The Newton-Rahson scheme is used for actually reconstructing the image, and this involves three main steps: forward solving, computation of the Jacobian, and the computation of the conductivity update. Forward solving relies typically on the finite element method, resulting in the solution of a sparse linear system. In typical three dimensional biomedical applications of EIT, like breast, prostate, or brain imaging, it is desirable to work with sufficiently fine meshes in order to properly capture the shape of the domain, of the electrodes, and to describe the resulting electric filed with accuracy. These requirements result in meshes with 100,000 nodes or more. The solution the resulting forward problems is computationally intensive. We address this aspect by speeding up the solution of the FEM linear system by the use of efficient numeric methods and of new hardware architectures. In particular, in terms of numeric methods, we solve the forward problem using the Conjugate Gradient method, with a wavelet-based algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner. This preconditioner is faster to set up than other AMG preconditoiners which are not based on wavelets, it does use less memory, and provides for a faster convergence. We report results for a MATLAB based prototype algorithm an we discuss details of a work in progress for a GPU implementation.

  13. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    . Structures down to sub-micrometer range and complex impedance measurements tools integrated at single chips are now affordable. Moreover, the introduction of alternative signals and data processing algorithms focuses on very fast and parallel electrical characterization which in turn pushes this technique to new applications and markets. Electrical impedance tomography today yields pictures in real time with a resolution that was impossible 10 years ago. The XVth International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance in conjunction with the XIVth Electrical Impedance Tomography ICEBI/EIT 2013 organized by the Institute for Bioprocessing and Analytical Measurement Techniques, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany, together with the EIT-group at the University of Göttingen, Germany, brings world leading scientists in these fields together. It is a platform to present the latest developments in instrumentation and signal processing but also points to new applications, especially in the field of biosensors and non-linear phenomena. Two Keynote lectures will extend the view of the participants above the mainstream of bio-impedance measurement. Friederich Kremer (University of Leipzig) delivers the plenary lecture on broad bandwidth dielectric spectroscopy. New achievements in the research of ligand gated ionic channels will be presented by Klaus Benndorf (University of Jena). Leading scientists in the field of bio-impedance measurement, such as, Sverre Grimnes, Orjan Martinsen, Andrea Robitzki, Richard Bayford, Jan Gimsa and Mart Min will give lectures for students but also more experienced scientists in a pre-conference tutorial which is a good opportunity to learn or refresh the basics. List of committees Conference Chair Dr Uwe Pliquett Professor Dieter Beckmann Institut für Bioprozess- und Analysenmesstechnik eV, Rosenhof, Heilbad Heiligenstadt, Germany Technical Program Chair Maik Hiller Conventus Congressmanagement & Marketing GmbH, Carl-Pulfrich-Str. 1 - 07745 Jena Pre

  14. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyun Bum; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-07-01

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  15. Multiscale electrical contact resistance in clustered contact distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyoung; Cho, Hyun; Jang, Yong Hoon

    2009-08-01

    For contact between rough surfaces of conductors in which a clustered contact spot distribution is dominant through a multiscale process, electrical contact resistance (ECR) is analysed using a smoothed version of Greenwood's model (Jang and Barber 2003 J. Appl. Phys. 94 7215), which is extended to estimate the statistical distribution of contact spots considering the size and the location simultaneously. The application of this statistical method to a contact spot distribution, generated by the finite element method using a fractal surface defined by the random midpoint displacement algorithm, identifies the effect of the clustered contact distribution on ECR, showing that including a finer scale in the fractal contact surface causes the predicted resistance to approach a finite limit. It is also confirmed that the results are close to that of Barber's analogy (Barber 2003 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 459 53) regarding incremental stiffness and conductance for elastic contact.

  16. A Human Body Pressure Distribution Imaging System Based on Wavelet Analysis and Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanfeng Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a pressure distribution sensing system based on wavelet analysis and resistance tomography is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of a traditional electrode type pressure distribution sensor, which needs to be arranged with many electrodes and has a high production cost. The system uses ADS1256, a constant current source module, a serial communication module, a Raspberry host, a touch screen, and other components. The wavelet transform is used to preprocess the collected signal to improve the anti-jamming performance of the system. The method of resistance tomography is used to realize the real-time imaging of pressure distribution. Finally, the reliability of the system is verified using conductive silica gel as a sensitive material. The experimental results show that wavelet analysis preprocessing can significantly improve the quality of pressure distribution imaging.

  17. Building Better Electrodes for Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, P. L.; La Brecque, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    In the third year of a project to understand and mitigate the systematic noise in resistivity and induced polarization measurements, we put a significant effort into understanding and developing better electrodes. The simple metal electrodes commonly used for both transmitting and receiving of electrical geophysical data are likely the Achilles" heal of the resistivity method. Even stainless steel, a commonly used electrode material because of its durability, showed only average results in laboratory tests for electrode noise. Better results have been found with non-polarizing metal-metal salt electrodes, which are widely used as surface electrodes and in IP surveys. But although they produce small measurement errors, they are not durable enough for in-situ borehole resistivity surveys, and often contain compounds that are toxic to the environment. They are also very seldom used as transmitters. In laboratory studies, we are exploring other materials and configurations for low-noise compound electrodes that will be nontoxic, inexpensive, and durable and can be used as both transmitters and receivers. Testing of the electrical noise levels of electrodes is an arduous task involving repeated measurements under varying conditions at field scales. Thus it is important to find methods of sorting out likely candidates from the mass of possible electrode configurations and construction methods. Testing of electrode impedance versus current density appears to provide simple criteria for predicting the suitability of electrodes. The best electrodes show relatively low overall contact impedance, relatively small changes in impedance with increased current density, and relatively small changes in impedance with time. Furthermore it can be shown that resistivity and induced polarization performance of electrodes is strongly correlated, so that methods of finding electrodes with low impedance and good direct current performance usually provide better quality induced

  18. Vector tomography for reconstructing electric fields with non-zero divergence in bounded domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouri, Alexandra, E-mail: koulouri@uni-muenster.de [Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of Münster, Einsteinstrasse 62, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Brookes, Mike [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Rimpiläinen, Ville [Institute for Biomagnetism and Biosignalanalysis, University of Münster, Malmedyweg 15, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland, Private bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    In vector tomography (VT), the aim is to reconstruct an unknown multi-dimensional vector field using line integral data. In the case of a 2-dimensional VT, two types of line integral data are usually required. These data correspond to integration of the parallel and perpendicular projection of the vector field along the integration lines and are called the longitudinal and transverse measurements, respectively. In most cases, however, the transverse measurements cannot be physically acquired. Therefore, the VT methods are typically used to reconstruct divergence-free (or source-free) velocity and flow fields that can be reconstructed solely from the longitudinal measurements. In this paper, we show how vector fields with non-zero divergence in a bounded domain can also be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements without the need of explicitly evaluating the transverse measurements. To the best of our knowledge, VT has not previously been used for this purpose. In particular, we study low-frequency, time-harmonic electric fields generated by dipole sources in convex bounded domains which arise, for example, in electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging. We explain in detail the theoretical background, the derivation of the electric field inverse problem and the numerical approximation of the line integrals. We show that fields with non-zero divergence can be reconstructed from the longitudinal measurements with the help of two sparsity constraints that are constructed from the transverse measurements and the vector Laplace operator. As a comparison to EEG source imaging, we note that VT does not require mathematical modeling of the sources. By numerical simulations, we show that the pattern of the electric field can be correctly estimated using VT and the location of the source activity can be determined accurately from the reconstructed magnitudes of the field. - Highlights: • Vector tomography is used to reconstruct electric fields generated by dipole

  19. Sensitivity study of an ultrasound coupled transrectal electrical impedance tomography system for prostate imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Y; Halter, R; Borsic, A; Manwaring, P; Hartov, A; Paulsen, K

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, prostate cancer ranked as the most common cancer and the second most fatal cancer in men in the United States. Unfortunately, the current clinical diagnostic methods (e.g. prostate-specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal examination, endorectal MRI, transrectal ultrasound, biopsy) used for detecting and staging prostate cancer are limited. It has been shown that cancerous prostate tissue has significantly different electrical properties when compared to benign tissues. Based on these electrical property findings, a transrectal electrical impedance tomography (TREIT) system is proposed as a novel prostate imaging modality. The TREIT system comprises an array of electrodes interfaced with a clinical transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe. We evaluate this imaging system through a series of phantom imaging experiments to assess the system's ability to image high and low contrast objects at various positions. We found that the TREIT system can easily discern high contrast inclusions of 1 cm in diameter at distances centered at two times the radius of the TREIT probe away from the probe surface. Furthermore, this technology's ability to detect low contrast inclusions suggests that it has the potential to successfully detect prostate cancer

  20. Denoising of B1+ field maps for noise-robust image reconstruction in electrical properties tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Eric; Hernandez, Daniel; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of adaptive nonlinear filters in reconstructing conductivity and permittivity images from the noisy B 1 + maps in electrical properties tomography (EPT). Methods: In EPT, electrical property images are computed by taking Laplacian of the B 1 + maps. To mitigate the noise amplification in computing the Laplacian, the authors applied adaptive nonlinear denoising filters to the measured complex B 1 + maps. After the denoising process, they computed the Laplacian by central differences. They performed EPT experiments on phantoms and a human brain at 3 T along with corresponding EPT simulations on finite-difference time-domain models. They evaluated the EPT images comparing them with the ones obtained by previous EPT reconstruction methods. Results: In both the EPT simulations and experiments, the nonlinear filtering greatly improved the EPT image quality when evaluated in terms of the mean and standard deviation of the electrical property values at the regions of interest. The proposed method also improved the overall similarity between the reconstructed conductivity images and the true shapes of the conductivity distribution. Conclusions: The nonlinear denoising enabled us to obtain better-quality EPT images of the phantoms and the human brain at 3 T

  1. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as Bz. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple Bz data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured Bz data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  2. Visualization of latent fingerprints beneath opaque electrical tapes by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kangkang; Zhang, Ning; Meng, Li; Li, Zhigang; Xu, Xiaojing

    2018-03-01

    Electrical tape is found as one type of important trace evidence in crime scene. For example, it is very frequently used to insulate wires in explosive devices in many criminal cases. The fingerprints of the suspects were often left on the adhesive side of the tapes, which can provide very useful clues for the investigation and make it possible for individual identification. The most commonly used method to detect and visualize those latent fingerprints is to peel off each layer of the tapes first and then adopt the chemical methods to develop the fingerprints on the tapes. However, the peeling-off and chemical development process would degrade and contaminate the fingerprints and thus adversely affect the accuracy of identification. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel forensic imaging modality based on lowcoherence interferometry, which has the advantages of non-destruction, micrometer-level high resolution and crosssectional imaging. In this study, a fiber-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) system with {6μm resolution was employed to obtain the image of fingerprint sandwiched between two opaque electrical tapes without any pre-processing procedure like peeling-off. Three-dimensional (3D) OCT reconstruction was performed and the subsurface image was produced to visualize the latent fingerprints. The results demonstrate that OCT is a promising tool for recovering the latent fingerprints hidden beneath opaque electrical tape non-destructively and rapidly.

  3. Monitoring Soil Hydraulic and Thermal Properties using Coupled Inversion of Time-lapse Temperature and Electrical Resistance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, A. P.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Faybishenko, B.; Long, P.

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of spatiotemporal dynamics of heat transport and water flow in terrestrial environments is essential for understanding hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Electrical resistance tomography has been increasingly well used for monitoring subsurface hydrological processes and estimating soil hydraulic properties through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. However, electrical resistivity depends on a variety of factors such as temperature, which may limit the accuracy of hydrogeophysical inversion. The main objective of this study is to develop a hydrogeophysical inversion framework to enable the incorporation of nonisothermal processes into the hydrogeophysical inversion procedure, and use of this procedure to investigate the effect of hydrological controls on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial environments. We developed the coupled hydro-thermal-geophysical inversion approach, using the iTOUGH2 framework. In this framework, the heat transport and water flow are simultaneously modeled with TOUGH2 code, which effectively accounts for the multiphase, multi-component and nonisothermal flow in porous media. A flexible approach is used to incorporate petrophysical relationships and uncertainty to link soil moisture and temperature with the electrical resistivity. The developed approach was applied to both synthetic and field case studies. At the DOE subsurface biogeochemistry field site located near Rifle CO, seasonal snowmelt delivers a hydrological pulse to the system, which in turn influences the cycles of nitrogen, carbon and other critical elements. Using the new approach, we carried out numerical inversion of electrical resistance data collected along a 100 m transect at the Rifle site, and compared the results with field investigations of the soil, vadose zone, including the capillary fringe, and groundwater, as well as temperature and tensiometer measurements. Preliminary results show the importance of accounting for nonisothermal conditions to

  4. Fabrication of an Electrically-Resistive, Varistor-Polymer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz A. Mohammadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the fabrication and electrical characterization of a polymer composite based on nano-sized varistor powder. The polymer composite was fabricated by the melt-blending method. The developed nano-composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FeSEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX. The XRD pattern revealed the crystallinity of the composite. The XRD study also showed the presence of secondary phases due to the substitution of zinc by other cations, such as bismuth and manganese. The TEM picture of the sample revealed the distribution of the spherical, nano-sized, filler particles throughout the matrix, which were in the 10–50 nm range with an average of approximately 11 nm. The presence of a bismuth-rich phase and a ZnO matrix phase in the ZnO-based varistor powder was confirmed by FeSEM images and EDX spectra. From the current-voltage curves, the non-linear coefficient of the varistor polymer composite with 70 wt% of nano filler was 3.57, and its electrical resistivity after the onset point was 861 KΩ. The non-linear coefficient was 1.11 in the sample with 100 wt% polymer content. Thus, it was concluded that the composites established a better electrical non-linearity at higher filler amounts due to the nano-metric structure and closer particle linkages.

  5. Modeling of shaft tombs in western Mexico by mean of resistive tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Gutierrez-Peña, Q. J.; Gomez-Gomez, G.; Rosas-Elguera, J.

    2013-05-01

    The archaeological affluence of Mexico is huge. However, the western part of the country is viewed as lacking of important prehispanic constructions. Discoveries since 1970 have exposed an ancient culture that has been termed as Teuchitlan Tradition. This culture is characterized by ceremonial centers formed with circular pyramids and several rectangular platforms surrounding them, and tombs below any of these structures. The tombs in turn are typically composed of a vertical shaft and one to three horizontal chambers, where bodies were placed. Due to this character is also referred to as Shaft Tombs Culture. The tombs are located mainly in low cohesion pumice, welded tephras and volcanic ash deposits. The vertical shafts were usually filled, and there was always the camera. Two major centers developed by this culture are found in Teuchitlan and El Arenal, in the western state of Jalisco. The former has been rebuilt and is currently open to tourism, while the latter is not restored yet. The latter apparently has two ceremonial centers located at two different altitudes. We conducted a survey in both sites with resistive tomography. The first study was conducted in Teuchitlan, on a circular platform. In this structure there are already located three shaft tombs. The results obtained using the Wenner alpha array with equidistance of 0.5 and 1 meter, are successful. The data have been modeled using the program RES2DINV, and models obtained show the presence of a boot-shaped tomb and other like bottle. The graves are identified with higher resistivity values, while values lower than 30 ohm-m indicate moisture leaks at the ends of the structure. Theoretical modeling of the tombs and the building was carried out, which is compared with the actual sections and their inversion models. Coincidences are appreciable. With this results, were conducted two lines in ceremonial centers of El Arenal, to identify the occurrence of shaft tombs. The two centers are separated by

  6. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Keller, N.A.; Lupton, L.R.; Taylor, T.; Tonner, P.D.

    1984-10-01

    Tomography is a non-intrusive imaging technique being developed at CRNL as an industrial tool for generating quantitative cross-sectional density maps of objects. Of most interest is tomography's ability to: distinguish features within complex geometries where other NDT techniques fail because of the complexity of the geometry; detect/locate small density changes/defects within objects, e.g. void fraction measurements within thick-walled vessels, shrink cavities in castings, etc.; provide quantitative data that can be used in analyses, e.g. of complex processes, or fracture mechanics; and provide objective quantitative data that can be used for (computer-based) quality assurance decisions, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating the present subjectivity often encountered in NDT. The CRNL program is reviewed and examples are presented to illustrate the potential and the limitations of the technology

  7. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  8. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  9. System Description and First Application of an FPGA-Based Simultaneous Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Aguiar Santos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new prototype of a multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system is presented. The system uses a field-programmable gate array as a main controller and is configured to measure at different frequencies simultaneously through a composite waveform. Both real and imaginary components of the data are computed for each frequency and sent to the personal computer over an ethernet connection, where both time-difference imaging and frequency-difference imaging are reconstructed and visualized. The system has been tested for both time-difference and frequency-difference imaging for diverse sets of frequency pairs in a resistive/capacitive test unit and in self-experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows preliminary frequency-difference images of in-vivo experiments. Results of time-difference imaging were compared with simulation results and shown that the new prototype performs well at all frequencies in the tested range of 60 kHz–960 kHz. For frequency-difference images, further development of algorithms and an improved normalization process is required to correctly reconstruct and interpreted the resulting images.

  10. Influence of the internal wall thickness of electrical capacitance tomography sensors on image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shiguo; Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Wu, Meng; Yang, Wuqiang

    2018-03-01

    In the design of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensors, the internal wall thickness can vary with specific applications, and it is a key factor that influences the sensitivity distribution and image quality. This paper will discuss the effect of the wall thickness of ECT sensors on image quality. Three flow patterns are simulated for wall thicknesses of 2.5 mm to 15 mm on eight-electrode ECT sensors. The sensitivity distributions and potential distributions are compared for different wall thicknesses. Linear back-projection and Landweber iteration algorithms are used for image reconstruction. Relative image error and correlation coefficients are used for image evaluation using both simulation and experimental data.

  11. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Moeller, Knut; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT. (paper)

  12. Research on Application of Wax Deposition Detection in the Nonmetallic Pipeline Based on Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wax deposition detection in nonmetallic pipelines is an important requirement in the oil industry. In this paper, an ECT (electrical capacitance tomography sensor is developed for wax deposition detection in nonmetallic pipelines. Four wax models with different concentrations were established for detection. These models were analyzed through simulations and practical experiments simultaneously and data were compared. A linear back projection algorithm is applied to reconstruct the image with both simulated and experimental data. A comparison of binary images with different concentration of stratified flow was demonstrated; this illustrates that the difference in concentration between the experimental results and profile distribution is less than 1.2%. The experimental results indicate that the ECT system is valid and feasible for detecting the degree of wax deposition in the nonmetallic pipelines.

  13. Exponential model normalization for electrical capacitance tomography with external electrodes under gap permittivity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baidillah, Marlin R; Takei, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    A nonlinear normalization model which is called exponential model for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) with external electrodes under gap permittivity conditions has been developed. The exponential model normalization is proposed based on the inherently nonlinear relationship characteristic between the mixture permittivity and the measured capacitance due to the gap permittivity of inner wall. The parameters of exponential equation are derived by using an exponential fitting curve based on the simulation and a scaling function is added to adjust the experiment system condition. The exponential model normalization was applied to two dimensional low and high contrast dielectric distribution phantoms by using simulation and experimental studies. The proposed normalization model has been compared with other normalization models i.e. Parallel, Series, Maxwell and Böttcher models. Based on the comparison of image reconstruction results, the exponential model is reliable to predict the nonlinear normalization of measured capacitance in term of low and high contrast dielectric distribution. (paper)

  14. A wide-band AC-coupled current source for electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragós, R; Rosell, J; Riu, P

    1994-05-01

    A current source suitable for application in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is described. The first stage of the commercially available current-feedback amplifier AD844 constitutes a current-conveyor implementation and allows the construction of wide-bandwidth current sources, thus avoiding the mismatching and temperature-induced problems that arise in discrete realizations. The lack in gain accuracy of this circuit is overcome by the inclusion of its input buffer in an operational amplifier (op amp) feedback loop. Saturation problems that appear when placing a DC-blocking capacitor between the source and the electrode are solved by a DC feedback that maintains DC voltage at the output near to 0 V without reducing the output impedance of the source. Two AC-coupled current sources, in both inverting and non-inverting configurations, are described and their possible applications to EIT are listed.

  15. Generating anatomically accurate finite element meshes for electrical impedance tomography of the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Canhua; Dai, Meng; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-07-01

    For electrical impedance tomography (EIT) of brain, the use of anatomically accurate and patient-specific finite element (FE) mesh has been shown to confer significant improvements in the quality of image reconstruction. But, given the lack of a rapid method to achieve the accurate anatomic geometry of the head, the generation of patient-specifc mesh is time-comsuming. In this paper, a modified fuzzy c-means algorithm based on non-local means method is performed to implement the segmentation of different layers in the head based on head CT images. This algorithm showed a better effect, especially an accurate recognition of the ventricles and a suitable performance dealing with noise. And the FE mesh established according to the segmentation results is validated in computational simulation. So a rapid practicable method can be provided for the generation of patient-specific FE mesh of the human head that is suitable for brain EIT.

  16. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Moeller, Knut

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT.

  17. A reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography based on sparsity regularization

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2011-08-24

    This paper develops a novel sparse reconstruction algorithm for the electrical impedance tomography problem of determining a conductivity parameter from boundary measurements. The sparsity of the \\'inhomogeneity\\' with respect to a certain basis is a priori assumed. The proposed approach is motivated by a Tikhonov functional incorporating a sparsity-promoting ℓ 1-penalty term, and it allows us to obtain quantitative results when the assumption is valid. A novel iterative algorithm of soft shrinkage type was proposed. Numerical results for several two-dimensional problems with both single and multiple convex and nonconvex inclusions were presented to illustrate the features of the proposed algorithm and were compared with one conventional approach based on smoothness regularization. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Compensation for geometric modeling errors by positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyvönen, N; Majander, H; Staboulis, S

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography aims at reconstructing the conductivity inside a physical body from boundary measurements of current and voltage at a finite number of contact electrodes. In many practical applications, the shape of the imaged object is subject to considerable uncertainties that render reconstructing the internal conductivity impossible if they are not taken into account. This work numerically demonstrates that one can compensate for inaccurate modeling of the object boundary in two spatial dimensions by finding compatible locations and sizes for the electrodes as a part of a reconstruction algorithm. The numerical studies, which are based on both simulated and experimental data, are complemented by proving that the employed complete electrode model is approximately conformally invariant, which suggests that the obtained reconstructions in mismodeled domains reflect conformal images of the true targets. The numerical experiments also confirm that a similar approach does not, in general, lead to a functional algorithm in three dimensions. (paper)

  19. Evaluation of reconstruction parameters of electrical impedance tomography on aorta detection during saline bolus injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thürk Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate detection of anatomical structures in electrical impedance tomography (EIT is still at an early stage. Aorta detection in EIT is of special interest, since it would favor non-invasive assessment of hemodynamic processes in the body. Here, diverse EIT reconstruction parameters of the GREIT algorithm were systematically evaluated to detect the aorta after saline bolus injection in apnea. True aorta position and size were taken from computed tomography (CT. A comparison with CT showed that the smallest error for aorta displacement was attained for noise figure nf = 0.7, weighting radius rw = 0.15, and target size ts = 0.01. The spatial extension of the aorta was most precise for nf = 0.7, rw = 0.25, and ts = 0.07. Detection accuracy (F1-score was highest with nf = 0.6, rw = 0.15, and ts = 0.04. This work provides algorithm-related evidence for potentially accurate aorta detection in EIT after injection of a saline bolus.

  20. Electrical impedance tomography through constrained sequential linear programming: a topology optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Cícero R.; Mello, Luis A. M.; Gonzalez Lima, Raul; Silva, Emílio C. N.

    2007-09-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging method that estimates conductivity distribution inside a body. In EIT, images are obtained by applying a sequence of low intensity electrical currents through electrodes attached to the body. Although in EIT there are serious difficulties to obtain a high-quality conductivity image, for medical applications this technology is safer and cheaper than other tomography techniques. The EIT deals with an inverse problem in which given the measured voltages on electrodes and a finite element (FE) model, it estimates the conductivity distribution, which are parameters of the FE model. In this work, the topology optimization method is applied as a reconstruction algorithm to obtain absolute images in EIT. It is an optimization method that has been applied successfully to structural mechanical applications and consists of systematically finding a conductivity distribution (or material distribution) in the domain that minimizes the difference between measured voltages and voltages calculated by using a computational model. This algorithm combines the finite element method and sequential linear programming (SLP) to solve the inverse problem of EIT. The SLP allows us to easily apply some regularization schemes based on included constraints in the topology optimization problem. Constraints based on image tuning control and weighted distance interpolation (WDI) are proposed, while a material model is applied to ensure the relaxation of the optimization problem. A new formulation to analytically perform the sensitivity analysis is proposed, using Maxwell's reciprocity theorem. To illustrate, the implemented algorithm is applied to obtain conductivity image distributions of some 2D examples using numerical and experimental data.

  1. On micro to mesoscale homogenization of electrical properties for damaged laminated composites (and their potential applications in electrical tomography)

    KAUST Repository

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    Efficient and optimal use of composites in structures requires tools to monitor and capture the complex degradation that can occur within the laminates over time. Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques uses sensors/actuators on the structure to progressively monitor the health of the structure with minimal manual intervention. Electrical tomography (ET) is a SHM technique that uses voltage measurements from the surface of the laminate to reconstruct a conductivity map of the structure. Since damage has been shown to modify the conductivity of the laminate, the conductivity map can provide an indirect measure of the damage within the material. Studies have shown the capability of ET to identify macroscale damage due to impact. But, little has been done to quantitatively assess damage using ET. In this work, we present a theoretical framework to link degradation mechanisms occuring at the microscale to the conductivity at the mesoscale through damage indicators. The mesoscale damage indicators are then shown to be intrinsic to the ply. Next, we use the knowledge obtained through mesoscale homogenization to study the detectability of transverse cracks. Last, we show how the mesoscale homogenization participates in regularization of the inverse problem and in the quantitative assessment of the reconstructed conductivity map. This is as such the first step towards turning ET into a viable quantitative health monitoring technique.

  2. Low-temperature electrical resistivity study of deformed Inconel alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, F.S.; Yao, Y.D.; Wang, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of a plastic deformed Inconel alloy 600 (alloy of Ni 72 Cr 16 Fe 8) as function of temperature between 25 K and 300 K was studied. The deformation does not affect the Curie temperature much; it is roughly near 176 K of the deflected point at electrical resistivity, except for the sample with 75% deformation. The λ-type behavior of the electrical resistivity is a typical signal for the magnetic phase transition

  3. Resistive graphene humidity sensors with rapid and direct electrical readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anderson D.; Elgammal, Karim; Niklaus, Frank; Delin, Anna; Fischer, Andreas C.; Vaziri, Sam; Forsberg, Fredrik; Råsander, Mikael; Hugosson, Håkan; Bergqvist, Lars; Schröder, Stephan; Kataria, Satender; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits.We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further

  4. UV-Cured Inkjet-Printed Silver Gate Electrode with Low Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Honglong; Zhou, Yicong; Fang, Zhiqiang; Yao, Rihui; Tao, Ruiqiang; Chen, Jianqiu; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Zhennan; Yang, Caigui; Wei, Jinglin; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2017-09-01

    Inkjet-printed silver gate electrode with low electrical resistivity was fabricated by UV curing method. By adjusting the UV curing time and the distance between the samples and UV lamp, the effects of UV curing conditions on the electrical resistivity of the silver films were studied, and the lowest electrical resistivity of 6.69 × 10-8 Ω·m was obtained. Besides, the UV-cured silver films have good adhesion to the glass substrates, with adhesion strength of 4B (ASTM international standard). Our work offered an easy and low temperature approach to fabricate inkjet-printed silver electrodes with low electrical resistivity.

  5. Seasonal electrical resistivity surveys of a coastal bluff, Barter Island, North Slope Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Johnson, Cordell; Lorenson, Thomas; Conaway, Christopher H.; Gibbs, Ann E.; Erikson, Li; Richmond, Bruce M.; Waldrop, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Select coastal regions of the North Slope of Alaska are experiencing high erosion rates that can be attributed in part to recent warming trends and associated increased storm intensity and frequency. The upper sediment column of the coastal North Slope of Alaska can be described as continuous permafrost underlying a thin (typically less than 1–2 m) active layer that responds variably to seasonal thaw cycles. Assessing the temporal and spatial variability of the active layer and underlying permafrost is essential to better constrain how heightened erosion may impact material fluxes to the atmosphere and the coastal ocean, and how enhanced thaw cycles may impact the stability of the coastal bluffs. In this study, multi-channel electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to image shallow subsurface features of a coastal bluff west of Kaktovik, on Barter Island, northeast Alaska. A comparison of a suite of paired resistivity surveys conducted in early and late summer 2014 provided detailed information on how the active layer and permafrost are impacted during the short Arctic summer. Such results are useful in the development of coastal resilience models that tie together fluvial, terrestrial, climatic, geologic, and oceanographic forcings on shoreline stability.

  6. Reliability of copper based alloys for electric resistance spot welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovicj, M.; Mihajlovicj, A.; Sherbedzhija, B.

    1977-01-01

    Durability of copper based alloys (B-5 and B-6) for electric resistance spot-welding was examined. The total amount of Be, Ni and Zr was up to 2 and 1 wt.% respectively. Good durability and satisfactory quality of welded spots were obtained in previous laboratory experiments carried out on the fixed spot-welding machine of an industrial type (only B-5 alloy was examined). Electrodes made of both B-5 and B-6 alloy were tested on spot-welding grips and fixed spot-welding machines in Tvornica automobila Sarajevo (TAS). The obtained results suggest that the durability of electrodes made of B-5 and B-6 alloys is more than twice better than of that used in TAS

  7. Material variability as measured by low temperature electrical resistivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A. F.; Tryon, P. V.

    1972-01-01

    Low temperature electrical resistivity was used to determine the material variability (1) between different manufacturers, (2) between different heats from the same manufacturer, and (3) within a given heat for Al 2024, Al-5% Mg alloys, Inconel 718, A286 stainless, and AISI 316. Generally, the coefficient of variation for solution annealed alloys ranged from 1.2 to 14% between manufacturers, 0.8 to 5.1% between heats, and 0.1 to 1.6% within a heat with stainless steels at the low ends and Al 2024 at the high ends. The variability is increased if the material is in a precipitation-hardened condition. A statistical analysis suggests that the variability within a heat is non-normal.

  8. An alternative methodology for the analysis of electrical resistivity data from a soil gas study

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sara; Rosqvist, Hakan; Svensson, Mats; Dahlin, Torleif; Leroux, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method for the analysis of resistivity data. The methodology was developed during a study to evaluate if electrical resistivity can be used as a tool for analysing subsurface gas dynamics and gas emissions from landfills. The main assumption of this study was that variations in time of resistivity data correspond to variations in the relative amount of gas and water in the soil pores. Field measurements of electrical resistivity, static chamb...

  9. Investigation of a slope endangered by rainfall-induced landslides using 3D resistivity tomography and geotechnical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, S.; Thielen, A.; Springman, S. M.

    2006-10-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides pose a common problem in areas with slopes steeper than the friction angle of the soil. A series of such landslides in North Switzerland inspired a detailed geophysical and geotechnical site investigation prior to a monitoring experiment. High-resolution 2D and 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to derive a detailed subsurface image, which was verified by direct penetration tests, boreholes and laboratory analysis of soil samples with respect to grain size distribution and plasticity. Resolution analysis of ERT configurations proved a combination of Wenner-, Schlumberger- and Dipole-Dipole data to be a reasonable compromise between measurement time and model accuracy. Furthermore, a statistical approach to reducing subjectivity in the interpretation of 3D resistivity models is suggested. Applying this classification scheme to field data yields a model in very good agreement with the geotechnical model. The 3D resistivity model is then interpreted quantitatively using laboratory data and a constitutive relation accounting for clay and silt contents. The dominant influence of saturation on resistivity predicted by this model is confirmed and exemplified during repeated surveys in a dry and a wet period. In wet summer 2004, a silty sand layer of high water saturation is confined between two less permeable layers, the sandstone bedrock below and a clayey sand layer on top. This layer may locally form an aquifer, which becomes rapidly saturated during heavy rainfalls and contributes to the risk of failure. The combined ERT and geotechnical survey helped to optimize the design of the forthcoming monitoring experiment and may be used as a guideline for the investigation of similar slope conditions.

  10. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-07-26

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices.

  11. Focused current density imaging using internal electrode in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging modality capable of visualizing cross-sectional current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. It uses an MRI scanner to measure one component of the magnetic flux density induced by an externally injected current through a pair of surface electrodes. For the cases of deep brain stimulation (DBS), electroporation, and radio frequency (RF) ablation, internal electrodes can be used to improve the quality of the MREIT images. In this paper, we propose a new MREIT imaging method using internal electrodes to visualize a current density distribution within a local region around them. To evaluate its performance, we conducted and analyzed a series of numerical simulations and phantom imaging experiments. We compared the reconstructed current density images using the internal electrodes with the obtained using only the external electrodes. We found that the proposed method using the internal electrodes stably determines the current density in the focused region with better accuracy.

  12. FPGA Based High Speed Data Acquisition System for Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S.; Borsic, A.; Manwaring, Preston; Hartov, Alexander; Halter, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) systems are used to image tissue bio-impedance. EIT provides a number of features making it attractive for use as a medical imaging device including the ability to image fast physiological processes (>60 Hz), to meet a range of clinical imaging needs through varying electrode geometries and configurations, to impart only non-ionizing radiation to a patient, and to map the significant electrical property contrasts present between numerous benign and pathological tissues. To leverage these potential advantages for medical imaging, we developed a modular 32 channel data acquisition (DAQ) system using National Instruments' PXI chassis, along with FPGA, ADC, Signal Generator and Timing and Synchronization modules. To achieve high frame rates, signal demodulation and spectral characteristics of higher order harmonics were computed using dedicated FFT-hardware built into the FPGA module. By offloading the computing onto FPGA, we were able to achieve a reduction in throughput required between the FPGA and PC by a factor of 32:1. A custom designed analog front end (AFE) was used to interface electrodes with our system. Our system is wideband, and capable of acquiring data for input signal frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 12 MHz. The modular design of both the hardware and software will allow this system to be flexibly configured for the particular clinical application.

  13. Application of Electrical Resistivity Imaging and Land Surveying in the Analysis of Underground Construction Impact on the Warsaw Scarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczmarek Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the II Underground Line construction’s impact on the Warsaw Scarp with the use of the electrical resistivity imaging (ERI, also known as the electrical resistivity tomography and further total station position measurements.The underground passes under the scarp perpendicular in the area of Dynasy Street 6, in Down-town district.The electrical resistivity imaging was performed for recognition of the geological structure and a potential land slide surface or zone.The gradient system was used during the prospection. In these analyses, the longitudinal section was 40 m long, and the depth of survey amounted to 6 m. In the case of the 200 m long transverse section, the resulted depth of survey was 30 m.The geophysical image of the longitudinal section,does not contain loosening soil zones,which could indicates lip surface.Next, total station measurements, which were tied to the archival geodetic observations’ results, were carried out. The aim of the measurements was to verify the activity of the horizontal and vertical displacements. The TBM excavation process led to summary vertical displacements up to approx. 24 mm and horizontal displacements amounting to approx. 13 mm. To sum up, the current land surveys reveals minor under ground line’ s construction impact on the scarp displacement. Nevertheless, the sensitive urban environment requires further monitoring, especially that the operation loads can result in displacement rate change.

  14. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Amanda C [Malibu, CA; Kirby, Kevin K [Calabasas Hills, CA; Gregoire, Daniel J [Thousand Oaks, CA

    2012-02-14

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  15. Experimental study of the electric resistivity in Heusler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzler, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been performed in the Cu 2 Mn (A1sub(1-x) Snsub(x)) Heusler alloys, where x = 0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15, in the temperature range from 4.2 to 800 0 K. Measurements have also been made on the Ni 2 MnX Heusler asloys, with X = In, Sn or Sb, in the range from 4.2 to 300 0 K. The experimental curves clearly show the importance of the ferromagnetic character for the alloys resistivity. The results obtained for the copper alloys, as well as for the Ni 2 MnSn alloy, are in agreement with an interpretation in terms of Bloch-Gruneisen and spin-disorder models, and fail to provide evidences of s-d scattering for the conduction electrons. This is not the case for the Ni 2 MnIn and Ni 2 MnSb alloys, in which the presence of (s-d) interband electronic scattering process, via phonon, was detected. Specially for the two last alloys specific heat and electronic photo-emissivity experiments are suggested. (Author) [pt

  16. A comparison of methods for in situ discrimination of imaged phase boundaries using electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. J.; Tsoligkas, A. N.; Simmons, M. J. H.; Robbins, P. T.; Stitt, E. H.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of hard boundaries using tomographic techniques is challenging due to the measurement resolution inherent in the hardware and smoothing effects created during image reconstruction. This paper is concerned with the development of data processing approaches which enable the use of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) in real-time applications to visualise interfaces in liquid/liquid and solid/liquid systems based upon phase permittivity differences in media with a high di-electric continuum. The methodologies developed were applied to a series of phantoms to investigate their validity as a tool for imaging phase boundaries in two and three phase systems. In an ECT based tomogram, the interface between phases is exhibited as a transition region; by applying a threshold technique based upon known areas of each respective phase within the system, the transient region can be resolved into a sharp interface. The image error of a tomogram, defined as the deviation of all pixels from their theoretical value, has been calculated using a pixel-by-pixel approach; however this requires exact a priori knowledge and is unsuitable for in-line application; the areal method used in this paper requires global phase distribution information thereby allowing for real-time application. A range of threshold values were applied to tomograms of phantoms of varying geometry and the corresponding image error for each threshold value calculated using both the areal and pixel-by-pixel approaches given above. The threshold value yielding lowest image error from this range is further used in the binary images giving improved tomograms with approximately 40% increase in image accuracy when compared with a default threshold value. Close to the sensor wall, the image becomes distorted due to reconstruction errors arising from decreased density in the electrical field lines, resulting in a circular phantom appearing elongated by approximately 10% when positioned near the wall.

  17. Frequency-Division Multiplexing for Electrical Impedance Tomography in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical impedance tomography (EIT produces an image of the electrical impedance distribution of tissues in the body, using electrodes that are placed on the periphery of the imaged area. These electrodes inject currents and measure voltages and from these data, the impedance can be computed. Traditional EIT systems usually inject current patterns in a serial manner which means that the impedance is computed from data collected at slightly different times. It is usually also a time-consuming process. In this paper, we propose a method for collecting data concurrently from all of the current patterns in biomedical applications of EIT. This is achieved by injecting current through all of the current injecting electrodes simultaneously, and measuring all of the resulting voltages at once. The signals from various current injecting electrodes are separated by injecting different frequencies through each electrode. This is called frequency-division multiplexing (FDM. At the voltage measurement electrodes, the voltage related to each current injecting electrode is isolated by using Fourier decomposition. In biomedical applications, using different frequencies has important implications due to dispersions as the tissue's electrical properties change with frequency. Another significant issue arises when we are recording data in a dynamic environment where the properties change very fast. This method allows simultaneous measurements of all the current patterns, which may be important in applications where the tissue changes occur in the same time scale as the measurement. We discuss the FDM EIT method from the biomedical point of view and show results obtained with a simple experimental system.

  18. Irreversibility in transformation behavior of equiatomic nickel-titanium alloy by electrical resistivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistivity were precisely performed on shape memory Ni 50 Ti 50 alloy in order to reveal the irreversible behavior of the thermoelastic martensitic transformation with thermal cycling. The hump in the electrical resistivity during cooling is enhanced with increasing the number of complete thermal cycles to result in a peak, although no peak in the electrical resistivity is observed on the reverse transformation during heating. The electrical resistivity in the low-temperature phase, of which the temperature dependence is linear, increases with increasing the number of complete thermal cycles. The temperature coefficient of the electrical resistivity in the temperature region of the high-temperature phase increases with elevating the temperature. The transformation is strongly influenced by incomplete thermal cycles to result in a peak in the resistivity even on the reverse transformation after incomplete thermal cycling. It is thought that the anomalous behavior such as enhancement of a resistivity-peak, the increase in the electrical resistivity of the low-temperature phase, and the nonlinear relation between the resistivity and the temperature in the high-temperature phase are attributable to the appearance of an intermediate phase stabilized by transformation-induced defects, the accumulation of the transformation-induced defects, and the electron scattering due to the softening of a phonon mode in the high-temperature phase, respectively. It proved useful to make more accurate measurements of the electrical resistivity in order to investigate the intrinsic behavior of the transformation in NiTi

  19. Temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils; Tsuchi no hiteiko no ondo izonsei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.; Matsui, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Park, M.; Fujiwara, H. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Kinds of ground materials, porosity, electrical resistivity of pores, degree of saturation, and content of clays are the factors affecting the electrical resistivity of soils. In addition to these factors, the electrical resistivity of soils around hot spring water and geothermal areas depends on the temperature due to fluctuation of cation mobility in the pore water with the temperature. In this paper, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of groundwater and soils is investigated by recognizing that of groundwater as that of pore water. As a result, it was found that the electrical resistivity of groundwater becomes lower as increasing the amount of dissolved cation, and that the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity is not significant because of the small mobility of cation. The electrical resistivity of soils was significantly affected by that of pore water, in which the mobility of cation was changed with temperature changes. Accordingly, the temperature dependency of electrical resistivity of soils has a similar tendency as that of groundwater. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Pressure and temperature induced electrical resistance change in nano-carbon/epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J. T.; Buschhorn, S. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Schulte, K.; Fiedler, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the changes of electrical resistance of the carbon black (CB) and carbon nanotube (CNT) filled epoxy composites upon compression, swelling and temperature variation. For all samples we observe a decrease of electrical resistance under compression, while an increase of

  1. Feature enhancement from electrical resistivity data in an archaeological survey: the Sapelos hillfort experiment (Boticas, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mafalda; Bernardes, Paulo; Fontes, Luís.; Martins, Manuela; Madeira, Joaquim

    2015-06-01

    The PoPaTERVA project is developing applied research regarding the comprehension of the multi-layered cultural background of the Terva Valley Archaeological Park, in Boticas, Portugal. One of the main aspects focused on the project is the appliance of remote sensing techniques to enhance non visible archaeological features. An earth resistance tomography (ERT) survey was carried out at the Sapelos hillfort, by the specialized SINERGEO geophysicist's team, using a Wenner-Schlumberger array. The resulting data was analyzed by the authors in order to extract and verify valid archaeological features regarding the settlement's structures. There are several adequate systems that can be used to visualize the surveyed data (x, y, z, Ω). However, the authors preferred the open source Visualization Toolkit (VTK) from Kitware Inc., since it supports several visualization and modelling techniques that are useful for interpretation purposes in archaeological contexts: for instance, it is possible to represent the archaeological site as a virtual scale model, which can be freely manipulated. For the Sapelos hillfort, two distinct visualizations were developed to represent the acquired electrical resistivity data. The first one is used to create a comprehensive volume from the surveyed data, which is imported as structured 3D points and mapped into a 3D volume. However, this representation does not provide the necessary insight for analysis purposes, so a second visualization is needed to cluster the relevant data for archaeological research. This visualization is based on contouring algorithms that generate isosurfaces from scalar resistivity values (Ω), therefore enhancing the features with potential archaeological interest.

  2. Anatomically accurate hard priors for transrectal electrical impedance tomography (TREIT) of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, H; Borsic, A; Hartov, A; Halter, R J

    2012-01-01

    Current prostate biopsy procedures entail sampling tissues at template-based locations that are not patient specific. Ultrasound (US)-coupled transrectal electrical impedance tomography (TREIT), featuring an endorectal US probe retrofitted with electrodes, has been developed for prostate imaging. This multi-modal imaging system aims to identify suspicious tumor regions based on their electrical properties and ultimately provide additional patient-specific locations where to take biopsy samples. Unfortunately, the open-domain geometry associated with TREIT results in a severely ill-posed problem due to the small number of measurements and unbounded imaging domain. Furthermore, reconstructing contrasts within the prostate volume is challenging because the conductivity differences between the prostate and surrounding tissues are much larger than the conductivity differences between benign and malignant tissues within the prostate. To help overcome these problems, anatomically accurate hard priors can be employed to limit estimation of the electrical property distribution to within the prostate volume; however, this requires the availability of structural information. Here, a method that extracts the prostate surface from US images and incorporates this surface into the image reconstruction algorithm has been developed to enable estimation of electrical parameters within the prostate volume. In this paper, the performance of this algorithm is evaluated against a more traditional EIT algorithm that does not use anatomically accurate structural information, in the context of numerical simulations and phantom experiments. The developed anatomically accurate hard-prior algorithm demonstrably identifies contrasts within the prostate volume while an algorithm that does not rely on anatomically accurate structural information is unable to localize these contrasts. While inclusions are identified in the correct locations, they are found to be smaller in size than the actual

  3. Influence of γ-ray on leaf tissue electrical resistance and its dynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shishi; Wang Zegang; Feng Min; Ma Fei; Ge Cailin

    2003-01-01

    Leaves of rice and tobacco were irradiated by γ-ray, and the dynamic change of electrical resistance and ion leakage of leaf tissue was studied. It is shown that, with the radiation dose rising, the leaf tissue electrical resistance for both plants rises firstly, and when the radiation dose exceeds a certain value, the resistance declines. But this change rule is different from the rule for ion leakage. And the method of measuring electrical resistance of leaf tissue can reveal the γ-ray's influence on plant more sensitively

  4. An Electric Resistivity Study of the Chelungpu Fault in the Taichung Area, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Ping-Hu Cheng; Yueh-Iuan Ger; Szu-Lin Lee

    2008-01-01

    We conducted an electric resistivity survey consisting of six resistivity image profilings and several resistivity measurements on outcrops of strata in the Taichung area to investigate the subsurface structures of the Chelungpu fault. Three magnetotelluric sounding results are added to infer rock formations at depth. Based on the resistivity measurements on outcrops of the strata and the correlations between the interpretative resistivity structures and the rock formations recognized from dr...

  5. A new contact electric resistance technique for in-situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films on metals in electrolytes at high temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Marichev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Surface films play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films. The method has been upgraded for high temperature high pressure application. The technique can be used for any electrically conductive material in any environment including liquid, gas or vacuum. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals during adsorption of water and anions, formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides, electroplating of metals and to study the electric resistance of films on semiconductors. The resolution of the CER technique is 10 -9 Ω, which corresponds to about 0.03 monolayers of deposited copper during electrochemical deposition Cu/Cu 2+ . Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which enables one to follow in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes. The kinetics of these processes and their dependence on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential can be investigated

  6. Error analysis of helmholtz-based MR-electrical properties tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, Stefano; Sbrizzi, Alessandro; Katscher, Ulrich; Luijten, Peter R; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2017-11-16

    MR electrical properties tomography (MR-EPT) aims to measure tissue electrical properties by computing spatial derivatives of measured B1+ data. This computation is very sensitive to spatial fluctuations caused, for example, by noise and Gibbs ringing. In this work, the error arising from the computation of spatial derivatives using finite difference kernels (FD error) has been investigated. In relation to this FD error, it has also been investigated whether mitigation strategies such as Gibbs ringing correction and Gaussian apodization can be beneficial for conductivity reconstructions. Conductivity reconstructions were performed on a phantom (by means of simulations and MR measurements at 3T) and on a human brain model. The accuracy was evaluated as a function of image resolution, FD kernel size, k-space windowing, and signal-to-noise ratio. The impact of mitigation strategies was also investigated. The adopted small FD kernel is highly sensitive to spatial fluctuations, whereas the large FD kernel is more noise-robust. However, large FD kernels lead to extended numerical boundary error propagation, which severely hampers the MR-EPT reconstruction accuracy for highly spatially convoluted tissue structures such as the human brain. Mitigation strategies slightly improve the accuracy of conductivity reconstructions. For the adopted derivative kernels and the investigated scenario, MR-EPT conductivity reconstructions show low accuracy: less than 37% of the voxels have a relative error lower than 30%. The numerical error introduced by the computation of spatial derivatives using FD kernels is one of the major causes of limited accuracy in Helmholtz-based MR-EPT reconstructions. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for prostate cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging technique that reconstructs the conductivity distribution inside the subject using magnetic flux density or current density measurements acquired by a magnetic resonance imaging system. Since the primary prostate cancer diagnostic method, prostate biopsy, has limited accuracy in cancer diagnosis and malignant tissues have shown significantly different electrical properties from normal or benign tissues, MREIT has potential application in prostate cancer detection. The feasibility of utilizing MREIT in detecting prostate cancer was evaluated via a series of well-designed computer simulations in the present study. MREIT techniques with three different electrode configurations (external, trans-rectal, and trans-urethral electrode arrays) and two different reconstruction algorithms (J-substitution algorithm and harmonic B z  algorithm) were successfully developed. The performance of different MREIT techniques were evaluated and compared based on the imaging accuracy of the reconstructed conductivity distribution in the prostate. Without the presence of noise, the external MREIT achieves a better imaging accuracy than the two endo-MREIT (trans-rectal and trans-urethral) techniques, while the trans-urethral MREIT achieves the best imaging accuracy in noisy environments. We also found that the J-substitution reconstruction algorithm consistently offered better imaging accuracy than the harmonic B z  algorithm. When Gaussian distributed random noise with a standard deviation of 0.25 nT was added, the relative errors (RE) between the reconstructed and target conductivity distributions inside the prostate were observed to be 14.18% and 17.35% by the trans-urethral MREIT with the J-substitution and harmonic B z  algorithms respectively. The lower REs of 9.64% and 11.17% were achieved respectively when the standard deviation of noise was reduced to 0.05 nT. The simulation results demonstrate the

  8. FPGA-based voltage and current dual drive system for high frame rate electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shadab; Manwaring, Preston; Borsic, Andrea; Halter, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is used to image the electrical property distribution of a tissue under test. An EIT system comprises complex hardware and software modules, which are typically designed for a specific application. Upgrading these modules is a time-consuming process, and requires rigorous testing to ensure proper functioning of new modules with the existing ones. To this end, we developed a modular and reconfigurable data acquisition (DAQ) system using National Instruments' (NI) hardware and software modules, which offer inherent compatibility over generations of hardware and software revisions. The system can be configured to use up to 32-channels. This EIT system can be used to interchangeably apply current or voltage signal, and measure the tissue response in a semi-parallel fashion. A novel signal averaging algorithm, and 512-point fast Fourier transform (FFT) computation block was implemented on the FPGA. FFT output bins were classified as signal or noise. Signal bins constitute a tissue's response to a pure or mixed tone signal. Signal bins' data can be used for traditional applications, as well as synchronous frequency-difference imaging. Noise bins were used to compute noise power on the FPGA. Noise power represents a metric of signal quality, and can be used to ensure proper tissue-electrode contact. Allocation of these computationally expensive tasks to the FPGA reduced the required bandwidth between PC, and the FPGA for high frame rate EIT. In 16-channel configuration, with a signal-averaging factor of 8, the DAQ frame rate at 100 kHz exceeded 110 frames s (-1), and signal-to-noise ratio exceeded 90 dB across the spectrum. Reciprocity error was found to be for frequencies up to 1 MHz. Static imaging experiments were performed on a high-conductivity inclusion placed in a saline filled tank; the inclusion was clearly localized in the reconstructions obtained for both absolute current and voltage mode data.

  9. Respiratory-gated electrical impedance tomography: a potential technique for quantifying stroke volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Saaid H.; Murphy, Ethan K.; Halter, Ryan J.

    2016-03-01

    Telemonitoring is becoming increasingly important as the proportion of the population living with cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases. Currently used health parameters in the suite of telemonitoring tools lack the sensitivity and specificity to accurately predict heart failure events, forcing physicians to play a reactive versus proactive role in patient care. A novel cardiac output (CO) monitoring device is proposed that leverages a custom smart phone application and a wearable electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential of using respiratory-gated EIT to quantify stroke volume (SV) and assess its feasibility using real data. Simulations were carried out using the 4D XCAT model to create anatomically realistic meshes and electrical conductivity profiles representing the human thorax and the intrathoracic tissue. A single 5-second period respiration cycle with chest/lung expansion was modeled with end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart volumes to evaluate how effective EIT-based conductivity changes represent clinically significant differences in SV. After establishing a correlation between conductivity changes and SV, the applicability of the respiratory-gated EIT was refined using data from the PhysioNet database to estimate the number of useful end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) heart events attained over a 3.3 minute period. The area associated with conductivity changes was found to correlate to SV with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. A window of 12.5% around peak exhalation was found to be the optimal phase of the respiratory cycle from which to record EIT data. Within this window, ~47 useable ED and ES were found with a standard deviation of 28 using 3.3 minutes of data for 20 patients.

  10. Pyramidal resistor networks for electrical impedance tomography with partial boundary measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcea, L; Mamonov, A V; Druskin, V; Vasquez, F Guevara

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an inversion algorithm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with partial boundary measurements in two dimensions. It gives stable and fast reconstructions using sparse parameterizations of the unknown conductivity on optimal grids that are computed as part of the inversion. We follow the approach in Borcea et al (2008 Inverse Problems 24 035013) and Vasquez (2006 PhD thesis Rice University, Houston, TX, USA) that connects inverse discrete problems for resistor networks to continuum EIT problems, using optimal grids. The algorithm in Borcea et al (2008 Inverse Problems 24 035013) and Vasquez (2006 PhD Thesis Rice University, Houston, TX, USA) is based on circular resistor networks, and solves the EIT problem with full boundary measurements. It is extended in Borcea et al (2010 Inverse Problems 26 045010) to EIT with partial boundary measurements, using extremal quasi-conformal mappings that transform the problem to one with full boundary measurements. Here we introduce a different class of optimal grids, based on resistor networks with pyramidal topology, that is better suited for the partial measurements setup. We prove the unique solvability of the discrete inverse problem for these networks and develop an algorithm for finding them from the measurements of the Dirichlet to Neumann map. Then, we show how to use the networks to define the optimal grids and to approximate the unknown conductivity. We assess the performance of our approach with numerical simulations and compare the results with those in Borcea et al (2010)

  11. Real-time management of faulty electrodes in electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, Alzbeta E; Guardo, Robert; Adler, Andy; Gagnon, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    Completely or partially disconnected electrodes are a fairly common occurrence in many electrical impedance tomography (EIT) clinical applications. Several factors can contribute to electrode disconnection: patient movement, perspiration, manipulations by clinical staff, and defective electrode leads or electronics. By corrupting several measurements, faulty electrodes introduce significant image artifacts. In order to properly manage faulty electrodes, it is necessary to: 1) account for invalid data in image reconstruction algorithms and 2) automatically detect faulty electrodes. This paper presents a two-part approach for real-time management of faulty electrodes based on the principle of voltage-current reciprocity. The first part allows accounting for faulty electrodes in EIT image reconstruction without a priori knowledge of which electrodes are at fault. The method properly weights each measurement according to its compliance with the principle of voltage-current reciprocity. Results show that the algorithm is able to automatically determine the valid portion of the data and use it to calculate high-quality images. The second part of the approach allows automatic real-time detection of at least one faulty electrode with 100% sensitivity and two faulty electrodes with 80% sensitivity enabling the clinical staff to fix the problem as soon as possible to minimize data loss.

  12. Assessment of distribution of ventilation by electrical impedance tomography in standing horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrisko, T D; Schramel, J P; Moens, Y P S; Adler, A; Kutasi, O; Makra, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in horses. Thoracic EIT was used in nine horses. Thoracic and abdominal circumference changes were also measured with respiratory ultrasound plethysmography (RUP). Data were recorded during baseline, rebreathing of CO 2 and sedation. Three breaths were selected for analysis from each recording. During baseline breathing, horses regularly took single large breaths (sighs), which were also analysed. Functional EIT images were created using standard deviations (SD) of pixel signals and correlation coefficients (R) of each pixel signal with a reference respiratory signal. Left-to-right ratio, centre-of-ventilation and global-inhomogeneity-index were calculated. RM-ANOVA and Bonferroni tests were used (P  <  0.05). Distribution of ventilation shifted towards right during sighs and towards dependent regions during sighs, rebreathing and sedation. Global-inhomogeneity-index did not change for SD but increased for R images during sedation. The sum of SDs for the respiratory EIT signals correlated well with thoracic (r 2   =  0.78) and abdominal (r 2   =  0.82) tidal circumferential changes. Inverse respiratory signals were identified on the images at sternal location and based on reviewing CT images, seemed to correspond to location of gas filled intestines. Application of EIT in standing non-sedated horses is feasible. EIT images may provide physiologically useful information even in situations, such as sighs, that cannot easily be tested by other methods. (paper)

  13. Data-driven classification of ventilated lung tissues using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Hogan, Matthew J; Elke, Gunnar; Weiler, Norbert; Frerichs, Inéz; Adler, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for identifying ventilated lung regions utilizing electrical impedance tomography images rely on dividing the image into arbitrary regions of interest (ROI), manually delineating ROI, or forming ROI with pixels whose signal properties surpass an arbitrary threshold. In this paper, we propose a novel application of a data-driven classification method to identify ventilated lung ROI based on forming k clusters from pixels with correlated signals. A standard first-order model for lung mechanics is then applied to determine which ROI correspond to ventilated lung tissue. We applied the method in an experimental study of 16 mechanically ventilated swine in the supine position, which underwent changes in positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O 2 ). In each stage of the experimental protocol, the method performed best with k = 4 and consistently identified 3 lung tissue ROI and 1 boundary tissue ROI in 15 of the 16 subjects. When testing for changes from baseline in lung position, tidal volume, and respiratory system compliance, we found that PEEP displaced the ventilated lung region dorsally by 2 cm, decreased tidal volume by 1.3%, and increased the respiratory system compliance time constant by 0.3 s. F I O 2 decreased tidal volume by 0.7%. All effects were tested at p < 0.05 with n = 16. These findings suggest that the proposed ROI detection method is robust and sensitive to ventilation dynamics in the experimental setting

  14. A configurable electrical capacitance tomography system using a combining electrode strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yunjie; Peng, Lihui

    2013-01-01

    Systematic investigation of a combining electrode strategy for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is carried out. A configurable digital and analogue mixed ECT system using a combining electrode strategy is presented. Compared to the traditional ECT system, the presented system can be configured flexibly as the traditional ECT sensor mode and the combining electrode mode by connecting a number of electrodes as a combined electrode. In particular, the combining electrode mode is increasing the number of capacitance measurement data and the amelioration of sensitivity distribution. An image reconstruction framework is proposed by configuring the presented ECT system as the corresponding sensor mode adaptive to the permittivity distribution to be reconstructed, which includes the traditional ECT sensor mode, the symmetric combining electrode mode, the asymmetric combining electrode mode and the mixed combining electrode mode. Both simulation and experimental results show that image reconstructions with better quality and robustness to measurement noise can be obtained under the proposed adaptive image reconstruction framework by using the presented configurable ECT system. (paper)

  15. Electrical Capacitance Tomography Measurement of the Migration of Ice Frontal Surface in Freezing Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The tracking of the migration of ice frontal surface is crucial for the understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms in freezing soil. Owing to the distinct advantages, including non-invasive sensing, high safety, low cost and high data acquisition speed, the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT is considered to be a promising visualization measurement method. In this paper, the ECT method is used to visualize the migration of ice frontal surface in freezing soil. With the main motivation of the improvement of imaging quality, a loss function with multiple regularizers that incorporate the prior formation related to the imaging objects is proposed to cast the ECT image reconstruction task into an optimization problem. An iteration scheme that integrates the superiority of the split Bregman iteration (SBI method is developed for searching for the optimal solution of the proposed loss function. An unclosed electrodes sensor is designed for satisfying the requirements of practical measurements. An experimental system of one dimensional freezing in frozen soil is constructed, and the ice frontal surface migration in the freezing process of the wet soil sample containing five percent of moisture is measured. The visualization measurement results validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the ECT visualization method

  16. Compressed sampling for boundary measurements in three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaherian, Ashkan; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) utilizes electrodes on a medium's surface to produce measured data from which the conductivity distribution inside the medium is estimated. For the cases that relocation of electrodes is impractical or no a priori assumptions can be made to optimize the electrodes placement, a large number of electrodes may be needed to cover all possible imaging volume. This may occur in dynamically varying conductivity distribution in 3D EIT. Three-dimensional EIT then requires inverting very large linear systems to calculate the conductivity field, which causes significant problems regarding storage space and reconstruction time in addition to that data acquisition for a large number of electrodes will reduce the achievable frame rate, which is considered as major advantage of EIT imaging. This study proposes an idea to reduce the reconstruction complexity based on the well-known compressed sampling theory. By applying the so-called model-based CoSaMP algorithm to large size data collected by a 256 channel system, the size of forward operator and data acquisition time is reduced to those of a 32 channel system, while accuracy of reconstruction is significantly improved. The results demonstrate great capability of compressed sampling for overriding the challenges arising in 3D EIT. (paper)

  17. Rotational electrical impedance tomography using electrodes with limited surface coverage provides window for multimodal sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti-Polojärvi, Mari; Koskela, Olli; Seppänen, Aku; Figueiras, Edite; Hyttinen, Jari

    2018-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an imaging method that could become a valuable tool in multimodal applications. One challenge in simultaneous multimodal imaging is that typically the EIT electrodes cover a large portion of the object surface. This paper investigates the feasibility of rotational EIT (rEIT) in applications where electrodes cover only a limited angle of the surface of the object. In the studied rEIT, the object is rotated a full 360° during a set of measurements to increase the information content of the data. We call this approach limited angle full revolution rEIT (LAFR-rEIT). We test LAFR-rEIT setups in two-dimensional geometries with computational and experimental data. We use up to 256 rotational measurement positions, which requires a new way to solve the forward and inverse problem of rEIT. For this, we provide a modification, available for EIDORS, in the supplementary material. The computational results demonstrate that LAFR-rEIT with eight electrodes produce the same image quality as conventional 16-electrode rEIT, when data from an adequate number of rotational measurement positions are used. Both computational and experimental results indicate that the novel LAFR-rEIT provides good EIT with setups with limited surface coverage and a small number of electrodes.

  18. Active electrode IC for EEG and electrical impedance tomography with continuous monitoring of contact impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermandi, Marco; Cardu, Roberto; Franchi Scarselli, Eleonora; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    The IC presented integrates the front-end for EEG and Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) acquisition on the electrode, together with electrode-skin contact impedance monitoring and EIT current generation, so as to improve signal quality and integration of the two techniques for brain imaging applications. The electrode size is less than 2 cm(2) and only 4 wires connect the electrode to the back-end. The readout circuit is based on a Differential Difference Amplifier and performs single-ended amplification and frequency division multiplexing of the three signals that are sent to the back-end on a single wire which also provides power supply. Since the system's CMRR is a function of each electrode's gain accuracy, an analysis is performed on how this is influenced by mismatches in passive and active components. The circuit is fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process and occupies 4 mm(2), the readout circuit consumes 360 μW, the input referred noise for bipolar EEG signal acquisition is 0.56 μVRMS between 0.5 and 100 Hz and almost halves if only EEG signal is acquired.

  19. In vitro localisation of intracranial haematoma using electrical impedance tomography semi-array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayati, S Bentolhoda; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Kerr, David

    2015-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography is a non-invasive and portable method that has good potential as an alternative to the conventional modalities for early detection of intracranial haematomas in high risk patients. Early diagnosis can reduce treatment delays and most significantly can impact patient outcomes. Two eight-electrode layouts, a standard ring full array (FA) and a semi-array (SA), were investigated for their ability to detect, localise and quantify simulated intracranial haematomas in vitro on ovine models for the purpose of early diagnosis. SA layout speeds up electrode application and avoids the need to move and lift the patient's head. Haematomas were simulated using gel samples with the same conductivity as blood. Both layouts, FA and SA, could detect the presence of haematomas at any location within the skull. The mean of the relative radial position error with respect to the brain radius was 7% for FA and 6% for SA, for haematomas close to the electrodes, and 11% for SA for haematomas far from the electrodes at the back of the head. Size estimation was not as good; the worst size estimation error for FA being around 30% while the best for SA was 50% for simulated haematomas close to the electrodes. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regional respiratory inflation and deflation pressure-volume curves determined by electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, I; Dargaville, P A; Rimensberger, P C

    2013-06-01

    Measurement of regional lung volume changes during a quasi-static pressure-volume (PV) manoeuvre using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) could be used to assess regional respiratory system mechanics and to determine optimal ventilator settings in individual patients. Using this approach, we studied regional respiratory system mechanics in healthy and lung-injured animals, before and after surfactant administration during inflation and deflation PV manoeuvres. The comparison of the EIT-derived regional PV curves in ventral, middle and dorsal regions of the right and left lungs showed not only different amounts of hysteresis in these regions but also marked differences among different landmark pressures calculated on the inflation and deflation limbs of the curves. Regional pressures at maximum compliance as well as the lower and upper pressures of maximum compliance change differed between the inflation and deflation and increased from ventral to dorsal regions in all lung conditions. All these pressure values increased in the injured and decreased in the surfactant treated lungs. Examination of regional respiratory system mechanics using EIT enables the assessment of spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the ventilation distribution. Characteristic landmarks on the inflation and especially on the deflation limb of regional PV curves may become useful measures for guiding mechanical ventilation.

  1. Regional respiratory inflation and deflation pressure–volume curves determined by electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frerichs, I; Dargaville, P A; Rimensberger, P C

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of regional lung volume changes during a quasi-static pressure–volume (PV) manoeuvre using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) could be used to assess regional respiratory system mechanics and to determine optimal ventilator settings in individual patients. Using this approach, we studied regional respiratory system mechanics in healthy and lung-injured animals, before and after surfactant administration during inflation and deflation PV manoeuvres. The comparison of the EIT-derived regional PV curves in ventral, middle and dorsal regions of the right and left lungs showed not only different amounts of hysteresis in these regions but also marked differences among different landmark pressures calculated on the inflation and deflation limbs of the curves. Regional pressures at maximum compliance as well as the lower and upper pressures of maximum compliance change differed between the inflation and deflation and increased from ventral to dorsal regions in all lung conditions. All these pressure values increased in the injured and decreased in the surfactant treated lungs. Examination of regional respiratory system mechanics using EIT enables the assessment of spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the ventilation distribution. Characteristic landmarks on the inflation and especially on the deflation limb of regional PV curves may become useful measures for guiding mechanical ventilation. (paper)

  2. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg-Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of cryogenic two-phase flow imaging using electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huangjun; Yu, Liu; Zhou, Rui; Qiu, Limin; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2017-09-01

    The potential application of the 2-D eight-electrode electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) to the inversion imaging of the liquid nitrogen-vaporous nitrogen (LN2-VN2) flow in the tube is theoretically evaluated. The phase distribution of the computational domain is obtained using the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique with variable iterative step size. The detailed mathematical derivations for the calculations are presented. The calculated phase distribution for the two detached LN2 column case shows the comparable results with the water-air case, regardless of the much reduced dielectric permittivity of LN2 compared with water. The inversion images of total eight different LN2-VN2 flow patterns are presented and quantitatively evaluated by calculating the relative void fraction error and the correlation coefficient. The results demonstrate that the developed reconstruction technique for ECT has the capacity to reconstruct the phase distribution of the complex LN2-VN2 flow, while the accuracy of the inversion images is significantly influenced by the size of the discrete phase. The influence of the measurement noise on the image quality is also considered in the calculations.

  4. Gravity-dependent ventilation distribution in rats measured with electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooney, Daniel; Fraser, John F; R Dunster, Kimble; Schibler, Andreas; Friese, Marlies

    2009-01-01

    Ventilation in larger animals and humans is gravity dependent and mainly distributed to the dependent lung. Little is known of the effect of gravity on ventilation distribution in small animals such as rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate gravity-dependent ventilation distribution and regional filling characteristics in rats. Ventilation distribution and regional lung filling were measured in six rats using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Measurements were performed in four body positions (supine, prone, left and right lateral), and all animals were ventilated with increasing tidal volumes from 3 to 8 mL kg −1 . The effect of gravity on regional ventilation distribution was assessed with profiles of relative impedance change and calculation of the geometric centre. Regional filling was measured by calculating the slope of the plot of regional versus global relative impedance change on a breath-by-breath basis. Ventilation was significantly distributed to the non-dependent lung regardless of body position and tidal volume used. The geometric centre was located in the dependent lung in all but prone position. The regional filling characteristics followed an anatomical pattern with the posterior and the right lung generally filling faster. Gravity had little impact on regional filling. Ventilation distribution in rats is gravity dependent, whereas regional filling characteristics are dependent on anatomy

  5. A Versatile and Reproducible Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Avery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly versatile Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT system, nicknamed the ScouseTom, has been developed. The system allows control over current amplitude, frequency, number of electrodes, injection protocol and data processing. Current is injected using a Keithley 6221 current source, and voltages are recorded with a 24-bit EEG system with minimum bandwidth of 3.2 kHz. Custom PCBs interface with a PC to control the measurement process, electrode addressing and triggering of external stimuli. The performance of the system was characterised using resistor phantoms to represent human scalp recordings, with an SNR of 77.5 dB, stable across a four hour recording and 20 Hz to 20 kHz. In studies of both haeomorrhage using scalp electrodes, and evoked activity using epicortical electrode mats in rats, it was possible to reconstruct images matching established literature at known areas of onset. Data collected using scalp electrode in humans matched known tissue impedance spectra and was stable over frequency. The experimental procedure is software controlled and is readily adaptable to new paradigms. Where possible, commercial or open-source components were used, to minimise the complexity in reproduction. The hardware designs and software for the system have been released under an open source licence, encouraging contributions and allowing for rapid replication.

  6. An electrode addressing protocol for imaging brain function with electrical impedance tomography using a 16-channel semi-parallel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, L; McEwan, A; Oh, T; Woo, E J; Holder, D S

    2009-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography of brain function poses special problems because applied current is diverted by the resistive skull. In the past, image resolution was maximized with the use of an electrode addressing protocol with widely spaced drive electrode pairs and use of a multiplexer so that many electrode pairs could be flexibly addressed. The purpose of this study was to develop and test an electrode protocol for a 16-channel semi-parallel system which uses parallel recording channels with fixed wiring, the Kyung Hee University (KHU) Mk1. Ten protocols were tested, all addressing pairs of electrodes for recording or current drive, based on recording with a spiral, spiral with suboccipital electrodes (spiral s-o) and zig-zag configurations, and combinations of current injection from electrode pairs at 180 degrees , 120 degrees and 60 degrees . These were compared by assessing the image reconstruction quality of five simulated perturbations in a homogenous model of the human head and of four epileptic foci in an anatomically realistic model in the presence of realistic noise, in terms of localization error, resolution, image distortion and sensitivity in the region of interest. The spiral s-o with current injection at 180 degrees + 120 degrees + 60 degrees gave the best image quality and permitted reconstruction with a localization error of less than 10% of the head diameter. This encourages the view that it might be possible to obtain satisfactory images of focal abnormalities in the human brain with 16 scalp electrodes and improved instrumentation avoiding multiplexers on recording circuits.

  7. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Bing; Hu, Shijie; Xu, Canhua; Yang, Bin; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Feng; Fei, Zhou; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W) during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, six patients (four male, two female) with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.93 ± 0.06) with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2) = 0.94 ± 0.05). In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  8. Research on Nonlinear Feature of Electrical Resistance of Acupuncture Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzi Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive volt-ampere characteristics detecting system was applied to measure the volt-ampere curves of nine acupuncture points, LU9, HT7, LI4, PC6, ST36, SP6, KI3, LR3, and SP3, and corresponding nonacupuncture points bilaterally from 42 healthy volunteers. Electric currents intensity was increased from 0 μA to 20 μA and then returned to 0 μA again. The results showed that the volt-ampere curves of acupuncture points had nonlinear property and magnetic hysteresis-like feature. On all acupuncture point spots, the volt-ampere areas of the increasing phase were significantly larger than that of the decreasing phase (P<0.01. The volt-ampere areas of ten acupuncture point spots were significantly smaller than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots when intensity was increase (P<0.05~P<0.001. And when intensity was decrease, eleven acupuncture point spots showed the same property as above (P<0.05~P<0.001, while two acupuncture point spots showed opposite phenomenon in which the areas of two acupuncture point spots were larger than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots (P<0.05~P<0.01. These results show that the phenomenon of low skin resistance does not exist to all acupuncture points.

  9. Delineation of a volcanic ash body using electrical resistivity profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Jianghai; Ludvigson, Greg; Miller, Richard D; Mayer, Lindsay; Haj, Adel

    2010-01-01

    Four lines of electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) were performed to define the extent of a shallow Quaternary volcanic ash deposit being mined in the United States. Inversion results of ERP proved suitable for defining the thickness and lateral extent of the volcanic ash deposit at this testing site. These interpretations were confirmed by shallow borehole drilling. The model sensitivity information indicates that inverted models possess sufficient resolving power down to a depth of 7 m and are fairly consistent in terms of horizontal resolution along the four ERP lines. The bottom of most of the volcanic ash deposit in the study area is less than 7 m in depth. Based on synthesis of the ERP and drill information, the limits of the mineable ash bed resources were clearly defined. Moreover, by integrating the ERP results with a minimal number of optimally placed borings, the volume of the volcanic ash deposit was established at a lesser cost, and with greater accuracy than would be possible with a traditionally designed grid drilling programme

  10. Hardware in the loop simulation of objects internal structures inhomogeneities in multi-angle electrical impedance tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksanyan Grayr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to the development of an algorithm for automatic analysis of images as the results of biological object internal structures conductivity field distribution reconstruction for the automated generation of not only qualitative but also quantitative estimates of inhomogeneities in the tasks of multi-angle multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography. The paper describes the modeling of biological object internal structures inhomogeneities of a given size as a way of obtaining initial data for approbation of the algorithm and its further debugging and optimization. In the work an interactive analysis of the images obtained as a result of modeling is carried out, the results of its work are compared with the results of the developed algorithm of automatic analysis. Based on the analysis, conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the developed algorithm in the problems of multi-angle multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography.

  11. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5–10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0–3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage. (paper)

  12. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5-10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0-3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage.

  13. Use of electrical resistivity to detect underground mine voids in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rodney A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical resistivity surveys were completed at two sites along State Route 32 in Jackson and Vinton Counties, Ohio. The surveys were done to determine whether the electrical resistivity method could identify areas where coal was mined, leaving air- or water-filled voids. These voids can be local sources of potable water or acid mine drainage. They could also result in potentially dangerous collapse of roads or buildings that overlie the voids. The resistivity response of air- or water-filled voids compared to the surrounding bedrock may allow electrical resistivity surveys to delineate areas underlain by such voids. Surface deformation along State Route 32 in Jackson County led to a site investigation, which included electrical resistivity surveys. Several highly resistive areas were identified using axial dipole-dipole and Wenner resistivity surveys. Subsequent drilling and excavation led to the discovery of several air-filled abandoned underground mine tunnels. A site along State Route 32 in Vinton County, Ohio, was drilled as part of a mining permit application process. A mine void under the highway was instrumented with a pressure transducer to monitor water levels. During a period of high water level, electrical resistivity surveys were completed. The electrical response was dominated by a thin, low-resistivity layer of iron ore above where the coal was mined out. Nearby overhead powerlines also affected the results.

  14. Multi-channel electrical impedance tomography for regional tissue hydration monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Ashe, Jeffrey M; Boverman, Gregory; Sabatini, James E; Davenport, David M

    2014-01-01

    Poor assessment of hydration status during hemodialysis can lead to under- or over-hydration in patients with consequences of increased morbidity and mortality. In current practice, fluid management is largely based on clinical assessments to estimate dry weight (normal hydration body weight). However, hemodialysis patients usually have co-morbidities that can make the signs of fluid status ambiguous. Therefore, achieving normal hydration status remains a major challenge for hemodialysis therapy. Electrical impedance technology has emerged as a promising method for hydration monitoring due to its non-invasive nature, low cost and ease-of-use. Conventional electrical impedance-based hydration monitoring systems employ single-channel current excitation (either 2-electrode or 4-electrode methods) to perturb and extract averaged impedance from bulk tissue and use generalized models from large populations to derive hydration estimates. In the present study, a prototype, single-frequency electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system with simultaneous multi-channel current excitation was used to enable regional hydration change detection. We demonstrated the capability to detect a difference in daily impedance change between left leg and right leg in healthy human subjects, who wore a compression sock only on one leg to reduce daily gravitational fluid accumulation. The impedance difference corresponded well with the difference of lower leg volume change between left leg and right leg measured by volumetry, which on average is ∼35 ml, accounting for 0.7% of the lower leg volume. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using multi-channel EIT to extract hydration information in different tissue layers with minimal skin interference. Our simultaneous, multi-channel current excitation approach provides an effective method to separate electrode contact impedance and skin condition artifacts from hydration signals. The prototype system has the potential to be used in

  15. Ion implantation to improve mechanical and electrical properties of resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeli, A.V.; Shykh, S.K.; Beresina, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of ion implantation, using different chemical species, on the surface micromorphology, wear resistance, coefficient of friction and electrical resistivity, and its variation during friction for resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide. It is demonstrated that nitrogen and hydrogen ions are the most effective for modifying surface properties. (Author)

  16. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  17. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  18. Analysis on the phase transition behavior of Cu base bulk metallic glass by electrical resistivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young Su; Chung, Sung Jae; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Hong, Kyung Tae; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Byeon, Jai Won; Yoon, Jin-Kook; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyung Sub

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of Cu 43 Zr 43 Al 7 Ag 7 (numbers indicate at.%) bulk metallic glass was investigated using the isothermal electrical resistivity measurements at 450 deg. C in the supercooled liquid region. The crystallization process is a single step phase transformation. To analyze the electrical resistivity reduction, microstructure evolutions were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. The Avrami parameter of the electrical resistivity reduction step was 1.73, indicating that the crystallization process is a diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic compounds with decreasing nucleation rate

  19. Investigation of real field application issues for resistive type SFCLs for distribution electric power networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, S.B. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon-shi, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.W., E-mail: bangwook@hanyang.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Hanyang University, Ansan-shi, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Conventional electric power networks were designed and operated not considering fault current limiting devices. Therefore, the performance and characteristics of resistive superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) should be reviewed considering the coordination with other electric circuit protecting devices. In this paper, real field application issues of resistive SFCL were investigated considering utilities' demands and coordination with other protection devices. Pure resistive SFCL and hybrid resistive SFCL were compared in order to determine suitable solutions for electric power systems. SFCLs were modeled and analyzed using electro-magnetic transients program (EMTP) and their performances were compared to identify the adaptability to the conventional power networks. Consequently, Simulation results showed that hybrid resistive SFCL have more advantages than pure resistive SFCL considering the requirements and specification for the distribution networks.

  20. Investigation of real field application issues for resistive type SFCLs for distribution electric power networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S. B.; Lee, B. W.

    2010-11-01

    Conventional electric power networks were designed and operated not considering fault current limiting devices. Therefore, the performance and characteristics of resistive superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) should be reviewed considering the coordination with other electric circuit protecting devices. In this paper, real field application issues of resistive SFCL were investigated considering utilities' demands and coordination with other protection devices. Pure resistive SFCL and hybrid resistive SFCL were compared in order to determine suitable solutions for electric power systems. SFCLs were modeled and analyzed using electro-magnetic transients program (EMTP) and their performances were compared to identify the adaptability to the conventional power networks. Consequently, Simulation results showed that hybrid resistive SFCL have more advantages than pure resistive SFCL considering the requirements and specification for the distribution networks.

  1. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J David [Bolingbrook, IL; Mawdsley, Jennifer R [Woodridge, IL; Niyogi, Suhas [Woodridge, IL; Wang, Xiaoping [Naperville, IL; Cruse, Terry [Lisle, IL; Santos, Lilia [Lombard, IL

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  2. Clinical performance of a novel textile interface for neonatal chest electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Louiza; Frerichs, Inez; Miedema, Martijn; Kallio, Merja; Papadouri, Thalia; Karaoli, Christina; Becher, Tobias; Tingay, David G; van Kaam, Anton; Bayford, Richard H; Waldmann, Andreas Daniel

    2018-03-08

    Critically ill neonates and infants might particularly benefit from continuous chest electrical impedance tomography (EIT) monitoring at the bedside. In this study a textile 32-electrode interface for neonatal EIT examination has been developed and tested to validate its clinical performance. The objectives were to assess ease of use in a clinical setting, stability of contact impedance at the electrode-skin interface and possible adverse effects. Thirty preterm infants (gestational age: 30.3±3.9 wk (mean ± SD), postnatal age: 13.8±28.2 d, body weight at inclusion: 1727±869 g) were included in this multicentre study. The electrode-skin contact impedances were measured continuously for up to three days and analysed during the initial 20-min phase after fastening the belt and during a 10-hour measurement interval without any clinical interventions. The skin condition was assessed by attending clinicians. Our findings imply that the textile electrode interface is suitable for long-term neonatal chest EIT imaging. It does not cause any distress for the preterm infants or discomfort. Stable contact impedance of about 300 Ohm was observed immediately after fastening the electrode belt and during the subsequent 20-min period. A slight increase in contact impedance was observed over time. Tidal variation of contact impedance was less than 5 Ohm. The availability of a textile 32-electrode belt for neonatal EIT imaging with simple, fast, accurate and reproducible placement on the chest strengthens the potential of EIT to be used for regional lung monitoring in critically ill neonates and infants. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  3. A new linear back projection algorithm to electrical tomography based on measuring data decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Benyuan; Yue, Shihong; Cui, Ziqiang; Wang, Huaxiang

    2015-01-01

    As an advanced measurement technique of non-radiant, non-intrusive, rapid response, and low cost, the electrical tomography (ET) technique has developed rapidly in recent decades. The ET imaging algorithm plays an important role in the ET imaging process. Linear back projection (LBP) is the most used ET algorithm due to its advantages of dynamic imaging process, real-time response, and easy realization. But the LBP algorithm is of low spatial resolution due to the natural ‘soft field’ effect and ‘ill-posed solution’ problems; thus its applicable ranges are greatly limited. In this paper, an original data decomposition method is proposed, and every ET measuring data are decomposed into two independent new data based on the positive and negative sensing areas of the measuring data. Consequently, the number of total measuring data is extended to twice as many as the number of the original data, thus effectively reducing the ‘ill-posed solution’. On the other hand, an index to measure the ‘soft field’ effect is proposed. The index shows that the decomposed data can distinguish between different contributions of various units (pixels) for any ET measuring data, and can efficiently reduce the ‘soft field’ effect of the ET imaging process. In light of the data decomposition method, a new linear back projection algorithm is proposed to improve the spatial resolution of the ET image. A series of simulations and experiments are applied to validate the proposed algorithm by the real-time performances and the progress of spatial resolutions. (paper)

  4. Use of electrical impedance tomography to monitor regional cerebral edema during clinical dehydration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Li, Bing; Dai, Meng; Hu, Shi-Jie; Li, Xia; Xu, Can-Hua; Wang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Tang, Meng-Xing; Dong, Xiu-Zhen; Fei, Zhou; Shi, Xue-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Variations of conductive fluid content in brain tissue (e.g. cerebral edema) change tissue impedance and can potentially be measured by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), an emerging medical imaging technique. The objective of this work is to establish the feasibility of using EIT as an imaging tool for monitoring brain fluid content. a prospective study. In this study EIT was used, for the first time, to monitor variations in cerebral fluid content in a clinical model with patients undergoing clinical dehydration treatment. The EIT system was developed in house and its imaging sensitivity and spatial resolution were evaluated on a saline-filled tank. 23 patients with brain edema. The patients were continuously imaged by EIT for two hours after initiation of dehydration treatment using 0.5 g/kg intravenous infusion of mannitol for 20 minutes. Overall impedance across the brain increased significantly before and after mannitol dehydration treatment (p = 0.0027). Of the all 23 patients, 14 showed high-level impedance increase and maintained this around 4 hours after the dehydration treatment whereas the other 9 also showed great impedance gain during the treatment but it gradually decreased after the treatment. Further analysis of the regions of interest in the EIT images revealed that diseased regions, identified on corresponding CT images, showed significantly less impedance changes than normal regions during the monitoring period, indicating variations in different patients' responses to such treatment. EIT shows potential promise as an imaging tool for real-time and non-invasive monitoring of brain edema patients.

  5. Detection of small bleeds in the brain with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Wang, Xin; Ashe, Jeffrey M; Davenport, David M; Amm, Bruce C

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we describe and assess feasibility of instrumentation and algorithms for detecting bleeding due to hemorrhagic strokes and traumatic brain injury using electrical impedance tomography, a novel biomedical diagnostic modality in which the body is probed noninvasively with generally imperceptible alternating currents applied in patterns to a set of electrodes placed in contact with the skin. We focus on the GENESIS instrument developed by GE Global Research and on the achievability of our goal to detect a bleed in the center of the head with a volume of several ml. Our main topic is compensation for the large changes in voltages that tend to occur when the electrodes are in contact with biological media, specifically either human subjects or with vegetable matter proxies which seem to exhibit the same 'drift' phenomenon. We show that these changes in voltages can be modeled by assuming that each electrode is attached to the body via a discrete complex impedance whose value is time-varying and describe how this discrete component value can be estimated and largely compensated-for. We compare this discrete model with changes in contact impedances estimated using the complete electrode model showing that the two models are roughly comparable in their ability to explain the data from a single human subject experiment with electrodes attached to the head. In a simulation study, we demonstrate that it is possible to detect a small bleed in the center of the head even in the case of large changes in electrode impedances, which can be treated as nuisance parameters.

  6. Regional overdistension identified with electrical impedance tomography in the perflubron-treated lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Gerhard K; Arnold, John H; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Boyd, Theonia K; Zurakowski, David

    2010-01-01

    Regional lung overdistension occurring during high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) and partial liquid ventilation (PLV) was investigated in a prospective animal trial using 18 mechanically ventilated Yorkshire swine under general anesthesia. Lung injury was induced with saline lavage and augmented using large tidal volumes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and regional lung histopathology were used to identify regional lung overdistension during HFOV. Lung injury was quantified using a histopathologic lung injury score. The animals were randomized to three groups (n = 6 animals in each group): a control group and two dose groups of perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) (PFOB-Lo 1.5 ml kg −1 and PFOB-Hi 3 ml kg −1 ). The nimals were transitioned from conventional ventilation to HFOV, and a slow inflation-deflation maneuver was performed by changing mean airway pressure (Paw) by 5 cmH 2 O every 15 min to a maximum Paw of 40 cmH 2 O. In dependent lung areas, the PFOB-Hi (3 ml kg −1 ) group, in comparison with the control group, was associated with significantly greater alveolar overdistension seen on lung histopathology (P < 0.001 compared to control), a decreased mean impedance (P < 0.05 compared to the control group) and a decreased ventilation-induced impedance change during HFOV (P < 0.05 compared to the control group). We conclude that treatment with PFOB-Hi during HFOV compared to a control group in an animal model of lung injury led to regional overdistension of dependent lung areas, as evidenced by increased alveolar overdistension on lung histopathology, decreased mean lung impedance and decreased HFOV-induced regional lung volume changes as measured by EIT

  7. [Measuring breathing pattern in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by electrical impedance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleza, Marco; Calaf, Núria; Feixas, Teresa; González, Mercedes; Antón, Daniel; Riu, Pere J; Casan, Pere

    2009-07-01

    The measurement of breathing pattern in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) requires the use of a mathematical calibration model incorporating not only anthropometric characteristics (previously evaluated in healthy individuals) but probably functional alterations associated with COPD as well. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between EIT measurements and spirometry parameters, static lung volumes, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) in a group of male patients to develop a calibration equation for converting EIT signals into volume signals. We measured forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)), FEV(1)/FVC, residual volume, total lung capacity, DLCO, carbon monoxide transfer coefficient (KCO) and standard anthropometric parameters in 28 patients with a FEV(1)/FVC ratio of <70%. We then compared tidal volume measurements from a previously validated EIT unit and a standard pneumotachometer. The mean (SD) lung function results were FVC, 72 (16%); FEV(1), 43% (14%); FEV(1)/FVC, 42% (9%); residual volume, 161% (44%); total lung capacity, 112% (17%); DLCO, 58% (17%); and KCO, 75% (25%). Mean (SD) tidal volumes measured by the pneumotachometer and the EIT unit were 0.697 (0.181)L and 0.515 (0.223)L, respectively (P<.001). Significant associations were found between EIT measurements and CO transfer parameters. The mathematical model developed to adjust for the differences between the 2 measurements (R(2)=0.568; P<.001) was compensation factor=1.81# - 0.82# height (m)# -0.004 x KCO (%). The measurement of breathing pattern by EIT in patients with COPD requires the use of a previously calculated calibration equation that incorporates not only individual anthropometric characteristics but gas exchange parameters as well.

  8. Reproducible 3D printed head tanks for electrical impedance tomography with realistic shape and conductivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, James; Aristovich, Kirill; Low, Barney; Holder, David

    2017-05-22

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has many promising applications in brain injury monitoring. To evaluate both instrumentation and reconstruction algorithms, experiments are first performed in head tanks. Existing methods, whilst accurate, produce a discontinuous conductivity, and are often made by hand, making it hard for other researchers to replicate. We have developed a method for constructing head tanks directly in a 3D printer. Conductivity was controlled through perforations in the skull surface, which allow for saline to pass through. Varying the diameter of the holes allowed for the conductivity to be controlled with 3% error for the target conductivity range. Taking CT and MRI segmentations as a basis, this method was employed to create an adult tank with a continuous conductivity distribution, and a neonatal tank with fontanelles. Using 3D scanning a geometric accuracy of 0.21 mm was recorded, equal to that of the precision of the 3D printer used. Differences of 6.1%  ±  6.4% (n  =  11 in 4 tanks) compared to simulations were recorded in c. 800 boundary voltages. This may be attributed to the morphology of the skulls increasing tortuosity effects and hole misalignment. Despite significant differences in errors between three repetitions of the neonatal tank, images of a realistic perturbation could still be reconstructed with different tanks used for the baseline and perturbation datasets. These phantoms can be reproduced by any researcher with access to a 'hobbyist' 3D printer in a matter of days. All design files have been released using an open source license to encourage reproduction and modification.

  9. A model of electrical impedance tomography implemented in nerve-cuff for neural-prosthetics control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, James; Vanholsbeeck, Frederique; McDaid, A J

    2018-03-16

    In neural interfaces for peripheral nerve a trade-off exists between the level of invasiveness and the selectivity of neural recordings. In this study, we implement electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in a nerve cuff with the aim to investigate the achievable level of selectivity. Approach: Established modelling approaches in neural-EIT are expanded on to be used, for the first time, on myelinated fibres which are abundant in mammalian peripheral nerves and transmit motor commands. The model is then used to evaluate the viability of using EIT with a nerve cuff to record neural activity in peripheral nerves. Main results: Fibre impedance models indicate activity in unmyelinated fibres can be screened out from activity in myelinated fibres using operating frequencies above 100 Hz. At 1 kHz the transverse impedance magnitude, which is perpendicular to the fibre length axis, of inactive intra-fascicle tissue and the fraction change during neural activity are estimated to be 1,142 Ω.cm and -8.8x10-4, respectively. At 1 kHz and 10 mm spacing between the impedance measurement electrode pair, the longitudinal impedance magnitude, which is parallel to the fibre length axis, and the fraction change during neural activity are estimated to be 328 Ω.cm and -0.30, respectively. We show that a novel EIT drive and measurement electrode pattern which utilises longitudinal current and longitudinal differential boundary voltage measurements could distinguish activity in different fascicles, as well as simultaneous activity in multiple fascicles, of a three-fascicle mammalian nerve using simulated data. Significance: The results of this study provide an estimate of the transient change in impedance of intra-fascicle tissue during neural activity in mammalian nerve, and present a viable EIT electrode pattern, both of which are critical steps towards implementing EIT in a nerve cuff for a recording neural interface. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  10. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Analysis of a Phase-Sensitive Voltmeter for Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ethan K; Takhti, Mohammad; Skinner, Joseph; Halter, Ryan J; Odame, Kofi

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, thorough analysis along with mathematical derivations of the matched filter for a voltmeter used in electrical impedance tomography systems are presented. The effect of the random noise in the system prior to the matched filter, generated by other components, are considered. Employing the presented equations allow system/circuit designers to find the maximum tolerable noise prior to the matched filter that leads to the target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the voltmeter, without having to over-design internal components. A practical model was developed that should fall within 2 dB and 5 dB of the median SNR measurements of signal amplitude and phase, respectively. In order to validate our claims, simulation and experimental measurements have been performed with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) followed by a digital matched filter, while the noise of the whole system was modeled as the input referred at the ADC input. The input signal was contaminated by a known value of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) noise, and the noise level was swept from 3% to 75% of the least significant bit (LSB) of the ADC. Differences between experimental and both simulated and analytical SNR values were less than 0.59 and 0.35 dB for RMS values ≥ 20% of an LSB and less than 1.45 and 2.58 dB for RMS values circuit designers in EIT, and a more accurate error analysis that was previously missing in EIT literature.

  11. Numerical implementation of magneto-acousto-electrical tomography (MAET) using a linear phased array transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soner Gözü, Mehmet; Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the performance and implementation of magneto-acousto-electrical tomography (MAET) is investigated using a linear phased array (LPA) transducer. The goal of MAET is to image the conductivity distribution in biological bodies. It uses the interaction between ultrasound and a static magnetic field to generate velocity current density distribution inside the body. The resultant voltage due to velocity current density is sensed by surface electrodes attached on the body. In this study, the theory of MAET is reviewed. A 16-element LPA transducer with 1 MHz excitation frequency is used to provide beam directivity and steerability of acoustic waves. Different two-dimensional numerical models of breast and tumour are formed to analyze the multiphysics problem coupled with acoustics and electromagnetic fields. In these models, velocity current density distributions are obtained for pulse type ultrasound excitations. The static magnetic field is assumed as 1 T. To sense the resultant voltage caused by the velocity current density, it is assumed that two electrodes are attached on the surface of the body. The performance of MAET is shown through sensitivity matrix analysis. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two transducer positions with 13 steering angles between -30\\circ to 30\\circ with 5\\circ angular intervals. For the reconstruction of the images, truncated singular value decomposition method is used with different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values (20 dB, 40 dB, 60 dB and 80 dB). The resultant images show that the perturbation (5 mm  ×  5 mm) placed 35 mm depth can be detected even if the SNR is 20 dB.

  12. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI) for Imaging Electrical Conductivity of Biological Tissue: A Tutorial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Yu, Kai; He, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a noninvasive imaging method developed to map electrical conductivity of biological tissue with millimeter level spatial resolution. In MAT-MI, a time-varying magnetic stimulation is applied to induce eddy current inside the conductive tissue sample. With the existence of a static magnetic field, the Lorentz force acting on the induced eddy current drives mechanical vibrations producing detectable ultrasound signals. These ultrasound signals can then be acquired to reconstruct a map related to the sample’s electrical conductivity contrast. This work reviews fundamental ideas of MAT-MI and major techniques developed in these years. First, the physical mechanisms underlying MAT-MI imaging are described including the magnetic induction and Lorentz force induced acoustic wave propagation. Second, experimental setups and various imaging strategies for MAT-MI are reviewed and compared together with the corresponding experimental results. In addition, as a recently developed reverse mode of MAT-MI, magneto-acousto-electrical tomography with magnetic induction (MAET-MI) is briefly reviewed in terms of its theory and experimental studies. Finally, we give our opinions on existing challenges and future directions for MAT-MI research. With all the reported and future technical advancement, MAT-MI has the potential to become an important noninvasive modality for electrical conductivity imaging of biological tissue. PMID:27542088

  13. Effects of iron content on electrical resistivity of oxide films on Zr-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Toshio; Uno, Masayoshi

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of electrical resistivity were made for oxide films formed by anodic oxidation and steam oxidation (400degC/12 h) on Zr plates with different Fe contents. When the Fe content was higher than about 1,000 ppm the electrical resistivity of the steam oxide films was almost equivalent to that of the anodic oxide films, while at lower Fe content the former exhibited lower electrical resistivity than the latter by about 1∼3 orders of magnitude. The anodic oxide film was an almost homogeneous single oxide layer. The steam oxide films, on the other hand, were composed of duplex oxide layers. The oxide layer formed in the vicinity of the oxide/metal interface had higher electrical resistivity than the near-surface oxide layer by about 1∼4 orders of magnitude. The oxide layer in the vicinity of the interface could act as a protective film against corrosion and its electrical resistivity is one important factor controlling the layer protectiveness. The electrical resistivity of the oxide/metal interfacial layer was strongly dependent on the Fe content. One possible reason for Fe to improve the corrosion resistance is that Fe ions would tend to stabilize the tetragonal (or cubic) phase and consequently suppress the formation of open pores and cracks in the interfacial layer. (author)

  14. An Electric Resistivity Study of the Chelungpu Fault in the Taichung Area, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hu Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an electric resistivity survey consisting of six resistivity image profilings and several resistivity measurements on outcrops of strata in the Taichung area to investigate the subsurface structures of the Chelungpu fault. Three magnetotelluric sounding results are added to infer rock formations at depth. Based on the resistivity measurements on outcrops of the strata and the correlations between the interpretative resistivity structures and the rock formations recognized from drilling cores and the outcrops of the strata, the resistivity spectra of rock formations are obtained, and the geological structures are deduced.

  15. Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP Composites using Electrical Resistance Change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Todoroki, Akira

    2007-01-01

    .... In this system, a tiny oscillation circuit is attached to the composite component. When delimitation of the component occurs, electrical resistance changes, which causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the circuit...

  16. Characterisation of electrical resistance for CMC Materials up to 1200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stäbler, T.; Böhrk, H.; Voggenreiter, H.

    2017-12-01

    Damage to thermal protection systems (TPS) during atmospheric re-entry is a severe safety issue, especially when considering re-usability of space transportation systems. There is a need for structural health monitoring systems and non-destructive inspection methods. However, damages are hard to detect. When ceramic matrix composites, in this case carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide (C/C-SiC), are used as a TPS, the electrical properties of the present semiconductor material can be used for health monitoring, since the resistivity changes with damage, strain and temperature. In this work the electrical resistivity as a function of the material temperature is analysed eliminating effects of thermal electricity and the thermal coefficient of electrical resistance is determined. A sensor network is applied for locally and time resolved monitoring of the 300 mm x 120 mm x 3 mm panel shaped samples. Since the material is used for atmospheric re-entry it needs to be characterised for a wide range of temperatures, in this case as high as 1200 °C. Therefore, experiments in an inductively heated test bench were conducted. Firstly, a reference sample was used with thermocouples for characterising the temperature distribution across the sample surface. Secondly, electrical resistance under heat load was measured, time and spatially resolved. Results will be shown and discussed in terms of resistance dependence on temperature, thermal coefficient of electrical resistance, thermal electricity and electrical path orientation including an analysis on effective conducting cross section. Conversely, the thermal coefficient can also be used to determine the material temperature as a function of electrical resistance.

  17. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  18. Using different ELECTRE methods in strategic planning in the presence of human behavioral resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Milani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the multicriteria strategic planning of an organization, management should often be aware of employees' resistance to change before making new decisions; otherwise, a chosen strategy, though technologically acceptable, may not be efficient in the long term. This paper, using a sample case study within an organization, shows how different versions of ELECTRE methods can be used in choosing efficient strategies that account for both human behavioral resistance and technical elements. The effect of resistance from each subsystem of the organization is studied to ensure the reliability of the chosen strategy. The comparison of results from a select number of compensatory and noncompensatory models (ELECTRE I, III, IV, IS; TOPSIS; SAW; MaxMin suggests that when employee resistance is a decision factor in the multicriteria strategic planning problem, the models can yield low-resistance strategies; however, ELECTRE seems to show more reasonable sensitivity.

  19. Electrical Resistivity Imaging and Hydrodynamic Modeling of Convective Fingering in a Sabkha Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Remke; Eustice, Brian; Hyndman, David; Wood, Warren; Simmons, Craig

    2014-05-01

    Free convection, or fluid motion driven by density differences, is an important groundwater flow mechanism that can enhance transport and mixing of heat and solutes in the subsurface. Various issues of environmental and societal relevance are exacerbated convective mixing; it has been studied in the context of dense contaminant plumes, nuclear waste disposal, greenhouse gas sequestration, the impacts of sea level rise and saline intrusion on drinking water resources. The basic theory behind convective flow in porous media is well understood, but important questions regarding this process in natural systems remain unanswered. Most previous research on this topic has focused on theory and modeling, with only limited attention to experimental studies and field measurements. The few published studies present single snapshots, making it difficult to quantify transient changes in these systems. Non-invasive electrical methods have the potential to exploit the relation between solute concentrations and electrical conductance of a fluid, and thereby estimate fluid salinity differences in time and space. We present the results of a two-year experimental study at a shallow sabkha aquifer in the United Arab Emirates, about 50 km southwest of the city of Abu Dhabi along the coast of the Arabian Gulf, that was designed to explore the transient nature of free convection. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data documented the presence of convective fingers following a significant rainfall event. One year later, the complex fingering pattern had completely disappeared. This observation is supported by analysis of the aquifer solute budget as well as hydrodynamic modeling of the system. The transient dynamics of the gravitational instabilities in the modeling results are in agreement with the timing observed in the time-lapse ERT data. Our experimental observations and modeling are consistent with the hypothesis that the instabilities arose from a dense brine that infiltrated

  20. Electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakamada, Masataka; Kato, Naoki; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoporous gold is modified with thiol-containing self-assembled monolayers. • The electrical resistivity of the thiol-modified nanoporous gold increases. • The electrical resistivity increases with increasing thiol concentration. • Monolayer tail groups enhance the atmosphere dependence of electrical resistivity. - Abstract: The electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold (NPG) modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been measured at 298 K using a four-probe method. We found that the adsorption of thiol SAMs increases the electrical resistivity of NPG by up to 22.2%. Dependence of the electrical resistivity on the atmosphere (air or water) was also observed in SAMs-modified NPG, suggesting that the electronic states of the tail groups affect the electrons of the binding sulfur and adjacent surface gold atoms. The present results suggest that adsorption of thiol molecules can influence the behavior of the conducting electrons in NPG and that modification of NPG with SAMs may be useful for environmental sensing.

  1. Electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakamada, Masataka, E-mail: hakamada.masataka.3x@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kato, Naoki, E-mail: katou.naoki.75w@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Mabuchi, Mamoru, E-mail: mabuchi@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Nanoporous gold is modified with thiol-containing self-assembled monolayers. • The electrical resistivity of the thiol-modified nanoporous gold increases. • The electrical resistivity increases with increasing thiol concentration. • Monolayer tail groups enhance the atmosphere dependence of electrical resistivity. - Abstract: The electrical resistivity of nanoporous gold (NPG) modified with thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been measured at 298 K using a four-probe method. We found that the adsorption of thiol SAMs increases the electrical resistivity of NPG by up to 22.2%. Dependence of the electrical resistivity on the atmosphere (air or water) was also observed in SAMs-modified NPG, suggesting that the electronic states of the tail groups affect the electrons of the binding sulfur and adjacent surface gold atoms. The present results suggest that adsorption of thiol molecules can influence the behavior of the conducting electrons in NPG and that modification of NPG with SAMs may be useful for environmental sensing.

  2. Combined application of vertical electrical sounding and 2D electrical resistivity imaging for geothermal groundwater characterization: Hammam Sayala hot spring case study (NW Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaane, Achref; Redhaounia, Belgacem; Gabtni, Hakim

    2017-10-01

    The following work is an attempt to enhance and optimize the potential exploitation of the Hammam Sayala thermal spring (NW Tunisia). This hot spring is located at 10 km of South-western Béja city, with higher temperature values around 42 °C and a low discharge value of about 1 l s-1. The geological and structural settings of the study area are complex and associated with faults and Triassic intruded salt and evaporate. An integrated geophysical approach using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Induced Polarization (IP) and Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) techniques can provide a high-resolution subsurface image of the principal geothermal plume and associated pathways. These data were used to determine and understand the mechanisms responsible of the rise of hot water flowing out onto the surface. Our results add new information of the hydrothermal system's context in Hammam Sayala area, which can help to create a therapeutic center opening new perspectives in the Béja region and to encourage regional thermal tourism development.

  3. Impact of electric and magnetic fields in a resistant medium on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we compare the impact of electric and magnetic fields in a resistant medium on the velocity of a particle subject to varying path angles by using numerical integration of finite difference method. The results show that the magnetic field has much impact on the velocity than the electric field. Journal of the Nigerian ...

  4. Monitoring of high temperature area by resistivity tomography during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature, mechanical conditions or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50 m. The well with a diameter of 30 cm and 60 cm of height, was drilled and filled with groundwater. The heater was installed in the well for heating the surrounding rock mass. During the heating, temperature and deformation around the well were measured. To evaluate the influence of heating on sedimentary soft rocks, it is important to monitor the extent of heated area. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature area. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. The decreasing rate of resistivity on temperature is correlated to that of laboratory experimental result and existing empirical formula between aqueous solution resistivity and temperature. Resistivity is changed by many other factors, but it is expected that resistivity change by other factors is very few in this test. This suggests that high temperature area is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the area heated by nuclear waste. (author)

  5. Strain-dependent electrical resistance of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Myounggu; Kim, Hyonny; Youngblood, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    The strain-dependent electrical resistance characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polymer composite films were investigated. In this research, polyethylene oxide (PEO) is used as the polymer matrix. Two representative volume fractions of MWCNT/PEO composite films were selected: 0.56 vol% (near the percolation threshold) and 1.44 vol% (away from the percolation threshold) of MWCNT. An experimental setup which can measure electrical resistance and strain simultaneously and continuously has been developed. Unique and repeatable relationships in resistance versus strain were obtained for multiple specimens with different volume fractions of MWCNT. The overall pattern of electrical resistance change versus strain for the specimens tested consists of linear and nonlinear regions. A resistance change model to describe the combination of linear and nonlinear modes of electrical resistance change as a function of strain is suggested. The unique characteristics in electrical resistance change for different volume fractions imply that MWCNT/PEO composite films can be used as tunable strain sensors and for application into embedded sensor systems in structures

  6. A Simultaneous and Continuous Excitation Method for High-Speed Electrical Impedance Tomography with Reduced Transients and Noise Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Dupré

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a concept for soft field tomographic scan of all the projections of electromagnetic waves emanating from an array of electrodes. Instead of the sequential excitation of all pairs of electrodes in the list of all projections, the new method present here consists of a single and continuous excitation. This excitation signal is the linear combination of the excitation signals in the projection set at different AC frequencies. The response to a given projection is discriminated by selecting the corresponding AC frequency component in the signal spectra of the digitally demodulated signals. The main advantage of this method is the suppression of transients after each projection, which is particularly problematic in electrical impedance tomography due to contact impedance phenomena and skin effect. The second benefit over the sequential scan method is the increased number of samples for each measurement for reduced noise sensitivity with digital demodulation. The third benefit is the increased temporal resolution in high-speed applications. The main drawback is the increased number of signal sources required (one per electrode. This paper focuses on electrical impedance tomography, based on earlier work by the authors. An experimental proof-of-concept using a simple 4-electrodes electrical impedance tomographic system is presented using simulations and laboratory data. The method presented here may be extended to other modalities (ultrasonic, microwave, optical, etc..

  7. Lithostratigraphic interpretation from joint analysis of seismic tomography and magnetotelluric resistivity models using self-organizing map techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, K.; Muñoz, G.; Moeck, I.

    2012-12-01

    The combined interpretation of different models as derived from seismic tomography and magnetotelluric (MT) inversion represents a more efficient approach to determine the lithology of the subsurface compared with the separate treatment of each discipline. Such models can be developed independently or by application of joint inversion strategies. After the step of model generation using different geophysical methodologies, a joint interpretation work flow includes the following steps: (1) adjustment of a joint earth model based on the adapted, identical model geometry for the different methods, (2) classification of the model components (e.g. model blocks described by a set of geophysical parameters), and (3) re-mapping of the classified rock types to visualise their distribution within the earth model, and petrophysical characterization and interpretation. One possible approach for the classification of multi-parameter models is based on statistical pattern recognition, where different models are combined and translated into probability density functions. Classes of rock types are identified in these methods as isolated clusters with high probability density function values. Such techniques are well-established for the analysis of two-parameter models. Alternatively we apply self-organizing map (SOM) techniques, which have no limitations in the number of parameters to be analysed in the joint interpretation. Our SOM work flow includes (1) generation of a joint earth model described by so-called data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning or training, (3) analysis of the feature map by adopting image processing techniques, and (4) application of the knowledge to derive a lithological model which is based on the different geophysical parameters. We show the usage of the SOM work flow for a synthetic and a real data case study. Both tests rely on three geophysical properties: P velocity and vertical velocity gradient from seismic tomography, and electrical resistivity

  8. Electrical impedance tomography during major open upper abdominal surgery: a pilot-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Maximilian S; Wania, Viktoria; Bastin, Bea; Schmalz, Ursula; Kienbaum, Peter; Beiderlinden, Martin; Treschan, Tanja A

    2014-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) of the lungs facilitates visualization of ventilation distribution during mechanical ventilation. Its intraoperative use could provide the basis for individual optimization of ventilator settings, especially in patients at risk for ventilation-perfusion mismatch and impaired gas exchange, such as patients undergoing major open upper abdominal surgery. EIT throughout major open upper abdominal surgery could encounter difficulties in belt positioning and signal quality. Thus, we conducted a pilot-study and tested whether EIT is feasible in patients undergoing major open upper abdominal surgery. Following institutional review board's approval and written informed consent, we included patients scheduled for major open upper abdominal surgery of at least 3 hours duration. EIT measurements were conducted prior to intubation, at the time of skin incision, then hourly during surgery until shortly prior to extubation and after extubation. Number of successful intraoperative EIT measurements and reasons for failures were documented. From the valid measurements, a functional EIT image of changes in tidal impedance was generated for every time point. Regions of interest were defined as horizontal halves of the picture. Monitoring of ventilation distribution was assessed using the center of ventilation index, and also using the total and dorsal ventilated lung area. All parameter values prior to and post intubation as well as extubation were compared. A p abdominal surgery lasting 4-13 hours were planned in 14 patients. The electrode belt was attached between the 2(nd) and 4(th) intercostal space. Consecutive valid measurements could be acquired in 13 patients (93%). 111 intraoperative measurements could be retrieved as planned (93%). Main obstacle was the contact of skin electrodes. Despite the high belt position, distribution of tidal volume showed a significant shift of ventilation towards ventral lung regions after intubation. This

  9. Influence of tidal volume on ventilation inhomogeneity assessed by electrical impedance tomography during controlled mechanical ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, T; Kott, M; Schädler, D; Vogt, B; Meinel, T; Weiler, N; Frerichs, I

    2015-01-01

    The global inhomogeneity (GI) index is a parameter of ventilation inhomogeneity that can be calculated from images of tidal ventilation distribution obtained by electrical impedance tomography (EIT). It has been suggested that the GI index may be useful for individual adjustment of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and for guidance of ventilator therapy. The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of tidal volume (V T ) on the GI index values. EIT data from 9 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome ventilated with a low and a high V T of 5   ±   1 (mean  ±  SD) and 9   ±   1 ml kg −1 predicted body weight at a high and a low level of PEEP (PEEP high , PEEP low ) were analyzed. PEEP high and PEEP low were set 2 cmH 2 O above and 5 cmH 2 O below the lower inflection point of a quasi-static pressure volume loop, respectively. The lower inflection point was identified at 8.1   ±   1.4 (mean  ±  SD) cmH 2 O, resulting in a PEEP high of 10.1   ±   1.4 and a PEEP low of 3.1   ±   1.4 cmH 2 O. At PEEP high , we found no significant trend in GI index with low V T when compared to high V T (0.49   ±   0.15 versus 0.44   ±   0.09, p = 0.13). At PEEP low , we found a significantly higher GI index with low V T compared to high V T (0.66   ±   0.19 versus 0.59   ±   0.17, p = 0.01). When comparing the PEEP levels, we found a significantly lower GI index at PEEP high both for high and low V T . We conclude that high V T may lead to a lower GI index, especially at low PEEP settings. This should be taken into account when using the GI index for individual adjustment of ventilator settings. (paper)

  10. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways.

  11. Electrical resistivity of quartzite obtained from the gold-belt of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The resistivity was measured for the passage of current through the samples in two orthogonal directions, parallel and perpendicular to the rock foliation. The average value of the room temperature resistivity for electrical conduction in the two directions were respectively, 9.02 x 105 W m and 1.95 x 108 W m. These values ...

  12. Electrical resistivity due to electron-phonon scattering in thin gadolinium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbaniak-Kucharczyk, A.

    1988-01-01

    The contribution to the electrical resistivity due to the electron-phonon scattering for the special case of h.c.p. structure is derived. The numerical results obtained for the case of polycrystalline gadolinum films show the resistivity dependence on the film thickness and the surface properties. (author)

  13. On the difference between optically and electrically determined resistivity of ultra-thin titanium nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the determination and comparison of the resistivity of ultra-thin atomic layer deposited titanium nitride films in the thickness range 0.65–20 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical test structures. We found that for films thicker than 4 nm, the resistivity values

  14. Critical behavior of electrical resistivity in amorphous Fe–Zr alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical resistivity (ρ) of the amorphous (a-)Fe100-Zr ( = 8.5, 9.5 and 10) alloys has been measured in the temperature range 77 to 300 K, which embraces the second-order magnetic phase transition at the Curie temperature point . Analysis of the resistivity data particularly in the critical region reveals that these ...

  15. Change in electrical resistance of irradiated nuclear graphite during compressive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Motokuni

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the change in electrical resistance of neutron-irradiated nuclear graphite is measured and compared with that of the unirradiated; the deformation mechanism for irradiated graphite is discussed in relation to the resistance change and the defects which are believed to be produced during irradiation. (orig./RK)

  16. Simple and stable transendothelial electrical resistance measurement in organs-on-chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Marieke Willemijn; Odijk, Mathieu; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2015-01-01

    Measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a popular way to monitor cellular barrier tightness in organs-on-chips. However, in these devices integrated electrodes often block sight on the cells and the measured part often includes fluid-filled channels with variable resistance.

  17. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, MICROMEGAS detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  18. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics including: plasticity, : water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear strength. Many of these characteristics also : influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  19. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics : including: plasticity, water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear : strength. Many of these characteristics also influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  20. Electrical resistance of CNT-PEEK composites under compression at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electrically conductive polymers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs have generated a great deal of scientific and industrial interest in the last few years. Advanced thermoplastic composites made of three different weight percentages (8%, 9%, and 10% of multiwalled CNTs and polyether ether ketone (PEEK were prepared by shear mixing process. The temperature- and pressure-dependent electrical resistance of these CNT-PEEK composites have been studied and presented in this paper. It has been found that electrical resistance decreases significantly with the application of heat and pressure.

  1. Application of electrical resistivity imaging on Divaška jama cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Mihevc

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI is a widely used tool in geophysical survey of various subsurface structures. To establish its applicability for karst subsurface, ERI was conducted in Divača karst above caves of Trhlovca and Divaška jama and in its continuation as denuded cave on slopes of Radvanj collapse doline. Empty cave passages were not detected with ERI as electrical resistivity difference between voids and highly resistive carbonate bedrock is too small. On the other hand, denuded caves and cave sections, filled with loamy material, can be clearly distinguished.

  2. Modelling the influence of steel fibres on the electrical resistivity of cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    One of the governing factors on the corrosion of embedded reinforcement is the electrical resistivity of the concrete. The combination of steel fibres and conventional reinforcement bars has been used in a number of structures. However, the addition of electrical con-ductive fibres might influence...... of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). The parameters investigated in the following are the fibre geometry, the fibre volume and the transitional resistance. On basis of the experimental results, a model, taking the resistivity of the fibres and the concrete matrix into account is proposed....

  3. Study on aerodynamic resistance to electric rail vehicles generated by the power supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan SEBESAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Improving the traction performance of the electric railway vehicles requires an analysis to reduce their aerodynamic resistance. These vehicles cannot be set in motion without an external power source, which demonstrates that the supply system is a key-element to their operation. The power source is located on the rooftop which basically results in an increase of their aerodynamic resistance. The present study discusses the aerodynamic resistance of the electric railway equipment such as pantographs, automatic circuit breaker, insulators, etc. The analyze is based on the equipment installed on the electric locomotive LE 060 EA of 5100 kW which is operational in Romania, emphasizing the pantographs role in capturing of electricity.

  4. Thickness effect on electric resistivity on polystyrene and carbon black- based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Lopez, S; Vigueras-Santiago, E [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA) Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon Esquina con Paseo Tollocan, s/n, CP 50000, Toluca (Mexico); Mayorga-Rojas, M; Reyes-Contreras, D, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico. Av. Instituto Literario 100 Ote. C. P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Changes on electrical resistivity were experimentally studied for polystyrene and carbon black-based composites respect to the temperature. 22% w/w carbon black composite films at 30{mu}m, 2mm y 1cm thick were submitted to thermal heating-cooling cycles from room temperature to 100 deg. C, slightly up to T{sub g} of the composite. For each cycle changes on electrical resistivity constituent a hysteresis loop that depends on the sample thickness. The changes during the heating stage could be explained as a consequence of the thermal expansion and mobility of the polymer chains at T{sub g}, producing a disconnecting of the electrical contacts among carbon black particles and an important increasing (200%) of the electrical resistivity. For each cycle, the hysteresis loop was observed in thicker samples, whereas for 30 mu m thickness sample the hysteresis loop was lost after four cycles.

  5. Thickness effect on electric resistivity on polystyrene and carbon black- based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Lopez, S; Vigueras-Santiago, E; Mayorga-Rojas, M; Reyes-Contreras, D

    2009-01-01

    Changes on electrical resistivity were experimentally studied for polystyrene and carbon black-based composites respect to the temperature. 22% w/w carbon black composite films at 30 μm, 2mm y 1cm thick were submitted to thermal heating-cooling cycles from room temperature to 100 deg. C, slightly up to T g of the composite. For each cycle changes on electrical resistivity constituent a hysteresis loop that depends on the sample thickness. The changes during the heating stage could be explained as a consequence of the thermal expansion and mobility of the polymer chains at T g , producing a disconnecting of the electrical contacts among carbon black particles and an important increasing (200%) of the electrical resistivity. For each cycle, the hysteresis loop was observed in thicker samples, whereas for 30 μ m thickness sample the hysteresis loop was lost after four cycles.

  6. Examination of Electrical Resistance of Carburizers Used for Cast Iron Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Książek D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The publication presents the results of examination of selected carburizers used for cast iron production with respect to their electric resistance. Both the synthetic graphite carburizers and petroleum coke (petcoke carburizers of various chemical composition were compared. The relationships between electrical resistance of tested carburizers and their quality were found. The graphite carburizers exhibited much better conductivity than the petcoke ones. Resistance characteristics were different for the different types of carburizers. The measurements were performed according to the authors’ own method based on recording the electric current flow through the compressed samples. The samples of the specified diameter were put under pressure of the gradually increased value (10, 20, 50, 60, and finally 70 bar, each time the corresponding value of electric resistance being measured with a gauge of high accuracy, equal to 0.1μΩ. The higher pressure values resulted in the lower values of resistance. The relation between both the thermal conductance and the electrical conductance (or the resistance is well known and mentioned in the professional literature. The results were analysed and presented both in tabular and, additionally, in graphic form.

  7. Evaluating the use of electrical resistivity imaging technique for improving CH4 and CO2 emission rate estimations in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgaki, I.; Soupios, P.; Sakkas, N.; Ververidis, F.; Trantas, E.; Vallianatos, F.; Manios, T.

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve the estimation of surface gas emissions in landfill, we evaluated a combination of geophysical and greenhouse gas measurement methodologies. Based on fifteen 2D electrical resistivity tomographies (ERTs), longitudinal cross section images of the buried waste layers were developed, identifying place and cross section size of organic waste (OW), organic waste saturated in leachates (SOW), low organic and non-organic waste. CH 4 and CO 2 emission measurements were then conducted using the static chamber technique at 5 surface points along two tomographies: (a) across a high-emitting area, ERT no. 2, where different amounts of relatively fresh OW and SOW were detected, and (b) across the oldest (at least eight years) cell in the landfill, ERT no. 6, with significant amounts of OW. Where the highest emission rates were recorded, they were strongly affected by the thickness of the OW and SOW fraction underneath each gas sampling point. The main reason for lower than expected values was the age of the layered buried waste. Lower than predicted emissions were also attributed to soil condition, which was the case at sampling points with surface ponding, i.e. surface accumulation of leachate (or precipitated water)

  8. Magnetic and electric field induced resistance change in SrFeO thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kito, Shinya; Yokota, Takeshi; Tsuboi, Yasutoshi; Imura, Rempei; Gomi, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated Fe electrode/SrFeO 3-x stacking layer as resistance random access memory which is called next generation non-volatile memory. In this stacking system, positive magnetoresistance (MR) due to exchange coupling between Fe electrode and SrFeO 3-x layer was observed in initial state. After applying external electric field, in the each resistance state which is high resistance state or low resistance state, MR behaviour was changed from positive MR to negative MR. This behaviour is more likely due to that exchange coupling and the phase of SrFeO 3-x layer were changed by electric field and we realized that it is possible to control magnetic property and series of SrFeO 3-x phase by using external electric field.

  9. The effect of mechanical stress on electric resistance of nanographite-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, L.; Lazarenko, A.; Matzui, L.; Zhuravkov, A.

    2012-03-01

    The in-plane electric resistance Ra of composite materials (CMs) thermoexfoliated graphite(TEG)-epoxy resin(ED) under compression along compacting C-axis has been investigated by four-probe method. TEG content was 5-75 wt%. It was shown that specimens prepared by cold pressing are denser and reveal lower values of electric resistivity in comparison with specimens prepared by pouring. It was found that compression of the specimens leads to plastic deformation of specimens (εpl) and essential irreversible decrease of electric resistance during the first cycle of loading (up to 50 MPa), especially for the poured specimens with low density. Within the proposed model the contact resistance Rk between graphite particles in CM has been evaluated and it was shown that it increased with the decrease in TEG content in CM and depends on compacting method of CMs and the dispersity of graphite filler.

  10. Application of column tests and electrical resistivity methods for leachate transport monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowaniak Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the human civilization leads to the pollution of environment. One of the contamination which are a real threat to soil and groundwater are leachates from landfills. In this paper the solute transport through soil was considered. For this purpose, the laboratory column tests of chlorides tracer and leachates transport on two soil samples have been carried out. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied as auxiliary tool to follow the movements of solute through the soil column what allowed to compare between the results obtained with column test method and electrical resistivity measurements. Breakthrough curves obtained by conductivity and resistivity methods represents similar trends which leads to the conclusion about the suitability of electrical resistivity methods for contamination transport monitoring in soil-water systems.

  11. Determination of Thermal Contact Resistances for Small TENV Electrical Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Olfa MEKSI; Mohd Azri Hizami RASID; Alejandro OSPINA; Vincent LANFRANCHI

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal study of Synchronous Reluctant motor is proposed. A specific experimental method is applied in order to identify the thermal parameters, this method focus on the study of contact resistances and total thermal capacity. Generally, in the classical thermal modeling, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) is estimated by empirical values and the thermal capacities are calculated by analytical solutions. The originality of the proposed model is based on the complementarity ...

  12. Influence of Dry Cleaning on the Electrical Resistance of Screen Printed Conductors on Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazani Ilda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrically conducting inks were screen printed on various textile substrates. The samples were dry cleaned with the usual chemicals in order to investigate the influence of the mechanical treatment on the electrical conductivity. It was found that dry cleaning has a tremendous influence on this electrical conductivity. For several samples, it is observed that the electrical resistance increases with the square of the number of dry cleaning cycles. In order to explain this observation a theoretical model and a numerical simulation have been carried out, by assuming that dry cleaning cycles introduce a crack in the conducting layer. The theoretical analysis and the numerical analysis both confirmed the experimental observations.

  13. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater–surface water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Steelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater–surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater–surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze–thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool–riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface. While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river

  14. Statistical analysis of electrical resistivity as a tool for estimating cement type of 12-year-old concrete specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Morales-Napoles, O.; Pacheco, J.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical tests on values of concrete resistivity can be used as a fast tool for estimating the cement type of old concrete. Electrical resistivity of concrete is a material property that describes the electrical resistance of concrete in a unit cell. Influences of binder type, water-to-binder

  15. Using repeat electrical resistivity surveys to assess heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics under contrasting vegetation types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Bradford, John; Soulsby, Chris

    2018-04-01

    As the relationship between vegetation and soil moisture is complex and reciprocal, there is a need to understand how spatial patterns in soil moisture influence the distribution of vegetation, and how the structure of vegetation canopies and root networks regulates the partitioning of precipitation. Spatial patterns of soil moisture are often difficult to visualise as usually, soil moisture is measured at point scales, and often difficult to extrapolate. Here, we address the difficulties in collecting large amounts of spatial soil moisture data through a study combining plot- and transect-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys to estimate soil moisture in a 3.2 km2 upland catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The aim was to assess the spatio-temporal variability in soil moisture under Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris) and heather moorland shrubs (Calluna vulgaris); the two dominant vegetation types in the Scottish Highlands. The study focussed on one year of fortnightly ERT surveys. The surveyed resistivity data was inverted and Archie's law was used to calculate volumetric soil moisture by estimating parameters and comparing against field measured data. Results showed that spatial soil moisture patterns were more heterogeneous in the forest site, as were patterns of wetting and drying, which can be linked to vegetation distribution and canopy structure. The heather site showed a less heterogeneous response to wetting and drying, reflecting the more uniform vegetation cover of the shrubs. Comparing soil moisture temporal variability during growing and non-growing seasons revealed further contrasts: under the heather there was little change in soil moisture during the growing season. Greatest changes in the forest were in areas where the trees were concentrated reflecting water uptake and canopy partitioning. Such differences have implications for climate and land use changes; increased forest cover can lead to greater spatial variability, greater

  16. Specific features in the behavior of electrical resistivity of the pine biocarbon preform/copper composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, A. T.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.

    2010-11-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ( T) of the novel type of composites prepared by infiltrating melted copper in vacuum in empty sap channels of white pine high-porosity biocarbon preforms has been measured in the temperature range 5-300 K. Biocarbon preforms have been prepared by pyrolysis of tree wood in an argon flow at two carbonization temperatures, 1000 and 2400°C. The electrical resistivity of the composites has been found to vary relatively weakly with temperature and to pass through a characteristic minimum near 40-50 K, which can be ascribed to iron and manganese impurities penetrating into copper from the carbon preform when liquid copper is infiltrated into it. It has been shown that the electrical resistivity ρ( T) of the composites is governed primarily by the specific microstructure of the preform, which is made up of parallel channels with an average diameter of about 50 μm interrupted by systems of thin capillaries. The small cross section of the copper-filled capillaries accounts for these regions providing the major contribution to the electrical resistivity of the composites. An increase in the wood carbonization temperature brings about a noticeable increase in the effective capillary cross section and a decrease in the electrical resistivity ρ( T) of the composite.

  17. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-02

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  18. Electrical resistance behavior with gamma radiation dose in bulk carbon nanostrutured samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, J.; Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Desdin, L. F.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Leyva, D.; Toledo, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on the electrical resistance and V-I characteristic of bulk carbon nano structured samples obtained by electric arc discharge in water method. Images of pristine samples obtained with scanning electron, and the results in graphical form of the electrical characterization of irradiated samples are presented in the text. It was observed that the electrical resistance vs. dose behavior shows an initial increment reaching the maximum at approximately 135 kGy, followed by a drop of the resistance values. These behaviors are associated with the progressive generation of radiation induced defects in the sample, whose number increases to reach saturation at 135 kGy. From this dose, defects could lead to cross-links between different nano structures present in the sample conducting to a gradually drop in electrical resistance. The measured V-I curves show that, increasing exposure to the 60 Co gamma radiation, the electrical properties of the studied samples transit from a semiconductor towards a predominantly metallic behavior. These results were compared with those obtained for a sample of graphite powder irradiated under the same conditions. (Author)

  19. Basic study of a diagnostic modality employing a new electrical impedance tomography (EIT) method for noninvasive measurement in localized tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kenji; Tangoku, Akira; Morimoto, Tadaoki; Kotani, Ryosuke; Hattori, Keigo; Yasuno, Emiko; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a device for noninvasive local tissue electrical impedance tomography (EIT) using divided electrodes with guard electrodes and to validate its effectiveness using bioequivalent phantoms. For this purpose, we prepared a measurement device and bioequivalent phantoms, measured the electrical characteristics of the phantoms, and validated the method using the phantoms. Monolayer phantoms mimicking the brain and muscle and bilayer phantoms consisting of muscle and brain layers were prepared. The relative differences between the measured electrical conductivities of the monolayer brain and muscle phantoms and the true values determined by the 4-electrode method were both less than 10%. The relative differences between the measured and true values in the bilayer phantoms were less than 20% in both layers. The biological impedance measurement device that we developed was confirmed to be effective for impedance measurement in bilayer phantoms with different electrical impedances. To develop a device for the early diagnosis of breast diseases, the development of a multi-layer phantom and demonstration of the effectiveness of the device for its examination are necessary. If the device that we developed makes impedance measurement in breast tumors possible, it may be used as a new diagnostic modality for breast diseases.

  20. An integrated deep electrical resistivity model of the Larderello geothermal field (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Enzo; Capozzoli, Luigi; De martino, Gregory; Godio, Alberto; Manzella, Adele; Perciante, Felice; Santilano, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    A new deep electrical resistivity acquisition was carried out in Larderello geothermal area (Tuscania Region, Italy) by 3D Deep Electrical Resistivity Tomography (3D-DERT) and Magnetotelluric (M) acquisition. The investigated area is located close the Venelle2 well in the southern part of Larderello site, where there is the oldest field in the world under exploitation for power production (actual installed capacity is about 795 MWe). A vapour-dominated system is exploited to depth over 3500 m, with temperatures exceeding 350°C, from two different reservoirs. The Larderello area has been investigated by many geological and geophysical data of previous exploration projects but nowadays several critical issues on deep features of the field are still matter of debate, e.g., permeability distribution in the hydrothermal reservoir and the presence of fluids at supercritical condition at depth. The 3D-DERT system was designed by Surface-Surface and Surface-Hole electrode distributions in the area around Venelle2 well covering an area around 16km2. The well (kindly provided by Enel GP) was accessible down to 1.6 km with a temperature up to 250°C and a metallic casing down to 1 km. The in-hole thermal cable is characterized by n.12 flexible metallic electrodes with an electrodes space of 50m covering the open-hole portion (1050m-1600m). The surface electrodes are located around the Venelle2 hole on n.23 different positions connected to automatic dataloger to acquire the drop of potential and to transmitter device to inject the current (5-10A). The crucial task was the data processing, considering the large distance between the Tx and Rx systems that strongly reduces the signal to-noise ratio. To overcome this drawback, for each quadripole position the corresponding voltage signal was filtered, stored and processed with advanced statistical packages. The new 22 station were installed in the studied area and the data were carried out taking in account a permanent remote

  1. INORGANIC PLUME DELINEATION USING SURFACE HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AT THE BC CRIBS & TRENCHES SITE HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2007-05-29

    A surface resistivity survey was conducted on the Hanford Site over a waste disposal trench that received a large volume of liquid inorganic waste. The objective of the survey was to map the extent of the plume that resulted from the disposal activities approximately 50 years earlier. The survey included six resistivity transects of at least 200m, where each transect provided two-dimensional profile information of subsurface electrical properties. The results of the survey indicated that a low resistivity plume resides at a depth of approximately 25-44 m below ground surface. The target depth was calibrated with borehole data of pore-water electrical conductivity. Due to the high correlation of the pore-water electrical conductivity to nitrate concentration and the high correlation of measured apparent resistivity to pore-water electrical conductivity, inferences were made that proposed the spatial distribution of the apparent resistivity was due to the distribution of nitrate. Therefore, apparent resistivities were related to nitrate, which was subsequently rendered in three dimensions to show that the nitrate likely did not reach the water table and the bounds of the highest concentrations are directly beneath the collection of waste sites.

  2. A combination of electrical resistivity and cone penetration test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conductive unconsolidated clayey soil / peat with the resistivity values 0.9 – 10 Ωm cum CPT values 2 to 4 kg/cm2 experienced along noticeable depressed parts could have contributed to the cracking and differential settlement of the residential buildings in the study area. However, boring via percussion drilling should ...

  3. Application Of Electrical Resistivity Method In Coastal Hydro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... borehole data to provide information on the freshwater-saltwater interfaces, and the depths to freshwater bearing units in the coastal areas. The results indicated that re-sistivity contrasts can be adopted for economic evaluation of groundwater development in coastal areas. Journal of Applied Science and Technology Vol.

  4. Use of electrical resistivity technique for engineering site investigation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of moderately thick (1.5 – 16.5m) clay has been established in this area; therefore the use of raft foundation and/or any other foundation that is commensurate with civil engineering standard is suggested for high rise structures. Keywords: bedrock integrity, transverse unit resistance, foundation. Global Journal ...

  5. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr; Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of); Kyung, Eun Jung [Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Bum [Department of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh In [Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  6. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  7. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based evaluation of biological tissue phantoms to study multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (Mf-EIT) systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2016-03-18

    Abstract: Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) phantoms are essential for the calibration, comparison and evaluation of the EIT systems. In EIT, the practical phantoms are typically developed based on inhomogeneities surrounded by a homogeneous background to simulate a suitable conductivity contrast. In multifrequency EIT (Mf-EIT) evaluation, the phantoms must be developed with the materials which have recognizable or distinguishable impedance variations over a wide range of frequencies. In this direction the impedance responses of the saline solution (background) and a number vegetable and fruit tissues (inhomogeneities) are studied with electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the frequency responses of bioelectrical impedance and conductivity are analyzed. A number of practical phantoms with different tissue inhomogeneities and different inhomogeneity configurations are developed and the multifrequency impedance imaging is studied with the Mf-EIT system to evaluate the phantoms. The conductivity of the vegetable inhomogeneities reconstructed from the EIT imaging is compared with the conductivity values obtained from the EIS studies. Experimental results obtained from multifrequency EIT reconstruction demonstrate that the electrical impedance of all the biological tissues inhomogenity decreases with frequency. The potato tissue phantom produces better impedance image in high frequency ranges compared to the cucumber phantom, because the cucumber impedance at high frequency becomes lesser than that of the potato at the same frequency range. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016 The Visualization Society of Japan

  8. Resistive Fault Current Limiter Prototypes: Mechanical and Electrical Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, L; Arcos, I; Bocchi, M; Brambilla, R; Dalessandro, R; Frigerio, A; Rossi, V

    2006-01-01

    The problem of excessive short-circuit currents has become an important issue for power systems operators and there are clear indications for a growing interest in superconducting fault current limiter devices for MV and HV grids. In this work, we report on both simulation and electrical testing on single-phase SFCL prototypes developed in the framework of an Italian RTD project to be completed with a 3-phase SFCL unit by the end of 2005

  9. [Numerical simulation and application of electrical resistivity survey in heavy metal contaminated sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-ling; Nai, Chang-xin; Wang, Yan-wen; Dong, Lu

    2013-05-01

    In order to analyze the effects of electrical resistivity in heavy metal contaminated sites, we established the resistivity model of typical contaminated sites and simulate the DC resistivity method with Wenner arrays using the finite element method. The simulation results showed that the electrical method was influenced by the contamination concentration and the location of pollution. The more serious the degree of pollution was, the more obvious the low resistivity anomaly, thus the easier the identification of the contaminated area; otherwise, if there was light pollution, Wenner array could not get obvious low resistivity anomalies, so it would be hard to judge the contaminated area. Our simulation results also showed that the closer the contaminated areas were to the surface, the more easily the pollution was detected and the low resistivity anomalies shown in the apparent resistivity diagram were influenced by the Layered medium. The actual field survey results using resistivity method also show that the resistivity method can correctly detect the area with serious pollution.

  10. Electrical Resistivity of Pristine and Functional Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of several pristine and functional single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs deposited and dried on interdigitated electrode (IDE chips was investigated to better understand how functional groups influence their resistivity. Without the external electrical field, the resistance was generally increased for the sulfonated and fluorinated SWNTs but not for COOH-SWNTs. With a 3 V electric field applied during depositing, while no change in resistance was found for the purified pristine SWNTs, fluorinated SWNTs, COOH SWNTs, and Ni-SWNTs, a significant decrease in resistance was observed in sulfonated SWNTs and unpurified pristine SWNTs, which could be due to the alignment of SWNTs in an electric field. The alignment of the sulfonated SWNTs is most likely due to the charge of the sulfate functional group. It is interesting to note that the alignment was found in the unpurified pristine SWNTs but not in the purified pristine ones which have lessened resistivity. The lower resistivity in the purified pristine SWNTs may be due to the smaller number (<5% of impurities. The significance of this research is that hydrophilic COOH-SWNTs could be a better candidate than the hydrophobic pristine SWNTs for being used in many applications, especially in polymer nanocomposites.

  11. Electrical resistivity of 5 f -electron systems affected by static and dynamic spin disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havela, L.; Paukov, M.; Buturlim, V.; Tkach, I.; Drozdenko, D.; Cieslar, M.; Mašková, S.; Dopita, M.; Matěj, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Metallic 5 f materials have very strong coupling of magnetic moments and electrons mediating electrical conduction. It is caused by strong spin-orbit interaction, coming with high atomic number Z , together with involvement of the 5 f states in metallic bonding. We have used the recently discovered class of uranium (ultra)nanocrystalline hydrides, which are ferromagnets with high ordering temperature, to disentangle the origin of negative temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity. In general, the phenomenon of electrical resistivity decreasing with increasing temperature in metals can have several reasons. The magnetoresistivity study of these hydrides reveals that quantum effects related to spin-disorder scattering can explain the resistivity behavior of a broad class of actinide compounds.

  12. B1-based SAR reconstruction using contrast source inversion-electric properties tomography (CSI-EPT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balidemaj, Edmond; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, A.L.H.M.W.; Nederveen, Aart J; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Crezee, Hans; Remis, Rob F

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment is essential for safety purposes during MR acquisition. Online SAR assessment is not trivial and requires, in addition, knowledge of the electric tissue properties and the electric fields in the human anatomy. In this study, the potential of the recently

  13. B1-based SAR reconstruction using contrast source inversion-electric properties tomography (CSI-EPT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balidemaj, Edmond; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; van Lier, Astrid L. H. M. W.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Crezee, Hans; Remis, Rob F.

    2017-01-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment is essential for safety purposes during MR acquisition. Online SAR assessment is not trivial and requires, in addition, knowledge of the electric tissue properties and the electric fields in the human anatomy. In this study, the potential of the recently

  14. B1-based SAR reconstruction using contrast source inversion–electric properties tomography (CSI-EPT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balidemaj, E.; van den Berg, CAT; van Lier, ALHMW; Nederveen, AJ; Stalpers, LJA; Crezee, H; Remis, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment is essential for safety purposes during MR acquisition. Online SAR assessment is not trivial and requires, in addition, knowledge of the electric tissue properties and the electric fields in the human anatomy. In this study, the potential of the recently

  15. Guanacaste Geothermal Project. Technical prefeasibility report. Annex C. Electric resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    This report is the third of six annexes to the Summary Report on the First Phase of the Guanacaste Geothermal Project. The studies covered an area of 500 km/sup 2/ on the SW flanks of the Rincon de la Vieja and Miravalles volcanoes of the Guanacaste Volcanic Range in NW Costa Rica, and were aimed at locating zones of high geothermal gradient, and reconstruction of the stratigraphic column. The formations in the area under study can be grouped into six resistivity ranges, varying from less than 5 to more than 200 ohm-meters. Values from 200 to as high as 30,000 ohm-meters generally correspond to fractured and porous lavas, their fracturing and porosity, as well as their drainability, increasing with resistivity. The values above 100 ohm-meters were recorded in zones of recent lava flows, in spurs of the volcanoes Rincon de la Vieja and Santa Maria, and in the slopes of the Miravalles volcano, and correspond to shallow formations (maximum depths of 150 meters) which may constitute recharge zones for the underground aquifiers. The values in the 100 to 200 ohm-meter range were generally recorded directly under layers constituted by drained, porous lavas, or under shallow layers where no recent lavas are present. The third group comprises materials with resistivities in the 25 to 100 ohm-meter range, occurring at two different depth levels: a deep one (more than 1000 meters) and a shallow one (less than 400 meters). Resistivities less than 25 ohm-meters were recorded at depths of 250 meters and more, and may correspond to material typical of the Aguacate formation, which probably constitutes the reservoir rock of the geothermal fluids. In order to locate the zones of most geothermal interest, this range was classified into the three remaining of the six groups, viz 10 to 25, 5 to 10, and less than 5 ohm-meters, the last group appearing to be that of greatest geothermal potential.

  16. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousineau, J. Emily [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bennion, Kevin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DeVoto, Doug [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mihalic, Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The ability to remove heat from an electric machine depends on the passive stack thermal resistances within the machine and the convective cooling performance of the selected cooling technology. This report focuses on the passive thermal design, specifically properties of the stator and rotor lamination stacks. Orthotropic thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density are reported. Four materials commonly used in electric machines were tested, including M19 (29 and 26 gauge), HF10, and Arnon 7 materials.

  17. Influence of accompanying substances of hemp fibres on their electric resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Biljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemp fibres belong to the group of natural, cellulose bast fibres. These fibres have exceptional properties such as: antimicrobial effect, absence of allergy effect, extraordinary sorption properties, good electro-physical properties (small static electricity in regard to other cellulose fibres as well as high values of breaking strength (the natural fibre with the highest strength. However, hemp fibres have some defects: heterogeneous chemical composition, large quantity of accompanying substances (lignin pectins, waxes and unsatisfactory fineness and eveness. It is possible to a great extent to eliminate or reduce, the defects of hemp fibres by of appropriate modification treatments. In order to determine the appropriate modification treatment of hemp fibres, the dependences between the chemical composition, fineness and electric resistance of hemp fibres were presented in this paper. In the experimental part of the paper, by the application of a procedure for the determination of the chemical composition, the accompanying supstances of hemp fibres were gradually removed. After each phase some fibrous substrates were separated. After that the fineness and electric resistance were determined. This experiment was conducted in order to define the influence of each component of hemp fibres on the fineness and electric resistance. In this paper, hemp fibres were modified by an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide, under different conditions of modification. The influence of modification conditions on the fineness and electric resistance were studied.

  18. Evaluation of atmospheric corrosion on electroplated zinc and zinc nickel coatings by Electrical Resistance (ER) Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per

    2013-01-01

    ER (Electrical Resistance) probes provide a measurement of metal loss, measured at any time when a metal is exposed to the real environment. The precise electrical resistance monitoring system can evaluate the corrosion to the level of nanometers, if the conductivity is compensated for temperature...... and magnetic fields. With this technique very important information about the durability of a new conversion coatings for aluminum, zinc and zinc alloys exposed to unknown atmospheric conditions can be gathered. This is expected to have a major impact on a number of industrial segments, such as test cars...

  19. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY METHODS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PETERSEN SW

    2008-01-01

    There is a continuing need for cost-effective subsurface characterization within the vadose zone and groundwater at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. With more than 1600 liquid and solid waste sites and 200 burial sites, contaminants have migrated to and through the vadose zone. In addition, future groundwater plumes may be generated from contaminants presently in the vadose zone. Relatively low-cost geophysical techniques can provide spatially extensive data that may provide information about the presence and extent of some contaminants. Recent electrical resistivity surveys at Hanford have provided encouraging results for mapping of some contaminants, such as nitrate, in the vadose zone. Because mobile radionuclides and trace elements may have been transported with nitrate through the vadose zone, the method may be used to map some mobile contaminants of concern, such as technetium-99 (99Tc). Validation of these recent electrical resistivity survey results remains to be completed. Electrical resistivity surveys have been conducted at various waste sites in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site: BC Cribs and Trenches (BCCT), T, S, U, C, B Tank Farms and the Purex Plant. Surveys have been completed using surface and well-to-well (WTW) array configurations. The goals of the surveys, as described by Fluor Hanford and CH2MHill Hanford staff, were to test the applicability of resistivity methods in identifying the presence of and mapping approximate extent of contaminant plumes within the vadose zone. The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the utility of electrical resistivity methods for characterizing contaminants of potential concern in the vadose zone in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. The panel was asked to perform the following activities: (1) Evaluate recently completed and ongoing electrical resistivity projects at Hanford in terms of methodology used, results obtained, and lessons learned, with specific focus on (a

  20. Delamination Detection in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites Using Electrical Resistance Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalovs, A; Rucevskis, S; Kulakov, V; Aniskevich, A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study 2-D numerical analysis of strip-type laminated composite specimens with and without damage is considered and numerical investigation is carried out by using a finite element method. The surface and oblique resistances are numerically calculated according to the two-probe and four-probe methods. The electrical conductivity of the composite laminate in the longitudinal direction is constant, while the electrical conductivity in the through-thickness direction is used as a variable in the parametric study. The resistance change due to delamination for each case is estimated by comparing the obtained resistance with the corresponding resistance of the specimen without delamination. Applicability and effectiveness of the proposed method are investigated by using various lengths of a delaminated crack in the specimen. (paper)

  1. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  2. Combined effects of fretting and pollutant particles on the contact resistance of the electrical connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Kong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Usually, when electrical connectors operate in vibration environments, fretting will be produced at the contact interfaces. In addition, serious environmental pollution particles will affect contact resistance of the connectors. The fretting will worsen the reliability of connectors with the pollutant particles. The combined effects of fretting and quartz particles on the contact resistance of the gold plating connectors are studied with a fretting test system. The results show that the frequencies have obvious effect on the contact resistance. The higher the frequency, the higher the contact resistance is. The quartz particles cause serious wear of gold plating, which make the nickel and copper layer exposed quickly to increase the contact resistance. Especially in high humidity environments, water supply certain adhesion function and make quartz particles easy to insert or cover the contact surfaces, and even cause opening resistance.

  3. Evaluation of physico-mechanical properties of clayey soils using electrical resistivity imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam

    Resistivity imaging (RI) is a promising approach to obtaining continuous profile of soil subsurface. This method offers simple technique to identify moisture variation and heterogeneity of the investigated area. However, at present, only qualitative information of subsurface can be obtained using RI. A study on the quantification of geotechnical properties has become important for rigorous use of this method in the evaluation of geohazard potential and construction quality control of landfill liner system. Several studies have been performed to describe electrical resistivity of soil as a function of pore fluid conductivity and surface conductance. However, characterization tests on pore water and surface charge are not typically performed in a conventional geotechnical investigation. The overall objective of this study is to develop correlations between geotechnical parameters and electrical resistivity of soil, which would provide a mean to estimate geotechnical properties from RI. As a part of the study, multiple regression analyses were conducted to develop practically applicable models correlating resistivity with influential geotechnical parameters. The soil samples considered in this study were classified as highly plastic clay (CH) and low plasticity clay (CL) according to Unified Soil Classification System (USCS). Based on the physical tests, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, kaolinite was identified as the dominant mineral with some traces of magnesium, calcium, potassium, and iron. Electrical resistivity tests were conducted on compacted clays and undisturbed samples under varied geotechnical conditions. The experimental results indicated that the degree of saturation substantially influenced electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity decreased as much as 11 times from initial value for the increase of degree of saturation from 23 to 100% in the laboratory tests on compacted clays. In case of

  4. Acidic Barren Slope Profiling using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) at Ayer Hitam area Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Haimi, D. S.; Hafiz, Z. M.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, non-destructive method such as the electrical resistivity technique has become increasingly popular in engineering, environmental, mining and archeological studies nowadays. This method was popular in subsurface profiling due to its ability to replicate the images of the subsurface indirectly. The soil slope found in Batu Pahat, specifically in Ayer Hitam, is known to be problematic due to its barren condition. This location is believed to contain futile soil due to its difficulty in supporting the growth of vegetations. In the past, acidic barren slope assessment using non-destructive method was rarely being used due to several reasons related to the equipment and knowledge constraints. Hence, this study performed an electrical resistivity imaging using ABEM Terrameter LS in order to investigate the acidic barren slope conditions. Field data acquisition was based on Schlumberger and Wenner arrays while RES2DINV software was used to analyze and generate a 2-D model of the problematic subsurface profile. Based on electrical resistivity results, it was found that the acidic barren slope studied consists of two main zones representing residual soil (electrical resistivity value = 10 - 600 Ωm) and shale (electrical resistivity value = 20 - 2000 Ωm). The results of resistivity value were correlated with the physical mapping and the in situ mackintosh probe test for verification purposes. It was found that the maximum depth of the mackintosh probe test was 1.8 m due to its ground penetration limitation. However, the results of the resistivity section managed to achieve greater depth up to 40 m. Hence, the correlation between electrical resistivity and mackintosh probe results can only be performed at certain depth of the acidic barren slope profile in contrast with the physical mapping which able to define the whole section of the barren soil slope structure. Finally, a good match of electrical resistivity results calibrated with mackintosh and physical

  5. Elastic and Electrical Properties Evaluation of Low Resistivity Pays in Malay Basin Clastics Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanna Lubis, Luluan; Ghosh, Deva P.; Hermana, Maman

    2016-07-01

    The elastic and electrical properties of low resistivity pays clastics reservoirs in Malay Basin are strongly dependent on the complex nature of the clay content, either dispersed or laminated/layered. Estimating the hydrocarbon pore volume from conventional electrical log, i.e. resistivity log, is quite a challenge. The low elastic impedance contrast also found as one of the challenge thus create a problem to map the distribution of the low resistivity reservoirs. In this paper, we evaluate the electrical properties and elastic rock properties to discriminate the pay from the adjacent cap rock or shale. Forward modeling of well log responses including electrical properties are applied to analyze the nature of the possible pays on laminated reservoir rocks. In the implementation of rock properties analysis, several conventional elastic properties are comparatively analyzed for the sensitivity and feasibility analysis on each elastic parameters. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each elastic parameters in detail. In addition, cross-plots of elastic and electrical properties attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional elastic parameter crossplots attributes. The possible relationship on electrical and elastic properties are discussed for further studies.

  6. Method of imaging the electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.

    2017-09-26

    A method of imaging electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface containing metallic structures with known locations and dimensions is disclosed. Current is injected into the subsurface to measure electrical potentials using multiple sets of electrodes, thus generating electrical resistivity tomography measurements. A numeric code is applied to simulate the measured potentials in the presence of the metallic structures. An inversion code is applied that utilizes the electrical resistivity tomography measurements and the simulated measured potentials to image the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution and remove effects of the subsurface metallic structures with known locations and dimensions.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity and elastic constants of antiferromagnetic UN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, P. de V.; Doorn, C.F. van

    1977-01-01

    Susceptibility and electrical resistivity measurements on UN indicate Tsub(N) approximately 53 K. The spin-disorder resistivity is mainly proportional to 1-m 2 sub(n)(msub(n) is the reduced sublattice magnetization). The elastic constant C 44 shows a renormalization proportional to M 2 sub(n), whereas C 11 exhibits an anomalous softening of 10% well below Tsub(N) at 47 K. (Auth.)

  8. Estimation of heavy metal-contaminated soils' mechanical characteristics using electrical resistivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya; Liu, Songyu; Wang, Fei; Cai, Guojun; Bian, Hanliang

    2017-05-01

    Under the process of urbanization in China, more and more attention has been paid to the reuse of heavy metal-contaminated sites. The shear characteristics of heavy metal-contaminated soils are investigated by electrical detection in this paper. Three metal ions (Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ ) were used, the metal concentrations of which are 50, 166.67, 500, 1666.67, and 5000 mg/kg, respectively. Direct shear tests were used to investigate the influence of heavy metal ions on the shear characters of soil samples. It is found that with the addition of heavy metal ions, the shear strength, cohesion, and friction angle of contaminated soils are higher than the control samples. The higher concentration of heavy metal ions penetrated in soils, the higher these engineering characteristics of contaminated soils observed. In addition, an electrical resistivity detection machine is used to evaluate the shear characteristics of contaminated soils. The electrical resistivity test results show that there is a decreasing tendency of resistivity with the increase of heavy metal ion concentrations in soils. Compared with the electrical resistivity and the shear characteristics of metal-contaminated soils, it is found that, under fixed compactness and saturation, shear strength of metal-contaminated soils decreased with the increase of resistivity. A basic linear relationship between C/log(N + 10) and resistivity can be observed, and there is a basic linear relationship between φ/log(N + 10) and resistivity. Besides, a comparison of the measured and predicted shear characteristics shows a high accuracy, indicating that the resistivity can be used to evaluate the shear characteristics of heavy metal contaminated soils.

  9. Structural perfection and residual electric resistance of tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagirova, D.M.; Dyakina, V.P.; Startsev, V.E.; Esin, V.O.

    1997-01-01

    A study was made into residual relative resistance (RRR) and structural perfection (SP) of tungsten single crystals, grown by electron beam zone melting using seeding crystals of several orientations, namely, , , , . The single crystals were of 99.98 and 99.9995 wt.% purity. The RRR value is found to depend on crystallographic orientation of an axis of crystal growth and to correlate with SP. Single crystals of different purity are differ in the nature of orientational dependences. It is shown that the correlation between RRR and SP of crystals is mainly due to conduction electron scattering by subgrain boundaries (internal size effect)

  10. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  11. An alternative methodology for the analysis of electrical resistivity data from a soil gas study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Sara; Rosqvist, Hâkan; Svensson, Mats; Dahlin, Torleif; Leroux, Virginie

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method for the analysis of resistivity data. The methodology was developed during a study to evaluate if electrical resistivity can be used as a tool for analysing subsurface gas dynamics and gas emissions from landfills. The main assumption of this study was that variations in time of resistivity data correspond to variations in the relative amount of gas and water in the soil pores. Field measurements of electrical resistivity, static chamber gas flux and weather data were collected at a landfill in Helsingborg, Sweden. The resistivity survey arrangement consisted of nine lines each with 21 electrodes in an investigation area of 16 ×20 m. The ABEM Lund Imaging System provided vertical and horizontal resistivity profiles every second hour. The data were inverted in Res3Dinv using L1-norm-based optimization method with a standard least-squares formulation. Each horizontal soil layer was then represented as a linear interpolated raster model. Different areas underneath the gas flux measurement points were defined in the resistivity model of the uppermost soil layer, and the vertical extension of the zones could be followed at greater depths in deeper layer models. The average resistivity values of the defined areas were calculated and plotted on a time axis, to provide graphs of the variation in resistivity with time in a specific section of the ground. Residual variation of resistivity was calculated by subtracting the resistivity variations caused by the diurnal temperature variations from the measured resistivity data. The resulting residual resistivity graphs were compared with field data of soil moisture, precipitation, soil temperature and methane flux. The results of the study were qualitative, but promising indications of relationships between electrical resistivity and variations in the relative amount of gas and water in the soil pores were found. Even though more research and better data quality is

  12. Proceedings of the CERI 2005 electricity conference : markets, integration, resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This conference was attended by power industry decision makers who face continuing challenges regarding changes in electricity market mechanisms, pricing options, and power generation and transmission alternatives. It provided an opportunity to review energy markets in North American with particular reference to supply and demand and opportunities for traditional or new generation technologies based on renewable energy sources including wind powered generation. The presentations focused on transmission issues, market design and capacity issues as well as market power and pricing. The integration of wind energy into the power grid as a measure to diversity the power generation portfolio in North America was also discussed along with hydrothermal synergies and interconnections. The role of wind, coal and nuclear power in future North American energy markets was also discussed along with their environmental consequences. tabs., figs

  13. Feasibility of magnetic resona