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Sample records for resins cement techniques

  1. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  2. Effects of layering technique on the shade of resin overlays and the microhardness of dual cure resin cement

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    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the color of layered resin overlays and to test the early microhardness of dual cure resin cement (DCRC light cured through the layered resin overlays. Resin overlays of 1.5 mm thickness were fabricated with the A3 shade of Z350 (Group 1L, the A3B and A3E shades of Supreme XT (Group 2L, and the A3, E3, and T1 shades of Sinfony (Group 3L using one, two, and three layers, respectively (n = 7. Each layer of the resin overlays was set in equal thickness. The color of the resin overlays was measured with a colorimeter and compared with an A3 shade resin denture tooth. DCRC was light cured through the resin overlays, and the early microhardness of the DCRC was measured. The ΔE value between the denture tooth and the resin overlays and the Vickers hardness number (VHN of the DCRC were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test. The color differences were 8.9 ± 0.5, 5.3 ± 1.0, and 7.3 ± 0.5 and the VHNs were 19.4 ± 1.1, 21.1 ± 0.9, and 29.3 ± 0.6 for Groups 1L, 2L, and 3L, respectively. Therefore, to match the designated tooth color of resin inlays and to increase the early microhardness of DCRC, layered resin inlays are more appropriate than single-dentin-layer resin inlays. However, the translucent layer should be used cautiously because the color difference of resin inlays with a translucent layer was affected more than those without a translucent layer.

  3. Effects of finishing/polishing techniques on microleakage of resin-modified glass ilonomer cement restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U J; Yap, W Y; Yeo, Egwin J C; Tan, Jane W S; Ong, Debbie S B

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of finishing/polishing techniques on the microleakage of resin-modified glass ionomer restorations. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (FT [GC]) and Photac-Fil Quick (PF [3M-ESPE]) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with eight-fluted tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups and finishing/polishing was done with one of the following systems: (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) Super-Snap system (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Polishers (CS). The sample size for each material-finishing/polishing system combination was eight. After finishing/polishing, the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for one week. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic and two coats of varnish was applied 1 mm beyond the restoration margins. The teeth were subsequently subjected to dye penetration testing (0.5% basic fuchsin), sectioned and scored. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results of statistical analysis were as follows: Enamel margins: PF-OGtechnique, leakage at dentin margins was significantly greater than at enamel margins for FT. For PF, no significant difference in leakage scores was observed between dentin and enamel with the exception of finishing/polishing with OG. FT restorations had significantly less enamel and dentin leakage than PF restorations when treated with OG. The effect of finishing/polishing techniques on microleakage was both tissue and material dependent.

  4. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  6. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-02-01

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  7. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

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    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  8. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  9. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

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    Lucas Pradebon BRONDANI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding, resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  10. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

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    Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Wandsher, Vinicius Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil; Valandro, Luis Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin

    2017-04-10

    Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding) and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding), resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation) for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  11. Characterization of monolith block of spent resin cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno; Endro-Kismolo; Isman MT

    1996-01-01

    Spent resin immobilization process with cement was done to prevent release of radionuclide in the ultimate storage or disposal. The varied Composition of water/cement ratio in the cementation process were 0.3; 0.4; 0.5 and the various weight of resin waste are 25 g, 37.5 g and 50 gram. The compressive strength of the various water/cement ratio without spent resin was bigger than 0.3. This investigation proved that the compressive strength of Tiga Roda cement was bigger than those of Gresik cement or Nusantara cement. The compressive of the cement block of were the spent resin cementation was influenced by the water/cement ratio and the total spent resin addition. The best condition reached at the water/cement ratio of 0.3 and 25 gram spent resin, was compressive strength of 17.86 N/mm 2 . Leaching rate of the various weight composition of spent resin cementation for 91 days were between 10 -2 - 10 -4 gram.cm -2 .day -1

  12. [Bonding of visible light cured composite resins to glass ionomer and Cermet cements].

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    Kakaboura, A; Vougiouklakis, G

    1990-04-01

    The "sandwich" technique involves combination of composite resins to etched glassionomer cements, is used today in restorative dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the bond strength between several composite resins and glass ionomer or cerment cements. Cylindrical specimens of the cements Ketac-Silver, Ionobond and GC-Lining Ce-ment were inserted in a mold and their flat free surfaces were etched for 30". Cylindrical plastic tubes were set upon each one of these surfaces and filled with the Composite resins Durafill, Brilliant Lux, Estilux posterior, Estilux posterior CVS and Herculite XR. Half of the specimens transferred in tap water for 24 hours and the others after thermocycling in the first month, kept for 4 months. Shear bond strengths were determined in Monsanto Testing Machine and some fractured surfaces were examined under SEM. The results of this investigation indicate that this technique produces bond strengths between composite resins and glassioners and the combination type of resin and type of cement, affects the values of the strength. Glass cermeet--small particle resin provides the most effective strength and glass ionomer--microfill resins the least. Storage time and thermocycling don't significantly effect the bond strength. SEM examination showed that all fracture failures were obtained in the cement while the opposite resin surfaces were covered with particles of the cements.

  13. Immobilization of ion-exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions, can be achieved using organic ion-exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilized in cement-based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water/cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres, giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. 26 tabs., 22 figs., 29 refs

  14. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  15. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes in hydraulic cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Kalb, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Work has been conducted to investigate the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes with portland cements. These efforts have been directed toward the development of acceptable formulations for the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes and the characterization of the resultant waste forms. This paper describes formulation development work and defines acceptable formulations in terms of ternary phase compositional diagrams. The effects of cement type, resin type, resin loading, waste/cement ratio and water/cement ratio are described. The leachability of unsolidified and solidified resin waste forms and its relationship to full-scale waste form behavior is discussed. Gamma irradiation was found to improve waste form integrity, apparently as a result of increased resin crosslinking. Modifications to improve waste form integrity are described. 3 tables

  16. Marginal adaptation of lithium disilicate ceramic crowns cemented with three different resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroz, Ingrid; Mitsas, Triantafyllos; Erdelt, Kurt; Kopsahilis, Niko

    2018-04-17

    The cementation process and cementation materials have an influence on the marginal adaptation of restorations. The gap could be affected by thermal and mechanical loading (TCML). The computerized x-ray microtomography (μCT) method offers the possibility of measuring the marginal gap without destruction of the restoration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and the absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) before and after TCML. Thirty-nine human premolars were prepared for full ceramic crowns made of lithium disilicate. The crowns were cemented by three different resins-Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, and Relyx Unicem. The MG and AMD were evaluated by μCT before and after TCML. Panavia F 2.0 had the lowest MG (before 118 μm-after TMCL 124 μm) and AMD (before 145 μm-after TMCL 154 μm), followed by Relyx Unicem (MG: before 164 μm-after TCML 155 μm; AMD: before 213 μm-after TMCL 209 μm) and Variolink II (MG: before 317 μm-after TMCL 320 μm; AMD: before 412 μm-after TMCL 406 μm). The differences were statistically significant before and after TCML. Rather than TCML, it appeared the resin cement was responsible for differences between the MG and AMD before and after TCML. μCT is an accurate technique for assessing cemented restorations. Panavia F 2.0 has the lowest MG and AMD before and after TCML. The resin material that features a three-step protocol (Variolink II) produced higher MG and AMG values than the Panavia or Relyx Unicem varieties with less or no intermediate steps at all.

  17. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  18. The Translucency Effect of Different Colored Resin Cements used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... color of resin cements and zirconia cores on the translucency parameter (TP) of the restoration that ... physical, mechanical, and esthetic properties. One of the ..... Raptis NV, Michalakis KX, Hirayama H. Optical behavior of.

  19. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

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    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  20. Porous structure analysis of radioactive spent resin cementation matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yaozhong; Yun Guichun

    2004-01-01

    According to a cement product microstructure, a radioactive spent resin cementation matrix has the properties of porous matters. The distributing of the pore size and the pore microstructure stability are closely related to many crucial macro properties, including strength and permeability of the matrixes. By using a new computer-controlled Hg pressure test, a experiment methods of the matrix micro-properties was studied. By using porous structure analyses, it was found that the experimental method is useful for the future cementation research. In this test, it was also found that ASC cement matrixes of spent resin have superior microstructure to the OPC's. They have better pore size distribution, more stable structure and higher ability to hold the Hg in the matrixes than OPC's, and these properties are the important factors that make ASC cement matrixes have more stable macro-structure and lower leaching of nuclides. (authors)

  1. Misfit and microleakage of implant-supported crown copings obtained by laser sintering and casting techniques, luted with glass-ionomer, resin cements and acrylic/urethane-based agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Turrión, Andrés S; López-Lozano, José F; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the marginal misfit and microleakage of cement-retained implant-supported crown copings. Single crown structures were constructed with: (1) laser-sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC) and (3) vacuum-cast Ni-Cr-Ti (CN). Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion onto machined titanium abutments using: (1) GC Fuji PLUS (FP); (2) Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); (3) RelyX Unicem 2 Automix (RXU) and (4) DentoTemp (DT) (n=15 each). After 60 days of water ageing, vertical discrepancy was SEM-measured and cement microleakage was scored using a digital microscope. Misfit data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were run for microleakage analysis (α=0.05). Regardless of the cement type, LS samples exhibited the best fit, whilst CC and CN performed equally well. Despite the framework alloy and manufacturing technique, FP and DT provide comparably better fit and greater microleakage scores than did CEC and RXU, which showed no differences. DMLS of Co-Cr may be a reliable alternative to the casting of base metal alloys to obtain well-fitted implant-supported crowns, although all the groups tested were within the clinically acceptable range of vertical discrepancy. No strong correlations were found between misfit and microleakage. Notwithstanding the framework alloy, definitive resin-modified glass-ionomer (FP) and temporary acrylic/urethane-based (DT) cements demonstrated comparably better marginal fit and greater microleakage scores than did 10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogen phosphate-based (CEC) and self-adhesive (RXU) dual-cure resin agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adhesive permeability affects coupling of resin cements that utilise self-etching primers to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R M; Pegoraro, T A; Tay, F R; Pegoraro, L F; Silva, N R F A; Pashley, D H

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of an experimental bonding technique that reduces the permeability of the adhesive layer on the coupling of resin cements to dentine. Extracted human third molars had their mid to deep dentin surface exposed flat by transversally sectioning the crowns. Resin composite overlays were constructed and cemented to the surfaces using either Panavia F (Kuraray) or Bistite II DC (Tokuyama) resin cements mediated by their respective one-step or two-step self-etch adhesives. Experimental groups were prepared in the same way, except that the additional layer of a low-viscosity bonding resin (LVBR, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE) was placed on the bonded dentine surface before luting the overlays with the respective resin cements. The bonded assemblies were stored for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C and subsequently prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. Beams of approximately 0.8 mm(2) were tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min in a universal tester. Fractured surfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional specimens were prepared and examined with TEM using a silver nitrate-staining technique. Two-way ANOVA showed significant interactions between materials and bonding protocols (p0.05). SEM observation of the fractured surfaces in Panavia F showed rosette-like features that were exclusive for specimens bonded according to manufacturer's directions. Such features corresponded well with the ultrastructure of the interfaces that showed more nanoleakage associated with the more permeable adhesive interface. The application of the additional layer of the LVBR reduced the amount of silver impregnation for both adhesives suggesting that reduced permeability of the adhesives resulted in improved coupling of the resin cements to dentin. Placement of an intermediate layer of a LVBR between the bonded dentine surface and the resin cements resulted in improved coupling of Panavia F to dentine.

  3. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements – What do we need to know?

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    Carlos José SOARES

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.

  4. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements - What do we need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Vilela, Andomar Bruno Fernandes; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2017-08-28

    Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.

  5. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm - 2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100 o C and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 (author)

  6. Impairment of resin cement application on the bond strength of indirect composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovito Adiel SKUPIEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed resin cement application on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations and, to evaluate adhesive strategies (for regular resin cement or humidity parameters for self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five enamel/dentin discs (0.5 mm height and 10 mm of diameter obtained from bovine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 5. For regular cement, the variation factors were cementation technique at three levels (immediate cementation, 5 or 30 min after adhesive system application; and type of adhesive system at two levels (three- or two-step. For self-adhesive cement, the dentin moisture was the source of variation at three levels (normal, dry, or wet cementation. The specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression. Regular cement and three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system showed the highest values of bond strength (25.21 MPa–30 min of delay. Only for this condition, three-step adhesive showed higher bond strength than the two-step adhesive. Nevertheless, the linear regression showed that irrespective of the strategy, the use of the two-step approach when compared with three-step adhesive system decreased μTBS (p < 0.001. The failure analysis showed predominant adhesive failures for all tested groups. All groups had comparable values of bond strength to bovine dentin when the same materials were used, even in suboptimal clinical conditions.

  7. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of mechanical and physicochemical properties of cementated spent ion-exchange-resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.

    1981-09-01

    As first part of a study on the possibilities, to immobilize spent ion exchange resins, for final disposal, the dependence of compressive strength from the composition of cement - resin mixtures was detected. Powdered resins, bead resins and ashes from the incinerator plant and several cement brands were examinated. As result an area was defined in the three-phase diagram of cement, resins and water, in which the following leach tests will be performed. (author)

  9. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central

  10. Transient and residual stresses in a pressable glass-ceramic before and after resin-cement coating determined using profilometry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heat-pressing and subsequent pre-cementation (acid-etching) and resin-cementation operative techniques on the development of transient and residual stresses in different thicknesses of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were characterised using profilometry prior to biaxial flexure strength (BFS) determination.

  11. Coating glass-ionomer cements with a nanofilled resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, C.C.; Werner, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanofilled resin coat on the flexural strength (FS) and the early wear (after 50 000 and 200 000 cycles) of the glass-ionomer cements Fuji IX GP Extra (FIXE) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (KM). Materials and methods. Specimens were

  12. The Translucency Effect of Different Colored Resin Cements used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the different color of resin cements and zirconia cores on the translucency parameter (TP) of the restoration that simulates the implant‑supported fixed prosthesis using titanium base on the bottom. Materials and Methods: Zirconia core plates (Zr‑Zahn) were ...

  13. Effect of Resin Coating and Chlorhexidine on Microleakage of Two Resin Cements after Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of resin coating and chlorhexidine on microleakage of two resin cements after water storage.Materials and Methods: Standardized class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual surfaces of one hundred twenty intact human molars with gingival margins placed 1mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Indirect composite inlays were fabricated and thespecimens were randomly assigned into 6 groups. In Groups 1 to 4, inlays were cemented with Panavia F2.0 cement. G1: according to the manufacturer’s instruction. G2: with light cured resin on the ED primer. G3: chlorhexidine application before priming. G4: withchlorhexidine application before priming and light cured resin on primer. G5: inlays were cemented with Nexus 2 resin cement. G6: chlorhexidine application after etching. Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the 24-hour and 6-month water storagetime. After preparation for microleakage test, the teeth were sectioned and evaluated at both margins under a 20×stereomicroscope. Dye penetration was scored using 0-3 criteria.The data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and complementary Dunn tests.Results: There was significantly less leakage in G2 and G4 than the Panavia F2.0 control group at gingival margins after 6 months (P<0.05. There was no significant differences in leakage between G1 and G3 at both margins after 24 hours and 6 months storage. After 6months, G6 revealed significantly less leakage than G5 at gingival margins (P=0.033. In general, gingival margins showed more leakage than occlusal margins.Conclusion: Additionally, resin coating in self-etch (Panavia F2.0 and chlorhexidine application in etch-rinse (Nexus resin cement reduced microleakage at gingival margins after storage.

  14. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  15. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  16. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  17. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Mittal, Sanjeev; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non-significant (p > 0.05). Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement.

  18. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  19. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    OpenAIRE

    Pamato, Saulo; do Valle, Acc?cio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; S?, Marcus-Vin?cius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer?s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond? FL,...

  20. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  1. Immobilisation Of Spent Ion Exchange Resins Using Portland Cement Blending With Organic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    Immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins (spent resins) using Portland cement blending with organic material for example bio char was investigated. The performance of cement-bio char matrix for immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins was evaluated based on their compression strength and leachability under different experimental conditions. The results showed that the amount of bio char and spent resins loading effect the compressive strength of the waste form. Several factors affecting the leaching behaviour of immobilised spent resins in cement-bio char matrix. (author)

  2. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  3. Immobilization in cement of ion exchange resins from Spanish nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebra, A.G. de la; Murillo, R.; Ortiz, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange materials used at nuclear power plants can be immobilized in cements less expensive than polymer matrices. Cement solidification of spent ion exchange resins shows swelling and cracking troubles (during setting time, or of storage). The objective of this study was to select the types of cement that produce the best quality on immobilization of three kinds of resins and to set up cement formulations containing the maximum possible loading of resin. Four cements were selected to carried out the study. After a study of hydration-dehydration phenomena of ion exchange resins, a systematic work has been carried out on immobilization. Tests were performed to study compressive strength and underwater stability by changing water/cement ratio and resin/cement ratio. Mixtures made with water, cement and resin only were loaded with 10% by weight dry resin. Mixtures with higher loadings show poor workability. Tests were carried out by adding organic plasticizers and silica products to improve waste loading. Plasticizers reduced water demand and silica products permit the use of more water. Leaching tests have been performed at 40 O C. In conclusion Blast Furnace Slag is the best cement for immobilization of ion exchange resin both bead and powdered form for mechanical strength, stability and leaching

  4. The immobilization of anion exchange resins in polymer modified cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, A.; Morgan, P.D.

    1991-09-01

    Organic anion exchange resins, loaded with 99-Tc as the pertechnate ion, were incorporated into polymer modified cements (Flexocrete Ltd, Preston). BFS/OPC (9:1 mix) also was modified by three polymers from the same source (styrene acrylic (2) styrene butadiene) and loaded with anion exchanger containing the pertechnate. Composites were tested for initial compressive strengths, under water and radiation stability and leach rate. IAEA standard leach testing was with simulated sea and ground waters. Ground water leaching also was carried out on composites subjected to 1.10 9 rads (γ). Leach testing correlated well with compressive strength. Modified composites performed better than the BFS/OPC mix under all conditions studied and were able to encapsulate higher resin loadings. (author)

  5. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; S?, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder? Scotchbond? Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-s...

  6. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  7. Comparison between three glass fiber post cementation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Dolci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to compare the traditional cement systems with those of the latest generation, to assess if indeed these could represent of viable substitutes in the cementation of indirect restorations, and in the specific case of endodontic posts. The assessment of the validity of the cementing methods was performed according to the test of the push-out, conducted on sections obtained from the roots of treated teeth. The samples were divided into three groups. Group A (10 samples): etching for 30 seconds with 37% orthophosphoric acid (Superlux-Thixo-etch-DMG) combined with a dual-curing adhesive system (LuxaBond-Total Etch-DMG), dual-cured resin-composite cement (LuxaCore-DMG) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). Group B (10 samples): self-adhesive resin cement (Breeze-Pentron Clinical) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). Group C (10 samples): 3 steps light-curing, self-etching, self-conditioning bonding agent (Contax-Total-etch-DMG), dual-cured resin-composite cement (LuxaCore-DMG) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). The survey was conducted by examining the breaking resistance of the post-cement-tooth complex, subjected to a mechanical force. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Inc. ver. 13.0, Chicago, IL, USA. Group A values of bond strenth ranged from a minimum of 10.14 Mpa to a maximum value of 14.73 Mpa with a mean value of 12.58 Mpa. In Group B the highest value of bond strength was 6.54 Mpa and the minimum 5.55 Mpa. The mean value of the bond strength for the entire group was 6.58 Mpa. In Group C the highest bond strength was 6.59 Mpa whereas the lowest bond strength was 4.84 Mpa. Mean value of the bond strength of Group C was calculated at 5.7 Mpa. Etching with orthophosphoric acid combined with a dual-curing adhesive system and a dual-cured resin-composite cement was the technique that guaranteed the highest bond strength. Lowest bond strength values were obtained when dual self-adhesive cement was used.

  8. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  9. Color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs associated with try-in pastes and with resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rigoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs (e.max Ceram / Ivoclar Vivadent / A2 associated with try-in pastes and those bonded with resin cements (Vitique / DMG/ try-in shade A2½ and cement shade A2½, Variolink II / Ivoclar Vivadent / try-in shade A1 and cement shade A1, and Choice 2 / Bisco / try-in shade A2 and cement shade A2, and to evaluate the shade stability of the discs bonded with resin cements. The shades of composite resin discs (Lliss / FGM / A2 and nanofluorapatite ceramic discs with try-in pastes or cements were evaluated according to the Vita Classical shade guide by a digital spectrophotometer (Micro EspectroShade, MHT immediately after placing the try-in pastes or resin cements between composite resin discs and ceramic discs. Other evaluations were performed at 2, 5, and 6 day intervals after cementation with the resin cements. All ceramic discs that received try-in pastes presented an A2 shade. There was no statistical difference in the shade of the ceramic specimens fixed with different cements at the different intervals, as evaluated by the Friedman test (p > 0.05. Two try-in pastes presented shade compatibility with those recommended by the manufacturers. There was no similarity of shades between the ceramic discs with try-in pastes and those with the respective resin cements. Shade stability was observed in ceramic discs with resin cements within the intervals evaluated.

  10. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELsourougy, M R; Zaki, A A; Aly, H F [Atomic energy authority, hot laboratory center, Cairo, (Egypt); Khalil, M Y [Nuclear engineering department, Alexandria university. Alexandria, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELsourougy, M.R.; Zaki, A.A.; Aly, H.F.; Khalil, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Effect of modified cementation technique on marginal fit and apical spread of excess cement for implant restorations: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate and compare the vertical marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement after cementation with modified cementation technique and conventional technique. Materials and Methods: Ten implant analogs with prefabricated standard abutments of similar dimensions were mounted individually in self-cure acrylic blocks subcrestally. Forty ideal metal coping specimens were prepared by conventional lost wax technique. Measurement of the marginal discrepancy at the implant-crown interface was done using a stereomicroscope before cementation. Abutment replicas (ARs were prepared for twenty specimens using cast copings and pattern resin. All forty copings were cemented according to the following cementation techniques and cement types, with ten specimens in each group. (1 Group 1: Half filling (HF cementation technique using provisional cement. (2 Group 2: HF cementation technique using permanent cement. (3 Group 3: AR technique using provisional cement. (4 Group 4: AR technique using permanent cement. Specimens were subjected to measurement of marginal discrepancy and spread of excess cement using stereomicroscope after cementation procedure. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test. Results: AR technique showed significantly less marginal discrepancy (P = 0.000 and apical spread of excess cement (P = 0.002 than conventional HF technique. Provisional cement showed significantly more marginal discrepancy (HF-P = 0.000 and AR-P = 0.001 and less apical spread of excess cement (HF-P = 0.023 and AR-P = 0.002 and among both technique. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t-test. Conclusion: An alternative technique of using AR is effective technique to prevent peri-implant diseases.

  13. Formulation study on immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in polymer cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Lili; Lin Meiqiong; Bao Liangjin; Fan Xianhua

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a formulation of cement-solidified spent radioactive ion exchange resin form. The solidified form consists of a sort of composite cement, epoxide resin emulsion, and spent ion exchange resins. The composite cement is made up of quick-setting sulphoaluminate cement, silica powder, zeolite, and fly ash in the proportion 1:0.05:0.10:0.05. Sixteen combinations of composite cement, epoxide resin emulsion and mixed anion-cation exchange resins are selected according to a three-factors-four-levels normal design table with the compression strength as the evaluation criterion. The resulted formulation is as follows: the mass ratio of polymer emulsion to composite cement is 0.55:1, the loading of mixed anion-cation exchange resins is 0.3, and the anionic-to-cationic exchange resins ratio is 2:1. The polymer cement solidified forms were tested after 28 d curing for Cs + and Sr 2+ leaching rates, pH and conductivity of the leaching water, and radiation-resistant property in addition to their compressive strength. The measurement results indicate that the performance of thus prepared solidified forms can meet the requirements of the National Standard GB14569.1-93 for near earth's surface disposal of low radioactive waste. (authors)

  14. Influence of Photoinitiator on Accelerated Artificial Aging and Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Helouise; Costa, Ana Rosa; Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles de; Abuna, Gabriel Flores; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of the photoinitiator phenylpropanedione (PPD), alone or combined with camphorquinone (CQ), on color stability of photoactivated resin cements and their bond strength to ceramics using a micro-shear test. Four resin cements were used: a commercial brand cement (RelyX Veneer®) and 3 experimental cements with different types and concentration of photoinitiators. For color analysis, ceramic discs were cemented on bovine dentin specimens to simulate indirect restorations (n=8) and were exposed to UV for 120 h and tested for color alteration using a reflectance spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* system. Data were analyzed by Anova and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The color test results did not present statistically significant difference for the ∆E for all the studied cements, neither for ∆L, ∆a and ∆b. For the bond strength, all the studied cements showed statistically significant differences to each other, with the highest result for the RelyX Veneer® (29.07 MPa) cement, followed by the cement with CQ (21.74 MPa) and CQ+PPD (19.09 MPa) cement; the lowest result was obtained by the cement using only PPD as a photoinitiator (13.99 MPa). So, based on the studied parameters, PPD was not advantageous as photoinitiator of resin cements, because it showed a low value of bond strength to the ceramics and no superior color stability.

  15. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of different resin luting cements on the marginal fit of lithium disilicate pressed crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounajjed, Radek; Salinas, Thomas J; Ingr, Tomas; Azar, Basel

    2017-11-15

    The vertical marginal discrepancy of restorations can increase upon cementation, and poor marginal fit can lead to cement dissolution, marginal discoloration, microleakage, and secondary caries. The amount of increase is related to the type of luting cement used, but how lithium disilicate pressed crowns are affected by different resin cements is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of using different resin luting cements on the vertical marginal discrepancy of lithium disilicate pressed crowns. A total of 18 intact extracted mandibular third molars were disinfected in a solution of 10% formalin for 7 days and were then prepared to receive a ceramic crown. Impressions were made with polyvinyl siloxane and lithium disilicate pressed crowns made and cemented with 1 of 3 resin luting cements. The marginal discrepancy was measured at 4 points on the finishing line of each tooth, with optical microscopy at ×200 magnification before and after cementation. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the median marginal increase among the 3 groups. The least amount of marginal increase after cementation was with Harvard PremiumFlow cement, with an average marginal increase of 42 ±11 μm. RelyX Ultimate cement increased the margins by an average 45 ±29 μm. The highest marginal increase was found in the Enamel Plus HRi preheated composite resin group (116 ±47 μm). The marginal increase of pressed crowns cemented with preheated composite resin (Enamel Plus HRi) exceeded the clinically acceptable range of marginal discrepancy. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  18. Evaluation of stainless steel crowns cemented with glass-ionomer and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Simsek, Sera; Dalmis, Anya; Gurbuz, Taskin; Kocogullari, M Elcin

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate in vitro and in vivo conditions of stainless steel crowns (SSC) cemented using one luting glass-ionomer cement (Aqua Meron) and one luting resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Vitremer). In the in vitro part of this study, retentive properties of SSCs cemented using Aqua Meron and Vitremer on extracted primary first molars were tested. In addition, two specimens of each group were used to evaluate the tooth hard tissue-cement, within the cement itself, cement-SSC, and tooth hard tissue-cement-SSC under scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the in vivo part of this study, 152 SSCs were placed on the first or second primary molars of 86 children, and cemented using either Aqua Meron or Vitremer. The crowns were examined for retention. In addition, the clinical views of the crowns were recorded with an intraoral camera. No significant difference was found between the mean retentive forces of Aqua Meron and Vitremer (P> 0.05). SSCs cemented with Aqua Meron and Vitremer had an average lifespan of 26.44 and 24.07 months respectively. Only one (0.66%) of 152 SSCs was lost from the Aqua Meron group during post-cementation periods. Nineteen of the 152 SSCs (12.5%) had dents or perforations.

  19. Color change of CAD-CAM materials and composite resin cements after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdal, Isil; Atay, Ayse; Eichberger, Marlis; Cal, Ebru; Üsümez, Aslihan; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2018-04-24

    The color of resin cements and computer-aided-design and computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations may change with aging. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of thermocycling on the color of CAD-CAM materials with underlying resin cement. Seven different CAD-CAM materials, composite resins and glass-ceramics were cut into 0.7-mm and 1.2-mm thicknesses (n=10) and cemented with a dual-polymerizing resin cement, a light-polymerizing resin cement, and a preheated composite resin (N=420). Color values were measured by using spectrophotometry. Specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5°C and 55°C; 5000 cycles). The measured color difference (ΔE) data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics. Normality of data distribution was tested by using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Three-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test and unpaired 2-sample Student t test were computed to determine the significant differences among the tested parameters (α=.05). ΔE values were significantly influenced by the CAD-CAM material (η p 2 =0.85, Pcement (η P 2 =0.03, P=.003) but were not influenced by thickness (P=.179). Significant interactions were present among thickness, cement, and CAD-CAM materials (Pcement showed significantly lower ΔE values than the preheated composite resin (P=.003). Restoration materials and composite resin cement types used for cementation influence the amount of color change due to aging. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  1. Titanium dioxide nanotubes addition to self-adhesive resin cement: Effect on physical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Tonello, Carla M; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N; Arruda, Larisa B; Tokuhara, Cintia K; Oliveira, Rodrigo C; Furuse, Adilson Y; Rubo, José H; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2017-07-01

    This study has investigated the influence of Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO 2 -nt) addition to self-adhesive resin cement on the degree of conversion, water sorption, and water solubility, mechanical and biological properties. A commercially available auto-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200™, 3M ESPE) was reinforced with varying amounts of nanotubes (0.3, 0.6, 0.9wt%) and evaluated at different curing modes (self- and dual cure). The DC in different times (3, 6, 9, 12 and 15min), water sorption (Ws) and solubility (Sl), 3-point flexural strength (σf), elastic modulus (E), Knoop microhardness (H) and viability of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts were performed to characterize the resin cement. Reinforced self-adhesive resin cement, regardless of concentration, increased the DC for the self- and dual-curing modes at all times studied. The concentration of the TiO 2 -nt and the curing mode did not influence the Ws and Sl. Regarding σf, concentrations of both 0.3 and 0.9wt% for self-curing mode resulted in data similar to that of dual-curing unreinforced cement. The E increased with the addition of 0.9wt% for self-cure mode and H increased with 0.6 and 0.9wt% for both curing modes. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that reinforced cements were biocompatible. TiO 2 -nt reinforced self-adhesive resin cement are promising materials for use in indirect dental restorations. Taken together, self-adhesive resin cement reinforced with TiO 2 -nt exhibited physicochemical and mechanical properties superior to those of unreinforced cements, without compromising their cellular viability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coating glass-ionomer cements with a nanofilled resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Werner, Arie; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johanes

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanofilled resin coat on the flexural strength (FS) and the early wear (after 50,000 and 200,000 cycles) of the glass-ionomer cements Fuji IX GP Extra (FIXE) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (KM). Specimens were prepared and half of them were coated with G-Coat plus. The uncoated specimens were used as controls. Flexural strength (n = 10) was evaluated after 24 h using a 3-point bending test on a universal testing machine (ISO 9917-2). Wear (n = 20) was evaluated after 50,000 and 200,000 cycles using the ACTA wear machine. One-way, two-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze differences in FS and wear. For FIXE the coat significantly increased the FS and the wear along the two time spans. KM did not show a significant difference in FS with the coat. Improvements in wear were observed only after 50,000 cycles. Based on these laboratory results, it is concluded that G-coat Plus is indicated in association with GP IX Extra with the aim to improve the mechanical properties of the former. However, this study is limited to a short-term observation.

  3. Influence of Resin Cements on Color Stability of Different Ceramic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Renata Borges; Lima, Erick de; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Soares, Carlos José; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Novais, Veridiana Resende

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate color stability of two dental ceramics cemented with two resin cements, assessing the color difference (ΔE00) by the measurement of L*, a*, b*, c* and h* of transmittance. The combination of two ceramic system (feldspathic and lithium disilicate) and two resin cements - color A3 (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) resulted in 4 groups (n=5). Ten disks-shaped specimens were fabricated for each ceramic system (10x1.5 mm), etched with hydrofluoric acid (10%) and silanized prior to cementation. The color analysis was performed 24 h after cementation of the samples and after 6 months of storage in relative humidity by means of spectrophotometry. The ΔE00 values were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test (p<0.05). One-way ANOVA were calculated for the means of individual color coordinates (L*, a*, b*, c* and h*). Two-way ANOVA showed that only the ceramic factor was significant (p=0.003), but there was no difference for the cement factor (p=0.275) nor for the ceramic/cement interaction (p=0.161). The feldspathic ceramic showed the highest values of ΔE00. Variations in L*, a*, b*, c* and h* were more significant for feldspathic ceramic. In conclusion, storage alters similarly the optical properties of the resin cements and feldspathic porcelain was more susceptible to cement color change after aging.

  4. Studies on the incorporation of spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants into bitumen and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnevie-Svendsen, M.; Tallberg, K.; Aittola, P.; Tollbaeck, H.

    1976-01-01

    The joint Nordic incorporation experiments should provide technical data needed for the assessment of solidification techniques for wastes from nuclear reactors in the Nordic countries. Spent ion exchange resins are a main fraction of such wastes, and more knowledge about their incorporation is wanted. The effects of simulated and real ion exchange wastes on the quality of bitumen and cement incorporation products were studied. Blown and distilled bitumen and three Portland cement qualities were used. Product characterizations were based on properties relevant for safe waste management, storage, transport and disposal. The applicability and relevance of established and suggested tests is discussed. Up to 40-60% dry resin could be incorporated into bitumen without impairing product qualities. Products with higher resin contents were found to swell in contact with water. The products had a high leach resistance. Their form stability was improved by incorporated resins. Product qualities appeared to be less affected by physico-chemical variables than by mechanical process parameters. Pure resin-cement products tend to decompose in water. Product qualities were strongly affected by a variety of physico-chemical process parameters, and integer products were only obtained within narrow tolerance limits. Caesium was rapidly leached out. To attain integer products and improved leach resistance within technically acceptable tolerance limits it was necessary to utilize stabilizing and caesium-retaining additives such as Silix and vermiculite. Under the present conditions the water content of the resins limited the amounts that could be incorporated in 40-50wt% or about 70vol.% water-saturated (containing 20-40% dry) resin. (author)

  5. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  6. Cement solidification of spent ion exchange resins produced by the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Vigreux, B.

    1988-01-01

    Cement solidification technology has been applied to spent ion exchange resins for many years in countries throughout the world (at reactors, research centers and spent fuel reprocessing plants). Changing specifications for storage of radioactive waste have, however, confronted the operators of such facilities with a number of problems. Problems related both to the cement solidification process (water/cement/resin interactions and chemical interactions) and to its utilization (mixing, process control, variable feed composition, etc.) have often led waste producers to prefer other, polymer-based processes, which are very expensive and virtually incompatible with water. This paper discusses research on cement solidification of ion exchange resins since 1983 and the development of application technologies adapted to nuclear service conditions and stringent finished product quality requirements

  7. Treatment of a Vertical Root Fracture Using Dual-Curing Resin Cement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Moradi Majd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vertical root fracture (VRF is one of the most frustrating complications of root canal treatment. The prognosis of the root with VRF is poor therefore tooth extraction and root amputation are usually the only treatment options. However, bonding of the fracture line with adhesive resin cement during the intentional replantation procedure was recently suggested as an alternative to tooth extraction. Methods. A vertically fractured left maxillary incisor was carefully extracted, fracture line was treated with adhesive resin cement, a retrograde cavity was produced and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement, and tooth was replanted. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The size of periapical radiolucency was noticeably reduced and there was no clinical sign of ankylosis. Conclusion. Using adhesive resin cement to bond the fracture lines extraorally in roots with VRF and intentional replantation of the reconstructed teeth could be considered as an alternative to tooth extraction, especially for anterior teeth.

  8. Color management of porcelain veneers: influence of dentin and resin cement colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozic, Alma; Tsagkari, Maria; Khashayar, Ghazal; Aboushelib, Moustafa

    2010-01-01

    Porcelain veneers have become an interesting treatment option to correct the shape and color of anterior teeth. Because of their limited thickness and high translucency, achieving a good color match is influenced by several variables. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of natural dentin and resin cement colors on final color match of porcelain veneers. A preselected shade tab (A1) was chosen as the target color for a maxillary central incisor, and its color parameters (L*a*b*) were measured using a digital spectrophotometer (SpectroShade, MHT). Nine natural dentin colors (Natural Die Material, Ivoclar Vivadent) representing a wide range of tooth colors were used to prepare resin replicas of the maxillary central incisor with a standard preparation for porcelain veneers. The prepared porcelain veneers (IPS Empress Esthetic, A1, 0.6 mm thick, Ivoclar Vivadent) were cemented on the resin dies (nine groups of natural dentin colors) using seven shades of resin cement (Variolink Veneers, Ivoclar Vivadent). The L*a*b* values of the cemented veneers were measured, and DE values were calculated against the preselected target color (A1). DE greater than 3.3 was considered as a significant color mismatch detectable by the human eye. The seven shades of resin cement had no significant influence on the final color of the veneers, as the measured DE values were almost identical for every test group. On the other hand, the color of natural dentin was a significant factor that influenced final color match. None of the 63 tested combinations (nine natural dentin colors and seven resin cement colors) produced an acceptable color match. Thin porcelain veneers cannot mask underlying tooth color even when different shades of resin cement are used. Incorporation of opaque porcelain (high chroma) may improve final color match.

  9. Cement matrix for immobilisation of spent anionic resins in borate form arising from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2005-11-01

    In water cooled reactors boron is added as boric acid to control nuclear reactor power levels. The boric acid concentration in coolant/moderator water, is controlled by using strongly basic anionic resins in borate (H 2 BO 3 - ) form. The spent anionic resins in borate form contain 131 Iodine, 99 Technitium and 137 Cesium activities. Direct immobilisation of anionic resins in borate form in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Slag Cement was investigated using vermiculite, bentonite, calcium oxide and silica as admixtures. The cumulative fraction of 137 Cesium leached and 137 Cesium leach rate for slag cement matrix were 0.029 and 0.00064 g.cm 2 .d -1 respectively for 95 days of leaching. The volume reduction factor achieved by direct immobilisation of anionic resins in borate form was 0.48. Immobilisation of pyrolysis residues from these resins in OPC matrix was also studied. Leaching of matrix blocks was carried out for 180 days in DM water to optimise the matrix formulation. The cumulative fraction of 137 Cesium leached and 137 Cesium leach rate were 0.076 and 0.00054 respectively for 180 days leaching. The volume reduction factor achieved by immobilisation of pyrolysis residues was 2.4. OPC is non compatible to cationic resins loaded with alkali in absence of specific admixtures. Hence cationic resins loaded with alkali and anionic resins in borate form can not be immobilised together. (author)

  10. A technique for the management of screw access opening in cement-retained implant restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abutment screw loosening has been considered as a common complication of implant-supported dental prostheses. This problem is more important in cement-retained implant restorations due to their invisible position of the screw access opening. Case Report: This report describes a modified retrievability method for cement-retained implant restorations in the event of abutment screw loosening. The screw access opening was marked with ceramic stain and its porcelain surface was treated using hydrofluoric acid (HF, silane, and adhesive to bond to composite resin. Discussion: The present modified technique facilitates screw access opening and improves the bond between the porcelain and composite resin.

  11. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins

  12. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laili, Zalina, E-mail: liena@nm.gov.my [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abdul [Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  13. Comparison of temperature change among different adhesive resin cement during polymerization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Alkurt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the intra-pulpal temperature changes in adhesive resin cements during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Dentin surface was prepared with extracted human mandibular third molars. Adhesive resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Panavia SA, and RelyX U200 were applied to the dentin surface and polymerized under IPS e.max Press restoration. K-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulpal chamber to measure temperature change (n = 7. The temperature data were recorded (0.0001 sensible and stored on a computer every 0.1 second for sixteen minutes. Differences between the baseline temperature and temperatures of various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 minute were determined and mean temperature changes were calculated. At various time intervals, the differences in temperature values among the adhesive resin cements were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey honestly test (α = 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the time points and resin cements (P < 0.05. Temperature values of the Pan SA group were significantly higher than Pan F and RelyX (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Result of the study on self-adhesive and self-etch adhesive resin cements exhibited a safety intra-pulpal temperature change.

  14. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  15. Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. The μSBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion.

  16. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  17. Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of Cement-Spent Resins Matrix Mixed with Bio char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud; Nurfazlina Zainal Abidin

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of compressive strength of cement-spent resins matrix mixed with bio char was investigated. In this study, bio char with different percentage (5 %, 8 %, 11 % 14 % and 18 %) was used as alternative admixture material for cement solidification of spent resins. Some properties of the physical and chemical of spent resins and bio char were also investigated. The performance of cemented spent resins with the addition of bio char was evaluated based on their compressive strength and the water resistance test. The compressive strength was evaluated at three different curing periods of 7, 14 and 28 days, while 4 weeks of immersion in distilled water was chosen for water resistance test. The result indicated that the compressive strength at 7, 14 and 28 days of curing periods were above the minimum criterion for example > 3.45 MPa of acceptable level for cemented waste form. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between the compressive strength of the specimen and the percentage of bio char content. Result from the water resistance test showed that only one specimen that contained of 5 % of bio char failed the water resistance test due to the high of spent resins/ bio char ratio. The compressive strength of cement solidified spent resins was found increased after the water resistance test indicating further hydration occurred after immersed in water. The results of this study also suggest that the specimen with 8 %, 11 %, 14 % and 18 % of bio char content were resistance in water and suitable for the leaching study of radionuclides from cement-bio char-spent resins matrix. (author)

  18. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Marginal Adaptation and Quality of Interfaces in Lithium Disilicate Crowns - Influence of Manufacturing and Cementation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Freire, C A; Borges, G A; Caldas, Dbm; Santos, R S; Ignácio, S A; Mazur, R F

    To evaluate the cement line thickness and the interface quality in milled or injected lithium disilicate ceramic restorations and their influence on marginal adaptation using different cement types and different adhesive cementation techniques. Sixty-four bovine teeth were prepared for full crown restoration (7.0±0.5 mm in height, 8.0 mm in cervical diameter, and 4.2 mm in incisal diameter) and were divided into two groups: CAD/CAM automation technology, IPS e.max CAD (CAD), and isostatic injection by heat technology, IPS e.max Press (PRESS). RelyX ARC (ARC) and RelyX U200 resin cements were used as luting agents in two activation methods: initial self-activation and light pre-activation for one second (tack-cure). Next, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 23°C ± 2°C for 72 hours. The cement line thickness was measured in micrometers, and the interface quality received scores according to the characteristics and sealing aspects. The evaluations were performed with an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were presented to demonstrate the various features found in the cement line. For the cement line thickness, data were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05). For the variable interface quality, the data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, and multiple comparisons nonparametric Dunn test (α=0.05). The ANOVA presented statistical differences among the ceramic restoration manufacturing methods as well as a significant interaction between the manufacturing methods and types of cement (pcement line thickness values when compared to the ARC with both cementation techniques (pmanufacturing methods and cementation techniques. The PRESS ceramics obtained lower scores than did the CAD ceramics when using ARC cement (pcemented with self-adhesive resin cement resulted in a thinner cement line that is statistically different from that of CAD or pressed

  20. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC(®) Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink(®) II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus(®) (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Combination of CEREC(®) Blocs PC and Variolink(®) II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Variolink(®) II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used.

  1. Casting granular ion exchange resins with medium-active waste in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijer, O.

    1980-01-01

    Medium active waste from nuclear power stations in Sweden is trapped in granular ion exchange resins. The resin is mixed with cement paste and cast in a concrete shell which is cubic and has an edge dimension of 1.2 m. In some cases the ion exchange cement mortar has cracked. The report presents laboratory sutdies of the properties of the ion exchange resin and the mortar. Also the leaching of the moulds has been investigated. It was shown that a mixture with a water cement ratio higher than about 0.5 swells considerably during the first weeks after casting. The diffusion constant for cesium 137 has been determined at 3.10 -4 cm 2 /24-hour period in conjunction with exposure of the mould and mortar to sea water. The Swedish language report has 400 pages with 90 figures and 30 tables. (author)

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. Experimental resin cements containing bioactive fillers reduce matrix metalloproteinase-mediated dentin collagen degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Yamauti, Monica; Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Thimoty F; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Collagen dentin matrix may represent a suitable scaffold to be remineralized in the presence of bioactive materials. The purpose of this study was to determine if experimental resin cements containing bioactive fillers may modulate matrix metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation of etched dentin. Human dentin beams demineralized using 10% phosphoric acid or 0.5 mol/L EDTA were infiltrated with the following experimental resins: (1) unfilled resin, (2) resin with Bioglass 45S5 particles (Sylc; OSspray Ltd, London, UK), and (3) resin with β-tricalcium phosphate-modified calcium silicate cement (HCAT-β) particles. The filler/resin ratio was 40/60 wt%. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and the determination of C-terminal telopeptide (ICTP) was performed by radioimmunoassay after 24 hours, 1 week, and 4 weeks. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of dentin surfaces after 4 weeks of storage was also executed. Collagen degradation was prominent both in phosphoric acid and EDTA-treated dentin. Resin infiltration strongly reduced the MMP activity in demineralized dentin. Resin-containing Bioglass 45S5 particles exerted higher and more stable protection of collagen at all tested dentin states and time points. HCAT-β induced collagen protection from MMPs only in EDTA-treated specimens. Dentin remineralization was achieved when dentin was infiltrated with the resin cements containing bioactive fillers. MMP degradation of dentin collagen is strongly reduced in resin-infiltrated dentin. The inclusion of Bioglass 45S5 particles exerted an additional protection of collagen during dentin remineralization. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of an Italian pozzolanic cement for the solidification of bead ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.

    1988-05-01

    Granular ion-exchange resins represent a large portion of the medium-active wastes generated at nuclear power stations. The most common practice for their confinement is to mix them with cement paste and cast the mixture in a concrete shell. Such a procedure however does not prove successful in many cases, because of the extreme swelling to which the embedded resin can give rise. This phenomenon has been investigated carefully. In particular, measurements of the swelling pressure have been made together with evaluation of the volume changes of the resin beads due to ion exchange and of the weight increase as a function of relative humidity. The ion exchange capacity, which continues even after incorporation in the cement matrix has also been put into evidence. The conclusion was drawn that a three component diagram (water - dry resin- cement) has to be prepared every time in order to identify the region corresponding to the better formulations. With this in mind the optimum waste loading of 11.5 wt% of dry resin was chosen to incorporate a mixed bed resin (Amberlite IR 120 Na + and IRA 400 Cl - in the weight ratio of 1:1) into an Italian pozzolanic cement (425 type). Several properties of the final waste form have been investigated, ranging from mechanical (crushing strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity, elastic modulus and Poisson ratio), to thermal stability, radiation stability, permeability, leachability and resistance to bacterial attack. Dimensional stability was also measured with the aim of examining the expansion phenomena which can take place in the presence of resin beads. The data obtained are encouraging for future application of the type 425 cement tested in the field of radwastes. An attempt to explain the performance of this binder, based on its intrinsic properties, was also made. (author)

  5. Zinc incorporation improves biological activity of beta-tricalcium silicate resin-based cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Yamauti, Monica; Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Tim F; Toledano, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition may improve endodontic treatment prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if zinc incorporation into experimental resin cements containing bioactive fillers may modulate MMP-mediated collagen degradation of dentin. Human dentin samples untreated and demineralized using 10% phosphoric acid or 0.5 mol/L EDTA were infiltrated with the following experimental resins: (1) unfilled resin, (2) resin with Bioglass 45S5 particles (OSspray, London, UK), (3) resin with beta-tricalcium silicate particles (βTCS), (4) resin with zinc-doped Bioglass 45S5, and (5) resin with zinc-doped βTCS particles. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva (for 24 hours, 1 week, and 4 weeks) and submitted to radioimmunoassay to quantify C-terminal telopeptide. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was also undertaken on dentin samples after 4 weeks of storage. Collagen degradation was prominent both in phosphoric acid and EDTA-treated dentin. Resin infiltration strongly reduced MMP activity in demineralized dentin. Resin containing Bioglass 45S5 particles exerted higher and stable protection of collagen. The presence of zinc in βTCS particles increases MMP inhibition. Different mineral precipitation was attained in dentin infiltrated with the resin cements containing bioactive fillers. MMP degradation of dentin collagen is strongly reduced after resin infiltration of dentin. Zinc incorporation in βTCS particles exerted an additional protection against MMP-mediated collagen degradation. However, it did not occur in resin containing Bioglass 45S5 particles, probably because of the formation of phosphate-zinc compounds. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A medicated polycarboxylate cement to prevent complications in composite resin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Shintani, H.; Yamaki, M.

    1990-01-01

    Preparative treatment is the preferred method to protect the dentin and pulp from complications in composite resin therapy. This study investigated the in vivo effects of the polycarboxylate cement containing zinc fluoride and tannic acid in composite resin restorations. Scanning electron micrographs established that the composite resin failed to contact the axial wall. The gaps varied from 10 to 60 microns. However, this polycarboxylate cement was shown to provide excellent adaptation to dentin when used as a base and its chemical adhesion allowed it to make close contact with the unetched dentin. The newly developed electron probe x-ray microanalyzer revealed that the in vivo penetration of fluoride and zinc occurred through the dentinal tubules. When this polycarboxylate cement was used, the orifices of dentinal tubules were partially occluded, possibly with the smear layer fixed by tannic acid. In addition, by releasing the components, this polycarboxylate cement adds acid resistance to dentin and increases the resistance of dentin collagen to proteolytic enzymes. As such this polycarboxylate cement offers advantages as a base to composite resin therapy

  7. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  8. Leach testing of simulated ion-exchange resin waste solidified in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.K.; Uotila, P.I.; Ovaskainen, R.M.

    Leach tests were carried out on ion-exchange resins solidified in cement. Three product mixtures, two isotopes and four leachants at two temperatures, were tested. The increase of resin content increased the leaching of Cs-137; the effect of silix admixture was negligible. The type of the leachant has a stronger influence on Co-60 than on Cs-137. The increase of temperature usually also increased leaching. (author)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  10. Solidification of ion exchange resins saturated with Na+ ions: Comparison of matrices based on Portland and blast furnace slag cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, E.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Stefan, L.; Le Bescop, P.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the conditioning of ion exchange resins used to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Calcium silicate cements may have a good potential to encapsulate spent resins. However, certain combinations of cement and resins produce a strong expansion of the final product, possibly leading to its full disintegration. The focus is placed on the understanding of the behaviour of cationic resins in the Na+ form in Portland or blast furnace slag (CEM III/C) cement pastes. During hydration of the Portland cement paste, the pore solution exhibits a decrease in its osmotic pressure, which causes a transient expansion of small magnitude of the resins. At 20 °C, this expansion takes place just after setting in a poorly consolidated material and is sufficient to induce cracks. In the CEM III/C paste, swelling of the resins also occurs, but before the end of setting, and induces limited stress in the matrix which is still plastic.

  11. Management of white spots: resin infiltration technique and microabrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hye Son

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report compared the effectiveness of resin infiltration technique (Icon, DMG with microabrasion (Opalustre, Ultradent Products, Inc. in management of white spot lesions. It demonstrates that although neither microabrasion nor resin infiltration technique can remove white spot lesions completely, resin infiltration technique seems to be more effective than microabrasion. Therefore resin infiltration technique can be chosen preferentially for management of white spot lesions and caution should be taken for case selection.

  12. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) ( n= 5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions ( Pceramic veneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  13. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  14. Centralized cement solidification technique for low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Izumida, Tatsuo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki.

    1996-01-01

    A centralized cement solidification system has been developed to enable a single facility to solidify such low-level radioactive wastes as liquid waste, spent ion exchange resin, incineration ash, and miscellaneous solid wastes. Since the system uses newly developed high-performance cement, waste loading is raised and deterioration of waste forms after land burial prevented. This paper describes the centralized cement solidification system and the features of the high-performance cement. Results of full-scale pilot plant tests are also shown from the viewpoint of industrial applicability. (author)

  15. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  16. Evaluation of the bond strength of resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giray, Figen Eren; Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Two adhesive cements, one "etch-and-rinse" [Variolink II (V)] and one "self-etch" [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U test. No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (pceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used.

  17. Carbon-14 behavior in a cement-dominated environment: Implications for spent CANDU resin waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Reardon, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    Cement based waste forms and concrete engineered barriers are expected to play a key role in providing 14 C waste containment and control 14 C migration for time periods commensurate with its hazardous life of about 50,000 years. The main thrust of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the performance of cement based waste forms with regard to 14 C containment. Of particular importance are the geochemical processes controlling 14 C solubility and release under anticipated cement dominated low and intermediate level waste repository conditions. Immobilization of carbonate-form exchange resin in grout involves transfer of sorbed 14 CO 3 2- ions, through exchange for hydroxyl ions from the grout slurry, followed by localized precipitation of solid calcium carbonate at the cement/resin interface in the grout matrix. Carbon-14 release behavior can be attributed to the dissolution characteristics and solubility of calcite present in the cement based waste form. The groundwater flow regime can exert a pronounced effect both on the near-field chemistry and the leaching behavior of 14 C. For a cement dominated repository, at relatively low-flow or stagnant groundwater conditions, the alkaline near-field chemical environments inhibits the release of 14 C from the cemented waste form. Under high flow conditions, the near-field environment is characterized by relatively neutral pH conditions which promote calcite dissolution, thus resulting in 14 C release from the waste form

  18. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Peutzfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM, High Power mode (HPM, or Xtra Power mode (XPM. Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm2; HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm2; XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm2 (n=17. Vickers hardness (HV and indentation modulus (EIT were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α=0.05. Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p≤0.0001. Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p≤0.0021. However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement.

  19. UV irradiation improves the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chen, Li; Li, Deli; Tan, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effect of UV irradiation on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Twelve epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Cont.): No surface treatment. Group 2 (Low-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 10 cm for 10 min. Group 3 (High-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 1 cm for 3 min. A resin cement (CLEARFIL SA LUTING) was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which contained fiber posts in the center. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the mean bond strengths (MPa) were 18.81 for Cont. group, 23.65 for Low-UV group, 34.75 for High-UV group. UV irradiation had a significant effect on the bond strength (pUV irradiation demonstrates its capability to improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  20. Impact of bleaching agents on water sorption and solubility of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi Ardakani, Mahshid; Atashkar, Berivan; Bagheri, Rafat; Burrow, Michael F

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of distilled water and home and office bleaching agents on the sorption and solubility of resin luting cements. A total of 18 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin cements: G-CEM LinkAce, Panavia F, Rely X Unicem, and seT. Specimens were cured according to the manufacturers' instructions and randomly divided into three groups of six, where they were treated with either an office or home bleaching agent or immersed in distilled water (control). Water sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. There was a significant, positive correlation between sorption and solubility. Two-way anova showed significant differences among all resin cements tested for either sorption or solubility. Water sorption and solubility of all cements were affected significantly by office bleaching, and even more by home bleaching agents. Sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were highly correlated and significantly affected by applying either office or home bleaching agents; seT showed the highest sorption and solubility, whereas Rely X Unicem revealed the lowest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. A critical analysis of the degree of conversion of resin-based luting cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORONHA FILHO, Jaime Dutra; BRANDÃO, Natasha Lamego; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; GUIMARÃES, José Guilherme Antunes; da SILVA, Eduardo Moreira

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study analyzed the degree of conversion (DC%) of four resin-based cements (All Ceram, Enforce, Rely X ARC and Variolink II) activated by two modes (chemical and dual), and evaluated the decrease of DC% in the dual mode promoted by the interposition of a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. Material and Methods In the chemical activation, the resin-based cements were prepared by mixing equal amounts of base and catalyst pastes. In the dual activation, after mixing, the cements were light-activated at 650 mW/cm2 for 40 s. In a third group, the cements were lightactivated through a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. The DC% was evaluated in a FT-IR spectrometer equipped with an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR). The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results For all resin-based cements, the DC% was significantly higher with dual activation, followed by dual activation through IPS Empress 2, and chemical activation (pEmpress 2 disc (pEmpress 2. PMID:21085798

  2. Micro-shear bond strength of resin cement to dentin after application of desensitizing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Goktas, Baris; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of three desensitizing toothpastes on bonding of resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of 72 maxillary third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into three groups according to three desensitizing toothpastes used: Sensodyne Rapid Relief (GlaxoSmithKline, SmithKline Beecham Ltd., Slough, UK), Signal Sensitive Expert (Unilever Sanayi ve Ticaret Türk A.Ş., Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey) and Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (Colgate Palmolive, New York, NY). Following bonding of the resin cement (Clearfil™ SA Cement, Kuraray Co, Osaka, Japan) to dentin, the specimens were light cured for 40 s with a LED (Elipar S10, 3M Espe, St. Paul, MN). The strength measurements were accomplished with a micro-shear testing machine (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that the application of desensitizing toothpastes had significant effects on bond strength of the resin cement tested to dentin (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were observed in all of the groups. The use of a desensitizing toothpaste before cementation might alter the bond strength of adhesively luted restorations.

  3. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  4. The bonding effectiveness of five luting resin cements to the IPS Empress 2 all ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhan, V; Essop, A R M; Du Preez, I C

    2005-04-01

    Variolink II is the only resin cement used for bonding IPS (Ivoclar Porcelain System) Empress 2 ceramic restorations. Alternative luting resin cements need to be investigated for their bonding effectiveness with the IPS Empress 2 ceramic. To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and the effect of thermocycling, on the bonding effectiveness, of five resin cements to IPS Empress 2 ceramic. The projecting surfaces of one hundred ceramic discs were ground wet on silicone carbide paper. The specimens were divided into 5 groups of 20. The resin cements were bonded to the prepared ceramic surfaces, in the form of a stub. The specimens were stored under distilled water at 37 degrees C in an oven for 24 hours. Ten specimens in each group were thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. All the specimens were stressed to failure in an Instron Materials Testing Machine. The results were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistically similar mean SBS values were grouped using the Bonferroni (Dunn) multiple comparison test. The means for the non-thermocycled group were: 26.21, 19.41, 17.69, 17.43, and 15.76. The means for the thermocycled group were: 22.90, 15.72, 14.34, 13.96 and 13.45. The differences between the means were highly significant (p Empress 2 ceramic was effective. Thermocycling had a significant effect on the mean SBS values of Calibra. Thermocycling had no significant effect on the mean SBS values of the other resin cements.

  5. Additional chemical polymerization of dual resin cements: reality or a goal to be achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Sakaguti UMETSUBO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study serves as a warning to dentists and researchers that dual-cured resin cements may not polymerize completely under some prosthetic crowns. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the polymerization degree of dual-cured resin cements under prosthetic barrier, by microhardness test. Material and method Three cements (Bistite II, RelyX ARC and Variolink II were light-cured through different barriers, placed between the cement and the light source: G1: without barrier; G2: composite resin (Cesead; G3: Inceram alumina; G4: IPS Empress; G5: Inceram zirconia; G6: tooth fragment. Photopolymerization was carried out using a halogen light unit (650 mW/cm2; microhardness was evaluated using the Microhardness Tester FM 700, under a load of 50gf with a dwell time of 15s, at two evaluation times (30min and 24h. Result The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%. Both Inceram alumina and Inceram zirconia ceramic barriers hindered polymerization. Bistite, followed by RelyX and Variolink, exhibited the highest microhardness values (p<0.05. As the highest values were obtained without a barrier, it was determined that the barrier, followed by the tooth, influenced microhardness. Both Empress and Cesead had the smallest microhardness values but with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion The barrier negatively affected the microhardness of dual-cured resin cements; evaluation time did not affect microhardness values for most of the conditions tested. There is a limited effect of the chemical activator on the polymerization of some dual-cured cements, and their performance is product specific.

  6. A critical analysis of the degree of conversion of resin-based luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Dutra Noronha Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the degree of conversion (DC% of four resin-based cements (All Ceram, Enforce, Rely X ARC and Variolink II activated by two modes (chemical and dual, and evaluated the decrease of DC% in the dual mode promoted by the interposition of a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the chemical activation, the resin-based cements were prepared by mixing equal amounts of base and catalyst pastes. In the dual activation, after mixing, the cements were light-activated at 650 mW/cm² for 40 s. In a third group, the cements were light-activated through a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. The DC% was evaluated in a FT-IR spectrometer equipped with an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS: For all resin-based cements, the DC% was significantly higher with dual activation, followed by dual activation through IPS Empress 2, and chemical activation (p<0.05. Irrespective of the activation mode, Rely X presented the highest DC% (p<0.05. Chemically activated Variolink and All Ceram showed the worst results (p<0.05. The DC% decreased significantly when activation was performed through a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study suggest that resin-based cements could present low DC% when the materials are dually activated through 2.0 mm of reinforced ceramic materials with translucency equal to or less than that of IPS-Empress 2.

  7. Solidification of ion exchange resins saturated with Na+ ions: Comparison of matrices based on Portland and blast furnace slag cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Stefan, L.; Le Bescop, P.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the conditioning of ion exchange resins used to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Calcium silicate cements may have a good potential to encapsulate spent resins. However, certain combinations of cement and resins produce a strong expansion of the final product, possibly leading to its full disintegration. The focus is placed on the understanding of the behaviour of cationic resins in the Na + form in Portland or blast furnace slag (CEM III/C) cement pastes. During hydration of the Portland cement paste, the pore solution exhibits a decrease in its osmotic pressure, which causes a transient expansion of small magnitude of the resins. At 20 °C, this expansion takes place just after setting in a poorly consolidated material and is sufficient to induce cracks. In the CEM III/C paste, swelling of the resins also occurs, but before the end of setting, and induces limited stress in the matrix which is still plastic. - Highlights: • Solidification of cationic resins in the Na + -form is investigated. • Portland and blast furnace slag cements are compared. • Deleterious expansion is observed with Portland cement only. • Resin swelling is due to a decrease in the osmotic pressure of the pore solution. • The consolidation rate of the matrix is a key parameter to prevent damage.

  8. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  9. Polymerization of dual cure resin cements applied for luting tooth colored fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Insufficient polymerization of resin cements is of considerable clinical importance, because of mechanical deficiencies and biological side effects of uncured resin. Dual cure resin cements are getting popular in luting tooth colored posts and although their curing is claimed to proceed chemically, polymerization efficiency in deep areas of canal is uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cements used for luting translucent and opaque fiber posts in different distances from the light tip. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, degree of conversion of two dual cured resin cements, Rely X ARC (3M, ESPE and Nexus 2 (Kerr, USA were measured when used with DT-Light and DT-White posts (RTD, France. The light curing unit used was Optilux 501, with output of 650-700 mw/cm2 with emitting time of 60 seconds. Degree of conversion was measured in three different depths (4, 6, 8 mm by FTIR. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Post hoc tests. P0.05. Nexus used with DT-Light had lower DC% in 8 mm depth (P<0.05. Nexus used with DT-White showed lower DC% in 8 mm depth compared to 4 mm depth. The control groups of both cements showed significant increased DC% in 4 mm depth compared to 6 and 8 mm depths (P<0.05. DT-White caused decreased DC% in both cements in 4 mm. DT-Light caused increased DC% of Rely X in 6 mm depth compared to DT-White and control. DT-Light increased DC% of Nexus in 6 and 8 mm depths, compared to DT-White and control groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, application of translucent fiber posts has a significant effect on degree of polymerization in dual-cure resin cements, compared to opaque types. Their better light transmission to deep areas due to the effect of optical fibers, can lead to better results.

  10. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (p<0.05). Surface roughening of the tested FRC posts is

  11. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  12. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  13. Push-out strength of modified Portland cements and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Francesco; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Huffman, Bradford; Sword, Jeremy; Agee, Kelli; Siboni, Francesco; Tay, Franklin; Prati, Carlo; Pashley, David

    2010-02-01

    Modified calcium-silicate cements derived from white Portland cement (PC) were formulated to test their push-out strength from radicular dentin after immersion for 1 month. Slabs obtained from 42 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with 0.6 mm diameter holes, then enlarged with rotary instruments. After immersion in EDTA and NaOC1, the holes were filled with modified PCs or ProRoot MTA, Vitrebond and Clearfil SE. Different concentrations of phyllosilicate (montmorillonite-MMT) were added to experimental cements. ProRoot MTA was also included as reference material. Vitrebond and Clearfil SE were included as controls. Each group was tested after 1 month of immersion in water or PBS. A thin-slice push-out test on a universal testing machine served to test the push-out strength of materials. Results were statistically analyzed using the least squares means (LSM) method. The modified PCs had push-out strengths of 3-9.5 MPa after 1 month of immersion in water, while ProRoot MTA had 4.8 MPa. The push-out strength of PC fell after incubation in PBS for 1 month, while the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA increased. There were no significant changes in Clearfil SE Bond or Vitrebond after water or PBS storage.

  14. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p enamel showed the highest mean fracture load (MFL; 1591 ± 172.59 N). The RelyX Ultimate groups MFLs were significantly higher than the corresponding RelyX U200 groups (p enamel (p enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Influence of the bracket on bonding and physical behavior of orthodontic resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Zein, Bilal; Menéndez-Núñez, Mario; Sánchez-Sánchez, Purificación; Ceballos-García, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of the type of bracket, on bond strength, microhardness and conversion degree (CD) of four resin orthodontic cements. Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) test between the bracket base and the cement was carried out on glass-hour-shaped specimens (n=20). Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) and micro-Raman spectra were recorded in situ under the bracket base. Weibull distribution, ANOVA and non-parametric test were applied for data analysis (pcement showing the worst performance. The CD was from 80% to 62.5%.

  16. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  17. Mixture Design and Its Application in Cement Solidification for Spent Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Xueying; Lin, Meiqing; Chen, Hui

    1994-01-01

    The study is aimed to assess the usefulness of the mixture design for spent resin immobilization in cement. Although a considerable amount of research has been carried out to determine the limits for the composition of an acceptable resin-cement mixture, no efficient experimental strategy exists that explores the full properties of waste form against composition relationship. In order to gain an overall view, this report introduces the method of mixture design and mixture analysis, and describes the design of experiment of the 5-component mixture with the constraint conditions. The mathematic models of 28-day compressive strength varying with the ingredients are fitted, and the main effect and interaction effect of two ingredients are identified quantitatively along with the graphical interpretation using the response trace plot and contour plots

  18. Evaluation of compatibility between different types of adhesives and dual-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Eduardo B; Lopes, Lawrence G; D'alpino, Paulo H P; Pereira, José C; Mondelli, Rafael F L; Navarro, Maria F L

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding compatibility between different adhesives and a dual-cured resin cement, using a conventional tensile bond test. The adhesives used were: Prime & Bond (PB) (Dentsply) (PB), Scotchbond Multi Purpose (SB) (3M), and the activator Self Cure (SC) (Dentsply). The dual-curing resin cement used was Enforce (EF) (Dentsply). Six groups with five specimens in each were tested: G1: EF/PB/EF (light cured); G2: EF/SB/EF (light cured); G3: EF/PB+SC/EF (light cured); G4: EF/PB+SC/EF (only chemically cured); G5: EF/EF (light cured); G6: EF/EF (only chemically cured). The resin cement was applied in two stainless steel molds with a cone-shaped perforation measuring 4 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness, and the adhesive was applied between them. Ten minutes after specimens were cured, the tensile strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values (MPa) +/- SD obtained in each experimental group were: G1: 1.4 +/- 0.2; G2: 1.3 +/- 0.2; G3: 1.2 +/- 0.4; G4: 0.8 +/- 0.2; G5: 1.2 +/- 0.1; G6: 0.7 +/- 0.1. The results were statistically evaluated using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p adhesives used with dual-cured resin cement. The lowest tensile bond strength values occurred in the absence of photoactivation.

  19. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  20. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  1. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Surface Treatment on the Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahmmad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel and dentin surface treatment on the micro-shear bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Seventy-two extracted third molars had their crowns embedded in acrylic resin and worn to obtain a flat enamel or dentin surface. The enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=12) that were based on surface treatment (11.5% polyacrylic acid solution or no treatment), substrate condition (wet or dry) and storage period (1 day or 90 days), and treated accordingly. Cylinders (1 × 1 mm) were fabricated using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) following the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for either 1 day or 90 days and subjected to micro-shear bond strength test (EMIC DL 2000 at 0.5 mm/min). After this, the failure type of the specimens was determined. Data were subjected to statistical analysis (a=0.05). According to the results, the 11.5% polyacrylic acid application decreased the bond strength in both enamel and dentin samples. The moist groups showed higher bond strength than the dry ones, regardless of the substrate and surface treatment. Storage period did not influence bond strength. In conclusion, surface treatment with 11.5% polyacrylic acid and absence of moisture decreased the bond strength of the resin-cement (RelyU200), regardless of the storage period.

  2. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-Wzirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  3. Influence of post pattern and resin cement curing mode on the retention of glass fibre posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskus, L T; Sgura, R; Paragó, F E M; Silva, E M; Guimarães, J G A

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of post design and roughness and cement system (dual- or self-cured) on the retention of glass fibre posts. Two tapered and smooth posts (Exacto Cônico No. 2 and White Post No. 1) and two parallel-sided and serrated posts (Fibrekor 1.25 mm and Reforpost No. 2) were adhesively luted with two different resin cements--a dual-cured (Rely-X ARC) and a self-cured (Cement Post)--in 40 single-rooted teeth. The teeth were divided into eight experimental groups (n = 5): PFD--Parallel-serrated-Fibrekor/dual-cured; PRD--Parallel-serrated-Reforpost/dual-cured; TED--Tapered-smooth-Exacto Cônico/dual-cured; TWD--Tapered-smooth-White Post/dual-cured; PFS--Parallel-serrated-Fibrekor/self-cured; PRS--Parallel-serrated-Reforpost/self-cured; TES--Tapered-smooth-Exacto Cônico/self-cured; TWS--Tapered-smooth-White Post/self-cured. The specimens were submitted to a pull-out test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Data were analysed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni's multiple comparison test (alpha = 0.05). Pull-out results (MPa) were: PFD = 8.13 (+/-1.71); PRD = 8.30 (+/-0.46); TED = 8.68 (+/-1.71); TWD = 9.35 (+/-1.99); PFS = 8.54 (+/-2.23); PRS = 7.09 (+/-1.96); TES = 8.27 (+/-3.92); TWS = 7.57 (+/-2.35). No statistical significant difference was detected for posts and cement factors and their interaction. The retention of glass fibre posts was not affected by post design or surface roughness nor by resin cement-curing mode. These results imply that the choice for serrated posts and self-cured cements is not related to an improvement in retention.

  4. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-Zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×10(5) cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (pHarvard cement group failed to showed no noticeable change in cytotoxicity with time. Although this study has limitations, it provides

  5. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  6. Physico-Chemical Studies Involving Incorporation of Radioactive and Industrial Waste In Cement-Epoxy Resin Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, M.S.; Hafez, N.

    1999-01-01

    Cement and epoxy resin as chemical additives are proposed to incorporate different types of wastes. The study was extended to prepare different mixtures of cement and epoxy resin in presence of some toxic ions. The studied ions were Cd II, Ni II, Cu II, Fe III, Ce IV, 154+152 Eu, phenol and toluene. The physical, mechanical and leaching properties of the mixtures were studied. The thermal analysis and infrared spectra were also investigated. It was observed that all the studied properties of the epoxy modified cement as a disposal matrix was improved

  7. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.; Lee, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The aim of the programme is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents used in water reactors can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (ratio 9:1) have been used. Improvements in the properties of the product and the waste loading of 50 w/o damp resin can be achieved using microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, as an additive to the blended cement. This report contains data on the effects of anion resins, and mixed anion/cation resins, on the performance of the cemented product. The effects of organic acids, especially picolinic and formic acids, bound to anion resins have also been investigated. In addition, formulations developed have been assessed at commercial scale (200 litres of cemented product) for their process and product characteristics. The final part of the report deals with the long-term product performance of samples prepared from cation resins which are now nearly one year old. (author)

  8. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  9. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

  10. Cementation of secondary wastes generated from carbonisation of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2004-07-01

    The spent IX resins containing radioactive fission and activation products from power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Process for carbonization of IX resins to achieve weight and volume reduction has been optimized on 50 dm 3 /batch pilot test rig. The process generates carbonaceous residue, organic liquid condensates (predominantly styrene) and aqueous alkaline scrubber solutions as secondary wastes. The report discusses laboratory tests on leaching of 137 Cs from cement matrix incorporating carbonaceous residues and extrapolation of results to 200 liter matrix block. The cumulative fraction of 137 Cs leached from 200 liter cement matrix was estimated to be 0.0021 in 200 days and 0.0418 over a period of 30 years. Incorporation of organic liquid condensates into cement matrix has been tried out successfully. Thus two types of secondary wastes generated during carbonization of spent IX resins can be immobilized in cement matrix. (author)

  11. Influence of light-curing units and restorative materials on the micro hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuguimiya Rosiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of indirect restorative materials (IRMs and light-curing units (LCUs on the micro hardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 cylindrical samples (2 mm thick were prepared with dual-cured resin cement (Relyx ARC photo-activated with either a QTH (Optilight Plus for 40s or a LED (Radii light-curing unit for 65s. Photo-activation was performed through the 2-mm- thick IRMs and the samples were divided into six groups (n=6 according to the combination of veneering materials (without, ceramic and indirect resin and LCUs (QTH and LED. In the control group, the samples were light-cured with a QTH unit without the interposition of any restorative material. Vickers micro hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample (load of 50 g for 15 secs. The data were statistically analyzed using a three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey x s post-hoc test ( P < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences on the top surface between the light curing-units ( P > 0.05; however, the LED provided greater hardness on the bottom surface when a ceramic material was used ( P < 0.05. The mean hardness in photo-activated samples, in which there was no interposition of indirect materials, was significantly greater ( P < 0.01. Conclusions: It may be concluded that the interposition of the restorative material decreased the micro hardness in the deeper cement layer. Such decrease, however, was lower when the ceramic was interposed and the cement light-cured with LED.

  12. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Khalilian-Gourtani, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-07-01

    Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (Pstrength in all tests (P>0.05). Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite.

  13. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  14. Assessing degradation of composite resin cements during artificial aging by Martens hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgin, Stefan; Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-05-19

    Aim of the study was to verify the efficiency of Martens hardness measurements in detecting the degradation of composite resin cements during artificial aging. Four cements were used: Variolink II (VL2), RelyX Unicem 2 Automix (RUN), PermaFlo DC (PDC), and DuoCem (DCM). Specimens for Martens hardness measurements were light-cured and stored in water at 37 °C for 1 day to allow complete polymerization (baseline). Subsequently the specimens were artificially aged by water storage at 37 °C or thermal cycling (n = 6). Hardness was measured at baseline as well as after 1, 4, 9 and 16 days of aging. Specimens for indirect tensile strength measurements were produced in a similar manner. Indirect tensile strength was measured at baseline and after 16 days of aging (n = 10). The results were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). After water storage for 16 days hardness was significantly reduced for VL2, RUN and DCM while hardness of PDC as well as indirect tensile strength of all cements were not significantly affected. Thermal cycling significantly reduced both, hardness and indirect tensile strength for all cements. No general correlation was found between Martens hardness and indirect tensile strength. However, when each material was analyzed separately, relative change of hardness and of indirect tensile strength revealed a strong linear correlation. Martens hardness is a sensible test method to assess aging of resin composite cements during thermal cycling that is easy to perform.

  15. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  16. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C_3S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data. - Highlights: • Experimental analysis about mechanical behavior of a composite material. • Chemo-Mechanical-Transport modeling on a composite material made up with IER embedded into cement paste matrix. • Multi-scale modeling.

  17. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher μTBS (pEDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher μTBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher μTBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC.

  18. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  19. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  20. Influence of power density and primer application on polymerization of dual-cured resin cements monitored by ultrasonic measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takubo, Chikako; Yasuda, Genta; Murayama, Ryosuke; Ogura, Yukari; Tonegawa, Motoka; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2010-08-01

    We used ultrasonic measurements to monitor the influence of power density and primer application on the polymerization reaction of dual-cured resin cements. The ultrasonic equipment comprised a pulser-receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. Resin cements were mixed and inserted into a transparent mould, and specimens were placed on the sample stage, onto which the primer, if used, was also applied. Power densities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, or 600 mW cm(-2) were used for curing. The transit time through the cement disk was divided by the specimen thickness to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity. When resin cements were light-irradiated, each curve displayed an initial plateau of approximately 1,500 m s(-1), which rapidly increased to a second plateau of 2,300-2,900 m s(-1). The rate of sound velocity increase was retarded when the cements were light-irradiated at lower power densities, and increased when the primer was applied. The polymerization behaviour of dual-cured resin cements was therefore shown to be affected by the power density of the curing unit and the application of self-etching primer. (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups. Key words:CAD/CAM ceramic, alumina, zirconia, resin cement, surface pre-treatment, sandblasting, silica-coating, chemical aging, bond degradation, microtensile bond strength. PMID:22322517

  2. The Comparison of Sorption and Solubility Behavior of Four Different Resin Luting Cements in Different Storage Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giti, Rashin; Vojdani, Mahroo; Abduo, Jaafar; Bagheri, Rafat

    2016-06-01

    Structural integrity and dimensional stability are the key factors that determine the clinical success and durability of luting cements in the oral cavity. Sorption and solubility of self-adhesive resin luting cements in food-simulating solutions has not been studied sufficiently. This study aimed to compare the sorption and solubility of 2 conventional and 2 self-adhesive resin-based luting cements immersed in four different storage media. A total of 32 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray), and Choice 2 (Bisco). Eight specimens of each material were immersed in all tested solutions including n-heptane 97%, distilled water, apple juice, or Listerine mouth wash. Sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 18, using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test with p≤ 0.05 set as the level of significance. There was a statistically significant interaction between the materials and solutions. The effect of media on the sorption and solubility was material-dependent. While seT showed the highest values of the sorption in almost all solutions, Choice 2 showed the least values of sorption and solubility. Immersion in apple juice caused more sorption than other solutions (p≤ 0.05). The sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were significantly affected by their composition and the storage media. The more hydrophobic materials with higher filler content like Choice 2 resin cement showed the least sorption and solubility. Due to their lower sorption and solubility, these types of resin-based luting cements are recommended to be used clinically.

  3. The Effect of Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement Base and Bulk-fill Resin Composite on Cuspal Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K V; Wong, R H; Palamara, J; Burrow, M F

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated cuspal deformation in teeth restored with different types of adhesive materials with and without a base. Mesio-occluso-distal slot cavities of moderately large dimension were prepared on extracted maxillary premolars (n=24). Teeth were assigned to one of four groups and restored with either a sonic-activated bulk-fill resin composite (RC) (SonicFill), or a conventional nanohybrid RC (Herculite Ultra). The base materials used were a flowable nanofilled RC (Premise Flowable) and a high-viscosity resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Riva Light-Cure HV). Cuspal deflection was measured with two direct current differential transformers, each contacting a buccal and palatal cusp. Cuspal movements were recorded during and after restoration placement. Data for the buccal and palatal cusp deflections were combined to give the net cuspal deflection. Data varied widely. All teeth experienced net inward cuspal movement. No statistically significant differences in cuspal deflection were found among the four test groups. The use of a flowable RC or an RMGIC in closed-laminate restorations produced the same degree of cuspal movement as restorations filled with only a conventional nanohybrid or bulk-fill RC.

  4. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  5. Effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihua; Song, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yaming; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether or not an erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser could improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Surface treatments can improve the bonding properties of dental ceramics. However, little is known about the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiated on zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were made, and randomly divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments, including one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine Er:YAG laser groups. The laser groups were subdivided by applying different energy intensities (100, 200, or 300 mJ) and irradiation times (5, 10, or 15 sec). After surface treatments, ceramic pieces had their surface morphology observed, and their surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. Shear bond strength was measured after the bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h, and additionally aged by thermocycling. Statistical analyses were performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for shear bond strength, and Dunnett's t test for surface roughness, with α=0.05. Er:YAG laser irradiation changed the morphological characteristics of zirconia ceramics. Higher energy intensities (200, 300 mJ) could roughen the ceramics, but also caused surface cracks. There were no significant differences in the bond strength between the control group and the laser groups treated with different energy intensities or irradiation times. Air abrasion with alumina particles induced highest surface roughness and shear bond strength. Er:YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Enhancing irradiation intensities and extending irradiation time have no benefit on the bond of the ceramics, and might cause material defect.

  6. Degree of conversion and surface hardness of resin cement cured with different curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Nilgun; Usumez, Aslihan; Usumez, Serdar; Ozturk, Bora

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion and Vickers surface hardness of resin cement under a simulated ceramic restoration with 3 different curing units: a conventional halogen unit, a high-intensity halogen unit, and a light-emitting diode system. A conventional halogen curing unit (Hilux 550) (40 s), a high-intensity halogen curing unit used in conventional and ramp mode (Optilux 501) (10 s and 20 s, respectively), and a light-emitting diode system (Elipar FreeLight) (20 s, 40 s) were used in this study. The dual-curing resin cement (Variolink II) was cured under a simulated ceramic restoration (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm), and the degree of conversion and Vickers surface hardness were measured. For degree of conversion measurement, 10 specimens were prepared for each group. The absorbance peaks were recorded using the diffuse-reflection mode of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. For Vickers surface hardness measurement, 10 specimens were prepared for each group. A load of 200 N was applied for 15 seconds, and 3 evaluations of each of the samples were performed. Degree of conversion achieved with Optilux 501 (20 s) was significantly higher than those of Hilux, Optilux 501 (10 s), Elipar FreeLight (20 s), and Elipar FreeLight (40 s). For Vickers surface hardness measurement, Optilux 501 (20 s) produced the highest surface hardness value. No significant differences were found among the Hilux, Optilux 501 (10 s), Elipar FreeLight (20 s), and Elipar FreeLight (40 s). The high-intensity halogen curing unit used in ramp mode (20 s) produced harder resin cement surfaces than did the conventional halogen curing unit, high-intensity halogen curing unit used in conventional mode (10 s) and light-emitting diode system (20 s, 40 s), when cured through a simulated ceramic restoration.

  7. Leachability of cesium from cemented evaporator concentrates and ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.

    1985-03-01

    Leachabilities of cesium from cemented evaporator concentrates and ion-exchange resins were measured. The standard draft of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO, 1979) for long-term leach testing was followed in the research. Three resin concretes and three concentrate concretes were tested. Deionized water and groundwater were used as leachants. The leaching temperature was 20-23 deg C. The incremental leach rate at the end of the three and a half year test varied between 5x10 -12 - 15x10 -12 m/s and the cumulative activity fraction leached between 1.5x10 -3 - 6x10 -3 m. The apparent diffusion coefficients in groundwater varied between 10 -9 - 10 -8 m/day. Because of the cracking the specimens cannot, however, be regarded as whole blocks, but the effects of cracking should be taken into account. (author)

  8. IPS Empress inlays luted with a self-adhesive resin cement after 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, Michael; Frankenberger, Roland; García-Godoy, Franklin; Rosenbusch, Silke; Petschelt, Anselm; Krämer, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    To prospectively compare the clinical performance of two different resin composites for luting IPS Empress inlays and onlays. 83 IPS Empress restorations were placed in 30 subjects. All restorations were inserted under rubber dam. 43 inlays/onlays were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement [RelyX Unicem (RX)]. A multistep adhesive (Syntac) was used with Variolink II low viscosity (SV) and served as control (n=40). The restorations were evaluated after 2 weeks: Baseline = 1st recall (R1), after 6 months (R2) and after 1 year (R3) by two calibrated examiners using the modified USPHS criteria. From R1 to R3, one failure was noticed in the SV group (R2) due to marginal enamel chipping. After 1 year of clinical service, SV revealed significantly better results regarding color match and integrity inlay (Mann-Whitney U-test, P0.05).

  9. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  10. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3 layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP, and chroma of low (LT and high (HT translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B and white (W background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  11. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Daiana Kelly Lopes; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Lima, Erick de; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  12. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Buttle, D.; Wallace-Sims, R.; O'Brien, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work to investigate acoustic emission as a non-intrusive monitor of corrosion and degradation of cemented wasteforms where the waste is a potentially reactive metal. The acoustic data collected shows good correlation with the corrosion rate as measured by hydrogen gas evolution rates and the electrochemically measured corrosion rates post cement hardening. The technique has been shown to be sensitive in detecting stress caused by expansive corrosion product within the cemented wasteform. The attenuation of the acoustic signal by the wasteform reduced the signal received by the monitoring equipment by a factor of 10 over a distance of approximately 150-400 mm, dependent on the water level in the cement. Full size packages were successfully monitored. It is concluded that the technique offers good potential for monitoring cemented containers of the more reactive metals, for example Magnox and aluminium. (author)

  13. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  14. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  15. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  16. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values.

  17. A systematic approach to standardize artificial aging of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Lukas; Schmidli, Fredy; Weiger, Roland; Fischer, Jens

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the investigation was to contribute to the ongoing discussion at the international standardization committee on how to artificially age dental resin composite cements. Indirect tensile strength (n=30) of a dual-cured resin composite cement (Panavia F2.0) was measured to evaluate the effect of water storage at 37°C or thermal cycling (5°C/55°C/1min) for up to 64 days. The influence of water temperature (5-65°C) after 16 days and the effect of 1 day water storage at 37°C prior to aging were assessed. Storage in air at 37°C served as control. Thermal cycling affected the indirect tensile strength most, followed by water storage at 55°C, whereas water storage at 37°C had only little influence. Major deterioration occurred before day 4 (≈6000 cycles). A 1-day pre-treatment by water storage at 37°C prior to thermal cycling attenuated the effect of aging. For the material investigated, thermal cycling for 4 days is the most efficient aging procedure. A 1-day water storage at 37°C prior to thermal cycling is recommended to allow complete polymerization. A 4-day water storage at 55°C may be considered as a viable alternative to thermal cycling. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of a bonding agent on in vitro biochemical activities of remineralizing resin-based calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Sabine H; Flaim, Glenn M

    2008-09-01

    To test whether fluoride in a resin-based Ca-PO4 ion releasing cement or coating with an acidic bonding agent for improved adhesion compromised the cement remineralization potential. Cements were formulated without fluoride (Cement A) or with fluoride (Cement B). The treatment groups were A=Cement A; A2=Cement A+bonding agent; B=Cement B; B2=Cement B+bonding agent. The calcium, phosphate, and fluoride ion release in saliva-like solution (SLS) was determined from hardened cement disks without or with a coating of bonding agent. For the remineralization, two cavities were prepared in dentin of extracted human molars and demineralized. One cavity received composite resin (control); the other received treatment A, A2, B or B2. After 6 week incubation in SLS, 180 microm cross-sections were cut. The percentage remineralization was determined by transverse microradiography comparing the dentin mineral density under the cement to that under the control. The percentage of remineralization (mean+/-S.D.) was A (39+/-14)=B (37+/-18), A2 (23+/-13), B2 (14+/-7). Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Holm-Sidak test showed a significant effect from the presence of bonding agent (p0.05). The ion solution concentrations of all groups showed undersaturation with respect to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium fluoride and supersaturation for fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite suggesting a positive remineralization potential. Compared to the control all treatments resulted in mineral increase. The remineralization was negatively affected by the presence of the bonding agent.

  19. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Chloride Ion Adsorption Capacity of Anion Exchange Resin in Cement Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsu Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of anion exchange resin (AER on the adsorption of chloride ions in cement mortar. The kinetic and equilibrium behaviors of AER were investigated in distilled water and Ca(OH2 saturated solutions, and then the adsorption of chloride ions by the AER in the mortar specimen was determined. The AER was used as a partial replacement for sand in the mortar specimen. The mortar specimen was coated with epoxy, except for an exposed surface, and then immersed in a NaCl solution for 140 days. The chloride content in the mortar specimen was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron probe microanalysis. The results showed that the AER could adsorb the chloride ions from the solution rapidly but had a relatively low performance when the pH of its surrounding environment increased. When the AER was mixed in the cement mortar, its chloride content was higher than that of the cement matrix around it, which confirms the chloride ion adsorption capacity of the AER.

  1. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  2. Curing time effect on the fraction of 137Cs from cement- ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.

    2007-01-01

    Curing conditions and time are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydratation of the cement materials determines how much hydratation product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching.[1,2]. To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclide 137 Cs has been studied in this paper. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develop and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates R n (cm/d) of 137 Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 180 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center. (author)

  3. Study of the effect of Kaolin in the mortar of cement matrices by confinement of ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labied S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive waste arising as a result of nuclear activities should be safely managed from its generation to final disposal in an appropriate conditioned form to reduce the risk of radiation exposure of technical personnel and of the public and to limit contamination of the environment. The immobilization of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes in cementitious matrices is the most commonly used technique to produce inexpensive waste matrix that complies with regulatory requirements in order to protect humans and the environment against nuisance caused by ionizing radiation. Cement based materials are used in radioactive waste management to produce stable waste forms. This matrix constitutes the first build engineering barrier in disposal facilities. In this work, the kaolin is used to enhance the mechanical performance of the matrix of confinement of ion exchange resins by gradually replacing the sand in mortar with kaolin clay. The Kaolin clay sample was a special pure product, sourced from a foreign country. The maximum quantity of resins that can be incorporated into the mortar formulation without the packages losing their strength is 13.915% which results in a better mechanical strength at 6.7686 MPA compression with kaolin.

  4. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  5. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  6. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  7. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on the tensile bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin. Zirconia ceramic surfaces were treated with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles, 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles, argon-ion bombardment, gas plasma, and piranha solution (H2SO4:H2O2=3:1). In addition, slip casting surfaces were examined. Untreated surfaces were used as the control group. Tensile bond strengths (TBS) were measured after water storage for 3 days or 150 days with additional 37,500 thermal cycling for artificial aging. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way and 3-way ANOVA, followed by comparison of means with the Tukey HSD test. After storage in distilled water for three days at 37 °C, the highest mean tensile bond strengths (TBS) were observed for zirconia ceramic surfaces abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles (TBS(AAP)=37.3 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=40.4 MPa), and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles (TBS(AZP)=34.8 MPa, TBS(CAZP)=35.8 MPa). Also a high TBS was observed for specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=37.8 MPa). After 150 days of storage, specimens abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles revealed high TBS (TBS(AAP)=37.6 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=33.0 MPa, TBS(AZP)=22.1 MPa and TBS(CAZP)=22.8 MPa). A high TBS was observed also for specimens prepared with slip casting (TBS(SC)=30.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed for control specimens (TBS(UNT)=12.5 MPa, TBS(CUNT)=9.0 MPa), specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=10.3 MPa) and gas plasma (TBS(GP)=11.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed also for specimens treated with piranha solution (TBS(PS)=3.9 MPa, TBS(CPS)=4.1 MPa). A significant difference in TBS after three days storage was observed for specimens treated with different methods (p0.05), CAAP(p>0.05) and SC(p>0.05). However, the failure patterns of debonded specimens prepared with 150-μm abrasive zirconia

  8. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  9. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cristoforides Pereira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One three-step etch-and-rinse (All-bond 2, Bisco and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10 crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (FRC Postec, Ivoclar was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco. Three transverse sections (3 mm were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical. The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (% were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For both groups, the degree of conversion means (% (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno III cervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno III apical = 54.3 were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer.

  10. Application of tracer technique in cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran'ai, L.

    1979-01-01

    Application is stated of the radioisotope indication method in the cement industry. The method was applied in three directions. In the first direction, by means of labelling of 300 steel mill balls by cobalt-60, wear of them was examined. The degree of wear of milling balls in the process of milling was determined according to the decrease of their weight. Radioactive label served only for tracing controll balls. In the second direction, according to the natural radioactivity being presented in ashes by radioisotopes radium-226 and thorium-229, amount of ashes in the products of cement milling was determined (in the mill product, cement product, flying dust and back loading groats). In the third direction, by means of labelling of definite fractions of mille by radioisotope gold-198, optimization of technological parameters of silos were raw meal is homogenization. The following technological parameters have been established: amount of homogenized material; time of homogenization and frequency of intensity changing of supplied compressed air jet [ru

  11. Cement waste form development for ion-exchange resins and fine particles ILW of AREVA La Hague Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, D.; Sanchez-Canet, J.; Avril, D.; Roussel, C.; Pineau, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Wastes have been temporarily stored in dedicated silos in La Hague reprocessing plant. These wastes are to be retrieved in the near future and to be conditioned for final disposal. Some of these wastes are supposed to be encapsulated in cement matrix and, depending on the chemical composition of the waste streams, several projects are presently ongoing. The present article aims to focus on one amongst these cement encapsulation relevant projects, namely the conditioning of a mix of spent ion-exchange resins (from filtration of pool) and fine particles (insoluble fission products from spent fuel dissolution and Zircaloy and stainless steel fines from cladding shearing). The project, aims to retrieve these wastes from a silo, separate the resins and fine particles from the other waste (hulls and end pieces), in order to encapsulate the intermediate-level fines and resins in a cement matrix. The waste forms will be produced in AREVA's La Hague reprocessing plant, prior to being sent as intermediate-level waste to a long-term repository. The cement formulation developments were initially carried out at a small scale at C.E.A. Marcoule on surrogate wastes. One of the main issues that were considered was the chemical compatibility between waste and cement matrix. Indeed, swelling phenomena are sometimes reported when ion exchange resins are embedded in cement matrixes such as Portland cement. This kind of destructive phenomenon has been prevented by the use of cement containing a high amount of ground granulated blast furnace slag. The impact of the variability of ionic charge of the resins on the waste form's properties has also been addressed in order to comfort the results obtained on the reference ionic charge of resins NaNO 3 . Once the results obtained were satisfactory, intermediate scale and full scale tests were performed by AREVA. These tests have focused on adjusting the mixing process and controlling the thermal properties of the mix during setting

  12. [Effects of different surface treatments on the zirconia-resin cement bond strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y; Liu, X Q; Chen, L; Zhou, J F; Tan, J G

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. Forty zirconia discs were randomly divided into four groups (10 discs in each group) for different surface treatments: control, no surface treatment; sandblast, applied air abrasion with aluminum oxide particles; ultraviolet (UV), the zirconia sample was placed in the UV sterilizer at the bottom of the UV lamp at 10 mm, and irradiated for 48 h; cold plasma, the discs were put in the cold plasma cabinet with the cold plasma generated from the gas of He for 30 s. Specimens of all the groups were surface treated prior to cementation with Panavia F 2.0 cement. The surface morphology and contact angle of water were measured. The shear bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Surface morphology showed no difference between the UV/cold plasma group and the control group. Sandblasted zirconia displayed an overall heterogeneous distribution of micropores. The contact angle of the control group was 64.1°±2.0°. After sandblasting, UV irradiation and cold plasma exposure, the values significantly decreased to 48.8°±2.6°, 27.1°±3.6° and 32.0°±3.3°. The values of shear bond strength of the specimens with sandblasted (14.82±2.01) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa with statistically significant difference (Pbond strength of the specimens with UV irradiation (10.02±0.64) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa, but without statistically significant difference (P>0.05). The values of cold plasma group (18.34±3.05) MPa were significantly higher than those of control group (9.41±1.07) MPa, even more than those with sandblast(14.82±2.01) MPa (PUV and cold plasma treatment. The surface C/O ratio also decreased after UV and cold plasma treatment. Zirconia specimens treated with UV and cold plasma could significantly improve the hydrophilicity. The surface

  13. Lateral-access Class II restoration using resin-modified glass-ionomer or silver-cermet cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, T P

    1995-02-01

    Direct-access preparation of a carious proximal surface is perhaps the most conservative approach to restoration. Physical properties and handling characteristics of silver amalgam and of resin composite and lack of fluoride ion release make these materials unsuitable for direct buccal- or lingual-access proximal restoration. Insufficient strengths and radiolucency of self-hardening glass-ionomer cements preclude their use for Class II restorations. However, glass-ionomer silver-cermet cement and some resin-modified glass-ionomer materials are proving useful for non-stress-bearing Class II restorations and may have applications in preventive dentistry. This article describes lateral-access Class II restoration with modified glass-ionomer cements. Emphasis is placed on careful handling of materials, maintenance of an ideal operative field, and conservation of tooth structure.

  14. Expansive failure reactions and their prevention in the encapsulation of phenol formaldehyde type ion exchange resins in cement based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constable, M.; Howard, C.G.; Johnson, M.A.; Jolliffe, C.B. (AEA Decommissioning and Waste Management, Winfrith (United Kingdom)); Sellers, R.M. (Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    Lewatit DN is a phenol formaldehyde based ion exchange resin used to remove radioactive caesium from liquid waste streams such as fuel cooling ponds and effluents. This paper presents the results of a study of the encapsulation of the bead form of the resin in cement with particular reference to the mechanisms of its interaction with the encapsulant. When incorporated in pure ordinary Portland cement (OPC) at loadings in excess of 15 wt % an unstable product results due to expansion of the systems and at higher waste loadings failure results after only a few days. Evidence from differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy all indicate the cause of the expansive reaction to be the formation of crystals of calcium salts around and within the resin beads. Addition of BFS and sodium hydroxide prevent the formation of these salts by removal of calcium hydroxide from the system in other reactions. (author).

  15. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  16. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  17. Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Cekic-nagas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods: A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem. Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes, light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group were stored dry in the dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV. For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37°C and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p0.05 were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion: The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties.

  18. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  19. Ultrasonic measurement of the effects of light irradiation and presence of water on the polymerization of self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Hirotaka; Ouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Kawamoto, Ryo; Murayama, Ryosuke; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-08-14

    Self-adhesive resin cements are useful in restorations because they reduce the number of clinical steps involved in the restoration process. This study evaluated, using ultrasonic measurements, the influence of light irradiation and the presence of water on the polymerization behavior and elastic modulus of a self-adhesive resin cement. A self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix) or a resin cement (RelyX ARC) was inserted into a transparent mold on a sample stage, and the presence of water and effect of light-irradiation were evaluated. The transit time of a sonic wave through the cement disk was divided by the specimen thickness to obtain the sonic velocity, and longitudinal and shear waves were used to determine the elastic modulus. When the resin cements were light-irradiated, the sonic velocity rapidly increased and plateaued at 2,500-2,700 m s -1 . When the cements were not irradiated, the rates of increase in the sonic velocity were reduced. When water was applied to the sample stage, the sonic velocity was reduced. The elastic modulus values of the specimens ranged from 9.9 to 15.9 GPa after 24 h. The polymerization behavior of self-adhesive resin cements is affected by the polymerization mode and the presence of water. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  1. Solidification of ion exchange resins saturated with Na{sup +} ions: Comparison of matrices based on Portland and blast furnace slag cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafond, E. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Cau dit Coumes, C., E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Gauffinet, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France, 9 Av Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Chartier, D. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Stefan, L. [AREVA, Back End Business Group, Dismantling & Services, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Le Bescop, P. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-01-15

    This work is devoted to the conditioning of ion exchange resins used to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Calcium silicate cements may have a good potential to encapsulate spent resins. However, certain combinations of cement and resins produce a strong expansion of the final product, possibly leading to its full disintegration. The focus is placed on the understanding of the behaviour of cationic resins in the Na{sup +} form in Portland or blast furnace slag (CEM III/C) cement pastes. During hydration of the Portland cement paste, the pore solution exhibits a decrease in its osmotic pressure, which causes a transient expansion of small magnitude of the resins. At 20 °C, this expansion takes place just after setting in a poorly consolidated material and is sufficient to induce cracks. In the CEM III/C paste, swelling of the resins also occurs, but before the end of setting, and induces limited stress in the matrix which is still plastic. - Highlights: • Solidification of cationic resins in the Na{sup +}-form is investigated. • Portland and blast furnace slag cements are compared. • Deleterious expansion is observed with Portland cement only. • Resin swelling is due to a decrease in the osmotic pressure of the pore solution. • The consolidation rate of the matrix is a key parameter to prevent damage.

  2. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (p<0.05) between the three groups of RMGIC. There is a decrease in the compressive strength value along with the duration of storage time.

  3. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  4. Fracture resistance of metal-free composite crowns-effects of fiber reinforcement, thermal cycling, and cementation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The improved mechanical properties of contemporary composites have resulted in their extensive use for the restoration of posterior teeth. However, the influence of fiber reinforcement, cementation technique, and physical stress on the fracture resistance of metal-free crowns is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber reinforcement, physical stress, and cementation methods on the fracture resistance of posterior metal-free Sinfony crowns. Ninety-six extracted human third molars received a standardized tooth preparation: 0.5-mm chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 1.3 to 1.5 mm. Sinfony (nonreinforced crowns, n=48) and Sinfony-Vectris (reinforced crowns, n=48) crowns restoring original tooth contour were prepared. Twenty-four specimens of each crown type were cemented, using either glass ionomer cement (GIC) or resin cement. Thirty-two crowns (one third) were stored in humidity for 48 hours. Another third was exposed to 10,000 thermal cycles (TC) between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The remaining third was treated with thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML), consisting of 1.2 million axial loads of 50 N. The artificial crowns were then vertically loaded with a steel sphere until failure occurred. Significant differences in fracture resistance (N) between experimental groups were assessed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha=.05). Fifty percent of the Sinfony and Sinfony-Vectris crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement loosened after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in a significant reduction in the mean fracture resistance for Sinfony crowns cemented with GIC, from 2037 N to 1282 N (P=.004). Additional fatigue produced no further effects. Fiber reinforcement significantly increased fracture resistance, from 1555 N to 2326 N (P=.001). The minimal fracture resistance was above 600 N for all combinations of material, cement and loading. Fracture resistance of metal-free Sinfony crowns was significantly increased by

  5. Microleakage of IPS empress 2 inlay restorations luted with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, E; Celik, E U; Turkun, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the microleakage of three self-adhesive and one etch-and-rinse resin cements when luting IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) all-ceramic inlay restorations to the prepared cavities in extracted human molars. The cylindrical Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars using diamond burs. The IPS Empress 2 ceramic inlays were placed with Multilink Sprint (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE, USA), G-Cem (GC, Japan), or Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent) as the control group. After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, samples were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between baths of 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. The microleakage scores were examined on the occlusal and gingival margins at 30× magnification after each sample was stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin and sectioned into three parts using a thin diamond blade (Isomet, Buehler, USA) (n=40). The extent of microleakage on both occlusal and gingival margins of the restorations was scored and recorded. The microleakage data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in both margins according to the Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (p<0.05). Microleakage scores on the occlusal margins were Variolink II < RelyX Unicem < G-Cem = Multilink Sprint. Microleakage scores on the gingival margins are Variolink II = RelyX Unicem < G-Cem < Multilink Sprint. Self-adhesive resin cements displayed higher microleakage scores on the occlusal margins, whereas on the gingival margins RelyX Unicem showed comparable microleakage results with the control samples.

  6. Alternative solidification techniques for radioactive ion exchange resins and liquid concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-01-01

    Methods, that are used or are under development for solidification of radioactive ion exchange resins or liquid concentrates, utilize normally cement, bitumen or some polymere as matrix material. This report contains a review and a description of these solidification processes and their products, especially of relatively new techniques that are under development in different countries. It is possible that solidification in thermosetting resins will be more used in the future, especially when product quality requirements are high (for instance when solidifying medium level resins) or when special waste categories has to be solidified. However it is not probable that thermosetting resins will be extensively used in a broad application as matrix material. In that case the methods are to complicated and expensive compared to, for instance, solidification in concrete. Systems for incorporation in polyesteremulsions (Dow-process) have a potential as they are quite simple and can accept a large variation of liquid wastes. Some methods in an early stage of development (for instance Inert Carrier Radwaste Process) will have to be tested in active application before they can be further evaluated. (author)

  7. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  8. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  9. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (pceramics (pceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Volume reduction of ion exchange resin by a pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, M.; Funabashi, K.; Uchida, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Volume reduction techniques, such as incineration and acid digestion, of spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants are being developed with a view toward reducing radioactive waste volume and also making the final waste form more stable. The authors chose pyrolysis as a technique that can be done at low operating temperatures and low gas flow rates in a reactor vessel. Fundamental experiments were performed to clarify the resin pyrolysis characteristics, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature was determined. Consequently, a pilot plant with a treatment capacity of approx. 50 kg/batch was constructed based on the results. Using the pilot plant, the authors are now performing pyrolysis of the resins and solidification of their residues. This report will give the results of fundamental experiments and pilot plant tests

  11. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  12. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Eun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3 specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3.

  13. Effect of Anatomical Customization of the Fiber Post on the Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Adricyla Teixeira; Gonçalves, Leticia Machado; Vasconcelos, Ana Júlia de Carvalho; Matos Maia Filho, Etevaldo; Nunes Carvalho, Ceci; De Jesus Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate, by means of the push-out test, the effect of the anatomical customization of the fiber post on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement. Twelve endodontically treated, human, upper central incisors were randomly divided into two groups ( n = 6): control (glass fiber posts cemented with Relyx® U200) and customized (glass fiber posts anatomically customized with translucent composite resin cemented with Relyx U200). The roots were sectioned into three slices, cervical, middle, and apical, and photographed with a digital camera attached to a stereomicroscopic loupe. The images were analyzed by software, for evaluation of the cement line. The slices were subsequently submitted to the push-out test until the post had completely extruded, and the fracture mode was analyzed with a stereomicroscopic loupe. The results showed significant differences between the groups in the different root thirds in relation to the area occupied by air bubbles ( p customized group. The customized group showed greater bond resistance than the control group and a more uniform cement layer.

  14. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...... of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...

  15. IPS Empress onlays luted with two dual-cured resin cements for endodontically treated teeth: a 3-year clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atali, Pinar Yilmaz; Cakmakcioglu, Ozcan; Topbasi, Bulent; Turkmen, Cafer; Suslen, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of IPS Empress ceramic onlays luted with two dual-cured adhesive resin cements for endodontically treated teeth. Twenty molar teeth were restored with all-ceramic restorations luted randomly with Maxcem or Clearfil Esthetic Cement and DC Bond Kit luting systems (n = 10 each) in 20 patients. The restorations were assessed using modified US Public Health Service criteria at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years. A statistically significant deterioration was found for the criteria marginal integrity, anatomical form, and surface roughness. For luting of ceramic onlays, no difference between the two luting systems was detected.

  16. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The process developed previously for the immobilisation of Ion Exchange resin in cement has been scaled up to 200 litres. Large scale samples produced exhibit acceptable compressive strengths and dimensional stabilities. Destructive examination has shown that these samples are homogeneous and monolithic. A number of samples have been stored under water, this appears to have no detrimental effects on the dimensional stability and elastic modulus when compared to samples stored in air. Finally, a description of leach test work initiated using waste ion exchange resin treated with LOMI from the reactor at Winfrith is given. This work will be performed in accordance with the ISO leach test procedure. (author)

  17. Long-term degradation of resin-based cements in substances present in the oral environment: influence of activation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Moreira da SILVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Indirect restorations in contact with free gingival margins or principally within the gingival sulcus, where the presence of organic acids produced by oral biofilm is higher, may present faster degradation of the resin-based cement pellicle. Objectives To investigate the degradation of four resin-based cements: Rely X ARC (R, Variolink II (V, Enforce (E and All Cem (A, after immersion in distilled water (DW, lactic acid (LA and artificial saliva (AS and to analyze the influence of the activation mode on this response. Material and Methods Two activation modes were evaluated: chemical (Ch and dual (D. In the dual activation, a two-millimeter thick ceramic disk (IPS Empress System was interposed between the specimen and light-curing unit tip. Specimens were desiccated, immersed in distilled water, artificial saliva and lactic acid 0.1 M at 37°C for 180 days, weighed daily for the first 7 days, and after 14, 21, 28, 90 and 180 days and were desiccated again. Sorption and solubility (µg/mm 3 were calculated based on ISO 4049. The data were submitted to multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA and Tukey's HSD test for media comparisons (α=0.05. Results Sorption was higher after immersion in LA (pD (p<0.05. The lowest solubility was presented by R (p<0.05. Conclusions Lactic acid increased the degradation of resin-based cements. Moreover, the physical component of activation, i.e., light-activation, contributed to a low degradation of resin-based cements.

  18. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raphaela F; Ramos, Carla M; Francisconi, Paulo A S; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians continue to search for ways to simplify bonding procedures without compromising clinical efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 and RelyX U200, and conventional resin cement RelyX ARC to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments. The crowns of 120 bovine incisor teeth were separated from the roots and embedded in epoxy resin in polyvinyl chloride tubes. In each tooth, the area to be cemented was delimited with central holed adhesive tape. The teeth were distributed into 12 groups (n=10) according to the substrate; etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid; and cement type of enamel-U100, enamel-phosphoric acid-U100, enamel-U200, enamel-phosphoric acid-U200, enamel-ARC, enamel-phosphoric acid-ARC, dentin-U100, dentin-phosphoric acid-U100, dentin-U200, dentin-phosphoric acid-U200, dentin-ARC, and dentin-phosphoric acid-ARC. After 7 days of storage in artificial saliva, shear strength tests were performed by using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05). Fracture analysis was performed with a light microscope. Two specimens from each group were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. In enamel, ARC (9.96 MPa) had higher shear strength (P=.038) than U100 (5.14 MPa); however, after surface etching, U100 (17.81 MPa) and U200 (17.52 MPa) had higher shear strength (Padhesive type. U200 self-adhesive cement had similar bond strength to the ARC in enamel, but the combination with phosphoric acid had the best bond strength. For dentin, self-adhesive resin cements are equally effective alternatives to conventional resin cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Significance of bone mineral density and modern cementing technique for in vitro cement penetration in total shoulder arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, G; Raiss, P; Kleinschmidt, K; Schuld, C; Mohr, G; Loew, M; Rickert, M

    2010-12-01

    Loosening of the glenoid component is one of the major causes of failure in total shoulder arthroplasty. Possible risk factors for loosening of cemented components include an eccentric loading, poor bone quality, inadequate cementing technique and insufficient cement penetration. The application of a modern cementing technique has become an established procedure in total hip arthroplasty. The goal of modern cementing techniques in general is to improve the cement-penetration into the cancellous bone. Modern cementing techniques include the cement vacuum-mixing technique, retrograde filling of the cement under pressurisation and the use of a pulsatile lavage system. The main purpose of this study was to analyse cement penetration into the glenoid bone by using modern cement techniques and to investigate the relationship between the bone mineral density (BMD) and the cement penetration. Furthermore we measured the temperature at the glenoid surface before and after jet-lavage of different patients during total shoulder arthroplasty. It is known that the surrounding temperature of the bone has an effect on the polymerisation of the cement. Data from this experiment provide the temperature setting for the in-vitro study. The glenoid surface temperature was measured in 10 patients with a hand-held non-contact temperature measurement device. The bone mineral density was measured by DEXA. Eight paired cadaver scapulae were allocated (n = 16). Each pair comprised two scapulae from one donor (matched-pair design). Two different glenoid components were used, one with pegs and the other with a keel. The glenoids for the in-vitro study were prepared with the bone compaction technique by the same surgeon in all cases. Pulsatile lavage was used to clean the glenoid of blood and bone fragments. Low viscosity bone cement was applied retrogradely into the glenoid by using a syringe. A constant pressure was applied with a modified force sensor impactor. Micro-computed tomography

  1. New atraumatic easy removal technique for permanently cemented crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar G Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of a permanently cemented crown or fixed partial denture is a cumbersome procedure for a prosthodontist, especially when there is no purchase point available to remove it. The technique described in this article consists of sectioning of a crown on facial surface followed by removal of the crown with orthodontic plier. This technique does not damage the gingival/periodontal tissues or underlying tooth structure as the crown need not to be removed with jerky back-action force.

  2. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenisey, Murat; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Rona, Nergiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. 220 zirconium-oxide ceramic (Ceramill ZI) specimens were prepared, sintered in two different period (Short=Ss, Long=Ls) and divided into ten treatment groups as: GC, no treatment; GSil, silanized (ESPE-Sil); GSilPen, silane flame treatment (Silano-Pen); GSb, sandblasted; GSbSil, sandblasted+silanized; GSbCoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (CoJet)+silanized; GSbRoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (Rocatech-Plus)+silanized; GSbDSil, sandblasted+diamond particle abraded (Micron MDA)+silanized; GSbSilPen, sandblasted+silane flame treatment+silanized; GSbLSil, sandblasted+Er:Yag (Asclepion-MCL30) laser treated+silanized. The composite resin (Filtek Z-250) cylinders were cemented to the treated ceramic surfaces with a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24h and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles (5-55 °C). Data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane's multiple comparison test (α=0.05). According to the ANOVA, sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (pzirconium-oxide ceramics. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of light-curing units, post-cured time and shade of resin cement on knoop hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reges, Rogério Vieira; Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Piva, Evandro; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness after 15 min and 24 h of different shades of a dual-cured resin-based cement after indirect photoactivation (ceramic restoration) with 2 light-curing units (LCUs). The resin cement Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent) shade XL, A2, A3 and opaque were mixed with the catalyst paste and inserted into a black Teflon mold (5 mm diameter x 1 mm high). A transparent strip was placed over the mold and a ceramic disc (Duceram Plus, shade A3) was positioned over the resin cement. Light-activation was performed through the ceramic for 40 s using quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) (XL 2500; 3M ESPE) or light-emitting diode (LED) (Ultrablue Is, DMC) LCUs with power density of 615 and 610 mW/cm(2), respectively. The Koop hardness was measured using a microhardness tester HMV 2 (Shimadzu) after 15 min or 24 h. Four indentations were made in each specimen. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The QTH LCU provided significantly higher (pcement showed lower Knoop hardness than the other shades for both LCUs and post-cure times.

  4. Effect of energy density and delay time on the degree of conversion and Knoop microhardness of a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Maria do Carmo A J; Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Ambrosano, Gláucia M; Paulillo, Luiz A M S; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the influence of the photo-curing delay time and energy density on the degree of conversion and the Knoop microhardness of a resin cement. Seventy-eight samples were assigned to 13 groups (n = 6), one of which received no light curing (control). The samples were made of a dual-cured resin cement (RelyX ARC) with the aid of a Teflon matrix, submitted to one of the following energy densities (J/cm²): 7, 14, 20, and 28. Delay times were immediate (0), 1 min, or 2 min. After 24 h, the degree of conversion and microhardness were measured at three segments: cervical, medium, and apical. Data were submitted to three-way anova and Tukey's and Dunnett's tests, the latest of which was used to compare the control to the experimental groups. No interaction was observed between delay time and energy density regarding the degree of conversion. The cervical segment showed the highest values, while the apical showed the lowest. Microhardness values concerning the cervical segment in all groups were statistically different from that obtained for the control. A high-irradiance light-curing unit allows for a reduced irradiation exposure time with a short delay time, aimed at tooth restorations using a dual-cured resin cement. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Influence of energy density of different light sources on Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Evandro; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Powers, John Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs) were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL), light-emitting diode (LED) and xenon plasma-arc (PAC) lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce). Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I) of each LCU and the irradiation time (T): 24 Jcm(-2) (I/2x2T), 24 Jcm(-2) (IxT) and 48 Jcm(-2) (Ix2T). Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus). Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10). Knoop hardness number (KHN) means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (alpha=5%). Application of 48 J.cm(-2) energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5+/-2.8) and HAL (50.9+/-3.7) produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05) than the control (44.7+/-3.8). LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  6. Modeling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behavior of ion exchange resins encapsulated into a cement-based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neji, Mejdi

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IER) are widely used in the nuclear industry to purge non directly storable infected effluents. IER then become a solid waste which could be stored as any classical nuclear waste. One way of conditioning consists in embedding it into a cement paste matrix. This process raises some concerns regarding the cohesiveness of the composite. Once embedded, the IER might indeed interact with the cement paste which would lead, in some cases, to the swelling of the composite. This thesis has been set up to address this potential issue, with the aim to develop a numerical tool able to predict the mechanical behavior of this kind of material. This work only focuses on the long term behavior and more specifically on the potential degradations of the cement paste/IER composite due to cationic IER. (author)

  7. Effect of light-curing method and indirect veneering materials on the Knoop hardness of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Tetsu Iriyama

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement (Rely-X ARC activated solely by chemical reaction (control group or by chemical / physical mode, light-cured through a 1.5 mm thick ceramic (HeraCeram or composite (Artglass disc. Light curing was carried out using conventional halogen light (XL2500 for 40 s (QTH; light emitting diodes (Ultrablue Is for 40 s (LED; and Xenon plasma arc (Apollo 95E for 3 s (PAC. Bovine incisors had their buccal face flattened and hybridized. On this surface a rubber mold (5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height was bulk filled with the resin cement. A polyester strip was seated for direct light curing or through the discs of veneering materials. After dry storage in the dark (24 h 37°C, the samples (n = 5 were sectioned for hardness (KHN measurements, taken in a microhardness tester (50 gF load 15 s. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The cement presented higher Knoop hardness values with Artglass for QTH and LED, compared to HeraCeram. The control group and the PAC/Artglass group showed lower hardness values compared to the groups light-cured with QTH and LED. PAC/HeraCeram resulted in the worst combination for cement hardness values.

  8. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, S.J.; Howard, C.G.; Lee, D.J.

    1987-06-01

    An account of the annual decontaminations undertaken on the SGHWR at Winfrith is given with reasons for changing from Citrox reagents to LOMI plus the effects of using nitric acid permanganate solution as a preoxidising agent. Safe disposal of these reagents after use is a problem concerning many water cooled reactor operators. A brief review of the various methods of disposal is given. The proposed method of disposing of LOMI wastes generated at Winfrith is to remove the activity onto ion exchange resins then immobilize them in a cement matrix. Duolite C225 (a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid functional groups) has been identified as a suitable ion exchanger. Duolite C225 in the sodium form can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which appears acceptable is manufactured from a 9 to 1 blend of Blast Furnace Slag and Ordinary Portland Cement, containing 40% ion exchange resin by weight, in the form of a slurry. The product has adequate strength for handling and shows little dimensional change with time. Experiments show that above 50% waste loading the product becomes unstable and its strength is unacceptably low. Changes in the metal cation have shown little effect on the properties of the product. Increasing the waste loading appears to have little effect on the hydration rate of the product. Preliminary calculations show that a volume reduction factor of 4 is obtained by taking the active LOMI effluent, removing the activity onto the Duolite C225 and then immobilising in cement. (author)

  9. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  10. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  11. Effect of light energy density on conversion degree and hardness of dual-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Paula Carolina de Paiva; de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; Martin, Airton Abrāo; Tango, Rubens Nisie; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different light energy densities on conversion degree (CD) and Knoop hardness number (KHN) of RelyX ARC (RLX) resin cement. After manipulation according to the manufacturer's instructions, RLX was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 mm x 5 mm) and covered with a Mylar strip. The tip of the light-curing unit (LCU) was positioned in contact with the Mylar surface. Quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) LCUs with light densities of 10, 20 and 30 J/cm2 were used to light-cure the specimens. After light curing, the specimens were stored dry in lightproof containers at 37 degrees C. After 24 hours, the CD was analyzed by FT-Raman and, after an additional 24-hours, samples were submitted to Knoop hardness testing. The data of the CD (%) and KHN were submitted to two-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). QTH and LED were effective light curing units. For QTH, there were no differences among the light energy densities for CD or KHN. For LED, there was a significant reduction in CD with the light energy density set at 10 J/cm2. KHN was not influenced by the light-curing unit and by its light energy density.

  12. Surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements: effects of finishing/polishing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U J; Ong, S B; Yap, W Y; Tan, W S; Yeo, J C

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements after immediate and delayed finishing with different finishing/polishing systems. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of 64 freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (GC) and Photac-Fil Quick (3M-ESPE) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with 8-fluted tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups of 16 teeth. Half of the teeth in each group were finished immediately, while the remaining half were finished after one-week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The following finishing/polishing systems were employed: (a) Robot Carbides; (b) Super-Snap system; (c) OneGloss and (d) CompoSite Polishers. The mean surface roughness (microm; n=8) in vertical (RaV) and horizontal (RaH) axis was measured using a profilometer. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's tests and Independent Samples t-test at significance level 0.05. Ra values were generally lower in both vertical and horizontal axis with delayed finishing/polishing. Although significant differences in RaV and RaH values were observed among several systems with immediate finishing/polishing, only one (Fuji II LC: RaH - Super-Snap < Robot Carbides) was observed with delayed finishing.

  13. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  14. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

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    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  15. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  17. Pre-heated dual-cured resin cements: analysis of the degree of conversion and ultimate tensile strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Álvares França

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the degree of conversion (DC and ultimate tensile strength (UTS of dual-cured resin cements heated to 50º C prior to and during polymerization. Disc- and hourglass-shaped specimens of Rely X ARC (RX and Variolink II (VII were obtained using addition silicon molds. The products were manipulated at 25º C or 50º C and were subjected to 3 curing conditions: light-activation through a glass slide or through a pre-cured 2-mm thick resin composite disc, or they were allowed to self-cure (SC. All specimens were dark-stored dry for 15 days. For DC analysis, the resin cements were placed into the mold located on the center of a horizontal diamond on the attenuated total reflectance element in the optical bench of a Fourier Transformed Infrared spectrometer. Infrared spectra (n = 6 were collected between 1680 and 1500 cm-1, and DC was calculated by standard methods using changes in ratios of aliphatic-to-aromatic C=C absorption peaks from uncured and cured states. For UTS test, specimens (n = 10 were tested in tension in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure. DC and UTS data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (α= 5%. Both products showed higher DC at 50º C than at 25º C in all curing conditions. No significant difference in UTS was noted between most light-activated groups at 25º C and those at 50º C. VII SC groups showed higher UTS at 50º C than at 25º C (p < 0.05. Increased temperature led to higher DC, but its effects on resin cement UTS depended on the curing condition.

  18. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L; Martim, Gedalias C; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2015-05-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10-30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10-20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by two-fold in the experimental groups (from 1.17 ± 0.36 MPam(1/2) to around 3.23 ± 0.22 MPam(1/2)). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  20. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  1. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C_3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data. - Highlights: • Ion exchange theory to model the swelling behavior of Ion exchange resin. • Experimental phenomenon analysis about Chemo-mechanical interaction between IER and cement paste matrix. • Chemo-Transport modeling on a composite material made with IER embedded into cement paste matrix.

  2. Effects of instrumentation time on microleakage of resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U J; Yeo, Egwin J C; Yap, W Y; Ong, Debbie S B; Tan, Jane W S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of instrumentation time on the microleakage of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Class V cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual/ palatal surfaces of 64 freshly extracted non-carious premolars. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (FT [GC]) and Photac-Fil Quick (PF [3M-ESPE]). The restored teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 32 teeth. Finishing/polishing was done immediately after light-polymerization in one group and was delayed for one week in the other group. The following finishing/polishing systems were evaluated: (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) SuperSnap (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Polishers (CS). The sample size for each instrumentation time, material and finishing/polishing system combination was 8. Storage medium for both immediate and delayed instrumentation groups was distilled water at 37 degrees C during the hiatus period. The teeth were subsequently subjected to dye penetration testing (0.5% basic fushcin), sectioned and scored. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at significance level 0.05. For PF, significant difference in enamel leakage was observed between immediate and delayed instrumentation with SS and CS. Significant differences in dentin leakage were also observed between the two instrumentation times for SS. For FT, significant differences in leakage between instrumentation times were observed only in dentin and with RC. Where significant differences in dye penetration scores existed, delayed finishing/polishing resulted in less microleakage.

  3. Surface texture of resin-modified glass ionomer cements: effects of finishing/polishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U J; Tan, W S; Yeo, J C; Yap, W Y; Ong, S B

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the surface texture of two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) in the vertical and horizontal axis after treatment with different finishing/polishing systems. Class V preparations were made on the buccal and lingual/palatal surfaces of freshly extracted teeth. The cavities on each tooth were restored with Fuji II LC (GC) and Photac-Fil Quick (ESPE) according to manufacturers' instructions. Immediately after light-polymerization, gross finishing was done with 8-flute tungsten carbide burs. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups and finished/polished with (a) Robot Carbides (RC); (b) Super-Snap system (SS); (c) OneGloss (OG) and (d) CompoSite Points (CS). The sample size for each material-finishing/polishing system combination was eight. The mean surface roughness (microm) in vertical (RaV) and horizontal (RaH) axis was measured using a profilometer. Data was subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's tests and Independent Samples t-test at significance level 0.05. Mean RaV ranged from 0.59-1.31 and 0.83-1.52, while mean RaH ranged from 0.80-1.43 and 0.85-1.58 for Fuji II LC and Photac-Fil, respectively. Results of statistical analysis were as follows: Fuji II LC: RaV-RC, SS

  4. Deposition of SiOx thin films on Y-TZP by reactive magnetron sputtering: influence of plasma parameters on the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for application in dental prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Calvacanti de Queiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper SiOx thin films were deposited on Y-TZP ceramics by reactive magnetron sputtering technique in order to improve the adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement for applications in dental prosthesis. For fixed cathode voltage, target current, working pressure and target-to-substrate distance, SiOx thin films were deposited at different oxygen concentrations in the Ar+O2 plasma forming gas. After deposition processes, SiOx thin films were characterized by profilometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Adhesion properties between Y-TZP and resin cement were evaluated by shear testing. Results indicate that films deposited at 20%O2 increased the bond strength to (32.8 ± 5.4 MPa. This value has not been achieved by traditional methods.

  5. The effect of continuous application of MDP-containing primer and luting resin cement on bond strength to tribochemical silica-coated Y-TZP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myung-Jin; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of continuous application of 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-containing primer and luting resin cement on bond strength to tribochemical silica-coated yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP). Forty bovine teeth and Y-TZP specimens were prepared. The dentin specimens were embedded in molds, with one side of the dentin exposed for cementation with the zirconia specimen. The Y-TZP specimen was prepared in the form of a cylinder with a diameter of 3 mm and a height of 10 mm. The bonding surface of the Y-TZP specimen was sandblasted with silica-coated aluminium oxide particles. The forty tribochemical silica-coated Y-TZP specimens were cemented to the bovine dentin (4 groups; n = 10) with either an MDP-free primer or an MDP-containing primer and either an MDP-free resin cement or an MDP-containing resin cement. After a shear bond strength (SBS) test, the data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (α = 0.05). The group with MDP-free primer and resin cement showed significantly lower SBS values than the MDP-containing groups ( p Y-TZP was the best choice among the alternatives tested in this study.

  6. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  7. Influence of energy density of different light sources on knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Piva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL, light-emitting diode (LED and xenon plasma-arc (PAC lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce. Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I of each LCU and the irradiation time (T: 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T, 24 Jcm-2 (IxT and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T. Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus. Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10. Knoop hardness number (KHN means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (a=5%. Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5±2.8 and HAL (50.9±3.7 produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05 than the control (44.7±3.8. LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  8. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  10. Effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation on the mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Haghgoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Metallic nano-particles show exclusive biological, chemical and physical characteristic. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation (0 (as control, 20, 40, 80, 120, 200 ppm on the mechanical Properties ( compressive and flexural strength of resin modified Glass ionomer Cement.   Materials and Methods: Based on ISO 4049 and ISO 9971 for polyalkenoid cements, 90 cases in each group were prepared for the flexural and compressive strength. Specimens in 6 groups with different amounts of nanosilver (20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm and control (Fuji II LC improved, stored in distilled water at 37 ° C for 1 day and 30 days. Flexural strength, using a three-point bending method, Modulus of elasticity and the compressive strength were measured by universal testing machine (Zwick with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post HOC test.   Results: The flexural strength and modulus of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation of resin modified glass-ionomer cement were not significantly different (P>0.05. The compressive strength of incorporating of20 ppm compared with control (P=0.01, 40 ppm (P=0.02 and 80 ppm compared with control (P<0.001 were increased. The flexural strength and compressive strength of Fuji II LC, containing nanosilver particles were increased after 1 day and 1 month significantly (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Incorporation of 20 to 80 ppm nanosilver into Fuji II LC had increased mechanical properties compared to the original cement.

  11. Comparison of resin cement adhesion to Y-TZP ceramic following manufacturers' instructions of the cements only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Kerkdijk, Sandra; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the bond strength of four resin materials with various chemical compositions following the manufacturers' instructions only and (2) to test their durability in dry and thermal aged conditions when they were bonded to zirconia ceramic. Four types of

  12. Employing 3R Techniques in Managing Cement Industry Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Mohammed Dawood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste management conserves human health, ownership, environment, and keeps valuable natural resources. Lean-green waste of an organization’s operations can be decreased through implementation 3R (Reduce, Reuse, and Recycling techniques by reduction of manufacturing system wastes. This research aims to integrate lean-green waste of the manufacturing system throughout employing 3R techniques and weighted properties method in order to manage waste. Al-Kufa cement plant is employed as a case study. Results are generated using Edraw Max Version 7 and Excel. Overall results show reduce technique of lean-green waste management has major contribution of 55 % and recycling technique has minor contribution 18 %. Defects waste has major integration of lean-green waste, while air emissions waste has minor integration of lean-green waste.

  13. Resin cements formulated with thio-urethanes can strengthen porcelain and increase bond strength to ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; de Oliveira, Gabriel Rodrigues; Pfeifer, Carmem; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2018-06-01

    The use of thio-urethane oligomers has been shown to significantly improve the mechanical properties of resin cements (RCs). The aim of this study was to use thio-urethane-modified RC to potentially reinforce the porcelain-RC structure and to improve the bond strength to zirconia and lithium disilicate. Six oligomers were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, P) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP, T) - with di-functional isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic, AL) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic, AR) or Dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic, CC). Thio-urethanes (20 wt%) were added to a BisGMA/UDMA/TEGDMA organic matrix. Filler was introduced at 60 wt%. The microshear bond strength (μSBS), Weibull modulus (m), and failure pattern of RCs bonded to zirconia (ZR) and lithium disilicate (LD) ceramics was evaluated. Biaxial flexural test and fractographic analysis of porcelain discs bonded to RCs were also performed. The biaxial flexural strength (σ bf ) and m were calculated in the tensile surfaces of porcelain and RC structures (Z = 0 and Z = -t 2 , respectively). The μSBS was improved with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL or T_AL bonded to LD and P_AL, P_AR or T_CC bonded to zirconia in comparison to controls. Mixed failures predominated in all groups. σ bf had superior values at Z = 0 with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL, P_AR, T_AL, or T_CC in comparison to control; σ bf increased with all RCs composed by thio-urethanes at Z = -t 2 . Fractographic analysis revealed all fracture origins at Z = 0. The use of specific thio-urethane oligomers as components of RCs increased both the biaxial flexural strength of the porcelain-RC structure and the μSBS to LD and ZR. The current investigation suggests that it is possible to reinforce the porcelain-RC pair and obtain higher bond strength to LD and ZR with RCs

  14. Novel cemented cup-holding technique while performing total hip arthroplasty with navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tomoki

    2017-09-01

    Recently, navigation systems have been more widely utilized in total hip arthroplasty. However, almost all of these systems have been developed for cementless cups. In the case of cemented total hip arthroplasty using a navigation system, a special-ordered cemented holder is needed. We propose a novel cemented cup-holding technique for navigation systems using readily available articles. We combine a cementless cup holder with an inverted cementless trial cup. The resulting apparatus is used as a cemented cup holder. The upside-down cup-holding technique is useful and permits cemented cup users to utilize a navigation system for placement of the acetabular component.

  15. Novel cemented cup-holding technique while performing total hip arthroplasty with navigation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takai, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, navigation systems have been more widely utilized in total hip arthroplasty. However, almost all of these systems have been developed for cementless cups. In the case of cemented total hip arthroplasty using a navigation system, a special-ordered cemented holder is needed. We propose a novel cemented cup-holding technique for navigation systems using readily available articles. We combine a cementless cup holder with an inverted cementless trial cup. The resulting apparatus is used as a cemented cup holder. The upside-down cup-holding technique is useful and permits cemented cup users to utilize a navigation system for placement of the acetabular component.

  16. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (Pcementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  17. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity

  18. Strength and wear resistance of a dental glass-ionomer cement with a novel nanofilled resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Krämer, Norbert; Siedschlag, Gustavo; Schubert, Edward W; Lauerer, Brigitte; Müller, Frank A; Petschelt, Anselm; Ebert, Johannes

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin coating protocols on the fracture strength and wear resistance of a commercial glass-ionomer cement (GIC). A new restorative concept [Equia (GC Europe)] has been introduced as a system application consisting of a condensable GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and a novel nanofilled resin coating material (G-Coat Plus). Four-point fracture strength (FS, 2 x 2 x 25 mm, 14-day storage, distilled water, 37 degrees C) were produced and measured from three experimental protocols: no coating GIC (Group 1), GIC coating before water contamination (Group 2), GIC coating after water contamination (Group 3). The strength data were analyzed using Weibull statistics. Three-body wear resistance (Group 1 vs. Group 2) was measured after each 10,000 wear cycles up to a total of 200,000 cycles using the ACTA method. GIC microstructure and interfaces between GIC and coating materials were investigated under SEM and CLSM. The highest FS of 26.1 MPa and the most homogenous behavior (m = 7.7) has been observed in Group 2. The coated and uncoated GIC showed similar wear resistance until 90,000 cycles. After 200,000 wear cycles, the coated version showed significantly higher wear rate (ANOVA, P< 0.05). The coating protocol has been shown to determine the GIC fracture strength. Coating after water contamination and air drying is leading to surface crack formation thus significantly reducing the FS. The resin coating showed a proper sealing of GIC surface porosities and cracks. In terms of wear, the coating did not improve the wear resistance of the underlying cement as similar or higher wear rates have been measured for Group 1 versus Group 2.

  19. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of degree of conversion and the effect of thermal aging on the color stability of resin cements and flowable composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Pimenta de Araújo, Cíntia Tereza; Araujo Pierote, Josué Junior; Salles de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Sartini Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability and degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cure and light-cure cements and flowable composites after thermal aging. A total of 50 human incisors were prepared and divided into six groups ( n = 10). Veneers were fabricated using IPS Empress Direct composite resin were bonded with three types of luting agents: Light-cured, conventional dual, and flowable composite according to the manufacturer's instructions. The groups were as follows: Filtek Z350XT Flow/Single Bond 2, RelyX ARC/Single Bond 2, RelyX Veneer/Single Bond 2, Tetric N-Flow/Tetric N-Bond, and Variolink II/Tetric N-Bond. Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage L*, a* and b* color coordinates were measured 24 h after cementation procedure with a color spectrophotometer and reevaluated after 10,000 thermal cycles. To evaluate the DC 50 specimens ( n = 10) of each resin material were obtained and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to evaluate the absorption spectra. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). No statistically significant differences in ΔE* occurred after aging. The greatest change in lightness occurred in the Variolink II resin cement. Changes in red-green hue were very small for the same cement and largest in the Tetric N-Flow flowable resin composite, while the greatest change in blue-yellow hue was a yellowing of the RelyX ARC luting cement. RelyX ARC exhibited the highest DC, and there were no statistically significant differences in DC among the other cements. Resin-based luting agent might affect the final of ceramic veneer restorations. The thermal aging affected the final color of the evaluated materials, and these were regarded as clinically unacceptable (ΔE >3.3).

  1. Effects of incorporation of nano-fluorapatite or nano-fluorohydroxyapatite on a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Zhu, Jiajun; Gu, Xiaoxia; Wen, Wenjian; Li, Qingshan; Fischer-Brandies, Helge; Wang, Huiming; Mehl, Christian

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the fluoride release properties and the effect on bond strength of two experimental adhesive cements. Synthesized particles of nano-fluorapatite (nano-FA) or nano-fluorohydroxyapatite (nano-FHA) were incorporated into a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC) and characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Blocks with six different concentrations of nano-FA or nano-FHA were manufactured and their fluoride release properties evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The unaltered glass ionomer cement Fuji Ortho LC (GC, control) and the two experimental cements with the highest fluoride release capacities (nano-FA+Fuji Ortho LC (GFA) and nano-FHA+Fuji Ortho LC (GFHA)) were used to bond composite blocks and orthodontic brackets to human enamel. After 24 h water storage all specimens were debonded, measuring the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) and the shear bond strength (SBS), respectively. The optimal concentration of added nano-FA and nano-FHA for maximum fluoride release was 25 wt.%, which nearly tripled fluoride release after 70 days compared with the control group. GC exhibited a significantly higher SBS than GFHA/GFA, with GFHA and GFA not differing significantly (P>0.05). The μTBS of GC and GFA were significantly higher than that of GFHA (P≤0.05). The results seem to indicate that the fluoride release properties of Fuji Ortho LC are improved by incorporating nano-FA or nano-FHA, simultaneously maintaining a clinically sufficient bond strength when nano-FA was added. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Özgür; Kılıç, Kerem; Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Sağsen, Burak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were determined with a metallographic optical microscope and push-out tests were done. RESULTS No significant differences were observed in terms of push-out bond strength between the oval and circular fiber posts (P>.05) The resin cement thicknesses of the oval posts were greater than those of the circular posts group in the coronal, middle and apical specimens (P<.05). CONCLUSION In the light of these results, it can be stated that resin cement thickness does not affect the push-out bond strength. PMID:25722832

  3. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    and acidic simplified adhesives is a well-studied phenomenon (Kanehira et al., 2006). A chemical incompatibility may occur in the oxygen-inhibited...not completely eliminate this incompatibility (Tay et al., 2003). Recently, new “universal adhesives ” have been introduced. These universal...potential incompatibilities with self-curing resin materials. Low bond strength between self-curing resin materials and acidic simplified adhesives is

  4. An in situ evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength of resin cements used for luting fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Camilo Andrés; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Kalinowski, Hypolito José; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2016-10-01

    The behavior and magnitude of the deformations that occur during polymerization and the behavior of the luting agents of glass fiber posts inside the root canal require quantification. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the in situ polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength inside the root canal of resin cements used to lute fiber posts. Thirty maxillary canines were prepared to lute fiber posts. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15) according to the cementation system used, which included ARC, the conventional dual-polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC, and the U200 system, a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX U200. Two fiber optic sensors with recorded Bragg gratings (FBG) were attached to each post before inserting the resin cement inside the root canal to measure the polymerization shrinkage (PS) of the cements in the cervical and apical root regions (με). Specimens were sectioned (into cervical and apical regions) to evaluate bond strength (BS) with a push-out test and degree of conversion (DC) with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (α=.05). The ARC and U200 system showed similar PS values (-276.4 ±129.2 με and -252.1 ±119.2 με, respectively). DC values from ARC were higher (87.5 ±2.7%) than those of U200 (55.9 ±9.7%). The cervical region showed higher DC values (74.8 ±15.2%) and PS values (-381.6 ±53.0 με) than those of the apical region (68.5 ±20.1% and -146.9 ±43.5 με, respectively) for both of the resin cements. BS was only statistically different between the cervical and apical regions for ARC (P<.05). The ARC system showed the highest PS and DC values compared with U200; and for both of the resin cements, the PS and DC values were higher at the cervical region than at the apical region of the canal root. BS was higher in the cervical region only for ARC. Copyright © 2016

  5. Effect of Self-Adhesive and Separate Etch Adhesive Dual Cure Resin Cements on the Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Dentin at Different Parts of the Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mohamadian Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding of fiber posts to intracanal dentin is challenging in the clinical setting. This study aimed to compare the effect of self-adhesive and separate etch adhesive dual cure resin cements on the bond strength of fiber post to dentin at different parts of the root.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 20 single-rooted premolars. The teeth were decoronated at 1mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ, and the roots underwent root canal treatment. Post space was prepared in the roots. Afterwards, the samples were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the fiber posts were cemented using Rely X Unicem cement, while in group 2, the fiber posts were cemented using Duo-Link cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The intracanal post in each root was sectioned into three segments of coronal, middle, and apical, and each cross-section was subjected to push-out bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 1mm/minute until failure. Push-out bond strength data were analyzed using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The bond strength at the middle and coronal segments in separate etch adhesive cement group was higher than that in self-adhesive cement group. However, the bond strength at the apical segment was higher in self-adhesive cement group compared to that in the other group. Overall, the bond strength in separate etch adhesive cement group was significantly higher than that in self-adhesive cement group (P<0.001.Conclusions: Bond strength of fiber post to intracanal dentin is higher after the use of separate etch adhesive cement compared to self-adhesive cement.

  6. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2007-01-01

    Volumetric measurement of autogenous strain is frequently performed by placing the fresh cement paste in a rubber membrane submerged in water. The volume change of the cement paste is measured by the amount of water displaced by the submerged sample. Volumetric and linear measurements of autogenous...... of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... on the same cement pastes....

  7. Novel cemented cup-holding technique while performing total hip arthroplasty with navigation system

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokazu Takai, MD; Tomoki Takahashi, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Recently, navigation systems have been more widely utilized in total hip arthroplasty. However, almost all of these systems have been developed for cementless cups. In the case of cemented total hip arthroplasty using a navigation system, a special-ordered cemented holder is needed. We propose a novel cemented cup-holding technique for navigation systems using readily available articles. We combine a cementless cup holder with an inverted cementless trial cup. The resulting apparatus is used ...

  8. Leaching of Co and Cs from spent ion exchange resins in cement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-08-22

    Aug 22, 2003 ... active waste management for a future Serbian radioactive waste disposal centre. Keywords. Cement ... cost, easy operation and radiation and thermal stability. It is generally .... Initial activity, A0 = 8,0⋅107 Bq/per sample (60Co and 137Cs). Table 2. ... Hespe E D 1971 Atomic Energy Rev. 9 195. Plecas I ...

  9. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  10. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  11. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Artioli COSTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10 and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3. Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0 than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1 (p < 0.05 and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7. The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6; seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7, and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9, showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05. Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin.

  12. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  13. Leaching behavior of some radionuclides from cement matrix incorporating exhausted polymeric resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Mesalam, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Exhausted poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid) impregnated with zirconium phosphate {P(AM-AA)-ZrP} produced from the treatment process of radioactive liquid waste was incorporated in different types of cement to prevent widespreading of radionuclides into the human environment. The rates at which 60 Co, 65 Zn and 152,154 Eu are leached from Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Blast Furnace Slag Cement (BFSC) were measured. From the leaching data the leach coefficients of 60 Co, 65 Zn and 152,154 Eu were determined and were found to vary between 1.62 x 10 -8 to 7.06 x 10 -10 cm 2 /day and 1.01 x 10 -8 to 8.93 x 10 -9 cm 2 /day in OPC and BFSC, respectively. In general, the radionuclide leaching rates followed the order: 152,154 Eu > 65 Zn > 60 Co. The leach coefficient was found to be dependent on the composition of the leachants and varied in the order: distilled water > ground water > synthetic sea water. The effect of NaNo 3 concentration in the wastes on the leach coefficient of 60 Co from OPC was also studied. (author)

  14. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) wer...

  15. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Buttle, D.; Wallace-Sims, R.; O'Brien, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  16. Effect of phototherapy on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of in-vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aali, Khulud Abdulrahman

    2018-05-11

    The present study systematically reviewed the literature to investigate the effect of phototherapy on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. electronic databases including MEDLINE (PubMed), ISI Web of Science, Scopus, ScIELO, LILACS and EMBASE until April 2018. The addressed focused question was: Does phototherapy increase the SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramics?" A total of 8 in-vitro studies were included in the qualitative and quantitative analysis. The mean SBS for phototherapy ranged from 4.1 to 18.95 MPa while mean SBS for sandblasted zirconia-composite specimens ranged from 3.98 to 23.35 MPa in the included studies. Qualitative analysis showed 3 studies favoured application of phototherapy in significantly increasing SBS, while 4 studies indicated sandblasting showed significantly greater SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Considering the effects of phototherapy, significant heterogeneity for SBS (Q value = 136.37, p<0.0001, I 2  = 94.87%) was noticed among both the groups. The overall mean difference for SBS (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI = -1.99 to -0.80, p = 0.402) was not significant between phototherapy and sandblast (control) groups. Whether the effect of phototherapy on increasing the SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramic is debatable. Further in-vitro studies should be performed in order to obtain strong conclusions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. A novel calorimetry technique for monitoring electron beam curing of polymer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.; Johnston, A.; Petrescue, L.; Hojjati, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a calorimetry-based technique for monitoring of the curing of electron beam (EB) curable resins, including design of the calorimeter hardware and the development of an analytical model for calculating resin cure rates and radiation dose. Factors affecting the performance of the calorimeter were investigated. Experimental trials monitoring the curing of epoxy resin were conducted under single pass and multiple passes of EB irradiation. Results show that the developed calorimeter is a simple, inexpensive and reasonably accurate technique for monitoring the EB curing of cationic epoxies

  18. Plastination of decalcified bone by a new resin technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rabiei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our synthesized resin found to be much more economical than conventional plastination method. In more details, properties of these new products were the same as, S 10 method, from points of strength, flexibility and weight, but, since the money cost for producing them was about one fifth that of S 10 method.

  19. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesaraki, S., E-mail: S-hesaraki@merc.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~ 32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. - Highlights: • Light cure cement based on SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and polymer-like matrix was formed. • The matrix includes poly(acrylic/maleic acid) and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate). • The cement is as strong as polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. • The cement exhibits apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid. • The cement is biodegradable and supports proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

  20. Influence of air-particle deposition protocols on the surface topography and adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo R; Campos, Fernanda; Sousa, Rafael S; Machado, Joao P B; Souza, Rodrigo O A; Bottino, Marco A; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of air-particle abrasion protocols on the surface roughness (SR) of zirconia and the shear bond strength (SBS) of dual-polymerized resin cement to this ceramic. Sintered zirconia blocks (n = 115) (Lava, 3M ESPE) were embedded in acrylic resin and polished. The specimens were divided according to the 'particle type' (Al: 110 µm Al2O3; Si: 110 µm SiO2) and 'pressure' factors (2.5 or 3.5 bar) (n = 3 per group): (a) Control (no air-abrasion); (b) Al2.5; (c) Si2.5; (d) Al3.5; (e) Si3.5. SR (Ra) was measured 3-times from each specimen after 20 s of air-abrasion (distance: 10 mm) using a digital optical profilometer. Surface topography was evaluated under SEM analyses. For the SBS test, 'particle type', 'pressure' and 'thermocycling' (TC) factors were considered (n = 10; n = 10 per group): Control (no air-abrasion); Al2.5; Si2.5; Al3.5; Si3.5; ControlTC; Al2.5TC; Si2.5TC; Al3.5TC; Si3.5TC. After silane application, resin cement (Panavia F2.0) was bonded and polymerized. Specimens were thermocycled (6.000 cycles, 5-55°C) and subjected to SBS (1 mm/min). Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey's and Dunnett tests (5%). 'Particle' (p = 0.0001) and 'pressure' (p = 0.0001) factors significantly affected the SR. All protocols significantly increased the SR (Al2.5: 0.45 ± 0.02; Si2.5: 0.39 ± 0.01; Al3.5: 0.80 ± 0.01; Si3.5: 0.64 ± 0.01 µm) compared to the control group (0.16 ± 0.01 µm). For SBS, only 'particle' factor significantly affected the results (p = 0.015). The SiO2 groups presented significantly higher SBS results than Al2O3 (Al2.5: 4.78 ± 1.86; Si2.5: 7.17 ± 2.62; Al3.5: 4.97 ± 3.74; Si3.5: 9.14 ± 4.09 MPa) and the control group (3.67 ± 3.0 MPa). All TC specimens presented spontaneous debondings. SEM analysis showed that Al2O3 created damage in zirconia in the form of grooves, different from those observed with SiO2 groups. Air-abrasion with 110 µm Al2O3 resulted in higher roughness, but air-abrasion protocols with SiO2

  1. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  2. Sequential mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium employing resin bead technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Chitambar, S.A.; Jain, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sequential mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium employing anion exchange resin bead technique is reported using a high sensitive single stage magnetic analyser instrument, the routinely employed rhenium double filament assembly and 0.5M HNO 3 as a wetting agent for loading the resin beads. A precision of bettter than 0.3per cent (2sigma) is obtained on the isotopic ratio measurements. However, extreme care has to be exercised to carry the resin bead experiments under ultra clean conditions so as to avoid pick up of contamination. (author)

  3. Composition of atmospheric precipitation. I. Sampling technique. Use of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egner, H; Eriksson, E; Emanuelsson, A

    1947-01-01

    In order to investigate the composition of atmospheric precipitations in Sweden, a technique using ion exchange resins has been developed. The possibilities of nitrate reduction, and ammonia losses, when the precipitation is collected in zinc gauges is stressed. Glass funnels are used, and they are effectively protected from bird droppings. The ion exchange resins so far available are quite serviceable but show some deficiencies as to stability, and activity in alkaline solutions. New resins, which are not yet available, seem to offer definite advantages.

  4. Dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials and five cements after six months storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Schmidt, Stefanie Zita; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to investigate dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic materials and five cements after 24 h and six months storage. Cylinders (n=15/group) of Lava Ultimate (3M ESPE) and VITA ENAMIC (VITA Zahnfabrik) were cemented to mid-coronal dentin of 300 extracted human molars with RelyX Ultimate (3M ESPE), PANAVIA F2.0 (Kuraray), Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), els cem (Saremco Dental), or Ketac Cem Plus (3M ESPE). Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h or six months storage (37°C, 100% humidity) and statistically analyzed (significance level: α=0.05). SBS varied markedly between Lava Ultimate and VITA ENAMIC, between the five cements, and between storage of either 24 h or six months. After six months, SBS was highest when Lava Ultimate was cemented with RelyX Ultimate and when VITA ENAMIC was cemented with RelyX Ultimate or with Variolink II. Lava Ultimate was somewhat more sensitive to storage than was VITA ENAMIC.

  5. An Ice Block: A Novel Technique of Successful Prevention of Cement Leakage Using an Ice Ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, Ishaq Fahmi, E-mail: uri.isaac@gmail.com [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital (United Kingdom); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpital Universitaire de Strasbourg, Service d’Imagerie Interventionnelle (France)

    2015-04-15

    We report three cases of painful bone metastases with extraosseous invasion treated with cementoplasty and cryoablation. Due to significant cortical loss in all cases, the ice ball was used simultaneously during cementoplasty to deter potential cement leakage. This was achieved by direct application of the ice ball against the cortical surface, resulting in adequate consolidation and successful containment of the cement within the treated bones. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report to describe such a combined technique.

  6. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  7. Influence of lithium and boron ions on calcium sulfo-aluminate cement hydration: application for the conditioning of boron ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhoury, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, a solution of boric acid, the pH of which is controlled by the addition of lithium hydroxide, is injected in the primary circuit. Boron acts as a neutron moderator and helps controlling the fission reactions. The primary coolant is purified by flowing through columns of ion exchange resins. These resins are periodically renewed and constitute a low-level radioactive waste. In addition to radionuclides, they mainly contain borate and lithium ions. They are currently encapsulated in an organic matrix before being stored in a near-surface repository. An evolution of the process is considered, involving the replacement of the organic matrix by a mineral one. In this PhD study, the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cements (CSAC) to solidify/stabilize borated resins in the presence of lithium is investigated. These binders have the advantage to form hydrates which can incorporate borate ions in their structure, and their hydration is less retarded than that of Portland cement.An analytical approach is adopted, based on a progressive increase in the complexity of the investigated systems. Hydration of ye-elimite-rich CSAC is thus successively investigated in the presence of (i) lithium salts, (ii) lithium hydroxide and sodium borate, and (iii) lithium hydroxide and borated ion exchange resins. The experimental investigation is supplemented by thermodynamic modelling using a database specially developed for the needs of the study. Lithium ions are shown to accelerate CSAC hydration by decreasing the duration of the period of low thermal activity. The postulated mechanism involves the precipitation of lithium-containing aluminum hydroxide. On the contrary, sodium borate retards CSAC hydration by increasing the duration of the period of low thermal activity. Ulexite, a poorly crystallized mineral containing sodium and borates, transiently precipitates at early age. As long as ulexite is present, dissolution of ye-elimite is strongly slowed

  8. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs

  9. The effect of moisture on the shear bond strength of gold alloy rods bonded to enamel with a self-adhesive and a hydrophobic resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Wiechmann, Dirk; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of enamel moisture on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a hydrophobic resin cement, Maximum Cure (MC), and a self-adhesive resin cement, Multilink Sprint (MLS), after etching of the enamel. Forty cylindrical gold alloy rods were used to simulate the Incognito lingual bracket system. They were bonded to the enamel of 40 human teeth embedded in self-cured acrylic resin. Twenty were bonded with MC (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel) and 20 with MLS (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel). The SBS of MC and MLS was determined in a universal testing machine and the site of bond failure was defined by the adhesive remnant index (ARI). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed followed by Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparison tests on the SBS results (P enamel, no significant differences between MC (58 +/- 5 MPa) and MLS (64 +/- 13 MPa) were noted. On wet enamel, the adherence of MC (6 +/- 8 MPa) and MLS (37 +/- 13 MPa) significantly decreased but to a lesser extent for MLS. The ARI scores corroborated these results. In conclusion, MC did not tolerate moisture. MLS was also affected but maintained sufficient adherence.

  10. Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine O. Geerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h×w×l=2mm×2mm×3mm were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany, iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany, and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany. All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs. Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (<.05. The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (=.091, except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (<.0001. Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling and others (microtensile tests.

  11. The Impact of Plasma Treatment of Cercon® Zirconia Ceramics on Adhesion to Resin Composite Cements and Surface Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Kasra; Hosseinpour, Sepanta; Mohammad-Rahimi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, the use of ceramic base zirconia is considered in dentistry for all ceramic restorations because of its chemical stability, biocompatibility, and good compressive as well as flexural strength. However, due to its chemical stability, there is a challenge with dental bonding. Several studies have been done to improve zirconia bonding but they are not reliable. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of plasma treatment on bonding strength of zirconia. Methods: In this in vitro study, 180 zirconia discs' (thickness was 0.85-0.9 mm) surfaces were processed with plasma of oxygen, argon, air and oxygen-argon combination with 90-10 and 80-20 ratio (n=30 for each group) after being polished by sandblast. Surface modifications were assessed by measuring the contact angle, surface roughness, and topographical evaluations. Cylindrical Panavia f2 resin-cement and Diafill were used for microshear strength bond measurements. The data analysis was performed by SPSS 20.0 software and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test as the post hoc. Results: Plasma treatment in all groups significantly reduces contact angle compare with control ( P =0.001). Topographic evaluations revealed coarseness promotion occurred in all plasma treated groups which was significant when compared to control ( P <0.05), except argon plasma treated group that significantly decreased surface roughness ( P <0.05). In all treated groups, microshear bond strength increased, except oxygen treated plasma group which decreased this strength. Air and argon-oxygen combination (both groups) significantly increased microshear bond strength ( P <0.05). Conclusion: According to this research, plasmatic processing with dielectric barrier method in atmospheric pressure can increase zirconia bonding strength.

  12. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  13. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t’am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  14. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2006-01-01

    of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... measurements by the same order of magnitude as the autogenous strain itself. By performing the measurements in a paraffin oil bath instead of a water bath, this artefact was eliminated. Furthermore, volumetric measurements performed in paraffin oil gave almost identical results as linear measurements performed...

  15. Application of Resin in Pulp Technique for Ion Exchange Separation of Uranium from Alkaline Leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.C.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Resin-in-pulp technique was applied for purification and enrichment of uranium values from a finely ground uranium ore leach slurry of alkaline nature using strong base anion exchange resin (size 500 - 675μm). • The chemical composition of the solution phase of the alkaline leach slurry (pH 9.5) was consisting of about 40 g/L of total dissolved solutes (TDS) predominantly with Na_2CO_3 and NaHCO_3 and minor levels of Na_2SO_4. The uranium content was only 730 mg/L and d50 of solids was 34μm. • Amongst the various commercially available resins studied PFA 4740 and 4783 having quaternary ammonium ion on polystyrene crosslink with divibyl benzez (DVB) gave best performance. The maximum loading capacity achieved in the RIP studies was about 60-65 g of U_3O_8/L of wet settled resin amounting to 98% of loading. This has necessitated 4 stages of counter-current extraction with overall contact time of 100 minutes at a resin to leach slurry volume ratio of about 1:50. Practically the entire uranium values loaded on the resin were eluted using NaCl. • The RIP process was found quite efficient for uranium bearing alkaline leach slurries.

  16. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed various cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline restorations have gained widespread use because of its enhanced strength and esthetics. During the try-in process, zirconia is likely to be contaminated with saliva. This contamination leads to a clear weakening of the bond between restorative material and cement. For this reason, zirconia surface should be cleaned before cementation. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed with various surface cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of zirconia discs were prepared in the dimensions 2.5 mm diameter and 4.5 mm thickness. They were divided into two groups of each forty samples based on luting cement used. Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of each (n = 10: Group 1: uncontaminated zirconia blocks, Group 2: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks and cleaned only with distilled water, Group 3: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks treated with Ivoclean, and Group 4: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks were air abraded. Eighty human maxillary premolars were then sectioned to expose dentin and were mounted on an acrylic block. A jig was fabricated to bond zirconia with the tooth using two self-adhesive resin cements. The samples were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significance difference test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strength values of Group 1 and 2 - subgroup B are 10.3 ± 0.4 and 9.80 ± 0.7 (saliva-contaminated zirconia, cleansed with distilled water only, respectively, were lowest among all test subgroups and were significantly less than mean values of subgroup C, Group 1 - 20.45 ± 0.6 and Group 2 - 20.75 ± 0.4 (Ivoclean group and subgroup D, Group 1 - 20.90 ± 0.3 and Group 2 - 20.60 ± 0.5 (air

  18. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  19. Measurement of net nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization in wetland soils using a modification of the resin-core technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    A modification of the resin-core method was developed and tested for measuring in situ soil N and P net mineralization rates in wetland soils where temporal variation in bidirectional vertical water movement and saturation can complicate measurement. The modified design includes three mixed-bed ion-exchange resin bags located above and three resin bags located below soil incubating inside a core tube. The two inner resin bags adjacent to the soil capture NH4+, NO3-, and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transported out of the soil during incubation; the two outer resin bags remove inorganic nutrients transported into the modified resin core; and the two middle resin bags serve as quality-control checks on the function of the inner and outer resin bags. Modified resin cores were incubated monthly for a year along the hydrogeomorphic gradient through a floodplain wetland. Only small amounts of NH4+, NO3-, and SRP were found in the two middle resin bags, indicating that the modified resin-core design was effective. Soil moisture and pH inside the modified resin cores typically tracked changes in the surrounding soil abiotic environment. In contrast, use of the closed polyethylene bag method provided substantially different net P and N mineralization rates than modified resin cores and did not track changes in soil moisture or pH. Net ammonification, nitrifi cation, N mineralization, and P mineralization rates measured using modified resin cores varied through space and time associated with hydrologic, geomorphic, and climatic gradients in the floodplain wetland. The modified resin-core technique successfully characterized spatiotemporal variation of net mineralization fluxes in situ and is a viable technique for assessing soil nutrient availability and developing ecosystem budgets.

  20. New resin gel for uranium determination by diffusive gradient in thin films technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregušová, Michaela; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 684, 1-2 (2011), s. 142-146 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/2002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : diffusive gradient in thin film technique * 8-hydroxyquinoline resin gel * uranium determination Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.555, year: 2011

  1. Assessment of the impact strength of the denture base resin polymerized by various processing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To measure the impact strength of denture base resins polymerized using short and long curing cycles by water bath, pressure cooker and microwave techniques. Materials and Methods: For impact strength testing, 60 samples were made. The sample dimensions were 60 mm × 12 mm × 3 mm, as standardized by the American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM. A digital caliper was used to locate the midpoint of sample. The impact strength was measured in IZOD type of impact tester using CEAST Impact tester. The pendulum struck the sample and it broke. The energy required to break the sample was measured in Joules. Data were analyzed using Student′s " t" test. Results: There was statistically significant difference in the impact strength of denture base resins polymerized by long curing cycle and short curing cycle in each technique, with the long curing processing being the best. Conclusion: The polymerization technique plays an important role in the influence of impact strength in the denture base resin. This research demonstrates that the denture base resin polymerized by microwave processing technique possessed the highest impact strength.

  2. Review of disposal techniques for radioactively contaminated organic ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inman, J.R.; Mack, J.

    1993-03-01

    Organic ion-exchange resins are used in the UK nuclear industry to remove radioactive nuclides from dilute aqueous solution. Resins represent a significant proportion of the organic content of ILW and LLW, particularly ILW. Spent resins are destined to be disposed of in the UK deep repository. There are concerns regarding the potential effects of organic materials on long-term repository performance, and these effects have been the subject of much recent research work. The object of this study has been to conduct a worldwide review of treatment and conditioning techniques available for spent organic ion-exchange resins with the intention of recommending the best option for dealing with the waste in the UK. Data on available techniques have been gathered together, and are presented in tabular form at the back of the report. The techniques have been reviewed and compared considering safety, practicality and cost, and a best option selected on the basis of current knowledge. On balance it would appear that wet oxidation using hydrogen peroxide with residue encapsulation in BFS/OPC is the most appropriate technique, probably implemented using a mobile plant. This conclusion and recommendation is not however clear cut and further advice regarding the acceptability of organic material in the repository is necessary before a definite recommendation can be made. (Author)

  3. In-place cement stabilized base reconstruction techniques interim report : "construction and two year evaluation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of soil cement shrinkage crack mitigation techniques. The contents of this report reflect an evaluation of the construction of the test sections and a two-year evaluation of the test sect...

  4. The effect of a nano-filled resin coating on the 3-year clinical performance of a conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Vu Thi Kieu; Tyas, Martin J; Ngo, Hien C; Phuong, Lam Hoai; Khanh, Ngo Dong

    2014-04-01

    The main aim of the study was to compare the clinical performance of the conventional high-powder/liquid ratio glass-ionomer cement (GIC) Fuji IX GP Extra (F IX), Fuji IX GP Extra with a low-viscosity nano-filled resin coating, G-Coat Plus (F IX+GCP), and a resin composite, Solare (S), as a comparison material. Moderate-depth occlusal cavities in the first permanent molars of 91 11-12-year-old children (1-4 restorations per child) were restored with either F IX (87 restorations), F IX+GCP (84 restorations) or S (83 restorations). Direct clinical assessment, photographic assessment and assessment of stone casts of the restorations were carried out at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and 3 years. The colour match with the tooth of the GIC restorations improved over the 3 years of the study. Marginal staining and marginal adaptation were minimal for all restorations; three restorations exhibited secondary caries at 3 years. From the assessment of the casts, at 2 years, there was significantly less wear of the F IX GP Extra+GCP restorations than the F IX GP Extra restorations (P G-Coat Plus showed acceptable clinical performance in occlusal cavities in children, the application of G-Coat Plus gave some protection against wear. The application of G-Coat Plus to Fuji IX GP Extra glass-ionomer cement may be beneficial in reducing wear in occlusal cavities.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis; Sintese e caracterizacao de pastas de cimento aditivadas com resinas epoxi - analises cineticas, termodinamicas e calorimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S., E-mail: macleybiane@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  6. Evaluation of effectiveness of cement removal from implant-retained crowns using a proposed circular crisscross flossing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Shafter, Mohamed Amer; Jain, Vinay; Wicks, Russel Anthony; Linder, Erno; Ledo, Carlos Alberto da Silva

    2018-02-13

    Extruded cement during dental implant crown cementation may cause peri-implant diseases if not removed adequately. Evaluate the efficiency of removal of cement after cementation of implant crowns using an experimental "circular crisscross flossing technique (CCCFT) flossing technique, compared to the conventional "C" shape flossing technique (CSFT). Twenty-four patients rendered 29 experimental and 29 control crowns. Prefabricated abutments were secured to the implant with the margins at least 1 mm subgingivally. The abutments were scanned using CADCAM technology and Emax crowns were fabricated in duplicates. Each crown was cemented separately and excess cement was removed using the CSFT and the CCFT techniques. After completion of cementation was completed, the screw access holes were accessed and the crown was unscrewed along with the abutment. The samples were disinfected using 70% ethanol for 10 minutes. Crowns were divided into 4 parts using a marker in order to facilitate measurement data collection. Vertical and horizontal measurements were made for extruded cement for each control and experimental groups by means of a digital microscope. One-hundred and seventeen measurements were made for each group. Mann-Whitney test was applied to verify statistical significance between the groups. The CCFT showed a highly statistically significant result (104.8 ± 13.66, pcrowns cementation when compared with the CSFT.

  7. Comparison of the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin with different protocol of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, Mohammad Javad; Hossainipour, Zahra; Majidinia, Sara; Ojrati, Najmeh

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin with and without surface treatments, and compare them with conventional resin cement as the control group. In this experimental study, buccal and lingual surface of the thirty sound human premolars were polished in order to obtain a flat surface of enamel (E) in buccal, and dentin (D) in lingual. Sixty feldspathic ceramic blocks (2×3×3 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into six groups (n=10). Each block was cemented to the prepared surface (30 enamel and 30 dentin surface) according to different protocol: E1 and D1; RelyX ARC as control group, E2, D2; RelyX Unicem, E3, D3; acid etching +RelyX Unicem. The specimens were termocycled and subjected to shear forces by a universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of fracture were evaluated by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods using SPSS version 15. One-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at α=0.05. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences within the enamel subgroups, but there were significant differences within the dentinal subgroups, and statistically significant differences were found between the groups D1and D3 (p=0.02). Comparison between similar enamel and dentinal subgroups showed that there was a significant difference just between the subgroups E3 and D3 (p=0.01). Elective etching of enamel did not lead to significant increase in the shear bond strength of RelyX Unicem in comparison to RelyX ARC. On the other hand, elective etching of dentin reduces the bond strength of RelyX Unicem with the dentin.

  8. Basic study of water-cement ratio evaluation for fresh mortar using an ultrasonic measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza Haffies Ismail; Murata, Yorinobu

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research is for the basic study of ultrasonic evaluation method for the determination of the water-cement-ratio (W/C) in fresh concrete at the early age of hardening. Water-cement ratio is a important parameter to evaluate the strength of concrete for concrete construction. Using an ultrasonic pulse measurement technique, wave velocity and frequency variations depend on the age of concrete during hardening process could be evaluated. As a sample test, fresh mortar of water-cement ratio of 40 %, 50% and 60 % was poured into cylindrical plastic mould form (φ100 mm x 50 mm). For an ultrasonic pulse wave transmission technique, two wide band ultrasonic transducers were set on the top and bottom surface of mortar, and start measuring from 10 minutes after pouring water until 60 minutes of 5 minutes of intervals. As a result, it was confirmed that wave velocity and center frequency were changed with the age of mortar depends on the water-cement ratio. (author)

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity of a novel resin-based pulp capping material containing the quaternary ammonium salt MAE-DB and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanwei; Huang, Li; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. The experimental material was prepared from a 2 : 1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4 : 3 : 1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution. Therefore, this material shows

  10. The initial instability of cemented and non-cemented femoral stems fixated with a bone grafting technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, B.W.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.

    1994-01-01

    To reconstruct intramedullary bone stock in revision surgery of failed total hip arthroplasties, a method was developed using impacted trabecular bone grafts. In an in vitro model with femora of the goat, the initial stabilities of both cemented and non-cemented hydroxylapatite-coated stems in this

  11. A new technique for the synthesis of ammonium phosphomolybdate: precipitation in resin support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing ammonium molybdophosphate, an inorganic ion exchanger which retains selectively cesium-137 from a mixture of fission products, employing a strong anionic resin, saturated with molybdate anions, is presented. This method enables the precipitation of ammonium molybdophosphate directly into the resinous structure by adding dihydrogen ammonium phosphate in 7,5M HNO 3 . The reactants maintened at 60 0 C for a period of four hours has been found to be the optimum condition for a maximum yield of this compound (anionic resin-ammonium molybdophosphate = R-AMP). The tests performed for characterizing this compound are: molybdenum-phosphorus ratio determination, electronic absorption spectra, infra-red absorption spectra, reflection microscopy observations, electron probe micro-analysis and X-ray powder patterns. The analysis confirmed the presence of the ammonium molybdophosphate in the resinous structure, permitting, thereby, its use as a cation exchanger. R-AMP showed a capacity of 0,48mE/g of dry material. The cesium retention studies were made using columns charged with R-AMP compound. The behavior of polivalent fission products was studied. The R-AMP column was applied to separate cesium from irradiated uranium solutions [pt

  12. Practical aspects of the resin bead technique for mass spectrometric sample loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.L.; Pritchard, C.A.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.

    1976-07-01

    Using an anion resin bead as a loading vehicle for uranium and plutonium samples which are to be analyzed isotopically in a mass spectrometer has many advantages over conventional techniques. It is applicable to any laboratory routinely performing such analyses, but should be particularly relevant for Safeguards' purposes. Because the techniques required differ markedly from those of conventional methods, this report has been written to describe them in detail to enable those unfamiliar with the technique to master it with a minimum of trouble

  13. The effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayanti, D.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial saliva with different acidities on the diametral tensile strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) coated with varnish and nanofilled coating agent. The specimens coated with coating agents were immersed in artificial saliva with pH of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 hours in an incubatorat 37°C. The diametral tensile strength of the specimens was tested with Universal Testing Machine. There were no significant differences on the diametral tensile strength of all specimens that were put into groups based on the acidity of the saliva and the type of coating agent (p>0.05). Both varnish and nanofilled coating agent stayed on the RMGIC in the acidic condition that simulated the true condition of oral cavity in people with high caries risk for the 24 hours of maturation.

  14. The influence of polishing techniques on pre-polymerized CAD\\CAM acrylic resin denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alammari, Manal Rahma

    2017-10-01

    Lately, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has broadly been successfully employed in dentistry. The CAD/CAM systems have recently become commercially available for fabrication of complete dentures, and are considered as an alternative technique to conventionally processed acrylic resin bases. However, they have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to inspect the effects of mechanical polishing and chemical polishing on the surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (wettability) of heat-cured, auto-cured and CAD/CAM denture base acrylic resins. This study was conducted at the Advanced Dental Research Laboratory Center of King Abdulaziz University from March to June 2017. Three denture base materials were selected: heat cure poly-methylmethacrylate resin, thermoplastic (polyamide resin) and (CAD\\CAM) denture base resin. Sixty specimens were prepared and divided into three groups, twenty in each. Each group was divided according to the polishing techniques into (Mech P) and (Chem P), ten specimens in each; surface roughness and wettability were investigated. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using one-way ANOVA and Pearson coefficient. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used for comparing the surface roughness values between three groups which revealed a statistical significant difference between them (p 1 CAD\\CAM denture base material (group III) showed the least mean values (1.08±0.23, 1.39±0.31, Mech P and Chem P respectively). CAD/CAM showed the least contact angle in both polishing methods, which were statistically significant at 5% level (p=0.034 and pCAD\\CAM denture base resin with superior smooth surface compared to chemical polishing. Mechanical polishing is considered the best effective polishing technique. CAD/CAM denture base material should be considered as the material of choice for complete denture construction in the near future, especially for older dental

  15. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical split-mouth evaluation of partial ceramic crowns luted with a new, universal adhesive system/resin cement: results after 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Vanessa; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Federlin, Marianne; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    A new universal adhesive with corresponding luting composite was recently marketed which can be used both, in a self-etch or in an etch-and-rinse mode. In this study, the clinical performance of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) inserted with this adhesive and the corresponding luting material used in a self-etch or selective etch approach was compared with a self-adhesive universal luting material. Three PCCs were placed in a split-mouth design in 50 patients. Two PCCs were luted with a combination of a universal adhesive/resin cement (Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) with (SB+E)/without (SB-E) selective enamel etching. Another PCC was luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE). Forty-eight patients were evaluated clinically according to FDI criteria at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months. For statistical analyses, the chi-square test (α = 0.05) and Kaplan-Meier analysis were applied. Clinically, no statistically significant differences between groups were detected over time. Within groups, clinically significant increase for criterion "marginal staining" was detected for SB-E over 18 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly higher retention rates for SB+E (97.8 %) and SB-E (95.6 %) in comparison to RXU2 (75.6 %). The 18-month clinical performance of a new universal adhesive/composite combination showed no differences with respect to bonding strategy and may be recommended for luting PCCs. Longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm superiority of SB+E over SB-E. At 18 months, the new multi-mode adhesive, Scotchbond Universal, showed clinically reliable results when used for luting PCCs.

  16. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S R; Moraes, M; Youssef, M N; De Souza-Zaroni, W C; Hanashiro, F S; Brugnera Junior, A; Nobre-dos-Santos, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO 2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO 2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO 2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm −2   +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO 2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey–Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC–C group. It was concluded that CO 2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used. (paper)

  17. Bond strength of composite resin to enamel: assessment of two ethanol wet-bonding techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength.Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control;Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test (α=0.05.There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73. However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3.In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel.

  18. The mechanical properties of nanofilled resin-based composites: characterizing discrete filler particles and agglomerates using a micromanipulation technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curtis, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    To assess the mechanical properties of discrete filler particles representative of several inorganic fillers in modern dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to assess the validity of a novel micromanipulation technique.

  19. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p improved the bond strength quality and values.

  20. Surface coating of jeungjing wood (Paraserianthes Falcataria (L) NIELSEN) with acrylate resins by using radiation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhariyono, Gatot

    1998-01-01

    An experiment on surface coating with acrylate resins has been done by using radiation technique to improve the quality and added value of jeunjing wood (Paraserianthes Falcataria (L) NIELSEN). Doses used in Electron Beam (BE) radiation were 20, 40, and 60 kGy. Epoxy acrylate and ester acrylate resins were used as coating materials after added with tripropylene glycol diacylate (TPGDA) monomer, 2,2-dimethyl-2hidroxy acetophenone (Darocur 1173) photoinitiator and talc as base coat. Top coat consists of este acrylate Setacure AM 548, after added with titanium dioxide OK 412 as additive respectively. Titanium dioxides in the mixture were varied at the concentration level of 0, 2, 4 and 6 % by weight. Conventional coating as comparison was carried out by using varnish as coating material. The results showed that the properties of film on jeunjing wood by EB curing are better than that of conventional one. (authors)

  1. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  2. Advanced dust control techniques in cement industry electrostatic precipitator - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, Z.; Ahmad, J.

    2011-01-01

    The case study deal with the current day problem of pollution by industrial zones in Pakistan with emphasis on the cement Industry which has been proved to be the second revenue generating hub after textile sector of the Pakistan. A pilot study into the identification and available removal Techniques of particulates from the exhaust of a cement plant clinker cooler was carried out. The objective of this work was to study the performance of the each technique in detail in the removal of a particulate with a wide range of sizes, under different operational conditions and to compare the results for collection efficiency with predictions by available theoretical models. A brief and comprehensive discussion regarding design, construction and bottlenecks of each tool has been discussed to fully ascertain it's scope and usability. First part of the study identifies the various pollutants being emitted from the chimney of a specific cement plant in Pakistan and while last portion deals with the ways to curtail these pollutants. (author)

  3. Mechanisms of cement leaching and degradation - integration of neutron imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Timothy E.; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Brew, Daniel R.M.; McGlinn, Peter J.; De Beer, Frikkie C.; Radebe, Mabuti J.; Nshimirimana, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Cementitious material is a commonly used wasteform for low and intermediate level radioactive waste, and comprises a major part of both structural components and barriers in many repository concepts. When exposed to water, cement-based barriers and waste-forms are expected to degrade by mechanisms involving both chemical and structural changes. The research program addresses several aspects of these processes, including the leaching of the waste-forms, water transport properties, as well as the effect of high pH cement leachates on the chemical and physical properties of surrounding materials (including clay barriers and host regolith materials). Chemical leaching tests and analyses by techniques such as electron microscopy can be augmented by neutron radiography and tomography. These methods provide a useful non-destructive method of determining properties related to water transport in cementitious materials, in particular the sorptivity and pore size distribution

  4. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  5. New resin gel for uranium determination by diffusive gradient in thin films technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregusova, Michaela; Docekal, Bohumil

    2011-01-01

    A new resin gel based on Spheron-Oxin chelating ion-exchanger with anchored 8-hydroxyquinoline functional groups was tested for application in diffusive gradient in thin film technique (DGT) for determination of uranium. Selectivity of uranium uptake from model carbonate loaded solutions of natural water was studied under laboratory conditions and compared with selectivity of the conventional Chelex 100 based resin gel. The affinity of Spheron-Oxin functional groups enables determination of the overall uranium concentration in water containing carbonates up to the concentration level of 10 2 mg L -1 . The effect of uranium binding to the polyacrylamide (APA) and agarose diffusive gels (AGE) was also studied. Uranium is probably bound in both gels by a weak interaction with traces of acrylic acid groups in the structure of APA gel and with pyruvic and sulfonic acid groups in the AGE gel. These sorption effects can be eliminated to the negligible level by prolonged deployment of DGT probes or by disassembling probes after the 1-2 days post-sampling period that is sufficient for release of uranium from diffusive gel and its sorption in resin gel.

  6. New resin gel for uranium determination by diffusive gradient in thin films technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregusova, Michaela, E-mail: gregusova@iach.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Docekal, Bohumil [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-17

    A new resin gel based on Spheron-Oxin chelating ion-exchanger with anchored 8-hydroxyquinoline functional groups was tested for application in diffusive gradient in thin film technique (DGT) for determination of uranium. Selectivity of uranium uptake from model carbonate loaded solutions of natural water was studied under laboratory conditions and compared with selectivity of the conventional Chelex 100 based resin gel. The affinity of Spheron-Oxin functional groups enables determination of the overall uranium concentration in water containing carbonates up to the concentration level of 10{sup 2} mg L{sup -1}. The effect of uranium binding to the polyacrylamide (APA) and agarose diffusive gels (AGE) was also studied. Uranium is probably bound in both gels by a weak interaction with traces of acrylic acid groups in the structure of APA gel and with pyruvic and sulfonic acid groups in the AGE gel. These sorption effects can be eliminated to the negligible level by prolonged deployment of DGT probes or by disassembling probes after the 1-2 days post-sampling period that is sufficient for release of uranium from diffusive gel and its sorption in resin gel.

  7. Application of resin in pulp technique for ion exchange separation of uranium from alkaline leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivas, T.; Rajan, K.; Chakravorty, J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of uranium from different ores uses ion exchange (IX) technique for the separation of dissolved uranium values. Conventionally, the IX process is carried out on leach solution obtained after the filtration or counter-current decantation of the leach slurries. Amongst the two types of leach pulps generated in uranium ore processing, viz acidic and alkaline, the latter one consists of predominantly fine-size pulps of higher viscosity, thus making the solid-liquid separation an arduous task. Sustained research for improvising the efficiency of various unit operations in the uranium process flowsheet have resulted in advent of new generation resins which are mechanically re-silent, posses higher exchange capacity thereby enabling separation of dissolved uranium ions from the leach pulps directly. Some of the prominent low-grade uranium ore deposits in India are hosted in acid consuming gangue matrix. These ore deposits necessitate fine grinding as well as application of alkaline leaching for the dissolution of uranium values. The leach pulps analyse 500 – 600 mg/l of U3O8 and contain total dissolved solutes (TDS) to the extent of about 50 g/l. Analysis of the characteristics of the leach pulp indicated suitability of resin-in-pulp technique for the separation of uranyl carbonate anions from the leachate. This paper describes the results of the RIP test work on alkaline leach slurry using various commercially available strong base anionic exchange resins. Parametric variation studies were conducted to establish the adsorption isotherm and sorption kinetics followed by elution of loaded uranium. Based on these results semi-continuous experiments on “carousel” mode were carried out. The results indicate superiority of gel type polystyrene based resins grafted with quaternary ammonium ion in comparison to the macro-porous resins. Semi-continuous counter-current extraction and elution tests indicated that about 98% of

  8. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P thick layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  9. A Comparison of Tensile Bond Strength Between Low Translucency and High Translucency Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Using Two Different Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    prepolymerized resin for complete denture bases, milling 8 titanium or zirconia for implant abutments, creating maxillofacial prosthetics , and orthodontic...ll’d interfaces under tC’llsHe force. The half-dumbbell specimens were designed using SolidWorks 3D design software (Waltham, Massachusetts) with...ceramics. The index jig will be additively manufactured from an Objet500 Connex (Stratasys Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) 3D printer with a

  10. A cement channel-detection technique using the pulsed-neutron log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    A channel-detection technique has been developed using boron solutions and pulsed-neutron logging (PNL) tools. This technique relies on the extremely high-neutron-absorption cross section that boron exhibits relative to other common elements, including chlorine. The PNL tool is used to detect movement of a boron solution in a log-inject-log procedure. The technique has identified channels in such difficult applications as logging through two strings of pipe and in highly deviated wellbores. Logging procedures are simple and cement channels can be readily identified. The boron solutions are relatively inexpensive, safe to handle, and nonradioactive. Additional PNL information for reservoir performance evaluation is collected simultaneously during channel-detection logging. This paper describes the theory, development, field application, and limitations of this channel-detection logging technique

  11. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n=10. Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37∘C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

  12. Effect of protective coating on microhardness of a new glass ionomer cement: Nanofilled coating versus unfilled resin

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, Foad; Heshmat, Haleh; Banava, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: EQUIATM is a new gastrointestinal (GI) system with high compressive strength, surface microhardness (MH), and fluoride release potential. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of aging and type of protective coating on the MH of EQUIATM GI cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 disc-shaped specimens measuring 9 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were fabricated of EQUIATM GI and divided into three groups of G-Coat nanofilled coating (a), no coating ...

  13. Energy release rate analysis on the interface cracks of enamel-cement-bracket fracture using virtual crack closure technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samshuri, S. F.; Daud, R.; Rojan, M. A.; Mat, F.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Hassan, R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the energy method to evaluate fracture behavior of enamel-cement-bracket system based on cement thickness. Finite element (FE) model of enamel-cement-bracket was constructed by using ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). Three different thickness were used in this study, 0.05, 0.2, and 0.271 mm which assigned as thin, medium and thick for both enamel-cement and cement bracket interface cracks. Virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) was implemented as a simulation method to calculated energy release rate (ERR). Simulation results were obtained for each thickness are discussed by using Griffith’s energy balance approach. ERR for thin thickness are found to be the lowest compared to medium and thick. Peak value of ERR also showed a significant different between medium and thick thickness. Therefore, weakest bonding occurred at low cement thickness because less load required to produce enough energy to detach the bracket. For medium and thick thickness, both increased rapidly in energy value at about the mid-point of the enamel-cement interface. This behavior occurred because of the increasing in mechanical and surface energy when the cracks are increasing. However, result for thick thickness are higher at mid-point compared to thin thickness. In conclusion, fracture behavior of enamel cracking process for medium most likely the safest to avoid enamel fracture and withstand bracket debonding.

  14. Influence of different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins on the setting time of Grossman cements Influência de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas sobre o tempo de endurecimento dos cimentos do tipo Grossman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Damião SOUSA NETO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the setting time by the addition of different kinds of rosin and hydrogenated resin on the Grossman cement powder was evaluated. The experiments were carried out following the American Dental Association’s specification number 57 for root canal sealers. For this analysis, different Grossman cement powders were prepared using different rosins (X, WW and WG and hydrogenated resins (Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10. The study of the physicochemical properties of the Grossman cements obtained the different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins interference on the cement’s setting time. The hydrogenated resin, having a higher pH, increased the setting time of the cement when compared to the X, WW and WG rosins.No presente estudo, analisou-se o efeito da adição de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas ao pó do cimento de GROSSMAN sobre o tempo de endurecimento. Os experimentos foram realizados de acordo com a Especificação 57 para materiais obturadores de canais radiculares da American Dental Association (ADA. Para análise, foram aviados pós do cimento de GROSSMAN com diferentes tipos de breu (X, WW e WG e resinas hidrogenadas (Stabylite e Stabylite éster 10. Os estudos das propriedades físico-químicas dos cimentos tipo GROSSMAN obtidos de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas interferem no tempo de endurecimento do cimento. A resina hidrogenada, obtida do processo de hidrogenação tem o pH mais alto, provocando um aumento do tempo de endurecimento do cimento em relação aos breus tipo X, WW e WG, que têm pH mais ácido.

  15. An evaluation of retention and marginal seating of Ni-Cr alloy cast restorations using three different luting cements: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash K Pattanaik

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Marginal seating of adhesive resin cement was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate and resin-modified GIC. Retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC was significantly greater than that of zinc phosphate There was no significant difference of retentive strength between adhesive resin cement and resin-modified GIC.

  16. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  17. [Chromatic study of all-ceramic crown--IPS Empress: difference of color by manufacturing technique and cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Utako; Sadamitsu, Kenichiro; Yamamura, Osamu; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Fujii, Teruhisa

    2004-12-01

    In recent years,aesthetic appearance and function are called for and all-ceramic crowns are spreading. By choosing an all-ceramic crown the problem of metal ceramics is avoided. There are difficulties of color tone reproducibility of cervical margin and darkness of gingival margin. We examined IPS Empress also in various all-ceramic crowns. IPS Empress has high permeability a ceramic ingot of various color tones and excellent color tone reproducibility of natural teeth. Generally a layering technique is used for an anterior tooth and the staining technique is used for a molar. However the details are unknown We examined how differences of manufacturing method and cement affect the color tone of all ceramics clinically. Two kinds of Empress crown were fabricated for a 27 year-old woman's upper left-side central incisors:the staining technique of IPS Empress and the layering technique of IPS Empress II. Various try-in pastes(transparent opaque white white and yellow) of VariolinkII of the IPS Empress System were used for cementing. Color was measured using a spectrophotometer CMS 35FS. The L*a*b* color system was used for showing a color. The right-side central incisors on the opposite side of the same name teeth were used for comparison. We analyzed the color difference (DeltaE* ab)with a natural tooth. Consequently when it had no cement of staining technique and was tranceparent small values were obtained. It is considered that the color tone can be adjusted by color cement. It is effective to use the staining technique for an anterior tooth crown depending on the case. The crown manufactured using the layering technique is not easily influenced by cement. The crown manufactured by the staining technique tends to be influenced by cement.

  18. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  19. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable.

  20. Evaluation of three different decontamination techniques on biofilm formation, and on physical and chemical properties of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Dos Santos, Andressa; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Giannini, Marcelo; Girotto, Emerson Marcelo; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1% chloramine T, and 70% ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1% chloramine-T and 70% ethanol) were analyzed with 1 H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70% ethanol, however, 1 H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70% ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 945-953, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  2. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  3. The investigation of non-destructive techniques for the examination and quality assurance of cemented radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M.S.T.

    1985-08-01

    Three nondestructive tests for quality assurance of cemented radioactive wastes are considered. These are electrical impedance measurement, paddle torque measurement and gas permeability. Electrical impedance has the advantage that it can be used throughout the mixing, casting and setting processes. The measurement of paddle torque during mixing indicates a measure of the characteristics of the mix. Helium leak rate and total pressure rise techniques have been employed, but leakages at or near the surface due to cracks is a fundamental factor which limits the assessment of cement quality by gas permeation techniques. (U.K.)

  4. Comparative study of nanomechanical properties of cements used in teeth restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluccio, M S; Bignardi, C; Lombardo, S; Montevecchi, F M; Carossa, S

    2007-01-01

    The discipline of dental science includes the diagnosis of disease in the mouth and teeth, its manifestations and the procedures involved in the restoration of their integrity and function. Restoration of lost tooth structure with suitable materials plays an integral part in the successful rehabilitation of oral tissues. Several factors influence the performance of dental restorations. These factors include the type of cement used to bond crown restoration to prepared teeth. The nanoindentation method was used to explore the mechanical properties of different types of resin cement polymerized using different techniques. A Nano Indenter XP (from MTS Nano Instruments, USA) was used for the experimental tests. A sample of 40 extracted human teeth were restored using two different resin cements: Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) and Venus A2 (Heraeus Kulzer, Germany). Both resin cements are light-cured and one of them is self-cured so that the degree of polymerization would be higher. The data obtained for nanohardness and the Young's modulus were analysed using ANOVA to evaluate the influence of different factors (the resin cement and polymerization technique used, the position on the tooth-restoration interface) and to determine the best performance for restoration. The results obtained could give a useful indication of the choice of cementation technique and of the materials used for the restoration of lost tooth structure in different clinical cases

  5. Effect of protective coating on microhardness of a new glass ionomer cement: Nanofilled coating versus unfilled resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Foad; Heshmat, Haleh; Banava, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    EQUIA TM is a new gastrointestinal (GI) system with high compressive strength, surface microhardness (MH), and fluoride release potential. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of aging and type of protective coating on the MH of EQUIA TM GI cement. A total of 30 disc-shaped specimens measuring 9 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were fabricated of EQUIA TM GI and divided into three groups of G-Coat nanofilled coating (a), no coating (b) and margin bond (c). The Vickers MH value of specimens was measured before (baseline) and at 3 and 6 months after water storage. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Group B had significantly higher MH than the other two groups at baseline. Both G-Coat and margin bond increased the surface MH of GI at 3 and 6 months. The MH values of G-Coat and margin bond groups did not significantly increase or decrease between 3 and 6 months. The increase in MH was greater in the G-Coat compared to the margin bond group in the long-term. Clinically, margin bond may be a suitable alternative when G-Coat is not available.

  6. Cement technique for reducing post-operative bursitis after trochanteric fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Peter B; Horneff, John G; Kamath, Atul F; Garino, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Post-operative trochanteric bursitis is a known complication secondary to the surgical approach in total hip arthroplasty. This phenomenon may be partially attributable to repetitive microtrauma generated when soft tissues rub against implanted hardware. Significant rates of post-operative trochanteric bursitis have been observed following procedures in which a trochanteric fixation device, such as a bolt-washer mechanism or a cable-grip/claw system, is used to secure the trochanteric fragment after trochanteric osteotomy. We present a simple technique for use with a bolt-washer system or grip plate in which trochanteric components are covered in bone wax followed by a layer of cement to decrease friction and to diminish the risk of post-operative bursitis.

  7. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  8. The effects of different polishing techniques on the staining resistance of CAD/CAM resin-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Tevfik; Demirci, Gamze; Sagsoz, Nurdan Polat; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purposes of this study were to evaluate the staining resistance of CAD/CAM resin-ceramics polished with different techniques and to determine the effectiveness of the polishing techniques on resin-ceramics, comparing it with that of a glazed glass-ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four different CAD/CAM ceramics (feldspathic ceramic: C-CEREC Blocs, (SIRONA) and three resin-ceramics: L-Lava Ultimate, (3M ESPE), E-Enamic, (VITA) and CS-CeraSmart, (GC)) and one light cure composite resin: ME-Clearfil Majesty Esthetic (Kuraray) were used. Only C samples were glazed (gl). Other restorations were divided into four groups according to the polishing technique: nonpolished control group (c), a group polished with light cure liquid polish (Biscover LV BISCO) (bb), a group polished with ceramic polishing kit (Diapol, EVE) (cd), and a group polished with composite polishing kit (Clearfil Twist Dia, Kuraray) (kc). Glazed C samples and the polished samples were further divided into four subgroups and immersed into different solutions: distilled water, tea, coffee, and fermented black carrot juice. Eight samples (8 × 8 × 1 mm) were prepared for each subgroup. According to CIELab system, four color measurements were made: before immersion, immersion after 1 day, after 1 week, and after 1 month. Data were analyzed with repeated measures of ANOVA (α=.05). RESULTS The highest staining resistance was found in gl samples. There was no difference among gl, kc and cd (P>.05). Staining resistance of gl was significantly higher than that of bb (PCeramic and composite polishing kits can be used for resin ceramics as a counterpart of glazing procedure used for full ceramic materials. Liquid polish has limited indications for resin ceramics. PMID:28018558

  9. Evaluation of internal adaptation of Class V resin composite restorations using three techniques of polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pereira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of Class V composite restorations to the cavity walls using three different techniques of polymerization. METHODS: Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars with margins located above and below the cementoenamel junction. Restorations were placed in one increment using two restorative systems: 3M Filtek A110/ Single Bond (M and 3M Filtek Z250/ Single Bond (H in the same tooth, randomly in the buccal and lingual surfaces. Resin composites were polymerized using three techniques: Group 1 - Conventional (60 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 2 - Soft-start (20 s - 200 mW/cm² , 40 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 3 - Pulse Activation (3 s - 200 mW/cm², 3-min hiatus, 57 s - 600 mW/cm². Buccolingual sections were polished, impressions taken and replicated. Specimens were assessed under scanning electron microscopy up to X1000 magnification. Scores were given for presence or absence of gaps (0 - no gap; 1 - gap in one wall; 2 - gap in two walls; 3 - gap in three walls. RESULTS: The mean scores of the groups were (±SD were: G1M-3.0 (± 0.0; G2M-2.43 (± 0.8; G3M- 1.71 (± 0.9; G1H- 2.14 (± 1.2; G2H- 2.00 (± 0.8; G3H- 1.67 (± 1.1. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnet's tests. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05 was found among groups. Gaps were observed in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The photocuring technique and the type of resin composite had no influence on the internal adaptation of the material to the cavity walls. A positive effect was observed when the slow polymerization techniques were used.

  10. Femoral component revision with use of impaction bone-grafting and a cemented polished stem. Surgical technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, B.W.; Arts, J.J.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Buma, P.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision of the femoral component of a hip arthroplasty with use of an impaction bone-grafting technique and a cemented polished stem. METHODS: Thirty-three consecutive femoral reconstructions that were

  11. A novel approach to water polution monitoring by combining ion exchange resin and XRF-scanning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. J.; Lin, S. C.; Löwemark, L.; Liou, Y. H.; Chang, Q. M.; Chang, T. K.; Wei, K. Y.; Croudace, I. W. C.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the rapid industrial expansion, environments are subject to irregular fluctuations and spatial distributions in pollutant concentrations. This study proposes to use ion exchange resin accompanied with the XRF-scanning technique to monitor environmental pollution. As a passive sampling sorbent, the use of ion exchange resin provides a rapid, low cost and simple method to detect episodic pollution signals with a high spatial sampling density. In order to digest large quantities of samples, the fast and non-destructive Itrax-XRF core scanner has been introduced to assess elemental concentrations in the resin samples. Although the XRF scanning results are often considered as a semi-quantitative measurement due to possible absorption or scattering caused by the physical variabilities of scanned materials, the use of resin can minimize such influences owing to the standarization of the sample matrix. In this study, 17 lab-prepared standard resin samples were scanned with the Itrax-XRF core scanner (at 100 s exposure time with the Mo-tube) and compared with the absolute elemental concentrations. Six elements generally used in pollution studies (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) were selected, and their regression lines and correlation coefficients were determined. In addition, 5 standard resin samples were scanned at different exposure time settings (1 s, 5 s, 15 s, 30 s, 100 s) to address the influence of exposure time on the accuracy of the measurements. The results show that within the test range (from few ppm to thousands ppm), the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.97, even at the shortest exposure time (1 s). Furthermore, a pilot field survey with 30 resin samples has been conducted in a potentially polluted farm area in central Taiwan to demonstrate the feasibility of this novel approach. The polluted hot zones could be identified and the properties and sources of wastewater pollution can therefore be traced over large areas for the purposes of

  12. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  13. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR on hardness (KHN of dual-cured resin cements (RCs, immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent, Rely X ARC (3M ESPE, and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.. The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter. The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group, or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS Empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent. The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's test (pre-set alpha of 5%. RESULTS: Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for Eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and Eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure.

  14. In vitro Evaluation of Effect of Dental Bleaching on the Shear Bond Strength of Sapphire Orthodontics Brackets Bonded with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab M Kadhom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to assess the effect of various types of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of sapphire brackets bonded to human maxillary premolar teeth using resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and to determine the site of bond failure. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary human premolars were selected and assigned into three equal groups, ten teeth in each. The first group was the control (unbleached group; the second group comprised teeth bleached with hydrogen peroxide group (HP 37.5% (in-office bleaching while the third group included teeth bleached with carbamide peroxide group (CP 16% (at-home bleaching. The teeth in the experimental groups were bleached and stored in water one day then bonded with sapphire brackets using RMGIC with the control group and left another day. De-bonding was performed using Instron universal testing machine. To determine the site of bond failure, both the enamel surface and bracket base of each tooth were examined under magnifying lens (20X of a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed statistically highly significant difference in the shear bond strengths between control group and both of bleaching groups being low in the control group. Score III was the predominant site of bond failure in all groups. Conclusions: RMGIC provides adequate bond strength when bonding the sapphire brackets to bleached enamel; this bonding was strong enough to resist both the mechanical and masticatory forces. Most of the adhesive remained on the brackets, so it reduced the time required for removal of the bonding material’s remnants during enamel finishing and polishing.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage Between Nano-Ionomer, Giomer and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement in Class V Cavities- CLSM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollu, Indira Priyadarshini; Hari, Archana; Thumu, Jayaprakash; Velagula, Lakshmi Deepa; Bolla, Nagesh; Varri, Sujana; Kasaraneni, Srikanth; Nalli, Siva Venkata Malathi

    2016-05-01

    Marginal integrity of adhesive restorative materials provides better sealing ability for enamel and dentin and plays an important role in success of restoration in Class V cavities. Restorative material with good marginal adaptation improves the longevity of restorations. Aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage in Class V cavities which were restored with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC), Giomer and Nano-Ionomer. This in-vitro study was performed on 60 human maxillary and mandibular premolars which were extracted for orthodontic reasons. A standard wedge shaped defect was prepared on the buccal surfaces of teeth with the gingival margin placed near Cemento Enamel Junction (CEJ). Teeth were divided into three groups of 20 each and restored with RMGIC, Giomer and Nano-Ionomer and were subjected to thermocycling. Teeth were then immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B dye for 48 hours. They were sectioned longitudinally from the middle of cavity into mesial and distal parts. The sections were observed under Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) to evaluate microleakage. Depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. The data was analysed using the Kruskal Wallis test. Pair wise comparison was done with Mann Whitney U Test. A p-valueNano-Ionomer showed less microleakage which was statistically significant when compared to Giomer (p=0.0050). Statistically no significant difference was found between Nano Ionomer and RMGIC (p=0.3550). There was statistically significant difference between RMGIC and Giomer (p=0.0450). Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC showed significantly less leakage and better adaptation than Giomer and there was no statistically significant difference between Nano-Ionomer and RMGIC.

  16. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  17. An Alternative Technique for Cementation of Cast Post and Core Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Satish Gaikwad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementation of cast post and core restoration involves the application of luting cement in the prepared post space which is intra radicular. Commonly an endodontic instrument, lentulo spiral, and rotary hand piece at slow speed is used. Occasionally, the luting cement does not reach the base or is not uniformly spread on to the walls of the prepared post space. The inefficiency of the luting cement to cover all the surfaces of the prepared post space results in a compromised post and core treatment. An alternate procedure using a disposable syringe and needle has been described to achieve better results.

  18. A multi-technique investigation of the nanoporosity of cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, Hamlin M.; Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Gevrenov, Julia S.; Constantinides, Georgios; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2007-01-01

    The nanometer-scale structure of cement paste, which is dominated by the colloidal-scale porosity within the C-S-H gel phase, has a controlling effect on concrete properties but is difficult to study due to its delicate structure and lack of long-range order. Here we present results from three experimental techniques that are particularly suited to analyzing disordered nanoporous materials: small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), weight and length changes during equilibrium drying, and nanoindentation. Particular attention is paid to differences between pastes of different ages and cured at different temperatures. The SANS and equilibrium drying results indicate that hydration of cement paste at 20 deg. C forms a low-density (LD) C-S-H gel structure with a range of gel pore sizes and a relatively low packing fraction of solid particles. This fine structure may persist indefinitely under saturated conditions. However, if the paste is dried or is cured at elevated temperatures (60 deg. C or greater) the structure collapses toward a denser (less porous) and more stable configuration with fewer large gel pores, resulting in a greater amount of capillary porosity. Nanoindentation measurements of pastes cured at different temperatures demonstrate in all cases the existence of two C-S-H structures with different characteristic values of the indentation modulus. The average value of the modulus of the LD C-S-H is the same for all pastes tested to date, and a micromechanical analysis indicates that this value corresponds to the denser and more stable configuration of LD C-S-H. The experimental results presented here are interpreted in terms of a previously proposed quantitative 'colloid' model of C-S-H gel, resulting in an improved understanding of the microstructural changes associated with drying and heat curing

  19. Characterisation and discrimination of various types of lac resin using gas chromatography mass spectrometry techniques with quaternary ammonium reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, K; del Río, J C

    2014-04-18

    A variety of lac resin samples obtained from artists' suppliers, industrial manufacturers, and museum collections were analysed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and reactive pyrolysis GCMS with quaternary ammonium reagents. These techniques allowed a detailed chemical characterisation of microgram-sized samples, based on the detection and identification of derivatives of the hydroxy aliphatic and cyclic (sesquiterpene) acids that compose the resin. Differences in composition could be related to the nature of the resin, e.g. wax-containing (unrefined), bleached, or aged samples. Furthermore, differences in the relative abundances of aliphatic hydroxyacids appear to be associated with the biological source of the resin. The diagnostic value of newly characterised lac components, including 8-hydroxyacids, is discussed here for the first time. Identification of derivatised components was aided by AMDIS deconvolution software, and discrimination of samples was enhanced by statistical evaluation of data using principal component analysis. The robustness of the analyses, together with the minimal sample size required, make these very powerful approaches for the characterisation of lac resin in museum objects. The value of such analyses for enhancing the understanding of museum collections is illustrated by two case studies of objects in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art: a restorer's varnish on a painting by Luca Signorelli, and a pictorial inlay in an early nineteenth-century High Chest by George Dyer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A pin-assisted retention technique for resin-bonded restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miara, P; Touati, B

    1992-09-01

    The value of pins for auxiliary retention has been demonstrated many times. The use of pins with resin-bonded restorations allows for improved aesthetics and less tooth reduction while increasing resistance to dislodging forces. Clinical and technical procedures for resin-bonded bridges with pin-assisted retention are presented.

  1. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. Objective. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and In Ceram all-ceramic crowns fixed on extracted human teeth. Methods. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. Results. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p=0.001. No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X=1.73, followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45 and polycarboxylate cement (X=3.20. The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X=3.33. Conclusion. The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0

  2. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  3. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.D.; Kim, J.S.; Han, S.H.; Ha, Y.K.; Song, K.S.; Jee, K.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of 129 I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The 129 I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67±3% and 5.43±0.53 g, 70±7% and 10.40±1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 129 I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, 129 I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher 129 I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  4. Stabilization techniques for reactive aggregate in soil-cement base course : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research are 1) to identify the mineralogical properties of soil-cement bases which have heaved or can potentially heave, 2) to simulate expansion of cement-stabilized soil in the laboratory, 3) to correlate expansion with the ...

  5. A computerized pre-clinical test for cemented hip prostheses based on finite element techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Despite the success of cemented total hip replacement (THR), high failure rates are occasionally reported for cemented hip implants that are introduced on the orthopaedic market. Rigorous pre-clinical testing of hip implants could prevent these disasters, by detecting unsafe implant designs at a

  6. Critical aspects of nano-indentation technique in application to hardened cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, D.; Jirasek, M.; Kopecky, L.

    2011-01-01

    Several open questions related to the experimental protocol and processing of data acquired by the nano-indentation (NI) technique are investigated. The volume fractions of mechanically different phases obtained from statistical NI (SNI) analysis are shown to be different from those obtained by back-scattered electron (BSE) image analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method on the same paste. Judging from transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, the representative volume element of low-density calcium-silicate hydrates (C-S-H) can be considered to be around 500 nm, whereas for high-density C-S-H it is about 100 nm. This raises the question how the appropriate penetration depth for NI experiments should be selected. Changing the maximum load from 1 mN to 5 mN, the effect of penetration depth on the experimental results is studied. As an alternative to the SNI method, a 'manual' indentation method is proposed, which combines information from BSE and atomic-force microscopy (AFM), coupled to the NI machine. The AFM allows to precisely indent a high-density C-S-H rim around unhydrated clinkers in cement paste. Yet the results from that technique still show a big scatter.

  7. Performance evaluation of anion exchange resins Purolite NRW-5050 and Duolite A-611 by application of radioisotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singare, P.U.

    2014-01-01

    Radioanalytical techniques using 131 I and 82 Br as tracer isotopes were applied to study the kinetics of iodide and bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions taking place between the external labeled ionic solution and the resin surface. The results indicate low values of specific reaction rate (min -1 ), amount of ion exchanged (mmol) and initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min) for bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction as compared to that obtained for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction performed at 35.0 C, 1 000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution, the values of specific reaction rate (min -1 ), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log K d were 0.340, 0.394, 0.134 and 20.2 respectively for Purolite NRW-5050 resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.216, 0.290, 0.063 and 18.2 as that obtained by using Duolite A-611. The results of present investigation indicate that during the two ion-isotopic exchange reactions, for both the resins, there exists a strong positive linear correlation between amount of ions exchanged and concentration of ionic solution; and strong negative correlation between amount of ions exchanged and temperature of exchanging medium. From the results it appears that as compared to Duolite A-611 resins, Purolite NRW-5050 resins shows superior performance under identical experimental conditions.

  8. A summary of methods for conditioning and immobilizing ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranzini, R.A.; Buckley, L.P.

    1983-02-01

    Ion-exchange resins are used in CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations to purify heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) and moderator systems. Two promising techniques for conditioning spent ion-exchange resins for disposal have been evaluated: direct immobilization and incineration combined with immobilization of the ash and scrubbed off-gases. When ion-exchange resins were immobilized directly, volumes of bitumen products were about 0.75 times the volumes of untreated resin, while the volumes of cement and polyester products were 2 to 3 times larger. While incinerating the resin is an extra processing step, much smaller volumes result from the latter option. Bitumen and glass product volumes were six and ten times smaller, respectively, than the volumes of untreated resin, while cement and polyester product volumes were about one-half the volume of untreated resin. Since the releases of Cs-136 by leaching were lowest for products made by immobilization in glass, PHT resins which have high concentrations of Cs-137 should be vitrified. Moderator resins which have high concentrations of C-14 should be incinerated and the ash and C-14-contaminated scrubbing solutions should be immobilized. By pretreating such resins with calcium chloride or carbon dioxide, the C-14 present on resin could be released at temperatures below the ignition temperature of the resin. The pretreatment technique reduces the amount of inactive carbon dioxide that must be scrubbed to trap the C-14. The releases of C-14 from immobilized barium hydroxide scrubbing solution were the same as releases from immobilized resin

  9. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  10. Two imaging techniques for 3D quantification of pre-cementation space for CAD/CAM crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungruanganunt, Patchanee; Kelly, J Robert; Adams, Douglas J

    2010-12-01

    Internal three-dimensional (3D) "fit" of prostheses to prepared teeth is likely more important clinically than "fit" judged only at the level of the margin (i.e. marginal "opening"). This work evaluates two techniques for quantitatively defining 3D "fit", both using pre-cementation space impressions: X-ray microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and quantitative optical analysis. Both techniques are of interest for comparison of CAD/CAM system capabilities and for documenting "fit" as part of clinical studies. Pre-cementation space impressions were taken of a single zirconia coping on its die using a low viscosity poly(vinyl siloxane) impression material. Calibration specimens of this material were fabricated between the measuring platens of a micrometre. Both calibration curves and pre-cementation space impression data sets were obtained by examination using micro-CT and quantitative optical analysis. Regression analysis was used to compare calibration curves with calibration sets. Micro-CT calibration data showed tighter 95% confidence intervals and was able to measure over a wider thickness range than for the optical technique. Regions of interest (e.g., lingual, cervical) were more easily analysed with optical image analysis and this technique was more suitable for extremely thin impression walls (impressions. Each has advantages and limitations but either technique has the potential for use as part of clinical studies or CAD/CAM protocol optimization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  12. Cemented total knee replacement in 24 dogs: surgical technique, clinical results, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew J; Leone, Kendall A; Lamonte, Kimberly; Townsend, Katy L; Mann, Kenneth A

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the performance of cemented total knee replacement (TKR) in dogs. Preclinical research study. Skeletally mature, male Hounds (25-30 kg; n=24) with no preexisting joint pathology. Dogs had unilateral cemented TKR and were evaluated at 6, 12, 26, or 52 weeks (6 dogs/time point) by radiography, bone density analysis, visual gait assessment, and direct measurement of thigh circumference and stifle joint range of motion as indicators of functional recovery. At study end, the stability of the cemented tibial component was determined by destructive mechanical testing. Joint stability was excellent in 16 dogs (67%) and good in 8 dogs. None of the tibial components had evidence of migration or periprosthetic osteolysis whereas 1 femoral component was loose at 52 weeks. There was an early and significant decrease in tibial bone density, likely because of disuse of the operated limb. Dogs returned to full activity by 12 weeks. The tibial cement-bone interface maintained its strength over 52 weeks. Cement provides stable fixation of the tibial component in canine TKR. Cemented TKR yields adequate clinical function and stifle joint excursion in the dog. Clinical studies are needed to determine the long-term fate of cemented TKR implants, to assess the influence of implant design on implant fixation and wear, and to obtain objective functional data.

  13. Separation of actinium-227 from its daughter products by cationic resins technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.J.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method for separating actinium-227 from its daughter products based on ion exchange principle is shown. Radionuclides mixture in perchloric acid 8,5 N and chloridric acid 0,5 N medium pass by a cationic resin column. Thorium-227 and actinium-227, which are retained by the resin, are eluted with nitric acid 6 N which releases actinium-227 while oxalic acid 7% is used for thorium-227 elution [pt

  14. Retention of oral microorganisms on conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements Retenção de microrganismos bucais em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise PEDRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries are a worldwide public and socioeconomic problem. The placement of restorations can lead to the development of environmental conditions favorable to microbial colonization, especially on the tooth/restoration interface, which is a predisposing factor for secondary caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial retention on conventional (Chelon-Fil and Vidrion R and resin-modified (Vitremer and Fuji II LC glass-ionomer cements, in situ, using a hybrid composite resin (Z100 as a control. Twelve volunteers wore Hawley appliances with specimens made of all tested filling materials for 7 days. The specimens were then removed from the appliances and transferred to tubes containing 2.0 ml of Ringer-PRAS. Microorganisms from the samples were inoculated onto blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and incubated under anaerobiosis (90% N2, 10% CO2, at 37°C, for 10 and 2 days, respectively. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and the composite resin retained the same levels of microorganisms on their surfaces. The resin-modified glass-ionomers retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin and conventional glass-ionomer cements. The conventional glass-ionomer cements retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin, but that difference was not statistically significant.A cárie secundária representa problema de saúde pública e socioeconômico no mundo. A restauração de dentes acometidos por cárie pode criar condições favoráveis à proliferação microbiana na superfície do material restaurador ou na interface dente/restauração, criando ambiente propício para o estabelecimento de cárie secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de retenção de placa bacteriana em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais (Chelon-Fil e Vidrion R e modificados por resina (Vitremer e Fuji II LC e de resina composta híbrida (Z100, utilizada como controle. Nos testes de reten

  15. The effect of dentine pre-treatment using bioglass and/or polyacrylic acid on the interfacial characteristics of resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy; Moscardó, Agustin Pascual; Luzi, Arlinda; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Banerjee, Avijit

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of load-cycle aging and/or 6 months artificial saliva (AS) storage on bond durability and interfacial ultramorphology of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) applied onto dentine air-abraded using Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) with/without polyacrylic acid (PAA) conditioning. RMGIC (Ionolux, VOCO) was applied onto human dentine specimens prepared with silicon-carbide abrasive paper or air-abraded with BAG with or without the use of PAA conditioning. Half of bonded-teeth were submitted to load cycling (150,000 cycles) and half immersed in deionised water for 24 h. They were cut into matchsticks and submitted immediately to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing or 6 months in AS immersion and subsequently μTBS tested. Results were analysed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Fractographic analysis was performed using FE-SEM, while further RMGIC-bonded specimens were surveyed for interfacial ultramorphology characterisation (dye-assisted nanoleakage) using confocal microscopy. RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG regardless PAA showed no significant μTBS reduction after 6 months of AS storage and/or load cycling (p > 0.05). RMGIC-dentine interface showed no sign of degradation/nanoleakage after both aging regimens. Conversely, interfaces created in PAA-conditioned SiC-abraded specimens showed significant reduction in μTBS (p air-abrasion might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding performance and durability of RMGIC applied to dentine. The use of PAA conditioner in smear layer-covered dentine may increase the risk of degradation at the bonding interface. A combined dentine pre-treatment using bioglass followed by PAA may increase the bond strength and maintain it stable over time. Conversely, the use of PAA conditioning alone may offer no significant contribute to the immediate and prolonged bonding performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of microleakage in Class II cavities restored with silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins using different restorative techniques over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Kazem; Mousavinasab, Seyed-Mostafa; Samani, Mahsa Sahraneshin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing tendency toward tooth-colored restorations in dentistry, polymerization shrinkage and subsequent marginal microleakage remains a problem. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage between silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins at different time intervals and with different restorative techniques. In this in vitro study, 108 sound extracted human molar teeth were used. Mesial and distal proximal class II boxes with dimensions of 1.5 mm depth and 4 mm width were prepared. The gingival margins of all cavities were 1 mm below the cement enamel junction. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups based on test materials. In the first group, the teeth were restored by a nanocomposite (Filtek Z350XT, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan), in the second group, the teeth were restored with a silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3MESPE) and Filtek P90 Adhesive (3M ESPE, USA) and in the third group, the teeth were restored with a microhybrid posterior composite resin (Filtek P60, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan). Half of the proximal cavities in each of these three groups were restored in two horizontal layers and the other half in four horizontal layers. After a period of aging (24-h, 3-month and 6-month) in water and then application of 500 thermal cycles, the teeth were immersed for 24-h in 0.5% fuchsin and evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×36 magnification to evaluate leakage in gingival margin. Data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. In Z350XT statistically significant differences were observed in microleakage in comparison of 24-h and 6-month intervals (P = 0.01) that was higher in 6-month. Comparison of microleakage in P90 and P60 composite resins was also statistically significant and was less in P90. Microleakage was not significantly different between P90 and Z350XT at 24-h. However, this difference was

  17. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  18. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  19. Validation of a measuring technique with computed tomography for cement penetration into trabecular bone underneath the tibial tray in total knee arthroplasty on a cadaver model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, Hennie; Ridder, Laurens C van de; Verhoeven, Vincent WJ; Pilot, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), cement penetration between 3 and 5 mm beneath the tibial tray is required to prevent loosening of the tibia component. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a reliable in vivo measuring technique using CT imaging to assess cement distribution and penetration depth in the total area underneath a tibia prosthesis. We defined the radiodensity ranges for trabecular tibia bone, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement and cement-penetrated trabecular bone and measured the percentages of cement penetration at various depths after cementing two tibia prostheses onto redundant femoral heads. One prosthesis was subsequently removed to examine the influence of the metal tibia prostheses on the quality of the CT images. The percentages of cement penetration in the CT slices were compared with percentages measured with photographs of the corresponding transversal slices. Trabecular bone and cement-penetrated trabecular bone had no overlap in quantitative scale of radio-density. There was no significant difference in mean HU values when measuring with or without the tibia prosthesis. The percentages of measured cement-penetrated trabecular bone in the CT slices of the specimen were within the range of percentages that could be expected based on the measurements with the photographs (p = 0.04). CT scan images provide valid results in measuring the penetration and distribution of cement into trabecular bone underneath the tibia component of a TKA. Since the proposed method does not turn metal elements into artefacts, it enables clinicians to assess the width and density of the cement mantle in vivo and to compare the results of different cementing methods in TKA

  20. Deformation of a dental ceramic following adhesive cementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced changes imparted in a \\'dentin-bonded-crown\\' material during sintering, annealing, pre-cementation surface modification, and resin coating have been visualized by profilometry. The hypothesis tested was that operative techniques modify the stressing pattern throughout the material thickness. We polished the upper surfaces of 10 ceramic discs to remove surface imperfections before using a contact profilometer (40-nm resolution) to measure the \\'flatness\\'. Discs were re-profiled after annealing and after alumina particle air-abrasion and resin-coating of the \\'fit\\' surface. Polished surfaces were convex, with a mean deflection of 8.4 + or - 1.5 microm. Mean deflection was significantly reduced (P = 0.029) following alumina particle air-abrasion and increased (P < 0.001) on resin-coating. Polishing induced a tensile stress state, resulting in surface convexity. Alumina particle air-abrasion reduced the relative tensile stress state of the contralateral polished surface. Resin-polymerization generated compression within the resin-ceramic \\'hybrid layer\\' and tension in the polished surface and is likely to contribute to the strengthening of ceramics by resin-based cements.

  1. Influence of Finishing and Polishing Techniques and Abrasion on Transmittance and Roughness of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pma; Ramos, T M; de Azevedo, C S; de Lima, E; de Souza, Shj; Turbino, M L; Cesar, P F; Matos, A B

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of finishing and polishing systems and toothbrush abrasion on transmittance (T) and surface roughness (Ra) of three composite resins (Filtek Z350 XT, Tetric N-Ceram, and IPS Empress Direct). Eighteen resin disks (10 mm diameter × 2 mm thick) finished by polyester strips had initial surface smoothness recorded, representing phase 1 (P1). Specimens were divided into three groups (n=6) according to the finishing/polishing instrument used (OneGloss, TopGloss, and Sof-Lex) to compose phase 2 samples (P2). Then specimens were subjected to 514 cycles of toothbrush simulation using a toothpaste slurry, with a constant load applied to soft bristles, and were then washed (phase 3=P3). After each phase, the specimens were examined by an optical profiler and spectrophotometer to measure Ra and T. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, Tukey and Pearson tests. T values were statistically influenced by composite resin ( p=0.000) and phase of measurement ( p=0.000) factors, while the finishing/polishing system used ( p=0.741) did not affect T. On the other hand, Ra values were statistically affected by the factor finishing/polishing system ( p=0.000), but not by composite resin ( p=0.100) and phase of measurement ( p=0.451). Tetric N-Ceram and Empress Direct presented higher values of roughness when polished by OneGloss, while TopGloss and Sof-Lex showed a lower roughness. It can be concluded that composite resins transmitted more light after dental abrasion. Transmittance of composite resins was not modified by the distinct roughness created by finishing/polishing instruments.

  2. The Effect of a Glass Ceramic Insert in Sandwich Technique on Microleakage in Class II Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of glass ceramic insert in the sandwich technique to reduce microleakage in class II composite resin restorations. Methods: Sixty sound human upper second premolars were selected and randomly divided into six groups (n=10. Class II box-only cavities were prepared in distal aspects of each tooth with gingival margin located approximately 0.5 mm below the CEJ. Group A (Control was restored incrementally with Tetric Ceram and a total-etch bonding technique. Group B and C were restored with sandwich technique using a compomer (Compoglass F or flowable composite resin (Tetric Flow as the lining material at gingival floor, respectively. Group D, E and F were represented in the same way as group A, B and C and a glass ceramic insert was added to the composite bulk. The specimens were thermo-mechanically cycled, and then immersed in 0.5 % basic fuschin for 24 hours. Dye penetration was detected using a sectioning technique. Results: No significant difference was found between total-etch bonding and sandwich techniques. The placement of an insert caused an increase in   microleakage in all groups significantly (P < 0.05. Group D (no liner/ with glass insert showed the highest amount of microleakage and Group A (no liner/ without glass insert resulted in the lowest amount of total microleakage. Conclusion: Placement of glass ceramic insert could not decrease gingival leakage. According to the limitation of this study a composite resin restorations with incremental technique is recommended

  3. The effect of polishing technique on 3-D surface roughness and gloss of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, N S; Oweis, Y G; Eliades, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness and gloss of resin composites polished using different polishing systems. Five resin composites were investigated: Filtek Silorane (FS), IPS Empress Direct (IP), Clearfil Majesty Posterior (CM), Premise (PM), and Estelite Sigma (ES). Twenty-five disk specimens were prepared from each material, divided into five groups, each polished with one of the following methods: Opti1Step (OS), OptiDisc (OD), Kenda CGI (KD), Pogo (PG), or metallurgical polishing (ML). Gloss and roughness parameters (Sa, Sz, Sq, and St) were evaluated by 60°-angle glossimetry and white-light interferometric profilometry. Two-way analysis of variance was used to detect differences in different materials and polishing techniques. Regression and correlation analyses were performed to examine correlations between roughness and gloss. Significant differences in roughness parameters and gloss were found according to the material, type of polishing, and material/polishing technique (pgloss was recorded for PM/ML (88.4 [2.3]) and lowest for FS/KD (30.3 [5.7]). All roughness parameters were significantly correlated with gloss (r= 0.871, 0.846, 0.713, and 0.707 for Sa, Sq, Sz, St, and gloss, respectively). It was concluded that the polishing procedure and the type of composite can have significant impacts on surface roughness and gloss of resin composites.

  4. Study of radon diffusion from RHA-modified ordinary Portland cement using SSNTD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, A.K.; Goyal, S.K.; Chauhan, R.P.; Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of radon is a very important factor in estimating the rate of indoor radon inflow. The aim of this work is to develop and assess the potential of radon resistant construction materials in residential buildings. Of late, rice husk ash (RHA) has been used as a component in cement. The X-ray diffraction of RHA indicates that the RHA contains mainly amorphous materials while the X-ray fluorescence analysis shows that the major percentage of it is composed of silica. The amorphous silica present in the RHA is responsible for the pozzolonic activity of the ash. The results of the present study indicate that the RHA when mixed with cement initially reduces radon diffusion coefficient, followed by enhancement when the percentage of RHA is increased above 30% by weight. - Highlights: ► Radon diffusion coefficient has been measured in Portland cement with different percentage of rice husk ash (RHA). ► The mixing of RHA to cement changes the radon diffusion coefficient. ► The mixture of cement and RHA can be used to make building materials more resistant to radon entry through diffusion

  5. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-11-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  6. Microencapsulation of rifampicin: A technique to preserve the mechanical properties of bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Ruiz, Pablo; Carbó-Laso, Esther; Del Real-Romero, Juan Carlos; Arán-Ais, Francisca; Ballesteros-Iglesias, Yolanda; Paz-Jiménez, Eva; Sánchez-Navarro, Magdalena; Pérez-Limiñana, María Ángeles; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Two-stage exchange with antibiotic-loaded bone cement spacers remains the gold standard for chronic periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Rifampicin is highly efficient on stationary-phase staphylococci in biofilm; however, its addition to PMMA to manufacture spacers prevents polymerization and reduces mechanical properties. Isolation of rifampicin during polymerization by microencapsulation could allow manufacturing rifampicin-loaded bone cement maintaining elution and mechanical properties. Microcapsules of rifampicin with alginate, polyhydroxybutyratehydroxyvalerate (PHBV), ethylcellulose and stearic acid (SA) were synthesized. Alginate and PHBV microcapsules were added to bone cement and elution, compression, bending, hardness, setting time and microbiological tests were performed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc test were performed, considering a p cement specimens containing alginate microcapsules eluted more rifampicin than PHBV microcapsules or non-encapsulated rifampicin over time (p Cement with alginate microcapsules showed similar behavior in hardness tests to control cement over the study period (73 ± 1.68H D ). PMMA with alginate microcapsules exhibited the largest zones of inhibition in microbiological tests. Statistically significant differences in mean diameters of zones of inhibition between PMMA loaded with alginate-rifampicin (p = 0.0001) and alginate-PHBV microcapsules (p = 0.0001) were detected. Rifampicin microencapsulation with alginate is the best choice to introduce rifampicin in PMMA preserving mechanical properties, setting time, elution, and antimicrobial properties. The main applicability of this study is the opportunity for obtaining rifampicin-loaded PMMA by microencapsulation of rifampicin in alginate microparticles, achieving high doses of rifampicin in infected tissues, increasing the successful of PJI treatment. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res

  7. The differential dieaway technique applied to the measurement of the fissile content of drums of cement encapsulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinhoe, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes calculations of the differential dieaway technique as applied to cement encapsulated waste. The main difference from previous applications of the technique are that only one detector position is used (diametrically opposite the neutron source) and the chamber walls are made of concrete. The results show that by rotating the drum the response to fissile material across the central plane of the drum can be made relatively uniform. The absolute size of the response is about 0.4. counts per minute per gram fissile for a neutron source of 10 8 neutrons per second. Problems of neutron and gamma background and water content are considered. (author)

  8. Development of an immobilisation technique by cementation for non-radioactive simulated liquid waste, from Mo-99 production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arva, E A; Marabini, S G; Varani, J L

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is the responsible for developing a management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the strictly environmental safe and efficient management of the radioactive waste from different sources. Since 1985, CNEA has been producing commercially Mo-99 for medical use. In this process two types of liquid waste are produced. One of them has high alkaline (NaOH 3,5M) and aluminate contents. Since Mo-99 production started, such liquid waste was stored in specially designed containers during production, and after a decay period in smaller containers in interim storage conditions. As this waste is still a liquid, development of an immobilisation technique is required. Immobilisation of radioactive liquid waste by cementation is a frequently used technique, and will be studied in the present work using Mo-99 non-radioactive simulated liquid waste. In this second stage, a full scale (200 liters drum) cementation test using simulated non radioactive waste was carried out. Such test included: using the BEBA 201 mixing machine - the same that will be used with real waste in the future for 'tuning up' the process, construction of a specially designed temperature sensor for measuring the maximum temperature value (five different positions, four inside the drum and one outside) and the time elapsed after all components mixing. Finally, standard specimens (IRAM 1622) were made for mechanical resistance tests after cement setting at 28 days. The results show values of temperature not above 40 o C with the maximum at 12 hours before component mixing and compression strength of 14 MPa. Such values are compatible for a waste immobilisation process by cementation (author)

  9. Microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of zirconia bonded to dentin using two self-adhesive resin cements; effect of airborne abrasion and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Gamal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Airborne abrasion-surface treatment of zirconia significantly enhanced the μTBS of both cements adhered to dentin while aging had an adverse effect. MS showed higher insignificant μTBS.

  10. NON DESTRUCTIVE APPLICATION OF RADIOACTIVE TRACER TECHNIQUE FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL GRADE ANION EXCHANGE RESINS INDION GS-300 AND INDION-860

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. SINGARE

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the application of radio isotopic non-destructive technique in the characterization of two industrial grade anion exchange resins Indion GS-300 and Indion-860. For the characterization of the two resins, 131I and 82Br were used as tracer isotopes to trace the kinetics of iodide and bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions. It was observed that the values of specific reaction rate (min−1, amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were calculated as 0.328, 0.577, 0.189 and 19.7 respectively for Indion GS-300 resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.180, 0.386, 0.070 and 17.0 calculated for Indion-860 resins when measured under identical experimental conditions. Also at a constant temperature of 40.0 °C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases 0.001 M to 0.004 M, the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 75.16 % to 78.36 % for Indion GS-300 resins, which was higher than the increases from 49.65 % to 52.36 % compared to that obtained for Indion-860 resins. The overall results indicate that under identical experimental conditions, Indion GS-300 resins show superior performance over Indion-860 resins.

  11. Non Destructive Application of Radioactive Tracer Technique for Characterization of Industrial Grade Anion Exchange Resins Indio GS-300 and Indion-860

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singare, P. U.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of radio isotopic non-destructive technique in the characterization of two industrial grade anion exchange resins Indion GS-300 and Indion-860. For the characterization of the two resins, 131 I and 82 Br were used as tracer isotopes to trace the kinetics of iodide and bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions. It was observed that the values of specific reaction rate (min -1 ), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log K d were calculated as 0.328, 0.577, 0.189 and 19.7 respectively for Indion GS-300 resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.180, 0.386, 0.070 and 17.0 calculated for Indion-860 resins when measured under identical experimental conditions. Also at a constant temperature of 40.0 .deg. C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases 0.001 M to 0.004 M, the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 75.16 % to 78.36 % for Indion GS-300 resins, which was higher than the increases from 49.65 % to 52.36 % compared to that obtained for Indion-860 resins. The overall results indicate that under identical experimental conditions, Indion GS-300 resins show superior performance over Indion-860 resins

  12. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques coupled with 4D X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, F.; Maeder, U.; Jenni, A.

    2012-01-01

    (Fig. 3). The resulting micrographs describe the density distribution in three dimensions and as a function of time. Densities are calibrated with reference samples mounted in an identical apparatus. After 1-2 years we will stop the experiment and subject the rock samples to post-mortem mineralogical and petrophysical analysis. Finally, it should be possible to describe and model cement/bentonite skin effects and possibly further develop this new method. In Figure 3, an example is given where a shear zone in granite was impregnated with cement slurry and stabilized with resin as a test on a medical scanner, with densities in the range anticipated for our work. In the current experiment a compacted and saturated MX-80 bentonite is used as starting material. A confining pressure of 40 bar is applied,. The infiltration fluid pressure is 20 bar, and outflow is into a syringe at ambient pressure. The infiltrating fluid represents an ordinary Portland cement pore-water after a hydration time of 623 days. The first data in Figure 2 show a compaction of the bentonite core after insertion into the infiltration apparatus. The decrease in hydraulic conductivity can be interpreted as an adjustment of compaction of the bentonite sample to the boundary conditions. (authors)

  13. [A study of different polishing techniques for amalgams and glass-cermet cement by scanning electron microscope (SEM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaboura, A; Vougiouklakis, G; Argiri, G

    1989-01-01

    Finishing and polishing an amalgam restoration, is considered as an important and necessary step of the restorative procedure. Various polishing techniques have been recommended to success a smooth amalgam surface. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three different polishing treatments on the marginal integrity and surface smoothness of restorations made of three commercially available amalgams and a glass-cermet cement. The materials used were the amalgams, Amalcap (Vivadent), Dispersalloy (Johnson and Johnson), Duralloy (Degussa) and the glass-cermet Katac-Silver (ESPE). The occlusal surfaces of the restorations were polished by the methods: I) round bur, No4-rubber cup-zinc oxide paste in a small brush, II) round bur No 4-bur-brown, green and super green (Shofu) polishing cups and points successively and III) amalgam polishing bur of 12-blades-smooth amalgam polishing bur. Photographs from unpolished and polished surfaces of the restorations, were taken with scanning electron microscope, to evaluate the polishing techniques. An improvement of marginal integrity and surface smoothness of all amalgam restorations was observed after the specimens had been polished with the three techniques. Method II, included Shofu polishers, proved the best results in comparison to the methods I and III. Polishing of glass-cermet cement was impossible with the examined techniques.

  14. Modified technique for preparation of venous circulation resin casts in the cirrhotic liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ OLÍMPIO MAIA DE VASCONCELOS FILHO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study describes two major adaptations for the preparation of resin casts in human cirrhotic liver, harvested at the time of transplantation. The first is the way of fixing the catheter in the ostia of the hepatic and portal veins through a cerclage, so as to prevent displacement of the catheter and / or leakage of the resin during its injection. The second is the extension of corrosion time in the NaOH solution, averaging 6.8 days, with daily replacement the solution until complete removal of parenchymal tissue. We applied the method in 14 cirrhotic livers, with good filling and coloring of the portal and hepatic vein territories, using different colors. This allows an anatomical study of these vessels, able to complement the knowledge of the histopathology in research work, and the planning of therapeutic procedures, such as the Trans-Jugular Intrahepatic Port-Systemic Shunt (TIPS.

  15. An investigation on the effects of different polymerization techniques on dimensional changes ofAcropars, an Iranian autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadian B

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Iranian product, Acropars autopolymerizing acrylic resin is nowadays widely used in"ndental prostheses. Dimensional change is a common problem among Iranian made acrylic resins in making"ncustom trays and record bases, seems to be more than the similar foreign products. In order to achieve a"ntechnique for making a record base with minimum dimensional changes, more research is necessary."nPurpose: The aim of the present study was to determine a curing technique for Iranian autopolymerizing"nacrylic resins leading to the least polymerization shrinkage and the most adaptation between record bases and"nstone casts."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 stone casts were divided into four 10- member group."nFor each group, polymerization shrinkage was determined at three points with one of the following"ntechniques: Bench curing, Curing under a coat of petroleum jelly , Curing in a monomer saturated"natmosphere, Curing in boiled water. Adaptation between bases and stone casts were measured at three points"n(the right and left crests of the ridge and the midpalatal region with a light-measuring microscope. To analyze"nthe data, Variance analysis was used."nResults: The monomer atmosphere technique showed the minimum dimensional changes and the samples in"nboiled water group had the maximum dimensional changes. No statistical differences were observed between"nother groups."nConclusion: More adaptation between record bases and stone casts was observed in monomer atmosphere"npolymerization technique. The differences between bench curing and curing under a coat of petroleum jelly"ntechniques with this method were not statistically significant. Therefore, it is suggested for making base"nrecords with maximum adaptation.

  16. The influence of "C-factor" and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi Ishikiriama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the influence of the cavity configuration factor ("C-Factor" and light activation technique on polymerization contraction forces of a Bis-GMA-based composite resin (Charisma, Heraeus Kulzer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three different pairs of steel moving bases were connected to a universal testing machine (emic DL 500: groups A and B - 2x2 mm (CF=0.33, groups C and D - 3x2 mm (CF=0.66, groups e and F - 6x2 mm (CF=1.5. After adjustment of the height between the pair of bases so that the resin had a volume of 12 mm³ in all groups, the material was inserted and polymerized by two different methods: pulse delay (100 mW/cm² for 5 s, 40 s interval, 600 mW/cm² for 20 s and continuous pulse (600 mW/cm² for 20 s. Each configuration was light cured with both techniques. Tensions generated during polymerization were recorded by 120 s. The values were expressed in curves (Force(N x Time(s and averages compared by statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey's test, p<0.05. RESULTS: For the 2x2 and 3x2 bases, with a reduced C-Factor, significant differences were found between the light curing methods. For 6x2 base, with high C-Factor, the light curing method did not influence the contraction forces of the composite resin. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse delay technique can determine less stress on tooth/restoration interface of adhesive restorations only when a reduced C-Factor is present.

  17. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 1. Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinzadeh, A T; Jongsma, L; de Groot-Kuin, D; Cristescu, R; Neirynck, N; Camilleri, J

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements (HCSCs) constitute a group of materials that have become increasingly popular in endodontics since the introduction of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) in the 1990s. MTA is Portland cement to which bismuth oxide has been added to increase its radiopacity. The most important property of MTA is its capacity to set in water or a humid environment. However, MTA also has important limitations, for example, it's difficult to work with and can discolour teeth. Recently, numerous products based on HCSC chemistry, which can be considered as modifications of MTA intended to reduce its limitations, have become available on the market. Despite their potential advantages, all of these materials have their own specific limitations that are currently insufficiently known and investigated.

  18. Application of neutron activation techniques and x-ray energy dispersion spectrometry, in analysis of metallic traces adsorbed by chelex-100 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Jair C.; Amaral, Angela M.; Magalhaes, Jesus C.; Pereira, Jose S.J.; Silva, Juliana B. da; Auler, Lucia M.L.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the authors have investigated optimal conditions of adsorption for several ion metallic groups (cations of heavy metals and transition metals, oxyanions metallics and metalloids and cations of rare earths), as traces (ppb), withdrawn and in mixture of groups, by chelex-100 resin. The experiments have been developed by bath techniques in ammonium acetate tamponade solution 40 mM pH 5,52 content 0,5 g of chelex-100 resin. After magnetic agitation for two hours, resins were dried and submitted to X-ray energy dispersion spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. The results have demonstrated that chelex-100 resin adsorb quantitatively transition element groups and rare earth groups in two cases (withdrawn and simultaneously adsorption)

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  20. Prefabricated Vertical Drain (PVD) and Deep Cement Mixing (DCM)/Stiffened DCM (SDCM) techniques for soft ground improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergado, D. T.; Long, P. V.; Chaiyaput, S.; Balasubramaniam, A. S.

    2018-04-01

    Soft ground improvement techniques have become most practical and popular methods to increase soil strength, soil stiffness and reduce soil compressibility including the soft Bangkok clay. This paper focuses on comparative performances of prefabricated vertical drain (PVD) using surcharge, vacuum and heat preloading as well as the cement-admixed clay of Deep Cement Mixing (DCM) and Stiffened DCM (SDCM) methods. The Vacuum-PVD can increase the horizontal coefficient of consolidation, Ch, resulting in faster rate of settlement at the same magnitudes of settlement compared to Conventional PVD. Several field methods of applying vacuum preloading are also compared. Moreover, the Thermal PVD and Thermal Vacuum PVD can increase further the coefficient of horizontal consolidation, Ch, with the associated reduction of kh/ks values by reducing the drainage retardation effects in the smear zone around the PVD which resulted in faster rates of consolidation and higher magnitudes of settlements. Furthermore, the equivalent smear effect due to non-uniform consolidation is also discussed in addition to the smear due to the mechanical installation of PVDs. In addition, a new kind of reinforced deep mixing method, namely Stiffened Deep Cement Mixing (SDCM) pile is introduced to improve the flexural resistance, improve the field quality control, and prevent unexpected failures of the Deep Cement Mixing (DCM) pile. The SDCM pile consists of DCM pile reinforced with the insertion of precast reinforced concrete (RC) core. The full scale test embankment on soft clay improved by SDCM and DCM piles was also analysed. Numerical simulations using the 3D PLAXIS Foundation finite element software have been done to understand the behavior of SDCM and DCM piles. The simulation results indicated that the surface settlements decreased with increasing lengths of the RC cores, and, at lesser extent, increasing sectional areas of the RC cores in the SDCM piles. In addition, the lateral movements

  1. The Effect of Simplified Bonding Agents on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Self-Activated Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    steps that included an acidic conditioner, primer, and adhesive monomer. Examples include Optibond FL (Kerr) and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose ( 3M ESPE...Bond NT (Dentsply) and Adper Prompt L-Pop ( 3M /ESPE); and two non-simplified adhesives , Optibond FL (Kerr) and Clearfil SE (Kuraray). The four...presentation at the 2013 IADR by Bisco Inc. compared their simplified adhesive and self-cure resin combination All-Bond Universal and Duolink with

  2. Modified technique for preparation of venous circulation resin casts in the cirrhotic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, José Olímpio Maia DE; Batista, Laécio Leitão; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Lacerda, Cláudio Moura

    2016-01-01

    This study describes two major adaptations for the preparation of resin casts in human cirrhotic liver, harvested at the time of transplantation. The first is the way of fixing the catheter in the ostia of the hepatic and portal veins through a cerclage, so as to prevent displacement of the catheter and / or leakage of the resin during its injection. The second is the extension of corrosion time in the NaOH solution, averaging 6.8 days, with daily replacement the solution until complete removal of parenchymal tissue. We applied the method in 14 cirrhotic livers, with good filling and coloring of the portal and hepatic vein territories, using different colors. This allows an anatomical study of these vessels, able to complement the knowledge of the histopathology in research work, and the planning of therapeutic procedures, such as the Trans-Jugular Intrahepatic Port-Systemic Shunt (TIPS). RESUMO Este estudo descreve duas importantes adaptações para o preparo de moldes de resina em fígado humano cirrótico, captado no momento do transplante: a primeira, é a maneira de fixação dos cateteres nos "óstios" das veias hepáticas e porta, através de uma "cerclagem" dos mesmos, de modo a evitar o deslocamento do cateter e/ou extravasamento da resina durante sua injeção, e a segunda, é o prolongamento do tempo de corrosão na solução de NaOH, atingindo a média de 6,8 dias, com a substituição diária da solução, até a remoção completa do tecido parenquimatoso. O método foi empregado em 14 fígados cirróticos com bom preenchimento e coloração dos territórios das veias porta e hepáticas, utilizando cores distintas. Isto permite um estudo anatômico desses vasos, capaz de complementar os conhecimentos da histopatologia em trabalhos de pesquisa, e planejar procedimentos terapêuticos como a derivação porto-sistêmica intra-hepática transjugular (TIPS - Transjugular Intrahepatic Postosystemic Shunt).

  3. Developing a technique to enhance durability of fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate for space greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivobok, A. S.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Shcherbakova, V. A.; Chuvilskaya, N. A.

    2018-02-01

    One way to cut consumables for space plant growth facilities (PGF) with artificial soil in the form of fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate (FIERS) is on-board regeneration of the used medium. After crop harvest the procedure includes removal of the roots from the fibrous media with preservation of the exchanger properties and capillary structure. One type of FIERS, namely BIONA-V3ۛ, has been used in Russian prototypes of space conveyors. We describe a two-stage treatment of BIONA-V3ۛ including primary microwave heating of the used FIERS until (90 ± 5) °C in alkali-peroxide solution during 3.5 hrs. The second stage of the treatment is decomposition of root vestiges inside pores of BIONA-V3ۛ by using thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic bacteria Clostridium thermocellum, Clostridium cellulolyticum and Cellulosilyticum lentocellum during 7-10 days at 55 °C. The two-stage procedure allows extraction of 90% dead roots from the FIERS' pores and the preservation of root zone hydro-physical properties. A posterior enrichment of the FIERS by minerals makes BIONA- V3ۛ reusable.

  4. Effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on microleakage of Class II computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing fabricated ceramic restorations: a confocal microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Shuzo; Nasser, Nasser A; Pilecki, Peter; Wilson, Ron F; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Watson, Timothy F; Foxton, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of resin coating and occlusal loading on microleakage of class II computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic restorations. Molars were prepared for an mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlay and were divided into two groups: non-coated (controls); and resin-coated, in which the cavity was coated with a combination of a dentin bonding system (Clearfil Protect Bond) and a flowable resin composite (Clearfil Majesty Flow). Ceramic inlays were fabricated using the CAD/CAM technique (CEREC 3) and cemented with resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement). After 24 h of water storage, the restored teeth in each group were divided into two subgroups: unloaded or loaded with an axial force of 80 N at a rate of 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles while stored in water. After immersion in 0.25% Rhodamine B solution, the teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually at the mesial and distal boxes. Tandem scanning confocal microscopy (TSM) was used for evaluation of microleakage. The locations of the measurements were assigned to the cavity walls and floor. Loading did not have a significant effect on microleakage in either the resin-coated or non-coated group. Resin coating significantly reduced microleakage regardless of loading. The cavity floor exhibited greater microleakage compared to the cavity wall. TSM observation also revealed that microleakage at the enamel surface was minimal regardless of resin coating. In contrast, non-coated dentin showed extensive leakage, whereas resin-coated dentin showed decreased leakage. Resin coating with a combination of a dentin-bonding system and a flowable resin composite may be indicated prior to impression-taking when restoring teeth with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays in order to reduce microleakage at the tooth-resin interface.

  5. Propriedades mecânicas de materiais compósitos à base de cimento Portland e resina epoxi Mechanical properties of composite materials based on portland cement and epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Panzera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de materiais de alto desempenho e multifuncionais, como os compósitos poliméricos cimentícios, tem sido o foco de inúmeras pesquisas na indústria da construção civil. Este trabalho investiga o efeito da combinação de uma fase polimérica termorrígida, uma resina epóxi, com cimento Portland branco estrutural, seguido da avaliação da resistência à compressão e módulo de elasticidade. Este compósito, quando comparado individualmente com as suas matérias-prima originais, promove um aumento da resistência mecânica à compressão, redução da massa específica e, também uma mudança significativa do comportamento mecânico. As mudanças nas propriedades mecânicas estão associadas à hidratação da fase cimentícia na presença da resina, fato comprovado através da análise espectroscópica na região do infravermelho.The study of multi-functional materials of high performance, as the polymeric-cementitious composites, has been the focus of several researches in the industry of the civil engineering. This work investigates the effect of the combination of a thermorigid epoxy phase and the white Portland cement, followed by the evaluation of its compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. This composite, when the phases are individually compared, provides an increase of the compressive strength, a reduction of the density, and a significant change of the mechanical behaviour. The changes in mechanical behaviour are associated with the hydration of cement in the presence of resin, which was evident after infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  6. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  7. Microtensile Bond Strength of CAD/CAM Resin Blocks to Dual-Cure Adhesive Cement: The Effect of Different Sandblasting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Kara, Dilan; Baydemir, Canan

    2018-02-11

    To investigate the effect of sandblasting powder particles on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of dual-cure adhesive cement to CAD/CAM blocks. CAD/CAM blocks (Cerasmart, VITA, and LAVA) were cut in slabs and divided into groups: group 1, no sandblasting; group 2, sandblasted with 27-μm Al 2 O 3 ; group 3, sandblasted with 30-μm CoJet; group 4, sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 . After sandblasting, all specimens were silanized and luted using dual-cure adhesive cement (G-CEM LinkForce). After 24 hours, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.2 mm 2 sticks, and μTBS values were obtained (N = 30). Additionally, 132 CAD/CAM block sections were prepared for surface roughness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations. Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA and Dunn's Post Hoc Test (p 0.05). For LAVA, μTBS values of specimens that were sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 powder were significantly higher than 30-μm-SiO 2 and 27-μm Al 2 O 3 (p CAD/CAM blocks for Cerasmart and VITA, although the results changed significantly for LAVA. The ideal bond protocol for CAD/CAM blocks is specific to the material used. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. A novel approach to measure elemental concentrations in cation exchange resins using XRF-scanning technique, and its potential in water pollution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Lin, Sheng-Chi; Löwemark, Ludvig; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Chang, Queenie; Chang, Tsun-Kuo; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Croudace, Ian W.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core-scanning is a fast, and convenient technique to assess elemental variations for a wide variety of research topics. However, the XRF scanning counts are often considered a semi-quantitative measurement due to possible absorption or scattering caused by down core variability in physical properties. To overcome this problem and extend the applications of XRF-scanning to water pollution studies, we propose to use cation exchange resin (IR-120) as an "elemental carrier", and to analyze the resins using the Itrax-XRF core scanner. The use of resin minimizes the matrix effects during the measurements, and can be employed in the field in great numbers due to its low price. Therefore, the fast, and non-destructive XRF-scanning technique can provide a quick and economical method to analyze environmental pollution via absorption in the resin. Five standard resin samples were scanned by the Itrax-XRF core scanner at different exposure times (1 s, 5 s, 15 s, 30 s, 100 s) to allow the comparisons of scanning counts with the absolute concentrations. The regression lines and correlation coefficients of elements that are generally used in pollution studies (Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) were examined for the different exposure times. The result shows that within the test range (from few ppm to thousands ppm), the correlation coefficients are all higher than 0.97, even at the shortest exposure time (1 s). Therefore, we propose to use this method in the field to monitor for example sewage disposal events. The low price of resin, and fast, multi elements and precise XRF-scanning technique provide a viable, cost- and time-effective approach that allows large sample numbers to be processed. In this way, the properties and sources of wastewater pollution can be traced for the purpose of environmental monitoring and environmental forensics.

  9. SUSTENTAÇÃO DE ESMALTE COM IONÔMEROS DE VIDRO E RESINA COMPOSTA: EFEITO NA RESISTÊNCIA À FRATURA DAS CÚSPIDES DE DENTES RESTAURADOS SUPPORTING ENAMEL WITH GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOSITE RESIN: EFFECT ON FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF CUSPS OF RESTORED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Stefano SECCO

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou a resistência e o tipo de fratura do esmalte suportado pelos materiais restauradores ionômeros de vidro convencional e modificado por resina e resina composta, bem como a influência dessa técnica restauradora na resistência das cúspides dos dentes. A remoção da estrutura dental para o preparo de cavidades tipo classe II e a presença de esmalte socavado diminuiram significativamente a resistência das cúspides dos dentes em relação ao dente hígido (p This study determined the resistance to fracture and its pattern for enamel supported with conventional and modified glass ionomer cements, and composite resin restorative materials, as well as the influence of these restorative techniques on cuspal strength of teeth. Removal of dental structure by class II cavity preparations and unsupported enamel had decreased significantly the cuspal strength in relation to healthy teeth (p < 0.01. Restorative materials used to support enamel reduced the fracture rate of restored cusps, but did not increase the fracture resistance values statistically. All tested groups presented alterations in the fracture pattern

  10. Continuous Modeling Technique of Fiber Pullout from a Cement Matrix with Different Interface Mechanical Properties Using Finite Element Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ferreira Friedrich

    Full Text Available Abstract Fiber-matrix interface performance has a great influence on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite. This influence is mainly presented during fiber pullout from the matrix. As fiber pullout process consists of fiber debonding stage and pullout stage which involve complex contact problem, numerical modeling is a best way to investigate the interface influence. Although many numerical research works have been conducted, practical and effective technique suitable for continuous modeling of fiber pullout process is still scarce. The reason is in that numerical divergence frequently happens, leading to the modeling interruption. By interacting the popular finite element program ANSYS with the MATLAB, we proposed continuous modeling technique and realized modeling of fiber pullout from cement matrix with desired interface mechanical performance. For debonding process, we used interface elements with cohesive surface traction and exponential failure behavior. For pullout process, we switched interface elements to spring elements with variable stiffness, which is related to the interface shear stress as a function of the interface slip displacement. For both processes, the results obtained are very good in comparison with other numerical or analytical models and experimental tests. We suggest using the present technique to model toughening achieved by randomly distributed fibers.

  11. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  12. The Use of a Modular Titanium Baseplate with a Press-Fit Keel Implanted with a Surface Cementing Technique for Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. Pelt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding outcomes following TKA performed with surface-cementation for the fixation of modular tibial baseplates with press-fit keels. Thus, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 439 consecutive primary TKAs performed with surface cemented tibial components. There were 290 female patients and 149 male patients with average age of 62 years (range 30–84. Two tibial components were revised for aseptic loosening (0.5% and four tibial components (0.9% were removed to improve instability (n=2 or malalignment (n=2. Complications included 13 deep infections treated with 2-stage revision (12 and fusion (1. These results support the surface cement technique with a modular grit-blasted titanium surface and cruciform stem during primary TKA.

  13. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  14. The Influence of Zirconium Acrylate on Curable Palm Oil Resin as Coating Material by Using UV Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sofian Alias; Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh; Mek Zah Salleh; Mohd Hamzah Harun; Rida Tajau; Khairul Azhar Abdul Halim; Nurul Huda Mudri

    2016-01-01

    Epoxidized Palm oil liquid acrylate (EPOLA) was introduced with commercial monomer and oligomer to produce coating film by using radiation technique. The percentage of EPOLA in curable formulation has varied in order to study the influence of EPOLA on coating film properties. Meanwhile Zirconium Acrylate was added and varied as additive into curable formulation to investigate the influence on film coating. FTIR analysis was used to monitor the crosslinking process by observed the disappearance of acrylate group. The performance of coating film were investigated by doing several mechanical analysis such as pencil hardness and adhesion test. Meanwhile, in order to determine gloss properties for cured film at different dose of radiation, gloss meter was used to measure gloss value. According to mechanical analysis result, an increasing of EPOLA compound in coating formulation will reduce film hardness and adhesion properties. However after additional of zirconium acrylate into resin formulation the properties of coating film were improved due to presence of zirconium in crosslinking network (author)

  15. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  16. A clinical trial of Empress II porcelain inlays luted to vital teeth with a dual-curing adhesive system and a self-curing resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabianelli, Andrea; Goracci, Cecilia; Bertelli, Egidio; Davidson, Carel L; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to clinically evaluate Empress II inlays cemented with a dual-curing bonding agent and a self-curing luting system. Forty patients were selected to receive one Empress II inlay. Empress II is a heat-pressed glass ceramic containing lithium disilicate and lithium orthophosphate crystals, purported to provide higher stress resistance and improved strength. The restorations were placed between March and May 2000. Recalls were performed after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. At the 3-year recall, 7 patients were lost to follow-up. Inlays were evaluated for postoperative sensitivity, marginal integrity, marginal leakage, color stability, surface staining, retention, and surface crazing (microcracks). At the 3-year recall, all the restorations were in place and only one showed postoperative sensitivity (at the first recall, 1 week after placement). Only 3 inlays showed slight marginal staining, and 4 inlays showed gaps, with little surface staining or microcracks. No inlay debonded or fractured during theobservation period. All the evaluated inlays were in place and acceptable.

  17. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  18. Incidence of flare-ups and evaluation of quality after retreatment of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin ("Russian Red Cement") endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gound, Tom G; Marx, David; Schwandt, Nathan A

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the quality of treatment and incidence of flare-ups when teeth with resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are retreated in a postgraduate endodontic clinic. Fifty-eight cases were included in this study. Obturated and unfilled canal space was measured on radiographs. Forty-eight percent of the total canal space was filled before retreatment; 90% was filled after retreatment. After retreatment, obturations were rated as optimal in 59%, improved in 33%, unchanged in 6%, and worse in 2%. Seven patients (12%) had postretreatment flare-ups. Data were statistically analyzed using the Cochran-Armitage Test for Discrete Variables. No statistical difference in the incidence of flare-ups was found in teeth that before treatment had more than half the canal space filled compared to teeth with less than half, cases with pre-existing periradicular radiolucencies compared to cases with normal periradicular appearance, symptomatic cases compared to asymptomatic cases, or cases with optimal fillings after retreatment compared to less than optimal cases. It was concluded that teeth with resorcinol-formaldehyde fillings might be retreated with a good prognosis for improving the radiographic quality, but a higher than normal incidence of flare-ups may occur.

  19. The potential use of transmission tomographic techniques for the quality checking of cemented waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, J.; Hutchinson, I.G.

    1986-01-01

    In support of the programme for the quality checking of encapsulated intermediate level waste, the possibilities of using transmission tomographic techniques for the determination of the physical properties of the drum are being considered. A literature survey has been undertaken and the possibilities of extracting data from video recordings of real time radiographs are considered. This work was carried out with financial support from British Nuclear Fuels plc and the UK Department of the Environment. In the DoE context, the results will be used in the formulation of Government Policy, but at this stage they do not necessarily represent Government Policy. (author)

  20. Accelerated aging of adhesive-mediated fiber post-resin composite bonds: A modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ivana; Monticelli, Francesca; Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Cury, Alvaro Hafiz; Vulicevic, Zoran R; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-08-01

    Although fiber posts luted in root canals are not directly exposed to oral fluids, water storage is considered as in vitro accelerated aging test for bonded interfaces. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated water aging on fiber post-resin composite adhesion. Forty fiber posts (DT Light Post, RTD) were randomly divided into two main groups, according to the surface treatment performed. Group I: XPBond adhesive (Dentsply Caulk); Group II: sandblasting (Rocatec-Pre, 3M ESPE) and XPBond. Dual-cured resin cement (Calibra, Dentsply Caulk) and flowable composite (X-Flow, Dentsply Caulk) were applied on the posts to produce cylindrical specimens. The bond strength at the interface between post and cement/composite was measured with the microtensile test according to the non-trimming technique. Half of the sticks were tested immediately for bond strength, while in the other half testing was performed after 1 month of water storage at 37 degrees C. Post-cement/composite interfaces were evaluated under SEM prior and after water aging. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA followed by Dunn's multiple range test (p<0.05). Immediate bond strength was higher on sandblasted posts. After water aging the two post surface treatments resulted comparable in bond strength. Resin cement achieved higher bond strength to fiber posts than flowable composite. Water aging significantly reduced bond strength. Sandblasting followed by adhesive coating may improve immediate post-resin bond strength in comparison to adhesive alone. However, fiber post-resin bond strength mediated by hydrophilic adhesive tends to decrease after water aging.

  1. Corrosion of steel drums containing immobilized ion exchange-resins and incineration ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marotta, F.; Schulz Rodriguez, F.M.; Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2009-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for developing the management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The proposed model is a near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The intermediate radioactive waste consists mostly in spent ionic exchange resins and filters from the nuclear power plants, research reactors and radioisotopes production facilities. The spent resins, as well as the incineration ashes, have to be immobilized before being stored to improve leach resistance of waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability for safety requirements. Generally, cementation processes have been used as immobilization techniques for economical reasons as well as for being a simple operation. The immobilized resins and incineration ashes are thus contained in steel drums that, in turn, can undergo corrosion depending on the ionic content of the matrix. This work is a part of a systematic study of the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with immobilized cemented exchange-resins with different types and contents of aggressive species and incineration ashes. To this purpose, a special type of specimen was manufactured to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix are being monitored along time. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (the main ionic species present in nature) and sulphate ions (produced during the radiolysis process of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). Preliminary results show the strong effect of chloride on the corrosion susceptibility of the steel. Monitoring will continue for

  2. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  3. TiO2-Nanofillers Effects on Some Properties of Highly- Impact Resin Using Different Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hawraa Khalid

    2018-01-01

    The criteria of conventional curing of polymethyl methacrylate do not match the standard properties of the denture base materials. This research was conducted to investigate the addition of TiO 2 nano practical on impact strength, thermal conductivity and color stability of acrylic resin cured by microwave in comparison to the conventional cured of heat-polymerized acrylic resin. 120 specimens made of high impact acrylic resin were divided into two main groups according to the type of curing (water bath, microwave), then each group was subdivided into two groups according to the addition of 3% TiO 2 nano-fillers and control group (without the addition of TiO 2 0%). Each group was subdivided according to the type of test into 3 groups with 10 specimens for each group. Data were statistically analyzed using Student t-test to detect the significant differences between tested and control groups at significance level ( P <0.05). According to curing type methods, the results showed that there was a significant decrease in impact strength of microwaved cured resin, but there was no significant difference in the thermal conductivity and color stability of resin. In addition, by using nanofiller, there was a significant increase in the impact strength and color stability with the addition of 3% TiO 2 nanofillers, but no significant difference was found in the thermal conductivity of the acrylic resin. The microwave curing of acrylic resin had no change in the color stability and thermal conductivity in comparison to the water bath, but the impact strength was decreased. The addition of 3% TiO 2 improved the impact and the color stability, but the thermal conductivity did not change.

  4. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  5. Case study: evaluation of continuos blending silos in the cement industry, by the aid of tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, C.; Maghella, G.; Mamani, E.

    2000-12-01

    Besides the actual burning process in cement manufacture, particular importance is attached to raw material preparation and homogenization, not only because of the quality of the kiln fed and therefore of the produced cement, but also because of the economy of the kiln operation, which significantly depends on the uniformity of the chemical composition of the material. As a result, the blending process of the cement raw material, before burning, is a basic stage of cement technology production. In this case, the pneumatic homogenization process is studied in a silo with a great storing and processing capacity. The objective is to evaluate the parameters which influence in the continuos operation. The method allows us to determine the optimal blending parameters, through the observation of the movement and distribution of the different fractions of fine dust raw meal, labelled with La-140 as tracer. Changes in blending according to time are discussed as well as the influence of the silo design on the degree of homogenization. It was showed that the silo blending operation has a strong influence on the production of good-quality cement as well as the implications on energy saving

  6. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  7. Application of solvlent change techniques to blended cements used to immobilize low-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1996-07-01

    The microstructures of hardened portland and blended cement pastes, including those being considered for use in immobilizing hazardous wastes, have a complex pore structure that changes with time. In solvent exchange, the pore structure is examined by immersing a saturated sample in a large volume of solvent that is miscible with the pore fluid. This paper reports the results of solvent replacement measurements on several blended cements mixed at a solution:solids ratio of 1.0 with alkaline solutions from the simulation of the off- gas treatment system in a vitrification facility treating low-level radioactive liquid wastes. The results show that these samples have a lower permeability than ordinary portland cement samples mixed at a water:solids ratio of 0.70, despite having a higher volume of porosity. The microstructure is changed by these alkaline solutions, and these changes have important consequences with regard to durability

  8. Retention of metal-ceramic crowns with contemporary dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Zhang, Hai; Wataha, John C

    2009-09-01

    New types of crown and bridge cement are in use by practitioners, and independent studies are needed to assess their effectiveness. The authors conducted a study in three parts (study A, study B, and study C) and to determine how well these new cements retain metal-ceramic crowns. The authors prepared teeth with a 20-degree taper and a 4-millimeter length. They cast high-noble metal-ceramic copings, then fitted and cemented them with a force of 196 newtons. The types of cements they used were zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer, conventional resin and self-adhesive modified resin. They thermally cycled the cemented copings, then removed them. They recorded the removal force and calculated the stress of dislodgment by using the surface area of each preparation. They used a single-factor analysis of variance to analyze the data (alpha = .05). The mean stresses necessary to remove crowns, in megapascals, were 8.0 for RelyX Luting (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), 7.3 for RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), 5.7 for Panavia F (Kuraray America, New York) and 4.0 for Fuji Plus (GC America, Alsip, Ill.) in study A; 8.1 for RelyX Luting, 2.6 for RelyX Luting Plus (3M ESPE) and 2.8 for Fuji CEM (GC America) in study B; and 4.9 for Maxcem (Kerr, Orange, Calif.), 4.0 for BisCem (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.), 3.7 for RelyX Unicem Clicker (3M ESPE), 2.9 for iCEM (Heraeus Kulzer, Armonk, N.Y.) and 2.3 for Fleck's Zinc Cement (Keystone Industries, Cherry Hill, N.J.) in study C. Powder-liquid versions of new cements were significantly more retentive than were paste-paste versions of the same cements. The mean value of crown removal stress for the new self-adhesive modified-resin cements varied appreciably among the four cements tested. All cements retained castings as well as or better than did zinc phosphate cement. Powder-liquid versions of cements, although less convenient to mix, may be a better clinical choice when crown retention is an issue. All cements tested will retain castings

  9. Effect of composite resin placement techniques on the microleakage of two self-etching dentin-bonding agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santini, A.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Mitchell, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate microleakage of Class V resin-based composites (RBC) bonded with two self-etching dentin adhesive systems. Class V cavities were restored with either one or three increments of RBC to determine whether the restorative method affected microleakage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 60

  10. Bond strength of resin composite to light activated bleached enamel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-02

    Sep 2, 2015 ... After setting of the cement, a composite resin (Variolink II) block was .... do not completely duplicate the physical and chemical properties of the oral ... peroxide concentrations on the corrosion behavior and surface topography.

  11. Overview of technologies to reprocess ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrish, V.M.; Chernikova, N.P.; Ivanets, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with overview of technologies for reprocessing of ion-exchange resins and determining the most optimal solutions for Ukraine. The technologies for cementations, thermal reprocessing, bituminization and deep decontamination are considered.

  12. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajkovic, Denis; Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Kisic, Danilo; Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  13. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  14. Evaluation of the surface roughness of three heat-cured acrylic denture base resins with different conventional lathe polishing techniques: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Duggineni Chalapathi; Kalavathy, N; Mohammad, H S; Hariprasad, A; Kumar, C Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Surface roughness promotes adhesion and colonization of denture plaque. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of polishing and finishing on the surface roughness of various acrylic resin materials. To evaluate and compare the effects of different conventional lathe polishing techniques on heat cured acrylic resins in producing surface roughness. Three different commercially available heat-cured acrylic resin materials namely DPI, Meliodent and Trevalon Hi were selected. 30 Specimens of each acrylic material (30 x 3 = 90, 10 x 60 x 2mm) were prepared and divided into 5 groups, each group consisted of 6 Nos. of specimens per material(6x3=18) and were grouped as Group A(unfinished), Group B (finished), Group C (Polishing Paste), Group D (Polishing Cake) and Group E (Pumice and Gold rouge). The resulted surface roughness (μm) was measured using Perthometer and observed under Scanning Electron Microscope. The values obtained were subjected statistical analyses. Among the materials tested, better results were obtained with Trevalon Hi followed by Meliodent and DPI. Among the polishing methods used, superior results were obtained with universal polishing paste followed by polishing cake; Pumice and Gold rouge. Although Pumice and Gold rouge values produced greater roughness value, they were well within the threshold value of 0.2 mm.

  15. Comparison of CT characteristics of extravertebral cement leakages after vertebroplasty performed by different navigation and injection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaso, G.; Horvath, Z.; Doczi, T.; Szenohradszky, K.; Sandor, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was intended to assess the results of post-operative CT scans in three groups of patients following percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) using different navigation and injection methods, in an attempt to explain the radiological characteristics of extravertebral cement leakage with relation to needle placement and focused on the ventral epidural accumulation of bone cement. Furthermore, we have suggested a morphological (and functional) classification of the types of cement leakage. Between July 2001 and February 2005, 123 percutaneous VP procedures were performed during 75 sessions in 65 patients for treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures. These included: group 1: 28 patients, 33 sessions; 50 right sided unilateral VP under fluoroscopic control with central position of the tip of the needle within the bone marrow. Group 2: 27 patients, 28 sessions; 50 bilateral VP under fluoroscopic control with separate cement injections into both 'hemivertebrae'. Group 3: 14 patients, 14 sessions; 23 bilateral VP navigated by frameless stereotaxy (neuronavigation). Needles were positioned strictly into the lateral thirds of the vertebral bodies. Leakages were classified as epidural, foraminal, intradiscal, venous paravertebral, compact extravertebral on the post-operative CT scans, and their frequency was compared in relation to the navigation method and the position of the tip of the needle. Group 1: extravertebral cement was detected in 23 patients (82 %), and in 35 (70 %) of the 50 vertebrae treated (ventral epidural: 23 vertebrae = 46 %; intradiscal: 12 vertebrae = 24 %; venous paravertebral: 8 vertebrae = 16 %; intraforaminal: 7 vertebrae = 14 %; and compact extravertebral: 3 vertebrae = 6 %). Group 2: extravertebral cement was detected in 20 patients (74 %), and in 38 (76 %) of the 50 vertebrae treated (ventral epidural: 12 vertebrae = 24 %; intradiscal: 12 vertebrae = 24 %; venous paravertebral: 9 vertebrae = 18 %; and foraminal: 1

  16. Leaching of 60 Co and 137 Cs from spent ion exchange resins in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cement; radioactive waste; composite; waste management. Abstract. The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or ...

  17. Effect of thermocycling on the bond strength of a glass-infiltrated ceramic and a resin luting cement Efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de união entre uma cerâmica infiltrada com vidro e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between the surface of the glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic In-Ceram (VITA and the Panavia F resin cement (Kuraray CO.. Four 5x6x6mm In-Ceram blocks were obtained. One of the 6x6mm faces of each block was conditioned with Cojet - System (tribochemical silica coating, ESPE-3M and then luted under a constant 750g pressure with Panavia F cement to another identical face of a resin composit block (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray obtained by reproduction of the ceramic one from Express (3M addition curing silicone impressions. The four sets so formed by ceramic, luting cement and resin have been each one serially sectioned in 20 sticks so that the adhesive surface in each presented 1mm² of area. The samples were divided in 2 groups (n=10: G1- stored for 7 days in deionized water at 36 ± 2ºC; G2 - thermocycled 1500 times between 5 and 55ºC dwell times. The microtensile tests were accomplished in an universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The results showed that the mean tensile bond strength values (MPa for the group G2: (22,815 ± 5,254 had not statistically differ of the values of group G1: (25,628 ± 3,353 (t = 1,427; gl = 18; p-value = 0,171, at the level of a= 5%. It can be concluded that the thermocycling technique used in the present experiment had not produced statistically significant differences between the bond strength results of the specimens obtained by the two used techniques.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de adesão entre a superfície da cerâmica In-Ceram Alumina (VITA e o cimento resinoso Panavia F (Kuraray. Foram confeccionados quatro blocos de cerâmica In-Ceram com dimensões de 5x6x6mm. Uma das faces com 6x6mm de cada bloco cerâmico, após condicionamento com o sistema Cojet (ESPE-3M (jateamento com óxido de alumínio/jateamento com óxido de s

  18. An Alternative Quality Control Technique for Mineral Chemistry Analysis of Portland Cement-Grade Limestone Using Shortwave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrullah Zaini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shortwave infrared (SWIR spectroscopy can be applied directly to analyze the mineral chemistry of raw or geologic materials. It provides diagnostic spectral characteristics of the chemical composition of minerals, information that is invaluable for the identification and quality control of such materials. The present study aims to investigate the potential of SWIR spectroscopy as an alternative quality control technique for the mineral chemistry analysis of Portland cement-grade limestone. We used the spectroscopic (wavelength position and depth of absorption feature and geochemical characteristics of limestone samples to estimate the abundance and composition of carbonate and clay minerals on rock surfaces. The depth of the carbonate (CO3 and Al-OH absorption features are linearly correlated with the contents of CaO and Al2O3 in the samples, respectively, as determined by portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF measurements. Variations in the wavelength position of CO3 and Al-OH absorption features are related to changes in the chemical compositions of the samples. The results showed that the dark gray and light gray limestone samples are better suited for manufacturing Portland cement clinker than the dolomitic limestone samples. This finding is based on the CaO, MgO, Al2O3, and SiO2 concentrations and compositions. The results indicate that SWIR spectroscopy is an appropriate approach for the chemical quality control of cement raw materials.

  19. A small punch test technique for characterizing the elastic modulus and fracture behavior of PMMA bone cement used in total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, V L; Kurtz, S M; Jewett, C W; Foulds, J R; Edidin, A A

    2001-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is used in total joint replacements to anchor implants to the underlying bone. Establishing and maintaining the integrity of bone cement is thus of critical importance to the long-term outcome of joint replacement surgery. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of a novel testing technique, the small punch or miniaturized disk bend test, to characterize the elastic modulus and fracture behavior of PMMA. We investigated the hypothesis that the crack initiation behavior of PMMA during the small punch test was sensitive to the test temperature. Miniature disk-shaped specimens, 0.5 mm thick and 6.4 mm in diameter, were prepared from PMMA and Simplex-P bone cement according to manufacturers' instructions. Testing was conducted at ambient and body temperatures, and the effect of test temperature on the elastic modulus and fracture behavior was statistically evaluated using analysis of variance. For both PMMA materials, the test temperature had a significant effect on elastic modulus and crack initiation behavior. At body temperature, the specimens exhibited "ductile" crack initiation, whereas at room temperature "brittle" crack initiation was observed. The small punch test was found to be a sensitive and repeatable test method for evaluating the mechanical behavior of PMMA. In light of the results of this study, future small punch testing should be conducted at body temperature.

  20. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV, coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive and Minimally Invasive Dentistry and the new preservative techniques recommended. Objective: The objective of the present article was to carry out a literature review study, to determine the characteristics of CIV that has a prominent role in the Minimally Invasive Dentistry profile. Results: The dentist surgeon must be aware of the classification, according to its composition and physical-chemical nature: conventional ionomers; ionomers reinforced by metals; high viscosity and various types of resin modified glass ionomers to correctly choose the CIV that will be used in their clinical interventions, which should occur based on the properties of the material and its clinical indication. Conclusion: It was concluded that the implementation of preventive techniques with CIV in public health care, tend to minimize curative treatments, concurrently valuing the low complexity dental procedures performed in Primary Care, avoiding referrals for treatment of cases of greater complexity at the level Secondary and tertiary care, saving resources.

  1. Evaluation of the maladaptation of the test base in acrylic resin regarding the technique of preparation, place of measurement and storage time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Pereira de OLIVEIRA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The most used material for the preparation of the baseplates is the acrylic resin, but it can present distortions. Objective To evaluate preparation technique, region and storage time that presents less maladaptation of the base when made with self-cured acrylic resin. Material and method Models were created in gypsum type III simulating edentulous maxilla, as divided into 3 groups (n = 10: GC (control group thermopolymerizable acrylic resin; G1 - manual adaptation technique and G2 - drip technique. For the measurements, silicone by condensation of light consistency that was interposed between base and model was used. With a hydraulic press, 50 kg pressure was applied leading the base of the model. The obtained mold was measured in the palate, canine and molar regions with a digital caliper at the following times: immediately after the base polymerization, at 24, 48, 72, 96 hours and one week. The results were submitted to statistical analysis. Result G1 presented maladaptation of 0.43 mm ± 0.10, while G2 obtained 0.39 mm ± 0.11. The lowest maladaptation occurred in the CG. The palate region presented greater maladaptation (0.52 ± 0.07 and the canine region, the lowest (CD = 0.27 mm ± 0.07 and CE = 0.27 ± 0.09; There was no statistically significant difference for storage times. Conclusion G2 presented lower values than G1, with no statistically significant difference. The palate region presented greater maladaptation, followed by molars and canines. The bases continued to maladaptation the model after the immediate polymerization, with no statistically significant difference.

  2. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffó, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fátima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  3. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fatima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  4. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage in complete crowns cemented with three luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Orlato Rossetti

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage can be related to margin misfit. Also, traditional microleakage techniques are time-consuming. This study evaluated the existence of correlation between in vitro margin fit and a new microleakage technique for complete crowns cemented with 3 different luting agents. Thirty human premolars were prepared for full-coverage crowns with a convergence angle of 6 degrees, chamfer margin of 1.2 mm circumferentially, and occlusal reduction of 1.5 mm. Ni-Cr cast crowns were cemented with either zinc phosphate (ZP (S.S. White, resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI (Rely X Luting Cement or a resin-based luting agent (RC (Enforce. Margin fit (seating discrepancy and margin gap was evaluated according to criteria in the literature under microscope with 0.001 mm accuracy. After thermal cycling, crowns were longitudinally sectioned and microleakage scores at tooth-cement interface were obtained and recorded at ×100 magnification. Margin fit parameters were compared with the one-way ANOVA test and microleakage scores with Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (alpha=0.05. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage was analyzed with the Spearman's test (alpha=0.05. Seating discrepancy and marginal gap values ranged from 81.82 µm to 137.22 µm (p=0.117, and from 75.42 µm to 78.49 µm (p=0.940, respectively. Marginal microleakage scores were ZP=3.02, RMGI=0.35 and RC=0.12 (p0.05. Conclusion: Margin fit parameters and microleakage showed no strong correlations; cast crowns cemented with RMGI and RC had lower microleakage scores than ZP cement.

  5. The Effects of Fabrication Techniques and Storage Methods on the Dimensional Stability of Removable Acrylic Resin Orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Bruxism : a report and a case report. J. Dent. Med., 9:189-199, 1954. 138. Super, S: A modified occlusal splint for segmental osteotomy fixation. J. Oral...minimize linear dimensional change prior to the clinical use of a removable acrylic resin orthosis. . .. . . . . TABLE OF CONTENTS Title...distortion and clinical use of an orthosis having a precise and accurate fit. V % N II. LITERATURE REVIEW A. Terminology The therapeutic use of interocclusal

  6. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Chul; Yang, Hong So; Chung, Hyun Ju; Oh, Won Mann

    1994-01-01

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  7. Sliding Malar Bone Augmentation Technique with a High Le Fort I ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... Upon clinical evaluation of the frontal view, maxillary hypoplasia is often associated ... resin. For the cementation of the appliance, light-cured glass ionomer cement (Unitek Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer. Orthodontic Band Cement ...

  8. Radioactive waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  9. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  10. Incineration of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Nykyri, M.

    1985-01-01

    Incineration of ion-exchange resins in a fluidized bed was studied on a pilot plant scale at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. Both granular and powdered resins were incinerated in dry and slurry form. Different bed materials were used in order to trap as much cesium and cobalt (inactive tracers) as possible in the bed. Also the sintering of the bed materials was studied in the presence of sodium. When immobilized with cement the volume of ash-concrete is 4 to 22% of the concrete of equal compressive strength acquired by direct solidification. Two examples of multi-purpose equipment capable of incinerating ion-exchange resins are presented. (orig.)

  11. Automation of radiochemical analysis by flow injection techniques. Am-Pu separation using TRU-resinTM sorbent extraction column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, O.; Washington Univ., Seattle, WA; Grate, J.W.; Ruzicka, J.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid automated flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure was developed for efficient separation of Am and Pu from each other and from interfering matrix and radionuclide components using a TRU-resin TM column. Selective Pu elution is enabled via on-column reduction. The separation was developed using on-line radioactivity detection. After the separation had been developed, fraction collection was used to obtain the separated fractions. In this manner, a FIA instrument functions as an automated separation workstation capable of unattended operation. (author)

  12. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  13. Studies on biosorption of Cr(VI) on a green resin: dry cow dung powder and tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barot, N.S.; Bagla, H.K.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation entails the application of dry cow dung powder (DCP) as an indigenous, inexpensive and eco-friendly material for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous medium. Batch biosorption experiments were conducted employing 51 Cr(VI) as a tracer and the effect of various process parameters such as optimum pH, temperature, amount of resin, time of equilibration, agitation speed, concentration of metal ions and interfering effect of different salts etc. were studied. The kinetic studies were carried out employing various models but the best fitting was given by Lagergren Pseudo-second order model with high correlation coefficient R 2 value of 0.997 and adsorption capacity of 10.20 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters for biosorption were evaluated as ΔG = -2.837 kJ/mol, ΔH = -4.757 kJ/mol and ΔS = 16.64 J/mol K, which indicated spontaneous and exothermic process with high affinity of DCP for Cr(VI). Many naturally available materials are used for the biosorption of heavy metal pollutants, where most of them are physically or chemically modified. In this research work, DCP has been utilized without any pre or post chemical treatment. Thus it manifests the principle of green chemistry and proves to be an eco-friendly resin. (orig.)

  14. Studies on biosorption of Cr(VI) on a green resin: dry cow dung powder and tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barot, N.S.; Bagla, H.K. [Kishinchand Chellaram College, Mumbai (India). Nuclear and Radiochemistry Dept.

    2012-07-01

    The present investigation entails the application of dry cow dung powder (DCP) as an indigenous, inexpensive and eco-friendly material for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous medium. Batch biosorption experiments were conducted employing {sup 51}Cr(VI) as a tracer and the effect of various process parameters such as optimum pH, temperature, amount of resin, time of equilibration, agitation speed, concentration of metal ions and interfering effect of different salts etc. were studied. The kinetic studies were carried out employing various models but the best fitting was given by Lagergren Pseudo-second order model with high correlation coefficient R{sup 2} value of 0.997 and adsorption capacity of 10.20 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters for biosorption were evaluated as {Delta}G = -2.837 kJ/mol, {Delta}H = -4.757 kJ/mol and {Delta}S = 16.64 J/mol K, which indicated spontaneous and exothermic process with high affinity of DCP for Cr(VI). Many naturally available materials are used for the biosorption of heavy metal pollutants, where most of them are physically or chemically modified. In this research work, DCP has been utilized without any pre or post chemical treatment. Thus it manifests the principle of green chemistry and proves to be an eco-friendly resin. (orig.)

  15. Effect of an experimental zirconia-silica coating technique on micro tensile bond strength of zirconia in different priming conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the adhesive properties of a MDP-containing resin cement to a colored zirconia ceramic, using an experimental zirconia-silica coating technique with different priming conditions. Methods 18 zirconia ceramic discs (Cercon base colored) were divided into two

  16. Optimization of the etch-and-rinse technique: New perspectives to improve resin-dentin bonding and hybrid layer integrity by reducing residual water using dimethyl sulfoxide pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Tjäderhane, Leo; Abuna, Gabriel; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2018-04-13

    To determine whether bonding effectiveness and hybrid layer integrity on acid-etched dehydrated dentin would be comparable to the conventional wet-bonding technique through new dentin biomodification approaches using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Etched dentin surfaces from extracted sound molars were randomly bonded in wet or dry conditions (30s air drying) with DMSO/ethanol or DMSO/H 2 O as pretreatments using a simplified (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE: SU) and a multi-step (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE: SBMP) etch-and-rinse adhesives. Untreated dentin surfaces served as control. Bonded teeth (n=8) were stored in distilled water for 24h and sectioned into resin-dentin beams (0.8mm 2 ) for microtensile bond strength test and quantitative interfacial nanoleakage analysis (n=8) under SEM. Additional teeth (n=2) were prepared for micropermeability assessment by CFLSM under simulated pulpar pressure (20cm H 2 O) using 5mM fluorescein as a tracer. Microtensile data was analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test and nanoleakage by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni multiple comparison test (α=0.05). While dry-bonding of SBMP produced significantly lower bond strengths than wet-bonding (padhesives to demineralized air-dried dentin beyond conventional wet-bonding. Less porous resin-dentin interfaces with higher bond strengths on air-dried etched dentin were achieved; nonetheless, overall efficiency varied according to DMSO's co-solvent and adhesive type. DMSO pretreatments permit etched dentin to be air-dried before hybridization facilitating residual water removal and thus improving bonding effectiveness. This challenges the current paradigm of wet-bonding requirement for the etch-and-rinse approach creating new possibilities to enhance the clinical longevity of resin-dentin interfaces. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  18. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Pcements and glass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P provisional crowns cemented with three different luting cements along the axial walls of

  20. Influence of space size of abutment screw access channel on the amount of extruded excess cement and marginal accuracy of cement-retained single implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Al-Qarni, Mohammed N; Al-Bakri, Ahmed S; Al-Maflehi, Nassr S; Abualsaud, Haythem S

    2018-02-01

    The detrimental effect of extruded excess cement on peri-implant tissue has been well documented. Although several techniques have been proposed to reduce this effect by decreasing the amount of extruded cement, how the space size of the abutment screw access channel (SAC) affects the amount of extruded cement and marginal accuracy is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the size of the unfilled space of the abutment SAC on the amount of extruded excess cement and the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings. Twelve implant replicas and corresponding standard abutments were attached and embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) zirconia copings with a uniform 30-μm cement space were fabricated by 1 dental technician using the standard method. The copings were temporarily cemented 3 times at different sizes of the left space of the SAC as follows: the nonspaced group (NS), in which the entire SAC was completely filled, the 1-mm-spaced group (1MMS), and the 2-mm-spaced group (2MMS). Abutments and crowns were ultrasonically cleaned, steam cleaned, and air-dried. The excess cement was collected and weighed. To measure the marginal accuracy, 20 measurements were made every 18 degrees along the coping margin at ×300 magnification and compared with the pre-cementation readings. One-way ANOVA was calculated to determine whether the amount of extruded excess cement differed among the 3 groups, and the Tukey test was applied for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The mean weights (mg) of extruded excess cement were NS (33.53 ±1.5), 1MMS (22.97 ±5.4), and 2MMS (15.17 ±5.9). Multiple comparisons showed significant differences in the amount of extruded excess cement among the 3 test groups (Pcemented group (29.5 ±8.2) was significantly different (Pcement by 55% in comparison with the nonspaced abutments. However, no effect was found on the marginal accuracy of zirconia copings

  1. Tensile bond strength between different glass ionomer cement and composite resin using three adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência de união interfacial entre diferentes cimentos de ionômero de vidro e resina composta, usando três sistemas adesivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among a Composite Resin (Filtek Z250 and six conventional Glass Ionomer Cements, three used for lining (Bioglass F, Vidrion F and Glass Ionomer L.C. and three for restorations (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R and Glass Ionomer type II etched and non etched, using three adhesive systems (Single Bond, Bond 1 and Stae. Thirty-six groups were made, ten samples for each group, totalizing 360 specimens. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. Group 31 (Glass Ionomer Cement type II showed the highest TBS (9.65 MPa in comparison to other tested groups. Group 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C presented the lowest TBS (2.72 MPa in comparison to all the other groups. Therefore, it can be concluded that the acid etching of the Glass Ionomer Cement is not necessary. Foi avaliada, ">in vitro, a resistência de união, por tração, entre uma Resina Composta micro-híbrida (Filtek Z-250 e seis Cimentos de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV convencionais: três utilizados para base/forramento (Bioglass F, Vidrion F e Glass Ionomer Lining Cement e três para restauração (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R e Glass Ionomer Cement type II, sem e com condicionamento ácido ortofosfórico a 37%, usando três sistemas adesivos (Single Bond, Bond 1 e Stae. Foram confeccionados 36 grupos de 10 corpos-de-prova cada, totalizando 360 espécimes. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste de Tukey-Kramer. Dentre os três CIV de base/forramento, os grupos 2 e 5 (Bioglass F apresentaram valores mais altos de adesividade à resina (7,24 e 6,03 MPa respectivamente. Quanto aos três CIV de restauração, todos apresentaram maior resistência de união, superior aos de base/forramento, sendo que o Glass Ionomer Cement type II (Grupo 31 e Vidrion R apresentaram maior força de adesão (9,65 e 7,47 MPa à resina composta. O grupo 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C. mostrou menor adesividade à resina (2,72 MPa. Houve diferenças significantes

  2. Elastic properties and strain-to-crack-initiation of calcium phosphate bone cements: Revelations of a high-resolution measurement technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaxon, Ingrid; Acciaioli, Alice; Lionello, Giacomo; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Öhman-Mägi, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Persson, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) should ideally have mechanical properties similar to those of the bone tissue the material is used to replace or repair. Usually, the compressive strength of the CPCs is reported and, more rarely, the elastic modulus. Conversely, scarce or no data are available on Poisson's ratio and strain-to-crack-initiation. This is unfortunate, as data on the elastic response is key to, e.g., numerical model accuracy. In this study, the compressive behaviour of brushite, monetite and apatite cements was fully characterised. Measurement of the surface strains was done using a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, and compared to results obtained with the commonly used built-in displacement measurement of the materials testers. The collected data showed that the use of fixed compression platens, as opposed to spherically seated ones, may in some cases underestimate the compressive strength by up to 40%. Also, the built-in measurements may underestimate the elastic modulus by up to 62% as compared to DIC measurements. Using DIC, the brushite cement was found to be much stiffer (24.3 ± 2.3GPa) than the apatite (13.5 ± 1.6GPa) and monetite (7.1 ± 1.0GPa) cements, and elastic moduli were inversely related to the porosity of the materials. Poisson's ratio was determined to be 0.26 ± 0.02 for brushite, 0.21 ± 0.02 for apatite and 0.20 ± 0.03 for monetite. All investigated CPCs showed low strain-to-crack-initiation (0.17-0.19%). In summary, the elastic modulus of CPCs is substantially higher than previously reported and it is concluded that an accurate procedure is a prerequisite in order to properly compare the mechanical properties of different CPC formulations. It is recommended to use spherically seated platens and measuring the strain at a relevant resolution and on the specimen surface. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Methods for removal of resin remaining after debonding of orthodontic brackets: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of resin debris and/or resin cement from the enamel surface without causing iatrogenic is the main objective when removing the orthodontic brackets. Some factors such as the time required for removal, damage to the tooth structure, are essential factors for the clinician at the time of removal. Various techniques are used for the removal of orthodontic brackets after the treatment; it is known that the use of clinical procedures such as the use of diamond burs and some pliers removers can damage the structure of the enamel, often depending on the bond strength that should be taken into consideration at the time of removal. This literature review aims to gather the most relevant studies that can clarify the clinical technique, which may be more suitable for removal of the brackets.

  4. Stressed state of a cement electrical insulation of a pulsed magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenevskij, V.V.; Sugak, E.B.; Fedorenko, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    The stresses arising in cement electrical insulation of a pulsed magnet intended for separation and scanning of beam of secondary particles with 5-10 MeV energy are investigated during its switching. The magnet represents a single-turn construction. During its switching repulsion forces arise in copper buses which affect the core consisting of a set of iron plates. In its turn two cores trying to separate transmit impact load onto cement electrical insulation, the mechanical strength of which determines the construction durability on the whole. For selection of calculation technique the method of photoelasticity is used on models of transparent polymeric materials. Epoxy resin served as material for insulation model, duraluminium for the rest of magnet parts. It is concluded that the calculation technique for the magnet under investigation is a hingeless circular arc

  5. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  6. Evaluation of the resin oxidation process using Fenton's reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Leandro G.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2013-01-01

    The ion exchange resin is considered radioactive waste after its final useful life in nuclear reactors. Usually, this type of waste is treated with the immobilization in cement Portland, in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, reducing the possibility of radionuclides release in to environment. Because of the characteristic of expansion and contraction of the resins in presence of water, its incorporation in the common Portland cement is limited in 10% in direct immobilization, causing high costs in the final product. A pre-treatment would be able to reduce the volume, degrading the resins and increasing the load capacity of this material. This paper is about a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Fenton's reagent. The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic and anionic resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25 to 80 mM), with and without external heat. The time of reaction was two hours. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%. The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of CaCO 3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ca(OH) 2 and the CO 2 from the resin degradation. It was possible to degrade the resins without external heating. The calcium carbonates showed no correlation with the residual resin mass. (author)

  7. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  8. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant: A boon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pit and fissure sealants are highly effective in preventing occlusal caries. The present study clinically evaluated and compared the retention and development of caries when sealed with moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant, conventional resin-based sealant with and without a bonding agent, and Glass Ionomer Cement Sealant in young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 healthy cooperative children aged 6-9 years who were at high caries risk with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were included in the study. Teeth were divided into 4 groups using a full-factorial design, and each of the molars was sealed with the four different sealant material. Evaluation of sealant retention and development of caries was performed at 6 and 12 months using Modified Simonsen′s criteria. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test. Result and Conclusion: The result from the present study indicated that moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant could be successfully used as a pit and fissure sealant because its hydrophilic chemistry makes it less technique sensitive and simplifies the sealant application procedure.

  10. Use of cement-fly ash-based stabilization techniques for the treatment of waste containing aromatic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Kamil; Marcinkowski, Tadeusz

    2017-11-01

    Research on evaluation of evaporation rate of volatile organic compounds from soil beds during processing is presented. For the experiment, soil samples were prepared with the same amounts of benzene and stabilized using a mixture of CEMI 42.5R cement and fly ash from pit-coal combustion. Solidification of soils contaminated with BTEX hydrocarbons using hydraulic binders involves a risk of releasing vapours of these compounds during homogenization of waste with stabilizing mixture introduced and its dilution with water. The primary purposes of the research were: analysis of benzene volume emitted from soil during stabilization/solidification process and characterization of factors that may negatively affect the quality of measurements/the course of stabilization process. Analysis of benzene emission intensity during the process was based on concentration (C6H6) values, recorded with flame-ionization detector above the surface of reacting mixture. At the same time, gaseous contaminants emitted during waste stabilization were passed through pipes filled with activated carbon (SCK, Anasorb CSC). Benzene vapours adsorbed on activated carbon were subjected to analysis using gas chromatograph Varian 450-GC. Evaporation characteristics of benzene during processing contaminated soils revealed the stages creating the highest danger to workers' health, as well as a need for actions connected with modification of technological line.

  11. Green and early age compressive strength of extruded cement mortar monitored with compression tests and ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, Thomas; Malonn, Tim; Shah, Surendra P.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge about the early age compressive strength development of cementitious materials is an important factor for the progress and safety of many construction projects. This paper uses cylindrical mortar specimens produced with a ram extruder to investigate the transition of the mortar from plastic and deformable to hardened state. In addition, wave transmission and reflection measurements with P- and S-waves were conducted to obtain further information about the microstructural changes during the setting and hardening process. The experiments have shown that uniaxial compression tests conducted on extruded mortar cylinders are a useful tool to evaluate the green strength as well as the initiation and further development of the compressive strength of the tested material. The propagation of P-waves was found to be indicative of the internal structure of the tested mortars as influenced, for example, by the addition of fine clay particles. S-waves used in transmission and reflection mode proved to be sensitive to the inter-particle bonding caused by the cement hydration and expressed by an increase in compressive strength

  12. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Hosseini Ghavam, Fereshteh; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly ( P =.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant ( P =.40). Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement.

  13. Effects of abutment diameter, luting agent type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Sina; Amini, Parviz; Yaghmaei, Kaveh

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment diameter, cement type, and re-cementation on the retention of implant-supported CAD/CAM metal copings over short abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty abutments with two different diameters, the height of which was reduced to 3 mm, were vertically mounted in acrylic resin blocks with matching implant analogues. The specimens were divided into 2 diameter groups: 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm (n=30). For each abutment a CAD/CAM metal coping was manufactured, with an occlusal loop. Each group was sub-divided into 3 sub-groups (n=10). In each subgroup, a different cement type was used: resin-modified glass-ionomer, resin cement and zinc-oxide-eugenol. After incubation and thermocycling, the removal force was measured using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In zinc-oxide-eugenol group, after removal of the coping, the cement remnants were completely cleaned and the copings were re-cemented with resin cement and re-tested. Two-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey tests, and paired t-test were used to analyze data (α=.05). RESULTS The highest pulling force was registered in the resin cement group (414.8 N), followed by the re-cementation group (380.5 N). Increasing the diameter improved the retention significantly (P=.006). The difference in retention between the cemented and recemented copings was not statistically significant (P=.40). CONCLUSION Resin cement provided retention almost twice as strong as that of the RMGI. Increasing the abutment diameter improved retention significantly. Re-cementation with resin cement did not exhibit any difference from the initial cementation with resin cement. PMID:29503708

  14. Radioactive spent resins conditioning by the hot super-compaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Andreas; Centner, Baudouin; Lemmens, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Spent ion exchanger media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion exchange materials, following to pretreatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using Cement, Bitumen, Polymer or High Integrity Containers, - The destruction of the organic compounds by using Thermochemical processes or Oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal, - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Compaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Compaction Process is used to make dense homogenous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of two 200 L drums (Figure). In the oil heated drying and mixing unit, the resins are heated to the necessary process temperature for the hot pressing step and then placed into special metal drums, which are automatically lidded and immediately transferred to a high force compactor. After high force compaction the pellets are transferred to a measuring unit, where the dose rate, height and weight are automatically measured and recorded. A volume reduction factor of approximately up to four (depending on the type of

  15. Microleakage of Glass Ionomer-based Provisional Cement in CAD/CAM-Fabricated Interim Crowns: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ra'fat I; Al-Harethi, Naji

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the marginal microleakage of glass ionomer-based provisional cement with resin-based provisional cement and zinc oxide non-eugenol (ZONE) provisional cement in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated interim restorations. Fifteen intact human premolars were prepared in a standardized manner for complete coverage of crown restorations. Interim crowns for the prepared teeth were then fabricated using CAD/CAM, and the specimens were randomized into three groups of provisional cementing agents (n = 5 each): Glass ionomer-based provisional cement (GC Fuji TEMP LT™), bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/ triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin-based cement (UltraTemp® REZ), and ZONE cement (TempBond NE). After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled and then stored again for 24 hours in distilled water at room temperature. Next, the specimens were placed in freshly prepared 2% aqueous methylene blue dye for 24 hours and then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks and sectioned in buccolingual and mesiodistal directions to assess dye penetration using a stereomicroscope. The results were statistically analyzed using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Dunn's post hoc test with a Bonferroni correction test was used to compute multiple pairwise comparisons that identified differences among groups; the level of significance was set at p provisional cement demonstrated the lowest microleakage scores, which were statistically different from those of the glass ionomer-based provisional cement and the ZONE cement. The provisional cementing agents exhibited different sealing abilities. The Bis-G