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Sample records for resistance plasmids carried

  1. Plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozwandowicz, M.; Brouwer, M.S.M.; Fischer, J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Gonzalez-Zorn, B.; Guerra, B.; Mevius, D.J.; Hordijk, J.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is constantly evolving and horizontal gene transfer through plasmids plays a major role. The identification of plasmid characteristics and their association with different bacterial hosts provides crucial knowledge that is essential to understand the

  2. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyu; Dalsgaard, Anders; Hammerum, Anette M; Porsbo, Lone J; Jensen, Lars B

    2010-07-30

    Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans) were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc) groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%), while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively). Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes. Sul genes were distributed widely in E. coli isolated

  3. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammerum Anette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3 in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%, while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively. Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 is associated with two types of IncA/C plasmids carrying multiple resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Magdalena; Calva, Edmundo; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Campos, Freddy; Zaidi, Mussaret B; Silva, Claudia

    2011-01-11

    Salmonella Typhimurium ST213 was first detected in the Mexican Typhimurium population in 2001. It is associated with a multi-drug resistance phenotype and a plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene conferring resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between the ST213 genotype and blaCMY-2 plasmids. The blaCMY-2 gene was carried by an IncA/C plasmid. ST213 strains lacking the blaCMY-2 gene carried a different IncA/C plasmid. PCR analysis of seven DNA regions distributed throughout the plasmids showed that these IncA/C plasmids were related, but the presence and absence of DNA stretches produced two divergent types I and II. A class 1 integron (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2) was detected in most of the type I plasmids. Type I contained all the plasmids carrying the blaCMY-2 gene and a subset of plasmids lacking blaCMY-2. Type II included all of the remaining blaCMY-2-negative plasmids. A sequence comparison of the seven DNA regions showed that both types were closely related to IncA/C plasmids found in Escherichia, Salmonella, Yersinia, Photobacterium, Vibrio and Aeromonas. Analysis of our Typhimurium strains showed that the region containing the blaCMY-2 gene is inserted between traA and traC as a single copy, like in the E. coli plasmid pAR060302. The floR allele was identical to that of Newport pSN254, suggesting a mosaic pattern of ancestry with plasmids from other Salmonella serovars and E. coli. Only one of the tested strains was able to conjugate the IncA/C plasmid at very low frequencies (10-7 to 10-9). The lack of conjugation ability of our IncA/C plasmids agrees with the clonal dissemination trend suggested by the chromosomal backgrounds and plasmid pattern associations. The ecological success of the newly emerging Typhimurium ST213 genotype in Mexico may be related to the carriage of IncA/C plasmids. We conclude that types I and II of IncA/C plasmids originated from a common ancestor and that the

  5. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuyu, Wu; Dalsgaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli......Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids...... carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses...

  6. The novel Pseudomonas putida plasmid p12969-2 harbors an In127-carrying multidrug-resistant region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Niu, Yong; Sun, Fengjun; Yang, Ying; Luo, Wenbo; Wang, Zhe

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to characterize a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid p12969-2 coexistent with the previously reported one p12969-DIM in clinical Pseudomonas putida. The complete sequence of p12969-2 was determined using next-generation sequencing technology. p12969-2 contains a 29.2 kb MDR region, which carries In127 harboring three resistance genes aadA2, qacED1 and sul1. The MDR region is derived from the connection of Tn5041D and Tn5045, which is facilitated by two copies of miniature inverted-repeat transposable element. Conclusion & future perspective: p12969-2 represents a novel lineage with the highest but limited nucleotide sequence similarity with the plasmid pGRT1 that does not carry any of the resistance genes. This is the first report of coexistence of two MDR plasmids in P. putida.

  7. A large conjugative Acinetobacter baumannii plasmid carrying the sul2 sulphonamide and strAB streptomycin resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that often complicates treatment because of its high level of resistance to antibiotics. Though plasmids can potentially introduce various genes into bacterial strains, compared to other Gram-negative bacteria, information about the unique A. baumannii plasmid repertoire is limited. Here, whole genome sequence data was used to determine the plasmid content of strain A297 (RUH875), the reference strain for the globally disseminated multiply resistant A. baumannii clone, global clone 1(GC1). A297 contains three plasmids. Two known plasmids were present; one, pA297-1 (pRAY*), carries the aadB gentamicin, kanamycin and tobramycin resistance gene and another is an 8.7kb cryptic plasmid often found in GC1 isolates. The third plasmid, pA297-3, is 200kb and carries the sul2 sulphonamide resistance gene and strAB streptomycin resistance gene within Tn6172 and a mer mercuric ion resistance module elsewhere. pA297-3 transferred sulphonamide, streptomycin and mercuric ion resistance at high frequency to a susceptible A. baumannii recipient, and contains several genes potentially involved in conjugative transfer. However, a relaxase gene was not found. It also includes several genes encoding proteins involved in DNA metabolism such as partitioning. However, a gene encoding a replication initiation protein could not be found. pA297-3 includes two copies of a Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element (MITE), named MITE-297, bracketing a 77.5kb fragment, which contains several IS and the mer module. Several plasmids related to but smaller than pA297-3 were found in the GenBank nucleotide database. They were found in different A. baumannii clones and are wide spread. They all contain either Tn6172 or a variant in the same position in the backbone as Tn6172 in pA297-3. Some related plasmids have lost the segment between the MITE-297 copies and retain only one MITE-297. Others have segments of various lengths between

  8. Nosocomial Outbreak of Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates ContainingblaOXA-237Carried on a Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujer, Andrea M; Higgins, Paul G; Rudin, Susan D; Buser, Genevieve L; Marshall, Steven H; Xanthopoulou, Kyriaki; Seifert, Harald; Rojas, Laura J; Domitrovic, T Nicholas; Cassidy, P Maureen; Cunningham, Margaret C; Vega, Robert; Furuno, Jon P; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Beldavs, Zintars G; Wright, Meredith S; Jacobs, Michael R; Adams, Mark D; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics are among the mainstays for treating infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii , especially in the Northwest United States, where carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii remains relatively rare. However, between June 2012 and October 2014, an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii occurred in 16 patients from five health care facilities in the state of Oregon. All isolates were defined as extensively drug resistant. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that the isolates belonged to sequence type 2 (international clone 2 [IC2]) and were >95% similar as determined by repetitive-sequence-based PCR analysis. Multiplex PCR revealed the presence of a bla OXA carbapenemase gene, later identified as bla OXA-237 Whole-genome sequencing of all isolates revealed a well-supported separate branch within a global A. baumannii phylogeny. Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) SMRT sequencing was also performed on one isolate to gain insight into the genetic location of the carbapenem resistance gene. We discovered that bla OXA-237 , flanked on either side by IS Aba1 elements in opposite orientations, was carried on a 15,198-bp plasmid designated pORAB01-3 and was present in all 16 isolates. The plasmid also contained genes encoding a TonB-dependent receptor, septicolysin, a type IV secretory pathway (VirD4 component, TraG/TraD family) ATPase, an integrase, a RepB family plasmid DNA replication initiator protein, an alpha/beta hydrolase, and a BrnT/BrnA type II toxin-antitoxin system. This is the first reported outbreak in the northwestern United States associated with this carbapenemase. Particularly worrisome is that bla OXA-237 was carried on a plasmid and found in the most prominent worldwide clonal group IC2, potentially giving pORAB01-3 great capacity for future widespread dissemination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids carrying fluoroquinolone and β-lactam resistance genes in Escherichia coli originating from diverse sources and geographical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika

    2016-08-01

    To describe the prevalence and diversity of IncX plasmids with antibiotic resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae and to identify the most disseminated lineages of the plasmid family. IncX plasmids were screened in 1894 Enterobacteriaceae isolates resistant to cefotaxime (2 mg/L) or with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) obtained from various sources in five continents using PCR. IncX plasmid-harbouring isolates were identified using MALDI-TOF or biochemical tests, and screened for antibiotic resistance genes using PCR and sequencing; their clonality was determined by PFGE. Horizontal transfer of plasmids was tested using transformation and conjugation. IncX plasmids were characterized by S1-nuclease and PFGE, RFLP and hybridization. A total of 164 Escherichia coli isolates (8.7%, n = 1894) carried at least one IncX subgroup. Seven isolates harboured two distinct subgroups. IncX1 subgroup was found in 93 isolates, followed by IncX2 (35 isolates), IncX4 (28) and IncX3 (15). IncX4 plasmids were not transferred horizontally as single plasmids and therefore excluded from further analysis. The most disseminated lineages of IncX plasmids included IncX1 harbouring qnrS1 and blaTEM-1,-135 found in 36 E. coli from different sources in Europe and Australia and IncX2 carrying qnrS1 and tet(A) detected in nine E. coli from wildlife in Europe. IncX3 plasmids harboured predominantly blaSHV-12 and qnrS1 or qnrB7. IncX plasmids were widely distributed in E. coli from wildlife in Europe and were predominantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance genes. Plasmids showing indistinguishable restriction profiles were identified in E. coli from different sources and countries suggesting wide dissemination of certain plasmid lineages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella Typhi carries an IncI1-ST31 plasmid encoding CTX-M-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghout, Bilal; Saha, Senjuti; Sajib, Mohammad Saiful Islam; Tanmoy, Arif Mohammad; Islam, Maksuda; Kay, Gemma L; Langridge, Gemma C; Endtz, Hubert P; Wain, John; Saha, Samir K

    2018-04-04

    Ceftriaxone is the drug of choice for typhoid fever and the emergence of resistant Salmonella Typhi raises major concerns for treatment. There are an increasing number of sporadic reports of ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi and limiting the risk of treatment failure in the patient and outbreaks in the community must be prioritized. This study describes the use of whole genome sequencing to guide outbreak identification and case management. An isolate of ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi from the blood of a child taken in 2000 at the Popular Diagnostic Center, Dhaka, Bangladesh was subjected to whole genome sequencing, using an Illumina NextSeq 500 and analysis using Geneious software.Results/Key findings. Comparison with other ceftriaxone-resistant S. Typhi revealed an isolate from the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2015 as the closest relative but no evidence of an outbreak. A plasmid belonging to incompatibility group I1 (IncI1-ST31) which included blaCTX-M-15 (ceftriaxone resistance) associated with ISEcp-1 was identified. High similarity (90 %) was seen with pS115, an IncI1 plasmid from S. Enteritidis, and with pESBL-EA11, an incI1 plasmid from E. coli (99 %) showing that S. Typhi has access to ceftriaxone resistance through the acquisition of common plasmids. The transmission of ceftriaxone resistance from E. coli to S. Typhi is of concern because of clinical resistance to ceftriaxone, the main stay of typhoid treatment. Whole genome sequencing, albeit several years after the isolation, demonstrated the success of containment but clinical trials with alternative agents are urgently required.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2015-11-12

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid. Copyright © 2015 Silva et al.

  12. A GC1 Acinetobacter baumannii isolate carrying AbaR3 and the aminoglycoside resistance transposon TnaphA6 in a conjugative plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Mohammad; Holt, Kathryn E; Pickard, Derek; Dougan, Gordon; Hall, Ruth M

    2014-04-01

    To locate the acquired antibiotic resistance genes, including the amikacin resistance transposon TnaphA6, in the genome of an Australian isolate belonging to Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 1 (GC1). A multiply antibiotic-resistant GC1 isolate harbouring TnaphA6 was sequenced using Illumina HiSeq, and reads were used to generate a de novo assembly and determine multilocus sequence types (STs). PCR was used to assemble the AbaR chromosomal resistance island and a large plasmid carrying TnaphA6. Plasmid DNA sequences were compared with ones available in GenBank. Conjugation experiments were conducted. The A. baumannii GC1 isolate G7 was shown to include the AbaR3 antibiotic resistance island. It also contains an 8.7 kb cryptic plasmid, pAb-G7-1, and a 70,100 bp plasmid, pAb-G7-2, carrying TnaphA6. pAb-G7-2 belongs to the Aci6 Acinetobacter plasmid family. It encodes transfer functions and was shown to conjugate. Plasmids related to pAb-G7-2 were detected in further amikacin-resistant GC1 isolates using PCR. From the genome sequence, isolate G7 was ST1 (Institut Pasteur scheme) and ST231 (Oxford scheme). Using Oxford scheme PCR-based methods, the isolate was ST109 and this difference was traced to a single base difference resulting from the inclusion of the original primers in the gpi segment analysed. The multiply antibiotic-resistant GC1 isolate G7 carries most of its resistance genes in AbaR3 located in the chromosome. However, TnaphA6 is on a conjugative plasmid, pAb-G7-2. Primers developed to locate TnaphA6 in pAb-G7-2 will simplify the detection of plasmids related to pAb-G7-2 in A. baumannii isolates.

  13. High-level fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198 epidemic clone with IncA/C conjugative plasmid carrying bla(CTX-M-25) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabela; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Zając, Magdalena; Hoszowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-30

    Multidrug resistant Salmonella Kentucky strains have been isolated from turkeys in Poland since 2009. Multiple mutations within chromosomal genes gyrA and parC were responsible for high-level ciprofloxacin resistance. One of the isolates was extended spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL) positive: the strain 1643/2010 carried a conjugative 167,779 bps plasmid of IncA/C family. The sequence analysis revealed that it carried a blaCTX-M-25 gene and an integron with another β-lactamase encoding gene-blaOXA-21. This is the first known report of a CTX-M-25 encoding gene both in Poland and in Salmonella Kentucky world-wide, as well as in the IncA/C plasmid. Analysis of the integron showed a novel arrangement of gene cassettes-aacA4, aacC-A1 and blaOXA-21 where the latter might result from an intergeneric gene transfer. The study confirmed Salmonella Kentucky population isolated in Poland belongs to global epidemics of high level fluoroquinolone resistant clone ST198 that can carry rare β-lactamase genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissemination of the Fosfomycin Resistance Gene fosA3 with CTX-M β-Lactamase Genes and rmtB Carried on IncFII Plasmids among Escherichia coli Isolates from Pets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianxia; Huang, Xianhui; Deng, Yuting; He, Liangying; Yang, Tong; Zeng, Zhenling; Chen, Zhangliu

    2012-01-01

    The presence and characterization of plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance determinants among Escherichia coli isolates collected from pets in China between 2006 and 2010 were investigated. Twenty-nine isolates (9.0%) were positive for fosA3, and all of them were CTX-M producers. The fosA3 genes were flanked by IS26 and were localized on F2:A−:B− plasmids or on very similar F33:A−:B− plasmids carrying both blaCTX-M-65 and rmtB. These findings indicate that the fosA3 gene may be coselected by antimicrobials other than fosfomycin. PMID:22232290

  15. High Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance and IncQ Plasmids Carrying qnrS2 Gene in Bacteria from Rivers near Hospitals and Aquaculture in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Wen

    Full Text Available Effluents from hospital and aquaculture are considered important sources of quinolone resistance. However, little information is available on the impact of this effluent on nearby rivers. In this study, 188 ciprofloxacin-resistant bacterial isolates obtained from rivers near hospitals and aquaculture were screened for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes. Species identification, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and PMQR gene transferability assessment were conducted for PMQR-positive bacteria. Representative qnrS2-encoding plasmids were subsequently sequenced using a primer-walking approach. In total, 44 isolates (23.4% were positive for qnr genes (16 qnrB2, 3 qnrS1, and 25 qnrS2 and 32 isolates (17.0% were positive for aac(6'-Ib-cr. Other PMQR genes were not detected. The qnrB2 and aac(6'-Ib-cr genes had a higher prevalence in aquaculture samples than in hospital samples, and were significantly associated with Enterobacteriaceae (p < 0.05. In contrast, the prevalence of qnrS2 was not site-related, but was significantly associated with Aeromonas spp. (p < 0.05. All PMQR isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics. Eleven qnrS2-harboring plasmids from Aeromonas spp., including a novel conjugative plasmid pHP18, were selected for sequencing. These plasmids were small in size (6,388-16,197 bp and belonged to the IncQ or IncU plasmid family, with qnrS2 being part of a mobile insertion cassette. Taken together, our findings suggest that aquaculture is a possible source for aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB2 dissemination, and demonstrate the ubiquity of qnrS2 in aquatic environments. Finally, Aeromonas spp. served as vectors for qnrS2 with the help of IncQ-type plasmids.

  16. Widespread plasmid resistance genes among Proteus species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    34% of the strains lost the antibiotic resistance plasmids marker after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mediated curing. The rest of the plasmid markers were non transferable. The results indicated that plasmids carry varied dissemination of antibiotics resistance markers to distant recipient cells, indicating clonal transfer ...

  17. Antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to various antimicrobial agents, and the relationship between antimicrobial resistance of the isolates and carriage of plasmids. Design: A random sampling of milk and meat samples was carried out. Setting: Milk was collected from various dairy ...

  18. First Report of cfr-Carrying Plasmids in the Pandemic Sequence Type 22 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type IV Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Anna C; Lazaris, Alexandros; Kinnevey, Peter M; Brennan, Orla M; Brennan, Gráinne I; O'Connell, Brian; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Coleman, David C

    2016-05-01

    Linezolid is often the drug of last resort for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Linezolid resistance is mediated by mutations in 23S rRNA and genes for ribosomal proteins; cfr, encoding phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) resistance; its homologue cfr(B); or optrA, conferring oxazolidinone and phenicol resistance. Linezolid resistance is rare in S. aureus, and cfr is even rarer. This study investigated the clonality and linezolid resistance mechanisms of two MRSA isolates from patients in separate Irish hospitals. Isolates were subjected to cfr PCR, PhLOPSA susceptibility testing, 23S rRNA PCR and sequencing, DNA microarray profiling, spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid curing, and conjugative transfer. Whole-genome sequencing was used for single-nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis, multilocus sequence typing, L protein mutation identification, cfr plasmid sequence analysis, and optrA and cfr(B) detection. Isolates M12/0145 and M13/0401 exhibited linezolid MICs of 64 and 16 mg/liter, respectively, and harbored identical 23S rRNA and L22 mutations, but M12/0145 exhibited the mutation in 2/6 23S rRNA alleles, compared to 1/5 in M13/0401. Both isolates were sequence type 22 MRSA staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV (ST22-MRSA-IV)/spa type t032 isolates, harbored cfr, exhibited the PhLOPSA phenotype, and lacked optrA and cfr(B). They differed by five PFGE bands and 603 SNVs. Isolate M12/0145 harbored cfr and fexA on a 41-kb conjugative pSCFS3-type plasmid, whereas M13/0401 harbored cfr and lsa(B) on a novel 27-kb plasmid. This is the first report of cfr in the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. Different cfr plasmids and mutations associated with linezolid resistance in genotypically distinct ST22-MRSA-IV isolates highlight that prudent management of linezolid use is essential. Copyright © 2016 Shore et al.

  19. pIMP-PH114 carrying bla IMP-4 in a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain is closely related to other multidrug-resistant IncA/C2 plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Lo, Wai-U; Chan, Jane; Cheung, Yuk-Yam; Chow, Kin-Hung; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Lin, Chi-Ho; Que, Tak-Lun

    2014-02-01

    The IncA/C plasmids are broad host-range vehicles which have been associated with wide dissemination of CMY-2 among Enterobacteriaceae of human and animal origins. Acquired metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) such as the IMP-type enzymes are increasingly reported in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria worldwide, particularly in Enterobacteriaceae. We described the complete sequence of the first IMP-4-encoding IncA/C2 plasmid, pIMP-PH114 (151,885 bp), from a sequence type 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain that was recovered from a patient who was hospitalized in the Philippines. pIMP-PH114 consists of a backbone from the IncA/C2 plasmids, with the insertion of a novel Tn21-like class 1 integron composite structure (containing the cassette array bla IMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3, followed by a class C β-lactamase bla DHA-1 and the mercury resistance operon, merRTPCADE) and a sul2-floR encoding region. Phylogenetic analysis of the IncA/C repA sequences showed that pIMP-PH114 formed a subgroup with other IncA/C plasmids involved in the international spread of CMY-2, TEM-24 and NDM-1. Identical bla IMP-4 arrays have been described among different Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. in China, Singapore and Australia but the genetic context is different. The broad host range of IncA/C plasmids may have facilitated dissemination of the bla IMP-4 arrays among different diverse groups of bacteria.

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing and Plasmid Genomics of Antimicrobial Resistance – Salmonella’s mobile genetic elements and the antimicrobial resistance genes they carry

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR), multidrug resistance (MDR), and carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), the specter of widespread untreatable bacterial infections threatens human and animal health. The ability of these emerging resistances to transfer between bacteria on mob...

  1. Resistant plasmid profile analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli has become a major threat and cause of many urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the resistant plasmids of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from (Urinary tract infections)UTIs in Abeokuta.

  2. Selective conditions for a multidrug resistance plasmid depend on the sociality of antibiotic resistance"

    OpenAIRE

    Bottery, Michael; Wood, A. Jamie; Brockhurst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes conferring qualitatively different mechanisms of resistance. We show here that the antibiotic concentrations selecting for the RK2 plasmid in Escherichia coli depend upon the sociality of the drug resistance: the selection for selfish drug resistance (efflux pump) occurred at very low drug concentrations, just 1.3% of the MIC of the plasmid-free antibiotic-sensitive strain, whereas selection for cooperative drug ...

  3. Characterization of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Carrying Plasmids in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Yu; Lin, Heng-Jia; Chang, Lin-Li; Ma, Ling; Siu, L Kristopher; Tung, Yi-Ching; Lu, Po-Liang

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the replicon types, sizes, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing of plasmids carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Taiwan. Fifty-one Escherichia coli transconjugant strains with plasmids from ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance III Program in 2002 were included. All the 51 plasmids carried a bla CTX-M gene, the majority of which were bla CTX-M-3 (28/51 [54.9%]). Plasmids ranged in size from 126 to 241 kb by S1 nuclease digestion and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the most common plasmid size (37.3%) was 161-170 kb. The most common replicon type of plasmids was incompatibility group (Inc)A/C (60.8%). The IncA/C plasmids all carried bla CTX-M (bla CTX-M-3, -14, -15 ), and some also carried bla SHV (bla SHV-5, -12 ) genes. All 51 plasmids could be typed with PstI, and 27 (52.9%) belonged to 10 clusters. Thirty-eight of the 51 plasmids were typable with BamHI, and 21 plasmids (55.3%) fell into 7 clusters. Plasmids in the same cluster belonged to the same incompatibility group, with the exception of cluster C6. In conclusion, IncA/C plasmids are the main plasmid type responsible for the dissemination of ESBL genes of K. pneumoniae from Taiwan. RFLP with PstI possessed better discriminatory power than that with BamHI and PCR-based replicon typing for ESBL-carrying plasmids in K. pneumoniae in this study. Greater than 50% of plasmids fell into clusters, and >60% of cluster-classified plasmids were present in clonally unrelated isolates, indicating that horizontal transfer of plasmids plays an important role in the spread of ESBL genes.

  4. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    more the copy number of resistance plasmid present in a bacterial cell, the higher the resistant ability of ... amoxicillin, as well as other semi synthetic penicillins, many cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, ... drugs resistant E. coli to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ceftriaxone were also carried out (Hadley, 2002;.

  5. Two Different Tetracycline Resistance Mechanisms, Plasmid-Carried tet(L) and Chromosomally Located Transposon-Associated tet(M), Coexist in Lactobacillus sakei Rits 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammor, M.S.; Gueimonde, M.; Danielsen, M.; Zagorec, M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilán, de los C.G.; Mayo, B.; Margolles, A.

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is extensively used as functional starter culture in fermented meat products. One of the safety criteria of a starter culture is the absence of potentially transferable antibiotic resistance determinants. However, tetracycline-resistant L. sakei strains have already been

  6. Heterogeneity of vat(E)-carrying plasmids in Enterococcus faecium recovered from human and animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simjee, Shabbir; Zhang, Yifan; McDermott, Patrick F; Donabedian, Susan M; Zervos, Marcus J; Meng, Jianghong

    2006-09-01

    In this study, quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D)-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates (33 from poultry farms and 1 from a human outpatient) with Q/D minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 4 microg/mL to 32 microg/mL were analysed. Polymerase chain reaction detected the presence of vat(E) in all isolates. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 14 distinct PFGE patterns were identified. The human E. faecium isolate was distinguishable from the 33 farm isolates by PFGE. Southern hybridisation localised the vat(E) gene to an 11 kb plasmid and resulted in five plasmid hybridisation types. The vat(E)-carrying plasmid from the human isolate showed a nearly identical hybridisation pattern to a plasmid from a farm isolate. This study showed that the vat(E) gene, conferring resistance to Q/D, was carried on different plasmids in a heterogeneous group of E. faecium, some of which may be acquired by E. faecium capable of infecting humans.

  7. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  8. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  9. Impact of co-carriage of IncA/C plasmids with additional plasmids on the transfer of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pendleton, Sean J; Deck, Joanna; Singh, Ruby; Gilbert, Jeffrey; Johnson, Timothy J; Sanad, Yasser M; Nayak, Rajesh; Foley, Steven L

    2018-04-20

    Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica is often plasmid encoded. A key resistance plasmid group is the incompatibility group (Inc) A/C plasmids that often carry multiple resistance determinants. Previous studies showed that IncA/C plasmids were often co-located with other plasmids. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of plasmid co-carriage on antimicrobial resistance and plasmid transfer. A total of 1267 Salmonella isolates, representing multiple serotypes and sources were previously subjected to susceptibility testing and 251 isolates with resistance to at least 5 antimicrobial agents were identified for further study. Each isolate was subjected to PCR-based replicon typing, and those with IncA/C plasmids were selected for plasmid isolation, PCR-based mapping of IncA/C plasmid backbone genes, and conjugation assays to evaluate resistance plasmid transferability. Of the 87 identified IncA/C positive isolates, approximately 75% carried a plasmid with another identified replicon type, with the most common being I1 (39%), FIA, FIIA, FIB and HI2 (each 15%). PCR-based mapping indicated significant diversity in IncA/C backbone content, especially in regions encoding transfer-associated and hypothetical proteins. Conjugation experiments showed that nearly 68% of the isolates transferred resistance plasmids, with 90% containing additional identified plasmids or larger (>50 kb) non-typeable plasmids. The majority of IncA/C-positive strains were able to conjugally transfer antimicrobial resistance to the recipient, encoded by IncA/C and/or co-carried plasmids. These findings highlight the importance of co-located plasmids for resistance dissemination either by directly transferring resistance genes or by potentially providing the needed conjugation machinery for IncA/C plasmid transfer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence-Resistance Plasmids Derived from the pSLT Carrying Nonconventional Class 1 Integrons with dfrA12 Gene in Their Variable Region and sul3 in the 3' Conserved Segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beutlich, J.; Rodicio, M.R.; Mendoza, M.C.; Garcia, P.; Kirchner, M.; Luzzi, I.; Mevius, D.J.; Threllfall, J.; Helmuth, R.; Guerra, B.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids, such as pSLT, in clinically-relevant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, represent a threat for human health. We have analysed 14 S. Typhimurium isolates recovered in Italy and the United Kingdom from swine and from

  11. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fil' kova, S.L.; Il' ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-11-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc/sup R/) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production.

  12. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil'kova, S.L.; Il'ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc R ) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production

  13. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates harboring small erm(T)-carrying plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compain, Fabrice; Hays, Constantin; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Joubrel, Caroline; Poyart, Claire

    2014-11-01

    Among 1,827 group B Streptococcus (GBS) strains collected between 2006 and 2013 by the French National Reference Center for Streptococci, 490 (26.8%) strains were erythromycin resistant. The erm(T) resistance gene was found in six strains belonging to capsular polysaccharides Ia, III, and V and was carried by the same mobilizable plasmid, which could be efficiently transferred by mobilization to GBS and Enterococcus faecalis recipients, thus promoting a broad dissemination of erm(T). Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Investigation of diversity of plasmids carrying the blaTEM-52 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielak, Eliza Maria; Bergenholtz, Rikke D.; Jørgensen, Mikael Skaanning

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaTEM-52 genes among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica originating from animals, meat products and humans. METHODS: A collection of 22 blaTEM-52-encoding plasmids was characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism...... of self-transfer to a plasmid-free E. coli recipient. CONCLUSIONS: The blaTEM-52 gene found in humans could have been transmitted on transferable plasmids originating from animal sources. Some of the blaTEM-52 plasmids carry replicons that differ from the classical ones. Two novel replicons were detected...... (RFLP), replicon typing (by PCR or replicon sequencing), susceptibility testing, assessment of plasmid ability to self-transfer by conjugation and typing of the genetic environment of the blaTEM-52 gene. Detected IncI1 plasmids underwent further plasmid multilocus sequence typing. RESULTS: RFLP profiles...

  15. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  16. Plasmid-mediated florfenicol resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Ken; Kohmoto, Mariko; Mikami, Osamu; Tamamura, Yukino; Uchida, Ikuo

    2012-03-23

    The aim of this study was to analyse a florfenicol-resistant Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from a calf to determine the genetic basis of its florfenicol-resistance. The antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmid content of the isolate were determined. A florfenicol resistant plasmid carrying the floR gene was identified by PCR and transformed into Escherichia coli JM109 and HB101 strains. The plasmid was then mapped and sequenced completely. The isolate was resistant to chloramphenicol, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, kanamycin, dihydrostreptomycin, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, and amoxicillin; it carried a floR plasmid of 7.7kb, designated pMH1405. The mobilisation and replication genes of pMH1405 showed extensive similarity to the 5.1-kb pDN1 plasmid from Dichelobacter nodosus and the 10.8-kb pCCK381 plasmid from Pasteurella multocida. An adjacent 2.4-kb segment was highly homologous to the TnfloR region of the E. coli BN10660 plasmid. A plasmid-mediated floR gene was responsible for florfenicol resistance in the bovine respiratory tract pathogen M. haemolytica. The pMH1405 plasmid is the smallest floR-carrying plasmid reported to date. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a florfenicol-resistant gene in M. haemolytica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Horizontol dissemination of TEM- and SHV-typr beta-lactamase genes-carrying resistance plasmids amongst clonical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae Disseminação horizontal de plasmídios de resistência contendo genes de beta-lactamase dos tipos TEM e SHV entre isolados clínicos de Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Birol Ozgumus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacteria have been isolated at increasing frequency worldwide. Expression of ESBL is often associated with multidrug resistance and dissemination by resistance plasmids. During a two-month period in 2000, 133 clinical isolates of enterobacterial strains were randomly collected from outpatients and inpatients at a university hospital in Turkey. The ESBL producing strains were determined by double-disk synergy (DDS testing. Twenty ESBL producing strains (15% including Escherichia coli (n = 9, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7, Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 2 and Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 2 were detected and further analyzed for their resistance transfer features, plasmid profile and nature of the resistance genes. Plasmid transfer assays were performed using broth mating techniques. TEM- and SHV- genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and hybridization using specific probes. EcoRI restriction enzyme analyses of R plasmids were used in the detection of epidemic plasmids. Fourteen plasmid profiles (A, B1, B2, C1, and C2 to L were obtained with EcoRI restriction enzyme analysis. Most of these plasmids were detected to carry both TEM- and SHV-derived genes by PCR, and confirmed by localizing each gene by hybridization assay. Epidemiological evidence indicated that there was an apparent horizontal dissemination of conjugative R plasmids among multidrug-resistant enterobacterial genera and species in this hospitalO isolamento de bactérias produtoras de beta-lactamases de espectro expandido (ESBL está aumentando no mundo todo. Freqüentemente, a expressão de ESBL está associada com resistência a múltiplas drogas e disseminação por plasmídios de resistência. Durante um período de dois meses em 2000, 133 isolados clínicos de cepas de enterobactérias foram obtidos aleatoriamente de pacientes internos e externos de um hospital universitário na Turquia. As cepas produtoras de ESBL foram

  18. Detection of a Novel qnrB19-Carrying Plasmid Variant Mediating Decreased Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Hadar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegen, Ulrike; Klein, Günter; de Jong, Anno; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Thirty Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Hadar isolates of avian origin collected between 2007 and 2010 from chicken carcasses in five geographically spread abattoirs in Germany were investigated for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants. Four isolates were identified by PCR analysis and hybridization experiments to carry qnrB genes. The isolates were indistinguishable by their XbaI macrorestriction patterns and did not exhibit a mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. The qnrB genes were found to be located on small plasmids of ∼2.6 kb, which mediated decreased susceptibility only to quinolones. The plasmids were assigned to the same type, pHAD28, and transformation studies into an Escherichia coli recipient strain confirmed their transferability. Sequence analysis of the complete plasmid pHAD28 revealed the presence of a qnrB19 gene. The gene was found on a novel variant of qnrB19-harboring plasmids with high similarity to plasmids pPAB19-3 from E. coli and pPAB19-4 from Salmonella sp. M9397. A presumptive recombination side was detected, suggesting that interplasmid recombination events might have played a role in the development of this plasmid variant.

  19. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems.

  20. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  1. Construction and Application of R Prime Plasmids, Carrying Different Segments of an Octopine Ti Plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, for Complementation of vir Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Klasen, Ina; Schilperoort, Rob

    1982-01-01

    Several R prime plasmids have been obtained with high efficiency, by enclosing the R plasmid replicator, in an R::Ti cointegrate plasmid, between two copies of the transposon Tn1831, in the same orientation. These R primes carry different segments of an octopine Ti plasmid, and are compatible with

  2. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  3. plasmid mediated resistance in multidrug resistant bacteria isolated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    PLASMID MEDIATED RESISTANCE IN MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA. ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN WITH SUSPECTED SEPTICAEMIA IN ZARIA,. NIGERIA. AbdulAziz, Z. A.,1* Ehinmidu, J. O.,1 Adeshina, G. O.,1 Pala, Y. Y2., Yusuf, S. S2. and. Bugaje, M. A.3. 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical ...

  4. Emergence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli isolates producing blaNDM and blaOXA-48-like carried on IncA/C and IncL/M plasmids at two Iranian university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solgi, Hamid; Giske, Christian G; Badmasti, Farzad; Aghamohammad, Shadi; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Sabeti, Shahram; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2017-11-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance among Escherichia coli is a serious threat to public health. The objective of this study was to investigate resistance genes and clonality of carbapenem resistant E. coli in Iran. Between February 2015 and July 2016, a total of 32 non-duplicate E. coli isolates that were ertapenem resistant or intermediate (R/I-ETP) were collected from patient clinical or surveillance cultures (rectal swabs) at two university hospitals. Resistance genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation experiments, PCR-based replicon typing, PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. PCR assays showed, among the 32 isolates, twenty-nine strains produced carbapenemase genes. The predominant carbapenemase was bla OXA-48 (82.8%), followed by bla NDM-1 (31%), bla NDM-7 (6.9%) and bla OXA-181 (3.4%). Seven of the bla NDM positive isolates co-harbored bla OXA-48 carbapenemases. The bla NDM and bla OXA-48 were found in IncA/C and IncL/M conjugative plasmids, respectively. The bla CTX-M-15 , qnrA and intI1 genes were also present in most isolates. The PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 28 E. coli isolates, which belonged to six minor PFGE clusters and 14 isolates were singletons. The 26 isolates were distributed into 18 STs, of which two were dominant (ST648 and ST167). We identified one bla NDM-1 -positive ST131 E. coli isolates that harbor the bla CTX-M-15 and bla TEM genes. Horizontal transfer of IncA/C and IncL/M plasmids has likely facilitated the spread of the bla OXA-48 and bla NDM genes among E. coli. Their clonal diversity and the presence of faecal carriers in isolates suggest an endemic spread of OXA-48 and NDM. Therefore, it emphasizes the critical importance of monitoring and controlling the spread of carbapenem resistant E. coli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A P7 Phage-Like Plasmid Carrying mcr-1 in an ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilong Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strain, named SCKP83, was isolated and found to be resistant to colistin thanks to the presence plasmid-borne colistin resistant gene mcr-1. The strain was subjected to whole genome sequencing and conjugation experiments. The subsequent analysis indicated that the strain belongs to ST15 and the capsular type K41. In SCKP83, mcr-1 was carried by a 97.4-kb non-self-transmissible plasmid, a 90.9-kb region of which was predicted as an intact phage. This phage was 47.79% GC content, encoded 105 proteins and contained three tRNAs. mcr-1 was located downstream of two copies of the insertion sequence ISApl1 (one complete and one truncated and was inserted in the ant1 gene, which encodes a putative antirepressor for antagonizing C1 repression, in this phage. The phage is highly similar to phage P7 (77% coverage and 98% identity from Escherichia coli. Several similar mcr-1-carrying plasmids have been found in E. coli at various locations in China, suggesting that these phage-like plasmids have circulated in China. The findings in this study suggest that the P7 phage-like plasmids are not restricted to E. coli and may represent new vehicles to mediate the inter-species spread of mcr-1.

  6. [Ecological behavior of plasmids and resistance to lead of Enterobacter agglomerans isolated from soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarai, M; Takeda, K; Uesiba, H

    1991-03-01

    Soil samples taken monthly in 1990 from five parks outside Tokyo were examined for Enterobacter agglomerans. A total of 348 strains were isolated and 250 of them were tested for the presence of plasmids by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. All the isolates carried at least two kinds of plasmids. Those isolated from July to September showed four or five kinds of plasmids (group I) and those isolated from January to June and from October to December showed two or three kinds of plasmids (group II). A majority of the plasmids detected were of 1,500 or fewer base pairs. The isolates were tested for the Pb2+ resistance; group I strains were more resistant to lead than group II strains. It is presumed that bacterial plasmids are related with the ecosystem of soil and the resistance to lead in E. agglomerans.

  7. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains

  8. Antibiotic resistance and plasmid carriage among Escherichia coli isolates from chicken meat in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin Tin Myaing; Saleha, A.A.; Arifah, A.K.; Raha, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates from 131 raw chicken meat samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics. Plasmids were isolated from many samples and their DNA molecular weight calculated. An 81.7% plasmid occurrence rate was observed among the isolates, ranging from 0 to 8 in number and with sizes from 1.2 to 118.6 MDa. Plasmids were detected in 93.8% of E. coIi isolates resistant to all 12 antibiotics, and in 90.5% of E. coli isolates resistant to 11. Three (2.8%) isolates harboured 8 plasmids and were resistant to all 12 antibiotics. Antibiotic resistant genes in bacteria are usually carried in extrachromosomal DNA and it is postulated that E. coli with a high number of plasmids possesses wider resistance to antibiotics. (author)

  9. Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Escherichia coli from the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Sonnevend

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This is the first report on the presence of the plasmid-coded mcr-1 gene in a variety of multi-resistant clinical isolates from the Arabian Peninsula indicating that several commonly used antibiotics can potentially facilitate the spread of mcr-1 carrying strains, or directly, mcr-1 containing plasmids.

  10. Characterization of the Complete Nucleotide Sequences of IncA/C2 Plasmids Carrying In809-Like Integrons from Enterobacteriaceae Isolates of Wildlife Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Kutilova, Iva; Medvecky, Matej; Hrabak, Jaroslav; Dolejska, Monika

    2017-09-01

    A total of 18 Enterobacteriaceae (17 from gulls and 1 from a clinical sample) collected from Australia, carrying IncA/C plasmids with the IMP-encoding In809-like integrons, were studied. Seven plasmids, being representatives of different origins, plasmid sizes, replicon combinations, and resistance genes, were completely sequenced. Plasmid pEc158, identified in a clinical Escherichia coli ST752 isolate, showed extensive similarity to type 2 IncA/C 2 plasmids. pEc158 carried none of the bla CMY-2 -like region or ARI-B and ARI-A regions, while it contained a hybrid transposon structure. The six remaining plasmids, which were of wildlife origin, were highly similar to each other and probably were fusion derivatives of type 1 and type 2 A/C 2 plasmids. The latter plasmids contained an ARI-B region and hybrid transposon structures. In all plasmids, hybrid transposon structures containing In809-like integrons were inserted 3,434 bp downstream of the rhs2 start codon. In all cases, the one outermost 38-bp inverted repeat (IR) of the transposon was associated with the Tn 1696 tnp module, while the other outermost 38-bp IR of the transposon was associated with either a Tn 6317 -like module or a Tn 21 mer module. However, the internal structure of the transposon and the resistance genes were different in each plasmid. These findings indicated that, for the specific periods of time and settings, different IncA/C 2 plasmid types carrying In809-like elements circulated among isolates of wildlife and clinical origins. Additionally, they provided the basis for speculations regarding the reshuffling of IncA/C 2 plasmids with In809-like integrons and confirmed the rapid evolution of IncA/C 2 plasmid lineages. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  12. Plasmid Borne Resistance in Klebsiella Isolates from Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nx 6110

    Conjugation studies showed the presence of transmissible plasmids that conferred resistance to. Escherichia coli K-12. Transfer of resistance to amoxicillin by conjugation shows that besides chromosomal carriage of resistance determinants inherent in Klebsiella species there are additional determinants on plasmids.

  13. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1, IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2 or blaNDM-7 (n = 1, IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1 or blaNDM-5 (n = 3, and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1. Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  14. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yo; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sakamoto, Noriko; Takeuchi, Dan; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiya, Hideharu; Yamamoto, Norihisa; Nishi, Isao; Yoshida, Hisao; Okada, Kazuhisa; Zin, Khwar Nyo; Aye, Mya Mya; Tomono, Kazunori; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1), IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2) or blaNDM-7 (n = 1), IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1) or blaNDM-5 (n = 3), and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1). Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  15. Novel plasmids and resistance phenotypes in Yersinia pestis: unique plasmid inventory of strain Java 9 mediates high levels of arsenic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that the plasmid repertoire of Yersinia pestis is not restricted to the three classical virulence plasmids. The Java 9 strain of Y. pestis is a biovar Orientalis isolate obtained from a rat in Indonesia. Although it lacks the Y. pestis-specific plasmid pMT, which encodes the F1 capsule, it retains virulence in mouse and non-human primate animal models. While comparing diverse Y. pestis strains using subtractive hybridization, we identified sequences in Java 9 that were homologous to a Y. enterocolitica strain carrying the transposon Tn2502, which is known to encode arsenic resistance. Here we demonstrate that Java 9 exhibits high levels of arsenic and arsenite resistance mediated by a novel promiscuous class II transposon, named Tn2503. Arsenic resistance was self-transmissible from Java 9 to other Y. pestis strains via conjugation. Genomic analysis of the atypical plasmid inventory of Java 9 identified pCD and pPCP plasmids of atypical size and two previously uncharacterized cryptic plasmids. Unlike the Tn2502-mediated arsenic resistance encoded on the Y. enterocolitica virulence plasmid; the resistance loci in Java 9 are found on all four indigenous plasmids, including the two novel cryptic plasmids. This unique mobilome introduces more than 105 genes into the species gene pool. The majority of these are encoded by the two entirely novel self-transmissible plasmids, which show partial homology and synteny to other enterics. In contrast to the reductive evolution in Y. pestis, this study underlines the major impact of a dynamic mobilome and lateral acquisition in the genome evolution of the plague bacterium.

  16. Previously undescribed plasmids recovered from activated sludge confer tetracycline resistance and phenotypic changes to Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyerim; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2014-02-01

    We used culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to extract previously undescribed plasmids harboring tetracycline (TC) resistance genes from activated sludge. The extracted plasmids were transformed into naturally competent Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to recover a non-Escherichia coli-based plasmid. The transformed cells showed 80-100-fold higher TC resistance than the wild-type strain. Restriction length polymorphism performed using 30 transformed cells showed four different types of plasmids. Illumina-based whole sequencing of the four plasmids identified three previously unreported plasmids and one previously reported plasmid. All plasmids carried TC resistance-related genes (tetL, tetH), tetracycline transcriptional regulators (tetR), and mobilization-related genes. As per expression analysis, TC resistance genes were functional in the presence of TC. The recovered plasmids showed mosaic gene acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, motility, growth rate, sensitivity to stresses, and quorum sensing signals of the transformed cells were different from those of the wild-type cells. Plasmid-bearing cells seemed to have an energy burden for maintaining and expressing plasmid genes. Our data showed that acquisition of TC resistance through plasmid uptake is related to loss of biological fitness. Thus, cells acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids can survive in the presence of antibiotics, but must pay ecological costs.

  17. Characterization of a Large Antibiotic Resistance Plasmid Found in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain B171 and Its Relatedness to Plasmids of Diverse E. coli and Shigella Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Nagaraj, Sushma; Okeke, Iruka N; Rasko, David A

    2017-09-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a leading cause of severe infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Previous research has focused on the diversity of the EPEC virulence plasmid, whereas less is known regarding the genetic content and distribution of antibiotic resistance plasmids carried by EPEC. A previous study demonstrated that in addition to the virulence plasmid, reference EPEC strain B171 harbors a second, larger plasmid that confers antibiotic resistance. To further understand the genetic diversity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance plasmids among EPEC strains, we describe the complete sequence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from EPEC strain B171. The resistance plasmid, pB171_90, has a completed sequence length of 90,229 bp, a GC content of 54.55%, and carries protein-encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer, resistance to tetracycline ( tetA ), sulfonamides ( sulI ), and mercury, as well as several virulence-associated genes, including the transcriptional regulator hha and the putative calcium sequestration inhibitor ( csi ). In silico detection of the pB171_90 genes among 4,798 publicly available E. coli genome assemblies indicates that the unique genes of pB171_90 ( csi and traI ) are primarily restricted to genomes identified as EPEC or enterotoxigenic E. coli However, conserved regions of the pB171_90 plasmid containing genes involved in replication, stability, and antibiotic resistance were identified among diverse E. coli pathotypes. Interestingly, pB171_90 also exhibited significant similarity with a sequenced plasmid from Shigella dysenteriae type I. Our findings demonstrate the mosaic nature of EPEC antibiotic resistance plasmids and highlight the need for additional sequence-based characterization of antibiotic resistance plasmids harbored by pathogenic E. coli . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Transfer Potential of Plasmids Conferring Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin Resistance in Escherichia coli from Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Sunde, Marianne; Ilag, Hanna Karin; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even

    2017-06-15

    Escherichia coli strains resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) are widely distributed in Norwegian broiler production, and the majority harbor transferable IncK or IncI1 plasmids carrying bla CMY-2 Persistent occurrence in broiler farms may occur through the survival of ESC-resistant E. coli strains in the farm environment, or by transfer and maintenance of resistance plasmids within a population of environmental bacteria with high survival abilities. The aim of this study was to determine the transferability of two successful bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids belonging to the incompatibility groups IncK and IncI1 into E. coli and Serratia species recipients. Initially, conjugative plasmid transfer from two E. coli donors to potential recipients was tested in an agar assay. Conjugation was further investigated for selected mating pairs in surface and planktonic assays at temperatures from 12°C to 37°C. Transfer of plasmids was observed on agar, in broth, and in biofilm at temperatures down to 25°C. The IncK plasmid was able to transfer into Serratia marcescens , and transconjugants were able to act as secondary plasmid donors to different E. coli and Serratia species recipients. All transconjugants displayed an AmpC phenotype corresponding to the acquisition of bla CMY-2 In summary, the results indicate that the IncK plasmid may transfer between E. coli and Serratia spp. under conditions relevant for broiler production. IMPORTANCE Certain bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids are successful and disseminated in European broiler production. Traditionally, plasmid transferability has been studied under conditions that are optimal for bacterial growth. Plasmid transfer has previously been reported between E. coli bacteria in biofilms at 37°C and in broth at temperatures ranging from 8 to 37°C. However, intergenus transfer of bla CMY-2 -carrying plasmids from E. coli to environmental bacteria in the food-processing chain has not been previously studied. We

  19. Drug resistance plasmids in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    OpenAIRE

    Vescovo, M; Morelli, L; Bottazzi, V

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and 20 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were tested for resistance to 22 antibiotics by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Evidence suggesting linkage of these resistances to plasmids was obtained by "curing" experiments with acridine dyes and high growth temperatures. Examination of plasmid patterns of agarose gel electrophoresis provided further evidence of loss in plasmid DNA under curing conditions in some of the strains examined.

  20. Plasmid mediated antimicrobial resistance in Ontario isolates of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbride, K A; Rosendal, S; Brunton, J L

    1989-01-01

    The genetic basis of antimicrobial resistance in Ontario isolates of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae was studied. Two Ontario isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were found to be resistant to sulfonamides (Su), streptomycin (Sm) and ampicillin (Amp). Resistance to Su and Sm was specified by a 2.3 megadalton (Mdal) plasmid which appeared to be identical to pVM104, which has been described in isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae from South Dakota. Southern hybridization showed that the 2.3 Mdal Su Sm plasmid was highly related to those Hinc II fragments of RSF1010 known to carry the Su Sm genes, but was unrelated to the remainder of this Salmonella resistance plasmid. Resistance to Su and Amp was specified by a 3.5 Mdal plasmid and appeared identical to pVM105 previously reported. The beta-lactamase enzyme had an isoelectric point of approximately 9.0. Southern hybridization showed no relationship to the TEM beta-lactamase. A third isolate of A. pleuropneumoniae was found to be resistant to chloramphenicol (Cm), Su and Sm by virtue of a 3.0 Mdal plasmid which specified a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase. We conclude that resistance to Su, Sm, Amp and Cm is mediated by small plasmids in A. pleuropneumoniae. Although the Su and Sm resistance determinants are highly related to those found in Enterobacteriaceae, the plasmids themselves and the beta-lactamase determinant are different. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2914226

  1. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    wounds, facilitates the persistence of MDR plasmids in Acinetobacter baumannii , a problematic wound pathogen. Moreover, we have shown that plasmids...which plasmid persistence can improve in Acinetobacter baumannii and other wound pathogens when grown in biofilm environments. This project has the... Acinetobacter * baumannii ,!Klebsiella*pneumoniae,!Enterobacter*sp.,! and! Escherichia* coli! (Eardley! et! al.,! 2011;! Gaynes! &! Edwards,! 2005;! Murray

  2. Plasmid profile and antimicrobial resistance ratings of enterococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim was to isolate and investigate the resistance ratings of enterococci poultry and pig isolates to various antimicrobial agents as well as to determine their plasmid profiles. Antimicrobial resistance ratings and the plasmid profiles of Enterococci isolated from poultry birds and pigs were analyzed. Three hundred and ...

  3. Multi-antibiotics-resistance plasmid profile of enteric pathogens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    from ≤0.55kbp to ≥1.14kbp. This indicates that plasmids allow the movement of genetic materials, including antimicrobial resistance genes between bacterial species and strains. Keywords: Diarrheagenic pathogens, antibiotics resistance plasmids profile. E-mail: yahclar@yahoo.com; Tel: 08053336108, 08063418265.

  4. Complete Sequences and Characterization of Two Novel Plasmids Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS Gene in Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiao-Ying; Pan, Jing-Cao; Gu, Ya-Ming; Zheng, Wei; Li, Jun; Yu, Hua

    2016-03-01

    The complete sequences of two previously reported plasmids carrying plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes from Shigella flexneri in China have not been available. The present study using the p5-C3 assembly method revealed that (1) the plasmid pSF07201 with aac(6')-Ib-cr had 75,335 bp with antibiotic resistance genes CTX-M-3, TEM-1, and FosA3; (2) seven fragments of pSF07201 had more than 99% homology with the seven corresponding plasmids; (3) the other plasmid pSF07202 with qnrS had 47,669 bp with antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 and 99.95% homology with a segment of pKF362122, which has the qnrS gene from location 162,490 to 163,146. A conjugation and electrotransformation experiment suggested that these two plasmids might horizontally transfer between and coexist in Escherichia coli J53 and S. flexneri 2a 301. Either the aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrS gene contributed to, but only the coexistence of the two genes conferred to the resistance to ciprofloxacin in these two strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the complete sequences of the aac(6')-Ib-cr- and qnrS-positive plasmids in Shigella isolates. Our findings indicate that two genes probably evolve through horizontal plasmid transfer between the different bacterial types.

  5. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Kirchner

    Full Text Available In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  6. Characterization of blaTEM-52-carrying plasmids of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica isolates from chicken meat with a common supplier in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuko; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    The acquisition of resistance to cephalosporins among Salmonella spp. is a major public health concern. This study identified clonal plasmids carrying bla(TEM-52) from 10 Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis and Manhattan isolates from retail chicken meats that originated from a common supplier in Japan. Whole-genome analyses of the representative plasmids, including pYM4, revealed that they are 38 kb in size and that pYM4 is identical to pDKX1 from beef in Denmark, suggesting a global dissemination of resistance mediated by the plasmids. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Plasmid Borne Resistance in Klebsiella Isolates from Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty six Klebsiella isolates from Kenyatta National Hospital and the Centre for Microbiology, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi were screened for resistance to commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents and for their plasmid content. Plasmids were transferred into Esherichia coli K-12 and resulting transconjugants ...

  8. Characterization of plasmids carrying oqxAB in bla(CTX-M)-negative Escherichia coli isolates from food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Tao; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Qiu-E; Huang, Ting; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2014-12-01

    To study the characteristics of plasmids harboring oqxAB among bla(CTX-M)-negative Escherichia coli isolates and search for oqxAB-harboring plasmids similar to plasmids carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M) reported previously, conjugation experiment was performed for 115 randomly selected oqxAB-positive but bla(CTX-M)-negative E. coli isolates from diseased animals in Guangdong, China. S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and southern blotting experiments were performed to investigate the location of oqxAB and other resistance genes. The EcoRI digestion profiles of the plasmids with oqxAB were also analyzed. The clonal relatedness of donor isolates was investigated by PFGE. In this study, 32 oqxAB transconjugants were successfully obtained and most transconjugants showed multidrug resistances. Eleven replicon combination types were found in these transconjugants. floR and oqxAB were found on the same plasmids in all nine transconjugants resistant to florfenicol. The sequences between floR and oqxAB were identical in most transconjugants and the two genes were both linked with tnp in insertion sequences. Nine F18:A-:B1 plasmids with only oqxAB shared identical EcoRI digestion profiles and the profiles were also identical with that of a plasmid carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M) found previously. Co-transfer of plasmids carrying oqxAB and fosA3, respectively, was also observed in one isolate. This study demonstrates the dissemination of oqxAB among bla(CTX-M)-negative E. coli isolates was mainly mediated by identical F18:A-:B1 plasmids. A novel arrangement of regions between floR and oqxAB might play an important role in the dissemination of floR-oqxAB. This is the first description of the genetic environment of the relationship between oqxAB and floR in E. coli.

  9. Complete sequences of IncHI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 and qnrS1 in equine Escherichia coli provide new insights into plasmid evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolejska, Monika; Villa, Laura; Minoia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the structure of two multidrug-resistant IncHI1 plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 in Escherichia coli isolates disseminated in an equine clinic in the Czech Republic. METHODS: A complete nucleotide sequencing of 239 kb IncHI1 (pEQ1) and 287 kb IncHI1/X1 (pEQ2) plasmids...... was performed using the 454-Genome Sequencer FLX system. The sequences were compared using bioinformatic tools with other sequenced IncHI1 plasmids. RESULTS: A comparative analysis of pEQ1 and pEQ2 identified high nucleotide identity with the IncHI1 type 2 plasmids. A novel 24 kb module containing an operon......CTX-M-1 gene was formed by a truncated macrolide resistance cluster and flanked by IS26 as previously observed in IncI1 and IncN plasmids. The IncHI1 plasmid changed size and gained the quinolone resistance gene qnrS1 as a result of IS26-mediated fusion with an IncX1 plasmid. CONCLUSIONS: Our data...

  10. Inducible plasmid-mediated copper resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, D; Camakaris, J; Lee, B T; Luke, R K

    1985-04-01

    The copper resistance in Escherichia coli determined by plasmid pRJ1004 is inducible. The level of resistance is proportional to the inducing dose of copper. The level of copper resistance in induced and uninduced cells changes with the growth phase of the culture. Induced resistant cells accumulate less copper than uninduced cells, so that reduced accumulation may be the mechanism of resistance. We propose that the inducible plasmid-coded copper resistance interacts with the normal metabolism of the cell to protect against toxic levels of copper while allowing continued operation of copper-dependent functions.

  11. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic and Heavy Metal Resistance in Bacillus Strains Isolated From Soils in Rize, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif SEVİM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen Bacillus strains which were isolated from soil samples were examined for resistance to 17 different antibiotics (ampicillin, methicillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, cephalotine, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, vancomycin, oxacilin, neomycin, kanamycin and, novabiocin and to 10 different heavy metals (copper, lead, cobalt, chrome, iron, mercury, zinc, nickel, manganese and, cadmium and for the presence of plasmid DNA. A total of eleven strains (67% were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The most common resistance was observed against methicillin and oxacillin. The most resistance strains were found as Bacillus sp. B3 and Bacillus sp. B11. High heavy metal resistance against copper, chromium, zinc, iron and nickel was detected, but mercury and cobalt resistance was not detected, except for 3 strains (B3, B11, and B12 which showed mercury resistance. It has been determined that seven Bacillus strains have plasmids. The isolated plasmids were transformed into the Bacillus subtilis W168 and it was shown that heavy metal and antibiotic resistance determinants were carried on these plasmids. These results showed that there was a correlation between plasmid content and resistance for both antibiotic and heavy metal resistance

  12. Antimicrobial, heavy metal resistance and plasmid profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial, heavy metal resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of Coliforms (Enterobacteriacea) isolated from nosocomial infections and healthy human faeces were compared. Fifteen of the 25 isolates from nosocomial infections were identified as Escherichia coli, and remaining as Kelebsiella pneumoniae.

  13. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  14. Antibiotic resistance plasmids of Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    A variety of plasmids were isolated physically, and most antibiotic resistance is thought to be plasmid mediated. A number of characters (e.g., resistance to erythromycin or methicillin, and production of pigment) are determined by genes that do not give clear indications of either plasmid or chromosomal location. Although the formation of a particular plasmid is probably, even in bacterial terms, a very rare event, once formed such an element can spread rapidly among the bacterial population. The spectacular increase in the incidence of penicillinase-producing hospital strains in the late 1940's could have been due in part to this process. Evidence is stronger, however, for the intercell transfer of recently isolated plasmids coding for resistance to fusidic acid (and penicillinase production), or for neomycin, or for tetracycline resistance. Study of bacterial plasmids can resolve fundamental biochemical problems, and give some insight into the life of the cell at the molecular level. But the immediate application of the study of staphylococcal plasmids may be directed towards improving the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. The most important aspect of future anti-staphylococcal chemotherapy should thus be the limitation of the use of antibiotics, particularly for application to the skin and nose. (U.S.)

  15. Quinolones Resistance And R-Plasmids Of Clinical Isolates Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been reported incidence in the emergence of. Quinolones resistance in clinical isolates in Nigeria and the level in resistance has been on the increase. Objective: To determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids profiles of 67 clinical Pseudomonas species from a teaching hospital ...

  16. Comparative Analysis Of Antibiotic Resistance And R-Plasmids Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics constitutes a major cause of failure in the treatment of bacterial infections. The genetic exchange of plasmids containing antibiotic resistant determinants between bacteria is believed to play a critical role in the evolution of antibiotics resistant bacteria and this has been shown in S. aureus.

  17. Transposon characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) and dissemination of resistance associated with transferable plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Liebana, Ernesto; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2007-01-01

    of the resistance. Methods and results: One hundred and one vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from 19 unrelated farms have been investigated. Tn 1546 characterization by long PCR and Clal-digestions of amplicons showed a very low diversity of Tn types (n = 4) in comparison to the high genotypic...... diversity demonstrated by PFGE (n = 62). Conjugation experiments were carried out to assess the transfer of vancomycin resistance. Co-transfer of vanA together with erm(B) positioned on the same conjugative plasmid containing a replicon similar to pRE25 was demonstrated and also the presence of different...... plasmid replicons, associated with antimicrobial resistance on several unrelated farms. Conclusions: Horizontal transfer of vancomycin resistance may play a more important role in the persistence of antimicrobial resistance than clonal spread. The presence of different plasmid replicons, associated...

  18. Identification of a globally distributed clinical streptomycin-resistance plasmid and other resistance determinants in a coastal bay of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Dang, H

    2011-01-01

    To study streptomycin-resistant bacteria isolated from Jiaozhou Bay and their molecular determinants of resistance. Twenty-seven tetracycline-resistant and 49 chloramphenicol-resistant bacterial isolates from surface seawater of Jiaozhou Bay were selected for investigation. More than 88% of these isolates were resistant to streptomycin. Half of the streptomycin-resistant bacteria harboured the strA-strB gene pair, and six isolates carried Tn5393-like transposons by PCR detection. The p9123-related plasmids containing the sul2-strA-strB gene cluster were characterized in two environmental Escherichia coli isolates. Transposon Tn5393 was first identified on a Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid, which also carried Tn1721, estP and umu genes responsible for antimicrobial and insecticide resistance. Coresistance to streptomycin and tetracycline or chloramphenicol was found with high frequency. p9123-related plasmid and Tn5393 transposon may contribute to the wide distribution and spread of the strA-strB gene pair in Jiaozhou Bay. The detection of streptomycin-resistance plasmid pQ1-1 from Jiaozhou Bay seawater bacteria and human bacterial pathogens from USA indicates its global dissemination and transmission, across different components of the microbiota on earth. Streptomycin resistance can be recognized as an important bioindicator of environmental quality, owing to its association with anthropogenic pollution and the multidrug-resistant microbiota. © 2010 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Influence of tra genes of IncP and F plasmids on the mobilization of small Kanamycin resistance ColE1-Like plasmids in bacterial biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Horizontal gene transfer is a mechanism for movement of antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria. Some small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids isolated from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica were shown to carry mobilization genes; although not self-transmissibl...

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles of Aeromonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of Aeromonas hydrophila at commonly used water collection points on the River Njoro and to determine the in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmid profiles of isolates. In total, 126 samples were collected and 36.5% of them were positive for A. hydrophila.

  1. Molecular organization of small plasmids bearing blaTEM-1 and conferring resistance to β-lactams in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Annette; San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Nielsen, Signe M; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-09-01

    TEM-1 is the dominant β-lactamase of Haemophilus influenzae and can be located on small plasmids. Three distinct plasmids with sizes from 4,304 to 5,646 nucleotides (nt) were characterized: pA1606, pA1209, and pPN223. In addition to TEM-1 and a replication enzyme of the Rep 3 superfamily, pA1606 carries a Tn3 resolvase gene and pA1606 and pA1209 carry an open reading frame (ORF) similar to a plasmid recombination enzyme gene described in Gram-positive bacteria. The plasmids transformed strain Rd to the ampicillin-resistant phenotype.

  2. Plasmid mediated tetracycline resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Eun Han

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most important problems in public health, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. Importantly, plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from shrimp can potentially be transferred through transposition, conjugation and plasmid uptake to different bacterial species in aquaculture systems. In this study, we evaluated the antibiotic resistance pattern in V. parahaemolyticus strains associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND from penaeid shrimp and identified AHPND strains from Mexico showed a high level of resistance to tetracycline (≥5 μg/mL and have the tetB gene coding tetracycline resistance. In particular, the tetB gene was carried in a single copy plasmid (named as pTetB-VA1 comprising 5162-bp with 40% G + C content from the strain (13-511/A1. The plasmid pTetB-VA1 consists of 9 ORFs encoding tetracycline resistant and repressor proteins, transcriptional regulatory proteins and transposases and showed a 99% sequence identity to other tet gene plasmids (pIS04_68 and pAQU2.

  3. Plasmid-determined heavy metal resistances in Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.; Schottel, J.; Silver, S.

    1976-01-01

    Plasmid PI258 of S. aureus has separate genes determining resistance to cadmium and to mercury and the organomercurial phenylmercury acetate. Mercury(ial) resistance is due to the inducible synthesis of a mercury volatilization system. Hg/sup 2 +/ and mercury in phenylmercury acetate is enzymatically reduced to Hg/sup 0/, which is insoluble in water and highly volatile. PI258 differs from most enteric or pseudomonad plasmids which have been studied which determine resistance only to inorganic Hg/sup 2 +/. Cadmium resistance has been found only with staph plasmids. Cadmium resistance is constitutive and is associated with a lower accumulation of cadmium by the plasmid-bearing resistant cells. Cadmium accumulation by sensitive cells is energy-dependent and has those characteristics usually associated with a transmembrane active transport system. There is a specific interrelationship between cadmium accumulation and manganese accumulation and retention. Cd/sup 2 +/ competitively inhibits the uptake of Mn/sup 2 +/ and accelerates the loss of intracellular Mn/sup 2 +/ by the sensitive but has no effect on the resistant S. aureus. Under similar conditions there is no differential effect of Cd/sup 2 +/ on Mg/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/ or Rb/sup +/ accumulation or exchange between the sensitive and the resistant strains.

  4. Antibiotic resistance plasmids in wastewater treatment plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance plasmids found in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may represent a threat to public health if they are readily disseminated into the environment and ultimately into pathogenic bacteria. The wastewater environments provide an ideal ecosystem for development and evolution of antibiotic resistance ...

  5. Mathematical Model of Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Ceftiofur in Commensal Enteric Escherichia coli of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V.; Lanzas, Cristina; Lu, Zhao; Gröhn, Yrjö Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial use in food animals may contribute to antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animals and humans. Commensal bacteria of animal intestine may serve as a reservoir of resistance-genes. To understand the dynamics of plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporin ceftiofur in enteric commensals of cattle, we developed a deterministic mathematical model of the dynamics of ceftiofur-sensitive and resistant commensal enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the absence of and during parenteral therapy with ceftiofur. The most common treatment scenarios including those using a sustained-release drug formulation were simulated; the model outputs were in agreement with the available experimental data. The model indicated that a low but stable fraction of resistant enteric E. coli could persist in the absence of immediate ceftiofur pressure, being sustained by horizontal and vertical transfers of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, and ingestion of resistant E. coli. During parenteral therapy with ceftiofur, resistant enteric E. coli expanded in absolute number and relative frequency. This expansion was most influenced by parameters of antimicrobial action of ceftiofur against E. coli. After treatment (>5 weeks from start of therapy) the fraction of ceftiofur-resistant cells among enteric E. coli, similar to that in the absence of treatment, was most influenced by the parameters of ecology of enteric E. coli, such as the frequency of transfer of plasmids carrying resistance-genes, the rate of replacement of enteric E. coli by ingested E. coli, and the frequency of ceftiofur resistance in the latter. PMID:22615803

  6. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  7. Detection of the IncX3 plasmid carrying blaKPC-3 in a Serratia marcescens strain isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, Floriana; Caio, Carla; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Monaco, Francesco; Di Mento, Giuseppina; Cuscino, Nicola; Fontana, Ignazio; Panarello, Giovanna; Maugeri, Gaetano; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Stefani, Stefania; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2017-10-01

    Dissemination of resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae through plasmids is an increasingly important concern in health care worldwide. Here we report the first description of an IncX3 plasmid carrying the blaKPC-3 gene in a strain of Serratia marcescens isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient at the transplantation centre ISMETT (Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, Palermo, Italy). To localize the transposable element containing the resistance-associated gene Next-Generation Sequencing of the bacterial DNA was performed. S. marcescens was positive for blaKPC-3 and blaSHV-11 genes. The molecular analysis demonstrated that the blaKPC-3 gene of this bacterial strain was located in one copy of the Tn-3-like element Tn4401-a carried in a plasmid that is 53 392 bp in size and showed the typical IncX3 scaffold. Our data demonstrated the presence of a new blaKPC-3 harbouring the IncX3 plasmid in S. marcescens. The possible dissemination among Enterobacteriaceae of this type of plasmid should be monitored and evaluated in terms of clinical risk.

  8. Characterization of Resistance Genes and Plasmids from Outbreaks and Illness Clusters Caused by Salmonella Resistant to Ceftriaxone in the United States, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, Jason P; Grass, Julian E; Bicknese, Amelia; Taylor, Julia; Friedman, Cindy R; Whichard, Jean M

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, quickly identifying the source of these infections can be difficult, and source identification is a crucial step in preventing additional illnesses. Although most infections are self-limited, invasive salmonellosis may require antimicrobial treatment. Ceftriaxone, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin, is commonly used for treatment of salmonellosis. Previous studies have identified a correlation between the food animal/retail meat source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella and the type of resistance gene and plasmid it carries. In this study, we examined seven outbreaks of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections, caused by serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, Heidelberg, and Infantis. All isolates were positive for a plasmid-encoded bla CMY gene. Plasmid incompatibility typing identified five IncI1 and two IncA/C plasmids. Both outbreaks containing bla CMY -IncA/C plasmids were linked to consumption of cattle products. Three of five outbreaks with bla CMY -IncI1 (ST12) plasmids were linked to a poultry source. The remaining IncI1 outbreaks were associated with ground beef (ST20) and tomatoes (ST12). In addition, we examined isolates from five unsolved clusters of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections and used our plasmid-encoded gene findings to predict the source. Overall, we identified a likely association between the source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella outbreaks and the type of resistance gene/plasmid it carries.

  9. Plasmid mediated resistance in multidrug resistant bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic susceptibility testing of isolated bacteria associated with septicaemia in children were carried out using standard microbiological protocol. The MAR index for the test bacterial isolates was determined and the bacterial isolates that displayed multiple antibiotic resistance were investigated for the presence of ...

  10. Multi-antibiotics-resistance plasmid profile of enteric pathogens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae 100% sensitive to peflacine and Enterococcus faecalis 100% sensitive to ciprofloxacin and augmentin. Most of the isolates were least sensitive to cotrimoxazole, ampicillin, erythromycin gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. The resistance plasmids to the various isolates were very diverse ...

  11. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance | Igwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of multidrug resistance in clinical Escherichia coli has been associated significantly with plasmid mediated genes in carriers; which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This study aimed at determining the antibiotics susceptibility pattern of E. coli isolates claimed to be ...

  12. Conjugative IncFI plasmids carrying CTX-M-15 among Escherichia coli ESBL producing isolates at a University hospital in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, constitute an emerging public-health concern. Little data on the molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing Escherichia coli is available in Germany. Here we describe the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing-Escherichia coli isolates at a German University hospital. Methods We analysed 63 non-duplicate clinical ESBL isolates obtained over an 8-month period using PCR and sequence-based ESBL allele typing, plasmid replicon typing, phylogenetic group typing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE based genotyping and plasmid profiling was performed, as well as confirmatory DNA-based hybridization assays. Results Examination of the 63 Escherichia coli isolates revealed an almost equal distribution among the E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D. High prevalence (36/63 of the CTX-M-15 gene was observed and an analysis of PFGE-based patterns revealed the presence of this CTX-M allele in multiple clones. Resistance to cefotaxime was a transferable trait and a commonly occurring 145.5 kb conjugative IncFI plasmid was detected in 65% of E. coli carrying the CTX-M-15 allele. The rate of transferable antibiotic resistances for GM, SXT, TET, GM-SXT-TET, SXT-TET and GM-TET was 33%, 61%, 61%, 27%, 44% and 11%, respectively. The remaining strains did not have a common IncFI plasmid but harboured transferable IncFI plasmids with sizes that ranged from 97 to 242.5 kb. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the presence of IncFI plasmids within the prevailing E. coli population in a hospital setting and suggest that the dissemination of CTX-M-15 allele is associated to lateral transfer of these well-adapted, conjugative IncFI plasmids among various E. coli genotypes.

  13. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

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    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  14. Evolution of IncA/C blaCMY-₂-carrying plasmids by acquisition of the blaNDM-₁ carbapenemase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Villa, Laura; Poirel, Laurent; Bonnin, Rémy A; Nordmann, Patrice

    2012-02-01

    The bla(NDM-1) gene has been reported to be often located on broad-host-range plasmids of the IncA/C type in clinical but also environmental bacteria recovered from the New Delhi, India, area. IncA/C-type plasmids are the main vehicles for the spread of the cephalosporinase gene bla(CMY-2), frequently identified in the United States, Canada, and Europe. In this study, we completed the sequence of IncA/C plasmid pNDM-KN carrying the bla(NDM-1) gene, recovered from a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Kenya. This sequence was compared with those of three IncA/C-type reference plasmids from Escherichia coli, Yersinia ruckeri, and Photobacterium damselae. Comparative analysis showed that the bla(NDM-1) gene was located on a widely diffused plasmid scaffold known to be responsible for the spread of bla(CMY-2)-like genes and consequently for resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Considering that IncA/C plasmids possess a broad host range, this scaffold might support a large-scale diffusion of the bla(NDM-1) gene among Gram-negative rods.

  15. Transmissible Plasmids and Integrons Shift Escherichia coli Population Toward Larger Multiple Drug Resistance Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Suhartono; Savin, Mary C; Gbur, Edward E

    2018-04-01

    Transmissible plasmids and integrons may play important roles in the persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria throughout aquatic environment by accumulating antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). Class 1 and class 2 integron (intI), mobilization (mob), sulfamethoxazole resistance (sul), and trimethoprim resistance (dfr) genes were PCR-amplified and confirmed through DNA sequencing following plasmid extraction from 139 antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. E. coli had previously been recovered from wastewater treatment plant effluent and receiving stream water in Northwest Arkansas and isolates had expressed resistance to one to six antibiotics. Almost half of the total isolates (47%) carried putatively transmissible plasmids with mob F12 gene as the most frequently detected mobilization gene. When two or three mob genes were detected per isolate, there was a significant shift in the population toward larger multiple drug resistance (MDR) number. Class 1 and/or 2 integrons were prevalent (46%), and the presence of integron significantly shifted the isolate population toward larger MDR number. More isolates carried single or coexistence of two or three sul genes (99.3%), and single or a combination up to five dfr genes (89.3%) than had exhibited in vitro resistance to the respective antibiotics. These findings indicate not only the role of the wastewater treatment effluent and the stream environment in coaccumulation of ARG with transmissible plasmids and integrons in multiple antibiotic-resistant E. coli populations but also suggest that density of sul and dfr resistance genes within an isolate may serve as a biomarker for mobile MDR in general.

  16. Characteristics of plasmids in multi-drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolated during prospective surveillance of a newly opened hospital in Iraq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhe Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria are major causes of nosocomial infections, and antibiotic resistance in these organisms is often plasmid mediated. Data are scarce pertaining to molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in resource constrained areas such as Iraq. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, all MDR Enterobacteriaceae (n = 38 and randomly selected non-MDR counterparts (n = 41 isolated from patients, healthcare workers and environmental surfaces in a newly opened hospital in Iraq were investigated to characterize plasmids found in these isolates and determine their contribution to antibiotic resistance. Our results demonstrated that MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates harbored significantly more (≥ 3 plasmids compared to their non-MDR counterparts, which carried ≤ 2 plasmids (p<0.01. Various large plasmids (~52 to 100 kb from representative isolates were confirmed to contain multiple resistance genes by DNA microarray analysis. Aminoglycoside (acc, aadA, aph, strA/B, and ksgA, β-lactam (bla(TEM1, bla(AMPC, bla(CTX-M-15, bla(OXA-1, bla(VIM-2 and bla(SHV, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (sul/dfr, tetracycline (tet and chloramphenicol (cat resistance genes were detected on these plasmids. Additionally, multiple plasmids carrying multiple antibiotic resistance genes were found in the same host strain. Genetic transfer-associated genes were identified on the plasmids from both MDR and non-MDR isolates. Seven plasmid replicon types (FII, FIA, FIB, B/O, K, I1 and N were detected in the isolates, while globally disseminated IncA/C and IncHI1 plasmids were not detected in these isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the characteristics of the plasmids found in Enterobacteriaceae isolated following the opening of a new hospital in Iraq. The information provided here furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in this specific region and their evolutionary

  17. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Brent S.; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N.; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria. PMID:26170289

  18. antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-09-01

    Sep 1, 2000 ... College of Agriculture and Veterinary Services, University of Nairobi, P. O Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya. Request for reprints to: Dr. J. N. Ombui, Department of Public Health, ..... Hall, B., Greene, R., Potter, M. E. Cohen, M. L. and Brake, B. A.. Chloramphenicol-resistant Salmonella newport traced through.

  19. The Salmonella genomic island 1 is specifically mobilized in trans by the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douard, Gregory; Praud, Karine; Cloeckaert, Axel; Doublet, Benoît

    2010-12-20

    The Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is a Salmonella enterica-derived integrative mobilizable element (IME) containing various complex multiple resistance integrons identified in several S. enterica serovars and in Proteus mirabilis. Previous studies have shown that SGI1 transfers horizontally by in trans mobilization in the presence of the IncA/C conjugative helper plasmid pR55. Here, we report the ability of different prevalent multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) gene-carrying plasmids to mobilize the multidrug resistance genomic island SGI1. Through conjugation experiments, none of the 24 conjugative plasmids tested of the IncFI, FII, HI2, I1, L/M, N, P incompatibility groups were able to mobilize SGI1 at a detectable level (transfer frequency IncA/C incompatibility group. Several conjugative IncA/C MDR plasmids as well as the sequenced IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 of 143,963 bp were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1 from a S. enterica donor to the Escherichia coli recipient strain. Depending on the IncA/C plasmid used, the conjugative transfer of SGI1 occurred at frequencies ranging from 10(-3) to 10(-6) transconjugants per donor. Of particular concern, some large IncA/C MDR plasmids carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase bla(CMY-2) gene were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1. The ability of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family to mobilize SGI1 could contribute to its spread by horizontal transfer among enteric pathogens. Moreover, the increasing prevalence of IncA/C plasmids in MDR S. enterica isolates worldwide has potential implications for the epidemic success of the antibiotic resistance genomic island SGI1 and its close derivatives.

  20. Acquisition of Carbapenem Resistance by Plasmid-Encoded-AmpC-Expressing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A; Arenas, Jesús; Goessens, Wil H F; Tommassen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx into the periplasm by mutations in the porin genes. Here we investigated the route and genetic mechanisms of acquisition of carbapenem resistance in a clinical E. coli isolate carrying bla CMY-2 on a plasmid by selecting for mutants that are resistant to increasing concentrations of meropenem. In the first step, the expression of OmpC, the only porin produced in the strain under laboratory conditions, was lost, leading to reduced susceptibility to meropenem. In the second step, the expression of the CMY-2 β-lactamase was upregulated, leading to resistance to meropenem. The loss of OmpC was due to the insertion of an IS1 element into the ompC gene or to frameshift mutations and premature stop codons in this gene. The bla CMY-2 gene was found to be located on an IncIγ plasmid, and overproduction of the CMY-2 enzyme resulted from an increased plasmid copy number due to a nucleotide substitution in the inc gene. The clinical relevance of these genetic mechanisms became evident from the analysis of previously isolated carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates, which appeared to carry similar mutations. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. pHTβ-promoted mobilization of non-conjugative resistance plasmids from Enterococcus faecium to Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Laura; Morroni, Gianluca; Brenciani, Andrea; Vignaroli, Carla; Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Di Cesare, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Biavasco, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    To analyse the recombination events associated with conjugal mobilization of two multiresistance plasmids, pRUM17i48 and pLAG (formerly named pDO1-like), from Enterococcus faecium 17i48 to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2. The plasmids from two E. faecalis transconjugants (JH-4T, tetracycline resistant, and JH-8E, erythromycin resistant) and from the E. faecium donor (also carrying a pHTβ-like conjugative plasmid, named pHTβ17i48) were investigated by several methods, including PCR mapping and sequencing, S1-PFGE followed by Southern blotting and hybridization, and WGS. Two locations of repApHTβ were detected in both transconjugants, one on a ∼50 kb plasmid (as in the donor) and the other on plasmids of larger sizes. In JH-4T, WGS disclosed an 88.6 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 (∼50 kb) and a new plasmid, named pLAG (35.3 kb), carrying the tet(M), tet(L), lsa(E), lnu(B), spw and aadE resistance genes. In JH-8E, a 75 kb plasmid resulting from the recombination of pHTβ17i48 and pRUM17i48 was observed. In both cases, the cointegrates were apparently derived from replicative transposition of an IS1216 present in each of the multiresistance plasmids into pHTβ17i48. The cointegrates could resolve to yield the multiresistance plasmids and a pHTβ17i48 derivative carrying an IS1216 (unlike the pHTβ17i48 of the donor). Our results completed the characterization of the multiresistance plasmids carried by the E. faecium 17i48, confirming the role of pHT plasmids in the mobilization of non-conjugative antibiotic resistance elements among enterococci. Results also revealed that mobilization to E. faecalis was associated with the generation of cointegrate plasmids promoted by IS1216-mediated transposition. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the...

  3. Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli Resistant to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins in the Norwegian Broiler Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Berg, Einar Sverre; Norström, Madelaine; Sunde, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins have been detected in the Norwegian broiler production, despite the fact that antimicrobial agents are rarely used. The genetic mechanism responsible for cephalosporin resistance is mainly attributed to the presence of the blaCMY-2 gene encoding a plasmid-mediated AmpC-beta-lactamase (pAmpC). The aim of this study was to characterize and compare blaCMY-2 containing Escherichia coli isolated from the intestinal flora of broilers and retail chicken meat (fillets) to identify possible successful clones and/or resistance plasmids widespread in the Norwegian broiler production. Methods used included PCR based phylotyping, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis and whole genome sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of an IncK plasmid carrying blaCMY-2 was determined. Intestinal isolates displayed a higher degree of genetic diversity than meat isolates. A cluster of genetically related isolates belonging to ST38, phylogroup D, carrying blaCMY-2 containing IncK plasmids was identified. Furthermore, genes encoding plasmid stability systems (relBE/stbDE and pndAC) were identified on the IncK plasmid. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of a subset of isolates confirmed a close genetic relationship within the two most prevalent STs. The IncK plasmids within these two STs also shared a high degree of similarity. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli with the same genetic characteristics have been identified in the broiler production in other European countries, and the IncK plasmid characterized in this study showed close homology to a plasmid isolated from retail chicken meat in the Netherlands. The results indicate that both clonal expansion and horizontal transfer of blaCMY-2 containing plasmids contribute to dissemination of cephalosporin resistant E. coli in the broiler production. The presence of plasmid

  4. Sequence Analysis of IncA/C and IncI1 Plasmids Isolated from Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc; Hoffmann, Maria; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2018-04-05

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmids play an important role in disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes. To elucidate the antimicrobial resistance gene compositions in A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) plasmids carried by animal-derived MDR Salmonella Newport, and to investigate the spread mechanism of IncA/C plasmids, this study characterizes the complete nucleotide sequences of IncA/C plasmids by comparative analysis. Complete nucleotide sequencing of plasmids and chromosomes of six MDR Salmonella Newport strains was performed using PacBio RSII. Open reading frames were assigned using prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline (PGAP). To understand genomic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Salmonella Newport IncA/C plasmids, we included three complete IncA/C plasmid sequences with similar backbones from Salmonella Newport and Escherichia coli: pSN254, pAM04528, and peH4H, and additional 200 draft chromosomes. With the exception of canine isolate CVM22462, which contained an additional IncI1 plasmid, each of the six MDR Salmonella Newport strains contained only the IncA/C plasmid. These IncA/C plasmids (including references) ranged in size from 80.1 (pCVM21538) to 176.5 kb (pSN254) and carried various resistance genes. Resistance genes floR, tetA, tetR, strA, strB, sul, and mer were identified in all IncA/C plasmids. Additionally, bla CMY-2 and sugE were present in all IncA/C plasmids, excepting pCVM21538. Plasmid pCVM22462 was capable of being transferred by conjugation. The IncI1 plasmid pCVM22462b in CVM22462 carried bla CMY-2 and sugE. Our data showed that MDR Salmonella Newport strains carrying similar IncA/C plasmids clustered together in the phylogenetic tree using chromosome sequences and the IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived Salmonella Newport contained diverse resistance genes. In the current study, we analyzed genomic diversities and phylogenetic relationships among MDR Salmonella Newport using complete plasmids and chromosome

  5. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1ε subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eWolters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manure is known to contain residues of antibiotics administered to farm animals as well as bacteria carrying antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs. These genes are often located on mobile genetic elements. In biogas plants (BGPs, organic substrates such as manure and plant material are mixed and fermented in order to provide energy, and resulting digestates are used for soil fertilization. The fate of plasmid carrying bacteria from manure during the fermentation process is unknown. The present study focused on transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from digestates of seven BGPs, using manure as a co-substrate, and their phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Plasmids conferring resistance to either tetracycline or sulfadiazine were captured by means of exogenous plasmid isolation from digestates into Pseudomonas putida KT2442 and Escherichia coli CV601 recipients, at transfer frequencies ranging from 10-5 to 10-7. Transconjugants (n = 101 were screened by PCR-Southern blot hybridization and real-time PCR for the presence of IncP-1, IncP-1ε, IncW, IncN, IncP-7, IncP-9, LowGC and IncQ plasmids. While 61 plasmids remained unassigned, 40 plasmids belonged to the IncP-1ε subgroup. All these IncP-1ε plasmids were shown to harbor the genes tetA, sul1, qacE∆1, intI1 and integron gene cassette amplicons of different size. Further analysis of 16 representative IncP-1ε plasmids showed that they conferred six different multiple antibiotic resistance patterns and their diversity seemed to be driven by the gene cassette arrays. IncP-1ε plasmids displaying similar restriction and antibiotic resistance patterns were captured from different BGPs, suggesting that they may be typical for this environment. Our study showed that BGP digestates are a potential source of transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids and in particular the broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids might contribute to the spread of ARGs when digestates are used as fertilizer.

  6. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities...

  7. pCERC3 from a commensal ST95 Escherichia coli: A ColV virulence-multiresistance plasmid carrying a sul3-associated class 1 integron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert A; Holt, Kathryn E; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-01-01

    The rare sulphonamide resistance gene sul3 was found in the commensal Escherichia coli ST95 strain 22.1-R1 that was isolated in 2010 from the faeces of a healthy Australian adult. The genome of 22.1-R1 was sequenced and a 144,344bp RepFII/FIB plasmid, pCERC3, carrying sul3 was assembled. The sul3 gene is part of a class 1 integron featuring a sul3-containing conserved segment (sul3-CS) that replaced the classic sul1-containing 3'-conserved segment (3'-CS) usually seen in class 1 integrons. The integron contained the cassette array dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, streptomycin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol and quaternary ammonium compound. Two additional antibiotic resistance genes, blaTEM (ampicillin resistance) and tetA(B) (tetracycline) were adjacent to the integron, forming a single resistance region. In pCERC3, the sul3-type class 1 integron was flanked by sequence derived from the tnp and mer modules of Tn21 and was in the same location as In2, the sul1-containing In5-type class 1 integron of Tn21. At one end the sequence extends into Tn2670-derived sequence and then into sequence derived from the plasmid NR1 (R100). Examination of the sequences of eleven more complete sul3-containing plasmids in GenBank confirmed the relationship between sul3-associated integrons and Tn21/Tn2670/NR1. This suggests that the events that formed sul3-associated class 1 integrons occurred within the Tn21/Tn2670 context, most likely in NR1 or a related plasmid. The backbone of pCERC3 is most closely related to the backbones of ColV virulence plasmids and contains a complete ColV operon as well as several virulence associated genes and gene clusters. Hence, pCERC3 is both an antibiotic resistance and virulence plasmid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis UC509.9 Encodes Multiple Bacteriophage Resistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Mahony, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains are used globally for the production of fermented dairy products, particularly hard cheeses. Believed to be of plant origin, L. lactis strains that are used as starter cultures have undergone extensive adaptation to the dairy environment, partially through the acquisition of extrachromosomal DNA in the form of plasmids that specify technologically important phenotypic traits. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the eight plasmids of L. lactis UC509.9, an Irish dairy starter strain. Key industrial phenotypes were mapped, and genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids were identified. Four distinct, plasmid-borne bacteriophage resistance systems were identified, including two abortive infection systems, AbiB and AbiD1, thereby supporting the observed phage resistance of L. lactis UC509.9. AbiB escape mutants were generated for phage sk1, which were found to carry mutations in orf6, which encodes the major capsid protein of this phage. PMID:24814781

  9. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  10. Factors that affect transfer of the IncI1 β-lactam resistance plasmid pESBL-283 between E. coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Nadine; Otte, Sarah; Jonker, Martijs; Brul, Stanley; ter Kuile, Benno H

    2015-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide presents a major health threat to human health care that results in therapy failure and increasing costs. The transfer of resistance conferring plasmids by conjugation is a major route by which resistance genes disseminate at the intra- and interspecies level. High similarities between resistance genes identified in foodborne and hospital-acquired pathogens suggest transmission of resistance conferring and transferrable mobile elements through the food chain, either as part of intact strains, or through transfer of plasmids from foodborne to human strains. To study the factors that affect the rate of plasmid transfer, the transmission of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid from a foodborne Escherichia coli strain to the β-lactam sensitive E. coli MG1655 strain was documented as a function of simulated environmental factors. The foodborne E. coli isolate used as donor carried a CTX-M-1 harboring IncI1 plasmid that confers resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Cell density, energy availability and growth rate were identified as factors that affect plasmid transfer efficiency. Transfer rates were highest in the absence of the antibiotic, with almost every acceptor cell picking up the plasmid. Raising the antibiotic concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) resulted in reduced transfer rates, but also selected for the plasmid carrying donor and recombinant strains. Based on the mutational pattern of transconjugant cells, a common mechanism is proposed which compensates for fitness costs due to plasmid carriage by reducing other cell functions. Reducing potential fitness costs due to maintenance and expression of the plasmid could contribute to persistence of resistance genes in the environment even without antibiotic pressure. Taken together, the results identify factors that drive the spread and persistence of resistance conferring plasmids in natural isolates and shows how these

  11. Genomic characterization of a large plasmid containing a blaNDM-1gene carried on Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana C629 isolate from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Peng, Zixin; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-07-07

    The bla NDM-1 gene in Salmonella species is mostly reported in clinical cases, but is rarely isolated from red and white meat in China. A Salmonella Indiana (S. Indiana) isolate was cultured from a chicken carcass procured from a slaughterhouse in China. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested against a panel of agents. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolate was carried out and data was analyzed. A large plasmid, denoted as plasmid pC629 (210,106 bp), containing a composite cassette, consisting of IS26-bla NDM-1 -ble MBL -△trpF-tat-cutA-ISCR1-sul1-qacE△1-aadA2-dfrA12-intI1-IS26 was identified. The latter locus was physically linked with bla OXA-1 , bla CTX-M-65 , bla TEM-1 -encoding genes. A mercury resistance operon merACDEPTR was also identified; it was flanked on the proximal side, among IS26 element and the distally located on the bla NDM-1 gene. Plasmid pC629 also contained 21 other antimicrobial resistance-encoding genes, such as aac(6')-Ib-cr, aac(3)-VI, aadA5, aph(4)-Ia, arr-3, blmS, brp, catB3, dfrA17, floR, fosA, mph(A), mphR, mrx, nimC/nimA, oqxA, oqxB, oqxR, rmtB, sul1, sul2. Two virulence genes were also identified on plasmid pC629. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bla NDM-1 gene being identified from a plasmid in a S. Indiana isolate cultured from chicken carcass in China.

  12. Characterization of large plasmids encoding resistance to toxic heavy metals in Salmonella abortus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A; Singh, A; Ramteke, P W; Singh, V P

    2000-05-27

    Salmonella abortus equi vaccine strains were found to be resistant to high levels of toxic heavy metals--arsenic, chromium, cadmium, and mercury. The two strains 157 and 158 were resistant to ampicillin also. Curing of these strains resulted in loss of one or more resistance marker indicating plasmid borne resistance. Plasmid profile of strain 157 showed presence of three plasmids of 85, 54, and 0.1 Kb, whereas 158 strain showed presence of 85 Kb and 2 Kb plasmids. Plasmids were isolated from strain 157 and introduced into E. coli DH5alpha with a transformation efficiency of 2 x 10(3) transformants/microg DNA. Interestingly the transformants were resistant to antibiotics, heavy metals (As, Cr, Cd, Hg) and was also able to utilize citrate, a trait specific to Salmonella species. We report and establish for the first time the transferable large plasmids encoding resistance to various heavy metals, antibiotics and biochemical nature of S. abortus equi.

  13. Emergence of Plasmid-Borne dfrA14 Trimethoprim Resistance Gene in Shigella sonnei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALFONSO MIRANDA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The most common mechanism of trimethoprim (TMP-resistance is the acquisition of dihydrofolate reductase enzyme resistant to this drug. Previous molecular characterization of TMP-genes resistance in Chilean isolates of S. sonnei searching for dfrA1 and dfrA8, showed solely the presence of dfrA8 (formerly dhfrIIIc. However, these genetic markers were absent in S. sonnei strains further isolated during an outbreak in 2009. To identify the TMP-resistance gene in these strains, a genomic DNA library from a TMP-resistant (TMPR S. sonnei representative strain for the outbreak was used to clone, select and identify a TMP-resistance marker. The TMPR clone was sequenced by primer walking, identifying the presence of the dfrA14 gene in the sul2-strA’-dfrA14-‘strA-strB gene arrangement, harbored in a native 6,779-bp plasmid. The same plasmid was isolated by transforming with a ~4.2 MDa plasmid extracted from several TMPR S. sonnei strains into E. coli. This plasmid, named pABC-3, was present only in dfrA14-positive strains and was homologous to a previously described pCERC-1, but different due to the absence of an 11-bp repetitive unit. The distribution of dfrA1, dfrA8 and dfrA14 TMP-resistance genes was determined in 126 TMPR S. sonnei isolates. Most of the strains (96 % carried only one of the three TMP-resistance genes assessed. Thus, all strains obtained during the 2009-outbreak harbored only dfrA14, whereas, dfrA8 was the most abundant gene marker before outbreak and, after the outbreak dfrA1 seems have appeared in circulating strains. According to PFGE, dfrA14-positive strains were clustered in a genetically related group including some dfrA1- and dfrA8-positive strains; meanwhile other genetic group included most of the dfrA8-positive strains. This distribution also correlated with the isolation period, showing a dynamics of trimethoprim genetic markers prevalent in Chilean S. sonnei strains. To our knowledge, dfrA14 gene associated to a small

  14. Survival and Evolution of a Large Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in New Clinical Bacterial Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-11-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities of plasmid adaptation. While insertion sequences are well known to supply plasmids with adaptive traits, our findings suggest that they also play an important role in plasmid evolution by maintaining the plasticity necessary to alleviate plasmid-host constrains. Further, the observed evolutionary strategy consistently followed by all evolved E. coli lineages exposes a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission that may ultimately limit the dissemination potential of clinical multidrug resistance plasmids in these hosts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Characterisation of IncA/C2 plasmids carrying an In416-like integron with the blaVIM-19 gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 of Greek origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radosław; Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Skálová, Anna; Chudějová, Kateřina; Dobiasova, Hana; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hrabák, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of three multidrug resistance (MDR) IncA/C-like plasmids from Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying the VIM-type carbapenemase-encoding integrons In4863 (blaVIM-19-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) or In4873 (blaVIM-1-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) were determined, which are the first In416-like elements identified in Greece. Plasmids pKP-Gr642 and pKP-Gr8143 were from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 isolates, whereas plasmid pEcl-Gr4873 was from an Enterobacter cloacae ST88 isolate. Sequencing showed that pKP-Gr642 (162787bp) and pKP-Gr8143 (154395bp) consisted of the type 1 IncA/C2 conserved backbone, the blaCMY-2-like gene-containing region, and the ARI-B (with the sul2 gene) and ARI-A (with a class 1 integron) resistance islands, like the plasmid pUMNK88_161 from the USA. The third plasmid, pEcl-Gr4873 (153958bp), exhibited extensive similarity with the type 2 IncA/C2 plasmid pR55 from France. pEcl-Gr4873 carried only one resistance island of a hybrid transposon structure inserted in a different location to ARI-A in type 1 A/C2 plasmids. In all three plasmids, the In416-like integrons In4863 or In4873 were identified within non-identical class II transposon structures. All three In416-like-carrying regions presented significant similarities with the MDR region of the IncA/C2 plasmid pCC416 from Italy, carrying the prototype In416 integron (blaVIM-4-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2). These findings provided the basis for speculations regarding the evolution of IncA/C2 plasmids with In416-like integrons, and confirmed the rapid evolution of some IncA/C2 plasmid lineages. Considering the broad host range of IncA/C2 molecules, it seems that pKP-Gr642, pKP-Gr8143 and pEcl-Gr4873 plasmids might support the diffusion of In416-like integrons among Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Imipenem-resistance in Serratia marcescens is mediated by plasmid expression of KPC-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Q; Zhu, Y-Q; Deng, N-M; Li, L

    2017-04-01

    Imipenem is a broad-spectrum carbapenem antibiotic with applications against severe bacterial infections. Here, we describe the identification of imipenem-resistant Serratia marcescens in our hospital and the role of plasmid-mediated KPC-2 expression in imipenem resistance. We used the modified Hodge test to detect carbapenemase produced in imipenem-resistant strains. His resistance can be transferred to E. coli in co-culture tests, which implicates the plasmid in imipenem resistance. PCR amplification from the plasmid identified two products consistent with KPC-2 of 583 and 1050 bp that were also present in E. coli after co-culture. The restriction pattern for both plasmids was identical, supporting the transfer from the S. marcescens isolate to E. coli. Finally, gene sequencing confirmed KPC-2 in the plasmid. Due to the presence of KPC-2 in the imipenem-resistant S. marcescens, we propose that KPC-2 mediates antibiotic resistance in the S. marcescens isolate.

  17. Characterization of tet(Y)-carrying LowGC plasmids exogenously captured from cow manure at a conventional dairy farm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Husník, Filip; Chroňáková, Alica; Heuer, H.; Smalla, K.; Elhottová, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 6 (2016), č. článku fiw075. ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/2077; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13046 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cattle manure * LowGC plasmids * tetracycline resistance * tet(Y) * Acinetobacter * horizontal gene transfer Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2016

  18. Changing plasmid types responsible for extended spectrum cephalosporin resistance inEscherichia coliO157:H7 in the United States, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, J P; Pecic, G; Stroika, S; Rickert, R; Whichard, J

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is a major cause of foodborne illness. Plasmids are genetic elements that mobilize antimicrobial resistance determinants including bla CMY β-lactamases that confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). ESCs are important for treating a variety of infections. IncA/C plasmids are found among diverse sources, including cattle, the principal source of E. coli O157 infections in humans. IncI1 plasmids are common among E. coli and Salmonella from poultry and other avian sources. To broaden our understanding of reservoirs of bla CMY , we determined the types of plasmids carrying bla CMY among E. coli O157. From 1996 to 2009, 3742 E. coli O157 isolates were tested. Eleven (0.29%) were ceftriaxone resistant and had a bla CMY-2 -containing plasmid. All four isolates submitted before 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY encoded on IncA/C plasmids, while all five isolates submitted after 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY carried on IncI1 plasmids. The IncI1 plasmids were ST2, ST20, and ST23. We conclude that cephalosporin resistance among E. coli O157:H7 is due to plasmid-encoded bla CMY genes and that plasmid types appear to have shifted from IncA/C to IncI1. This shift suggests either a change in plasmid type among animal reservoirs or that the organism has expanded into avian reservoirs. More analysis of human, retail meat, and food animal isolates is necessary to broaden our understanding of the antimicrobial resistance determinants of ESC resistance among E. coli O157.

  19. Changing plasmid types responsible for extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the USA, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folster, J P; Pecic, G; Stroika, S; Rickert, R; Whichard, J M

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is a major cause of food-borne illness. Plasmids are genetic elements that mobilise antimicrobial resistance determinants, including bla CMY β-lactamases that confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs). ESCs are important for treating a variety of infections. IncA/C plasmids are found among diverse sources, including cattle, the principal source of E. coli O157 infections in humans. IncI1 plasmids are common among E. coli and Salmonella from poultry and other avian sources. To broaden our understanding of the reservoirs of bla CMY , the types of plasmids carrying bla CMY among E. coli O157 were determined. From 1996 to 2009, 3742 E. coli O157 isolates were tested. Eleven isolates (0.29%) were ceftriaxone-resistant and had a bla CMY -2-containing plasmid. All four isolates submitted before 2001 as well as a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY encoded on IncA/C plasmids, whilst all five isolates submitted after 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had bla CMY carried on IncI1 plasmids. The IncI1 plasmids were ST2, ST20 and ST23. We conclude that cephalosporin resistance among E. coli O157:H7 is due to plasmid-encoded bla CMY genes and that plasmid types appear to have shifted from IncA/C to IncI1. This shift suggests either a change in plasmid type among animal reservoirs or that the organism has expanded into avian reservoirs. More analysis of human, retail meat and food animal isolates is necessary to broaden our understanding of the antimicrobial resistance determinants of ESC resistance among E. coli O157. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Sources of diversity of carbapenem resistance levels in Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying blaVIM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tzelepi, E; Carattoli, A; Vatopoulos, A C; Tassios, P T; Miriagou, V

    2006-09-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the diversity of beta-lactam resistance phenotypes among isolates of a VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) strain that is endemic in Greek hospitals. Five VPKP clinical isolates were studied. MICs of beta-lactams were determined by agar dilution. PFGE of XbaI-digested genomic DNA was used for typing. Profiles of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were determined by SDS-PAGE. Selected isolates were transformed with a plasmid encoding the Omp36K porin. beta-Lactamase activities were analysed by IEF and imipenem hydrolysis was assessed by spectrophotometry. VIM-1-encoding, self-transmissible plasmids were characterized by replicon typing, RFLP and hybridization with bla(VIM)- and IS26-specific probes. Characterization of integrons was performed by PCR, cloning and sequencing. Isolates exhibited highly similar PFGE patterns. Imipenem MICs were 2, 4, 16, 32 and 64 mg/L. The isolate with the highest imipenem MIC (Vipm-64) lacked a 36 kDa OMP. Expression of a cloned OmpK36 in this isolate reduced the imipenem MIC to susceptibility levels. Imipenem-hydrolysing activity was significantly higher in Vipm-16 as compared with the other isolates that expressed similar amounts of VIM-1. All isolates transferred beta-lactam resistance to Escherichia coli through conjugative, IncN plasmids that exhibited differences in the RFLP and hybridization patterns with bla(VIM)- and IS26-specific probes. The Vipm-16 plasmid, mediating the higher imipenem MICs among transconjugants, carried two copies of bla(VIM-1). Cloning and sequencing showed In-e541-like integrons truncated at the 5'CS by insertion of IS26 elements at two different positions. A VIM-1-producing strain of K. pneumoniae has evolved through OMP alterations and rearrangements in the bla(VIM-1)-carrying plasmid probably mediated by IS26, generating isolates with imipenem MICs ranging from susceptibility to resistance.

  1. Plasmid mediated enhancement of uv resistance in Streptococcus faecalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehl, R.; Miller, M.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A 38.5-Mdal plasmid of Streptococcus faecalis subdp. zymogenes has been shown to enhance survival following uv irradiation. In addition, the presence of this plasmid increases the mutation frequencies following uv irradiation and enhanced W-reactivation. The data presented indicate that S. faecalis has an inducible error-prone repair system and that the plasmid enhances these repair functions

  2. Inter- and Intraspecies Plasmid-Mediated Transfer of Florfenicol Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae Isolates from Swine▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Cha, Seung Bin; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Su In; Lee, Hee Soo; Yoo, Han Sang

    2009-01-01

    Florfenicol resistance was analyzed in 230 enteric pig isolates collected between 1998 and 2006. PCR, plasmid profiling, Southern blot hybridization, and a mixed-broth conjugation assay suggested the intra- and interspecies plasmid-mediated transfer of florfenicol resistance among the isolates that exhibited MICs for florfenicol between 4 to 128 mg/liter.

  3. Inter- and Intraspecies Plasmid-Mediated Transfer of Florfenicol Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae Isolates from Swine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Cha, Seung Bin; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Su In; Lee, Hee Soo; Yoo, Han Sang

    2009-01-01

    Florfenicol resistance was analyzed in 230 enteric pig isolates collected between 1998 and 2006. PCR, plasmid profiling, Southern blot hybridization, and a mixed-broth conjugation assay suggested the intra- and interspecies plasmid-mediated transfer of florfenicol resistance among the isolates that exhibited MICs for florfenicol between 4 to 128 mg/liter. PMID:19592530

  4. Conjugation-Mediated Transfer of Antibiotic-Resistance Plasmids Between Enterobacteriaceae in the Digestive Tract of Blaberus craniifer (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacarso, I; Iseppi, R; Sabia, C; Messi, P; Condò, C; Bondi, M; de Niederhäusern, S

    2016-05-01

    Cockroaches, insects of the order Blattodea, seem to play a crucial role in the possible conjugation-mediated genetic exchanges that occur among bacteria that harbor in the cockroach intestinal tract. The gut of these insects can be thought of as an effective in vivo model for the natural transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids among bacteria. In our study, we evaluated the conjugation-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes between Escherichia coli and other microorganisms of the same Enterobacteriaceae family within the intestinal tract of Blaberus craniifer Burmeister, 1838 (Blattodea: Blaberidae). Different in vivo mating experiments were performed using E. coli RP4 harboring the RP4 plasmid carrying ampicillin, kanamycin, and tetracycline resistance genes as the donor and E. coli K12 resistant to nalidixic acid or Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis IMM39 resistant to streptomycin as the recipients. The RP4 plasmid was successfully transferred to both recipients, producing E. coli K12-RP4 and S. Enteritidis IMM39-RP4 transconjugants. Conjugation frequencies in vivo were similar to those previously observed in vitro. The transfer of the RP4 plasmid in all transconjugants was confirmed by small-scale plasmid isolation and agar gel electrophoresis, suggesting that the intestinal tract of cockroaches is an effective in vivo model for natural gene transfer. Our results confirm that cockroaches allow for the exchange of antimicrobial resistance plasmids among bacteria and may represent a potential reservoir for the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in different environments. These findings are particularly significant to human health in the context of health care settings such as hospitals. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, W Florian; Welch, Timothy J; McDermott, Patrick F; Mammel, Mark K; LeClerc, J Eugene; White, David G; Cebula, Thomas A; Ravel, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug-resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we present the complete plasmid sequences of the IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 (143,963 bp), isolated in 1971 from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and of the cryptic IncA/C plasmid pRAx (49,763 bp), isolated from Escherichia coli transconjugant D7-3, which was obtained through pRA1 transfer in 1980. Using comparative sequence analysis of pRA1 and pRAx with recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family, we show that both plasmids provide novel insights into the evolution of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family and the minimal machinery necessary for stable IncA/C plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family evolved from a common ancestor, similar in composition to pRA1, through stepwise integration of horizontally acquired resistance gene arrays into a conserved plasmid backbone. Phylogenetic comparisons predict type IV secretion-like conjugative transfer operons encoded on the shared plasmid backbones to be closely related to a group of integrating conjugative elements, which use conjugative transfer for horizontal propagation but stably integrate into the host chromosome during vegetative growth. A hipAB toxin-antitoxin gene cluster found on pRA1, which in Escherichia coli is involved in the formation of persister cell subpopulations, suggests persistence as an early broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance mechanism in the evolution of IncA/C resistance plasmids.

  6. Isolation of novel IncA/C and IncN fluoroquinolone resistance plasmids from an antibiotic-polluted lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Johnning, Anna; Nilsson, Ida; Smalla, Kornelia; Kristiansson, Erik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-polluted environments may function as reservoirs for novel resistance plasmids not yet encountered in pathogens. The aims of this study were to assess the potential of resistance transfer between bacteria from such environments and Escherichia coli, and to characterize the conjugative elements involved. Sediment samples from Kazipally lake and Asanikunta tank, two Indian lakes with a history of severe pollution with fluoroquinolones, were investigated. Proportions of resistant bacteria were determined by selective cultivation, while horizontal gene transfer was studied using a GFP-tagged E. coli as recipient. Retrieved transconjugants were tested for susceptibility by Etest(®) and captured conjugative resistance elements were characterized by WGS. The polluted lakes harboured considerably higher proportions of ciprofloxacin-resistant and sulfamethoxazole-resistant bacteria than did other Indian and Swedish lakes included for comparison (52% versus 2% and 60% versus 7%, respectively). Resistance plasmids were captured from Kazipally lake, but not from any of the other lakes; in the case of Asanikunta tank because of high sediment toxicity. Eight unique IncA/C and IncN resistance plasmids were identified among 11 sequenced transconjugants. Five plasmids were fully assembled, and four of these carried the quinolone resistance gene qnrVC1, which has previously only been found on chromosomes. Acquired resistance genes, in the majority of cases associated with class 1 integrons, could be linked to decreased susceptibility to several different classes of antibiotics. Our study shows that environments heavily polluted with antibiotics contain novel multiresistance plasmids transferrable to E. coli. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Isolation of a conjugative F-like plasmid from a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain CM6 using tandem shock wave-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Alonso, G; Cruz-Medina, J A; Caballero-Pérez, J; Arvizu-Hernández, I; Ávalos-Esparza, L M; Cruz-Hernández, A; Romero-Gómez, S; Rodríguez, A L; Pastrana-Martínez, X; Fernández, F; Loske, A M; Campos-Guillén, J

    2015-07-01

    Genetic characterization of plasmids from bacterial strains provides insight about multidrug resistance. Ten wild type Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from cow fecal samples were characterized by their antibiotic resistance profile, plasmid patterns and three different identification methods. From one of the strains, a fertility factor-like plasmid was replicated using tandem shock wave-mediated transformation. Underwater shock waves with a positive pressure peak of up to approximately 40 MPa, followed by a pressure trough of approximately -19 MPa were generated using an experimental piezoelectric shock wave source. Three different shock wave energies and a fixed delay of 750 μs were used to study the relationship between energy and transformation efficiency (TE), as well as the influence of shock wave energy on the integrity of the plasmid. Our results showed that the mean shock wave-mediated TE and the integrity of the large plasmid (~70 kb) were reduced significantly at the energy levels tested. The sequencing analysis of the plasmid revealed a high identity to the pHK17a plasmid, including the replication system, which was similar to the plasmid incompatibility group FII. It also showed that it carried an extended spectrum beta-lactamase gene, ctx-m-14. Furthermore, diverse genes for the conjugative mechanism were identified. Our results may be helpful in improving methodologies for conjugative plasmid transfer and directly selecting the most interesting plasmids from environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Emergence and Spread of A Plasmid-Mediated Polymyxin Resistance Mechanism, MCR-1: Are Bacteria Winning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The report of the emergence of mcr-1, the first plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance mechanism, in Enterobacteriaceae in November 2015 challenged our last psychological line of defense. However, we still trusted that this resistance factor had not spread globally. One month later, in December 2015, the detection of mcr-1 in an Escherichia coliisolate from a septicemic patient in Denmark and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat really defeated us. The worst news was that one of the chicken meat isolates belonged to ST131, a spreading epidemic sequence type. In China, 15%-21% of E. coli strains isolated from raw meat and animals carried mcr-1, and about 1% of patient isolates carried this gene, indicating that E. coli carrying this plasmid is not a rare phenomenon. This gene is transferable by conjugation and can be maintained in Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting the risk of transfer between different bacterial genera. The good news is that the strains carrying mcr-1 do not contain genes for pan-resistance profiles, although some Danish strains contain 15 different resistance genes, including genes for extended-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics, and gene mutations leading to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. If the mcr-1-bearing strains acquire multidrug resistance, extensive drug resistance, or pandrug resistance, no antibiotic drugs will be available with which clinicians can treat infected patients. Therefore, the use of antibiotics in both hospitals and the animal breeding industry must be strictly regulated. The origin of mcr-1 may be associated with the wide use of colistin in agriculture. There is no evidence that the Danish mcr-1 gene spread from China. Therefore, it is likely that mcr-1 genes originated in multiple sites simultaneously under the pressure of colistin use, because India and Denmark are the world’ s greatest users of this antibiotic. More surveys must be conducted in different

  9. IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural systems: diversification driven by class 1 integron gene cassettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eHeuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of broad host range IncP-1ε plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5’-nuclease assay for real time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1ε plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1ε plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1ε plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridisation. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1ε plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1ε plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon Tn1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1ε plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems.

  10. Plasmid-Mediated Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae Changing Landscape and Implications for Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultsz, Constance; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is increasing worldwide, and pathogenic microorganism's that are resistant to all available antimicrobial agents are increasingly reported. Emerging plasmid-encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases are increasingly reported worldwide.

  11. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Rincon Cruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers.

  12. Characterisation of a mobilisable plasmid conferring florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Atherton, Tom G; Walker, Stephanie; Williamson, Susanna M; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Weinert, Lucy A; Holden, Matthew TG; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 7.7 kb mobilisable plasmid (pM3446F), isolated from a florfenicol resistant isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, showed extended similarity to plasmids found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae containing the floR gene as well as replication and mobilisation genes. Mobilisation into other Pasteurellaceae species confirmed that this plasmid can be transferred horizontally. PMID:26049592

  13. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven...... sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several...... antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related...

  14. Lactose carrier protein of Escherichia coli. Structure and expression of plasmids carrying the Y gene of the lac operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teather, R M; Bramhall, J; Riede, I; Wright, J K; Fürst, M; Aichele, G; Wilhelm, U; Overath, P

    1980-01-01

    The previously described hybrid plasmid pC7 which carries lacI+O+delta(Z)Y+A+ on a 12.3 X 10(6)-Mr DNA fragment [Teather et al. (1978) Mol. Gen. Genet. 159, 239-248] was partially digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under conditions reducing the recognition sequence to d(A-A-T-T) and ligated to the vector pB322. lac Y-carrying inserts of various sized (Mr 1.5-4.7 X 10(6)) were obtained. Hybrid plasmid pTE18 (2300-base-pair insert) carries part of the I (repressor) gene, the promotor-operator region, part of the Z (beta-galactosidase) gene, the Y (lactose carrier) gene and part of the A (transacetylase) gene. Upon induction of pTE18-harbouring strains the Y-gene product is expressed at a nearly constant rate for several generations and accumulates to a level of 12-16% of the total cytoplasmic membrane protein. Integration into the membrane leads to active carrier as judged by binding and transport measurements.

  15. First environmental sample containing plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli detected in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Silje Bakken; Søraas, Arne; Arnesen, Lotte Stenfors; Leegaard, Truls; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Jenum, Pål A

    2017-09-01

    We hereby report the detection of the plasmid borne mcr-1 gene conferring colistin resistance in an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli ST10 strain retrieved from seawater at a public beach in Norway. The sample was collected in September 2010 and was investigated by whole-genome sequencing in 2016. This report illustrates that E. coli strains carrying plasmid-mediated colistin resistance genes have also reached areas where this drug is hardly used at all. Surveillance of colistin resistance in environmental, veterinary, and human strains is warranted also in countries where colistin resistance is rare in clinical settings. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification of dfrA14 in two distinct plasmids conferring trimethoprim resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Walker, Stephanie; Atherton, Tom; Fernandez Crespo, Roberto; Williamson, Susanna M; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Weinert, Lucy A; Oshota, Olusegun; Holden, Matt T G; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution and genetic basis of trimethoprim resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates from pigs in England. Clinical isolates collected between 1998 and 2011 were tested for resistance to trimethoprim and sulphonamide. The genetic basis of trimethoprim resistance was determined by shotgun WGS analysis and the subsequent isolation and sequencing of plasmids. A total of 16 (out of 106) A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were resistant to both trimethoprim (MIC >32 mg/L) and sulfisoxazole (MIC ≥256 mg/L), and a further 32 were resistant only to sulfisoxazole (MIC ≥256 mg/L). Genome sequence data for the trimethoprim-resistant isolates revealed the presence of the dfrA14 dihydrofolate reductase gene. The distribution of plasmid sequences in multiple contigs suggested the presence of two distinct dfrA14-containing plasmids in different isolates, which was confirmed by plasmid isolation and sequencing. Both plasmids encoded mobilization genes, the sulphonamide resistance gene sul2, as well as dfrA14 inserted into strA, a streptomycin-resistance-associated gene, although the gene order differed between the two plasmids. One of the plasmids further encoded the strB streptomycin-resistance-associated gene. This is the first description of mobilizable plasmids conferring trimethoprim resistance in A. pleuropneumoniae and, to our knowledge, the first report of dfrA14 in any member of the Pasteurellaceae. The identification of dfrA14 conferring trimethoprim resistance in A. pleuropneumoniae isolates will facilitate PCR screens for resistance to this important antimicrobial. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  17. Distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, David Olusoga; Alli, Armstrong Oyebode; Anorue, Michael C; Daini, Oluwole Adebayo; Oluwadun, Afolabi

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, mechanisms of resistance to quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria were believed to be only chromosome encoded. However, emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been reported worldwide. This study investigated distribution of PMQR in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in eastern part of Nigeria. Seventy-one nonduplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates of eight species were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic detection of various PMQRs, typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and analysis of plasmids present, including replicon typing. The minimum inhibitory concentrations showed MIC90values as high as 256 μg/ml for fluoroquinolones. Carriage of PMQR was found to be 35.2%. Twenty (28.2%) isolates carried various qnr genes, of which seven (9.9%) qnrA1; four (5.6%) qnrB1; eight (11.3%) qnrS1 while one (1.4%) encoded qnrD1. Eighteen (25.4%) isolates were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr while carriage of multiple genes exists in some strains. Similarly, 13 isolates (18.7%) were found to carry PMQR efflux pump gene, qepA. Conjugation experiments revealed that the plasmids once transferred coded for fluoroquinolone resistance. The transconjugant strains carried a common plasmid estimated to be 65 kb. These plasmids were untypable for replicon/incompatibility. Typing revealed high diversity among all species tested with no identical RAPD pattern seen. This study further confirms high level resistance to many antimicrobials in different species of Gram-negative bacteria including fluoroquinolones and spread of PMQR genes in Southern Nigeria.

  18. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Pettengill, James B; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Miller, John; Ayers, Sherry L; Zhao, Shaohua; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) are often encoded on mobile elements, such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which have the potential to transfer among foodborne pathogens, as well as to other virulent pathogens, increasing the threats these traits pose to human and veterinary health. Our understanding of MDR among Salmonella has been limited by the lack of closed plasmid genomes for comparisons across resistance phenotypes, due to difficulties in effectively separating the DNA of these high-molecular weight, low-copy-number plasmids from chromosomal DNA. To resolve this problem, we demonstrate an efficient protocol for isolating, sequencing and closing IncA/C plasmids from Salmonella sp. using single molecule real-time sequencing on a Pacific Biosciences (Pacbio) RS II Sequencer. We obtained six Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry, representing six different serovars, each exhibiting the MDR-Ampc resistance profile. Salmonella plasmids were obtained using a modified mini preparation and transformed with Escherichia coli DH10Br. A Qiagen Large-Construct kit™ was used to recover highly concentrated and purified plasmid DNA that was sequenced using PacBio technology. These six closed IncA/C plasmids ranged in size from 104 to 191 kb and shared a stable, conserved backbone containing 98 core genes, with only six differences among those core genes. The plasmids encoded a number of antimicrobial resistance genes, including those for quaternary ammonium compounds and mercury. We then compared our six IncA/C plasmid sequences: first with 14 IncA/C plasmids derived from S. enterica available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and then with an additional 38 IncA/C plasmids derived from different taxa. These comparisons allowed us to build an evolutionary picture of how antimicrobial resistance may be mediated by this common plasmid backbone. Our project provides detailed genetic information about resistance genes in

  19. Antibiotic-resistance and plasmids in Staphylococcus-hyicus isolated from pigs with exudative eperdermitis and from healthy pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Schwarz, S.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 100 S. hyicus strains isolated from healthy piglets and piglets with exudative epidermitis originating from 100 different herds was examined for drug-resistance and prevalence of plasmids. Resistance to macrolide/lincosamide antibiotics could be related to plasmids in 55 (93%) of the 59...... resistant strains: A plasmid of 2.4 kb mediating resistance to macrolides and lincosamides was observed in 25 strains, and a plasmid of 11.5 kb mediating resistance to both macrolides/lincosamides and tetracycline was observed in 30 strains. A plasmid with a molecular weight of 4.5 kb was shown by curing...... experiments to be associated with resistance to tetracycline in 12 strains. All together, 47 strains were resistant to tetracycline. In 42 (89%) of these strains tetracycline-resistance was found to be encoded by plasmids. Fifty six strains were resistant to streptomycin, and resistance was associated...

  20. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  1. Heat Resistance Mediated by a New Plasmid Encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a Possible Novel Mechanism for Nosocomial Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  2. Mosaic Structure of a Multiple-Drug-Resistant, Conjugative Plasmid from Campylobacter jejuni

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nirdnoy, Warawadee; Mason, Carl J; Guerry, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of a tet(O) plasmid from a multiple-drug-resistant clinical isolate of Campylobacter jejuni revealed 10 genes or pseudogenes encoding different aminoglycoside inactivating enzymes, transposaselike genes...

  3. Plant agricultural streptomycin formulations do not carry antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Stockwell, Virginia O; Duffy, Brion

    2009-07-01

    Streptomycin is used in plant agriculture for bacterial disease control, particularly against fire blight in pome fruit orchards. Concerns that this may increase environmental antibiotic resistance have led to bans or restrictions on use. Experience with antibiotic use in animal feeds raises the possible influence of formulation-delivered resistance genes. We demonstrate that agricultural streptomycin formulations do not carry producer organism resistance genes. By using an optimized extraction procedure, Streptomyces 16S rRNA genes and the streptomycin resistance gene strA were not detected in agricultural streptomycin formulations. This diminishes the likelihood for one potential factor in resistance development due to streptomycin use.

  4. Plant Agricultural Streptomycin Formulations Do Not Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Duffy, Brion

    2009-01-01

    Streptomycin is used in plant agriculture for bacterial disease control, particularly against fire blight in pome fruit orchards. Concerns that this may increase environmental antibiotic resistance have led to bans or restrictions on use. Experience with antibiotic use in animal feeds raises the possible influence of formulation-delivered resistance genes. We demonstrate that agricultural streptomycin formulations do not carry producer organism resistance genes. By using an optimized extracti...

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of the multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid pR55 from Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublet, Benoît; Boyd, David; Douard, Gregory; Praud, Karine; Cloeckaert, Axel; Mulvey, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    To determine the complete nucleotide sequence of the multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid pR55 from a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae strain that was isolated from a urinary tract infection in 1969 in a French hospital and compare it with those of contemporary emerging IncA/C plasmids. The plasmid was purified and sequenced using a 454 sequencing approach. After draft assembly, additional PCRs and walking reads were performed for gap closure. Sequence comparisons and multiple alignments with other IncA/C plasmids were done using the BLAST algorithm and CLUSTAL W, respectively. Plasmid pR55 (170 810 bp) revealed a shared plasmid backbone (>99% nucleotide identity) with current members of the IncA/C(2) multidrug resistance plasmid family that are widely disseminating antibiotic resistance genes. Nevertheless, two specific multidrug resistance gene arrays probably acquired from other genetic elements were identified inserted at conserved hotspot insertion sites in the IncA/C backbone. A novel transposon named Tn6187 showed an atypical mixed transposon configuration composed of two mercury resistance operons and two transposition modules that are related to Tn21 and Tn1696, respectively, and an In0-type integron. IncA/C(2) multidrug resistance plasmids have a broad host range and have been implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Enterobacteriaceae from humans and animals. This typical IncA/C(2) genetic scaffold appears to carry various multidrug resistance gene arrays and is now also a successful vehicle for spreading AmpC-like cephalosporinase and metallo-β-lactamase genes, such as bla(CMY) and bla(NDM), respectively.

  6. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  7. Expansion of the IncX plasmid family for improved identification and typing of novel plasmids in drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bielak, Eliza Maria; Fortini, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    IncX plasmids are narrow host range plasmids of Enterobactericeae that have been isolated for over 50years. They are known to encode type IV fimbriae enabling their own conjugative transfer, and to provide accessory functions to their host bacteria such as resistance towards antimicrobial agents...

  8. Emergence of an Extensively Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Clone Harboring a Promiscuous Plasmid Encoding Resistance to Fluoroquinolones and Third-Generation Cephalosporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J. Klemm

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid. Multidrug-resistant (MDR isolates are prevalent in parts of Asia and Africa and are often associated with the dominant H58 haplotype. Reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones is also widespread, and sporadic cases of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins or azithromycin have also been reported. Here, we report the first large-scale emergence and spread of a novel S. Typhi clone harboring resistance to three first-line drugs (chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole as well as fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in Sindh, Pakistan, which we classify as extensively drug resistant (XDR. Over 300 XDR typhoid cases have emerged in Sindh, Pakistan, since November 2016. Additionally, a single case of travel-associated XDR typhoid has recently been identified in the United Kingdom. Whole-genome sequencing of over 80 of the XDR isolates revealed remarkable genetic clonality and sequence conservation, identified a large number of resistance determinants, and showed that these isolates were of haplotype H58. The XDR S. Typhi clone encodes a chromosomally located resistance region and harbors a plasmid encoding additional resistance elements, including the blaCTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase, and carrying the qnrS fluoroquinolone resistance gene. This antibiotic resistance-associated IncY plasmid exhibited high sequence identity to plasmids found in other enteric bacteria isolated from widely distributed geographic locations. This study highlights three concerning problems: the receding antibiotic arsenal for typhoid treatment, the ability of S. Typhi to transform from MDR to XDR in a single step by acquisition of a plasmid, and the ability of XDR clones to spread globally.

  9. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    that include global equities, global bonds, currencies, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and equity index options. This predictability underlies the strong returns to "carry trades" that go long high-carry and short low-carry securities, applied almost exclusively to currencies, but shown here...

  10. Plasmid-Encoded Multidrug Resistance of Salmonella typhi and some Enteric Bacteria in and around Kolkata, India: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishith Kumar Pal

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the occurrence of R-plasmid in Salmonella typhi isolates from enteric fever cases in and around Kolkata (1991-2001, India following in vitro conjugation experiments, isolation of plasmid DNAs and agarose gel electrophoretic analysis. The multidrug resistant (MDR S. typhi strains contained a transferable plasmid conferring resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, cotrimoxazole and tetracycline. The plasmid encoding ACCoT-resistance of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris were conjugative and co-migrated with the plasmid of MDR S. typhi isolates. The antibiotic sensitive S. typhi isolates did not contain any plasmid. Thus the findings of the present study confirmed the instability of the R-plasmid in S. typhi, and that the antibiotic sensitive S. typhi strains acquired the R-plasmid from other enteric bacteria such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P.vulgaris to undergo a suitable adaptation for survival in the changing antibiotic environment.

  11. Characterization of plasmids carrying the blaOXA-24/40 carbapenemase gene and the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins of a toxin/antitoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, Noraida; Gato, Eva; Roca, Ignasi; López, María; de Alegría, Carlos Ruíz; Fernández Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo; Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Vila, Jordi; Bou, Germán; Tomás, María

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) is a major source of nosocomial infections in Spain associated with the production of OXA-58-like or OXA-24/40-like β-lactamase enzymes. We analysed the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene in CRAb isolates obtained a decade apart. The presence of β-lactamases was screened for by PCR (metallo-β-lactamases, carbapenem-hydrolysing class D β-lactamases, GES and KPC) in 101 CRAb isolates obtained in two multicentre studies (GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2000 and GEIH/REIPI-Ab-2010; n = 493 Acinetobacter spp). We analysed the distribution and characterization of the plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene and sequenced two plasmids, AbATCC223p (2000) and AbATCC329p (2010) from A. baumannii ATCC 17978 transformants. Acquisition of the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene was the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems (48.7% in 2000 compared with 51.6% in 2010). This gene was mainly isolated in ST2 A. baumannii strains in both studies, although some novel STs (ST79 and ST80) appeared in 2010. The gene was located in plasmids (8-12 kbp) associated with the repAci2 or repAci2/repGR12 types. The sequences of AbATCC223p (8840 bp) and AbATCC329p (8842 bp) plasmids were similar, particularly regarding the presence of the genes encoding the AbkA/AbkB proteins associated with the toxin/antitoxin system. Moreover, the abkA/abkB gene sequences (>96% identity) were also located in plasmids harbouring the bla(OXA-58)-like gene. The action of OXA-24/40 and OXA-58 β-lactamase-like enzymes represents the main mechanism underlying resistance to carbapenems in Spain in the last decade. AbkA/AbkB proteins in the toxin/antitoxin system may be involved in the successful dissemination of plasmids carrying the bla(OXA-24/40)-like gene, and probably also the bla(OXA-58)-like gene, thus contributing to the plasmid stability. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  12. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Investigation of plasmid DNA and antibiotic resistance in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Helmuth R, Stephen R, Bungo C, Hoog B, Steinbeck A, Bulling E. (1985). Epidemiology of Vimlence-associated plasmids and outer membrane protein patterns within seven common Salmonella serotypes. Infection and community 48: 175-182. Karmaker S, Biswas D, Shaikh NM, Chatterjee SK, Kataria VK, ...

  14. Plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporins and quinolones in Escherichia coli from American crows in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamborova, Ivana; Dolejska, Monika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea K; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Papousek, Ivo; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) faeces were tested for Escherichia coli with plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC beta-lactamases. A total of 590 faecal samples were collected at four roosting sites in the USA and cultivated on selective media. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were performed to assess clonality. Transferability of resistance genes was studied using conjugation and transformation bioassays. In total, 78 (13%, n = 590) cefotaxime-resistant isolates were obtained, of which 66 and 12 displayed AmpC and ESBL phenotypes, respectively. Fifty-four AmpC-producing isolates carried bla CMY-2 . Isolates producing ESBLs contained genes bla CTX-M-27 (5 isolates), bla CTX-M-15 (4), bla CTX-M-14 (2) and bla CTX-M-1 (1). Ninety isolates (15%, n = 590) with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were obtained, among which 14 harboured PMQR genes aac(6')-Ib-cr (4 isolates), qnrB19 (3), qnrS1 (2), qnrA1 (2), qnrB2 (1), qnrB6 (1) and qnrD3 (1). High genetic diversity was revealed by PFGE and MLST. Epidemiologically important E. coli clones (e.g., ST131, ST405) were identified. Plasmids carrying bla CMY-2 were assigned predominantly to IncA/C (8 plasmids), IncI1/ST23 (5) and IncI1/ST12 (3). The study demonstrates a widespread occurrence of E. coli with ESBL, AmpC and PMQR genes associated with clinically important multidrug-resistant clones and epidemic plasmids, in American crows. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. pKJ1, a naturally occurring conjugative plasmid coding for toluene degradation and resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K.; Nishi, T.

    1980-08-01

    Pseudomonas sp. TA8 isolated by m-toluate enrichment from an aqueous sample metabolized toluene and m- and p-xylenes via the meta cleavage pathway, and manifested specific resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides. A variety of experiments revealed that the pKJ1 plasmid of about 150 megadaltons carried by TA8 specified both the toluene and xylene degradative function (the Tol function) and streptomycin/sulfonamide resistance. The deletion of a segment of pKJ1 (about 22 megadaltons) resulted in the loss of the Tol function. pKJ1 was not assigned to Pseudomonas incompatibility group P-1, P-2, P-3, or P-9.

  16. Cloning of Bacteroides fragilis plasmid genes affecting metronidazole resistance and ultraviolet survival in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehnert, G.U.; Abratt, V.R.; Goodman, H.J.; Woods, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Since reduced metronidazole causes DNA damage, resistance to metronidazole was used as a selection method for the cloning of Bacteroides fragilis genes affecting DNA repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli. Genes from B. fragilis Bf-2 were cloned on a recombinant plasmid pMT100 which made E. coli AB1157 and uvrA, B, and C mutant strains more resistant to metronidazole, but more sensitive to far uv irradiation under aerobic conditions. The loci affecting metronidazole resistance and uv sensitivity were linked and located on a 5-kb DNA fragment which originated from the small 6-kb cryptic plasmid pBFC1 present in B. fragilis Bf-2 cells

  17. Characterization of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lianwei; Li, Ruichao; Lin, Dachuan; Zhou, Yuanjie; Fu, Aisi; Ding, Qiong; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio alginolyticus was first isolated from food products, with β-lactamases encoded by blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaCMY-2 being the major mechanisms mediating their cephalosporin resistance. The complete sequence of a multidrug resistance plasmid, pVAS3-1, harboring the blaCMY-2 and qnrVC4 genes was decoded in this study. Its backbone exhibited genetic homology to known IncA/C plasmids recoverable from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting its possible origin in Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human?s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistan...

  19. Effects of halides on plasmid-mediated silver resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Maynes, M; Silver, S

    1998-12-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag+ resistance were measured with AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag+.

  20. IncA/C Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance in the Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florfenicol has recently been approved for the treatment of enteric septicemia of catfish caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri. Here we report the identification of florfenicol resistance in a clinical isolate of E. ictaluri. Resistance in this isolate is associated with a mobile IncA/C plasmid conferrin...

  1. Characterization of IncN plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 and qnr genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella from animals, the environment and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolejska, Monika; Villa, Laura; Hasman, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    DNA purified from the respective E. coli transformants.Results Three types of IncN plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1, qnrS1 and qnrB19 genes were identified in strains isolated from the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Denmark, Italy and the Netherlands, corresponding to pMLST sequence type (ST) 1, ST3...... and ST8, respectively. Related plasmids circulating in human and animal isolates were identified. Complete nucleotide sequences of the ST1 pHHA45 plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-1, isolated from E. coli from pigs in Denmark, and the ST3 pKT58A plasmid harbouring qnrS1, identified in E. coli from a water bird......Objectives The aim of the study was to characterize a collection of Escherichia coli and Salmonella harbouring qnr and blaCTX-M-1 genes on IncN plasmids isolated from humans, food-producing, companion and wild animals, and the environment from six European countries.Methods Nineteen IncN plasmids...

  2. Effect of growth rate and selection pressure on rates of transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid between E. coli strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, Jasper M.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Piet, Jurgen R.; Händel, Nadine; Smelt, Jan; Brul, Stanley; ter Kuile, Benno H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases costs for health care and causes therapy failure. An important mechanism for spreading resistance is transfer of plasmids containing resistance genes and subsequent selection. Yet the factors that influence the rate of transfer are poorly known. Rates of plasmid

  3. Conjugative IncF and IncI1 plasmids with tet(A) and class 1 integron conferring multidrug resistance in F18(+) porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmolka, Ama; Lestár, Barbara; Pászti, Judit; Fekete, Péter; Nagy, Béla

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) bacteria frequently cause watery diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs. Plasmids carrying genes of different enterotoxins and fimbrial adhesins, as well as plasmids conferring antimicrobial resistance are of prime importance in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ETEC. Recent studies have revealed the significance of the porcine ETEC plasmid pTC, carrying tetracycline resistance gene tet(B) with enterotoxin genes. In contrast, the role of tet(A) plasmids in transferring resistance of porcine ETEC is less understood. The objective of the present study was to provide a comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles of porcine post-weaning ETEC strains representing pork-producing areas in Central Europe and in the USA, with special attention to plasmids carrying the tet(A) gene. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of 87 porcine ETEC strains isolated from cases of post-weaning diarrhoea in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary and the Midwest USA was determined by disk diffusion and by PCR. Central European strains carrying tet(A) or tet(B) were further subjected to molecular characterisation of their tet plasmids. Results indicated that > 90% of the ETEC strains shared a common multidrug resistant (MDR) pattern of sulphamethoxazole (91%), tetracycline (84%) and streptomycin (80%) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was most frequently determined by the tet(B) gene (38%), while tet(A) was identified in 26% of all isolates with wide ranges for both tet gene types between some countries and with class 1 integrons and resistance genes co-transferred by conjugation. The virulence gene profiles included enterotoxin genes (lt, sta and/or stb), as well as adhesin genes (k88/f4, f18). Characterisation of two representative tet(A) plasmids of porcine F18(+) ETEC from Central Europe revealed that the IncF plasmid (pES11732) of the Czech strain (~120 kb) carried tet(A) in association with catA1 for

  4. Carry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koijen, Ralph S.J.; Moskowitz, Tobias; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    2018-01-01

    -sectionally and in time series for a host of different asset classes, including global equities, global bonds, commodities, US Treasuries, credit, and options. Carry is not explained by known predictors of returns from these asset classes, and it captures many of these predictors, providing a unifying framework...... for return predictability. We reject a generalized version of Uncovered Interest Parity and the Expectations Hypothesis in favor of models with varying risk premia, in which carry strategies are commonly exposed to global recession, liquidity, and volatility risks, though none fully explains carry’s premium....

  5. Molecular characterization of a 21.4 kilobase antibiotic resistance plasmid from an α-hemolytic Escherichia coli O108:H- human clinical isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fay E Dawes

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the 21.4 kilobase plasmid pECTm80 isolated from Escherichia coli strain 80, an α hemolytic human clinical diarrhoeal isolate (serotype O108:H-. DNA sequence analysis of pECTm80 revealed it belonged to incompatibility group X1, and contained plasmid partition and toxin-antitoxin systems, an R6K-like triple origin (ori replication system, genes required for replication regulation, insertion sequences IS1R, ISEc37 and a truncated transposase gene (Tn3-like ΔtnpA of the Tn3 family, and carried a class 2 integron. The class 2 integron of pECTm80 contains an intact cassette array dfrA1-sat2, encoding resistance to trimethoprim and streptothricin, and an aadA1 gene cassette truncated by the insertion of IS1R. The complex plasmid replication system includes α, β and γ origins of replication. Pairwise BLASTn comparison of pECTm80 with plasmid pE001 reveals a conserved plasmid backbone suggestive of a common ancestral lineage. Plasmid pECTm80 is of potential clinical importance, as it carries multiple genes to ensure its stable maintenance through successive bacterial cell divisions and multiple antibiotic resistance genes.

  6. Norwegian patients and retail chicken meat share cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli and IncK/blaCMY-2 resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, E S; Wester, A L; Ahrenfeldt, J; Mo, S S; Slettemeås, J S; Steinbakk, M; Samuelsen, Ø; Grude, N; Simonsen, G S; Løhr, I H; Jørgensen, S B; Tofteland, S; Lund, O; Dahle, U R; Sunde, M

    2017-06-01

    In 2012 and 2014 the Norwegian monitoring programme for antimicrobial resistance in the veterinary and food production sectors (NORM-VET) showed that 124 of a total of 406 samples (31%) of Norwegian retail chicken meat were contaminated with extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to compare selected cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from humans and poultry to determine their genetic relatedness based on whole genome sequencing (WGS). Escherichia coli representing three prevalent cephalosporin-resistant multi-locus sequence types (STs) isolated from poultry (n=17) were selected from the NORM-VET strain collections. All strains carried an IncK plasmid with a bla CMY-2 gene. Clinical E. coli isolates (n=284) with AmpC-mediated resistance were collected at Norwegian microbiology laboratories from 2010 to 2014. PCR screening showed that 29 of the clinical isolates harboured both IncK and bla CMY-2 . All IncK/bla CMY-2 -positive isolates were analysed with WGS-based bioinformatics tools. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2.5 Mbp of shared genome sequences showed close relationship, with fewer than 15 SNP differences between five clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) and the ST38 isolates from poultry. Furthermore, all of the 29 clinical isolates harboured IncK/bla CMY-2 plasmid variants highly similar to the IncK/bla CMY-2 plasmid present in the poultry isolates. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that clonal transfer of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from chicken meat to humans may occur, and may cause difficult-to-treat infections. Furthermore, these E. coli can be a source of AmpC-resistance plasmids for opportunistic pathogens in the human microbiota. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Processing of Nonconjugative Resistance Plasmids by Conjugation Nicking Enzyme of Staphylococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollet, Rebecca M.; Ingle, James D.; Hymes, Jeff P.; Eakes, Thomas C.; Eto, Karina Yui; Kwong, Stephen M.; Ramsay, Joshua P.; Firth, Neville; Redinbo, Matthew R. (Curtin U.); (Sydney); (UNC)

    2016-01-04

    Antimicrobial resistance inStaphylococcus aureuspresents an increasing threat to human health. This resistance is often encoded on mobile plasmids, such as pSK41; however, the mechanism of transfer of these plasmids is not well understood. In this study, we first examine key protein-DNA interactions formed by the relaxase enzyme, NES, which initiates and terminates the transfer of the multidrug resistance plasmid pSK41. Two loops on the NES protein, hairpin loops 1 and 2, form extensive contacts with the DNA hairpin formed at theoriTregion of pSK41, and here we establish that these contacts are essential for proper DNA cleavage and religation by the full 665-residue NES proteinin vitro. Second, pSK156 and pCA347 are nonconjugativeStaphylococcus aureusplasmids that contain sequences similar to theoriTregion of pSK41 but differ in the sequence predicted to form a DNA hairpin. We show that pSK41-encoded NES is able to bind, cleave, and religate theoriTsequences of these nonconjugative plasmidsin vitro. Although pSK41 could mobilize a coresident plasmid harboring its cognateoriT, it was unable to mobilize plasmids containing the pSK156 and pCA347 variantoriTmimics, suggesting that an accessory protein like that previously shown to confer specificity in the pWBG749 system may also be involved in transmission of plasmids containing a pSK41-likeoriT. These data indicate that the conjugative relaxase intransmechanism recently described for the pWBG749 family of plasmids also applies to the pSK41 family of plasmids, further heightening the potential significance of this mechanism in the horizontal transfer of staphylococcal plasmids.

    IMPORTANCEUnderstanding the

  8. Plasmid metagenome reveals high levels of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available The overuse or misuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the public health in the world. Sewage treatment plants (STPs are considered as important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and activated sludge characterized with high microbial density and diversity facilitates ARG horizontal gene transfer (HGT via mobile genetic elements (MGEs. However, little is known regarding the pool of ARGs and MGEs in sludge microbiome. In this study, the transposon aided capture (TRACA system was employed to isolate novel plasmids from activated sludge of one STP in Hong Kong, China. We also used Illumina Hiseq 2000 high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics analysis to investigate the plasmid metagenome. Two novel plasmids were acquired from the sludge microbiome by using TRACA system and one novel plasmid was identified through metagenomics analysis. Our results revealed high levels of various ARGs as well as MGEs for HGT, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. The application of the TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the environmental metagenome, coupled with subsequent high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis, highlighted the prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in microbial community of STPs.

  9. Plasmid metagenome reveals high levels of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ye, Lin

    2011-01-01

    The overuse or misuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the public health in the world. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are considered as important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and activated sludge characterized with high microbial density and diversity facilitates ARG horizontal gene transfer (HGT) via mobile genetic elements (MGEs). However, little is known regarding the pool of ARGs and MGEs in sludge microbiome. In this study, the transposon aided capture (TRACA) system was employed to isolate novel plasmids from activated sludge of one STP in Hong Kong, China. We also used Illumina Hiseq 2000 high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics analysis to investigate the plasmid metagenome. Two novel plasmids were acquired from the sludge microbiome by using TRACA system and one novel plasmid was identified through metagenomics analysis. Our results revealed high levels of various ARGs as well as MGEs for HGT, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. The application of the TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the environmental metagenome, coupled with subsequent high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis, highlighted the prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in microbial community of STPs.

  10. Plasmid profile of multi antibiotic resistant staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains evolving worldwide has created a great public health problem that needs urgent attention; as such bacteria show resistance to the drug of choice for treatment as well as being resistant to newer and last line antibiotics. In this study, the antibiotic susceptibility, multi antibiotic resistance ...

  11. Estimating the Transfer Range of Plasmids Encoding Antimicrobial Resistance in a Wastewater Treatment Plant Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Liguan; Dechesne, Arnaud; He, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been suggested as reservoirs and sources of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. In a WWTP ecosystem, human enteric and environmental bacteria are mixed and exposed to pharmaceutical residues, potentially favoring genetic exchange and thus...... sludge microbial community was challenged in standardized filter matings with one of three multidrug resistance plasmids (pKJK5, pB10, and RP4) harbored by Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas putida. Different donor–plasmid combinations had distinct transfer frequencies, ranging from 3 to 50 conjugation...

  12. The IncI1 plasmid carrying the bla CTX-M-1 gene persists in in vitro culture of a Escherichia coli strain from broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, E.A.J.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Roermund, van H.J.W.; Mevius, D.J.; Stegeman, A.; Klinkenberg, D.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria are a reservoir for antimicrobial-resistance genes. In the Netherlands, bacteria producing Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) are found on chicken-meat and in the gut of broilers at a high prevalence and the predominant ESBL-gene is the blaCTX-M-1 located on IncI1 plasmids.

  13. Identification of a Plasmid-Borne Chloramphenicol-Florfenicol Resistance Gene in Staphylococcus sciuri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan; Werckenthin, Christiane; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2000-01-01

    The 16.5-kbp plasmid pSCFS1 from Staphylococcus sciuri mediated combined resistance to chloramphenicol and florfenicol. The gene responsible for this resistance property, cfr, was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of the Cfr protein revealed no homology to known acetyltransferases or efflux proteins involved in chloramphenicol and/or florfenicol resistance or to other proteins whose functions are known. PMID:10952608

  14. Heterogeneity of plasmids determining high-level resistance to gentamicin in clinical isolates of Streptococcus faecalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zervos, M J; Mikesell, T S; Schaberg, D R

    1986-01-01

    Between November 1981 and October 1984, 48 of 3,458 clinical isolates of Streptococcus faecalis at the University of Michigan Hospital showed high-level (greater than 2,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to gentamicin, as well as to all other clinically available aminoglycosides. Thirteen percent of clinical isolates in the University of Michigan Hospital currently demonstrate this level of resistance. Transfer of resistance to a plasmid-free streptococcal recipient was observed in filter matings ...

  15. Complete plasmid sequence carrying type IV-like and type VII secretion systems from an atypical mycobacteria strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mascarenhas Morgado

    Full Text Available The genus Mycobacterium is highly diverse and ubiquitous in nature, comprehending fast- and slow-growing species with distinct impact in public health. The plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer represents one of the major events in bacteria evolution. Here, we report the complete sequence of a 160,489 bp circular plasmid (pCBMA213_2 from an atypical and fast-growing environmental mycobacteria. This is a unique plasmid, in comparison with the characterised mycobacteria plasmids, harboring a type IV-like and ESX-P2 type VII secretion systems. pCBMA213_2 can be further explored for evolutionary and conjugation studies as well as a tool to manipulate DNA within this bacteria genus.

  16. Complete Sequence of pSAM7, an IncX4 Plasmid Carrying a Novel blaCTX-M-14b Transposition Unit Isolated from Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae from Cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokes, M.O.; Abuoun, M.; Umur, S.; Wu, G.; Partridge, S.R.; Mevius, D.J.; Coldham, N.G.; Fielder, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    The same plasmid carrying blaCTX-M-14b was identified from an Escherichia coli isolate and an Enterobacter cloacae isolate collected from cattle in the United Kingdom by complete plasmid sequencing. This 35,341-bp plasmid, pSAM7, had an IncX4 backbone that is 99% identical to that of pJIE143 from a

  17. Loss of plasmid-mediated resistance after conversion of a group B streptococcus strain to a stable cell wall deficient variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Slomska, J; Caravano, R; El-Solh, N

    1979-01-01

    A group B streptococcus strain carrying plasmid DNA determining resistance to several drugs was converted by penicillin to cell wall (CW) defective and then to CW deficient variants (L-forms). The stable CW deficient variants became susceptible to antibiotics in study. Dye-buoyant density analysis of the DNA of CW deficient variants showed that the loss of antibiotic resistance was associated with the loss of extrachromosomal DNA.

  18. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  19. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbowy, Olesia; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively). The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2) nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake. PMID:26848973

  20. Plasmid pEC156, a Naturally Occurring Escherichia coli Genetic Element That Carries Genes of the EcoVIII Restriction-Modification System, Is Mobilizable among Enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Werbowy

    Full Text Available Type II restriction-modification systems are ubiquitous in prokaryotes. Some of them are present in naturally occurring plasmids, which may facilitate the spread of these systems in bacterial populations by horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about the routes of their dissemination. As a model to study this, we have chosen an Escherichia coli natural plasmid pEC156 that carries the EcoVIII restriction modification system. The presence of this system as well as the cis-acting cer site involved in resolution of plasmid multimers determines the stable maintenance of pEC156 not only in Escherichia coli but also in other enterobacteria. We have shown that due to the presence of oriT-type F and oriT-type R64 loci it is possible to mobilize pEC156 by conjugative plasmids (F and R64, respectively. The highest mobilization frequency was observed when pEC156-derivatives were transferred between Escherichia coli strains, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii representing coliform bacteria. We found that a pEC156-derivative with a functional EcoVIII restriction-modification system was mobilized in enterobacteria at a frequency lower than a plasmid lacking this system. In addition, we found that bacteria that possess the EcoVIII restriction-modification system can efficiently release plasmid content to the environment. We have shown that E. coli cells can be naturally transformed with pEC156-derivatives, however, with low efficiency. The transformation protocol employed neither involved chemical agents (e.g. CaCl2 nor temperature shift which could induce plasmid DNA uptake.

  1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella serotypes isolated from chicken carcasses in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Ata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones have been extensively used for treatment of a variety of invasive and systemic infections of salmonellosis. Widespread use of these agents has been associated with the emergence and dissemination of quinolone-resistant pathogens. The quinolone resistance and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6’-Ib-cr of 85 Salmonella isolates from chicken carcasses were investigated in this study. Isolates were serotyped according to the Kauffman-White-Le Minor scheme, and broth microdilution method was used to determine quinolone resistance. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were investigated by real-time PCR and positive results were confirmed by sequencing. Among the Salmonella isolates, 30/85 (35% and 18/85 (21% were found to be resistant to enrofloxacin (MIC ≥ 2 mg/ml, and danofloxacin (MIC ≥ 2 mg/ml, respectively. All the isolates were negative for qnrA, qnrB and aac(6’-Ib-cr genes, nevertheless 2% (S. Brandenburg and S. Dabou were positive for qnrS (qnrS1 determinant. This study is the first and unique investigating the plasmid- mediated quinolone resistance determinants of Salmonella isolated from chicken carcasses in Turkey.

  2. IncA/C plasmids conferring high azithromycin resistance in vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Li, Jie; Wan, Kanglin

    2018-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is a clinically important antibiotic against Vibrio cholerae, especially for inhibiting V. cholerae colonisation of the intestine and for the treatment of severe cholera in children and pregnant women. An IncA/C plasmid was isolated from two high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) AZM-resistant V. cholerae strains of the two mainly pathogenic serogroups (O1 and O139) isolated in China. In the 172 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), 16 genes were related to antibiotic resistance, of which 5 were well-defined genes associated with macrolide resistance. The five macrolide resistance genes distributed in two clusters, mphR-mrx-mph(K) and mel-mph2, flanked by insertion sequence elements and involving two kinds of resistance mechanism. Deletion of the complete region of the two clusters deceased the AZM MIC from ≥64 µg/mL to ≤0.5 µg/mL. This IncA/C plasmid shows great ability to accumulate antibiotic resistance genes. In addition to 11 resistance genes to other antibiotics, 5 macrolide resistance genes with different function were gathered repeatedly through transposition on one plasmid. This genotype could not be simply explained by antibiotic stress applied on the host from the environment or treatment. These phosphorylases and transmembrane transporters might be involved in the transport and metabolism of other non-antibiotic substances, enabling this kind of plasmid to propagate better in the host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. IncA/C Plasmid Carrying bla(NDM-1), bla(CMY-16), and fosA3 in a Salmonella enterica Serovar Corvallis Strain Isolated from a Migratory Wild Bird in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, L; Guerra, B; Schmoger, S; Fischer, J; Helmuth, R; Zong, Z; García-Fernández, A; Carattoli, A

    2015-10-01

    A Salmonella enterica serovar Corvallis strain was isolated from a wild bird in Germany. This strain carried the IncA/C2 pRH-1238 plasmid. Complete sequencing of the plasmid was performed, identifying the blaNDM-1, blaCMY-16, fosA3, sul1, sul2, strA, strB, aac(6')-Ib, aadA5, aphA6, tetA(A), mphA, floR, dfrA7, and merA genes, which confer clinically relevant resistance to most of the antimicrobial classes, including β-lactams with carbapenems, fosfomycin, aminoglycosides, co-trimoxazole, tetracyclines, and macrolides. The strain likely originated from the Asiatic region and was transferred to Germany through the Milvus migrans migratory route. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Travelers Can Import Colistin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Including Those Possessing the Plasmid-Mediated mcr-1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Odette J; Kuenzli, Esther; Pires, João; Tinguely, Regula; Carattoli, Alessandra; Hatz, Christoph; Perreten, Vincent; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Stool samples from 38 travelers returning from India were screened for extended-spectrum cephalosporin- and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae implementing standard selective plates. Twenty-six (76.3%) people were colonized with CTX-M or DHA producers, but none of the strains was colistin resistant and/or mcr-1 positive. Nevertheless, using overnight enrichment and CHROMagar Orientation plates supplemented with colistin, four people (10.5%) were found to be colonized with colistin-resistant Escherichia coli One cephalosporin-susceptible sequence type 10 (ST10) strain carried a 4,211-bp ISApl1-mcr-1-ISApl1 element in an IncHI2 plasmid backbone. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Plasmid-mediated streptomycin and sulfamethoxazole resistance in Shigella flexneri 3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Soumik; Chatterjee, Sohini; Chowdhury, Goutam; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Kumar, Ranajit; Koley, Hemanta

    2010-10-01

    Shigellosis is a major cause of diarrhoea-related morbidity and mortality, especially in children in developing countries such as India. Recently, it was estimated that 91 million individuals worldwide contract shigellosis each year. The emergence and dissemination of multidrug-resistant strains of Shigella is now an emerging global health problem. During the past two decades, much attention was given to re-evaluation of treatment recommendations. In the present study, we investigated a clinical strain of Shigella flexneri 3a with multiple drug resistance. This strain was resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole), nalidixic acid, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and trimethoprim. However, it was susceptible to 46.7% of drugs tested, i.e. azithromycin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. A 6.3-kb plasmid was cured from this strain using acridine orange. Following curing, it was observed that 87% of drug resistance loci of S. flexneri 3a are chromosomal and 13% are plasmid-encoded. This 6.3-kb plasmid was involved in streptomycin and sulfamethoxazole resistance in S. flexneri 3a strain, which was confirmed by the disk diffusion method. Clonality was confirmed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This study contributes to our knowledge on acquired drug resistance in one of the most common Shigella spp., S. flexneri 3a, which will enable better understanding of effective clinical management of shigellosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. In Vivo Transfer and Microevolution of Avian Native IncA/C2blaNDM-1-Carrying Plasmid pRH-1238 during a Broiler Chicken Infection Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziabdic, Sead; Fischer, Jennie; Malorny, Burkhard; Borowiak, Maria; Guerra, Beatriz; Kaesbohrer, Annemarie; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Szabo, Istvan

    2018-04-01

    The emergence and spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in wildlife and livestock animals pose an important safety concern for public health. With our in vivo broiler chicken infection study, we investigated the transfer and experimental microevolution of the bla NDM-1 -carrying IncA/C 2 plasmid (pRH-1238) introduced by avian native Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Corvallis without inducing antibiotic selection pressure. We evaluated the dependency of the time point of inoculation on donor ( S Corvallis [12-SA01738]) and plasmid-free Salmonella recipient [d-tartrate-fermenting (d-Ta + ) S Paratyphi B (13-SA01617), referred to here as S Paratyphi B (d-Ta + )] excretion by quantifying their excretion dynamics. Using plasmid profiling by S1 nuclease-restricted pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we gained insight into the variability of the native plasmid content among S Corvallis reisolates as well as plasmid acquisition in S Paratyphi B (d-Ta + ) and the enterobacterial gut microflora. Whole-genome sequencing enabled us to gain an in-depth insight into the microevolution of plasmid pRH-1238 in S Corvallis and enterobacterial recipient isolates. Our study revealed that the fecal excretion of avian native carbapenemase-producing S Corvallis is significantly higher than that of S Paratyphi (d-Ta + ) and is not hampered by S Paratyphi (d-Ta + ). Acquisition of pRH-1238 in other Enterobacteriaceae and several events of plasmid pRH-1238 transfer to different Escherichia coli sequence types and Klebsiella pneumoniae demonstrated an interspecies broad host range. Regardless of the microevolutionary structural deletions in pRH-1238, the single carbapenem resistance marker bla NDM-1 was maintained on pRH-1238 throughout the trial. Furthermore, we showed the importance of the gut E. coli population as a vector of pRH-1238. In a potential scenario of the introduction of NDM-1-producing S Corvallis into a broiler flock, the pRH-1238 plasmid could

  7. Genetic characterization of two fully sequenced multi-drug resistant plasmids pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 from Leclercia adecarboxylata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Qiang; Luo, Wenbo; Tong, Yigang; Zhang, Defu; Wang, Qian; Feng, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Fan, Yahan; Xia, Peiyuan

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported the complete sequence of the resistance plasmid pP10164-NDM, harboring blaNDM (conferring carbapenem resistance) and bleMBL (conferring bleomycin resistance), which is recovered from a clinical Leclercia adecarboxylata isolate P10164 from China. This follow-up work disclosed that there were still two multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmids pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 coexisting in this strain. pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 were completely sequenced and shown to carry a wealth of resistance genes, which encoded the resistance to at least 10 classes of antibiotics (β-lactams. macrolides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, amphenicols, quaternary ammonium compounds, sulphonamides, trimethoprim, and rifampicin) and 7 kinds of heavy mental (mercury, silver, copper, nickel, chromate, arsenic, and tellurium). All of these antibiotic resistance genes are associated with mobile elements such as transposons, integrons, and insertion sequence-based transposable units, constituting a total of three novel MDR regions, two in pP10164-2 and the other one in pP10164-3. Coexistence of three resistance plasmids pP10164-NDM, pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 makes L. adecarboxylata P10164 tend to become extensively drug-resistant. PMID:27658354

  8. Molecular Organization of Small Plasmids Bearing blaTEM-1 and Conferring Resistance to β-Lactams in Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Søndergaard, Annette; San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Nielsen, Signe M.; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    TEM-1 is the dominant β-lactamase of Haemophilus influenzae and can be located on small plasmids. Three distinct plasmids with sizes from 4,304 to 5,646 nucleotides (nt) were characterized: pA1606, pA1209, and pPN223. In addition to TEM-1 and a replication enzyme of the Rep 3 superfamily, pA1606 carries a Tn3 resolvase gene and pA1606 and pA1209 carry an open reading frame (ORF) similar to a plasmid recombination enzyme gene described in Gram-positive bacteria. The plasmids transformed strain...

  9. Occurrence of plasmid linked multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraian, R; Ram, S; Kaistha, S D; Srivastava, J

    2012-12-22

    Effluents of three different tanneries (T-1, T-2, & T-3) were investigated to isolate and scrutinize antibiotic, chromate and salinity resistant bacteria. Total 18 isolates of 9 different bacterial genera were screened out and identified; some strains established in all effluents. Amongst the three effluents tested; T-1 exhibited largest population of all isolates compared to T-2 and T-3 effluents. The T-1 effluent contained largest 4.4 x10(6) cfu/ml population of Pseudomonas aeruginosa followed by 3.9 x10(6) cfu/ml in T-2 effluent. The lowest 0.7 x10(6) cfu/ml count of Aeromonas spp. was recorded in T-3 effluent. Furthermore, antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed with 7 antibiotics which include ampicillin, sulfafurazole, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, tetracycline and amikacin. Three strains of P. aeruginosa and one strain of Escherichia coli deserved as multiple drug resistant (MDR). The P. aeruginosaT-3 and E. coliT-1 showed strongest MDR feature for 5 antibiotics. The response of chromate (50, 100, 200, 250 and 300 μg/ml) and NaCl concentrations (20, 40, 60 and 80 g/l) was incredible for 4 MDR isolates. Nearly each strain showed tolerance up to 300 μg/ml of chromate and 80 g/l of NaCl. The P. aeruginosaT-1, P. aeruginosaT-2, P. aeruginosaT-3 and E. coliT-1 were most tolerant isolates. Plasmid profiling of resistant strains was conducted with agarose gel electrophoresis. As consequence, plasmids from two strains of P. aeruginosa and E. coliT-1 represented different bands. At least for confirmation of plasmids nature; these were transformed and transformants were screened on medium having antibiotics. The study of plasmid transformation has confirmed the plasmid mediated resistance in isolates.

  10. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants among carbapeneme non-susceptible Enterobacter cloacae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. METHODS: The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes bla(KPC and bla(SME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs bla(IMP, bla(VIM and bla(NDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs,bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6'-Ib-cr and ARDs (including aac(6'-Ib, armA and rmtB of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7% harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7% carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6% were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1% were ARD positive. Among the 5 bla(IMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80% contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100% harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1% were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9% were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3% were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing bla(NDM-1, bla(IMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported.

  11. Effects of Metals on Antibiotic Resistance and Conjugal Plasmid Transfer in Soil Bacterial Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Jianxiao

    Antibiotic resistance currently represents one of the biggest challenges for human health and in recent years the environmental dimension of antibiotic resistance has been increasingly recognized. The soil environment serves as an important reservoir of antibiotic resistance determinants....... In addition to direct selection of antibiotic resistance by antibiotics, metals may co-select for antibiotic resistance via different mechanisms causing environmental selection of antibiotic resistance in metal contaminated soils. Horizontal gene transfer of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) like plasmids...... is generally considered one of the most important co-selection mechanisms as multiple resistance genes can be located on the same MGE. This PhD thesis focused on the impact of metals (Cu and Zn) on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities in soils exposed to different degrees...

  12. Modelling dynamics of plasmid-gene mediated antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria using stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Lu, Zhao; Lanzas, Cristina; Scott, H Morgan; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous commensal bacteria harbour genes of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), often on conjugative plasmids. Antimicrobial use in food animals subjects their enteric commensals to antimicrobial pressure. A fraction of enteric Escherichia coli in cattle exhibit plasmid-gene mediated AMR to a third-generation cephalosporin ceftiofur. We adapted stochastic differential equations with diffusion approximation (a compartmental stochastic mathematical model) to research the sources and roles of stochasticity in the resistance dynamics, both during parenteral antimicrobial therapy and in its absence. The results demonstrated that demographic stochasticity among enteric E. coli in the occurrence of relevant events was important for the AMR dynamics only when bacterial numbers were depressed during therapy. However, stochasticity in the parameters of enteric E. coli ecology, whether externally or intrinsically driven, contributed to a wider distribution of the resistant E. coli fraction, both during therapy and in its absence, with stochasticities in individual parameters interacting in their contribution.

  13. Investigation of plasmid DNA and antibiotic resistance in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-eight strains of Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Escherichia coli isolated from cultures of stool, urine and wound were tested for their susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents. All the strains were resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline. Nineteen Salmonella isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ...

  14. Quinolones resistance and R-plasmids of some gram negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolated gram-negative enteric bacilli consist of Escherichia coli (22), Klebsiella species (65), Proteus species (20), Salmonella typhi (2), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (39) and Pseudomonas species (18). Among the antimicrobial agents tested, high resistance was found with ofloxacin 44.0%, followed by pefloxacin 30.1% ...

  15. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-Kilobase IncN Plasmid Carrying the blaVIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, V.; Papagiannitsis, C. C.; Kotsakis, S. D.; Loli, A.; Tzelepi, E.; Legakis, N. J.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including blaVIM-1, aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes. PMID:20660690

  16. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-kilobase IncN plasmid carrying the blaVIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriagou, V; Papagiannitsis, C C; Kotsakis, S D; Loli, A; Tzelepi, E; Legakis, N J; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2010-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including bla(VIM-1), aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes.

  17. Comparative Genomics of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Isolates from Intensive Care Unit Patients and the Utility of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A.; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D.; Rasko, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A blaFOX-5 gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing blaFOX-5 were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings. PMID:24914121

  18. Comparative genomics of an IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella isolates from intensive care unit patients and the utility of whole-genome sequencing in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-08-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A bla(FOX-5) gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing bla(FOX-5) were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼ 167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Hexachlorophene. Secondary microorganism resistance to hexachlorophene. Conjugative transfer inhibition by the R-plasmid-coded resistance by hexachlorophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volná, F

    1982-01-01

    Strain resistance of the genus Escherichia, Salmonella, and Pseudomonas to hexachlorophene is inducible. Secondary resistance of the Gram-negative microorganisms to hexachlorophene is an inherited property of these strains. There are not any explicit differences of primary sensitivity to hexachlorophene between sensitive strains and those resistant to antibiotics. The secondary resistance level of Gram-negative microorganisms to hexachlorophene is also not dependent on the natural resistance (or sensitivity) of strains to antibiotics. Hexachlorophene, in concentration of 10 micrograms/ml of conjugation mixture, causes 100% inhibition of the conjugation transfer of the resistance determinants to antibiotics from tested strains with conjugative R-plasmid. The indirect secondary resistance conjugation transfer to hexachlorophene was verified in two cases. The resistance to hexachlorophene was transferred, coupled with resistance to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and streptomycin, from the Escherichia coli strains (No. 8) and Salmonella typhimurium (No. 4) to the recipient Escherichia coli strain K 12, SZK-Ec-329/74 (No. 2).

  20. Novel plasmid conferring kanamycin and tetracycline resistance in the turkey-derived Campylobacter jejuni strain 11601MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, M D; Altermann, E; Olson, J; Miller, W G; Chandrashekhar, K; Kathariou, S

    2016-07-01

    In Campylobacter spp., resistance to the antimicrobials kanamycin and tetracycline is frequently associated with plasmid-borne genes. However, relatively few plasmids of Campylobacter jejuni have been fully characterized to date. A novel plasmid (p11601MD; 44,095nt) harboring tet(O) was identified in C. jejuni strain 11601MD, which was isolated from the jejunum of a turkey produced conventionally in North Carolina. Analysis of the p11601MD sequence revealed the presence of a high-GC content cassette with four genes that included tet(O) and a putative aminoglycoside transferase gene (aphA-3) highly similar to kanamycin resistance determinants. Several genes putatively involved in conjugative transfer were also identified on the plasmid. These findings will contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of potentially self-mobilizing plasmids harboring antibiotic resistance determinants in Campylobacter spp. from turkeys and other sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance Encoded by the floR Gene in Escherichia coli Isolated from Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Baucheron, Sylvie; Flaujac, Geraldine; Schwarz, Stefan; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Martel, Jean-Louis; Chaslus-Dancla, Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    A florfenicol resistance gene almost identical to floR of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 was detected on 110- to 125-kb plasmids in Escherichia coli isolates of animal origin. Analysis of the floR gene flanking regions of one of the plasmids showed that they were different from those encountered in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. PMID:10991873

  2. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1 epsilon subgroup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wolters, B.; Kyselková, Martina; Krögerrecklenfort, E.; Kreuzig, R.; Smalla, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, January (2015), Article 765 ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : IncP-1 epsilon plasmid * class 1 integrons * biogas plant digestate * antibiotic resistance * exogenous plasmid isolation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.165, year: 2015

  3. Dissemination and characterization of plasmids carrying oqxAB-bla CTX-M genes in Escherichia coli isolates from food-producing animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of PMQR and ESBLs in negative-bacteria isolates has been of great concern. The present study was performed to investigate the prevalence of co-transferability of oqxAB and bla CTX-M genes among the 696 Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates from food-producing animals in South China, and to characterize these plasmids. METHODS: The ESBL-encoding genes (bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, and PMQR (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qnrD, aac(6'-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB of these 696 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced directionally. Conjugation, S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern blotting experiments were performed to investigate the co-transferability and location of oqxAB and bla(CTX-M. The EcoRI digestion profiles of the plasmids with oqxAB-bla(CTX-M were also analyzed. The clonal relatedness was investigated by PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 696 isolates, 429 harbored at least one PMQR gene, with oqxAB (328 being the most common type; 191 carried bla(CTX-M, with bla(CTX-M-14 the most common. We observed a significant higher prevalence of bla(CTX-M among the oqxAB-positive isolates (38.7% than that (17.4% in the oqxAB-negative isolates. Co-transferability of oqxAB and bla(CTX-M was found in 18 of the 127 isolates carrying oqxAB-bla(CTX-M. These two genes were located on the same plasmid in all the 18 isolates, with floR being on these plasmids in 13 isolates. The co-dissemination of these genes was mainly mediated by F33:A-: B- and HI2 plasmids with highly similar EcoRI digestion profiles. Diverse PFGE patterns indicated the high prevalence of oqxAB was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: bla(CTX-M was highly prevalent among the oqxAB-positive isolates. The co-dissemination of oqxAB-bla(CTX-M genes in E. coli isolates from food-producing animals is mediated mainly by similar F33:A-: B- and HI2 plasmids. This is the first report of the co-existence of oqxAB, bla(CTX-M, and floR on the same

  4. Diversity of Plasmids and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Healthy Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C R; Davis, J A; Frye, J G; Barrett, J B; Hiott, L M

    2015-09-01

    The presence and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal bacteria in companion animals to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance gene content and the presence of genetic elements in antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from healthy companion animals. In our previous study, from May to August, 2007, healthy companion animals (155 dogs and 121 cats) from three veterinary clinics in the Athens, GA, USA area were sampled and multidrug-resistant E. coli (n = 36; MDR, resistance to ≥ 2 antimicrobial classes) were obtained. Of the 25 different plasmid replicon types tested by PCR, at least one plasmid replicon type was detected in 94% (34/36) of the MDR E. coli; four isolates contained as many as five different plasmid replicons. Nine replicon types (FIA, FIB, FII, I2, A/C, U, P, I1 and HI2) were identified with FIB, FII, I2 as the most common pattern. The presence of class I integrons (intI) was detected in 61% (22/36) of the isolates with eight isolates containing aminoglycoside- and/or trimethoprim-resistance genes in the variable cassette region of intI. Microarray analysis of a subset of the MDR E. coli (n = 9) identified the presence of genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides (aac, aad, aph and strA/B), β-lactams (ampC, cmy, tem and vim), chloramphenicol (cat), sulfonamides (sulI and sulII), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D) and regulator, tetR] and trimethoprim (dfrA). Antimicrobial resistance to eight antimicrobials (ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, streptomycin, gentamicin, sulfisoxazole and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and five plasmid replicons (FIA, FIB, FII, I1 and I2) were transferred via conjugation. The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, intI and transferable plasmid replicons indicate that E. coli from companion animals may play an important role in the

  5. Plasmid (pKM101)-mediated resistance to UV light and /sup 60/Co-gamma radiation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, I.; Szabolcs, M.; Hernadi, F.; Dezsi, Z. (Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Debrecen (Hungary))

    1984-09-11

    The drug resistance plasmid pKM101 was originally derived from clinically isolated plasmid, R46, by P22 transduction and serial transfer. The modifying effect of this plasmid on the sensitivity to UV and /sup 60/Co-gamma irradiation in rec/sup -/ mutants were studied. It was shown that E. coli K12 the plasmid pKM101 enhanced bacterial survival after both UV and /sup 60/Co-gamma irradiation. These effects proved to be dependent on recA/sup +/ genotype but not on the recB/sup +/, recC/sup +/ or recF/sup +/ genotypes.

  6. Complete sequence of the IncA/C1 plasmid pCf587 carrying blaPER-2 from Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Melina; Girlich, Delphine; Dabos, Laura; Power, Pablo; Naas, Thierry; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2018-02-20

    The bla PER-2 harboring plasmid pCf587 (191,541 bp) belongs to lineage IncA/C 1 and is closely related to pRA1. It contains a large resistance island including the bla PER-2 gene between two copies of IS Kox2 -like elements, the toxin-antitoxin module pemK-pemI, several other resistance genes inserted within a Tn 2 transposon, a Tn 21 -like structure, and a class 1 integron. pCf587 belongs into ST 13, a new pMLST. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Strain-Specific Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance from an Environmental Plasmid to Foodborne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Van Meervenne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics are rapidly emerging, entailing important consequences for human health. This study investigated if the broad-host-range multiresistance plasmid pB10, isolated from a wastewater treatment plant, harbouring amoxicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline resistance genes, was transferable to the foodborne pathogens Salmonella spp. or E. coli O157:H7 and how this transfer alters the phenotype of the recipients. The transfer ratio was determined by both plating and flow cytometry. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined for both recipients and transconjugants using the disk diffusion method. For 14 of the 15 recipient strains, transconjugants were detected. Based on plating, transfer ratios were between 6.8×10−9 and 3.0×10−2 while using flow cytometry, transfer ratios were between <1.0×10−5 and 1.9×10−2. With a few exceptions, the transconjugants showed phenotypically increased resistance, indicating that most of the transferred resistance genes were expressed. In summary, we showed that an environmental plasmid can be transferred into foodborne pathogenic bacteria at high transfer ratios. However, the transfer ratio seemed to be recipient strain dependent. Moreover, the newly acquired resistance genes could turn antibiotic susceptible strains into resistant ones, paving the way to compromise human health.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and plasmid profiling of Vibrio spp. in tropical waters of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, K G; Bong, C W; Lee, C W

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio species isolated from four different sampling stations in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were screened for their antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles. A total of 138 isolates belonging to 15 different species were identified. Vibrio campbellii, V. parahaemolyticus, V. harveyi, and V. tubiashii were found to predominance species at all stations. High incidence of erythromycin, ampicillin, and mecillinam resistance was observed among the Vibrio isolates. In contrast, resistance against aztreonam, cefepime, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfonamides was low. All the Vibrio isolates in this study were found to be susceptible to imipenem, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and oxytetracycline. Ninety-five percent of the Vibrio isolates were resistant to one or more different classes of antibiotic, and 20 different resistance antibiograms were identified. Thirty-two distinct plasmid profiles with molecular weight ranging from 2.2 to 24.8 kb were detected among the resistance isolates. This study showed that multidrug-resistant Vibrio spp. were common in the aquatic environments of west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

  9. Polymyxins: Antibacterial Activity, Susceptibility Testing, and Resistance Mechanisms Encoded by Plasmids or Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Laurent; Jayol, Aurélie; Nordmann, Patrice

    2017-04-01

    SUMMARYPolymyxins are well-established antibiotics that have recently regained significant interest as a consequence of the increasing incidence of infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Colistin and polymyxin B are being seriously reconsidered as last-resort antibiotics in many areas where multidrug resistance is observed in clinical medicine. In parallel, the heavy use of polymyxins in veterinary medicine is currently being reconsidered due to increased reports of polymyxin-resistant bacteria. Susceptibility testing is challenging with polymyxins, and currently available techniques are presented here. Genotypic and phenotypic methods that provide relevant information for diagnostic laboratories are presented. This review also presents recent works in relation to recently identified mechanisms of polymyxin resistance, including chromosomally encoded resistance traits as well as the recently identified plasmid-encoded polymyxin resistance determinant MCR-1. Epidemiological features summarizing the current knowledge in that field are presented. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Effects of halides on plasmid-mediated silver resistance in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Maynes, M.; Silver, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    1998-12-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag{sup +} resistance were measured with AgNO{sub 3} and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag{sup +}. The purpose of this report is to set out easy-to-use conditions for measuring silver sensitivity and resistance in familiar and widely used media, Luria-Bertani (LB) agar and broth, so as to facilitate wider identification of silver resistance in nature.

  11. Genomic Analysis of Hospital Plumbing Reveals Diverse Reservoir of Bacterial Plasmids Conferring Carbapenem Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Rebecca A; Johnson, Ryan C; Conlan, Sean; Ramsburg, Amanda M; Dekker, John P; Lau, Anna F; Khil, Pavel; Odom, Robin T; Deming, Clay; Park, Morgan; Thomas, Pamela J; Henderson, David K; Palmore, Tara N; Segre, Julia A; Frank, Karen M

    2018-02-06

    The hospital environment is a potential reservoir of bacteria with plasmids conferring carbapenem resistance. Our Hospital Epidemiology Service routinely performs extensive sampling of high-touch surfaces, sinks, and other locations in the hospital. Over a 2-year period, additional sampling was conducted at a broader range of locations, including housekeeping closets, wastewater from hospital internal pipes, and external manholes. We compared these data with previously collected information from 5 years of patient clinical and surveillance isolates. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of 108 isolates provided comprehensive characterization of bla KPC / bla NDM -positive isolates, enabling an in-depth genetic comparison. Strikingly, despite a very low prevalence of patient infections with bla KPC -positive organisms, all samples from the intensive care unit pipe wastewater and external manholes contained carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPOs), suggesting a vast, resilient reservoir. We observed a diverse set of species and plasmids, and we noted species and susceptibility profile differences between environmental and patient populations of CPOs. However, there were plasmid backbones common to both populations, highlighting a potential environmental reservoir of mobile elements that may contribute to the spread of resistance genes. Clear associations between patient and environmental isolates were uncommon based on sequence analysis and epidemiology, suggesting reasonable infection control compliance at our institution. Nonetheless, a probable nosocomial transmission of Leclercia sp. from the housekeeping environment to a patient was detected by this extensive surveillance. These data and analyses further our understanding of CPOs in the hospital environment and are broadly relevant to the design of infection control strategies in many infrastructure settings. IMPORTANCE Carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPOs) are a global concern because of the morbidity and

  12. Emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mechanism MCR-1 in animals and human beings in China: a microbiological and molecular biological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Yun; Wang, Yang; Walsh, Timothy R; Yi, Ling-Xian; Zhang, Rong; Spencer, James; Doi, Yohei; Tian, Guobao; Dong, Baolei; Huang, Xianhui; Yu, Lin-Feng; Gu, Danxia; Ren, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaojie; Lv, Luchao; He, Dandan; Zhou, Hongwei; Liang, Zisen; Liu, Jian-Hua; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    Until now, polymyxin resistance has involved chromosomal mutations but has never been reported via horizontal gene transfer. During a routine surveillance project on antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from food animals in China, a major increase of colistin resistance was observed. When an E coli strain, SHP45, possessing colistin resistance that could be transferred to another strain, was isolated from a pig, we conducted further analysis of possible plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance. Herein, we report the emergence of the first plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance mechanism, MCR-1, in Enterobacteriaceae. The mcr-1 gene in E coli strain SHP45 was identified by whole plasmid sequencing and subcloning. MCR-1 mechanistic studies were done with sequence comparisons, homology modelling, and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The prevalence of mcr-1 was investigated in E coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains collected from five provinces between April, 2011, and November, 2014. The ability of MCR-1 to confer polymyxin resistance in vivo was examined in a murine thigh model. Polymyxin resistance was shown to be singularly due to the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene. The plasmid carrying mcr-1 was mobilised to an E coli recipient at a frequency of 10(-1) to 10(-3) cells per recipient cell by conjugation, and maintained in K pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In an in-vivo model, production of MCR-1 negated the efficacy of colistin. MCR-1 is a member of the phosphoethanolamine transferase enzyme family, with expression in E coli resulting in the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A. We observed mcr-1 carriage in E coli isolates collected from 78 (15%) of 523 samples of raw meat and 166 (21%) of 804 animals during 2011-14, and 16 (1%) of 1322 samples from inpatients with infection. The emergence of MCR-1 heralds the breach of the last group of antibiotics, polymyxins, by plasmid-mediated resistance. Although currently confined to China

  13. Prevalence of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated and chromosome-encoded fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frasson Ilaria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spread of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants was evaluated in 197 enterobacterial isolates recovered in an Italian teaching hospital. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was found exclusively in Escherichia coli strains. The gene was located on a plasmid which presented additional ESBL genes. Most of the clinical strains were clonally related and displayed three point mutations at the topoisomerase level which conferred high resistance to fluoroquinolones.

  14. IncA/C plasmids harboured in serious multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Lianhui; Li, Jie; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 emerged in 1992 and is one of two major serogroups to have caused cholera epidemics. After 1998, serious multidrug-resistant (MDR) O139 strains quickly became common in China, showing a multidrug resistance profile to eight antibiotics. It is a great threat to public health, and elucidation of its mechanisms of resistance will provide a helpful guide for the clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. In this study, mega-plasmids from MDR V. cholerae O139 strains were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) without enzyme digestion. One plasmid was isolated and sequenced, belonging to the IncA/C family. Ten antibiotic resistance genes were found in the MDR regions, including a blaTEM-20 gene, and these genes endowed the host with resistance to seven antibiotics. This kind of plasmid was positive in 71.2% (198/278) of toxigenic O139 strains, and the rate of plasmid positivity was consistent with the yearly change in MDR rates of these strains. This study reveals an important role of the IncA/C family plasmid in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance of epidemic V. cholerae serogroup O139 strains, which has recombined with plasmids from different bacterial species and transferred among V. cholerae strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system by use of plasmids carrying the bra genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, T; Kose, K

    1990-01-01

    About 30 mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO defective in the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I) were isolated by the selection for resistance to 4-aza-DL-leucine, a toxic leucine analog for LIV-I. All of the mutants were complemented by plasmid pKTH24, harboring the braC gene, which encodes the branched-chain amino acid-binding protein, and the four open reading frames named braD, braE, braF, and braG (T. Hoshino and K. Kose, J. Bacteriol. 172:5531-5539, 1990)...

  16. Translocation of integron-associated resistance in a natural system: Acquisition of resistance determinants by Inc P and Inc W Plasmids from Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Diggle, M.; Platt, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    and tetracycline). A range of natural plasmids was used as targets for the translocation of resistance. Plasmids that acquired resistance from the DT104 chromosome were segregated by conjugation into Escherichia coli K12. Plasmids R751, R388, and RP4::Tn7 acquired several combinations of resistance determinant....... Sequencing of the R751 transconjugants confirmed these findings and showed that the translocation of streptomycin and ampicillin cassettes was associated with the precise excision of dhfrIIc and orfD cassettes. Furthermore, the translocation of multiple determinants occurred by at least two mechanisms, one...

  17. DNA plasmid vaccine carrying Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) major outer membrane and human papillomavirus 16L2 proteins for anti-Ct infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ledan; Cai, Yiqi; Xiong, Yirong; Du, Wangqi; Cen, Danwei; Zhang, Chanqiong; Song, Yiling; Zhu, Shanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Zhang, Lifang

    2017-05-16

    Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is one of the most frequently encountered sexual infection all over the world, yielding tremendous reproductive problems (e.g. infertility and ectopic pregnancy) in the women. This work described the design of a plasmid vaccine that protect mice from Ct infection, and reduce productive tract damage by generating effective antibody and cytotoxic T cell immunity. The vaccine, s was composed of MOMP multi-epitope and HPV16L2 genes carried in pcDNA plasmid (i.e. pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L). In transfection, the vaccine expressed the chimeric genes (i.e. MOMP and HPV16L2), as demonstrated via western blot, RT-PCR and fluorescence imaging. In vitro, the vaccine transfected COS-7 cells and expressed the proteins corresponding to the genes carried in the vaccine. Through intramuscular immunization in BALB/c mice, the vaccine induced higher levels of anti-Ct IgG titer, anti-HPV16L2 IgG titer in serum and IgA titer in local mucosal secretions, compared to plasmid vaccines that carry only Ct MOMP multi-epitope or HPV16L2 chimeric component only. In mice intravaginally challenged with Ct, the vaccines pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 generated a higher level of genital protection compared to other vaccine formulations. Additionally, histochemical staining indicated that pcDNA3.1/MOMP/HPV16L2 eliminated mouse genital tract tissue pathologies induced by Ct infection. This work demonstrated that pcDNA/MOMP/HPV16L2 vaccine can protect against Ct infection by regulating antibody production, cytotoxic T cell killing functions and reducing pathological damage in mice genital tract. This work can potentially offer us a new vaccine platform against Ct infection.

  18. ICESag37, a Novel Integrative and Conjugative Element Carrying Antimicrobial Resistance Genes and Potential Virulence Factors in Streptococcus agalactiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaixin Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ICESag37, a novel integrative and conjugative element carrying multidrug resistance and potential virulence factors, was characterized in a clinical isolate of Streptococcus agalactiae. Two clinical strains of S. agalactiae, Sag37 and Sag158, were isolated from blood samples of new-borns with bacteremia. Sag37 was highly resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline, and susceptible to levofloxacin and penicillin, while Sag158 was resistant to tetracycline and levofloxacin, and susceptible to erythromycin. Transfer experiments were performed and selection was carried out with suitable antibiotic concentrations. Through mating experiments, the erythromycin resistance gene was found to be transferable from Sag37 to Sag158. SmaI-PFGE revealed a new SmaI fragment, confirming the transfer of the fragment containing the erythromycin resistance gene. Whole genome sequencing and sequence analysis revealed a mobile element, ICESag37, which was characterized using several molecular methods and in silico analyses. ICESag37 was excised to generate a covalent circular intermediate, which was transferable to S. agalactiae. Inverse PCR was performed to detect the circular form. A serine family integrase mediated its chromosomal integration into rumA, which is a known hotspot for the integration of streptococcal ICEs. The integration site was confirmed using PCR. ICESag37 carried genes for resistance to multiple antibiotics, including erythromycin [erm(B], tetracycline [tet(O], and aminoglycosides [aadE, aphA, and ant(6]. Potential virulence factors, including a two-component signal transduction system (nisK/nisR, were also observed in ICESag37. S1-PFGE analysis ruled out the existence of plasmids. ICESag37 is the first ICESa2603 family-like element identified in S. agalactiae carrying both resistance and potential virulence determinants. It might act as a vehicle for the dissemination of multidrug resistance and pathogenicity among S. agalactiae.

  19. ICESag37, a Novel Integrative and Conjugative Element Carrying Antimicrobial Resistance Genes and Potential Virulence Factors in Streptococcus agalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Xie, Lianyan; Han, Lizhong; Guo, Xiaokui; Wang, Yong; Sun, Jingyong

    2017-01-01

    ICESag37, a novel integrative and conjugative element carrying multidrug resistance and potential virulence factors, was characterized in a clinical isolate of Streptococcus agalactiae. Two clinical strains of S. agalactiae, Sag37 and Sag158, were isolated from blood samples of new-borns with bacteremia. Sag37 was highly resistant to erythromycin and tetracycline, and susceptible to levofloxacin and penicillin, while Sag158 was resistant to tetracycline and levofloxacin, and susceptible to erythromycin. Transfer experiments were performed and selection was carried out with suitable antibiotic concentrations. Through mating experiments, the erythromycin resistance gene was found to be transferable from Sag37 to Sag158. SmaI-PFGE revealed a new SmaI fragment, confirming the transfer of the fragment containing the erythromycin resistance gene. Whole genome sequencing and sequence analysis revealed a mobile element, ICESag37, which was characterized using several molecular methods and in silico analyses. ICESag37 was excised to generate a covalent circular intermediate, which was transferable to S. agalactiae. Inverse PCR was performed to detect the circular form. A serine family integrase mediated its chromosomal integration into rumA, which is a known hotspot for the integration of streptococcal ICEs. The integration site was confirmed using PCR. ICESag37 carried genes for resistance to multiple antibiotics, including erythromycin [erm(B)], tetracycline [tet(O)], and aminoglycosides [aadE, aphA, and ant(6)]. Potential virulence factors, including a two-component signal transduction system (nisK/nisR), were also observed in ICESag37. S1-PFGE analysis ruled out the existence of plasmids. ICESag37 is the first ICESa2603 family-like element identified in S. agalactiae carrying both resistance and potential virulence determinants. It might act as a vehicle for the dissemination of multidrug resistance and pathogenicity among S. agalactiae. PMID:29051752

  20. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-17

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human's health in the 21 st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6')-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought.

  1. Characterization of Acinetobacter johnsonii isolate XBB1 carrying nine plasmids and encoding NDM-1, OXA-58 and PER-1 by genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Yang, Ping; Wang, Xiaohui; Zong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    To obtain the complete genome sequence of an Acinetobacter johnsonii isolate, which encodes the NDM-1 and OXA-58 carbapenemases. Genome sequencing was performed using the 454 and HiSeq 2000 platforms. Reads were assembled into scaffolds and gaps between scaffolds were filled by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of A. johnsonii isolates and their intrinsic blaOXA genes were performed using Harvest and MEGA. The context of blaOXA-58 was analysed in detail. Isolate XBB1 has one 3.5 Mb chromosome (38.5% GC content) and nine plasmids in the range 3.9-398.9 kb. Isolate XBB1 appears to be distinct from other A. johnsonii isolates. Five of the nine plasmids contained genes encoding for mobilization. The largest contains four XerC/XerD-like binding sites and five Re27 regions. Alignment revealed that Re27 regions are variants of XerC/XerD-like sites. Besides blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-58, isolate XBB1 has an ESBL gene blaPER-1 and a few other genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, sulphonamides and tetracycline. blaOXA-58 is located in a Russian doll-type structure, as it is flanked by ISAba3, then by two copies of a newly identified element ISAjo2 and bracketed by a pair of Re27 regions. The intrinsic blaOXA of XBB1 is a new variant, blaOXA-311, which is most closely related to blaOXA-333 in an Australian A. johnsonii isolate. We present the first completely assembled genome sequence of A. johnsonii. The ability of A. johnsonii to harbour nine plasmids suggests this species could generate various platforms to mediate the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Complete Sequence of a F33:A-:B- Conjugative Plasmid Carrying the oqxAB, fosA3 and blaCTX-M-55 Elements from a Foodborne Escherichia coli Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ho-yin Wong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the complete sequence of pE80, a conjugative IncFII plasmid recovered from an E. coli strain isolated from chicken meat. This plasmid harbors multiple resistance determinants including oqxAB, fosA3, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM-1, and is a close variant of the recently reported p42-2 element, which was recovered from E. coli of veterinary source. Recovery of pE80 constitutes evidence that evolution or genetic re-arrangement of IncFII type plasmids residing in animal-borne organisms is an active event, which involves acquisition and integration of foreign resistance elements into the plasmid backbone. Dissemination of these plasmids may further compromise the effectiveness of current antimicrobial strategies.

  3. A multicopy phr-plasmid increases the ultraviolet resistance of a recA strain of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Satake, M.; Shinagawa, H.

    1984-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the ultraviolet sensitivity of recA strains of Escherichia coli in the dark is suppressed by a plasmid pKY1 which carries the phr gene, suggesting that this is due to a novel effect of photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) of E. coli in the dark. In this work, it is observed that an increase of UV-resistance by pKY1 in the dark is not apparent in strains with a mutation in either uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, lexA, recBC or recF. The sensitivity of recA lexA and recA recBC multiple mutants to UV is suppressed by the plasmid but that of recA uvrA, recA uvrB and recA uvrC is not. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated lambda phage is slightly more efficient in the recA/pKY1 strain compared with the parental recA strain. On the other hand, the recA and recA/pKY1 strains do not differ significantly in the following properties: Hfr recombination, induction of lambda by UV, and mutagenesis. It is suggested that dark repair of PRE is correlated with its capacity of excision repair. (Auth.)

  4. The contribution of small cryptic plasmids to the antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli E2348/69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Cynthia L; Stang, Charma T; Raivio, Tracy L; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2009-11-01

    Two uncharacterized small cryptic plasmids (SCPs) were isolated from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain E2348/69. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of both SCPs indicated that the smaller plasmid, p5217, encoded several mobilization genes, whereas the larger plasmid, p6148, encoded several putative antibiotic resistance determinants. Complementation analysis showed that p6148 encodes functional streptomycin resistance genes but, owing to the presence of several frameshift mutations, a nonfunctional sulfonamide resistance determinant. A plasmid similar to p6148 has previously been shown to confer a slight growth advantage on E. coli. However, we were unable to observe any significant growth advantage in different E. coli strains transformed with p6148. The p6148 DNA sequence is homologous in sequence and arrangement to DNA from other plasmid families, including large conjugative plasmids and SXT integrative and conjugative elements. This study suggests that gene clusters of the sul2-strAB antibiotic resistance genes are widespread and highly transferable, owing to their presence in a wide variety of mobile genetic elements.

  5. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  6. Co-spread of metal and antibiotic resistance within ST3-IncHI2 plasmids from E. coli isolates of food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liangxing; Li, Xingping; Li, Liang; Li, Shumin; Liao, Xiaoping; Sun, Jian; Liu, Yahong

    2016-05-04

    Concerns have been raised in recent years regarding co-selection for antibiotic resistance among bacteria exposed to heavy metals, particularly copper and zinc, used as growth promoters for some livestock species. In this study, 25 IncHI2 plasmids harboring oqxAB (20/25)/blaCTX-M (18/25) were found with sizes ranging from ∼260 to ∼350 kb and 22 belonged to the ST3-IncHI2 group. In addition to blaCTX-M and oqxAB, pcoA-E (5/25) and silE-P (5/25), as well as aac(6')-Ib-cr (18/25), floR (16/25), rmtB (6/25), qnrS1(3/25) and fosA3 (2/25), were also identified on these IncHI2 plasmids. The plasmids carried pco and sil contributed to increasing in the MICs of CuSO4 and AgNO3. The genetic context surrounding the two operons was well conserved except some variations within the pco operon. The ~32 kb region containing the two operons identified in the IncHI2 plasmids was also found in chromosomes of different Enterobacteriaceae species. Further, phylogenetic analysis of this structure showed that Tn7-like transposon might play an important role in cross-genus transfer of the sil and pco operons among Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, co-existence of the pco and sil operons, and oqxAB/blaCTX-M as well as other antibiotic resistance genes on IncHI2 plasmids may promote the development of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  7. Characterization of a small erythromycin resistance plasmid pLFE1 from the food-isolate Lactobacillus plantarum M345

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feld, Louise; Bielak, Eliza; Hammer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the complete 4031 bp nucleotide sequence of the small erythromycin resistance plasmid pLFE1 isolated from the raw-milk cheese isolate Lactobacillus plantarum M345. Analysis of the sequence revealed the coding regions for the erythromycin resistance determinant Erm(B). A replica......This paper reports the complete 4031 bp nucleotide sequence of the small erythromycin resistance plasmid pLFE1 isolated from the raw-milk cheese isolate Lactobacillus plantarum M345. Analysis of the sequence revealed the coding regions for the erythromycin resistance determinant Erm......(B). A replication initiation protein RepB was identified belonging to the RepB proteins of the pMV158 family of rolling-circle replicating plasmids. The transcriptional repressor protein CopG and a small counter transcribed RNA, two elements typically involved in replication control within this family were also...

  8. Abundant rifampin resistance genes and significant correlations of antibiotic resistance genes and plasmids in various environments revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, a newly developed metagenomic analysis approach was applied to investigate the abundance and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in aquaculture farm sediments, activated sludge, biofilm, anaerobic digestion sludge, and river water. BLASTX analysis against the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database was conducted for the metagenomic sequence data of each sample and then the ARG-like sequences were sorted based on structured sub-database using customized scripts. The results showed that freshwater fishpond sediment had the highest abundance (196 ppm), and anaerobic digestion sludge possessed the highest diversity (133 subtypes) of ARGs among the samples in this study. Significantly, rifampin resistance genes were universal in all the diverse samples and consistently accounted for 26.9~38.6 % of the total annotated ARG sequences. Furthermore, a significant linear correlation (R (2) = 0.924) was found between diversities (number of subtypes) of ARGs and diversities of plasmids in diverse samples. This work provided a wide spectrum scan of ARGs and MGEs in different environments and revealed the prevalence of rifampin resistance genes and the strong correlation between ARG diversity and plasmid diversity for the first time.

  9. Sequences of two related multiple antibiotic resistance virulence plasmids sharing a unique IS26-related molecular signature isolated from different Escherichia coli pathotypes from different hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Venturini

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC are important zoonotic pathogens that increasingly are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here we describe two plasmids, pO26-CRL125 (125 kb from a human O26:H- EHEC, and pO111-CRL115 (115kb from a bovine O111 aEPEC, that impart resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, sulfathiazole, trimethoprim and tetracycline and both contain atypical class 1 integrons with an identical IS26-mediated deletion in their 3´-conserved segment. Complete sequence analysis showed that pO26-CRL125 and pO111-CRL115 are essentially identical except for a 9.7 kb fragment, present in the backbone of pO26-CRL125 but absent in pO111-CRL115, and several indels. The 9.7 kb fragment encodes IncI-associated genes involved in plasmid stability during conjugation, a putative transposase gene and three imperfect repeats. Contiguous sequence identical to regions within these pO26-CRL125 imperfect repeats was identified in pO111-CRL115 precisely where the 9.7 kb fragment is missing, suggesting it may be mobile. Sequences shared between the plasmids include a complete IncZ replicon, a unique toxin/antitoxin system, IncI stability and maintenance genes, a novel putative serine protease autotransporter, and an IncI1 transfer system including a unique shufflon. Both plasmids carry a derivate Tn21 transposon with an atypical class 1 integron comprising a dfrA5 gene cassette encoding resistance to trimethoprim, and 24 bp of the 3´-conserved segment followed by Tn6026, which encodes resistance to ampicillin, kanymycin, neomycin, streptomycin and sulfathiazole. The Tn21-derivative transposon is linked to a truncated Tn1721, encoding resistance to tetracycline, via a region containing the IncP-1α oriV. Absence of the 5 bp direct repeats flanking Tn3-family transposons, indicates that homologous recombination events played a key role in the formation of this complex

  10. Associations Between Multidrug Resistance, Plasmid Content, and Virulence Potential Among Extraintestinal Pathogenic and Commensal Escherichia coli from Humans and Poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Logue, Catherine M.; Johnson, James R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Sherwood, Julie S.; Barnes, H. John; DebRoy, Chitrita; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M.; Obata-Yasuoka, Mana; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of plasmid-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) among enteric bacteria presents a serious challenge to the treatment of bacterial infections in humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that avian Escherichia coli commonly possess the ability to resist multiple antimicrobial agents,

  11. Genomic Analysis of Hospital Plumbing Reveals Diverse Reservoir of Bacterial Plasmids Conferring Carbapenem Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hospital environment is a potential reservoir of bacteria with plasmids conferring carbapenem resistance. Our Hospital Epidemiology Service routinely performs extensive sampling of high-touch surfaces, sinks, and other locations in the hospital. Over a 2-year period, additional sampling was conducted at a broader range of locations, including housekeeping closets, wastewater from hospital internal pipes, and external manholes. We compared these data with previously collected information from 5 years of patient clinical and surveillance isolates. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of 108 isolates provided comprehensive characterization of blaKPC/blaNDM-positive isolates, enabling an in-depth genetic comparison. Strikingly, despite a very low prevalence of patient infections with blaKPC-positive organisms, all samples from the intensive care unit pipe wastewater and external manholes contained carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPOs), suggesting a vast, resilient reservoir. We observed a diverse set of species and plasmids, and we noted species and susceptibility profile differences between environmental and patient populations of CPOs. However, there were plasmid backbones common to both populations, highlighting a potential environmental reservoir of mobile elements that may contribute to the spread of resistance genes. Clear associations between patient and environmental isolates were uncommon based on sequence analysis and epidemiology, suggesting reasonable infection control compliance at our institution. Nonetheless, a probable nosocomial transmission of Leclercia sp. from the housekeeping environment to a patient was detected by this extensive surveillance. These data and analyses further our understanding of CPOs in the hospital environment and are broadly relevant to the design of infection control strategies in many infrastructure settings. PMID:29437920

  12. Genomic Analysis of Hospital Plumbing Reveals Diverse Reservoir of Bacterial Plasmids Conferring Carbapenem Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Weingarten

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The hospital environment is a potential reservoir of bacteria with plasmids conferring carbapenem resistance. Our Hospital Epidemiology Service routinely performs extensive sampling of high-touch surfaces, sinks, and other locations in the hospital. Over a 2-year period, additional sampling was conducted at a broader range of locations, including housekeeping closets, wastewater from hospital internal pipes, and external manholes. We compared these data with previously collected information from 5 years of patient clinical and surveillance isolates. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of 108 isolates provided comprehensive characterization of blaKPC/blaNDM-positive isolates, enabling an in-depth genetic comparison. Strikingly, despite a very low prevalence of patient infections with blaKPC-positive organisms, all samples from the intensive care unit pipe wastewater and external manholes contained carbapenemase-producing organisms (CPOs, suggesting a vast, resilient reservoir. We observed a diverse set of species and plasmids, and we noted species and susceptibility profile differences between environmental and patient populations of CPOs. However, there were plasmid backbones common to both populations, highlighting a potential environmental reservoir of mobile elements that may contribute to the spread of resistance genes. Clear associations between patient and environmental isolates were uncommon based on sequence analysis and epidemiology, suggesting reasonable infection control compliance at our institution. Nonetheless, a probable nosocomial transmission of Leclercia sp. from the housekeeping environment to a patient was detected by this extensive surveillance. These data and analyses further our understanding of CPOs in the hospital environment and are broadly relevant to the design of infection control strategies in many infrastructure settings.

  13. pEOC01: a plasmid from Pediococcus acidilactici which encodes an identical streptomycin resistance (aadE) gene to that found in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, E B; O'Sullivan, O; Stanton, C; Danielsen, M; Simpson, P J; Callanan, M J; Ross, R P; Hill, C

    2007-09-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of pEOC01, a plasmid (11,661 bp) from Pediococcus acidilactici NCIMB 6990 encoding resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, and streptomycin was determined. The plasmid, which also replicates in Lactococcus and Lactobacillus species contains 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs), including regions annotated to encode replication, plasmid maintenance and multidrug resistance functions. Based on an analysis the plasmid replicates via a theta replicating mechanism closely related to those of many larger Streptococcus and Enterococcus plasmids. Interestingly, genes homologous to a toxin/antitoxin plasmid maintenance system are present and are highly similar to the omega-epsilon-zeta operon of Streptococcus plasmids. The plasmid contains two putative antibiotic resistance homologs, an ermB gene encoding erythromycin and clindamycin resistance, and a streptomycin resistance gene, aadE. Of particular note is the aadE gene which holds 100% identity to an aadE gene found in Campylobacter jejuni plasmid but which probably originated from a Gram-positive source. This observation is significant in that it provides evidence for recent horizontal transfer of streptomycin resistance from a lactic acid bacterium to a Gram-negative intestinal pathogen and as such infers a role for such plasmids for dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes possibly in the human gut.

  14. [The structure of replication initiation region of Pseudomonas IncP-7 streptomycin resistance plasmid Rms148].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, O V; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonads' IncP-7 plasmids make significant contribution to the environmental biodegradative potential and sometimes harbour antibiotic resistance genes. More than 30 years plasmid Rms148 is used as archetypal P-7 plasmid in microbiological incompatibility tests. However, the structure of its basic replicon was not described up to now, as well as phylogenetic relationships between all known plasmids within the IncP-7 group were not studied. In the frames of this work we have constructed two primer pairs to amplify main components of P-7 replication initiation region, and subsequent screening of repA intragenic polymorphism was made using laboratory collection of IncP-7 plasmids. Minimal replicon of Rms148 was constructed and its nucleotide sequence was determined to be identical to repA-oriVof known P-7 plasmids on 81-83% and forming separate branch on appropriate phylogenetic tree. Additionally, repA seems to be more conservative between group members compared with putative oriV region. Deduced amino acid sequence and predicted secondary and tertiary structures of Rms148 RepA protein allow us to make assumption about similar to unclassified cryptic plasmid pPS10 model of replication initiation for IncP-7 group members.

  15. Selective pressure affects transfer and establishment of a Lactobacillus plantarum resistance plasmid in the gastrointestinal environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feld, Louise; Schjorring, S.; Hammer, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives and methods: A Lactobacillus plantarum strain recently isolated from French raw-milk cheese was tested for its ability to transfer a small plasmid pLFE1 harbouring the erythromycin resistance gene erm(B) to Enterococcus faecalis. Mating was studied in vitro and in different...... favourable environment for antibiotic resistance transfer than conditions provided in vitro. However, the indigenous gut microbiota severely restricts transfer, thus minimizing the number of detectable transfer events. Treatment with erythromycin strongly favoured transfer and establishment of pLFE1....... of similar to 5.7 x 10(-8) transconjugants/recipient obtained in vitro by filter mating, a surprisingly high number of transconjugants (10(-4) transconjugants/recipient) was observed in gnotobiotic rats even without antibiotic treatment. When erythromycin was administered, a transfer rate of similar to 100...

  16. Molecular genetics and transport analysis of the copper-resistance determinant (pco) from Escherichia coli plasmid pRJ1004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N L; Barrett, S R; Camakaris, J; Lee, B T; Rouch, D A

    1995-09-01

    The copper-resistance determinant (pco) of Escherichia coli plasmid pRJ1004 was cloned and sequenced. Tn1000 transposon mutagenesis identified four complementation groups, mutations in any of which eliminated copper resistance. DNA sequence analysis showed that the four complementation groups contained six open reading frames, designated pco-ABCDRS. The protein product sequences derived from the nucleotide sequence show close homology between this copper-resistance system and the cop system of a plasmid pPT23D of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The PcoR and PcoS protein sequences show homology to the family of two-component sensor/responder phosphokinase regulatory systems. A seventh reading frame (pcoE) was identified from DNA sequence data, and lies downstream of a copper-regulated promoter. Transport assays with 64Cu(II) showed that the resistant cells containing the plasmid had reduced copper accumulation during the log phase of growth, while increased accumulation had previously been observed during stationary phase. Chromosomal mutants defective in cellular copper management were obtained and characterized. In two of these mutants pco resistance was rendered totally inactive, whilst in another two mutants pco complemented the defective genes. These data indicate that plasmid-borne copper resistance in E. coli is linked with chromosomal systems for copper management.

  17. Cloning and DNA sequence of the mercuric- and organomercurial-resistance determinants of plasmid pDU1358

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.G.; Foster, T.J.; Silver, S.; Misra, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    The broad-spectrum mercurial-resistance plasmid pDU1358 was analyzed by cloning the resistance determinants and preparing a physical and genetic map of a 45-kilobase (kb) region of the plasmid that contains two separate mercurial-resistance operons that mapped about 20 kb apart. One encoded narrow-spectrum mercurial resistance to Hg 2+ and a few organomercurials; the other specified broad-spectrum resistance to phenylmercury and additional organomercurials. Each determinant governed mercurial transport functions. Southern DNA x DNA hybridization experiments using gene-specific probes from the plasmid R100 mer operon indicated close homology with the R100 deteminant. The 2153 base pairs of the promoter-distal part of the broad-spectrum Hg 2+ -resistance operon of pDU1358 were sequenced. This region included the 3'-terminal part of the merA gene, merD, unidentified reading frame URF1, and a part of URF2 homologous to previously sequenced determinants of plasmid R100. Between the merA and merD genes, an open reading frame encoding a 212 amino acid polypeptide was identified as the merB gene that determines the enzyme organomercurial lyase that cleaves the C-Hg bond of phenylmercury

  18. Coselection for resistance to multiple late-generation human therapeutic antibiotics encoded on tetracycline resistance plasmids captured from uncultivated stream and soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J B; Haynes, R; Heringa, S; Brooks, J M; Sobota, L T

    2014-08-01

    Transmissible plasmids captured from stream and soil bacteria conferring resistance to tetracycline in Pseudomonas were evaluated for linked resistance to antibiotics used in the treatment of human infections. Cells released from stream sediments and soils were conjugated with a rifampicin-resistant, plasmid-free Pseudomonas putida recipient and selected on tetracycline and rifampicin. Each transconjugant contained a single 50-80 kb plasmid. Resistance to 11 antibiotics, in addition to tetracycline, was determined for the stream transconjugants using a modification of the Stokes disc diffusion antibiotic susceptibility assay. Nearly half of plasmids conferred resistance to six or more antibiotics. Resistance to streptomycin, gentamicin, and/or ticarcillin was conferred by a majority of the plasmids, and resistance to additional human clinical use antibiotics such as piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam was observed. MICs of 16 antibiotics for representative sediment and soil transconjugants revealed large increases, relative to the Ps. putida recipient, for 11 of 16 antibiotics tested, including the expanded spectrum antibiotics cefotaxime and ceftazidime, as well as piperacillin/tazobactam, lomefloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to multiple antibiotics-including those typically used in clinical Pseudomonas and enterobacterial infections-can be conferred by transmissible plasmids in streams and soils. Selective pressure exerted by the use of one antibiotic, such as the common agricultural antibiotic tetracycline, may result in the persistence of linked genes conferring resistance to important human clinical antibiotics. This may impact the spread of resistance to human use antibiotics even in the absence of direct selection. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Emergence of a plasmid-borne multidrug resistance gene cfr(C) in foodborne pathogen Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yizhi; Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Wu, Zuowei; Liu, Mingyuan; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-06-01

    To identify and characterize a novel cfr variant that recently emerged and confers multidrug resistance in Campylobacter , a major foodborne pathogen. WGS was initially used to identify the cfr (C) gene in Campylobacter isolates and its function was further verified by cloning into an antibiotic-susceptible Campylobacter jejuni strain. Distribution of cfr (C) in various Campylobacter isolates was determined by PCR analysis. Genotyping of cfr (C)-positive strains was done by PFGE and MLST. The cfr (C) gene is predicted to encode a protein that shares 55.1% and 54.9% identity with Cfr and Cfr(B), respectively. cfr (C) was located on a conjugative plasmid of ∼48 kb. Cloning of cfr (C) into C. jejuni NCTC 11168 and conjugative transfer of the cfr (C)-containing plasmid confirmed its role in conferring resistance to phenicols, lincosamides, pleuromutilins and oxazolidinones, and resulted in an 8-256-fold increase in their MICs in both C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli . The cfr (C) gene was detected in multiple C. coli (34 of 344; 10%) isolates derived from different cattle farms in different states, and molecular typing of the cfr (C)-positive C. coli isolates revealed its spread mainly via clonal expansion. These results identify cfr (C) as a new multidrug resistance mechanism in Campylobacter and suggest the potential transmission of this mechanism via the foodborne route, warranting enhanced efforts to monitor its spread in Campylobacter and other foodborne pathogens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carraro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  1. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Nicolas; Matteau, Dominick; Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  2. Microarray-based analysis of IncA/C plasmid-associated genes from multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    In the family Enterobacteriaceae, plasmids have been classified according to 27 incompatibility (Inc) or replicon types that are based on the inability of different plasmids with the same replication mechanism to coexist in the same cell. Certain replicon types such as IncA/C are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). We developed a microarray that contains 286 unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes based on sequences from five IncA/C plasmids: pYR1 (Yersinia ruckeri), pPIP1202 (Yersinia pestis), pP99-018 (Photobacterium damselae), pSN254 (Salmonella enterica serovar Newport), and pP91278 (Photobacterium damselae). DNA from 59 Salmonella enterica isolates was hybridized to the microarray and analyzed for the presence or absence of genes. These isolates represented 17 serovars from 14 different animal hosts and from different geographical regions in the United States. Qualitative cluster analysis was performed using CLUSTER 3.0 to group microarray hybridization results. We found that IncA/C plasmids occurred in two lineages distinguished by a major insertion-deletion (indel) region that contains genes encoding mostly hypothetical proteins. The most variable genes were represented by transposon-associated genes as well as four antimicrobial resistance genes (aphA, merP, merA, and aadA). Sixteen mercury resistance genes were identified and highly conserved, suggesting that mercury ion-related exposure is a stronger pressure than anticipated. We used these data to construct a core IncA/C genome and an accessory genome. The results of our studies suggest that the transfer of antimicrobial resistance determinants by transfer of IncA/C plasmids is somewhat less common than exchange within the plasmids orchestrated by transposable elements, such as transposons, integrating and conjugative elements (ICEs), and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs), and thus pose less opportunity for exchange of antimicrobial resistance.

  3. Plasmid-mediated mcr-1 in carbapenem-susceptible Escherichia coli ST156 causing a blood infection: an unnoticeable spread of colistin resistance in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Rossi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We describe an IncX4 pHC891/16mcr plasmid carrying mcr-1 in a colistin-resistant and carbapenem-susceptible E. coli isolate (HC891/16, ST156, which caused a blood infection in a Brazilian patient with gallbladder adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Strain HC891/16 was subjected to whole genome sequencing using the MiSeq Platform (Illumina, Inc., USA. Assembly was performed using Mira and ABACAS. RESULTS: The isolates showed resistance only to ciprofloxacin, ampicillin and cefoxitin, and whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of aac(6’Ib-cr and blaTEM1. CONCLUSION: Our findings warn of the possible silent dissemination of colistin resistance by carbapenem-susceptible mcr-1 producers, as colistin susceptibility is commonly tested only among carbapenem-resistant isolates.

  4. Identification of a Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Gene in Salmonella Isolates from Texas Dairy Farm Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, K J; Rodriguez-Rivera, L D; Norman, K N; Ohta, N; Scott, H M

    2017-06-01

    A recent increase in plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been detected among Salmonella isolated from humans in the United States, and it is necessary to determine the sources of human infection. We had previously isolated Salmonella from dairy farm environmental samples collected in Texas, and isolates were tested for anti-microbial susceptibility. Two isolates, serotyped as Salmonella Muenster, showed the discordant pattern of nalidixic acid susceptibility and intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. For this project, whole-genome sequencing of both isolates was performed to detect genes associated with quinolone resistance. The plasmid-mediated qnrB19 gene and IncR plasmid type were identified in both isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PMQR in Salmonella isolated from food animals or agricultural environments in the United States. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Human Isolates in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsaneh Shams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib-cr, and qepA among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Kashan, Iran. A total of 185 K. pneumoniae isolates were tested for quinolone resistance and ESBL-producing using the disk diffusion method and double disk synergy (DDST confirmatory test. ESBL-producing strains were further evaluated for the blaCTX-M genes. The PCR method was used to show presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and the purified PCR products were sequenced. Eighty-seven ESBL-producing strains were identified by DDST confirmatory test and majority (70, 80.5% of which carried blaCTX-M genes including CTX-M-1 (60%, CTX-M-2 (42.9%, and CTX-M-9 (34.3%. Seventy-seven ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates harbored PMQR genes, which mostly consisted of aac(6′-Ib-cr (70.1% and qnrB (46.0%, followed by qnrS (5.7%. Among the 77 PMQR-positive isolates, 27 (35.1% and 1 (1.3% carried 2 and 3 different PMQR genes, respectively. However, qnrA and qepA were not found in any isolate. Our results highlight high ESBL occurrence with CTX-M type and high frequency of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes among ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates in Kashan.

  6. Lateral dissemination and inter-patient transmission of blaKPC-3: role of a conjugative plasmid in spreading carbapenem resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijet, Nathalie; Muller, Matthew P; Matukas, Larissa M; Khan, Anjum; Patel, Samir N; Melano, Roberto G

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the nosocomial spread of carbapenemase-producing enterobacteria and characterize a plasmid involved in KPC dissemination. Two Klebsiella pneumoniae, one Escherichia coli and one Citrobacter freundii isolated from two patients were studied. Susceptibility profiles were obtained using Etest. Carbapenemase activity was detected using the Carba NP test. β-Lactamase gene content was screened by PCR and sequencing. K. pneumoniae isolates were genotyped by MLST and PFGE. KPC plasmid sizes were estimated by S1-DNA digestion and PFGE-Southern blot. Plasmids were sequenced using Illumina's technology and Sanger sequencing. Two patients sharing a room on a surgical unit were positive for carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae. One patient was also colonized with carbapenemase-producing C. freundii and E. coli. Neither patient had known risk factors for carbapenemase acquisition, although one patient had recent surgery at another Toronto hospital; the other patient's husband had surgery in New York City 3 years prior to her presentation. An extensive investigation was conducted at both hospitals, but no additional cases were identified. blaKPC-3 was detected in all clinical isolates. Variable carbapenem resistance levels were observed. Both K. pneumoniae belonged to the same clone by PFGE and MLST (ST277). pKPC-SMH (∼ 53 kb) was identified in all the clinical isolates, showing identity only with structurally similar IncN plasmids. We describe intra- and inter-patient dissemination of blaKPC. The involvement of a clone related to the successful K. pneumoniae ST258 and the blaKPC-3 gene detected in an active Tn4401 transposon carried on a conjugative broad-host-range plasmid increased the potential for this horizontal transmission. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  8. Characterization of the population structure, drug resistance mechanisms and plasmids of the community-associated Enterobacter cloacae complex in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kai; Yu, Wei; Cao, Xiaoli; Shen, Ping; Lu, Haifeng; Luo, Qixia; Rossen, John W. A.; Xiao, Yonghong

    Objectives: To investigate the population structure, drug resistance mechanisms and plasmids of community-associated Enterobacter cloacae complex (CA-ECC) isolates in China. Methods: Sixty-two CA-ECC isolates collected from 31 hospitals across China were typed by hsp60 typing and MLST. ESBL and

  9. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata Cells with an Antibiotic Resistance Gene Using a Ti-Plasmid-Derived Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1986-01-01

    A chimaeric antibiotic resistance gene was transferred to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a member of the legume family. This transfer was established by inoculating cowpea leaf discs with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a Ti-plasmid-derived vector that contained two copies of a chimaeric

  10. Genetic diversity, anti-microbial resistance, plasmid profile and frequency of the Vi antigen in Salmonella Dublin strains isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, F P; Frazão, M R; Rodrigues, D P; Costa, R G; Casas, M R T; Fernandes, S A; Falcão, J P; Campioni, F

    2018-02-01

    Salmonella Dublin is strongly adapted to cattle causing enteritis and/or systemic disease with high rates of mortality. However, it can be sporadically isolated from humans, usually causing serious disease, especially in patients with underlying chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to molecularly type S. Dublin strains isolated from humans and animals in Brazil to verify the diversity of these strains as well as to ascertain possible differences between strains isolated from humans and animals. Moreover, the presence of the capsular antigen Vi and the plasmid profile was characterized in addition to the anti-microbial resistance against 15 drugs. For this reason, 113 S. Dublin strains isolated between 1983 and 2016 from humans (83) and animals (30) in Brazil were typed by PFGE and MLVA. The presence of the capsular antigen Vi was verified by PCR, and the phenotypic expression of the capsular antigen was determined serologically. Also, a plasmid analysis for each strain was carried out. The strains studied were divided into 35 different PFGE types and 89 MLVA-types with a similarity of ≥80% and ≥17.5%, respectively. The plasmid sizes found ranged from 2 to >150 kb and none of the strains studied presented the capsular antigen Vi. Resistance or intermediate resistance was found in 23 strains (20.3%) that were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, nalidixic acid, piperacillin, streptomycin and/or tetracycline. The majority of the S. Dublin strains studied and isolated over a 33-year period may descend from a common subtype that has been contaminating humans and animals in Brazil and able to cause invasive disease even in the absence of the capsular antigen. The higher diversity of resistance phenotypes in human isolates, as compared with animal strains, may be a reflection of the different anti-microbial treatments used to control S. Dublin infections in humans in Brazil. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Integration of metal-resistant determinants from the plasmid of an Acidocella strain into the chromosome of Escherichia coli DH5alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sajalendu; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Nandi, Suvobroto; Banerjee, Pataki C

    2005-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of mine origin are ideal systems for studying microbial metal resistance because of their ability to grow in the presence of high concentrations of metal salts. We have previously shown that the metal-resistant transformants obtained after transformation of Escherichia coli DH5alpha with plasmid DNA preparation from Acidocella sp. strain GS19h did not contain any plasmid suggesting chromosomal integration of the plasmid(s) (Appl Environ Microbiol 1997; 63: 4523-4527). The present study provides evidence in support of this suggestion. The pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern of genomic DNA of the plasmidless metal-resistant transformants differed markedly from that of the untransformed DH5alpha strain. Moreover, when the recombinant plasmids constructed by cloning plasmid DNA fragments of the Acidocella strain GS19h in the vector pBluescript II KS+ were used to transform E. coli DH5alpha strain, no plasmid DNA was detected in some of the zinc- and ampicillin-resistant (ZnrAmpr) clones. The PFGE pattern of genomic DNA of such a transformed clone also differed markedly from that of the parent strain, suggesting chromosomal integration of the recombinant plasmid(s) containing both ampicillin- and zinc-resistance determinants. This observation was further supported by hybridization of chromosomal DNA of the plasmidless ZnrAmpr E. coli DH5alpha clone with the probes made from the plasmid DNA of strain GS19h and the vector DNA. Thus, this study corroborates our previous finding and documents the phenomenon of integration of metal-resistant determinants from the Acidocella GS19h plasmid(s) into the chromosome of E. coli DH5alpha.

  12. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance; interactions between human, animal and environmental ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent ePOIREL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is being increasingly reported among human but also veterinary isolates during the last two to three decades, very likely as a consequence of the large clinical usage of those antibiotics. Even if the principle mechanisms of resistance to quinolones are chromosome-encoded, due to modifications of molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux, the emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR has been reported since 1998. Although these PMQR determinants confer low-level resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, they are a favorable background for selection of additional chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms. Different transferable mechanisms have been identified, corresponding to the production of Qnr proteins, of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6’-Ib-cr, or of the QepA-type or OqxAB-type efflux pumps. Qnr proteins protect target enzymes (DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition (mostly nalidixic acid. The AAC(6’-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Finally, the QepA and OqxAB efflux pumps extrude fluoroquinolones from the bacterial cell. A series of studies have identified the environment to be a reservoir of PMQR genes, with farm animals and aquatic habitats being significantly involved. In addition, the origin of the qnr genes has been identified, corresponding to the waterborne species Shewanella sp. Altogether, the recent observations suggest that the aquatic environment might constitute the original source of PMQR genes, that would secondly spread among animal or human isolates.

  13. Distribution of small native plasmids in Streptococcus pyogenes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-05-01

    Complete characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes population from a defined geographic region comprises information on the plasmids that circulate in these bacteria. Therefore, we determined the distribution of small plasmids (pyogenes isolates from India, where diversity of strains and incidence rates of S. pyogenes infections are high. The collection comprised 77 emm-types. For plasmid detection and discrimination, we developed PCRs for different plasmid replication initiation protein genes, the putative repressor gene copG and bacteriocin genes dysA and scnM57. Plasmid distribution was limited to 13 emm-types. Co-detection analysis using aforementioned PCRs revealed four distinct plasmid sub-types, two of which were previously unknown. Representative plasmids pA852 and pA996 of the two uncharacterized plasmid sub-types were sequenced. These two plasmids could be assigned to the pMV158 and the pC194/pUB110 family of rolling-circle plasmids, respectively. The majority of small plasmids found in India belonged to the two newly characterized sub-types, with pA852- and pA996-like plasmids amounting to 42% and 22% of all detected plasmids, respectively. None of the detected plasmids coded for a known antibiotic resistance gene. Instead, all of the four plasmid sub-types carried known or potential bacteriocin genes. These genes may have influence on the evolutionary success of certain S. pyogenes genotypes. Notably, pA852-like plasmids were found in all isolates of the most prevalent emm-type 11.0. Together, a priori fitness of this genotype and increased fitness due to the acquired plasmids may have rendered type emm11.0 successful and caused the prevalence of pA852-like plasmids in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein in Staphylococci: Role of the qacA Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferwasser, Leon Iri; Skurray, Ronald A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Firth, Neville; Yeaman, Michael R.; Bayer, Arnold S.

    1999-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded st...

  15. The presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes among uropathogenes isolated from diabetic and non-diabetic patients with chronic pyelonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Chub

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased multidrug resistance of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs compromises the efficacy of treatment of urinary tract infections. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of ESBL-producing uropathogens from patients with chronic pyelonephritis (CP and to evaluate the risk factors of these types of infections. Screening for the presence of plasmid-mediated ESBL was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Out of 105 patients, 22 (20.9% revealed strains with resistance genes: 11 (36.7%, 11 (36.7% and 8 (26.7% were identified to carry bla(TEM, bla(SHV and bla(CTX-M beta-lactamase genes, respectively. We have demonstrated that prevalence of the resistance among patients with CP combined with type 2 DM was 31.3%, while among patients with CP without type 2 DM was 27.4%; however the difference between these groups was not significant. The main factors related with appearance of plasmid-mediated resistance genes were age range above 55 years, Chronic Kidney Disease stage ІІІ and ІV, in-patient treatment history, history of using antibiotics last year. Isolation and detection of ESBL-producing strains are essential fоr the sеlection оf the mоst effеctive antibiоtic for the empiric trеatment.

  16. Complete Sequences of Six IncA/C Plasmids of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Newport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria; Monday, Steven R; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Rump, Lydia; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-02-26

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport has been a long-standing public health concern in the United States. We present the complete sequences of six IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived MDR S. Newport ranging from 80.1 to 158.5 kb. They shared a genetic backbone with S. Newport IncA/C plasmids pSN254 and pAM04528. Copyright © 2015 Cao et al.

  17. Insights into a Novel blaKPC-2-Encoding IncP-6 Plasmid Reveal Carbapenem-Resistance Circulation in Several Enterobacteriaceae Species from Wastewater and a Hospital Source in Spain

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    Yancheng Yao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Untreated wastewater, particularly from hospitals and other healthcare facilities, is considered to be a reservoir for multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, its role in the spread of antibiotic resistances in the human population remains poorly investigated. We used whole genome sequencing to analyze 25 KPC-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from sewage water collected during a 3-year period and three clinical Citrobacter freundii isolates from a tertiary hospital in the same collection area in Spain. We detected a common, recently described, IncP-6 plasmid carrying the gene blaKPC-2 in 21 isolates from both sources. The plasmid was present in diverse environmental bacterial species of opportunistic pathogens such as C. freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Raoultella ornithinolytica. The 40,186 bp IncP-6 plasmid encoded 52 coding sequences and was composed of three uniquely combined regions that were derived from other plasmids recently reported in different countries of South America. The region harboring the carbapenem resistance gene (14 kb contained a Tn3 transposon disrupted by an ISApu-flanked element and the core sequence composed by ISKpn6/blaKPC-2/ΔblaTEM-1/ISKpn27. We document here the presence of a novel promiscuous blaKPC-2 plasmid circulating in environmental bacteria in wastewater and human populations.

  18. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance determinants qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qep in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, W M; Hashim, A; Domany, Raa

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qep in extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) -producing E. coli and to determine the association of these determinants with CTX-M group in Cairo, Egypt. MICs of 15 antimicrobial agents against 70 E. coli clinical isolates were determined using agar dilution technique according to CLSI. Screening for the qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib, qep and CTX-M genes was carried out by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Curing was used to confirm whether qnr, aac(6')-Ib, qep or ESBL-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Out of 70 E. coli clinical isolates, 61 were resistant to at least one antibiotic, 16 (22.8%) were multidrug resistant and 30 (42%) were ESBL producers. Out of 30 ESBL producers E. coli isolates, 8 (26.6%) were positive for qnr genes, and the qnrA1-, qnrB1-and qnrS1-type genes were detected alone or in combination in 5 (16.6%), 7 (23.3%) and 5 (16.6%) isolates, respectively. Seven (23.3%) isolates were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr and only two (6.6%) isolates were positive for qepA4. Loss of all plasmids upon curing suggested that qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr , qep A4 and ESBL-encoding genes were always plasmid mediated. Out of 8 Qnr positive isolates 5 were associated with both CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-9 while 2 from 6 aac(6')-Ib-cr positive isolates were associated with both CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-9. This study highlights the prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr , qep A4 associated with CTX-M positive E. coli isolates from Egypt. This is the first report of the plasmid mediated fluoroquinolone efflux pump, Qep A from Egypt.

  19. Transfer of resistance plasmids from Staphylococcus epidermidis to Staphylococcus aureus: evidence for conjugative exchange of resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, B A; Schaberg, D R

    1983-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to transfer antimicrobial resistance to Staphylococcus aureus was tested by mixed culture on filter membranes. Two of six clinical isolates examined were able to transfer resistance to S. aureus strains 879R4RF, RN450RF, and UM1385RF. Subsequent S.aureus transconjugants resulting from matings with S. epidermidis donors were able to serve as donors to other S. aureus strains at similar frequencies. Cell-free and mitomycin C-induced filtrates of donors ...

  20. Plasmid-mediated resistance to thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein in staphylococci: role of the qacA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferwasser, L I; Skurray, R A; Brown, M H; Firth, N; Yeaman, M R; Bayer, A S

    1999-10-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) is a small, cationic peptide released from rabbit platelets following thrombin stimulation. In vitro resistance to this peptide among strains of Staphylococcus aureus correlates with the survival advantage of such strains at sites of endothelial damage in humans as well as in experimental endovascular infections. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic resistance of S. aureus to tPMP-1 are not fully delineated. The plasmid-encoded staphylococcal gene qacA mediates multidrug resistance to multiple organic cations via a proton motive force-dependent efflux pump. We studied whether the qacA gene might also confer resistance to cationic tPMP-1. Staphylococcal plasmids encoding qacA were found to confer resistance to tPMP-1 in an otherwise susceptible parental strain. Deletions which removed the region containing the qacA gene in the S. aureus multiresistance plasmid pSK1 abolished tPMP-1 resistance. Resistance to tPMP-1 in the qacA-bearing strains was inoculum independent but peptide concentration dependent, with the level of resistance decreasing at higher peptide concentrations for a given inoculum. There was no apparent cross-resistance in qacA-bearing strains to other endogenous cationic antimicrobial peptides which are structurally distinct from tPMP-1, including human neutrophil defensin 1, protamine, or the staphylococcal lantibiotics pep5 and nisin. These data demonstrate that the staphylococcal multidrug resistance gene qacA also mediates in vitro resistance to cationic tPMP-1.

  1. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

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    Claudia Fernández-Alarcón

    Full Text Available Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2 gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2 plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  2. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Singer, Randall S; Johnson, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2) gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2) plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  3. Association of virulence plasmid and antibiotic resistance determinants with chromosomal multilocus genotypes in Mexican Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains

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    Silva Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes are mosaic structures composed of genes present in every strain of the same species (core genome, and genes present in some but not all strains of a species (accessory genome. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic diversity of core and accessory genes of a Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Typhimurium population isolated from food-animal and human sources in four regions of Mexico. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and macrorestriction fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to address the core genetic variation, and genes involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance were selected to evaluate the accessory genome. Results We found a low genetic diversity for both housekeeping and accessory genes. Sequence type 19 (ST19 was supported as the founder genotype of STs 213, 302 and 429. We found a temporal pattern in which the derived ST213 is replacing the founder ST19 in the four geographic regions analyzed and a geographic trend in the number of resistance determinants. The distribution of the accessory genes was not random among chromosomal genotypes. We detected strong associations among the different accessory genes and the multilocus chromosomal genotypes (STs. First, the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV was found mostly in ST19 isolates. Second, the plasmid-borne betalactamase cmy-2 was found only in ST213 isolates. Third, the most abundant integron, IP-1 (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2, was found only in ST213 isolates. Fourth, the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1 was found mainly in a subgroup of ST19 isolates carrying pSTV. The mapping of accessory genes and multilocus genotypes on the dendrogram derived from macrorestiction fingerprints allowed the establishment of genetic subgroups within the population. Conclusion Despite the low levels of genetic diversity of core and accessory genes, the non-random distribution of the accessory genes

  4. Characterization of Two Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from the 1960s by Using the MinION Sequencer Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Mónika; Nagy, Tibor; Wilk, Tímea; Farkas, Tibor; Hegyi, Anna; Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-11-01

    Two A/C incompatibility group (IncA/C family) plasmids from the 1960s have been sequenced and classified into the A/C 2 type 1 group. R16a and IP40a contain novel antibiotic resistance islands and a complete GIsul2 genomic island not previously found in the family. In the 173.1-kb R16a, the 29.9-kb antibiotic resistance island (ARI) is located in a unique backbone position not utilized by ARIs. ARI R16a consists of Tn1, Tn6020, and Tn6333, harboring the resistance genes bla TEM-1D and aphA1b and a mer module, respectively; a truncated Tn5393 copy; and a gene cluster with unknown function. Plasmid IP40a is 170.4 kb in size and contains a 5.6-kb ARI inserted into the kfrA gene. ARI IP40a carrying bla TEM-1D and aphA1b genes is composed of Tn1 with a Tn6023 insertion. Additionally, IP40a harbors single IS2, IS186, and Tn1000 insertions scattered in the backbone; an IS150 copy in GIsul2; and a complete Tn6333 carrying a mer module at the position of ARI R16a Loss of resistance markers in R16a, IP40a, and R55 was observed during stability tests. Every phenotypic change proved to be the result of recombination events involving mobile elements. Intramolecular transposition of IS copies that generated IP40a derivatives lacking large parts of the backbone could account for the formation of other family members, too. The MinION platform proved to be a valuable tool in bacterial genome sequencing since it generates long reads that span repetitive elements and facilitates full-length plasmid or chromosome assembly. Nanopore technology enables rapid characterization of large, low-copy-number plasmids and their rearrangement products. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Class 1 Integron-Borne, Multiple-Antibiotic Resistance Encoded by a 150-Kilobase Conjugative Plasmid in Epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains Isolated in Guinea-Bissau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Anders; Forslund, Anita; Petersen, Andreas; Brown, Derek J.; Dias, Francisco; Monteiro, Serifo; Mølbak, Kåre; Aaby, Peter; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Sandström, Anita

    2000-01-01

    In the 1996–1997 cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau, surveillance for antimicrobial resistance showed the emergence of a multidrug-resistant strain of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the course of the epidemic. The strain was resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, furazolidone, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole. Concomitant with the emergence of this strain, we observed a resurgence in the number of registered cholera cases as well as an increase in the case fatality rate from 1.0% before the emergence of the multiple-drug-resistant strain to 5.3% after the emergence of the strain. Our study shows that the strain contained a 150-kb conjugative multiple-antibiotic resistance plasmid with class 1 integron-borne gene cassettes encoding resistance to trimethoprim (dhfrXII) and aminoglycosides [ant(3")-1a]). The finding of transferable resistance to almost all of the antibiotics commonly used to treat cholera is of great public health concern. Studies should be carried out to determine to what extent the strain or its resistance genes have been spread to other areas where cholera is endemic. PMID:11015401

  6. Investigation of the resistance gene presence in plasmids isolated from e. Coli and salmonella strains originating from domestic animals by the method of plasmid DNA transformation into competent cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mišić D.; Ašanin Ružica

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of the presence of plasmids was performed on E. coli and Salmonella strains, originating from dogs, cats, cattle, pigs and poultry. The investigated bacterial strains were isolated from ear and skin swabs vaginal swabs, faeces and urine, obtained from healthy and diseased animals of various age and breed categories. Up to now 45 E. coli and 35 Salmonella strains have been isolated, but the presence of plasmids was investigated in 42 strains of bacteria resistant to at least ...

  7. Bicarbonate and amino acids are co-germinants for spores of Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying plasmid-borne enterotoxin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoman, Maryam; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2018-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (cpe) gene (C-cpe) are generally linked to food poisoning, while isolates carrying cpe on a plasmid (P-cpe) are associated with non-food-borne gastrointestinal diseases. Both C-cpe and P-cpe isolates can form metabolically dormant spores, which through germination process return to actively growing cells to cause diseases. In our previous study, we showed that only 3 out of 20 amino acids (aa) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) triggered germination of spores of P-cpe isolates (P-cpe spores). We now found that 14 out of 20 individual aa tested induced germination of P-cpe spores in the presence of bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.0). However, no significant spore germination was observed with bicarbonate (pH 7.0) alone, indicating that aa and bicarbonate are co-germinants for P-cpe spores. P-cpe strain F4969 gerKC spores did not germinate, and gerAA spores germinated extremely poorly as compared to wild-type and gerKA spores with aa-bicarbonate (pH 7.0) co-germinants. The germination defects in gerKC and gerAA spores were partially restored by complementing gerKC or gerAA spores with wild-type gerKC or gerAA, respectively. Collectively, this study identified aa-bicarbonate as a novel nutrient germinant for P-cpe spores and provided evidence that GerKC and GerAA play major roles in aa-bicarbonate induced germination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sunde

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331 isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241 produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9 than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3, (p<0.01, Chi-square test. Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination

  9. Diversity and stability of plasmids from glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Villadsen, A. G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    was seen at the end of the 7-year period, coinciding with the ban in 1998 of the macrolide tylosin as growth promoter for pig production. The stability of the plasmid in its original host was compared with stability of the same plasmid in BM4105RF, when both strains were maintained in liquid cultures...

  10. Role of integrons, plasmids and SXT elements in multidrug resistance of Vibrio cholerae and Providencia vermicola obtained from a clinical isolate of diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha eRajpara

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The isolates of Vibrio cholerae and Providencia vermicola obtained from a diarrhoeal patient were investigated for genetic elements governing their drug resistance phenotypes. Out of fourteen antibiotics tested, V. cholerae Vc IDH02365 isolate showed resistance to nine antibiotics, while P. vermicola Pv NBA2365 was found to be resistant to all the antibiotics except polymyxin B. Though SXT integrase was depicted in both the bacteria, class 1 integron was found to be associated only with Pv NBA2365. Integrons in Pv NBA2365 conferred resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and trimethoprim. Pv NBA2365 carried two transformable plasmids imparting distinct antibiotic resistance traits to their Escherichia coli transformants. In rabbit ileal loop assays, Pv NBA2365 did not show any fluid accumulation in contrast with Vc IDH02365 that showed high fluid accumulation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a highly drug resistant P.vermicola and additionally co-existence of multidrug resistant V. cholerae and P. vermicola. Both the microbes appeared to possess a wide array of mobile genetic elements for a large spectrum of antimicrobial agents, some of which are being used in the treatment of acute diarrhoea.

  11. Real-time quantitative PCR assay with Taqman® probe for rapid detection of MCR-1 plasmid-mediated colistin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chabou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the development of two rapid real-time quantitative PCR assays with TaqMan® probes to detect the MCR-1 plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene from bacterial isolates and faecal samples from chickens. Specificity and sensitivity of the assay were 100% on bacterial isolates including 18 colistin-resistant isolates carrying the mcr-1 gene (six Klebsiella pneumoniae and 12 Escherichia coli with a calibration curve that was linear from 101 to 108 DNA copies. Five out of 833 faecal samples from chickens from Algeria were positive, from which three E. coli strains were isolated and confirmed to harbour the mcr-1 gene by standard PCR and sequencing.

  12. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We havecharacterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... of Clp ATPases in acquired environmental fitness and highlights the challenges of mobile genetic elements in fighting nosocomial infections...... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  13. Heat Resistance Mediated by a New Plasmid Encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a Possible Novel Mechanism for Nosocomial Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We have characterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... of Clp ATPases in acquired environmental fitness and highlights the challenges of mobile genetic elements in fighting nosocomial infections....... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  14. Norwegian patients and retail chicken meat share cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli and IncK/blaCMY-2 resistance plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, E. S.; Wester, A. L.; Ahrenfeldt, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    In 2012 and 2014 the Norwegian monitoring programme for antimicrobial resistance in the veterinary and food production sectors (NORM-VET) showed that 124 of a total of 406 samples (31%) of Norwegian retail chicken meat was contaminated with extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli....... The aim of this study was to compare selected cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from humans and poultry to determine their genetic relatedness based on whole genome sequencing (WGS). E. coli representing three prevalent cephalosporin-resistant multi-locus sequence types (STs) isolated from poultry (n=17...... urinary tract infections, and the ST38 isolates from poultry. Furthermore, all of the 29 clinical isolates harboured IncK/blaCMY-2 plasmid variants highly similar to the IncK/blaCMY-2 plasmid present in the poultry isolates. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that clonal transfer...

  15. The mosaic architecture of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida pAsa4 plasmid and its consequences on antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine H. Tanaka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis in salmonids, is an issue especially because many isolates of this bacterium display antibiotic resistances, which limit treatments against the disease. Recent results suggested the possible existence of alternative forms of pAsa4, a large plasmid found in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and bearing multiple antibiotic resistance genes. The present study reveals the existence of two newly detected pAsa4 variants, pAsa4b and pAsa4c. We present the extensive characterization of the genomic architecture, the mobile genetic elements and the antimicrobial resistance genes of these plasmids in addition to the reference pAsa4 from the strain A449. The analysis showed differences between the three architectures with consequences on the content of resistance genes. The genomic plasticity of the three pAsa4 variants could be partially explained by the action of mobile genetic elements like insertion sequences. Eight additional isolates from Canada and Europe that bore similar antibiotic resistance patterns as pAsa4-bearing strains were genotyped and specific pAsa4 variants could be attributed to phenotypic profiles. pAsa4 and pAsa4c were found in Europe, while pAsa4b was found in Canada. In accordance with their content in conjugative transfer genes, only pAsa4b and pAsa4c can be transferred by conjugation in Escherichia coli. The plasticity of pAsa4 variants related to the acquisition of antibiotic resistance indicates that these plasmids may pose a threat in terms of the dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida bacteria.

  16. The involvement of tetA and tetE tetracycline resistance genes in plasmid and chromosomal resistance of Aeromonas in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Teruszkin Balassiano

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the involvement of tetA and tetE genes in the tetracycline resistance of 16 strains of genus Aeromonas, isolated from clinical and food sources. Polymerase chain reactions revealed that 37.5% of the samples were positive for tetA, and also 37.5% were tetE positive. One isolate was positive for both genes. Only the isolate A. caviae 5.2 had its resistance associated to the presence of a plasmid, pSS2. The molecular characterization of pSS2 involved the construction of its restriction map and the determination of its size. The digestion of pSS2 with HindIII originated two fragments (A and B that were cloned separately into the pUC18 vector. The tetA gene was shown to be located on the HindIII-A fragment by PCR. After transforming a tetracycline-sensitive strain with pSS2, the transformants expressed the resistance phenotype and harbored a plasmid whose size was identical to that of pSS2. The results confirmed the association between pSS2 and the tetracycline resistance phenotype, and suggest a feasible dissemination of tetA and tetE among strains of Aeromonas. This study suggests the spreading tetA and tetE genes in Aeromonas in Brazil and describes a resistance plasmid that probably contributes to the dissemination of the resistance.

  17. Environmental emission of multiresistant Escherichia coli carrying the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 from German swine farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Sebastian; Falgenhauer, Linda; Semmler, Torsten; Imirzalioglu, Can; Chakraborty, Trinad; Roesler, Uwe; Roschanski, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Pigs have been the focus of the worldwide spread of colistin resistance. However, there is little information on the transmission of mcr-1 -containing bacteria into the environment of pig farms. We therefore rescreened environmental Escherichia coli isolates from the surrounding farm areas of three previously mcr-1 -positive swine herds in Germany. Thirty-five mixed bacterial cultures obtained from boot swabs, flies, dog faeces and manure from three pig farms in Germany in 2011-12 were non-selectively recultivated and the presence of the mcr-1 gene was checked by real-time PCR. After separation, single E. coli colonies were subsequently isolated and the presence of mcr-1 was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. In addition, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance screening and WGS followed by phylogenetic analysis and resistance genotyping as well as plasmid typing were performed. Seven mcr-1 -positive E. coli strains originating from environmental boot swabs, dog faeces, stable flies and manure were found. The isolates belonged to five different STs (ST10, ST1011, ST1140, ST5281 and ST342) and harboured extensive additional resistance genes. Comparative plasmid analysis predominantly located mcr-1 on IncX4 plasmids, which are strongly related to a recently described plasmid of human clinical origin (pICBEC72Hmcr). WGS-based analysis of the environmental E. coli isolates of farm surroundings showed clear links to mcr-1 -harbouring E. coli recovered from pig production in Europe as well as from human clinical isolates worldwide, presenting another piece of the puzzle, which further complicates the rapidly evolving epidemiology of plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant E. coli strains. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A plasmid carrying mucA and mucB genes from pKM101 in Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spikes, D.; Setlow, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmid pMucAMucB, constructed from the Haemophilus influenzae vector pDM2, and a similar plasmid, constructed from pBR322, increased the survival after UV irradiation of Escherichia coli AB1157 with the umu-36 mutation and also caused UV-induced mutation in the E. coli strain. In H. influenzae, pMucAMucB caused a small but reproducible increase in survival after UV irradiation in wild-type cells and in a rec-1 mutant, but there was no increase in spontaneous mutation in the wild type or in the rec-1 mutant and no UV-induced mutation

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp incFIIY plasmid encoding blaIMI-3-mediated carbapenem resistance, from river sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjun eDang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediment of Haihe River using E. coli CV601 (gfp-tagged as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to incFIIY group and harbors a backbone region shares high homology and gene synteny to several other incF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1 and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one blaIMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The blaIMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the blaIMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of blaIMI carbapenemase genes.

  20. Characterization of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from cockles (Anadara granosa): antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiles and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, S; Elhadi, N; Hassan, Z; Rusul, G; Lihan, S; Fifadara, N; Yuherman; Purwati, E

    1998-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility, plasmid profiles and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) were used to study strains of Vibrio vulnificus isolated from cockles (Anadara granosa). Thirty-six isolates were analyzed. The prevalent biotypes were 1 (72.2% of the isolates) and 2 (27.8%). Among these, 21 strains of biotype 1 and two strains of biotype 2 contained plasmid DNA bands ranging in size from 1.4 to 9.7 MDa. Thirty-one (83.3%) were found to be resistant to one or more of the antimicrobial agents tested, however no specific correlation between antimicrobial resistance patterns and a single biotype was found. In addition, no particular plasmid profile was predictive of a particular pattern of antibiotic susceptibility. Two primers produced polymorphisms in all strains tested, producing bands ranging from 0.25 to 2.7 kb, indicating a high variability among both biotype 1 and biotype 2 of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. RAPD identity across biotypes was also observed among Vibrio vulnificus strains.

  1. The IncF plasmid pRSB225 isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant's on-site preflooder combining antibiotic resistance and putative virulence functions is highly related to virulence plasmids identified in pathogenic E. coli isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberg, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Eikmeyer, Felix; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    The IncF antibiotic resistance and virulence plasmid pRSB225, isolated from an unknown bacterium released with the purified wastewater from a municipal sewage treatment plant into the environment has been analysed at the genomic level by pyrosequencing. The 164,550bp plasmid comprises 210 coding sequences (cds). It is composed of three replicons (RepFIA, RepFIB, and RepFII) and encodes further plasmid-specific functions for stable maintenance and inheritance and conjugative plasmid transfer. The plasmid is self-transmissible and shows a narrow host range limited to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The accessory modules of the plasmid mainly comprise genes conferring resistance to ampicillin (bla(TEM-1b)), chloramphenicol (catA1), erythromycin (mphA), kanamycin and neomycin (aphA1), streptomycin (strAB), sulphonamides (sul2), tetracycline (tetA(B)) and trimethoprim (dfrA14), as well as mercuric ions (mer genes). In addition, putative virulence-associated genes coding for iron uptake (iutA/iucABCD, sitABCD, and a putative high-affinity Fe²⁺ uptake system) and for a toxin/antitoxin system (vagCD) were identified on the plasmid. All antibiotic and heavy metal resistance genes are located either on class 1 (Tn10-remnant, Tn4352B) and class 2 transposons (Tn2-remnant, Tn21, Tn402-remnant) or a class 1 integron, whereas almost all putative virulence genes are associated with IS elements (IS1, IS26), indicating that transposition and/or recombination events were responsible for acquisition of the accessory pRSB225 modules. Particular modules of plasmid pRSB225 are related to corresponding segments of different virulence plasmids harboured by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Moreover, pRSB225 modules were also detected in entero-aggregative-haemorrhagic E. coli (EAHEC) draft genome sequences suggesting that IncF plasmids related to pRSB225 mediated gene transfer into pathogenic E. coli derivatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Physical structure and genetic expression of the sulfonamide-resistance plasmid pLS80 and its derivatives in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.; Lacks, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The 10-kb chromosomal fragment of Streptococcus pneumoniae cloned in pLS80 contains the sul-d allele of the pneumococcal gene for dihydropteroate synthase. As a single copy in the chromosome this allele confers resistance to sulfanilamide at 0.2 mg/ml; in the multicopy plasmid it confers resistance to 2.0 mg/ml. The sul-d mutation was mapped by restriction analysis to a 0.4-kb region. A spontaneous deletion beginning approx. 1.5 kb to the right of the sul-d mutation prevented gene function, possibly by removing a promoter. This region could be restored by chromosomal facilitation and be demonstrated in the plasmid by selection for sulfonamide resistance. Under selection for a vector marker, tetracycline resistance, only the deleted plasmid was detectable, apparently as a result of plasmid segregation and the advantageous growth rates of cells with smaller plasmids. When such cells were selected for sulfonamide resistance, the deleted region returned to the plasmid, presumably by equilibration between the chromosome and the plasmid pool, to give a low frequency (approx. 10/sup -3/) of cells resistant to sulfanilamide at 2.0 mg/ml. Models for the mechanisms of chromosomal facilitation and equilibration are proposed. Several derivatives of pLS80 could be transferred to Bacillus subtilis, where they conferred resistance to sulfanilamide at 2 mg/ml, thereby demonstrating cross-species expression of the pneumococcal gene. Transfer of the plasmids to B. subtilis gave rise to large deletions to the left of the sul-d marker, but these deletions did not interfere with the sul-d gene function. Restriction maps of pLS80 and its variously deleted derivatives are presented.

  3. Interplay between plasmid-mediated and chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance and bacterial fitness in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Labrador, Gema; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; López-Rojas, Rafael; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Pachón, Maria Eugenia; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the interplay among plasmid-mediated qnr genes, alone or in combination with multiple chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance determinants, susceptibility to FQs and bacterial fitness in an isogenic Escherichia coli collection. E. coli ATCC 25922 was used to modify or delete chromosomal genes. qnr genes were cloned into the pBK-CMV vector. The MICs of FQs were determined by microdilution. Mutant prevention concentration and frequency of mutants were evaluated. Bacterial fitness was analysed using ΔlacZ system competition assays using in vitro and in vivo models. The relationships between the number of resistance mutations and bacterial fitness were complex. With specific combinations of resistance mechanisms the addition of a new resistance mutation was shown to improve bacterial fitness. qnrA1 caused a decrease in fitness (7%-21%) while qnrS1 caused an increase in fitness (9%-21%) when combined with chromosomal mutations. We identified susceptible triple mutants in which the acquisition of a fourth resistance mutation significantly increased fitness and at the same time reached the clinical resistance level (the acquisition of qnrS1 in a S83L + D87N + ΔmarR genetic background). A strong correlation with the production of reactive oxygen species, as well as changes in susceptibility, was observed following treatment with ciprofloxacin. Our data indicate that there may be critical stages (depending on the genotype) in resistance development, including chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated mechanisms, at which some low-fitness mutants below the resistance breakpoint are able to evolve clinical resistance with just one or two mutations, and show increased fitness. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The 79,370-bp conjugative plasmid pB4 consists of an IncP-1beta backbone loaded with a chromate resistance transposon, the strA-strB streptomycin resistance gene pair, the oxacillinase gene bla(NPS-1), and a tripartite antibiotic efflux system of the resistance-nodulation-division family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauch, A; Schlüter, A; Bischoff, N; Goesmann, A; Meyer, F; Pühler, A

    2003-02-01

    Plasmid pB4 is a conjugative antibiotic resistance plasmid, originally isolated from a microbial community growing in activated sludge, by means of an exogenous isolation method with Pseudomonas sp. B13 as recipient. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of pB4. The plasmid is 79,370 bp long and contains at least 81 complete coding regions. A suite of coding regions predicted to be involved in plasmid replication, plasmid maintenance, and conjugative transfer revealed significant similarity to the IncP-1beta backbone of R751. Four resistance gene regions comprising mobile genetic elements are inserted in the IncP-1beta backbone of pB4. The modular 'gene load' of pB4 includes (1) the novel transposon Tn 5719 containing genes characteristic of chromate resistance determinants, (2) the transposon Tn 5393c carrying the widespread streptomycin resistance gene pair strA-strB, (3) the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance gene bla(NPS-1) flanked by highly conserved sequences characteristic of integrons, and (4) a tripartite antibiotic resistance determinant comprising an efflux protein of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP), and an outer membrane factor (OMF). The components of the RND-MFP-OMF efflux system showed the highest similarity to the products of the mexCD-oprJ determinant from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. Functional analysis of the cloned resistance region from pB4 in Pseudomonas sp. B13 indicated that the RND-MFP-OMF efflux system conferred high-level resistance to erythromycin and roxithromycin resistance on the host strain. This is the first example of an RND-MFP-OMF-type antibiotic resistance determinant to be found in a plasmid genome. The global genetic organization of pB4 implies that its gene load might be disseminated between bacteria in different habitats by the combined action of the conjugation apparatus and the mobility of its component elements.

  5. The ancient small mobilizable plasmid pALWED1.8 harboring a new variant of the non-cassette streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance gene aadA27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakov, Anton; Mindlin, Sofia; Beletsky, Alexey; Shcherbatova, Natalya; Rakitin, Andrey; Ermakova, Aleksandra; Mardanov, Andrey; Petrova, Mayya

    2016-01-01

    The small mobilizable plasmid pALWED1.8 containing a novel variant of the streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance gene aadA27 was isolated from the permafrost strains of Acinetobacter lwoffii. The 4135bp plasmid carries mobА and mobC genes that mediate its mobilization by conjugative plasmids. The nucleotide sequences of mobА and mobC are similar to those of mobilization genes of the modern plasmid pRAY* and its variants, which contain aadB gene, and are widespread among the pathogenic strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Almost identical pALWED1.8 variants were detected in modern environmental Аcinetobacter strains. A highly similar plasmid was revealed in a strain of Acinetobacter parvus isolated from mouse intestine. Furthermore, we discovered six previously unidentified variants of plasmids related to pALWED1.8 and pRAY* in public databases. In contrast to most known variants of aadA which are cassette genes associated with integrons, the aadA27 variant harbored by pALWED1.8 is a non-cassette, autonomously transcribed gene. Non-cassette aadA genes with 96% sequence identity to aadA27 were detected in the chromosomes of Acinetobacter gyllenbergii and several uncharacterized strains of Аcinetobacter sp. Moreover, we revealed that the autonomous aadA-like genes are present in the chromosomes of many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of all identified AadA proteins showed the following: (i) cassette aadA genes form a separate monophyletic group and mainly reside on plasmids and (ii) chromosomal non-cassette aadA genes are extremely diverse and can be inherited both vertical and via horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Plasmid-Bearing Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains with Type VI Secretion Systems, Isolated from Retail Turkey and Pork

    OpenAIRE

    Marasini, Daya; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the complete genome sequences of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from retail turkey and pork, respectively. The chromosomes of these two isolates contained type VI secretion system genes. The two isolates also harbored large plasmids with antimicrobial resistance genes possibly contributing to their multidrug resistance.

  7. Factors that affect transfer of the IncI1 β-lactam resistance plasmid pESBL-283 between E. coli strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Händel, N.; Otte, S.; Jonker, M.J.; Brul, S.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide presents a major health threat to human health care that results in therapy failure and increasing costs. The transfer of resistance conferring plasmids by conjugation is a major route by which resistance genes disseminate at the intra- and

  8. Diversity and Global Distribution of IncL/M Plasmids Enabling Horizontal Dissemination of β-Lactam Resistance Genes among the Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Adamczuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance determinants are frequently associated with plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, which simplifies their horizontal transmission. Several groups of plasmids (including replicons of the IncL/M incompatibility group were found to play an important role in the dissemination of resistance genes encoding β-lactamases. The IncL/M plasmids are large, broad host range, and self-transmissible replicons. We have identified and characterized two novel members of this group: pARM26 (isolated from bacteria inhabiting activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant and pIGT15 (originating from a clinical strain of Escherichia coli. This instigated a detailed comparative analysis of all available sequences of IncL/M plasmids encoding β-lactamases. The core genome of these plasmids is comprised of 20 genes with conserved synteny. Phylogenetic analyses of these core genes allowed clustering of the plasmids into four separate groups, which reflect their antibiotic resistance profiles. Examination of the biogeography of the IncL/M plasmids revealed that they are most frequently found in bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae originating from the Mediterranean region and Western Europe and that they are able to persist in various ecological niches even in the absence of direct antibiotic selection pressure.

  9. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pengcheng; Song, Guangji; Shi, Mengyang; Zhou, Yafei; Liu, Yang; Lei, Jun; Chen, Peng; Yin, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Colistin is considered a last-resort antibiotic against most gram-negative bacteria. Recent discoveries of a plasmid-mediated, transferable mobilized colistin-resistance gene ( mcr-1) on all continents have heralded the imminent emergence of pan-drug-resistant superbacteria. The inner-membrane protein MCR-1 can catalyze the transfer of phosphoethanolamine (PEA) to lipid A, resulting in colistin resistance. However, little is known about the mechanism, and few drugs exist to address this issue. We present crystal structures revealing the MCR-1 catalytic domain (cMCR-1) as a monozinc metalloprotein with ethanolamine (ETA) and d-glucose, respectively, thus highlighting 2 possible substrate-binding pockets in the MCR-1-catalyzed PEA transfer reaction. Mutation of the residues involved in ETA and d-glucose binding impairs colistin resistance in recombinant Escherichia coli containing full-length MCR-1. Partial analogs of the substrate are used for cocrystallization with cMCR-1, providing valuable information about the family of PEA transferases. One of the analogs, ETA, causes clear inhibition of polymyxin B resistance, highlighting its potential for drug development. These data demonstrate the crucial role of the PEA- and lipid A-binding pockets and provide novel insights into the structure-based mechanisms, important drug-target hot spots, and a drug template for further drug development to combat the urgent, rising threat of MCR-1-mediated antibiotic resistance.-Wei, P., Song, G., Shi, M., Zhou, Y., Liu, Y., Lei, J., Chen, P., Yin, L. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

  11. Prevalence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolated from chickens in Anhui province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in 202 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens in Anhui Province, China, and to determine whether ESBL and PMQR genes co-localized in the isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility for 12 antimicrobials was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reactions (PCRs, DNA sequencing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were employed to characterize the molecular basis for β-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed, 147 out of the 202 (72.8% isolates were resistant to at least 6 antimicrobial agents and 28 (13.9% of the isolates were resistant to at least 10 antimicrobials. The prevalence of blaCTX-M, blaTEM-1 and blaTEM-206 genes was 19.8%, 24.3% and 11.9%, respectively. Seventy-five out of the 202 (37.1% isolates possessed a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant in the form of qnrS (n = 21; this determinant occurred occasionally in combination with aac(6'-1b-cr (n = 65. Coexistence of ESBL and/or PMQR genes was identified in 31 of the isolates. Two E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M and qnrS, while two others carried blaCTX-M, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr. In addition, blaTEM-1, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr were co-located in two other E. coli isolates. PFGE analysis showed that these isolates were not clonally related and were genetically diverse. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to describe detection of TEM-206-producing E. coli in farmed chickens, and the presence of blaTEM-206, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr in one of the isolates.

  12. Prevalence of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli in a farrowing farm: ST1121 clone harboring IncHI2 plasmid contributes to the dissemination of blaCMY-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eDeng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During a regular monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in a farrowing farm in Southern China, 117 Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from sows and piglets. Compared with the isolates from piglets, the isolates from sows exhibited higher resistance rates to the tested cephalosporins. Correspondingly, the total detection rate of the blaCMY-2/blaCTX-M genes in the sow isolates (34.2% was also significantly higher than that of the piglet isolates (13.6% (p<0.05. The blaCMY-2 gene had a relatively high prevalence (11.1% in the E. coli isolates. MLST and PFGE analysis revealed the clonal spread of ST1121 E. coli in most (7/13 of the blaCMY-2-positive isolates. An indistinguishable IncHI2 plasmid harboring blaCMY-2 was also identified in each of the seven ST1121 E. coli isolates. Complete sequence analysis of this IncHI2 plasmid (pEC5207 revealed that pEC5207 may have originated through recombination of an IncHI2 plasmid with a blaCMY-2-carrying IncA/C plasmid like pCFSAN007427_01. In addtion to blaCMY-2, pEC5207 also carried other resistance determinants for aminoglycosides (aacA7, sulfonamides (sul1, as well as heavy metals ions, such as Cu and Ag. The susceptibility testing showed that the pEC5207 can mediate both antibiotic and heavy metal resistance. This highlights the role of pEC5207 in co-selection of blaCMY-2-positive isolates under the selective pressure of heavy metals, cephalosporins and other antimicrobials. In conclusion, clonal spread of an ST1121 type E. coli strain harboring an IncHI2 plasmid contributed to the dissemination of blaCMY-2 in a farrowing farm in Southern China. We also have determined the first complete sequence analysis of a blaCMY-2-carrying IncHI2 plasmid.

  13. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  14. Inhibition of resistance plasmid transfer in Escherichia coli by ionophores, chlortetracycline, bacitracin, and ionophore/antimicrobial combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Jeremy J; Clark, Steven R; Hausmann, Denny; Tillman, Paul; Benning, Valerie R; Gordon, Shelly K

    2004-01-01

    Medicinal feed additives bacitracin, chlortetracycline (CTC), laidlomycin, lasalocid, and salinomycin inhibited the transfer of multiresistance-conferring plasmid pBR325 (Tet(r) Amp(r) Cp(r), 6.0 kb) into selected gram-negative strains with the use of an in vitro model. High concentrations of ampicillin-sensitive competence-pretreated Escherichia coli HB 101 cells were exposed to 10% (v/v) of 1:10 dimethyl sulfoxide/agent : water containing test mixtures for 0.5 hr prior to plasmid addition and transforming conditions. Transformation was inhibited for all antimicrobials and showed a positive association wich higher concentration. Additional testing of ionophore compounds separately and in combination with bacitracin, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, roxarsone, tylosin, and virginiamycin at representative feed concentrations demonstrated 80.6% to >99.9% inhibition (P < 0.001) of resistance transfer. Bacitracin alone inhibited transformation within the range of 50-500 ppm. No increase in resistance transfer was observed when poultry-derived and reference gram-negative isolates having low or no transformation efficiency were additionally tested. The results suggest that these compounds, at relevant concentrations used in animal feed, may interfere with cell envelope-associated DNA uptake channels or other transformation competence mechanisms. Through these mechanisms, ionophores and cell membrane-interactive feed agents such as CTC and bacitracin may act to inhibit resistance transfer mechanisms within poultry and livestock.

  15. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Platt, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10......, 6 and 13a respectively. The results indicate a different route for phage type conversion Enteritidis from others reported in the literature and, although IncX plasmids are not normally present in PT8 or PT13a, may suggest a possible mechanism/link connecting these phage types....

  16. R46 and pKM101 plasmid-mediated resistance to ionizing radiation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, I.; Hernadi, S.; Szabolcs, M.; Hernadi, F.

    1985-09-01

    The ability of the R46 R factor and its derivative pKM101 to modify sensitivity to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation was studied. In Escherichia coli K12 both plasmids enhanced bacterial survival after /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation. This effect was dependent on recA/sup +/ genotype but not on recB/sup +/, recB/sup +/recC/sup +/, and recF/sup +/ genotypes. 5-Fluorouracil eliminated the R46 R factor from the parent and its rec/sup -/ mutant strains. These strains lost not only the antibiotic resistance coded for R46 R factor but their radioresistance as well.

  17. Transfer and Persistence of a Multi-Drug Resistance Plasmid in situ of the Infant Gut Microbiota in the Absence of Antibiotic Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumpert, Heidi; Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Porse, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    advantage in the mouse gut in spite of a fitness cost in vitro. Our findings highlight the dynamic nature of the human gut microbiota and provide the first genomic description of antibiotic resistance gene transfer between bacteria in the unperturbed human gut. These results exemplify that conjugative...... infections, as well as the loss and acquisition of plasmids in these lineages during their colonization of the human gut. In particular, we captured the exchange of multidrug resistance genes, and identified a clinically relevant conjugative plasmid mediating the transfer. This resistant transconjugant...

  18. How should we respond to the emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in humans and animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Mendelson, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics in humans and animals has contributed to growing rates of antibiotic resistance. Previously treatable bacterial infections now require the last line of antibiotics or are untreatable. The current antibiotic of last resort for carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections is often colistin. Evidence for the shifting pattern of colistin resistance and how the international community should respond are discussed in this review. The literature on colistin resistance was reviewed. Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance encoded by mcr-1 was first documented in China during the routine surveillance of food animals. This has been followed by similar reports across a wide geographic area, in humans, animals, and the environment. The mcr-1 gene has been reported among human isolates in 29 countries, related to environmental samples in four countries, and in food animals and other animals in 28 countries. More recently, a second gene encoding resistance, mcr-2, has been isolated from porcine and bovine Escherichia coli. The emergence and horizontal transmission of colistin resistance highlights the need for heightened stewardship efforts across the One Health platform for this antibiotic of last resort, and indeed for all antibiotics used in animals and humans. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Expansion of KPC-producing klebsiella pneumoniae with various mgrB-mutations giving rise to colistin-resistance : the role of ISL3 on plasmids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordano, Cesira; Barnini, Simona; Tsioutis, Constantinos; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Scoulica, Effie V; Gikas, Achilleas; Rossen, John W; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bathoorn, Erik

    BACKGROUND: mcr-1 has been reported as first plasmid gene to confer colistin-resistance. In KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-KP) isolates, however, colistin resistance is rapidly emerging through other mechanisms. This is frequently the result of disruption of mgrB gene by insertion

  20. Multiplex PCR for detection of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance determinants, mcr-1, mcr-2, mcr-3, mcr-4 and mcr-5 for surveillance purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, Ana Rita; Bortolaia, Valeria; Kjeldgaard, Jette S.

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim: Plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mechanisms have been identified worldwide in the past years. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for detection of all currently known transferable colistin resistance genes (mcr-1 to mcr-5, and variants) in Enterobacteriace...

  1. Coastal seawater bacteria harbor a large reservoir of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Dang, Hongyue

    2012-07-01

    Diversity and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were investigated in environmental bacteria isolated from surface seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, China. Five qnr gene alleles were identified in 34 isolates by PCR amplification, including qnrA3 gene in a Shewanella algae isolate, qnrB9 gene in a Citrobacter freundii isolate, qnrD gene in 22 Proteus vulgaris isolates, qnrS1 gene in 1 Enterobacter sp. and 4 Klebsiella spp. isolates, and qnrS2 gene in 1 Pseudomonas sp. and 4 Pseudoalteromonas sp. isolates. The qnrC, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA genes could not be detected in this study. The 22 qnrD-positive Proteus vulgaris isolates could be differentiated into four genotypes based on ERIC-PCR assay. The qnrS1 and qnrD genes could be transferred to Escherichia coli J53 Azi(R) or E. coli TOP10 recipient strains using conjugation or transformation methods. Among the 34 qnr-positive isolates, 30 had a single point mutation in the QRDRs of GyrA protein (Ala67Ser, Ser83Ile, or Ser83Thr), indicating that cooperation of chromosome- and plasmid-mediated resistance contributed to the spread and evolution of quinolone resistance in this coastal bay. Eighty-five percent of the isolates were also found to be resistant to ampicillin, and bla(CMY), bla(OXY), bla(SHV), and bla(TEM) genes were detected in five isolates that also harbored the qnrB9 or qnrS1 gene. Our current study is the first identification of qnrS2 gene in Pseudoalteromonas and Pseudomonas strains, and qnrD gene in Proteus vulgaris strains. High prevalence of diverse qnr genes in Jiaozhou Bay indicates that coastal seawater may serve as an important reservoir, natural source, and dissemination vehicle of quinolone resistance determinants.

  2. Bacteria isolated from pristine high altitude environments in the Argentinean Andean wetlands: plasmid profile and multiple antibiotic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dib, J.R.; Martinez, M.A.; Sineriz, F.; Farias, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Andean wetlands, placed in the North-Western Argentine at 4,600 m altitude, are attractive for both, environmental and biotechnology studies. Most of these wetlands are completely remote and inaccessible, having a high salinity and metal contents, a wide range of daily temperature changes, and an important intensity of solar UV-B radiation. Bacteria isolated from these environments were identified by 16SrDNA sequence and resulted in Gram-positive colored bacteria. Interesting features, to our knowledge never reported so far from bacteria isolates from these pristine high altitude lake-environments, such as similar plasmids profiles and multiple antibiotic resistances are the focus of this work. At least two plasmids were found in all isolates studied by using modifications of the alkaline Iysis method. Their preliminary characterization in this work includes size, incompatibility group through PCR, genetic transference to suitable hosts by transformation and conjugation, and studies of possible relationships of them with antibiotic resistances. (author)

  3. Emergence of Ceftazidime-Avibactam Resistance Due to Plasmid-BorneblaKPC-3Mutations during Treatment of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ryan K; Chen, Liang; Cheng, Shaoji; Chavda, Kalyan D; Press, Ellen G; Snyder, Avin; Pandey, Ruchi; Doi, Yohei; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2017-03-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam is a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor with activity against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC). We report the first cases of ceftazidime-avibactam resistance to develop during treatment of CRE infections and identify resistance mechanisms. Ceftazidime-avibactam-resistant K. pneumoniae emerged in three patients after ceftazidime-avibactam treatment for 10 to 19 days. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of longitudinal ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible and -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates was used to identify potential resistance mechanisms. WGS identified mutations in plasmid-borne bla KPC-3 , which were not present in baseline isolates. bla KPC-3 mutations emerged independently in isolates of a novel sequence type 258 sublineage and resulted in variant KPC-3 enzymes. The mutations were validated as resistance determinants by measuring MICs of ceftazidime-avibactam and other agents following targeted gene disruption in K. pneumoniae , plasmid transfer, and bla KPC cloning into competent Escherichia coli In rank order, the impact of KPC-3 variants on ceftazidime-avibactam MICs was as follows: D179Y/T243M double substitution > D179Y > V240G. Remarkably, mutations reduced meropenem MICs ≥4-fold from baseline, restoring susceptibility in K. pneumoniae from two patients. Cefepime and ceftriaxone MICs were also reduced ≥4-fold against D179Y/T243M and D179Y variant isolates, but susceptibility was not restored. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of bla KPC-3 encoding D179Y/T243M and D179Y variants was diminished compared to bla KPC-3 expression in baseline isolates. In conclusion, the development of resistance-conferring bla KPC-3 mutations in K. pneumoniae within 10 to 19 days of ceftazidime-avibactam exposure is troubling, but clinical impact may be ameliorated if carbapenem susceptibility is restored in certain isolates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  4. Characterization of a plasmid carrying cat, ermB and tetS genes in a foodborne Listeria monocytogenes strain and uptake of the plasmid by cariogenic Streptococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Shi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans by natural transformation and resulted in the acquiring of multiple resistances in the transconjugants. This study contributes to our knowledge on acquired multi-drug resistance in foodborne pathogenic L.monocytogenes, which will add to a better understanding of effective clinical...

  5. Erythromycin Resistance-Conferring Plasmid pRSB105, Isolated from a Sewage Treatment Plant, Harbors a New Macrolide Resistance Determinant, an Integron-Containing Tn402-Like Element, and a Large Region of Unknown Function▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, A.; Szczepanowski, R.; Kurz, N.; Schneiker, S.; Krahn, I.; Pühler, A.

    2007-01-01

    The erythromycin resistance plasmid pRSB105 was previously isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Compilation of the complete pRSB105 nucleotide sequence revealed that the plasmid is 57,137 bp in size and has a mean G+C content of 56.66 mol%. The pRSB105 backbone is composed of two different replication and/or partitioning modules and a functional mobilization region encoding the mobilization genes mobCDE and mobBA. The first replicon (Rep1) is nearly identical to the corresponding replication module of the multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from an unknown activated sludge bacterium. Accordingly, pRSB101 and pRSB105 are sister plasmids belonging to a new plasmid family. The second replicon (Rep2) of pRSB105 was classified as a member of the IncP-6 group. While Rep1 confers replication ability only in γ-proteobacteria, Rep2 extents the host range of the plasmid since it is also functional in the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. Plasmid pRSB105 harbors the macrolide resistance genes mel and mph, encoding, respectively, a predicted ABC-type efflux permease and a macrolide-2′-phosphotransferase. Erythromycin resistance is mainly attributed to mel, whereas mph contributes to erythromycin resistance to a lesser extent. The second resistance region, represented by an integron-containing Tn402-like element, includes a β-lactam (oxa10) and a trimethoprim (dfrB2) resistance gene cassette. In addition to antibiotic resistance modules, pRSB105 encodes a functional restriction/modification system and two nonresistance regions of unknown function. The presence of different mobile genetic elements that flank resistance and nonresistance modules on pRSB105 indicates that these elements were involved in acquisition of accessory plasmid modules. Comparative genomics of pRSB105 and related plasmids elucidated that pRSB105 evolved by integration of distinct modules from different plasmid sources, including

  6. Antibiotic Resistance In Neisseria Gonorrhoeae: Impact Of Ceftriaxone Resistance On Microbial Fitness And Potential Of Resistance Determinants To Spread During Mixed Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    mega Dalton (MDa) conjugative plasmid. Evidence supported the theory that this resistance gene was introduced into the plasmid 48 through a one...six percent of clinical Gc isolates carry a 2.6 mega Dalton (MDa) cryptic plasmid, but this plasmid is not associated with any known virulence...so many strains. This theory is supported by the fact that portions of the plasmid, both large and small, are incorporated into the chromosome

  7. Development of pVCR94ΔX from Vibrio cholerae, a prototype for studying multidrug resistant IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eCarraro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has grown steadily in Vibrio cholerae over the last few decades to become a major threat in countries affected by cholera. Multi-drug resistance (MDR spreads among clinical and environmental V. cholerae strains by lateral gene transfer often mediated by integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs of the SXT/R391 family. However, in a few reported but seemingly isolated cases, MDR in V. cholerae was shown to be associated with other self-transmissible genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids. IncA/C conjugative plasmids are often found associated with MDR in isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. To date, IncA/C plasmids have not been commonly found in V. cholerae or other species of Vibrio. Here we present a detailed analysis of pVCR94ΔX derived from pVCR94, a novel IncA/C conjugative plasmid identified in a V. cholerae clinical strain isolated during the 1994 Rwandan cholera outbreak. pVCR94 was found to confer resistance to sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol and to transfer at very high frequency. Sequence analysis revealed its mosaic nature as well as high similarity of the core genes responsible for transfer and maintenance with other IncA/C plasmids and ICEs of the SXT/R391 family. Although IncA/C plasmids are considered a major threat in antibiotics resistance, their basic biology has received little attention, mostly because of the difficulty to genetically manipulate these MDR conferring elements. Therefore, we developed a convenient derivative from pVCR94, pVCR94ΔX, a 120.5-kb conjugative plasmid which only codes for sulfamethoxazole resistance. Using pVCR94ΔX, we identified the origin of transfer (oriT and discovered an essential gene for transfer, both located within the shared backbone, allowing for an annotation update of all IncA/C plasmids. pVCR94ΔX may be a useful model that will provide new insights in the basic biology of IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

  8. Development of pVCR94ΔX from Vibrio cholerae, a prototype for studying multidrug resistant IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Nicolas; Sauvé, Maxime; Matteau, Dominick; Lauzon, Guillaume; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has grown steadily in Vibrio cholerae over the last few decades to become a major threat in countries affected by cholera. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) spreads among clinical and environmental V. cholerae strains by lateral gene transfer often mediated by integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family. However, in a few reported but seemingly isolated cases, MDR in V. cholerae was shown to be associated with other self-transmissible genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids. IncA/C conjugative plasmids are often found associated with MDR in isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. To date, IncA/C plasmids have not been commonly found in V. cholerae or other species of Vibrio. Here we present a detailed analysis of pVCR94ΔX derived from pVCR94, a novel IncA/C conjugative plasmid identified in a V. cholerae clinical strain isolated during the 1994 Rwandan cholera outbreak. pVCR94 was found to confer resistance to sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol and to transfer at very high frequency. Sequence analysis revealed its mosaic nature as well as high similarity of the core genes responsible for transfer and maintenance with other IncA/C plasmids and ICEs of the SXT/R391 family. Although IncA/C plasmids are considered a major threat in antibiotics resistance, their basic biology has received little attention, mostly because of the difficulty to genetically manipulate these MDR conferring elements. Therefore, we developed a convenient derivative from pVCR94, pVCR94Δ X, a 120.5-kb conjugative plasmid which only codes for sulfamethoxazole resistance. Using pVCR94Δ X, we identified the origin of transfer (oriT) and discovered an essential gene for transfer, both located within the shared backbone, allowing for an annotation update of all IncA/C plasmids. pVCR94Δ X may be a useful model that will provide new insights on the basic biology of IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

  9. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids, extrachromosomal DNA, were identified in bacteria pertaining to family of Enterobacteriacae for the very first time. After that, they were discovered in almost every single observed strain. The structure of plasmids is made of circular double chain DNA molecules which are replicated autonomously in a host cell. Their length may vary from few up to several hundred kilobase (kb. Among the bacteria, plasmids are mostly transferred horizontally by conjugation process. Plasmid replication process can be divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The process involves DNA helicase I, DNA gyrase, DNA polymerase III, endonuclease, and ligase.Plasmids contain genes essential for plasmid function and their preservation in a host cell (the beginning and the control of replication. Some of them possess genes whichcontrol plasmid stability. There is a common opinion that plasmids are unnecessary fora growth of bacterial population and their vital functions; thus, in many cases they can be taken up or kicked out with no lethal effects to a plasmid host cell. However,there are numerous biological functions of bacteria related to plasmids. Plasmids identification and classification are based upon their genetic features which are presented permanently in all of them, and these are: abilities to preserve themselves in a host cell and to control a replication process. In this way, plasmids classification among incompatibility groups is performed. The method of replicon typing, which is based on genotype and not on phenotype characteristics, has the same results as in compatibility grouping.

  10. [The effectiveness of empirical antibiotic therapy of pyelonephritis in patients with type 2 diabetes and without depending on the availability of plasmid-mediated resistance genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chub, O I; Bilchenko, A V

    2015-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance has been increasing in the treatment of urinary tract infections, especially complicated. The prevalence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes among urinary pathogens has nether been studied in Ukraine. So, the aim of our study was to identify the plasmid-mediated resistance genes and to determine their impact on the efficacy of the treatment. A total of 105 adult patients with chronic pyelonephritis were included in the study. Among them, 32 patients were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of pyelonephritis was verified according to the criteria EAU, 2013. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms among patients with pyelonephritis were 44,4%. ESBLs was the most common isolated genes. Favorable clinical response was seen in 11/31 (35,5%) infected with ESBL-producing organisms compared with 59/74 (79,7%) patients with non-ESBL-producing organisms (p<0,05). In 16% of patients with resistance organisms antimicrobial agent was changed. Antibiotic efficiency was reduced in patients with complicated pyelonephritis due to presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes. Therefore, prоpеr mаnagеment fоr prescriptiоn of аntibiоtics and also idеntificаtiоn of ESBL-prоducing bаcteria in cоmmunitiеs arе impоrtant fоr prevеntion.

  11. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopin, M.C.; Rouault, A. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Rennes (France). Lab. de Recherches de Technologie Laitiere); Moillo-Batt, A. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Pontchaillon, 35 - Rennes (France))

    1985-02-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by co-transfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci.

  12. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.-C.; Rouault, A.

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by cotransfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci. (orig.)

  13. Rapid detection of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant AAC(6')-Ib-cr in Enterobacteriaceae by MALDI-TOF MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviaño, Marina; Rodríguez-Martínez, Jose Manuel; Pascual, Álvaro; Bou, Germán

    2017-04-01

    Rapid detection of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant AAC(6')-Ib-cr in Enterobacteriaceae by measuring acetyltransferase activity against fluoroquinolones by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The presence of the AAC(6')-Ib-cr enzyme was determined by MS by measuring the acetyltransferase activity of a collection of 81 isogenic Escherichia coli control strains [10 carrying the AAC(6')-Ib-cr enzyme during exposure to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin] and further analysis of 36 clinical isolates [25 carrying the AAC(6')-Ib-cr enzyme in addition to different combinations of quinolone resistance mechanisms]. The effect of acetylation yields an increase of 43 Da in the mass of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, but not of levofloxacin, that can be observed by visual inspection of the mass peaks in the spectra. Based on the characteristic peak pattern for the acetylated and non-acetylated forms of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, a clear differentiation between AAC(6')-Ib-cr-producing isolates and non-AAC(6')-Ib-cr-producing isolates was detected after an incubation time of 30 min, both in the isogenic control strains and in the clinical isolates. Levofloxacin was found intact. A 100% agreement was found between the MALDI-TOF-MS-based assay and the results of the molecular characterization of the tested isolates. MALDI-TOF MS is an outstanding method for detection of the AAC(6')-Ib-cr enzyme in clinical samples. The method is easy to perform and not time consuming, as analytical results can be obtained within minutes. For the first time, MALDI-TOF MS has been used to detect resistance promoted by enzymatic modification of antibiotics aside from β-lactamases, expanding the capacity of analysis into new families of antibiotics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A study on the role that quorum sensing play in antibiotic-resistant plasmid conjugative transfer in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueheng; Ma, Qingping; Su, Bingmei; Chen, Rui; Lin, Juan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Yu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Horizontal genes transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. However, the mechanisms of HGT of ARGs under the influence of antibiotics in sub-MIC remain rarely explored. Moreover, given its collective nature, HGT was considered to be relative to quorum sensing (QS) system. To investigate whether QS has any impact on horizontal gene transfer of ARGs, experiments were conducted to determine the conjugative efficiency of plasmid RP4 on Escherichia coli (E.coli) under the influences of tetracyclines (TCs), quorum sensing autoinducers (AIs) and quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). The results indicated that the sub-MIC TCs could facilitate the conjugative transfer of RP4, a process which could be enhanced by AIs but inhibited by QSIs. This study demonstrated the roles that QS played in the dissemination of ARGs, and provided theoretical insights into the mechanism of HGT of ARGs in the environment.

  15. Molecular characterization of antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates: First identification of a plasmid carrying qnrD or oqxAB in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: GyrA mutations are the major mechanisms associated with quinolone-resistant Salmonella isolates in Taiwan. Overproduction of efflux pump genes and the presence of qnr and oqxAB play additional roles in reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

  16. R plasmid with carbadox resistance from Escherichia coli of porcine origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmae, K; Yonezawa, S; Terakado, N

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates of porcine fecal origin from a farm where the antibacterial agent carbadox was used were examined for resistance to carbadox (Cdxr). Of 72 strains examined, 24 showed resistance to this drug. All 24 Cdxr strains, except one, were also resistant to tetracycline (Tcr), streptomycin (Smr), spectinomycin (Spcr), sulfadimethoxine (Sur), kanamycin (Kmr), ampicillin (Apcr), or a combination of tetracycline, streptomycin, spectinomycin, sulfadimethoxine, and ampicillin. The ...

  17. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Hammerum, A. M.; Hansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131...

  18. Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamases, AmpC Beta-Lactamases and Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Klebsiella spp. from Companion Animals in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donati, Valentina; Feltrin, Fabiola; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization of 15 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) and 4 isolates of K. oxytoca (KO) from clinical cases in dogs and cats and showing extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) resistance. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC genes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistanc...

  19. IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Mobilize a New Family of Multidrug Resistance Islands in Clinical Vibrio cholerae Non-01/Non-0139 Isolates from Haiti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carraro, N.; Rivard, N.; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Colwell, R.R.; Burrus, V.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements play a pivotal role in the adaptation of bacterial populations, allowing them to rapidly cope with hostile conditions, including the presence of antimicrobial compounds. IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are efficient vehicles for dissemination of multidrug resistance genes

  20. High diversity of genes and plasmids encoding resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones in clinical Escherichia coli from commercial poultry flocks in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niero, Giulia; Bortolaia, Valeria; Vanni, Michele

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to investigate occurrence and diversity of plasmid-mediated resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (3GC) and quinolones in clinical Escherichia coli from 200 industrial poultry farms across Italy. E. coli was isolated from colibacillosis lesions in turkeys (n = 109), broilers (...

  1. Emergence of Plasmid-Mediated Fosfomycin-Resistance Genes among Escherichia coli Isolates, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Yahia; Gallah, Salah; Hommeril, Baptiste; Genel, Nathalie; Decré, Dominique; Rottman, Martin; Arlet, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    FosA, a glutathione S-transferase that inactivates fosfomycin, has been reported as the cause of enzymatic resistance to fosfomycin. We show that multiple lineages of FosA-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase Escherichia coli have circulated in France since 2012, potentially reducing the efficacy of fosfomycin in treating infections with antimicrobial drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli.

  2. Identification of virulence genes carried by bacteriophages obtained from clinically isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasartova, Djursun; Cavusoglu, Zeynep Burcin; Turegun, Buse; Ozsan, Murat T; Şahin, Fikret

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages play an important role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) either by carrying accessory virulence factors or several superantigens. Despite their importance, there are not many studies showing the actual distribution of the virulence genes carried by the prophages obtained from the clinically isolated Staphylococcus. In this study, we investigated prophages obtained from methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from hospital- and community-associated (HA-CA) infections for the virulence factors. In the study, 43 phages isolated from 48 MRSA were investigated for carrying toxin genes including the sak, eta, lukF-PV, sea, selp, sek, seg, seq chp, and scn virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. Restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to analyze phage genomes to investigate the relationship between the phage profiles and the toxin genes' presence. MRSA strains isolated from HA infections tended to have higher prophage presence than the MRSA strains obtained from the CA infections (97% and 67%, respectively). The study showed that all the phages with the exception of one phage contained one or more virulence genes in their genomes with different combinations. The most common toxin genes found were sea (83%) followed by sek (77%) and seq (64%). The study indicates that prophages encode a significant proportion of MRSA virulence factors.

  3. Housefly (Musca domestica) and Blow Fly (Protophormia terraenovae) as Vectors of Bacteria Carrying Colistin Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jilei; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Li; Yassin, Afrah Kamal; Kelly, Patrick; Butaye, Patrick; Li, Jing; Gong, Jiansen; Cattley, Russell; Qi, Kezong; Wang, Chengming

    2018-01-01

    Flies have the capacity to transfer pathogens between different environments, acting as one of the most important vectors of human diseases worldwide. In this study, we trapped flies on a university campus and tested them for mobile resistance genes against colistin, a last-resort antibiotic in human medicine for treating clinical infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Quantitative PCR assays we developed showed that 34.1% of Musca domestica (86/252) and 51.1% of Protophormia terraenovae (23/45) isolates were positive for the mcr-1 gene, 1.2% of M. domestica (3/252) and 2.2% of P. terraenovae (2.2%, 1/45) isolates were positive for mcr-2 , and 5.2% of M. domestica (13/252) and 44.4% of P. terraenovae (20/45) isolates were positive for mcr-3 Overall, 4.8% (9/189) of bacteria isolated from the flies were positive for the mcr-1 gene ( Escherichia coli : 8.3%, 4/48; Enterobacter cloacae : 12.5%, 1/8; Providencia alcalifaciens : 11.8%, 2/17; Providencia stuartii : 4.9%, 2/41), while none were positive for mcr-2 and mcr-3 Four mcr-1 -positive isolates (two P. stuartii and two P. alcalifaciens ) from blow flies trapped near a dumpster had a MIC for colistin above 4 mg/ml. This study reports mcr-1 carriage in Providencia spp. and detection of mcr-2 and mcr-3 after their initial identification in Belgium and China, respectively. This study suggests that flies might contribute significantly to the dissemination of bacteria, carrying these genes into a large variety of ecological niches. Further studies are warranted to explore the roles that flies might play in the spread of colistin resistance genes. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most serious global threats to human health. An option for treatment of the Gram-negative ESKAPE ( Enterococcus faecium , Staphylococcus aureus , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Acinetobacter baumannii , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Enterobacter species) bacteria with multiple drug resistance was

  4. Plasmid-mediated mcr-1 colistin resistance in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. clinical isolates from the Western Cape region of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mae Newton-Foot

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colistin is a last resort antibiotic for the treatment of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative infections. Until recently, mechanisms of colistin resistance were limited to chromosomal mutations which confer a high fitness cost and cannot be transferred between organisms. However, a novel plasmid-mediated colistin resistance mechanism, encoded by the mcr-1 gene, has been identified, and has since been detected worldwide. The mcr-1 colistin resistance mechanism is a major threat due to its lack of fitness cost and ability to be transferred between strains and species. Surveillance of colistin resistance mechanisms is critical to monitor the development and spread of resistance.This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, in colistin-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates in the Western Cape of South Africa; and whether colistin resistance is spread through clonal expansion or by acquisition of resistance by diverse strains. Methods Colistin resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates were collected from the NHLS microbiology laboratory at Tygerberg Hospital. Species identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing was done using the API® 20 E system and the Vitek® 2 Advanced Expert System™. PCR was used to detect the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 colistin resistance gene and REP-PCR was used for strain typing of the isolates. Results Nineteen colistin resistant isolates, including 12 E. coli, six K. pneumoniae and one K. oxytoca isolate, were detected over 7 months from eight different hospitals in the Western Cape region. The mcr-1 gene was detected in 83% of isolates which were shown to be predominantly unrelated strains. Conclusions The plasmid-mediated mcr-1 colistin resistance gene is responsible for the majority of colistin resistance in clinical isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from the Western Cape of South Africa. Colistin resistance is not

  5. Distribution of cfr in Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Strains from Pig Farms in China and Characterization of a Novel cfr-Carrying F43:A-:B- Plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qin Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-resistance gene cfr is widely distributed among various gram-positive and gram-negative species in livestock in China. To better understand the epidemiology of cfr among Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli isolates, 254 Staphylococcus spp. and 398 E. coli strains collected from six swine farms in China were subjected to prevalence and genetic analysis. Forty (15.7% Staphylococcus spp. isolates, including 38 Staphylococcus sciuri strains, one Staphylococcus chromogenes strain, and one Staphylococcus lentus strain, and two (0.5% E. coli isolates were found to contain the cfr gene. Most of the 38 S. sciuri strains were clonally unrelated; however, clonal dissemination of cfr-positive S. sciuri was detected at the same farm. In eight randomly selected cfr-positive staphylococci, a cfr-harboring module (IS21-558-cfr-ΔtnpB was detected in six S. sciuri isolates; cfr was bracketed by two copies of ISEnfa4 or IS256 in the remaining two S. sciuri isolates. In the two E. coli isolates, EP25 and EP28, cfr was flanked by two IS26 elements in the same or opposite orientation, respectively. Complete sequence analysis of the novel F43:A-:B- plasmid pHNEP28 revealed that it contains two multi-resistance regions: cfr together with floR, qnrS1 interspersed with IS26, ΔISCR2 and ISKpn19, and blaTEM-1 together with tet(M interspersed with IS26, ISApl1, ΔTn2, and ΔIS1B. The coexistence of cfr with other resistance genes on a conjugative plasmid may contribute to the dissemination of these genes by co-selection. Thus, rational drug use and continued surveillance of cfr in swine farms are warranted.

  6. Distribution of cfr in Staphylococcus spp. and Escherichia coli Strains from Pig Farms in China and Characterization of a Novel cfr-Carrying F43:A-:B- Plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-Qing; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jian-Hua; Zeng, Zhen-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The multi-resistance gene cfr is widely distributed among various gram-positive and gram-negative species in livestock in China. To better understand the epidemiology of cfr among Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli isolates, 254 Staphylococcus spp. and 398 E. coli strains collected from six swine farms in China were subjected to prevalence and genetic analysis. Forty (15.7%) Staphylococcus spp. isolates, including 38 Staphylococcus sciuri strains, one Staphylococcus chromogenes strain, and one Staphylococcus lentus strain, and two (0.5%) E. coli isolates were found to contain the cfr gene. Most of the 38 S. sciuri strains were clonally unrelated; however, clonal dissemination of cfr -positive S. sciuri was detected at the same farm. In eight randomly selected cfr -positive staphylococci, a cfr -harboring module (IS 21-558-cfr- Δ tnpB ) was detected in six S. sciuri isolates; cfr was bracketed by two copies of IS Enfa4 or IS 256 in the remaining two S. sciuri isolates. In the two E. coli isolates, EP25 and EP28, cfr was flanked by two IS 26 elements in the same or opposite orientation, respectively. Complete sequence analysis of the novel F43:A-:B- plasmid pHNEP28 revealed that it contains two multi-resistance regions: cfr together with floR , qnrS1 interspersed with IS 26 , ΔIS CR2 and IS Kpn19 , and bla TEM-1 together with tet (M) interspersed with IS 26 , IS Apl1 , ΔTn 2 , and ΔIS 1B . The coexistence of cfr with other resistance genes on a conjugative plasmid may contribute to the dissemination of these genes by co-selection. Thus, rational drug use and continued surveillance of cfr in swine farms are warranted.

  7. Plasmid metagenome reveals high levels of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in activated sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, T; Zhang, XX; Ye, L

    2011-01-01

    The overuse or misuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the public health in the world. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are considered as important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and activated sludge characterized with high microbial density and diversity facilitates ARG horizontal gene transfer (HGT) via mobile genetic elements (MGEs). However, little is known regarding the pool of ARGs and MGEs in sludge microbiome. In thi...

  8. Identification of Qnr and AAC(6')-1b-cr plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in multidrug-resistant Enterobacter spp. isolated from extraintestinal infections in companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Justine S; Cobbold, Rowland N; Heisig, Peter; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat T; Trott, Darren J

    2010-07-14

    Fluoroquinolone resistance is becoming more common in veterinary medicine. Resistance is due to a combination of chromosomal and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance (PMQR) mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to screen 17 multidrug-resistant Enterobacter isolates obtained from opportunistic infections in companion animals for chromosomal and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants and to determine if they are co-located with other antimicrobial resistance genes including beta-lactamases. Phenotypic tests (biochemical identification, organic solvent tolerance testing) were combined with genotypic analysis (PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis, sequencing, plasmid isolation and southern blot hybridization) to characterize the molecular basis for fluoroquinolone resistance. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution for fluoroquinolone antimicrobials (enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, marbofloxacin and pradofloxacin) and by disk diffusion for other antimicrobials. Sixteen isolates were resistant to at least one of the five fluoroquinolones tested. Fourteen isolates possessed PMQR determinants which were identified as qnrA1 (n=3) or qnrB2 (n=11), often in combination with aac(6')-1b-cr (n=6). The PMQR genes were localized to large, transferable MDR plasmids often associated with an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and quinolone resistance was co-transferred with bla(SHV-12) for 10 of the 14 qnr-positive strains. Three isolates had wild-type topoisomerases, 11 had a single point mutation in gyrA (Ser83Phe or Tyr), and three had two mutations; one in gyrA (Ser83Ile) and one in parC (Ser80Ile). PMQR genes in clinical veterinary Enterobacter isolates are co-located with beta-lactamases and other resistance genes on large transferable plasmids. PMQR genes contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance when combined with topoisomerase mutations and efflux. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mohammad R; Antonic, Vlado; Ravizee, Adrien; Weina, Peter J; Izadjoo, Mina; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors' screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids. The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dyeterminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database. Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid. Transposition of Tn1331 into the Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1 enables this transposon to propagate in this Enterobacter. Since Tn1331 was previously isolated only from Klebsiella, this report suggests horizontal transfer of this transposon between the two bacterial genera.

  10. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta S. Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of faecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of faecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull faeces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and faeces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull faeces (29% and 32% were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%. Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull faeces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A and tet(B, were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12 and seagull faeces (blaCMY-2. Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull faeces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived faecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health.

  11. Presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase in Salmonella enterica isolates with resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Soares, Flávia Barrosa; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias; Fernandes, Sueli Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, the emergence and spread of resistance to nalidixic acid are usually associated with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella serotypes. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms associated with resistance to fluoroquinolone and the clonal relatedness of Salmonella strains isolated from human and nonhuman origins, in a 5-year period in São Paulo, Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Salmonella isolates was performed. PCR and DNA sequencing were accomplished to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes and to determine the fluoroquinolone determinants. The strains presented MIC to ciprofloxacin ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 mg/L (all nonsusceptible). From these, 16 strains (17.5%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥1 mg/L) and belonging to serotypes Typhimurium, I. 4,5,12:i:-, Enteritidis, and Heidelberg. Amplification and DNA sequencing of topoisomerases genes identified multiple amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC. No mutations were identified in GyrB, and 1 amino acid substitution was identified in ParE. Among the 16 Salmonella strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, 8 S. I. 4,5,12:i:- presenting mutations in gyrA and parE genes were grouped into the same pulsotype. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants: qnrB, aac(6')-lb-cr, and oqxA/B were detected among 13 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to report Salmonella isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin in Brazil. Indeed, this is the first detection of PMQR determinants in Salmonella strains from Sao Paulo State. These findings alert for the potential spread of quinolone resistance of Salmonella strains, particularly in S. I. 4,5,12:i:-, a prevalent serotype implicated in human disease and foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A putative multi-replicon plasmid co-harboring beta-lactamase genes blaKPC-2, blaCTX-M-14 and blaTEM-1 and trimethoprim resistance gene dfrA25 from a Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type (ST 11 strain in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    Full Text Available The global emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae poses a major public health threat requiring immediate and aggressive action. Some older generation antibiotics, such as trimethoprim, serve as alternatives for treatment of infections. Here, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pHS091147, which co-harbored the carbapenemase (blaKPC-2 and trimethoprim resistance genes (dfrA25 from a Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type (ST 11 clone recovered in Shanghai, China. pHS091147 had three replication genes, several plasmid-stability genes and an intact type IV secretion system gene cluster. Besides blaKPC-2 and dfrA25, pHS091147 carried several other resistance genes, including β-lactamase genes blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-14, sulphonamide resistance gene sul1, a quinolone resistance gene remnant (ΔqnrB2, and virulence associated gene iroN. Notably, the multidrug-resistance region was a chimeric structure composed of three subregions, which shared strong sequence homology with several plasmids previously assigned in Genbank. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-localization of blaKPC-2 and dfrA25 on a novel putative multi-replicon plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 clone.

  13. Plasmid-mediated resistance and virulence mechanisms in the private health sector in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: An investigation of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates collected during a three month period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Daniel G; Bester, Linda A; Somboro, Anou M; Baijnath, Sooraj; Govind, Chetna N; Essack, Sabiha Y

    2016-05-01

    Due to the lack of information on the plasmid content of MRSA strains in South Africa (SA), this study investigated the resistance and virulence mechanisms of 27 clinical isolates from the private health care sector over a period of 3 months. Plasmids were extracted and the presence of MRSA confirmed by the presence of mecA. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular characterization of common resistance encoding genes and frequently encountered virulence factors by PCR using plasmid DNA as the template. The genetic relatedness between the isolates was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All isolates were plasmid positive, and displayed ampillicin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, rifampicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and clindamycin resistance. They were all fully susceptible to daptomycin, linezolid, vancomycin, tigecycline and fusidic acid. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was found in 74.1% (20/27) of the MRSA isolates. The frequency of the resistance and virulence genes ranged from 100% to 0%. PFGE analysis revealed 10 pulsotypes, designated A-J, which showed correlation with resistance profile of the isolates in each group. Of note, 85.2% (23/27) of the isolates clustered into six major PFGE types giving an indication of similar circulating MRSA clones. This study highlights the genetic diversity and resistance mechanisms in MRSA strains from the private health sector in SA hence the need for implementing effective infection control programs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase genes in extensively drug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a patient in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveenkittiporn, Wantana; Kerdsin, Anusak; Chokngam, Sukanya; Bunthi, Charatdao; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Gregory, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    We reported a case of Escherichia coli with colistin resistance and an extensively drug-resistant phenotype. Molecular analysis revealed that the isolate carried mcr-1 and multiple β-lactamase genes includingbla NDM1 , bla CTX-M-15 , bla TEM1 , and bla CMY-2 . This is the first report of a clinical mcr-1 isolate in Thailand highlighting the urgent need for a comprehensive antimicrobial resistance containment strategy to prevent further spread. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  16. Acquisition of carbapenem resistance by plasmid-encoded-AmpC-expressing Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tommassen - van Boxtel, Ria; Wattel, Agnes A.; Arenas Busto, Jesus; Goessens, Wil H.F.; Tommassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Although AmpC β-lactamases can barely degrade carbapenems, if at all, they can sequester them and prevent them from reaching their targets. Thus, carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae can result from AmpC production and simultaneous reduction of antibiotic influx

  17. Detection of 140 clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes in the plasmid metagenome of wastewater treatment plant bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to selected antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Linke, Burkhard; Krahn, Irene; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Gützkow, Tim; Eichler, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    To detect plasmid-borne antibiotic-resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria, 192 resistance-gene-specific PCR primer pairs were designed and synthesized. Subsequent PCR analyses on total plasmid DNA preparations obtained from bacteria of activated sludge or the WWTP's final effluents led to the identification of, respectively, 140 and 123 different resistance-gene-specific amplicons. The genes detected included aminoglycoside, beta-lactam, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, macrolide, rifampicin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfonamide resistance genes as well as multidrug efflux and small multidrug resistance genes. Some of these genes were only recently described from clinical isolates, demonstrating genetic exchange between clinical and WWTP bacteria. Sequencing of selected resistance-gene-specific amplicons confirmed their identity or revealed that the amplicon nucleotide sequence is very similar to a gene closely related to the reference gene used for primer design. These results demonstrate that WWTP bacteria are a reservoir for various resistance genes. Moreover, detection of about 64 % of the 192 reference resistance genes in bacteria obtained from the WWTP's final effluents indicates that these resistance determinants might be further disseminated in habitats downstream of the sewage plant.

  18. Characterization of plasmids harbouring qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Fernandez, A.; Fortini, D.; Veldman, K.T.; Mevius, D.J.; Carattoli, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize plasmids carrying qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19 genes identified in Salmonella strains from The Netherlands. The identification of plasmids may help to follow the dissemination of these resistance genes in different countries and environments.

  19. Virulence factors, antimicrobial resistance, and plasmid content of Escherichia coli isolated in swine commercial farms

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,M.M.; Drescher,G.; Maboni,F; Weber,S.S.; Schrank,A.; Vainstein,M.H.; Schrank,I.S.; Vargas,A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Escherichia coli isolates were evaluated. A total of 80 E. coli isolates were evaluated, being 64 from clinical samples (intestinal content and fragments of organs from diarrheic piglets), seven from feces of clinically healthy piglets and sows, and nine environmental samples (five from facilities, two from feed, one from insect, and one from waste). Molecular characterization was performed by PCR detection of fimbriae and toxin genes...

  20. Diversity and stability of Plasmids from glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GRE) isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Villadsen, A.G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    was seen at the end of the 7-year period, coinciding with the ban in 1998 of the macrolide tylosin as growth promoter for pig production. The stability of the plasmid in its original host was compared with stability of the same plasmid in BM4105RF, when both strains were maintained in liquid cultures...

  1. Diversity and stability of Plasmids from glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GRE) isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Villadsen, A.G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the plasmid variation between a subset of unrelated GRE isolated from pigs in Denmark between 1995 and 2001 (five from each of the years). The isolates were tested with PFGE, plasmid RFLP, and subsequently Southern blotting with an IS1216V probe. Of the 35 isolates, 31 b...

  2. Transposon Tn5393e carrying the aphA1-containing transposon Tn6023 upstream of strAB does not confer resistance to streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Amy K; Hall, Ruth M

    2011-09-01

    The simplest form of transposon Tn5393 carries the strA and strB genes that confer resistance to streptomycin, in addition to its transposition determinants. Tn5393e, made up of Tn5393 and a second transposon, Tn6023, was found in an IncHI2 plasmid, pSRC125, recovered from a multiply antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate of bovine origin. Tn6023 is made up of the aphA1b gene flanked by two inversely oriented copies of insertion sequence (IS) IS26 and is flanked by an 8 bp duplication. It is related to several other transposons that carry aphA1b in fragments of differing length, also flanked by copies of IS26. Tn6023 is located in the tnpR gene of Tn5393, which lies upstream of the strA and strB genes, and the combined structure was designated Tn5393e. Although neither strA nor strB contain any mutations that would inactivate them, pSRC125 does not confer resistance to streptomycin, indicating that the strA and strB genes are not expressed. In Tn5393, strA and strB are transcribed from the tnpR promoter, and in Tn5393e neither this transcript nor the transcript from the aphA1b promoter in Tn6023 must reach strAB. Tn5393e was previously found in different locations in Corynebacteria, indicating that it can move and suggesting a wide distribution. The structures of several further variants of Tn5393 found in GenBank were analyzed and assigned variant designations Tn5393f-Tn5393i.

  3. Petrol and diesel exhaust particles accelerate the horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Gu, April Z; Cen, Tianyu; Li, Xiangyang; Li, Dan; Chen, Jianmin

    2018-03-07

    Particles exhausted from petrol and diesel consumptions are major components of urban air pollution that can be exposed to human via direct inhalation or other routes due to atmospheric deposition into water and soil. Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious threats to modern health care. However, how the petrol and diesel exhaust particles affect the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in various environments remain largely unknown. This study investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of four representative petrol and diesel exhaust particles, namely 97 octane petrol, 93 octane petrol, light diesel oil, and marine heavy diesel oil, on the horizontal transfer of ARGs between two opportunistic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains, E. coli S17-1 (donor) and E. coli K12 (recipient). The results demonstrated that these four representative types of nano-scale particles induced concentration-dependent increases in conjugative transfer rates compared with the controls. The underlying mechanisms involved in the accelerated transfer of ARGs were also identified, including the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the consequent induction of oxidative stress, SOS response, changes in cell morphology, and the altered mRNA expression of membrane protein genes and those involved in the promotion of conjugative transfer. The findings provide new evidences and mechanistic insights into the antimicrobial resistance risks posed by petrol and diesel exhaust particles, and highlight the implications and need for stringent strategies on alternative fuels to mitigate air pollution and health risks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of plasmid-determined mercury and cadmium resistances in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucifora, G.

    1989-01-01

    The structural basis for induction of the broad spectrum mercurial resistance operon of pDU1358 with inorganic mercury and with phenylmercury acetate was addressed by DNA sequencing analysis (that showed that a major difference occurred in the 3' 29 base pairs of the ital merR gene compared to the merR genes of Tn501 and R100) and by lac-fusion transcription experiments regulated by merR in trans. The lac-fusion results were compared with those from a narrow spectrum operon, and the pDU1358 merR deleted at the 3' end. A hybrid mer operon containing the merR gene from pDU1358 and lacking the merB gene was inducible by both phenylmercury and inorganic Hg 2+ , showing that organomercurial lyase is not needed for induction by organomercurials. A mutant form of pDU1358 merR missing the C-terminal 17 amino acids responded to inorganic Hg 2+ but not to phenylmercury, indicating that the C-terminal region of the MerR protein of the pDU1358 mer operon is required for the recognition of phenylmercury acetate. The down regulation of the mer operon by the merD gene was also measured in trans with complementing mer operons of pDU1358 or R100 or merD - mutants. In the presence of the merD gene, beta-galactosidase activity was lowered by 2 to 4 fold. The merD gene gene product was visualized by autoradiography. The Cd 2+ resistance determinant cadA of S. aureus was investigated. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment containing the cadA determinant revealed two open reading frames the larger one of which is essential for expression of cadmium resistance

  5. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiogram and Plasmid Profiles of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective laboratory-based investigative study was carried out on clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoea to determine their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and plasmid profile using standard microbiological and molecular techniques. All the 32 isolates studied showed total resistance to penicillin, spectinomycin and ...

  7. PLASMID PROFILES OF KLEBSIELLA ISOLATES IN ILORIN, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to identify factors responsible for poor clinical outcome in Klebsiella infections due to antibiotic resistance, and to detect the type of plasmids harbored by various strains of Klebsiella. Three hundred Klebsiella spp. were isolated from various clinical samples at the University of Ilorin Teaching ...

  8. Molecular Epidemiology, Sequence Types, and Plasmid Analyses of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains in Israel▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Azita; Carmeli, Yehuda; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Goren, Moran G.; Ofek, Itzhak; Navon-Venezia, Shiri

    2010-01-01

    Sporadic isolates of carbapenem-resistant KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated in Tel Aviv Medical Center during 2005 and 2006, parallel to the emergence of the KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST 258). We aimed to study the molecular epidemiology of these isolates and to characterize their blaKPC-carrying plasmids and their origin. Ten isolates (8 KPC-2 and 2 KPC-3 producing) were studied. All isolates were extremely drug resistant. They possessed the blaKPC gene and varied in their additional beta-lactamase contents. The KPC-2-producing strains belonged to three different sequence types: ST 340 (n = 2), ST 277 (n = 2), and a novel sequence type, ST 376 (n = 4). Among KPC-3-producing strains, a single isolate (ST 327) different from ST 258 was identified, but both strains carried the same plasmid (pKpQIL). The KPC-2-encoding plasmids varied in size (45 to 95 kb) and differed among each of the STs. Two of the Klebsiella blaKPC-2-carrying plasmids were identical to plasmids from Escherichia coli, suggesting a common origin of these plasmids. These data indicate that KPC evolution in K. pneumoniae is related to rare events of interspecies spread of blaKPC-2-carrying plasmids from E. coli followed by limited clonal spread, whereas KPC-3 carriage in this species is related almost strictly to clonal expansion of ST 258 carrying pKpQIL. PMID:20350950

  9. Molecular epidemiology, sequence types, and plasmid analyses of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Azita; Carmeli, Yehuda; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Goren, Moran G; Ofek, Itzhak; Navon-Venezia, Shiri

    2010-07-01

    Sporadic isolates of carbapenem-resistant KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated in Tel Aviv Medical Center during 2005 and 2006, parallel to the emergence of the KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST 258). We aimed to study the molecular epidemiology of these isolates and to characterize their bla(KPC)-carrying plasmids and their origin. Ten isolates (8 KPC-2 and 2 KPC-3 producing) were studied. All isolates were extremely drug resistant. They possessed the bla(KPC) gene and varied in their additional beta-lactamase contents. The KPC-2-producing strains belonged to three different sequence types: ST 340 (n = 2), ST 277 (n = 2), and a novel sequence type, ST 376 (n = 4). Among KPC-3-producing strains, a single isolate (ST 327) different from ST 258 was identified, but both strains carried the same plasmid (pKpQIL). The KPC-2-encoding plasmids varied in size (45 to 95 kb) and differed among each of the STs. Two of the Klebsiella bla(KPC-2)-carrying plasmids were identical to plasmids from Escherichia coli, suggesting a common origin of these plasmids. These data indicate that KPC evolution in K. pneumoniae is related to rare events of interspecies spread of bla(KPC-2)-carrying plasmids from E. coli followed by limited clonal spread, whereas KPC-3 carriage in this species is related almost strictly to clonal expansion of ST 258 carrying pKpQIL.

  10. Diversity of plasmid replicons encoding the bla(CMY-2) gene in broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from livestock animals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiki, Mototaka; Usui, Masaru; Kojima, Akemi; Ozawa, Manao; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Asai, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Broad-spectrum cephalosporin (BSC) resistance has increased in Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Japan since 2004. The purpose of this study was to understand the epidemiology of BSC-resistant E. coli in livestock animals. Among 3274 E. coli isolates from 1767 feces of apparently healthy animals on 1767 farms between 2004 and 2009, 118 ceftiofur (CTF)-resistant isolates (CTF MIC ≥4 μg/mL) were identified on 74 farms. After elimination of apparently clonal isolates from a single animal, 75 selected CTF-resistant isolates (62 isolates from 61 broiler chickens, 10 isolates from 10 layer chickens, two isolates from two cows, and one isolate from a pig) were characterized. The bla(CMY-2) gene was most frequently detected in 50 isolates, followed by bla(CTX-M) (CTX-M-2: six isolates; CTX-M-14: four isolates; CTX-M-25: two isolates; CTX-M-1: one isolate) and bla(SHV) (SHV-12: seven isolates; SHV-2, SHV-2a, SHV-5: one isolate each). In particular, 42 of 62 broiler chicken isolates harbored bla(CMY-2). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses using XbaI revealed divergent profiles among the BSC-resistant isolates. The incompatibility groups of bla(CMY-2) plasmids from 34 of the 42 broiler chicken isolates belonged to IncIγ (10 isolates), IncA/C (nine isolates), IncB/O (seven isolates) and IncI1 (six isolates), or were nontypeable (two isolates). Co-transmission of resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was observed in transconjugants with IncA/C plasmids, but not with IncI1, IncIγ, and IncB/O plasmids except for one isolate with IncB/O. Our findings suggest that the bla(CMY-2) gene is a key player in BSC-resistant E. coli isolates and that coselection is unlikely to be associated with the abundance of bla(CMY-2) plasmids, except for IncA/C plasmids.

  11. [Transfer of erythromycin-resistance among strains and species of bacteria: plasmid conjugation method in enterococcal isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Ping; Xu, Xi-wei; Song, Wen-Qi; Zhen, Jing-hui; Yu, Sang-jie; Yang, Yong-hong; Shen, Xu-zhuang

    2007-08-14

    To study if the resistance to macrolide in Enterococcus can be transferred between strains, and species of the same and different genera. Agar dilution was used to screen 30 enterococcal isolates that were resistant to erythromycin. Conjugation was performed by filter mating method. The 30 donor bacteria included 13 strains of Enterococcus faecalis, 16 strains of E. faecium, and 1 strain of E. hirae. The recipient bacteria included 1 strain of E. faecalis sensitive to erythromycin and resistant to tetracycline, and 1 strain of Staphylococcus aureus with the MIC against erythromycin of 0.25 approximately 1 microg/ml. Polymerase chain reaction was used to test the existence of ermB gene and the tranposons Tn1545 and Tn917 in the enterococcal isolates before and after filter mating. The transfer rate between different strains and species of the same genus were all 100%. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) against erythromycin of 13 conjugates were both 512 microg/ml, and Tn1545 and Tn917 were found in the ermB gene of 12 conjugates. 17 conjugates were obtained from 16 strains of donor E. faecium and 1 strain of E. hirae with the MIC(50) and MIC(90) both of 512 microg/ml. The ermB gene was found in 16 of the 17 conjugates, and 11 of the 16 conjugates showed the existence of Tn1545 and Tn917, Tn1545 existed in the ermB gene of 4 conjugates, and Tn917 existed in the ermB gene of 1 conjugate. 30 conjugates of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by plasmid conjugation and transfer with a transfer rate of 100% and the MIC(50) and MIC(90) both of 512 microg/ml. The ermB gene was found in 28 of the 30 conjugates. Both Tn1545 and Tn917 were found in the ermB gene of 23 of the 28 conjugates, Tn1545 was found in the ermB gene of 4 conjugates, and Tn917 was found in the ermB gene of 1 conjugate. The resistance to macrolide of Enterococcus, related with the existence of ermB gene and transposons Tn1545 and Tn917, can be transferred between strains and species of same and different genera.

  12. Analysis of pCERC7, a small antibiotic resistance plasmid from a commensal ST131 Escherichia coli, defines a diverse group of plasmids that include various segments adjacent to a multimer resolution site and encode the same NikA relaxase accessory protein enabling mobilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert A; Hall, Ruth M

    2017-01-01

    The ampicillin resistance plasmid pCERC7, carrying transposon Tn2 with an IS4 insertion, was detected in the draft genome of a commensal Escherichia coli isolate. The genome data also revealed that this isolate belongs to ST131, clade B. pCERC7 is 9712bp comprised of a 3319bp backbone, Tn2::IS4 (6388bp) and 5bp of target site duplication, and was present at a copy number of 40. pCERC7 is related to several plasmids composed of only the backbone, or the backbone with the Tn2 insertion in the same position. These plasmids have been found previously in Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica recovered in several different countries from as early as the 1970s. This group was named the NTP16 group after the best studied example. pCERC7 was annotated using available information about plasmids in this group and additional analyses. The backbone includes genes for RNA I and RNA II to initiate replication and the Tn2 interrupts a gene found here to encode a protein 66% identical to the Rom regulatory protein of ColE1. NTP16 family plasmids include a gene, previously designated mobA, that was found to encode a homologue (53% identical) of the NikA relaxase accessory protein of the conjugative IncI1 plasmid R64, which is known to bind to the R64 oriT. However, a nikB relaxase gene is not present, indicating that a relaxase must be supplied in trans for mobilisation by R64 to occur, as demonstrated previously for NTP16. Hence, MobA of NTP16 and relatives was renamed NikA. Upstream of nikA, we found a region closely related to the oriT of R64. pCERC7 and all members of the NTP16 family also include a multimer resolution site, nmr, similar to the cer site of ColE1. The backbone of the NTP16 family also includes genes for a demonstrated toxin-antitoxin system, LsoAB. Several more distantly related groups of plasmids that include a very closely related nmr-nikA-oriT segment (99.4-93.7% DNA identity) were identified in the GenBank non-redundant DNA database. All use an RNA I/RNA II

  13. Antimicrobial synergism against different lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying SCCmec IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, P D M; Sedaca, S; Ferreira, D C; Iorio, N L; Toledo, V C S; Freitas, A I C; Coelho, F L; Sousa, C; Dos Santos, K R N; Pereira, M O

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the synergistic activity of antimicrobial drugs against lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying SCCmec IV. The biofilm production and related genes were also detected. Forty two MRSA isolates were tested for biofilm production and related genes. Biofilm/biomass susceptibility to gentamicin (G), linezolid (L), rifampicin (R) and vancomycin (V) was determined for six isolates from three lineages prevalent in Rio de Janeiro hospitals in concentrations ranging from 0·25 to 64 μg ml(-1). Biomass was evaluated by microtitre plate test and number of viable cells (CFU cm(-2)) and inspected by epifluorescence microscopy. All isolates presented the icaA and sasG genes, but only 38% were biofilm producers. There were 50 and 45% biomass reductions when concentrations ≥4 μg ml(-1) of R or L and ≥16 μg ml(-1) of G or V, respectively, were used. Synergism tests produced a 55% biomass reduction with R(2μgml-1) + G(16μgml-1), R(2μgml-1) + L(2μgml-1), R(2μgml-1) + V(4μgml-1), and L(2μgml-1) + V(4μgml-1). Number of viable cells was reduced from 2 to 3 logs with R(2μgml-1) + L(2μgml-1) and R(2μgml-1) + V(4μgml-1). Synergisms involving R plus L and R plus V caused important reductions in biofilm/biomass and the number of viable cells. Drug combinations should be considered in the chemotherapies of MRSA-SCCmec IV infections. Biofilms in MRSA infections restrict the clinical choice of antimicrobials. Thus, knowledge of the best options for monotherapy and drug synergisms could improve clinical results. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Complete Sequence of Four Multidrug-Resistant MOBQ1 Plasmids Harboring blaGES-5 Isolated from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens Persisting in a Hospital in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David; Taylor, Geoffrey; Fuller, Jeff; Bryce, Elizabeth; Embree, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Kuhn, Magdalena; Langley, Joanne; Mataseje, Laura; Mitchell, Robyn; Roscoe, Diane; Simor, Andrew; Thomas, Eva; Turgeon, Nathalie; Mulvey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of carbapenems for gram-negative infections is becoming compromised by organisms harboring carbapenemases, enzymes which can hydrolyze the drug. Currently KPC (class A), NDM (class B), and OXA-48 types (class D) are the most globally widespread carbapenemases. However, among the GES-type class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) there are variants that hydrolyze carbapenems, with blaGES-5 being the most common. Two Escherichia coli and two Serratia marcescens harboring blaGES-5 on plasmids were isolated by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) from four different patients in a single hospital over a 2-year period. Complete sequencing of the blaGES-5 plasmids indicated that all four had nearly identical backbones consisting of genes for replication, partitioning, and stability, but contained variant accessory regions consisting of mobile elements and antimicrobial resistance genes. The plasmids were of a novel replicon type, but belonged to the MOBQ1 group based on relaxase sequences, and appeared to be mobilizable, but not self-transmissible. Considering the time periods of bacterial isolation, it would appear the blaGES-5 plasmid has persisted in an environmental niche for at least 2 years in the hospital. This has implications for infection control and clinical care when it is transferred to clinically relevant gram-negative organisms.

  15. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Platt, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10......, 11 and 13). Acquisition of the plasmid by these strains did not result in the loss of any resident plasmids but resulted in phage type conversion in 8 of the 10 strains (PT1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10 and 11). The observed changes in phage type were found to result from the loss of sensitivity to 3...... of the 10 typing phages used (phages 3, 5 and 7). Where the conversion resulted in a change to a defined phage type, both the new and original PTs belonged to the same, previously described, evolutionary lines. Enteritidis PTs 1, 4 and 8, commonly associated with poultry world-wide, were converted to PTs 21...

  16. Screening of antibiotic resistant gram negative bacteria and plasmid profiling of multi-drug resistant isolates present in sewage associated with health care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Khan Md. Anik Ashfaq, Sutradhar Pijush, Islam Mohammad Majharul, Ojha Ravi Kant, Biswas Gokul Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Healthcare effluent acts as the store house of harmful infectious agents such as the pathogens and microorganisms possessing multiple drug resistant genes. Potential health risk includes spreading of diseases by these pathogens and wide dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. Gram-negative bacteria are particularly important for causing most of the hospital and community acquired infections. Aim: This study was carried out to highlight the incidence of antibiotic resistan...

  17. Resistance to nitrofurantoin and UV-irradiation in recA; uvrA; and uvrA, lexA, Escherichia coli mutants conferred by an R-plasmid from an Escherichia coli clinical isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaseiki-Ebor, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    There have been some reports of R-plasmids conferring nitrofuran resistance by decreasing the reduction of nitrofurantoin. The mechanism by which these R-plasmids mediate nitrofurantoin resistance is still not properly understood. Since DNA repair mutants are very sensitive to nitrofurantoin, it was therefore of interest to see whether R-plasmids conferring nitrofurantoin resistance affected the nitrofurantoin sensitivity of recA; uvrA and uvrA, lexA strains of E. coli K-12. Protection against UV-irradiation was also estimated. The experiments showed that the nitrofurantoin resistance conferred by R-plasmid pBN105 was not due to defective nitrofurantoin reduction or altered permeability of the cell. Because it is known that repair-deficient bacteria have increased susceptibility to nitrofurantoin, it may be suggested that the mechanisms of UV and nitrofurantoin protection conferred by pBN105 to the DNA repair mutant strains are related. (Auth.)

  18. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  19. Preliminary investigation of resistance of plasmid DNA to neon ion beams using transformation into recipient Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, M; Seki, T; Tamai, T; Nakagawa, T; Nishimura, A; Yamashiki, N; Inoue, K; Akagi, K; Sawada, S; Kasahara-Imamura, M; Okamura, A; Takimoto, K; Watanabe, H; Ohnishi, T; Harada, K

    1999-07-01

    The sensitivity of the vector plasmid pKmK8 DNA to neon ion beams was studied under dry conditions. This plasmid contains the cloning vector pJKKmf(-) and a 3.6 kbp segment encoding the Escherichia coli crp gene that can be used in mutagenesis analysis. The survival curve of the plasmid indicated an exponential profile and a D10 value of about 16 kGy in the E. coli wild-type strain for DNA repair capability. This was similar to the D10 value for the shuttle vector plasmid pZ189 DNA. Therefore, it was assumed that the excision repair system in E. coli was not effective for repairing DNA lesions induced by irradiation with heavy ion beams.

  20. Investigation of plasmid-induced growth defect in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia; Sydow, Anne; Schempp, Florence; Becher, Daniela; Schewe, Hendrik; Schrader, Jens; Buchhaupt, Markus

    2016-08-10

    Genetic engineering in bacteria mainly relies on the use of plasmids. But despite their pervasive use for physiological studies as well as for the design and optimization of industrially used production strains, only limited information about plasmid induced growth defects is available for different replicons and organisms. Here, we present the identification and characterization of such a phenomenon for Pseudomonas putida transformants carrying the pBBR1-derived plasmid pMiS1. We identified the kanamycin resistance gene and the transcription factor encoding rhaR gene to be causal for the growth defect in P. putida. In contrast, this effect was not observed in Escherichia coli. The plasmid-induced growth defect was eliminated after introduction of a mutation in the plasmid-encoded rep gene, thus enabling construction of the non-toxic variant pMiS4. GFP reporters construct analyses and qPCR experiments revealed a distinctly lowered plasmid copy number for pMiS4, which is probably the reason for alleviation of the growth defect by this mutation. Our work expands the knowledge about plasmid-induced growth defects and provides a useful low-copy pBBR1 replicon variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. First report on rapid screening of nanomaterial-based antimicrobial agents against β-lactamase resistance using pGLO plasmid transformed Escherichia coli HB 101 K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, M. Alpha; Muralidhar, Y.; Sravanthi, M.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Nissipriya, M.; Reddy, P. Sirisha; Neelima, T. Shoba; Reddy, G. Dilip; Adilaxmamma, K.; Kumar, P. Anand; Krishna, T. Giridhara

    2016-08-01

    Combating antibiotic resistance requires discovery of novel antimicrobials effective against resistant bacteria. Herein, we present for the first time, pGLO plasmid transformed Escherichia coli HB 101 K 12 as novel model for screening of nanomaterial-based antimicrobial agents against β-lactamase resistance. E. coli HB 101 was transformed by pGLO plasmid in the presence of calcium chloride (50 mM; pH 6.1) aided by heat shock (0-42-0 °C). The transformed bacteria were grown on Luria-Bertani agar containing ampicillin (amp) and arabinose (ara). The transformed culture was able to grow in the presence of ampicillin and also exhibited fluorescence under UV light. Both untransformed and transformed bacteria were used for screening citrate-mediated nanosilver (CNS), aloin-mediated nanosilver (ANS), 11-α-keto-boswellic acid (AKBA)-mediated nanosilver (BNS); nanozinc oxide, nanomanganese oxide (NMO) and phytochemicals such as aloin and AKBA. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by microplate method using ρ-iodo nitro tetrazolium indicator. All the compounds were effective against transformed bacteria except NMO and AKBA. Transformed bacteria exhibited reverse cross resistance against aloin. ANS showed the highest antibacterial activity with a MIC of 0.32 ppm followed by BNS (10.32 ppm), CNS (20.64 ppm) and NZO (34.83 ppm). Thus, pGLO plasmid can be used to induce resistance against β-lactam antibiotics and the model can be used for rapid screening of new antibacterial agents effective against resistant bacteria.

  2. Partition locus-based classification of selected plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica spp.: an additional tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, A; Henquet, S; Compain, F; Genel, N; Arlet, G; Decré, D

    2015-03-01

    The dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae has been largely attributed to plasmids, circular DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication. Whereas high-copy-number plasmids primarily rely on passive diffusion for plasmid maintenance, low-copy-number plasmids utilize so-called partition (par) systems. Plasmid partition relies on three structures, i.e. a centromere like DNA site, a centromere-binding protein and an ATPase or a GTPase motor protein for plasmid positioning. Identification and classification of plasmids is essential for tracing plasmids conferring drug resistance. PCR-based replicon typing is currently the standard method for plasmid identification but there are new classification schemes, especially the relaxase gene typing (PRaseT). Here we developed a multiplex PCR set targeting par loci found on the plasmids most frequently encountered in Enterobacteriaceae. This method, called "plasmid partition gene typing" (PAR-T), was validated with 136 transconjugants or transformants harboring various replicon types. The method was tested with 30 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica carrying 1-4 replicons; all replicons were tested in parallel with PRaseT for comparison. Six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR including 18 pairs of primers recognized plasmids of groups IncA/C, FIA, FIB, FIC, FIIk, FII, HI1, HI2, I1, L/M, N, X. Our set of multiplex PCRs showed high specificity for the classification of resistance plasmids except for IncX replicons. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The characteristics of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjarief, Sri Hariani; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    The characterization of micrococcus (deinococcus) radiodurans sark plasmids. This bacterium has been classified as a new genus deinococcus radiodurans which is resistant to gamma-rays. It can repair itself completely almost all of DNA damages including double strand breaks induced by gamma-rays up to about 5 KGy. To reveal the repair mechanism, several investigations had been done to develop a cloning vector available for the genetic analysis. For this purpose D. radiodurans Sark are to be prepared as a vector by studying the characteristics of its plasmid. Plasmids were isolated by electrophoresis using 0.6% low-melting-temperature agarose in TAE and run for 5.5 hours, followed by the identification. An antibiotic marker was also carried out in this experiment to identify its location in the genetic materials of the cell, beside making a restriction map of the plasmid. Results have shown that D. radiodurans Sark has 4 plasmids (P1, P2, P3, and P4) and the refampicin resistant genes were not found in the plasmid. (authors). 14 refs; 4 figs

  4. High Prevalence of β-lactamase and Plasmid-mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Extended-spectrum Cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from Dogs in Shaanxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL, plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (pAmpC and carbapenemases as well as plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistant (PMQR among extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESC-R Escherichia coli from dogs in Shaanxi province in China.Methods: A total of 40 ESC-R Escherichia coli selected from 165 Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC isolated from dogs were screened and characterized for the genes encoding for the ESBLs, pAmpC, carbapenemases and PMQR genes by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic groups, virulence gene profiles and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were used to investigate the genetic background of the ESC-R E. coli isolates. Results: Among 40 ESC-R E. coli, the predominant β-lactamase gene was blaCTX-Ms (n=35, and followed by blaTEM-1 (n=31, blaSHV-12 (n=14, blaOXA-48 (n=8, blaTEM-30 (n=4, blaCMY-2 (n=3 and blaDHA-1 (n=2. The most common specific blaCTX-M gene subtype was blaCTX-M-15 (n=31, and followed by blaCTX-M-123 (n=14, blaCTX-M-1 (n=10, blaCTX-M-14 (n=10 and blaCTX-M-9 (n=7. PMQR genes were detected in 32 (80% isolates, and the predominant PMQR gene was aac(6'-Ib-cr (n=26, followed by qnrS (n=12, qnrD (n=9, qnrB (n=8, qepA (n=4, and all PMQR genes were detected in co-existence with β-lactamase genes. traT (n=34 and fimH (n=32 were the most prevalent virulence genes, and virulence genes fimH, iutA, fyuA, malX, iha and sat were more prevalent in phylogenetic group B2. The 40 ESC-R isolates analyzed were assigned to 22 sequence types (STs, and the clonal lineages ST131 (n=10 and ST10 (n=9 were the predominant STs. Conclusion: High prevalence of β-lantamases and PMQR genes were detected among ESC-R E. coli from companion animals. This is also the first description of the co-existence of six β-lantamase genes and five PMQR genes in one E. coli isolate. Moreover, ten ST131 clones harboring CTX

  5. pGIAK1, a heavy metal resistant plasmid from an obligate alkaliphilic and halotolerant bacterium isolated from the Antarctic Concordia station confined environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxia Guo

    Full Text Available pGIAK1 is a 38-kb plasmid originating from the obligate alkaliphilic and halotolerant Bacillaceae strain JMAK1. The strain was originally isolated from the confined environments of the Antarctic Concordia station. Analysis of the pGIAK1 38,362-bp sequence revealed that, in addition to its replication region, this plasmid contains the genetic determinants for cadmium and arsenic resistances, putative methyltransferase, tyrosine recombinase, spore coat protein and potassium transport protein, as well as several hypothetical proteins. Cloning the pGIAK1 cad operon in Bacillus cereus H3081.97 and its ars operon in Bacillus subtilis 1A280 conferred to these hosts cadmium and arsenic resistances, respectively, therefore confirming their bona fide activities. The pGIAK1 replicon region was also shown to be functional in Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, but was only stably maintained in B. subtilis. Finally, using an Escherichia coli - B. thuringiensis shuttle BAC vector, pGIAK1 was shown to display conjugative properties since it was able to transfer the BAC plasmid among B. thuringiensis strains.

  6. Occurrence of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance, and Disinfectant Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Ready-To-Eat Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Ye, Lei; Kromann, Sofie; Meng, Hecheng

    2017-02-01

    There are growing concerns about the coselection of resistance against antibiotics and disinfectants in bacterial pathogens. The aim of this study was to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQRs), and quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (QACs) in Escherichia coli isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products obtained in Guangzhou, China, and to determine whether these genes were colocalized in the isolates. A total of 64 E. coli isolates were obtained from 720 RTE meat samples. Multidrug resistance was observed in 70.3% of the isolates. A 100% of the isolates were resistant to benzalkonium chloride. Four types of β-lactamase genes were identified in the 16 ESBL-producing E. coli isolates: bla SHV (9.4%), bla TEM (7.8%), bla CTX-M-15 (1.6%), and bla CTX-M-9 (1.6%). PMQRs were present in nine isolates (14.1%), with aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrD detected in eight (12.5%) and one isolate (1.6%), respectively. The QACs ydgE/ydgF were most commonly present (60.9%), while qacF, mdfA, sugE(p), emrE, qacG, sugE(c), and qacE were less prevalent (1.6%-18.8%). Coexistence of ESBLs and/or PMQRs with QACs was found in 21 isolates (32.8%). The aac(6')-Ib-cr and bla CTX-M-15 genes were found to be cotransferred with qacF in one isolate. The data obtained in this study indicate that ESBLs and/or PMQRs with QACs can not only be colocalized but can also be cotransferred in E. coli isolates from RTE meat products. The E. coli isolates with multiple antimicrobial resistance genes may transmit to humans through food chain and thus require further investigation and increased awareness.

  7. blaOXA-48 carrying clonal colistin resistant-carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in neonate intensive care unit, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gupta, Minakshi

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria resistant to colistin, a last resort antibiotic reflect the pre-antibiotic era. In this study, colistin resistance carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (COL R - CRKP) strains from neonate's intensive care unit were evaluated. Molecular analysis showed that all the four colistin resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were clonally related with strong biofilm formation ability and harbored bla SHV-34 and bla OXA-48 genes. Our result suggested the need of proper surveillance and adequate infection control to limiting the spread of these organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissemination of multidrug-resistant blaCTX-M-15/IncFIIk plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from hospital- and community-acquired human infections in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Wejdene; Grami, Raoudha; Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Dahmen, Safia; Châtre, Pierre; Haenni, Marisa; Aouni, Mahjoub; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the molecular features of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae from hospital- and community-acquired (HA/CA) infections in the region of Mahdia, Tunisia. Among 336 K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from both clinical contexts between July 2009 and December 2011, 49 and 15 were ESBL producers and originated from clinical and community sources, respectively. All isolates produced the CTX-M-15 enzyme. As shown by Southern blot on S1 nuclease treatment followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) gels, the blaCTX-M-15 gene was carried on IncFII (n=4), IncFIIk (n=25), IncL/M (n=4), IncK (n=1), or untypeable (n=15) plasmids in HA isolates. In CA isolates, the blaCTX-M-15 gene was carried on IncFIIk (n=6), IncFII (n=1), IncHI1 (n=1), or untypeable (n=7) plasmids. In all, 23 and 11 PFGE types were found among the HA and CA isolates. Multilocus sequence typing on representative isolates shows diverse sequence types (STs), such as ST307, ST101, ST39, ST4, ST140, ST15, and ST307 in HA isolates and ST101, ST664, and ST323 in CA isolates. This study is the first comprehensive report of ESBL plasmids in K. pneumoniae from HA and CA infections in Tunisia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasmid borne Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamases (CHDLs) and AdeABC efflux pump conferring carbapenem-tigecycline resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harboring TnAbaRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Mohammad; Ekrami, Alireza; Shoja, Saeed; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Here we studied the prevalence and mechanisms of simultaneous resistance to carbapenem and tigecycline and accumulation of resistance determinants reservoirs in genome of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates. Susceptibility of the isolates were measured to 18 antimicrobial agents. Genetic diversity of the microbial population was determined using the International Clonal lineage typing (IC typing), multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) and plasmid profiling methods. To detect the AbaRs, Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamases (CHDLs) genes, AdeABC efflux pump genes and resistance determinants, PCR was used. Filter mating experiments were used to prove that if carbapenem resistance genes are located on conjugative plasmids or not. Among the A. baumannii clinical isolates, 40.8% were carbapenem-tigecycline resistant and in this population, 46.9% were belonging to IC I, IC II or IC III and 53.1% were IC variants. These isolates had fallen in 40 MLVA types and were harboring plasmids in multiple numbers and sizes. In this study, bla OXA-23-like was the most prevalent CHDL and conjugation analysis proved that the carbapenem resistance genes are located on conjugative plasmids. All efflux pump genes, except for adeC, were detected in all carbapenem-tigecycline resistant A. baumannii (CTRAb) isolates. Resistance determinants were distributed in both TnAbaRs and R plasmids with a shift toward the R plasmids. Emerging of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) with simultaneous resistance to the last line therapy including tigecycline represent emerging of extensively drug resistance (XDR) and pandrug resistance (PDR) phenotypes that would be a great threat to our public health system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromosomal and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms among broad-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates recovered from companion animals in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Bashar W; Nayak, Rajesh; Foley, Steven L; Boothe, Dawn M

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and investigate mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase genes that may contribute to increased fluoroquinolone resistance in canine and feline Escherichia coli isolates in the USA that displayed reduced susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. This study was undertaken because previous epidemiological studies identified a potential correlation between extended-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolone resistance. Isolates (n = 54) with reduced susceptibility to ceftazidime or cefotaxime were screened by PCR for the presence of PMQR determinants and gyrase and topoisomerase genes were sequenced. Isolates were further characterized by conjugation and phylogenetic analyses. PMQR determinants aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS and qepA were identified in 30, 23 and 5 isolates, respectively. Multiple mutations were identified in the quinolone resistance-determining region, including the novel substitutions of Glu-84 → Ala and Leu-88 → Gln in ParC and Arg-432 → Ser and Glu-460 → Val in ParE. The isolate that exhibited the highest level of enrofloxacin resistance (MIC > 256 mg/L) had a double mutation in gyrA (Ser-83 → Leu and Asp-87 → Asn) and a triple mutation in parC (Ser-80 → Ile, Glu-84 → Gly and a novel mutation, Leu-88 → Gln). The presence of PMQR genes increased the ciprofloxacin MIC values 4-fold to 8-fold in transconjugants relative to the recipient strain. Approximately 39% of the isolates belonged to phylogenetic group D and 30% to group B2, which typically contain an increased number of virulence determinants compared with other groups. Novel mutations in topoisomerase genes and PMQR determinants aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS and qepA genes were detected among extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli in the USA.

  11. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG5-PCR and ERIC-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fardsanei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7% was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1–P7 were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin.

  12. IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Mobilize a New Family of Multidrug Resistance Islands in Clinical Vibrio cholerae Non-O1/Non-O139 Isolates from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Nicolas; Rivard, Nicolas; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Colwell, Rita R; Burrus, Vincent

    2016-07-19

    Mobile genetic elements play a pivotal role in the adaptation of bacterial populations, allowing them to rapidly cope with hostile conditions, including the presence of antimicrobial compounds. IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are efficient vehicles for dissemination of multidrug resistance genes in a broad range of pathogenic species of Enterobacteriaceae ACPs have sporadically been reported in Vibrio cholerae, the infectious agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. The regulatory network that controls ACP mobility ultimately depends on the transcriptional activation of multiple ACP-borne operons by the master activator AcaCD. Beyond ACP conjugation, AcaCD has also recently been shown to activate the expression of genes located in the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Here, we describe MGIVchHai6, a novel and unrelated mobilizable genomic island (MGI) integrated into the 3' end of trmE in chromosome I of V. cholerae HC-36A1, a non-O1/non-O139 multidrug-resistant clinical isolate recovered from Haiti in 2010. MGIVchHai6 contains a mercury resistance transposon and an integron In104-like multidrug resistance element similar to the one of SGI1. We show that MGIVchHai6 excises from the chromosome in an AcaCD-dependent manner and is mobilized by ACPs. Acquisition of MGIVchHai6 confers resistance to β-lactams, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, and streptomycin/spectinomycin. In silico analyses revealed that MGIVchHai6-like elements are carried by several environmental and clinical V. cholerae strains recovered from the Indian subcontinent, as well as from North and South America, including all non-O1/non-O139 clinical isolates from Haiti. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, remains a global public health threat. Seventh-pandemic V. cholerae acquired multidrug resistance genes primarily through circulation of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements. IncA/C conjugative plasmids have sporadically been reported to

  13. Progressive resistance training increases strength after stroke but this may not carry over to activity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, Simone; Ada, Louise; Alloggia, Daniella

    2018-04-01

    Does progressive resistance training improve strength and activity after stroke? Does any increase in strength carry over to activity? Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Adults who have had a stroke. Progressive resistance training compared with no intervention or placebo. The primary outcome was change in strength. This measurement had to be of maximum voluntary force production and performed in muscles congruent with the muscles trained in the intervention. The secondary outcome was change in activity. This measurement had to be a direct measure of performance that produced continuous or ordinal data, or with scales that produced ordinal data. Eleven studies involving 370 participants were included in this systematic review. The overall effect of progressive resistance training on strength was examined by pooling change scores from six studies with a mean PEDro score of 5.8, representing medium quality. The effect size of progressive resistance training on strength was 0.98 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.29, I 2 =0%). The overall effect of progressive resistance training on activity was examined by pooling change scores from the same six studies. The effect size of progressive resistance training on activity was 0.42 (95% CI -0.08 to 0.91, I 2 =54%). After stroke, progressive resistance training has a large effect on strength compared with no intervention or placebo. There is uncertainty about whether these large increases in strength carry over to improvements in activity. PROSPERO CRD42015025401. [Dorsch S, Ada L, Alloggia D (2018) Progressive resistance training increases strength after stroke but this may not carry over to activity: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 64: 84-90]. Copyright © 2018 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Full-Genome Sequencing Identifies in the Genetic Background Several Determinants That Modulate the Resistance Phenotype in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Carrying the NovelmecCGene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheiriço, Catarina; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics due to the presence of the mecA gene, encoding an extra penicillin-binding protein (PBP2A) that has low affinity for virtually all beta-lactam antibiotics. Recently, a new resistance determinant-the mecC gene-was identified in S. aureus isolates recovered from humans and dairy cattle. Although having typically low MICs to beta-lactam antibiotics, MRSA strains with the mecC determinant are also capable of expressing high levels of oxacillin resistance when in an optimal genetic background. In order to test the impact of extensive beta-lactam selection on the emergence of mecC -carrying strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance, we exposed the prototype mecC -carrying MRSA strain, LGA251, to increasing concentrations of oxacillin. LGA251 was able to rapidly adapt to high concentrations of oxacillin in growth medium. In such laboratory mutants with increased levels of oxacillin resistance, we identified mutations in genes with no relationship to the mecC regulatory system, indicating that the genetic background plays an important role in the establishment of the levels of oxacillin resistance. Our data also indicate that the stringent stress response plays a critical role in the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance phenotype of MRSA strains carrying the mecC determinant. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates carrying different PBP2a alleles to develop resistance to ceftaroline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sushmita D; Alm, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by MRSA continue to cause significant morbidity worldwide. Ceftaroline (the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil) is a cephalosporin that possesses activity against MRSA due to its having high affinity for PBP2a while maintaining activity against the other essential PBPs. PBP2a sequence variations, including some outside of the transpeptidase binding pocket, impact ceftaroline susceptibility. This study evaluated the potential of ceftaroline to select for resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones in isolates containing a variety of PBP2a alleles and with a range of ceftaroline MIC values from different MLST lineages. Direct resistance selection experiments were performed by plating 20 S. aureus isolates (18 MRSA and 2 MSSA) on agar plates containing increasing concentrations of ceftaroline. Colonies that emerged were tested by standard broth microdilution for changes in ceftaroline susceptibility and genetically characterized. The frequency of spontaneous resistance to ceftaroline was low for all isolates and, although resistant variants were not obtained on plates containing ≥4-fold the MIC of ceftaroline, six MRSA isolates had a small number of colonies emerge on plates containing 2-fold the MIC of ceftaroline and had a 2- to 8-fold elevation of the ceftaroline MIC, while also impacting the MIC of methicillin compared with the parental isolate. Additional PBP2a mutations located in the ceftaroline-binding pocket, Y446N or A601S, were observed in several of the resistant isolates. These studies demonstrate that there is a low risk of generating ceftaroline-resistant MRSA isolates, which appears independent of any pre-existing variation in the PBP2a protein sequence or initial ceftaroline MIC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of wheat introgression lines carrying the stem rust resistance gene Sr39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn., poses a serious threat to global wheat production because of the emergence of Pgt-TTKSK (Ug99). The TTKSK resistant gene Sr39 was derived from Aegilops speltoides through chromosome translocation. In this study, we ch...

  17. IncP-1β plasmids of Comamonas sp. and Delftia sp. strains isolated from a wastewater treatment plant mediate resistance to and decolorization of the triphenylmethane dye crystal violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolze, Yvonne; Eikmeyer, Felix; Wibberg, Daniel; Brandis, Gerrit; Karsten, Christina; Krahn, Irene; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Viehöver, Prisca; Barsch, Aiko; Keck, Matthias; Top, Eva M; Niehaus, Karsten; Schlüter, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The application of toxic triphenylmethane dyes such as crystal violet (CV) in various industrial processes leads to large amounts of dye-contaminated sludges that need to be detoxified. Specific bacteria residing in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are able to degrade triphenylmethane dyes. The objective of this work was to gain insights into the genetic background of bacterial strains capable of CV degradation. Three bacterial strains isolated from a municipal WWTP harboured IncP-1β plasmids mediating resistance to and decolorization of CV. These isolates were assigned to the genera Comamonas and Delftia. The CV-resistance plasmid pKV29 from Delftia sp. KV29 was completely sequenced. In addition, nucleotide sequences of the accessory regions involved in conferring CV resistance were determined for plasmids pKV11 and pKV36 from the other two isolates. Plasmid pKV29 contains typical IncP-1β backbone modules that are highly similar to those of previously sequenced IncP-1β plasmids that confer antibiotic resistance, degradative capabilities or mercury resistance. The accessory regions located between the conjugative transfer (tra) and mating pair formation modules (trb) of all three plasmids analysed share common modules and include a triphenylmethane reductase gene, tmr, that is responsible for decolorization of CV. Moreover, these accessory regions encode other enzymes that are dispensable for CV degradation and hence are involved in so-far-unknown metabolic pathways. Analysis of plasmid-mediated degradation of CV in Escherichia coli by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight MS revealed that leuco crystal violet was the first degradation product. Michler's ketone and 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde appeared as secondary degradation metabolites. Enzymes encoded in the E. coli chromosome seem to be responsible for cleavage of leuco crystal violet. Plasmid-mediated degradation of triphenylmethane dyes such as CV

  18. aac(6')-Ib-cr is the major plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant in extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in eastern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Thomas; Bertrand, Xavier; de Champs, Christophe; Cholley, Pascal; Bajolet, Odile; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-Ec) in hospitals in eastern France. All ESBL-Ec isolated from May 2008 to April 2009 in nine hospitals in eastern France were collected and screened by PCR for the presence of PMQR genes. bla genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Randomly chosen PMQR-positive ESBL-Ec isolates were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and phylogenetic group identification. Of the 447 ESBL-Ec tested, 122 (27.3%) had a PMQR determinant. aac(6')-Ib-cr was more prevalent (118/122; 96.7%) than qnr [4/122 (3.3%), comprising 2 qnrB2, 1 qnrB1 and 1 qnrA1]. Among 37 PMQR-positive ESBL-Ec isolates selected for typing, 26 (70%) carried bla CTX-M-15 of which 25/26 (96%) co-harboured aac(6')-Ib-cr. Of the 37 isolates, 14 belonged to the B2:ST131 clone, all of which produced AAC(6')-Ib-cr. On the other hand, most of the qnr genes (3/4) were observed in strains carrying bla genes other than bla CTX-M (qnrB2 and bla SHV-12 ; qnrA1 and bla TEM-52 ). These findings suggest that aac(6')-Ib-cr, rather than qnr, is the spreading PMQR determinant in ESBL-Ec isolates, and the qnr determinant is not specifically associated with bla CTX-M genes in France. aac(6')-Ib-cr was the predominant PMQR gene in ESBL-Ec isolated in eastern France hospitals, suggesting that the distribution may be due to clonal spread of ST131 CTX-M-15-producing E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular analysis of multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Shigella spp. from 2001–2010 in Kolkata, India: role of integrons, plasmids, and topoisomerase mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajpara N

    2018-01-01

    during conjugation, establishing the role of plasmids in horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Multiple mutations such as S80→I, S83→L, and D87→G/N/Y in quinolone resistance determining regions of topoisomerases from the representative quinolone-resistant isolates could explain the spectrum of minimal inhibitory concentration values for various quinolones. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report that describes the contribution of mobile (plasmids, integrons, and quinolone resistance genes named qnr and innate genetic elements (mutations in topoisomerases in determining the resistance phenotype of all the four species of Shigella over a span of ten years. Keywords: mobile genetic element, conjugation, atypical class 1 integron, quinolone resistance, efflux pumps

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis carrying SCCmec type V misidentified as MRSA

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    Eliezer Menezes Pereira

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a rare cause of severe infections and clinical manifestations are similar to those related to S. aureus infection. We describe a hospital-acquired bacteremia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, misidentified as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The oxacillin MIC was 16 µg/mL and the mecA gene and SCCmec type V were determined by PCR. Although treatment had been appropriated, the patient died after rapid progressive respiratory failure and another nosocomial sepsis. It is important not only to identify S. lugdunensis in view of its clinical course, but also to determine its susceptibility to oxacillin by detecting the mecA gene or its product.

  1. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  2. Prevalence and molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesari, Maryam Rahimpour; Salehzadeh, Ali; Darsanaki, Reza Kazemi

    2018-03-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus. The main genes are coa and spa for distinguishing and typing of S. aureus isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate antibiotic resistance, presence of mecA and pvl genes, as well as epidemiological typing of these isolates according to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method in clinical sample isolated from Rasht city, Iran. A total of 250 clinical samples have been isolated from different hospitals. First, isolates of S. aureus were identified through microbiological methods and their antibiotic sensitivity was determined by disk diffusion agar based on a standard method of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. DNA was extracted by boiling and presence of pvl and mecA genes was investigated by PCR using specific primers. To type these isolates, amplification of fragments of coa and spa genes was done and restriction enzyme digestion pattern was determined by PCR-RFLP method. Among the 250 samples, 50 isolates belonged to S. aureus and results of antibiotic sensitivity showed that 68% (34 samples) of isolates were methicillin resistant. Frequency of mecA and pvl genes among S. aureus isolates were 60% (30 samples) and 20% (10 samples). The PCR of coa gene showed three patterns whereas that of spa gene showed two patterns for enzyme digestion. Result of PCR-RFLP using HaeIII enzymes for coa gene and Bsp1431 for spa gene showed three patterns for enzyme digestion. Recent studies indicated increase in the resistance of S. aureus to different antibiotics, which is a serious problem in the treatment of infections resulting from S. aureus in this region. The result of PCR of pvl showed high frequency of this gene in this region, and coa and spa typing by PCR-RFLP was a useful tool for typing of S. aureus isolates.

  3. Effects of 100 years wastewater irrigation on resistance genes, class 1 integrons and IncP-1 plasmids in Mexican soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven eJechalke

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term irrigation with untreated wastewater can lead to an accumulation of antibiotic substances and antibiotic resistance genes in soil. However, little is known so far about effects of wastewater, applied for decades, on the abundance of IncP-1 plasmids and class 1 integrons which may contribute to the accumulation and spread of resistance genes in the environment, and their correlation with heavy metal concentrations.Therefore, a chronosequence of soils that were irrigated with wastewater from zero to 100 years was sampled in the Mezquital Valley in Mexico in the dry season. The total community DNA was extracted and the absolute and relative abundance (relative to 16S rRNA genes of antibiotic resistance genes (tet(W, tet(Q, aadA, class 1 integrons (intI1, quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (qacE+qacEΔ1 and IncP-1 plasmids (korB were quantified by real-time PCR. Except for intI1 and qacE+qacEΔ1 the abundances of selected genes were below the detection limit in non-irrigated soil. Confirming the results of a previous study, the absolute abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples increased significantly over time (linear regression model, p < 0.05 suggesting an increase in bacterial biomass due to repeated irrigation with wastewater. Correspondingly, all tested antibiotic resistance genes as well as intI1 and korB significantly increased in abundance over the period of 100 years of irrigation. In parallel, concentrations of the heavy metals Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Cr significantly increased. However, no significant positive correlations were observed between the relative abundance of selected genes and years of irrigation, indicating no enrichment in the soil bacterial community due to repeated wastewater irrigation or due to a potential co-selection by increasing concentrations of heavy metals.

  4. Generation of Helper Plasmids Encoding Mutant Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Capsid Proteins with Increased Resistance against Proteasomal Degradation

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    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2 vectors are widely used for both experimental and clinical gene therapy. A recent research has shown that the performance of these vectors can be greatly improved by substitution of specific surface-exposed tyrosine residues with phenylalanines. In this study, a fast and simple method is presented to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding capsid proteins with single, double or triple Y→F mutations.   Materials and Methods: A one-step, high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR cloning procedure involving the use of two partially overlapping primers to amplify a circular DNA template was applied to produce AAV2 cap genes encoding VP1 mutants with Y→F substitutions in residues 444, 500 or 730. The resulting constructs were used to make the different double and triple mutant by another round of PCR (Y444500F mutant, subcloning (Y444730F and Y500730F mutants or a combination of both techniques (Y444500730F mutant. Results: Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed successful introduction of the desired mutations in the AAV2 cap gene and showed the absence of any unintended mutations in the DNA fragments used to assemble the final set of AAV2 vector helper plasmids. The correctness of these plasmids was further confirmed by restriction mapping. Conclusion: PCR-based, single-step site-directed mutagenesis of circular DNA templates is a highly efficient and cost-effective method to generate AAV2 vector helper plasmids encoding mutant Cap proteins for the production of vector particles with increased gene transfer efficiency.

  5. Effect of Shear Resistance on Flexural Debonding Load-Carrying Capacity of RC Beams Strengthened with Externally Bonded FRP Composites

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    Guibing Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Debonding failure is the main failure mode in flexurally strengthened reinforced concrete beams by externally bonded or near surface mounted fibre reinforced polymer (FRP composites. It is believed that FRP debonding will be initiated if the shear stress on the concrete-FRP interface reaches the tensile strength of concrete. However, it was found through experimental and analytical studies that the debonding mechanism of FRP composites has the potential of shear failure in combination with debonding failure. Moreover, the shear failure probably influences the debonding failure. Presently, there are very little experimental and analytical studies to investigate the influence of shear resistance of reinforced concrete (RC beam on FRP debonding failure. The current study investigates and analyzes the effect of shear resistance on FRP debonding failure based on test results. The analytical results show that the shear resistance of RC beam has a great effect on flexural debonding load-carrying capacity of FRP-strengthened RC beam. The influence of shear resistance on flexural debonding load-carrying capacity must be fully considered in flexural strengthening design of RC beams.

  6. Multilocus sequence typing of IncN plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Villa, Laura; Moodley, Arshnee

    2011-01-01

    in different countries from both animals and humans belonged to ST1, suggesting dissemination of an epidemic plasmid through the food chain. Fifteen of 17 plasmids carrying blaVIM-1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, isolated during a 5year period in Greece were assigned to ST10, suggesting...... that spread and persistence of this particular IncN-carrying blaVIM-1 lineage in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: This study proposes the use of pMLST as a suitable and rapid method for identification of IncN epidemic plasmid lineages. The recent spread of blaCTX-M-1 among humans and animals seems to be associated......OBJECTIVES: Incompatibility group N (IncN) plasmids have been associated with the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and are a major vehicle for the spread of blaVIM-1 in humans and blaCTX-M-1 in animals. A plasmid multilocus sequence typing (pMLST) scheme was developed for rapid...

  7. Ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae carrying multiple metallo-beta-lactamase genes

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    Dwivedi Mayank

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a leading nosocomial infection in the intensive care unit (ICU. Members of Enterobacteriaceae are the most common causative agents and carbapenems are the most commonly used antibiotics. Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL production leading to treatment failure may go unnoticed by routine disc diffusion susceptibility testing. Moreover, there is not much information on association of MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae with ICU-acquired VAP. Therefore, a study was undertaken to find out the association of MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae with VAP. Settings: This study was conducted in a large tertiary care hospital of North India with an eight-bed critical care unit. Materials and Methods: The respiratory samples (bronchoalveolar lavage, protected brush catheter specimens and endotracheal or transtracheal aspirates obtained from VAP patients (during January 2005-December 2006 were processed, isolated bacteria identified and their antibiotic susceptibilities tested as per standard protocols. The isolates of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to carbapenem were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic tests for the detection of MBLs. Results: Twelve of 64 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were detected as MBL producers, bla IMP being the most prevalent gene. Additionally, in three strains, simultaneous coexistence of multiple MBL genes was detected. Conclusion: The coexistence of multiple MBL genes in Enterobacteriaceae is an alarming situation. As MBL genes are associated with integrons that can be embedded in transposons, which in turn can be accommodated on plasmids thereby resulting in a highly mobile genetic apparatus, the further spread of these genes in different pathogens is likely to occur.

  8. Determination of extended spectrum β-lactamases/AmpC β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates obtained from bovine carcasses in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Montes de Oca, Saúl; Talavera-Rojas, Martín; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Barba-León, Jeannette; Vazquez-Navarrete, Jesús

    2015-06-01

    Food-borne bacterial infections have worldwide importance, and a great variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms, mainly of the chromosome type, have rapidly developed. Antimicrobial resistance was determined in this study in terms of the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid AmpC β-lactamases (pAmpC), and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) from 155 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from bovine carcasses from two states in Mexico (states of Mexico and Jalisco). Isolates were challenged with β-lactam antimicrobials (ampicillin, ceftazidime, and cefotaxime) and quinolones (nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin). The presence of the bla TEM, bla SHV, bla CTX-M, bla OXA , bla CMY, bla MOX, bla LAT, bla BIL, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA genes was examined by PCR. Clonal relationship was determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The highest resistance was found to be to nalidixic acid (64 %), followed by ampicillin (32 %), ciprofloxacin (10 %), and ceftazidime and cefotaxime (both 1.3 %). bla CMY (n = 1), bla TEM (n = 24), qnrB (n = 9), and qnrS (n = 7) genes were detected. PFGE analysis showed that the majority of isolates had a different genotypic profile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of the qnrB, qnrS, and bla CMY genes in E. coli isolated from bovine meat in Mexico.

  9. Two types of genetic carrier, the IncP genomic island and the novel IncP-1β plasmid, for the aac(2')-IIa gene that confers kasugamycin resistance in Acidovorax avenae ssp. avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Atsushi; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Koyama, Satoshi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    A unique aminoglycoside antibiotic, kasugamycin (KSM), has been used to control many plant bacterial and fungal diseases in several countries. The emergence of KSM-resistant Acidovorax avenae ssp. avenae and Burkholderia glumae, which cause rice bacterial brown stripe and rice bacterial grain and seedling rot, respectively, is a serious threat for the effective control of these diseases. Previously, we have identified the aac(2')-IIa gene, encoding a KSM 2'-N-acetyltransferase, from both KSM-resistant pathogens. Although all KSM-resistant isolates from both species possess the aac(2')-IIa gene, only A. avenae strain 83 showed higher resistance than other strains. In this research, kinetic analysis indicates that an amino acid substitution from serine to threonine at position 146 of AAC(2')-IIa in strain 83 is not involved in this increased resistance. Whole draft genome analysis of A. avenae 83 shows that the aac(2')-IIa gene is carried by the novel IncP-1β plasmid pAAA83, whereas the genetic carrier of other strains, the IncP genomic island, is inserted into their chromosomes. The difference in the nucleotides of the promoter region of aac(2')-IIa between strain 83 and other strains indicates an additional transcription start site and results in the increased transcription of aac(2')-IIa in strain 83. Moreover, biological characterization of pAAA83 demonstrates that it can be transferred by conjugation and maintained in the host cells. These results demonstrate that acquisition of the aac(2')-IIa gene takes place in at least two ways and that the gene module, which includes aac(2')-IIa and the downstream gene, may be an important unit for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Genetic transformation of a clinical (genital tract, plasmid-free isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis: engineering the plasmid as a cloning vector.

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    Yibing Wang

    Full Text Available Our study had three objectives: to extend the plasmid-based transformation protocol to a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis belonging to the trachoma biovar, to provide "proof of principle" that it is possible to "knock out" selected plasmid genes (retaining a replication competent plasmid and to investigate the plasticity of the plasmid. A recently developed, plasmid-based transformation protocol for LGV isolates of C. trachomatis was modified and a plasmid-free, genital tract C. trachomatis isolate from Sweden (SWFP- was genetically transformed. Transformation of this non-LGV C. trachomatis host required a centrifugation step, but the absence of the natural plasmid removed the need for plaque purification of transformants. Transformants expressed GFP, were penicillin resistant and iodine stain positive for accumulated glycogen. The transforming plasmid did not recombine with the host chromosome. A derivative of pGFP::SW2 carrying a deletion of the plasmid CDS5 gene was engineered. CDS5 encodes pgp3, a protein secreted from the inclusion into the cell cytoplasm. This plasmid (pCDS5KO was used to transform C. trachomatis SWFP-, and established that pgp3 is dispensable for plasmid function. The work shows it is possible to selectively delete segments of the chlamydial plasmid, and this is the first step towards a detailed molecular dissection of the role of the plasmid. The 3.6 kb β-galactosidase cassette was inserted into the deletion site of CDS5 to produce plasmid placZ-CDS5KO. Transformants were penicillin resistant, expressed GFP and stained for glycogen. In addition, they expressed β-galactosidase showing that the lacZ cassette was functional in C. trachomatis. An assay was developed that allowed the visualisation of individual inclusions by X-gal staining. The ability to express active β-galactosidase within chlamydial inclusions is an important advance as it allows simple, rapid assays to measure directly chlamydial infectivity without

  11. Resistance to classical scrapie in experimentally challenged goats carrying mutation K222 of the prion protein gene

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    Acutis Pier Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of small ruminants, is strongly influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP. Breeding programs have been implemented to increase scrapie resistance in sheep populations; though desirable, a similar approach has not yet been applied in goats. European studies have now suggested that several polymorphisms can modulate scrapie susceptibility in goats: in particular, PRNP variant K222 has been associated with resistance in case-control studies in Italy, France and Greece. In this study we investigated the resistance conferred by this variant using a natural Italian goat scrapie isolate to intracerebrally challenge five goats carrying genotype Q/Q 222 (wild type and five goats carrying genotype Q/K 222. By the end of the study, all five Q/Q 222 goats had died of scrapie after a mean incubation period of 19 months; one of the five Q/K 222 goats died after 24 months, while the other four were alive and apparently healthy up to the end of the study at 4.5 years post-challenge. All five of these animals were found to be scrapie negative. Statistical analysis showed that the probability of survival of the Q/K 222 goats versus the Q/Q 222 goats was significantly higher (p = 0.002. Our study shows that PRNP gene mutation K222 is strongly associated with resistance to classical scrapie also in experimental conditions, making it a potentially positive target for selection in the frame of breeding programs for resistance to classical scrapie in goats.

  12. Assessment of antibiotic resistance pattern in Acinetobacter bumannii carrying bla oxA type genes isolated from hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Goudarzi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlease cite this article as: Goudarzi H, Douraghi M, Ghalavand Z, Goudarzi M. Assessment of antibiotic resistance pattern in Acinetobacter baumannii carrying bla oxA type genes isolated from hospitalized patients. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:54-61.Introduction: Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative coccobacillus and one of the most opportunistic pathogens responsible for serious infections in hospitalized patients.Methods: During a 12 month study, 221 clinical isolates and 22 environmental Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected. In vitro susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates to 13 antimicrobial agents amikacin; cefepime; ceftazidime; ciprofloxacin; meropenem; piperacillin/tazobactam; sulfamethoxazole/ trimethoprim; imipenem; tigecycline; colistin; gentamycin; ceftriaxone; levofloxacin was performed by the disk diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration(MICs of imipenem; levofloxacin and cefepime.was done by the E-test according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI criteria. blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaOXA-51genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing.Results: The result of antimicrobial susceptibility test of clinical isolates by the disk diffusion method revealed that that all strains of Acinetobacter baumannii were resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam. The rates of resistance to the majority of antibiotics tested varied between 69% and 100 %, with the exception of tigecycline and colistin. Of 221 isolates tested 99(44.8% were XDR. All strains carry a blaOXA-51-like gene. blaOXA-23gene was the most prevalence among blaOXA-types.Conclusion: colistin and tigecycline can be effective drugs for treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Continuous Surveillance for Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant strains is necessary to prevent the further spread of resistant isolates.

  13. Emissions of Escherichia coli Carrying Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Resistance from Pig Farms to the Surrounding Environment

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    Lili Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli from food-producing animals to the surrounding environment has attracted much attention. To determine the emissions of ESBL-producing E. coli from pig farms to the surrounding environment, fecal and environmental samples from six pig farms were collected. In total, 119 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from feces, air samples, water, sludge and soil samples. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that the ESBL-producing isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics and isolates of different origin within the same farm showed similar resistance phenotypes. Both CTX-M and TEM ESBL-encoding genes were detected in these isolates. CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15 were the predominant ESBL genes identified. ESBL producers from feces and environmental samples within the same farm carried similar CTX-M types. The results indicated that the ESBL-producing E. coli carrying multidrug resistance could readily disseminate to the surrounding environment.

  14. Emissions of Escherichia coli Carrying Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Resistance from Pig Farms to the Surrounding Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lili; Tan, Yeke; Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Jiaqing; Miao, Zengmin; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie

    2015-01-01

    The dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) from food-producing animals to the surrounding environment has attracted much attention. To determine the emissions of ESBL-producing E. coli from pig farms to the surrounding environment, fecal and environmental samples from six pig farms were collected. In total, 119 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from feces, air samples, water, sludge and soil samples. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that the ESBL-producing isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics and isolates of different origin within the same farm showed similar resistance phenotypes. Both CTX-M and TEM ESBL-encoding genes were detected in these isolates. CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15 were the predominant ESBL genes identified. ESBL producers from feces and environmental samples within the same farm carried similar CTX-M types. The results indicated that the ESBL-producing E. coli carrying multidrug resistance could readily disseminate to the surrounding environment. PMID:25893997

  15. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains carrying the bla(OxA-23) and the bla(GES-11) genes in a neonatology center in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charfi-Kessis, Karama; Mansour, Wejdene; Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Mastouri, Maha; Nordmann, Patrice; Aouni, Mahjoub; Poirel, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant and difficult-to-treat Acinetobacter baumannii may be responsible for nosocomial infections. The production of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDLs) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLs) of the GES type possessing a carbapenemase activity has been increasingly reported worldwide in A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance mechanisms of two carbapenem resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates recovered in a neonatology center in the center-east of Tunisia. Two carbapenem resistant A. baumannii isolates were recovered. The first isolate co-harbored the blaGES-11 ESBL gene and the blaOxA-23 CHDL gene. Analyses of the genetic location indicated that the blaGES-11 gene was plasmid located (Gr6). However, the blaOxA-23 gene was located on the chromosome. The second strain had only the blaOxA-23 CHDL gene, which was plasmid located. This study showed the first description of the GES-type β-lactamase in A. baumannii in Tunisia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailan, Alexander M; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K; Sartor, Anna L; Williamson, Deborah A; Forde, Brian M; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Partridge, Sally R

    2016-07-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Horizontal transfer of tet(M) and erm(B) resistance plasmids from food strains of Lactobacillus plantarum to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Louise; Wilcks, Andrea; Hammer, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Two wild-type strains of Lactobacillus plantarum previously isolated from fermented dry sausages were analysed for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gastrointestinal tract. For this purpose, we used gnotobiotic rats as an in vivo model. Rats were initially inoculated......(2) CFU g(-1) faeces towards the end of the experiment. For erm(B)-TCs, the number was significantly higher and increased to c. 10(3) CFU g(-1) faeces. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing in vivo transfer of wild-type antibiotic resistance plasmids from L. plantarum to E. faecalis....

  18. Plasmid DNA Analysis of Pasteurella multocida Serotype B isolated from Haemorrhagic Septicaemia outbreaks in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 150 purified isolates of Pasteurella multocida serotype B were used (Salmah, 2004 for plasmid DNA curing experiment to determine hyaluronidase activity, antibiotic resistance pattern (ARP and mice lethality test (LD50 for their role of pathogenicity. A plasmid curing experiment was carried out by using the intercalating agent; ethidium bromide and rifampicin, where it was found all the plasmids had been cured (plasmidless from Pasteurella multocida. All of these plasmidless isolates maintained their phenotypic characteristics. They showed the same antibiotic resistancepattern as before curing, produced hyaluronidase and possessed lethality activity in mice when injected intraperitoneally(i.p. Based on this observation, the antibiotic resistance, hyaluronidase activity and mice virulence could probably be chromosomal-mediated. Plasmids were detected 100% in all P. multocida isolates with identical profile of 2 plasmids size 3.0 and 5.5 kb. No large plasmids could be detected in all isolates. Since all the isolates appeared to have identicalplasmid profiles, they were subjected to restriction enzyme(RE analysis. From RE analysis results obtained, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA in serotype B isolates are identical. Only 4 of 32 REs were found to cleave these plasmids with identical restriction fingerprints; BglII, HaeIII, RsaI and SspI. From RE analysis results, it can be concluded that the plasmid DNA isolates are identical. This plasmid might not played any role in pathogenicity of Pasteurella multocida serotype B, however this information is important for the construction of shuttle vectors in genetic studies of the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic septicaemia(HS.

  19. Emergence of a Staphylococcus aureus Clone Resistant to Mupirocin and Fusidic Acid Carrying Exotoxin Genes and Causing Mainly Skin Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudoulakakis, Anastassios; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Spyridis, Nikolaos; Giormezis, Nikolaos; Kopsidas, John; Militsopoulou, Maria; Lebessi, Evangelia; Tsolia, Maria

    2017-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains have recently increased in number in our settings. We sought to evaluate the characteristics of these cases over a 43-month period. Data for all community-acquired staphylococcal infections caused by mupirocin-resistant strains were retrospectively reviewed. Genes encoding products producing high-level resistance (HLR) to mupirocin ( mupA ), fusidic acid resistance ( fusB ), resistance to macrolides and lincosamides ( ermC and ermA ), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) ( lukS/lukF -PV), exfoliative toxins ( eta and etb ), and fibronectin binding protein A ( fnbA ) were investigated by PCRs in 102 selected preserved strains. Genotyping was performed by SCC mec and agr typing, whereas clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 437 cases among 2,137 staphylococcal infections were recorded in 2013 to 2016; they were all SSTIs with the exception of 1 case of primary bacteremia. Impetigo was the predominant clinical entity (371 cases [84.9%]), followed by staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (21 cases [4.8%]), and there were no abscesses. The number of infections detected annually increased during the study years. All except 3 isolates were methicillin susceptible. The rates of HLR to mupirocin and constitutive resistance to clindamycin were 99% and 20.1%, respectively. Among the 102 tested strains, 100 (98%) were mupA positive and 97 (95%) were fusB positive, 26/27 clindamycin-resistant strains (96.3%) were ermA positive, 83 strains (81.4%) were lukS/lukF positive, 95 (93%) carried both eta and etb genes, and 99 (97%) were fnbA positive. Genotyping of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains revealed that 96/99 (96.7%) belonged to one main pulsotype, pulsotype 1, classified as sequence type 121 (ST121). The emergence of a single MSSA clone (ST121) causing impetigo was documented. Resistance to

  20. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via horizontal gene transfer as well as

  1. Comparison of two DNA microarrays for detection of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Fiona

    2010-06-01

    A DNA microarray was developed to detect plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance (AR) and virulence factor (VF) genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. The array was validated with the following bacterial species: Escherichiacoli (n=17); Klebsiellapneumoniae (n=3); Enterobacter spp. (n=6); Acinetobacter genospecies 3 (n=1); Acinetobacterbaumannii (n=1); Pseudomonasaeruginosa (n=2); and Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia (n=2). The AR gene profiles of these isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA microarray consisted of 155 and 133 AR and VF gene probes, respectively. Results were compared with the commercially available Identibac AMR-ve Array Tube. Hybridisation results indicated that there was excellent correlation between PCR and array results for AR and VF genes. Genes conferring resistance to each antibiotic class were identified by the DNA array. Unusual resistance genes were also identified, such as bla(SHV-5) in a bla(OXA-23)-positive carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. The phylogenetic group of each E. coli isolate was verified by the array. These data demonstrate that it is possible to screen simultaneously for all important classes of mobile AR and VF genes in Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae whilst also assigning a correct phylogenetic group to E. coli isolates. Therefore, it is feasible to test clinical Gram-negative bacteria for all known AR genes and to provide important information regarding pathogenicity simultaneously.

  2. Detection of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase and Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants in Escherichia coli Isolates from Retail Meat in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Jiang, Xiaobing; Fu, Kaifei; Liu, Biyun; Xu, Dong; Ji, Shengdong; Zhou, Lijun

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in Escherichia coli isolated from retail meat samples in Henan Province, China. E. coli isolates were detected in 179 of 645 (27.7%) retail meat samples. Resistance of these isolates to antimicrobials was commonly observed, with 78.2% of isolates resistant to streptomycin, 74.3% resistant to tetracycline and 54.2% resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Of the 179 isolates, 30 (16.7%) expressed ESBL, with blaTEM-1 (n = 17) and bla(CTX-M-14) (n = 9) most commonly mediating the ESBL phenotype. PMQR genes were present in 14 isolates (7.8%), with qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr detected alone or in combination in nine (5.0%) and seven isolates (3.9%), respectively. The qnr genes detected included qnrS1 (n = 5), qnrA1 (n = 3), and qnrB4 (n = 1). The qepA gene was absent among these isolates. CTX-M-14 was the most prevalent ESBL type among the PMQR-positive isolates. The qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found to co-reside and be co-transferred with blaCTX-M-14 or blaTEM-1 in five isolates. Our data suggest that retail meat may act as a reservoir for multi-resistant E. coli and may facilitate the dissemination of resistance genes. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi MR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad R Alavi1,2, Vlado Antonic2, Adrien Ravizee1, Peter J Weina3, Mina Izadjoo1,2, Alexander Stojadinovic21Division of Wound Biology and Translational Research, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and American Registry of Pathology, Washington DC, 2Combat Wound Initiative Program, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, 3The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USABackground: Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors’ screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids.Methods: The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dye-terminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database.Results: Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid.Conclusion: Transposition of Tn1331 into

  4. Profiles of phenotype resistance to antibiotic other than β-lactams in Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBLs-producers, carrying blaSHV genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sacha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Extended spectrum β-lactamases production is one of the most common mechanism of resistance to extendedspectrum β-lactam antibiotics is increasing worldwide. Twenty five strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinicalspecimens were tested. Based on the phenotypic confirmatory test all these strains were defined as ESBL producers namedESBL(+. The plasmid DNA from each strains was used to investigate the presence of blaSHV genes responsible for extendedspectrum β-lactamases production. Moreover, susceptibility of these strains to antibiotic other than β-lactams in was tested.

  5. Development and characterization of wheat lines carrying stem rust resistance gene Sr43 derived from Thinopyrum ponticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Z; Klindworth, D L; Yu, G; L Friesen, T; Chao, S; Jin, Y; Cai, X; Ohm, J-B; Rasmussen, J B; Xu, Steven S

    2014-04-01

    Wheat lines carrying Ug99-effective stem rust resistance gene Sr43 on shortened alien chromosome segments were produced using chromosome engineering, and molecular markers linked to Sr43 were identified for marker-assisted selection. Stem rust resistance gene Sr43, transferred into common wheat (Triticum aestivum) from Thinopyrum ponticum, is an effective gene against stem rust Ug99 races. However, this gene has not been used in wheat breeding because it is located on a large Th. ponticum 7el(2) chromosome segment, which also harbors genes for undesirable traits. The objective of this study was to eliminate excessive Th. ponticum chromatin surrounding Sr43 to make it usable in wheat breeding. The two original translocation lines KS10-2 and KS24-1 carrying Sr43 were first analyzed using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and florescent genomic in situ hybridization. Six SSR markers located on wheat chromosome arm 7DL were identified to be associated with the Th. ponticum chromatin in KS10-2 and KS24-1. The results confirmed that KS24-1 is a 7DS·7el(2)L Robertsonian translocation as previously reported. However, KS10-2, which was previously designated as a 7el(2)S·7el(2)L-7DL translocation, was identified as a 7DS-7el(2)S·7el(2)L translocation. To reduce the Th. ponticum chromatin carrying Sr43, a BC(2)F(1) population (Chinese Spring//Chinese Spring ph1bph1b*2/KS10-2) containing ph1b-induced homoeologous recombinants was developed, tested with stem rust, and genotyped with the six SSR markers identified above. Two new wheat lines (RWG33 and RWG34) carrying Sr43 on shortened alien chromosome segments (about 17.5 and 13.7 % of the translocation chromosomes, respectively) were obtained, and two molecular markers linked to Sr43 in these lines were identified. The new wheat lines with Sr43 and the closely linked markers provide new resources for improving resistance to Ug99 and other races of stem rust in wheat.

  6. Bacteraemia due to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying the mecC gene in a patient with urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, María Pilar; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Lázaro-Perona, Fernando; Gómez-Gil, María Rosa; Mingorance, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of bacteraemia due to meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the mecC gene. The susceptibility to meticillin of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated directly from one blood culture bottle using GenomEra MRSA/SA (Abacus Diagnostica Oy) test. This test identified S. aureus but the presence of the mecA gene result was negative, and the isolate was reported as meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Susceptibility studies were done using VITEK 2 AST-P588 susceptibility cards (bioMérieux). The strain was identified as MRSA by the VITEK 2 system, although oxacillin MIC was low (0.5 µg ml(-1)). In view of these results, the isolate was tested for the presence of the mecC gene by a specific PCR and was verified as MRSA carrying mecC. The emergence of this new mecA homologue could have important consequences for the detection of MRSA when routine PCR methods are used as an identification method or provisional detection of MRSA, as in the case reported in this article, because S. aureus carrying the mecC gene will be wrongly diagnosed as meticillin susceptible. Negative results must be interpreted with caution and should be followed by conventional culture, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing or detection of mecC gene by a specific PCR.

  7. Simple method for identification of plasmid-coded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancar, A.; Hack, A.M.; Rupp, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Proteins encoded by plasmid DNA are specifically labeled in uv-irradiated cells of Escherichia coli carrying recA and uvrA mutations because extensive degradation of the chromosome DNA occurs concurrently with amplification of plasmid DNA

  8. Plasmid-free CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum confirms mutations conferring resistance to the dihydroisoquinolone clinical candidate SJ733.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily D Crawford

    Full Text Available Genetic manipulation of the deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remains challenging, but the rise of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing tools is increasing the feasibility of altering this parasite's genome in order to study its biology. Of particular interest is the investigation of drug targets and drug resistance mechanisms, which have major implications for fighting malaria. We present a new method for introducing drug resistance mutations in P. falciparum without the use of plasmids or the need for cloning homologous recombination templates. We demonstrate this method by introducing edits into the sodium efflux channel PfATP4 by transfection of a purified CRISPR/Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein complex and a 200-nucleotide single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN repair template. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data with the variant-finding program MinorityReport confirmed that only the intended edits were made, and growth inhibition assays confirmed that these mutations confer resistance to the antimalarial SJ733. The method described here is ideally suited for the introduction of mutations that confer a fitness advantage under selection conditions, and the novel finding that an ssODN can function as a repair template in P. falciparum could greatly simplify future editing attempts regardless of the nuclease used or the delivery method.

  9. Fitness Advantage of mcr-1–Bearing IncI2 and IncX4 Plasmids in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjie Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of diverse plasmids bearing colistin resistance gene mcr-1 on host fitness. Forty-seven commensal E. coli isolates recovered from the pig farm where mcr-1 was first identified were screened for mcr-1. mcr-1-bearing plasmids were characterized by sequencing. The fitness impact of mcr-1-bearing plasmids was evaluated by in vitro competition assays. Twenty-seven (57.5% E. coli isolates were positive for mcr-1. The mcr-1 genes were mainly located on plasmids belonging to IncI2 (n = 5, IncX4 (n = 11, IncHI2/ST3 (n = 8, IncFII (n = 2, and IncY (n = 2. InHI2 plasmids also carried other resistance genes (floR, blaCTX−M, and fosA3 and were only detected in isolates from nursery pigs. Sequences of the representative mcr-1–bearing plasmids were almost identical to those of the corresponding plasmid types reported previously. An increase in the fitness of IncI2- and IncX4-carrying strains was observed, while the presence of IncHI2, IncFII and IncY plasmids showed a fitness cost although an insignificant fitness increase was initially observed in IncFII or IncY plasmids-containing strains. Acquisition of IncI2-type plasmid was more beneficial for host E. coli DH5α than either IncHI2 or IncX4 plasmid, while transformants with IncHI2-type plasmid presented a competitive disadvantage against IncI2 or IncX4 plasmid containing strains. In conclusion, IncI2, IncX4, and IncHI2 were the major plasmid types driving the dissemination of mcr-1 in this farm. Increased fitness or co-selection by other antimicrobials might contribute to the further dissemination of the three epidemic mcr-1–positive plasmids (IncI2, IncX4, and IncHI2 in this farm and worldwide.

  10. Genetic characterization and plasmid replicon typing of ß-lactam resistant Escherichia coli from humans and companion animals in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited therapeutic options due to antimicrobial resistance (AR) is a major threat to human and animal health worldwide. There is a paucity of information on ß-lactam resistant Esherichia coli isolated from companion animals in developing countries; therefore their zoonotic impact is unknown. This s...

  11. DNA polymorphism among barley NILs of cv. Pallas, carrying genes for resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czembor, Paweł Cz; Czembor, Jerzy H

    2004-01-01

    Barley powdery mildew, caused by the pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is an important disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to detect DNA polymorphism among 7 Pallas near-isogenic lines (NILs) carrying Mla3, Mla12, Mlk, Mlp, Mlat, Mlg and MlLa genes for resistance to B. graminis f. sp. hordei. From among 500 random 10-mer primers tested, 3 were specific for NIL P2 (Mla3), 1 for P10 (Mla12), 6 for P17 (Mlk), 46 for P19 (Mlp), 4 for P20 (Mlat), 6 for P21 (Mlg), and 4 for P23 (MlLa). The results of this study demonstrated that the RAPD technique is a useful tool for detecting DNA polymorphism among Pallas NILs.

  12. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  13. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Burmølle

    Full Text Available Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs® for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54 and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33 were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmølle, Mette; Norman, Anders; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids) into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs®) for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54) and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33) were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  15. Subtyping of Chilean Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type I

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    Gustavo Medina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec present in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has two essential components, the ccr gene complex and the mec gene complex. Additionally, SCCmec has non-essential components called J regions which are used for MRSA subtyping. This study was performed to determine subtypes MRSA strains carrying SCCmec type I based on polymorphism of regions located downstream of the mecA gene. A total of 98 MRSA strains carrying SCCmec type I isolated from patients hospitalized at the County Hospital of Valdivia (Chile between May 2007 and May 2008, were analyzed by multiplex PCR designed to amplify the mecA gene and 7 DNA hypervariable regions located around the mecA gene. MRSA strains were classified into seventeen genotypes accordingly to amplification patterns of DNA hypervariable regions. Five genotypes showed amplification patterns previously described. The remaining twelve genotypes showed new amplification patterns. Genotypes 18 and Genotype 19 were the most frequently detected. Regions HVR, Ins117 and pI258 stand out as being present in more than 60% of tested isolates. The acquisition of hypervariable regions by MRSA is a continuous horizontal transfer process through which the SCCmec have been preserved intact, or even may give rise to new types and subtypes of SCCmec. Therefore it is possible to infer that most MRSA strains isolated at the County Hospital of Valdivia (Chile were originated from two local clones which correspond to Genotype 18 and Genotype 19.

  16. How should we respond to the emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in humans and animals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The emergence and horizontal transmission of colistin resistance highlights the need for heightened stewardship efforts across the One Health platform for this antibiotic of last resort, and indeed for all antibiotics used in animals and humans.

  17. High Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Pediatric Patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guanhua; Li, Jing; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Wenjian; Li, Shaoli; Yan, Chao; Zhao, Hanqing; Sun, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes among pediatric clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was investigated. A total of 243 nonduplicate clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae collected between January 2010 and December 2012 from Beijing, China, were studied. In total, 55 isolates (22.63%) were positive for PMQR genes, the most frequently detected gene was qnrS (13.2%), followed by aac(6')-Ib-cr (6.2%) and qnrB (3.7%). The qnrA and qepA genes were not detected. Furthermore, 92.73% (51/55) produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and 21.82% (12/55) were resistant to quinolones. DNA sequencing results showed that 14.55% (8/55) of isolates possessed gyrA mutations, while 1.82% (1/55) had parC mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). Nalidixic acid or ciprofloxacin resistance of the transconjugants increased from 2- to 32-fold. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence polymerase chain reaction typing indicated that most isolates were not clonally related. Our findings showed that the PMQR detection rate among pediatric clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae was high in China. PMQR-positive strains were more common among ESBL-producing and ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. Conjugation experiments showed that these isolates could be transferred horizontally. The present study highlights the high prevalence of PMQR in Chinese pediatrics who are not treated with quinolones.

  18. Spontaneous mutability and light-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium: effects of an R-plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, L.

    1979-01-01

    The UV-protecting plasmid R46 was transferred by conjugation to a genetically marked mouse-virulent Salmonella typhimurium strain, not derived from LT2; in this host the plasmid conferred UV protection and enhanced UV mutagenesis just as it does in LT2 lines. Tra - derivatives of R46 encountered during transduction retained UV-protecting and mutagenesis-enhancing ability. Stored strains carrying the R46-derived plasmids with strong mutator effect but not UV-protecting had lost most of their original streptomycin resistance but were slightly resistant to spectinomycin; attempts to transfer such plasmids failed. R46 enhanced the weak mutagenic effect of visible light on several his and trp mutants of strain LT2, including some whose frequency of spontaneous reversion was not increased by the plasmid. A mutagenic effect was produced by visible-light irradiation of hisG46(R46), either growing cells or nonmultiplying (histidine-deprived cells at 10 0 C). Presence of catalase or cyanide during irradiation did not prevent mutagenesis, which excludes some hypothetical mechanisms. Visible-light irradiation of hisG46 or hisG46(R46) under strict anaerobiosis had little or no mutagenic effect (controls showed that revertants if produced would have been detected). This is as expected if visible-light irradiation in air causes photodynamic damage to DNA and mutations are produced during error-prone, plasmid-enhanced repair

  19. KPC-mediated resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae in two hospitals in Padua, Italy, June 2009-December 2011: massive spreading of a KPC-3-encoding plasmid and involvement of non-intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Sara N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs producing bacteria have emerged as a cause of multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections worldwide. KPCs are plasmid-encoded enzymes capable of hydrolysing a broad spectrum of beta-lactams, including carbapenems and monobactams, therefore worryingly limiting antimicrobial treatment options. Analysis of circulating bacterial strains and KPC alleles may help understanding the route of KPC dissemination and therefore help containing the infection. Methods KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae dissemination in two 1580- and 300- bed hospitals in Padua, Italy, from initial outbreak in 2009 to late 2011 was analysed. Molecular and clinical epidemiology, including bacterial strains, KPC-encoding plasmid sequences and associated resistance genes, involved hospital wards and relocation of patients were described. Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing and MIC of carbapenems on clinical isolates were performed. Detection of resistance genes was obtained by PCR and sequencing. MLST, PFGE and ERIC were used for molecular genotyping. Plasmid analysis was obtained by digestion with restriction enzymes and deep sequencing. Results KPC-positive clinical samples were isolated from nearly 200 patients. In the initial outbreak intensive care units were almost exclusively involved, while medical, surgical and long-term wards were successively massively concerned. Analysis of KPC alleles, plasmids and bacterial sequence types (STs indicated that during the initial outbreak KPC-3 in ST258 and KPC-2 in ST147 were each confined in one of the two surveilled hospitals. While KPC-2 dissemination was effectively contained, KPC-3 in ST258 cross-spreading was observed. The simultaneous presence of two carbapenemases, VIM-1 and KPC-2, in the same isolate was also observed in three patients. Total sequencing of plasmid content of two KPC-3 strains showed novel association of resistance plasmids. Conclusions The

  20. Dissemination of Cephalosporin Resistance Genes between Escherichia coli Strains from Farm Animals and Humans by Specific Plasmid Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Been, Mark; Lanza, Val F.; de Toro, María; Scharringa, Jelle; Dohmen, Wietske|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/333690451; Du, Yu; Hu, Juan; Lei, Ying; Li, Ning; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Heederik, Dick J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Fluit, Ad C.; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; de la Cruz, Fernando; van Schaik, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins are a class of β-lactam antibiotics that are often used for the treatment of human infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli. Worryingly, the incidence of human infections caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli is

  1. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  2. Hospital clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are carried by medical students even before healthcare exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Orlin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains are prevalent in healthcare and the community. Few studies have examined MRSA carriage among medical students. The aim of this study is to examine Staphylococcus aureus (SA carriage, and particular MRSA, over time in cohort medical students Methods Prospective collection of nasal swabs from medical students in Israel and assessment of SA carriage. Three samples were taken per student in preclinical and clinical parts of studies. Antibiotic susceptibilities were recorded and MRSA typing was performed by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec types, Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL encoding genes, and spa types. Clonality was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results Among 58 students, SA carriage rates increased from 33% to 38% to 41% at baseline (preclinical studies, 13 and 19 months (clinical studies, respectively (p = 0.07. Methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA carriage increased in the clinical studies period (22 to 41%, p = 0.01. Overall, seven students (12% carried 13 MRSA isolates. MRSA isolates were PVL negative and were characterized as SCCmecII-t002, SCCmecIV-t032, or t12435 with untypable SCCmec. MRSA carriage during the pre-clinical studies was evident in 4/7 students. Two students carried different MRSA clones at various times and persistent MRSA carriage was noted in one student. Simultaneous carriage of MRSA and MSSA was not detected. Conclusions MSSA carriage increased during the clinical part of studies in Israeli medical students. Compared with previous reports, higher rates of MRSA carriage were evident. MRSA strains were genotypically similar to Israeli healthcare-associated clones; however, carriage occurred largely before healthcare exposure, implying community-acquisition of hospital strains.

  3. Resistance of transgenic eggplant carrying the oryzacystatin gene to Mechanitis polymnia and Mechanitis lysimnia - DOI: 10.4025/actasciagron.v27i4.1345

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula de Oliveira; UFV; Otoni, Wagner Campos; UFV; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho; Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde; Galvan, Tederson Luiz; UFV; Pereira, Eliseu José Guedes; UFV; Picoli, Edgard Augusto de Toledo; UFV; Silva, Derly José Henriques da; UFV

    2008-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate the resistance of transgenic eggplant (Solanum melongena) carrying the oryzacystatin gene to Mechanitis polymnia L. and Mechanitis lysimnia Fabr. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). The leaf area consumed, the mortality and duration of the larval and pupal phases of M. polymnia and M. lysimnia were evaluated. Results showed the transgenic eggplant is not resistant to Lepidoptera M. polymnia and M. lysimnia Esta pesquisa objetivou avaliar a resistência da berinjela (...

  4. Mutation in ESBL Plasmid from Escherichia coli O104:H4 Leads Autoagglutination and Enhanced Plasmid Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Poidevin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Conjugative plasmids are one of the main driving force of wide-spreading of multidrug resistance (MDR bacteria. They are self-transmittable via conjugation as carrying the required set of genes and cis-acting DNA locus for direct cell-to-cell transfer. IncI incompatibility plasmids are nowadays often associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producing Enterobacteria in clinic and environment. pESBL-EA11 was isolated from Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain in Germany in 2011. During the previous study identifying transfer genes of pESBL-EA11, it was shown that transposon insertion at certain DNA region of the plasmid, referred to as Hft, resulted in great enhancement of transfer ability. This suggested that genetic modifications can enhance dissemination of MDR plasmids. Such ‘superspreader’ mutations have attracted little attention so far despite their high potential to worsen MDR spreading. Present study aimed to gain our understanding on regulatory elements that involved pESBL transfer. While previous studies of IncI plasmids indicated that immediate downstream gene of Hft, traA, is not essential for conjugative transfer, here we showed that overexpression of TraA in host cell elevated transfer rate of pESBL-EA11. Transposon insertion or certain nucleotide substitutions in Hft led strong TraA overexpression which resulted in activation of essential regulator TraB and likely overexpression of conjugative pili. Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy observation suggested that IncI pili are distinct from other types of conjugative pili (such as long filamentous F-type pili and rather expressed throughout the cell surface. High transfer efficiency in the mutant pESBL-EA11 was involved with hyperpiliation which facilitates cell-to-cell adhesion, including autoagglutination. The capability of plasmids to evolve to highly transmissible mutant is alarming, particularly it might also have adverse effect on host pathogenicity.

  5. [Combination of bla(VIM-1) and qnrS2 on the same plasmid in Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Seville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José M; Conejo, M Carmen; Díaz de Alba, Paula; López-Cerero, Lorena; Fernandez-Echauri, Pedro; Pascual, Alvaro

    2012-05-01

    Combined resistance to quinolones and β-lactams is common in Enterobacteriaceae. The appearance in enterobacteria coding for metallo-β-lactamases and determinants of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance are an emerging problem in our country. The susceptibility was determined by E-test. The resistance genes were detected by PCR and the corresponding plasmids were characterised. This study describes 2 strains (1 Klebsiella oxytoca, 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae) carrying the genes qnrS2 and blaVIM-1 in a transferable plasmid of 70-Kb isolated in surveillance cultures at the University Hospital Virgen Macarena in Seville. This is the first combination of qnrS2 and bla(VIM-1) on the same non-typeable plasmid isolated in our centre. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of metal and biocides resistance genes in drug resistance and susceptible Salmonella enterica from food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Generally drug resistant bacteria carry antibiotic resistance genes and heavy metal and biocide resistance genes on large conjugative plasmids. The presence of these metal and biocide resistance genes in susceptible bacteria are not assessed comprehensively. Hence, WGS data of susceptib...

  7. Horizontal Transfer of Carbapenemase-Encoding Plasmids and Comparison with Hospital Epidemiology Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, C. A.; Weingarten, R. A.; Khil, P.; Dekker, J. P.; Mathers, A. J.; Sheppard, A. E.; Segre, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing organisms have spread worldwide, and infections with these bacteria cause significant morbidity. Horizontal transfer of plasmids carrying genes that encode carbapenemases plays an important role in the spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here we investigate parameters regulating conjugation using an Escherichia coli laboratory strain that lacks plasmids or restriction enzyme modification systems as a recipient and also using patient isolates as donors and recipients. Because conjugation is tightly regulated, we performed a systematic analysis of the transfer of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC)-encoding plasmids into multiple strains under different environmental conditions to investigate critical variables. We used four blaKPC-carrying plasmids isolated from patient strains obtained from two hospitals: pKpQIL and pKPC-47e from the National Institutes of Health, and pKPC_UVA01 and pKPC_UVA02 from the University of Virginia. Plasmid transfer frequency differed substantially between different donor and recipient pairs, and the frequency was influenced by plasmid content, temperature, and substrate, in addition to donor and recipient strain. pKPC-47e was attenuated in conjugation efficiency across all conditions tested. Despite its presence in multiple clinical species, pKPC_UVA01 had lower conjugation efficiencies than pKpQIL into recipient strains. The conjugation frequency of these plasmids into K. pneumoniae and E. coli patient isolates ranged widely without a clear correlation with clinical epidemiological data. Our results highlight the importance of each variable examined in these controlled experiments. The in vitro models did not reliably predict plasmid mobilization observed in a patient population, indicating that further studies are needed to understand the most important variables affecting horizontal transfer in vivo. PMID:27270289

  8. Inactivation efficiency of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance genes during water treatment with chlorine, UV, and UV/H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Younggun; Chung, Hay Jung; Wen Di, Doris Yoong; Dodd, Michael C; Hur, Hor-Gil; Lee, Yunho

    2017-10-15

    This study assessed the inactivation efficiency of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) both in extracellular form (e-ARG) and present within Escherichia coli (intracellular form, i-ARG) during water treatment with chlorine, UV (254 nm), and UV/H 2 O 2 . A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method was used to quantify the ARG damage to amp R (850 bp) and kan R (806 bp) amplicons, both of which are located in the pUC4K plasmid. The plate count and flow cytometry methods were also used to determine the bacterial inactivation parameters, such as culturability and membrane damage, respectively. In the first part of the study, the kinetics of E. coli inactivation and ARG damage were determined in phosphate buffered solutions. The ARG damage occurred much more slowly than E. coli inactivation in all cases. To achieve 4-log reduction of ARG concentration at pH 7, the required chlorine exposure and UV fluence were 33-72 (mg × min)/L for chlorine and 50-130 mJ/cm 2 for UV and UV/H 2 O 2 . After increasing pH from 7 to 8, the rates of ARG damage decreased for chlorine, while they did not vary for UV and UV/H 2 O 2 . The i-ARGs mostly showed lower rates of damage compared to the e-ARGs due to the protective roles of cellular components against oxidants and UV. The contribution of OH radicals to i-ARG damage was negligible in UV/H 2 O 2 due to significant OH radical scavenging by cellular components. In all cases, the ARG damage rates were similar for amp R versus kan R , except for the chlorination of e-ARGs, in which the damage to amp R occurred faster than that to kan R . Chlorine and UV dose-dependent ARG inactivation levels determined in a wastewater effluent matrix could be reasonably explained by the kinetic data obtained from the phosphate buffered solutions and the expected oxidant (chlorine and OH radicals) demands by water matrix components. These results can be useful in optimizing chlorine and UV-based disinfection systems to achieve ARG

  9. Occurrence of blaNDM-7within IncX3-type plasmid of Escherichia coli from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Deepjyoti; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha; Ingti, Birson; Choudhury, Nargis Alom; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Dhar, Debadatta; Chakravarty, Atanu

    2017-04-01

    New-Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-7 with higher hydrolytic activity than its ancestor NDM-1 is emerging across the globe including India. In this study, we have investigated the genetic context of bla NDM-7 and alteration in plasmid copy number under concentration gradient carbapenem stress. Six bla NDM-7 producing Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from Silchar Medical College and Hospital and the co-existence of other β-lactamases and transferability of this resistant determinant was determined by transformation and conjugation assay followed by typing of the plasmid by PBRT method. Genetic context and plasmid stability of bla NDM-7 was also determined. The change in copy number of transconjugable plasmid carrying bla NDM-7 under exposure of different carbapenem antibiotics was determined by quantitative Real Time PCR. All the six isolates carrying bla NDM-7 were conjugatively transferable through an IncX3-type plasmid and were also found to co-harbor bla CTX-M-15 . Genetic analysis of bla NDM-7 showed an association of ISAba125, IS5 and a truncated portion of ISAba125 in the upstream region and ble MBL gene in the downstream region of bla NDM-7 . Complete loss of the plasmids carrying bla NDM-7 was observed between 85th to 90th serial passages when antibiotic pressure was withdrawn. After analyzing the relative copy number it was observed that the copy number of the bla NDM-7 encoding plasmid was highly affected by the concentration of ertapenem. The present study has first demonstrated presence of IncX3-type plasmid encoding bla NDM-7 within nosocomial isolates of E. coli. Measures must be taken to prevent or atleast slowdown the emergence of this resistance determinant in this country. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  11. ESBL, plasmidic AmpC, and associated quinolone resistance determinants in coliforms isolated from hospital effluent: first report of qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, and blaCMY-4 in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anssour, Lynda; Messai, Yamina; Derkaoui, Meriem; Alouache, Souhila; Estepa, Vanesa; Somalo, Sergio; Torres, Carmen; Bakour, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    The characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases , plasmidic AmpC (pAmpC), and associated plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants in cefotaxime-resistant coliforms isolated from hospital effluent in Algiers showed blaCTX-M genes in 89%, blaTEM-1 in 79·8%, and pAmpC genes (blaCIT) in 2·7% isolates. Association of ISEcp1B with blaCTX-M was found in all CTX-M+ isolates, and 97·2% harboured class 1 integrons. Sequencing showed blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-3, and blaCMY-4 genes. blaCTX-M-3 and blaCTX-M-15 were located in Inc L/M conjugative plasmids. The PMQR determinants identified were qnrB1, qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, qnrS2, and aac(6')-Ib-cr. qnrB2, qnrB9, qnrB19, and blaCMY-4 are described for the first time in Algeria and qnrB19 for the first time in non-clinical environments. This study highlights the major potential role of hospital effluents as providers of resistance genes to natural environments.

  12. Circulation of a multiresistant, conjugative, IncA/C plasmid within the nosocomial Providencia stuartii population in the Athens area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Tryfinopoulou, Kyriaki; Polemis, Michalis; Pappa, Olga; Miriagou, Vivi; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to report a multidrug-resistant outbreak of Providencia stuartii that occurred in inpatients in the Athens area in 2012 resulting from a very successful transmissible A/C multidrug-resistant plasmid. Thirteen multidrug-resistant P. stuartii clinical isolates from 5 hospitals were studied. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antibiotic resistance genes and their genetic surround were detected by PCR and sequencing. Plasmid analysis included conjugation experiments using liquid cultures, sizing by S1 digestion, and incompatibility replicon typing by PCR. Isolates were grouped into 2 distinct clonal types A and B, exhibiting similarity less than 70%. Isolates of type A were recovered from patients hospitalized in 4 different hospitals with no obvious epidemiological linkage, while isolates of type B were recovered from patients treated in a single hospital. Both clonal types harbored a conjugative plasmid of 130 bp and IncA/C replicon type carrying 5 β-lactamase genes bla(SHV-5), bla(VEB-1), bla(VIM-1), bla(OXA-10), and bla(TEM-1) and aminoglycosides resistant determinants. All β-lactamase genes were included in stable structures as IS26, IS1999, and In-e541. The current plasmid seemed to have many common determinants with previously reported plasmids derived from P. stuartii and Proteus mirabilis clinical isolates and exhibited the ability to circulate in nosocomial bacterial populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of Enterobacter hormaechei carrying blaNDM-1 and blaKPC-2 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Biwei; Feng, Yu; McNally, Alan; Zong, Zhiyong

    2018-02-01

    Three carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of the Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC) were recovered from different patients in a hospital. All 3 isolates carried 2 carbapenemase genes bla KPC-2 and bla NDM-1 . A study was performed to characterize their relatedness and to investigate possible links among the patients. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the isolates were Enterobacter hormaechei and belonged to ST177 of the ECC. There were 19-142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the isolates, suggesting that the isolates were likely from a central reservoir, which might have existed for some time. bla KPC-2 and bla NDM-1 were carried on 2 different IncF-type plasmids in the isolates. The 3 bla NDM-1 -carrying plasmids were almost identical and were self-transmissible, while the bla KPC-2 -carrying plasmids were only transmissible in the presence of the bla NDM-1 -carrying plasmid. The source of and direct links among them were not identified, suggesting a hospital transmission of a common multidrug resistant strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transfer of Wild-Type Plasmids Harbouring Tetracycline or Erythromycin Resistance Genes from Native Strains of Lactobacillus plantarum to other Bacteria in a Gastrointestinal Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feld, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Overførsel af oprindelige plasmider indeholdende tetracyklin eller erythromycin resistensgener fra naturligt forekommende Lactobacillus plantarum stammer til andre bakterier i et tarmmiljø Denne rapport omhandler overførsel af plasmider vha. konjugation fra naturlige laktobaciller til andre...... optræder som mulige recipienter. En vurdering af antibiotikas selektive virkning, både i koncentrationer under det hæmmende niveau og i koncentrationer der simulerer kliniske niveauer, er også medtaget. Derudover, er der antaget et mere mekanistisk synspunkt med fokus på de genetiske faktorer for plasmider...... fokus på tetracyklin og erythromycin samt på laktobaciller, konjugation og rolling-circle replikerende plasmider, idet de praktiske studier specielt har koncentreret sig om dette. 6 Manuskript I, havde til formål at teste to naturligt forekommende Lactobacillus plantarum stammers (DG 507 og DG 522...

  15. Destabilization of IncA and IncC plasmids by SGI1 and SGI2 type Salmonella genomic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Both the Salmonella genomic islands (SGI) and the conjugative IncC plasmids are known to contribute substantially to the acquisition of resistance to multiple antibiotics, and plasmids in the A/C group are known to mobilize the Salmonella genomic island SGI1, which also carries multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid pRMH760 (IncC; A/C 2 ) was shown to mobilize SGI1 variants SGI1-I, SGI1-F, SGI1-K and SGI2 from Salmonella enterica to Escherichia coli where it was integrated at the preferred location, at the end of the trmE (thdF) gene. The plasmid was transferred at a similar frequency. However, we observed that co-transfer of the SGI and the plasmid was rarer. In E. coli to E. coli transfer, the frequency of transfer of the IncC plasmid pRMH760 was at least 1000-fold lower when the donor carried SGI1-I or SGI1-K, indicating that the SGI suppresses transfer of the plasmid. In addition, pRMH760 was rapidly lost from both E. coli and S. enterica strains that also carried SGI1-I, SGI1-F or SGI2. However, plasmid loss was not seen when the SGI1 variant was SGI1-K, which lacks two segments of the SGI1 backbone. The complete sequence of the SGI1-I and SGI1-F were determined and SGI1-K also carries two single base substitutions relative to SGI1-I. The IncA (A/C 1 ) plasmid RA1 was also shown to mobilize SGI2-A and though there are significant differences between the backbones of IncA and IncC plasmids, RA1 was also rapidly lost when SGI2-A was present in the same cell. We conclude that there are multiple interactions, both cooperative and antagonistic, between an IncA or IncC plasmid and the SGI1 and SGI2 family genomic islands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Complete Nucleotide Sequences of Two VIM-1-Encoding Plasmids from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Leclercia adecarboxylata Isolates of Czech Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papousek, Ivo; Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Medvecky, Matej; Hrabak, Jaroslav; Dolejska, Monika

    2017-05-01

    Two multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids, carrying the VIM-1-encoding integron In110, were characterized. Plasmid pLec-476cz (311,758 bp), from a Leclercia adecarboxylata isolate, consisted of an IncHI1 backbone, a MDR region, and two accessory elements. Plasmid pKpn-431cz (142,876 bp), from a sequence type 323 (ST323) Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, comprised IncFII Y -derived and pKPN3-like sequences and a mosaic region. A 40,400-bp sequence of pKpn-431cz was identical to the MDR region of pLec-476cz, indicating the en bloc acquisition of the VIM-1-encoding region from one plasmid by the other. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. СRACK-RESISTANCE AND DURABILITY OF NUCLEAR-POWER STATION (NPS) LOAD-CARRYING STRUCTURES FROM FRACTURE MECHANICS POINT OF VIEW

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Leonovich

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents calculations pertaining to survivability of NPS load-carrying elements with respect to crack-resistance. These calculations reflect their resistance ability to actions of mechanical, thermal, hydro-dynamic, electro-magnetic  loads in the case when there are defects in the elements (initially technological defects or operational ones). The most dangerous defects are micro- and macro-cracks that create maximum high concentration of stresses and deformations.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance among invasive Haemophilus influenzae strains: results of a Brazilian study carried out from 1996 through 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casagrande S.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1712 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from patients with invasive diseases were obtained from ten Brazilian states from 1996 to 2000. ß-Lactamase production was assessed and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone and rifampin were determined using a method for broth microdilution of Haemophilus test medium. The prevalence of strains producing ß-lactamase ranged from 6.6 to 57.7%, with an overall prevalence of 18.4%. High frequency of ß-lactamase-mediated ampicillin resistance was observed in Distrito Federal (25%, São Paulo (21.7% and Paraná (18.5%. Of the 1712 strains analyzed, none was ß-lactamase negative, ampicillin resistant. A total of 16.8% of the strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, and 13.8% of these also presented resistance to ampicillin, and only 3.0% were resistant to chloramphenicol alone. All strains were susceptible to ceftriaxone and rifampin and the MIC90 were 0.015 µg/ml and 0.25 µg/ml, respectively. Ceftriaxone is the drug of choice for empirical treatment of bacterial meningitis in pediatric patients who have not been screened for drug susceptibility. The emergence of drug resistance is a serious challenge for the management of invasive H. influenzae disease, which emphasizes the fundamental role of laboratory-based surveillance for antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Self-assembled Nanoscale Coordination Polymers Carrying siRNAs and Cisplatin for Effective Treatment of Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunbai; Liu, Demin; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin is a major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers. Development of novel strategies to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to chemotherapy is of critical importance to effective treatment of ovarian cancer and other types of cancers. We have sought to re-sensitize resistant ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy by co-delivering chemotherapeutics and pooled siRNAs targeting multi-drug resistance (MDR) genes using self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs). In this work, NCP-1 particles with trigger release properties were first constructed by linking cisplatin prodrug-based bisphosphonate bridging ligands with Zn2+ metal-connecting points and then coated with a cationic lipid layer, followed by the adsorption of pooled siRNAs targeting three MDR genes including survivin, Bcl-2, and P-glycoprotein via electrostatic interactions. The resulting NCP-1/siRNA particles promoted cellular uptake of cisplatin and siRNA and enabled efficient endosomal escape in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. By down-regulating the expression of MDR genes, NCP-1/siRNAs enhanced the chemotherapeutic efficacy as indicated by cell viability assay, DNA ladder, and flow cytometry. Local administration of NCP-1/siRNAs effectively reduced tumor sizes of cisplatin-resistant SKOV-3 subcutaneous xenografts. This work shows that the NCP-1/siRNA platform holds great promise in enhancing chemotherapeutic efficacy for the effective treatment of drug-resistant cancers. PMID:25315138

  20. A Novel IncA/C1 Group Conjugative Plasmid, Encoding VIM-1 Metallo-Beta-Lactamase, Mediates the Acquisition of Carbapenem Resistance in ST104 Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit of V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Eliana P; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Del Franco, Mariateresa; Crivaro, Valeria; Bernardo, Mariano; Cuccurullo, Susanna; Pennino, Francesca; Triassi, Maria; Marone, Piero; Sassera, Davide; Zarrilli, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae has raised major public health concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology and the mechanism of carbapenem resistance acquisition of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from 20 neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples, Italy, from April 2015 to March 2016. Genotype analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) identified PFGE type A and subtypes A1 and A2 in 17, 2, and 1 isolates, respectively, and assigned all isolates to sequence type (ST) 104. K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to all classes of β-lactams including carbapenems, fosfomycin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but susceptible to quinolones, amikacin, and colistin. Conjugation experiments demonstrated that resistance to third-generation cephems and imipenem could be transferred along with an IncA/C plasmid containing the extended spectrum β-lactamase bla SHV -12 and carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-β-lactamase bla V IM-1 genes. The plasmid that we called pIncAC_KP4898 was 156,252 bp in size and included a typical IncA/C backbone, which was assigned to ST12 and core genome (cg) ST12.1 using the IncA/C plasmid MLST (PMLST) scheme. pIncAC_KP4898 showed a mosaic structure with bla V IM-1 into a class I integron, bla SHV -12 flanked by IS6 elements, a mercury resistance and a macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase clusters, ant(3″), aph(3″), aacA4, qnrA1, sul1 , and dfrA14 conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim, respectively, several genes predicted to encode transfer functions and proteins involved in DNA transposition. The acquisition of pIncAC_KP4898 carrying bla V IM-1 and bla SHV -12 contributed to the spread of ST104 K. pneumoniae in the NICU of V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples.

  1. A Novel IncA/C1 Group Conjugative Plasmid, Encoding VIM-1 Metallo-Beta-Lactamase, Mediates the Acquisition of Carbapenem Resistance in ST104 Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit of V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana P. Esposito

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae has raised major public health concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology and the mechanism of carbapenem resistance acquisition of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from 20 neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of the V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples, Italy, from April 2015 to March 2016. Genotype analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST identified PFGE type A and subtypes A1 and A2 in 17, 2, and 1 isolates, respectively, and assigned all isolates to sequence type (ST 104. K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to all classes of β-lactams including carbapenems, fosfomycin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, but susceptible to quinolones, amikacin, and colistin. Conjugation experiments demonstrated that resistance to third-generation cephems and imipenem could be transferred along with an IncA/C plasmid containing the extended spectrum β-lactamase blaSHV -12 and carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-β-lactamase blaV IM-1 genes. The plasmid that we called pIncAC_KP4898 was 156,252 bp in size and included a typical IncA/C backbone, which was assigned to ST12 and core genome (cg ST12.1 using the IncA/C plasmid MLST (PMLST scheme. pIncAC_KP4898 showed a mosaic structure with blaV IM-1 into a class I integron, blaSHV -12 flanked by IS6 elements, a mercury resistance and a macrolide 2′-phosphotransferase clusters, ant(3″, aph(3″, aacA4, qnrA1, sul1, and dfrA14 conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim, respectively, several genes predicted to encode transfer functions and proteins involved in DNA transposition. The acquisition of pIncAC_KP4898 carrying blaV IM-1 and blaSHV -12 contributed to the spread of ST104 K. pneumoniae in the NICU of V. Monaldi Hospital in Naples.

  2. Characterization of blaCTX-M IncFII plasmids and clones of Escherichia coli from pets in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Safia; Haenni, Marisa; Châtre, Pierre; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-01

    To characterize bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids and clones of Escherichia coli from cats and dogs and to compare them with bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids reported in humans. From December 2006 to April 2010, 518 E. coli isolates from clinical infections in cats and dogs were screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by disc diffusion and resistance genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Plasmids were characterized using PCR-based replicon typing and sub-typing schemes, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, S1-PFGE and Southern hybridization. Isolates were characterized by PFGE, phylogenetic grouping, O25b typing and multilocus sequence typing. Nineteen E. coli isolates (3.7%) produced ESBLs, of which 14 (74%) carried bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids. The bla(CTX-M) gene was predominant and located on F31:A4:B1, F36:A4:B1 or F36:A1:B20 plasmids, abundantly reported in humans. The bla(CTX-M) F22:A1:B20 or F2:A2:B20 plasmids were also found. Different sequence types (STs) were identified, such as ST10, ST410, ST359, ST617 and ST224. Only one E. coli isolate belonged to the ST131 E. coli clone and carried a bla(CTX-M) F2:A2:B20 plasmid. This is the first known extensive study on ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from pets in France. The ST131 clone was rare. However, the predominance of human-like bla(CTX-M) IncFII plasmids suggests exchanges of these plasmids with the human reservoir.

  3. Occurrence of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance, and Disinfectant Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Ready-To-Eat Meat Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Ye, Lei; Kromann, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    resistance genes (PMQRs), and quaternary ammonium compound resistance genes (QACs) in Escherichia coli isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products obtained in Guangzhou, China, and to determine whether these genes were colocalized in the isolates. A total of 64 E. coli isolates were obtained from 720 RTE...... meat samples. Multidrug resistance was observed in 70.3% of the isolates. A 100% of the isolates were resistant to benzalkonium chloride. Four types of β-lactamase genes were identified in the 16 ESBL-producing E. coli isolates: blaSHV (9.4%), blaTEM (7.8%), blaCTX-M-15 (1.6%), and blaCTX-M-9 (1...... and/or PMQRs with QACs was found in 21 isolates (32.8%). The aac(6')-Ib-cr and blaCTX-M-15 genes were found to be cotransferred with qacF in one isolate. The data obtained in this study indicate that ESBLs and/or PMQRs with QACs can not only be colocalized but can also be cotransferred in E. coli...

  4. Design and synthesis of a quintessential self-transmissible IncX1 plasmid, pX1.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H Hansen

    Full Text Available DNA exchange in bacteria via conjugative plasmids is believed to be among the most important contributing factors to the rapid evolution- and diversification rates observed in bacterial species. The IncX1 plasmids are particularly interesting in relation to enteric bacteria, and typically carry genetic loads like antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors. So far, however, a "pure" version of these molecular parasites, without genetic loads, has yet to be isolated from the environment. Here we report the construction of pX1.0, a fully synthesized IncX1 plasmid capable of horizontal transfer between different enteric bacteria. The designed pX1.0 sequence was derived from the consensus gene content of five IncX1 plasmids and three other, more divergent, members of the same phylogenetic group. The pX1.0 plasmid was shown to replicate stably in E. coli with a plasmid DNA per total DNA ratio corresponding to approximately 3-9 plasmids per chromosome depending on the growth phase of the host. Through conjugation, pX1.0 was able to self-transfer horizontally into an isogenic strain of E. coli as well as into two additional species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Our results demonstrate the immediate applicability of recent advances made within the field of synthetic biology for designing and constructing DNA systems, previously existing only in silica.

  5. The sudden dominance of blaCTX-M harbouring plasmids in Shigella spp. Circulating in Southern Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhu Thi Khanh Nguyen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid mediated antimicrobial resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae is a global problem. The rise of CTX-M class extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs has been well documented in industrialized countries. Vietnam is representative of a typical transitional middle income country where the spectrum of infectious diseases combined with the spread of drug resistance is shifting and bringing new healthcare challenges.We collected hospital admission data from the pediatric population attending the hospital for tropical diseases in Ho Chi Minh City with Shigella infections. Organisms were cultured from all enrolled patients and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Those that were ESBL positive were subjected to further investigation. These investigations included PCR amplification for common ESBL genes, plasmid investigation, conjugation, microarray hybridization and DNA sequencing of a bla(CTX-M encoding plasmid.We show that two different bla(CTX-M genes are circulating in this bacterial population in this location. Sequence of one of the ESBL plasmids shows that rather than the gene being integrated into a preexisting MDR plasmid, the bla(CTX-M gene is located on relatively simple conjugative plasmid. The sequenced plasmid (pEG356 carried the bla(CTX-M-24 gene on an ISEcp1 element and demonstrated considerable sequence homology with other IncFI plasmids.The rapid dissemination, spread of antimicrobial resistance and changing population of Shigella spp. concurrent with economic growth are pertinent to many other countries undergoing similar development. Third generation cephalosporins are commonly used empiric antibiotics in Ho Chi Minh City. We recommend that these agents should not be considered for therapy of dysentery in this setting.

  6. Prevalence and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying mecA or mecC and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in dairy sheep farms in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, G; Carfora, V; Caprioli, A; Sagrafoli, D; Marri, N; Giangolini, G; Amoruso, R; Iurescia, M; Stravino, F; Dottarelli, S; Feltrin, F; Franco, A; Amatiste, S; Battisti, A

    2017-10-01

    Between January and May 2012, a total of 286 bulk tank milk samples from dairy sheep farms located in central Italy were tested for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. One hundred fifty-three samples were positive for S. aureus (53.5%), with an average count of 2.53 log cfu/mL. A total of 679 S. aureus colonies were screened for methicillin resistance by the cefoxitin disk diffusion test, and 104 selected cefoxitin-susceptible isolates were also tested for their susceptibility to other antimicrobials representative of the most relevant classes active against Staphylococcus spp. by using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates, carrying respectively the mecA and the mecC genes, were detected in 2 samples from 2 different farms (prevalence 0.7%). The mecA-positive MRSA isolate was blaZ positive, belonged to spa type t127, sequence type (ST)1, clonal complex (CC)1, carried a staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa, and was phenotypically resistant to all the β-lactams tested and to erythromycin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. The mecC-positive MRSA isolate was negative for the chromosomally or plasmid-associated blaZ gene but positive for the blaZ allotype associated with SCCmec XI (blaZ-SCCmecXI), belonged to spa type 843, ST(CC)130, carried a SCCmec type XI, and was resistant only to β-lactams. Both MRSA were negative for the presence of specific immune-evasion and virulence genes such as those coding for the Panton-Valentine leucocidin, the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1, and the immune evasion cluster genes. Regarding the presence of the major S. aureus enterotoxin genes, the mecC-positive MRSA tested negative, whereas the ST (CC)1 mecA-positive MRSA harbored the seh gene. Among the 104 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, 63 (60.58%) were susceptible to all the antimicrobials tested, and 41 (39.42%) were resistant to at

  7. Remarkable Diversity of Escherichia coli Carrying mcr-1 from Hospital Sewage with the Identification of Two New mcr-1 Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasmid-borne colistin-resistant gene mcr-1 has rapidly become a worldwide public health concern. This study aims to determine the host bacterial strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts of mcr-1 in hospital sewage. A 1-ml hospital sewage sample was cultured. Colistin-resistant bacterial colonies were selected on agar plates and were subjected to whole genome sequencing and subsequent analysis. The transfer of mcr-1 between bacterial strains was tested using conjugation. New variants of mcr-1 were cloned to test the impact of variations on the function of mcr-1. Plasmids carrying mcr-1 were retrieved from GenBank for comparison based on concatenated backbone genes. In the sewage sample, we observed that mcr-1 was located in various genetic contexts on the chromosome, or plasmids of four different replicon types (IncHI2, IncI2, IncP, and IncX4, in Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera spp. and seven Escherichia coli strains of six different sequence types (ST10, ST34, ST48, ST1196, ST7086, and ST7087. We also identified two new variants of mcr-1, mcr-1.4 and mcr-1.7, both of which encode an amino acid variation from mcr-1. mcr-1-carrying IncX4 plasmids, which have a global distribution across the Enterobacteriaceae, are the result of global dissemination of a single common plasmid, while IncI2 mcr-1 plasmids appear to acquire mcr-1 in multiple events. In conclusion, the unprecedented remarkable diversity of species, strains, plasmids, and genetic contexts carrying mcr-1 present in a single sewage sample from a single healthcare site highlights the continued evolution and dynamic transmission of mcr-1 in healthcare-associated environments.

  8. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-10-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence.

  9. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments...... that segregate plasmids paired at mid-cell to daughter cells. Like microtubules, ParM filaments exhibit dynamic instability (i.e., catastrophic decay) whose regulation is an important component of the DNA segregation process. The Walker box ParA ATPases are related to MinD and form highly dynamic, oscillating...... filaments that are required for the subcellular movement and positioning of plasmids. The role of the observed ATPase oscillation is not yet understood. However, we propose a simple model that couples plasmid segregation to ParA oscillation. The model is consistent with the observed movement...

  10. Persistence of antibiotic resistance and plasmid-associated genes in soil following application of sewage sludge and abundance on vegetables at harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahube, Teddie O; Marti, Romain; Scott, Andrew; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Duenk, Peter; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward

    2016-07-01

    Sewage sludge recovered from wastewater treatment plants contains antibiotic residues and is rich in antibiotic resistance genes, selected for and enriched in the digestive tracts of human using antibiotics. The use of sewage sludge as a crop fertilizer constitutes a potential route of human exposure to antibiotic resistance genes through consumption of contaminated crops. Several gene targets associated with antibiotic resistance (catA1, catB3, ereA, ereB, erm(B), str(A), str(B), qnrD, sul1, and mphA), mobile genetic elements (int1, mobA, IncW repA, IncP1 groups -α, -β, -δ, -γ, -ε), and bacterial 16S rRNA (rrnS) were quantified by qPCR from soil and vegetable samples obtained from unamended and sludge-amended plots at an experimental field in London, Ontario. The qPCR data reveals an increase in abundance of gene targets in the soil and vegetables samples, indicating that there is potential for additional crop exposure to antibiotic resistance genes carried within sewage sludge following field application. It is therefore advisable to allow an appropriate delay period before harvesting of vegetables for human consumption.

  11. Plasmidic Expression of nemA and yafC* Increased Resistance of Ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 to Nonvolatile Side Products from Dilute Acid Treatment of Sugarcane Bagasse and Artificial Hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Aiqin; Zheng, Huabao; Yomano, Lorraine P.; York, Sean W.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolysate-resistant Escherichia coli SL100 was previously isolated from ethanologenic LY180 after sequential transfers in AM1 medium containing a dilute acid hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse and was used as a source of resistance genes. Many genes that affect tolerance to furfural, the most abundant inhibitor, have been described previously. To identify genes associated with inhibitors other than furfural, plasmid clones were selected in an artificial hydrolysate that had been treated with a vacuum to remove furfural. Two new resistance genes were discovered from Sau3A1 libraries of SL100 genomic DNA: nemA (N-ethylmaleimide reductase) and a putative regulatory gene containing a mutation in the coding region, yafC*. The presence of these mutations in SL100 was confirmed by sequencing. A single mutation was found in the upstream regulatory region of nemR (nemRA operon) in SL100. This mutation increased nemA activity 20-fold over that of the parent organism (LY180) in AM1 medium without hydrolysate and increased nemA mRNA levels >200-fold. Addition of hydrolysates induced nemA expression (mRNA and activity), in agreement with transcriptional control. NemA activity was stable in cell extracts (9 h, 37°C), eliminating a role for proteinase in regulation. LY180 with a plasmid expressing nemA or yafC* was more resistant to a vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate and to a vacuum-treated artificial hydrolysate than LY180 with an empty-vector control. Neither gene affected furfural tolerance. The vacuum-treated hydrolysates inhibited the reduction of N-ethylmaleimide by NemA while also serving as substrates. Expression of the nemA or yafC* plasmid in LY180 doubled the rate of ethanol production from the vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate. PMID:26826228

  12. Plasmidic Expression of nemA and yafC* Increased Resistance of Ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180 to Nonvolatile Side Products from Dilute Acid Treatment of Sugarcane Bagasse and Artificial Hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Aiqin; Zheng, Huabao; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2016-01-29

    Hydrolysate-resistant Escherichia coli SL100 was previously isolated from ethanologenic LY180 after sequential transfers in AM1 medium containing a dilute acid hydrolysate of sugarcane bagasse and was used as a source of resistance genes. Many genes that affect tolerance to furfural, the most abundant inhibitor, have been described previously. To identify genes associated with inhibitors other than furfural, plasmid clones were selected in an artificial hydrolysate that had been treated with a vacuum to remove furfural. Two new resistance genes were discovered from Sau3A1 libraries of SL100 genomic DNA: nemA (N-ethylmaleimide reductase) and a putative regulatory gene containing a mutation in the coding region, yafC*. The presence of these mutations in SL100 was confirmed by sequencing. A single mutation was found in the upstream regulatory region of nemR (nemRA operon) in SL100. This mutation increased nemA activity 20-fold over that of the parent organism (LY180) in AM1 medium without hydrolysate and increased nemA mRNA levels >200-fold. Addition of hydrolysates induced nemA expression (mRNA and activity), in agreement with transcriptional control. NemA activity was stable in cell extracts (9 h, 37°C), eliminating a role for proteinase in regulation. LY180 with a plasmid expressing nemA or yafC* was more resistant to a vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate and to a vacuum-treated artificial hydrolysate than LY180 with an empty-vector control. Neither gene affected furfural tolerance. The vacuum-treated hydrolysates inhibited the reduction of N-ethylmaleimide by NemA while also serving as substrates. Expression of the nemA or yafC* plasmid in LY180 doubled the rate of ethanol production from the vacuum-treated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Novel Plasmid Transformation Method Mediated by Chrysotile, Sliding Friction, and Elastic Body Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Naoto; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Matsuki, Kaori; Shigeno, Toshiya

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli as a plasmid recipient cell was dispersed in a chrysotile colloidal solution, containing chrysotile adsorbed to plasmid DNA (chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture). Following this, the chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture was dropped onto the surface of an elastic body, such as agarose, and treated physically by sliding a polystyrene streak bar over the elastic body to create friction. Plasmid DNA was easily incorporated into E. coli, and antibiotic resistance was conferred by transform...

  14. Detection of New Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains That Carry a Novel Genetic Homologue and Important Virulence Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur J.; Koksal, Mahir; Akkerboom-Likhuta, Vika; Monecke, Stefan; Kriegeskorte, Andre; Hendrix, Ron; Ehricht, Ralf; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 18 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI, recovered in the Dutch-German Euregio, were characterized by DNA microarrays. In contrast to previous data, we found two MRSA strains of different clonal

  15. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......, a phenotype associated with all known plasmid-encoded centromere loci. An R1 plasmid carrying par2 from plasmid pB171 was destabilized by the presence of an F plasmid carrying parC1, parC2 or the entire par2 locus of pB171. Strikingly, cytological double-labelling experiments revealed no evidence of long......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...

  16. Vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus faecium isolated from Danish chicken meat is located on a pVEF4-like plasmid persisting in poultry for 18 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinweber, Helena Augusta Katharina; Alotaibi, Sulaiman Mohammed I; Overballe-Petersen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    plasmid could transfer between E. faecium strains in vitro and that transfer occurred concomitantly with a larger, co-residing plasmid. The data presented here indicates that poultry meat constitutes a reservoir of VREfm and further investigations are needed to assess the risk of foodborne transmission...... traits of VREfm in Danish retail chicken meat. Three out of 40 samples (7.5%) from two slaughterhouses yielded VREfm (vancomycin MIC > 32mg/L). This is the first report of VREfm in Danish retail poultry meat since 2010 (DANMAP). All three VREfm belonged to the sequence type ST32, cluster type CT1068...

  17. Construction of an artificial recombinant bicistronic plasmid DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Tingting Cui; Jun Xiong; Yongzhi Wang; Xintian Wen; Xiaobo Huang; Yong Huang; Xiaoping Ma; Zhongkai Hu; Qin Zhao; Sanjie Cao

    2013-01-01

    The attenuated Salmonella typhimurium χ4550 strain was used to harbour a reconstructed bicistronic DNA vaccine against porcine rotavirus, which carried the rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) and VP7 genes simultaneously. Using a balanced lethal system, the kanamycin resistance gene of expressing eukaryotic plasmids pVAX1 and pVAXD were replaced by the aspartate β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene. The NSP4 cleavage product (259–525) of rotavirus OSU strain and VP7 full-lengt...

  18. Genotypic evaluation of etravirine sensitivity of clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates carrying resistance mutations to nevirapine and efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumar, A A; Jnaoui, K; Kabamba-Mukadi, B; Yombi, J C; Vandercam, B; Goubau, P; Ruelle, J

    2010-01-01

    Etravirine is a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with a pattern of resistance mutations quite distinct from the current NNRTIs. We collected all routine samples of HIV-1 patients followed in the AIDS reference laboratory of UCLouvain (in 2006 and 2007) carrying resistance-associated mutations to nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV). The sensitivity to Etravirine was estimated using three different drug resistance algorithms: ANRS (July 2008), IAS (December 2008) and Stanford (November 2008). We also verified whether the mutations described as resistance mutations are not due to virus polymorphisms by the study of 58 genotypes of NNRTI-naive patients. Sixty one samples harboured resistance to NVP and EFV: 41/61 had at least one resistance mutation to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS algorithms; 42/61 samples had at least one resistance mutation to Etravirine according to the Stanford algorithm. 48 and 53 cases were fully sensitive to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS and Stanford algorithms, respectively. Three cases harboured more than three mutations and presented a pattern of high-degree resistance to Etravirine according to ANRS-IAS algorithm, while one case harboured more than three mutations and presented high degree resistance to Etravirine according to the Stanford algorithm. The V1061 and V179D mutations were more frequent in the ARV-naive group than in the NNRTI-experienced one. According to the currently available algorithms, Etravirine can still be used in the majority of patients with virus showing resistance to NVP and/or EFV, if a combination of other active drugs is included.

  19. Genes from plasmid pKM101 in Haemophilus influenzae: separation of functions of mucA and mucB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, normally not mutable by UV, became UV mutable with a recombinant plasmid insertion. A 7.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) fragment of the plasmid pKM101 containing the mucA and mucB genes was ligated to the shuttle vector pDM2, and a Rec- strain of H. influenzae was transformed with the ligated mixture. All of the transformants, unlike the parent Rec- strain, were resistant to UV, could carry out postreplication repair and Weigle reactivation, showed greatly increased spontaneous mutation, and contained a plasmid carrying an insert of only 1.2 rather than 7.8 kbp. This plasmid in a umuC mutant strain of Escherichia coli complemented a pKM101 derivative lacking mucA function but with an intact mucB gene, although there was no complementation with a mucA+ mucB- plasmid, suggesting that the newly constructed plasmid coded for the mucA protein; this is in accord with the restriction analysis and hybridization between the plasmid and a probe containing all of the mucA gene but only a small fraction of mucB. When one of the H. influenzae Rec- transformants lost the plasmid, the resistance to UV was retained but the high spontaneous mutation and UV mutability were not. The fact that there was hybridization between the chromosome of the cured strain and a probe containing both muc genes but none when almost no mucB was present suggested that at least part of the mucB gene had been integrated into the Rec- chromosome. Five different postreplication repair-proficient strains became UV mutable and had high spontaneous mutation rates caused by the putative mucA plasmid, indicating that these strains already possessed a chromosomal equivalent of the mucB gene

  20. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to multiple antibiotics and carrying the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes in an Algiers hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Hélène; Forey, Françoise; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Lina, Gerard; Vandenesch, François; Tazir, Mohamed; Etienne, Jerome

    2006-03-01

    Forty-five Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated in Algeria between 2003 and 2004; 18 isolates were isolated in the community and 27 in a hospital. Five PVL-positive hospital isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, including ofloxacin and gentamicin for three isolates.

  1. Proposed model for the high rate of rearrangement and rapid migration observed in some IncA/C plasmid lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinersmann, R J; Lindsey, R L; Bono, J L; Smith, T P; Oakley, B B

    2013-08-01

    IncA/C plasmids are a class of plasmids from the Enterobacteriaceae that are relatively large (49 to >180 kbp), that are readily transferred by conjugation, and that carry multiple antimicr