WorldWideScience

Sample records for residue nitrogen credit

  1. Nitrogen credits after peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperative Extension throughout the Southeast currently recommends 22-67 kg N/ha credit to subsequent crops following peanut. However, these values are not supported in the peer-reviewed literature. Most of the peer-reviewed literature has shown that N credits to subsequent crops are negligible. Da...

  2. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes is the main input of nitrogen in ecological agriculture. The cycling of N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues was studied during three years in small field plots and lysimeters. The residual organic labelled N declined rapidly during the initial...... management methods in order to conserve grain legume residue N sources within the soil-plant system....

  3. Nitrogen credits from cowpea, soybean, groundnut and Mucuna to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    zone of Ghana to quantify nitrogen credits to maize from early (65–105 days) and medium/late-matur- ing (80–120days) grain legumes (cowpea, soybean, and groundnut), and from Mucuna cover crop. The design was a split plot in randomized complete block with three nitrogen levels (0, 45, 90 kg Nha-") applied to maize ...

  4. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  5. Peanut residue carbon and nitrogen mineralization under simulated conventional and conservation tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Residue management is an important aspect of crop production systems. Availability of plant residue nitrogen (N) to succeeding crops is dependent on N mineralization rates during decomposition. Cooperative Extension currently recommends 22-67 kg N ha-1 credit to subsequent crops following peanut (Ar...

  6. Availability of residual nitrogen from fertilizers in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakovljevic, M.; Filipovic, R.; Petrovic, M.

    1983-01-01

    The plant availability of residual fertilizer nitrogen for the next crop was studied in chernozem and pseudogley soils. Release of nitrogen was examined after incubation at 3 and 30 0 C. It was found that the use of increased doses of nitrogen fertilizer (ammonium nitrate) led to an increased release of residual fertilizer nitrogen into plant available forms. The release of this nitrogen fraction was 5-10 times faster in comparison with the remaining soil nitrogen. (author)

  7. Availability of residual nitrogen from fertilizers in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakovljevic, M.; Filipovic, R.; Petrovic, M. (Institut za Primeni Nuklearne Energije u Poljoprivedri, Veterinarstvu i Sumarstvu, Zemun (Yugoslavia))

    1983-05-01

    The plant availability of residual fertilizer nitrogen for the next crop was studied in chernozem and pseudogley soils. Release of nitrogen was examined after incubation at 3 and 30/sup 0/C. It was found that the use of increased doses of nitrogen fertilizer (ammonium nitrate) led to an increased release of residual fertilizer nitrogen into plant available forms. The release of this nitrogen fraction was 5-10 times faster in comparison with the remaining soil nitrogen.

  8. Nitrogen mineralization from organic residues: research opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, M L; Kissel, D E; Vigil, M F

    2005-01-01

    Research on nitrogen (N) mineralization from organic residues is important to understand N cycling in soils. Here we review research on factors controlling net N mineralization as well as research on laboratory and field modeling efforts, with the objective of highlighting areas with opportunities for additional research. Among the factors controlling net N mineralization are organic composition of the residue, soil temperature and water content, drying and rewetting events, and soil characteristics. Because C to N ratio of the residue cannot explain all the variability observed in N mineralization among residues, considerable effort has been dedicated to the identification of specific compounds that play critical roles in N mineralization. Spectroscopic techniques are promising tools to further identify these compounds. Many studies have evaluated the effect of temperature and soil water content on N mineralization, but most have concentrated on mineralization from soil organic matter, not from organic residues. Additional work should be conducted with different organic residues, paying particular attention to the interaction between soil temperature and water content. One- and two-pool exponential models have been used to model N mineralization under laboratory conditions, but some drawbacks make it difficult to identify definite pools of mineralizable N. Fixing rate constants has been used as a way to eliminate some of these drawbacks when modeling N mineralization from soil organic matter, and may be useful for modeling N mineralization from organic residues. Additional work with more complex simulation models is needed to simulate both gross N mineralization and immobilization to better estimate net N mineralized from organic residues.

  9. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    weeks of decomposition, due to high rates of residue N net mineralization and subsequent leaching and denitrification losses of N. Lysimeter experiments showed that pea residues may reduce leaching losses of N, probably due to their effect on the mineralization-immobilizalion turnover of N...... and denitrification. Winter barley succeeding field pea recovered 13% of the incorporated pea residue N by early December; the recovery was found to be 15% at maturity in July. A spring-sown crop of barley recovered less than half the amount of pea residue N recovered by winter barley. The residue N-use efficiencies...

  10. Nitrogen accumulation and residual effects of nitrogen catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The nitrogen accumulation in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) and tansy phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia L.), under- or aftersown as nitrogen catch crops to spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and field pea (Pisum...

  11. Nitrogen accumulation and residual effects of nitrogen catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    sativum L.), was studied in three field experiments. The effect of catch crop incorporation in the soil on the yield and N accumulation in succeeding crops was also investigated. An aftersown catch crop should be used for pea, since undersown ryegrasses reduced the pea yield. Undersown perennial ryegrass......The nitrogen accumulation in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) and tansy phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia L.), under- or aftersown as nitrogen catch crops to spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and field pea (Pisum...... or an aftersown catch crop can be used for spring barley. The catch crops had accumulated up to 70 kg N ha-1 at the time of ploughdown in early December. The nitrogen accumulation in catch crops following pea was significantly higher than in the catch crop following barley supplied with 100 kg N ha-1. Barley...

  12. RECOVERY OF WHEAT RESIDUE NITROGEN 15 AND RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore 85 kg ha-1 N as labelled ammonium sulfate (9.764% atomic excess) was applied in a three-split application. Fertiliser N recovery by wheat in the first year was 33.1%. At harvest, 64.8% of fertiliser N was found in the 0 - 80 cm profile as residual fertiliser-derived N; 2.1% of the applied N could not be accounted for ...

  13. Decomposition of sugar cane crop residues under different nitrogen rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Costa Potrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of organic residues through mechanical harvesting of cane sugar is a growing practice in sugarcane production system. The maintenance of these residues on the soil surface depends mainly on environmental conditions. Nitrogen fertilization on dry residues tend to retard decomposition of these, providing benefits such as increased SOM. Thus, the object of this research was to evaluate the effect of different doses of nitrogen on sugar cane crop residues, as its decomposition and contribution to carbon sequestration in soil. The experiment was conducted in Dourados-MS and consisted of a randomized complete block design. Dried residues were placed in litter bags and the treatments were arranged in a split plot, being the four nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg ha-1 N the plots, and the seven sampling times (0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 the spit plots. Decomposition rates of residues, total organic carbon and labile carbon on soil were analysed. The application of increasing N doses resulted in an increase in their decomposition rates. Despite this, note also the mineral N application as a strategy to get higher levels of labile carbon in soil.

  14. Minerilization of carbon and nitrogen of organic residues from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minerilization of carbon and nitrogen of organic residues from selected plants in a tropical cropping system. O M Onuh, HA Okorie. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences Vol. 3 (1) 2005 pp. 11-24. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  15. Mineralization of nitrogen from nitrogen-15 labeled crop residues and utilization by rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, R.J.; Gilmour, J.T.; Wells, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of N from the residues of the previous crop to the subsequent rice (Oryza sativa L.) crop is largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure the mineralization of N from 15 N-labeled rice, soybean (Glycine max L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) residues and the uptake by a subsequent rice crop; and (2) compare the 15 N tracer method with the standard fertilizer-N response method used in field studies to quantify the N contribution from the crop residue to the next crop. Nitrogen mineralization from decomposing crop residues was measured by soil sampling prior to seeding the rice crop and after seeding by plant sampling the rice at maturity. The minimum estimate of the amount of residue N mineralized from the time of residue incorporation until rice harvest was 9, 52, and 38% of the rice, soybean, and wheat residue N, respectively. The amount of residue N recovered in the rice crop was 3, 11, and 37% of the rice, soybean, and wheat residue N, respectively. The lower the C/N ratio and the higher the amount of N in the residue, the lower was the amount of residue N recovered in the soil organic fraction at harvest and the higher was the amount of residue N mineralized. The 15 N tracer method compared favorably with the fertilizer N response method when the uptake efficiency of the fertilizer N was taken into account

  16. Exchangeable basic cations and nitrogen distribution in soil as affected by crop residues and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of N fertilization and residues of pearl millet, black oats and oilseed radish on pH and Ca, Mg, K, NO3-, and NH4+ distribution within the profile of a Distroferric Red Latosol. The equivalent of 8 t ha-1 of plant residues were placed on soil surface. Lime was applied on the soil surface and nitrogen was applied over the straw at 0, 50, 100, and 150 mg kg-1, as ammonium nitrate. Corn was grown for 57 days. Calcium contents and pH in the soil profile were decreased by Pearl millet residue, while black oat and oilseed radish increased Ca contents and these effects are not related with Ca contents in residue tissue. However, the presence of plant residues increased nitrate, ammonium, and potassium contents in the deeper layers of the pots.

  17. Cycling of fertilizer and cotton crop residue nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, I.J.; Constable, G.A.; MacLeod, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral nitrogen (N), nitrate and ammonium contents were monitored in N-fertilized soils supporting cotton crops to provide information on the nitrification, mineralization and immobilization processes operating in the soil. The relative contributions of fertilizer N, previous cotton crop residue N and indigenous soil N to the mineral N pools and to the current crop's N uptake were calculated. After N fertilizer (urea) application, the soil's mineral N content rose rapidly and subsequently declined at a slower rate. The recovery of 15 N-labelled urea as mineral N declined exponentially with time. Biological immobilization (and possibly denitrification to some extent) were believed to be the major processes reducing post-application soil mineral N content. Progressively less N was mineralized upon incubation of soil sampled through the growing season. Little soil N (either from urea or crop residue) was mineralized at crop maturity. Cycling of N was evident between the soil mineral and organic N pools throughout the cotton growing season. Considerable quantities of fertilizer N were immobilized by the soil micro biomass; immobilized N was remineralized and subsequently taken up by the cotton crop. A large proportion of the crop N was taken up in the latter part of the season when the soil mineral N content was low. It is suggested that much of the N taken up by cotton was derived from microbial sources, rather than crop residues. The application of cotton crop residue (stubble) slightly reduced the mineral N content in the soil by encouraging biological immobilization. 15 N was mineralized very slowly from the labelled crop residue and did not contribute significantly to the supply of N to the current crop. Recovery of labelled fertilizer N and labelled crop residue N by the cotton crop was 28% and 1%, respectively. In comparison, the apparent recovery of fertilizer N was 48%. Indigenous soil N contributed 68% of the N taken up by the cotton crop. 33 refs., 1 tab

  18. [Influence of water deficit and supplemental irrigation on nitrogen uptake by winter wheat and nitrogen residual in soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Wang, Bing; Li, Shengxiu

    2004-08-01

    Pot experiment in greenhouse showed that water deficit at all growth stages and supplemental irrigation at tillering stage significantly decreased the nitrogen uptake by winter wheat and increased the mineral N residual (79.8-113.7 mg x kg(-1)) in soil. Supplemental irrigation at over-wintering, jointing or filling stage significantly increased the nitrogen uptake by plant and decreased the nitrogen residual (47.2-60.3 mg x kg(-1)) in soil. But, the increase of nitrogen uptake caused by supplemental irrigation did not always mean a high magnitude of efficient use of nitrogen by plants. Supplemental irrigation at over-wintering stage didn't induce any significant change in nitrogen content of grain, irrigation at filling stage increased the nitrogen content by 20.9%, and doing this at jointing stage decreased the nitrogen content by 19.6%, as compared to the control.

  19. Nitrogen Immobilization in Plant Growth Substrates: Clean Chip Residual, Pine Bark, and Peatmoss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R. Boyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising costs of potting substrates have caused horticultural growers to search for alternative, lower-cost materials. Objectives of this study were to determine the extent of nitrogen immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate, clean chip residual. Microbial activity and nitrogen availability of two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm of clean chip residual were compared to control treatments of pine bark and peatmoss in a 60-day incubation experiment. Four rates (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg of supplemental nitrogen were assessed. Peatmoss displayed little microbial respiration over the course of the study, regardless of nitrogen rate; followed by pine bark, 0.95 cm clean chip residual, and 0.48 cm clean chip residual. Respiration increased with increasing nitrogen. Total inorganic nitrogen (plant available nitrogen was greatest with peatmoss; inorganic nitrogen in other treatments were similar at the 0, 1, and 2 mg supplemental nitrogen rates, while an increase occurred with the highest rate (3 mg. Clean chip residual and pine bark were similar in available nitrogen compared to peatmoss. This study suggests that nitrogen immobilization in substrates composed of clean chip residual is similar to pine bark and can be treated with similar fertilizer amendments during nursery production.

  20. Nitrogen fertilizer replacement value of legumes with residues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crop rotation with legumes can help reduce the inorganic nitrogen fertilizer need of the following maize as a result of increased nitrogen availability in the soil. The Nitrogen Fertilizer Replacement Value (NFRV) method was used to estimate the nitrogen contribution of grain legumes (soybean, cowpea) and an herbaceous ...

  1. Nitrogen mineralization from 'AU Golden' sunn hemp residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) cultivar ‘AU Golden’ has the potential to provide substantial amounts of nitrogen (N) to subsequent crops that could reduce recommended application rates of synthetic N fertilizers. Nitrogen fertilization problems via legumes are often due to asynch...

  2. Influence of legume residue and nitrogen fertilizer on the growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (11o38'N and 10o31'E) both in Bauchi state, during the rainy seasons of 2011 and 2012 to determine the influence of legume residue and nitrogen fertilizer on the growth and yield of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench). The treatments consist of two legumes (cowpea and soybean), nitrogen fertilizer applied at the rate ...

  3. Morphogenic and structural traits of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu under different nitrogen levels and residues heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuza Clarete Junqueira de Sales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of leaf appearance, leaf elongation rate, number of green leaves, length of blade and stem of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu under different nitrogen levels and two residue heights. A randomized block design was used in a 4 x 2 factorial scheme, four doses of nitrogen (100, 200, 300 and 400 kg N ha-1 year-1 and two residue heights (5 and 15 cm. There was significant interaction between residue height and nitrogen levels for leaf appearance rate (P> 0.05 of signal grass, which was influenced negatively and linearly (P 0.05 between the levels of nitrogen x residue height on the number of green leaves. The dosage that provided the highest stalk in the residue height of 5 cm was of 271.5 kg N ha -1. An increase of 0.0745 cm tiller -1 day-1 for 1 kg of N ha -1 applied to height of 15 cm of residue was observed. Nitrogen fertilization contributes positively to growth and development of rates of appearance and leaf extension. The management of pasture of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu with 5 cm of residue and fertilization with 100 kg N ha -1 provided better answer morphogenic traits.

  4. Residual frying oil in the diets of sheep: intake, digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Eduardo Lucas Terra; Mizubuti, Ivone Yurika; de Azambuja Ribeiro, Edson Luiz; dos Santos Moura, Elizabeth; Pereira, Elzânia Sales; do Prado, Odimari Pricila Pires; de Carvalho, Larissa Nóbrega; Pires, Kássia Amariz

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the intake and nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal ammonia nitrogen in lambs of diets containing different levels of residual frying oil. Methods Levels of 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 g/kg dry matter (DM) base of residual frying oil in the diets of lambs were evaluated. Five castrated lambs with initial body weights of 36.8±3.3 kg, distributed in a Latin square (5×5) design, were used. Results There was a decreasing linear effect on the intake of DM, organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), total carbohydrates (TCH), and nonfibrous carbohydrates (NFC). There was an increased linear intake of ether extract (EE). The apparent digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NDF, TCH, and NFC, as well as urine nitrogen excretion, nitrogen balance and ruminal parameters, were not influenced by different levels of residual frying oil in the diet. EE digestibility presented a crescent linear effect. Conclusion It can be concluded that the addition of residual frying oil to the diets of sheep can affect nutrient intake without affecting the digestibility of most nutrients (with the exception of EE), nitrogen balance and ruminal ammonia nitrogen concentration. PMID:26954203

  5. Short communication. Nitrogen content of residual alfalfa taproots under irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. residues can provide significant amounts of N to subsequent crops, but most of the data on this subject has been obtained from 1-2 year old alfalfa stands. The objective of this study was to determine the biomass of alfalfa taproots and their N content in irrigated alfalfa stands that are more than 2 years old. Twenty-two commercial irrigated alfalfa fields were evaluated in the Ebro Valley (Northeast Spain from 2006 to 2010. The taproot biomass in the arable layer (0 to 30 cm depth ranged from 1.8 to 10.1 Mg ha-1 and averaged 4.8 Mg ha-1. In contrast, the N concentration in alfalfa taproots was constant among fields and averaged 24.6 g N kg-1. The total amount of N contained in alfalfa taproots (0-30 cm depth ranged from 47 to 96 kg N ha-1 in 55% of the fields, ranged from 97 to 200 kg N ha-1 in 22% of the fields, and exceeded 200 kg N ha-1 in 23% of the fields. The N content of the irrigated alfalfa taproots studied here is in the upper range previously reported in other areas, mainly with younger alfalfa stands. Based on the current finding, a classification of the quality of irrigated alfalfa stands is proposed to improve the estimates of the residual-N effects of alfalfa on subsequent crops.

  6. Nitrogen acquisition by pea and barley and the effect of their crop residues on available nitrogen for subsequent crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen acquisition by field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grown on a sandy loam soil and availability of N in three subsequent sequences of a cropping system were studied in an outdoor pot experiment. The effect of crop residues on the N availability was evaluated....... The uptake of soil-derived N by a test crop (N catch crop) of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) grown in the autumn was higher after pea than after barley. The N uptake in the test crop was reduced by 27% and 34% after pea and barley residue incorporation, respectively, probably due to N immobilization....... The dry matter production and total N uptake of a spring barley crop following pea or barley, with a period of unplanted soil in the autumn/winter, were significantly higher after pea than after barley. The barley crop following pea and barley recovered 11% of the pea and 8% of the barley residue N...

  7. Fertilizer nitrogen recovery efficiencies in crop production systems of China with and without consideration of the residual effect of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xiaoyuan; Ti, Chaopu; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Vitousek, Peter; Chen, Deli; Leip, Adrian; Cai, Zucong

    2014-01-01

    China is the world’s largest consumer of synthetic nitrogen (N), where very low rates of fertilizer N recovery in crops have been reported, raising discussion around whether fertilizer N use can be significantly reduced without yield penalties. However, using recovery rates as indicator ignores a possible residual effect of fertilizer N—a factor often unknown at large scales. Such residual effect might store N in the soil increasing N availability for subsequent crops. The objectives of the present study were therefore to quantify the residual effect of fertilizer N in China and to obtain more realistic rates of the accumulative fertilizer N recovery efficiency (RE) in crop production systems of China. Long-term spatially-extensive data on crop production, fertilizer N and other N inputs to croplands in China were used to analyze the relationship between crop N uptake and fertilizer N input (or total N input), and to estimate the amount of residual fertilizer N. Measurement results of cropland soil N content in two time periods were obtained to compare the change in the soil N pool. At the provincial scale, it was found that there is a linear relationship between crop N uptake and fertilizer N input or total N input. With the increase in fertilizer N input, annual direct fertilizer N RE decreased and was indeed low (below 30% in recent years), while its residual effect increased continuously, to the point that 40–68% of applied fertilizer was used for crop production sooner or later. The residual effect was evidenced by a buildup of soil N and a large difference between nitrogen use efficiencies of long-term and short-term experiments. (paper)

  8. Covalent binding of nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue in human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jansen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Covalent binding of various clinically important nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin, in vitro and in vivo, is demonstrated. A rapid method for detection of these adducts is presented, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the adducted

  9. Nitrogen immobilization in plant growth substrates: clean chip residual, pine bark and peat moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent of nitrogen (N) immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate (clean chip residual (CCR)). Control treatments of pine bark (PB) and peat moss (PM) were compared to two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm) of CCR for micro...

  10. Crop residue decomposition, residual soil organic matter and nitrogen mineralization in arable soils with contrasting textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matus, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of cropping, soil texture and soil structure for the decomposition of 14C- and 15N-labelled crop residues, a study was conducted in a sand and a

  11. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Crop Residues and Animal Manure Common in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Zhao, Guanglu; Zhang, Yang; Han, Lujia; Xiao, Weihua

    2017-10-25

    Accurately determining protein content is essential in exploiting biomass as feed and fuel. A survey of biomass samples in China indicated protein contents from 2.65 to 3.98% for crop residues and from 6.07 to 10.24% for animal manure of dry basis. Conversion factors based on amino acid nitrogen (k A ) ranged from 5.42 to 6.00 for the former and from 4.78 to 5.36 for the latter, indicating that the traditional factor of 6.25 is not suitable for biomass samples. On the other hand, conversion factors from Kjeldahl nitrogen (k P ) ranged from 3.97 to 4.57 and from 2.76 to 4.31 for crop residues and animal manure, respectively. Of note, conversion factors were strongly affected by amino acid composition and levels of nonprotein nitrogen. Thus, k P values of 4.23 for crop residues, 4.11 for livestock manure, and 3.11 for poultry manure are recommended to better estimate protein content from total nitrogen.

  12. Nitrogen Transfer from Cover Crop Residues to Onion Grown under Minimum Tillage in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoncio de Paula Koucher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen derived from cover crop residues may contribute to the nutrition of onion grown under minimum tillage (MT and cultivated in rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the N transferred from different cover crop residues to the onion crop cultivated under MT in southern Brazil. In June 2014, oilseed radish, black oat, and oilseed radish + black oat residues labeled with 15N were deposited on the soil surface before transplanting onions. During the growth season and at harvest, young expanded onion leaves, complete plants, and samples from different soil layers were collected and analyzed for recovery of 15N-labeled residue. Oilseed radish decomposed faster than other residues and 4 % of residue N was recovered in leaves and bulbs at harvest, but in general, N in plant organs was derived from sources other than the cover crop residues. In addition, leaf N was in the proper range for all treatments and was adequately mobilized to the bases for bulbing. The N derived from decomposing residues contributed little to onion development and the use of these plants should be chosen based on their advantages for physical and biological soil quality.

  13. Residue and soil carbon sequestration in relation to crop yield as affected by irrigation, tillage, cropping system and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on management practices is needed to increase surface residue and soil C sequestration to obtain farm C credit. The effects of irrigation, tillage, cropping system, and N fertilization were evaluated on the amount of crop biomass (stems and leaves) returned to the soil, surface residue C...

  14. Part 1: Logging residues in piles - Needle loss and fuel quality. Part 2: Nitrogen leaching under piles of logging residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtikangas, P.; Lundkvist, H.

    1991-01-01

    Part 1: Experimental piles were built in three geographical locations during May-Sept. 1989. Logging residues consisted of 95% spruce and 5% pine. Height of the piles varied between 80 and 230 cm. Needles were collected by placing drawers under 40 randomely chosen piles. The drawers were emptied every two weeks during the storage period. Natural needle loss was between 18 and 32% of the total amount of needles after the first two months of storage. At the end of the storage period, 24-42% of the needles had fallen down to the drawers. At the end of the experiment the total needle fall was 95-100% in the shaken piles. According to the results of this study piles smaller than 150 cm had the most effective needle fall. Piles should be placed on open places where the air and sun heat penetrate and dry them. Needles were the most sensitive fraction to variations in precipitation compared to the other components, such as branches. Piles usually dried quickly, but they also rewet easily. This was especially true in the smaller piles. The lowest moisture content was measured at the end of June. The ash content in needles varied between 4 and 8%. 16 refs., 15 figs. Part 2: Three field experiments were equipped with no-tension humus lysimeters. Pairs of lysimeters with the same humus/field layer vegetation material were placed in pairs, one under a pile of felling residues and another in the open clear felling. Leaching of nitrogen as well as pH and electric conductivity in the leachate was followed through sampling of the leachate at regular intervals. The results from the investigation show that: * the amount of leachate was higher in lysimeters in the open clear felling, * pH in the leachate was initially lower under piles of felling residues, * the amount of nitrogen leached was higher in the open clear felling. Thus, storing of felling residues in piles during the summer season did not cause any increase in nitrogen leaching, which had been considered to be a risk

  15. A Nitrogen-concentrated Phase in IA Iron Meteorite Acid Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, K.; Sugiura, N.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: Iron meteorites are considered to have experienced a complex history, which is indicated by the variations in trace element chemistry (e.g., [1]). Among iron meteorite groups, the so called nonmagmatic groups, such as IAB, IIE, and IIICD, may have passed through different formation paths compared to others. Nitrogen isotopes can be a useful tool to understand the origin and formation processes of iron meteorites. Nikogen isotopes in a number of iron meteorites are measured [2,3], although trapping sites of nitrogen in iron meteorites are not yet clear. This is an important issue because nitrogen, a typical mobile element, may well reflect thermal history of their parent bodies (c.f., [4]). Generally, a major portion of nitrogen in iron meteorites is expected to be in a solid solution in Fe-Ni, especially in f.c.c. Fe-Ni (taenite). Franchi et al. [3] report that at least 25 to 35% of nitrogen in magmatic iron meteorites is in acid insoluble phases, however, not in those of non-magmatic meteorites. This result contradicts with the result [5] who report that a significant portion of nitrogen seems to be trapped in acid residues not only of magmatic meteorites but also of non- magmatic meteorites. To resolve the contradiction described above, and to identify the trapping site, we started measuring nitrogen isotopes in acid residues of iron metcorites. We report here preliminary results on acid residues of Canyon Diablo (IA). Procedures: Acid residues were prepared by Dr. J.-I. Matsuda and his colleagues. Different blocks of Canyon Diablo, "Can-1" and "Can-2" were treated by 14M HCl, 10M-HF + 1M-HCl, 1M-HCl, and by aqua regia, which destroyed Fe-Ni, sulfides, silicates, and shreibersite. Acid residues of these two blocks, "Can-1bn" and "Can-2b," yielded 0.102 wt% and 0.299 wt% of their original masses, respectively These residues seem to consist mostly of graphite No diamond was detected by powder X-ray analysis [6]. Preliminary Results: A predominant

  16. Biochemical suitability of crop residues for cellulosic ethanol: disincentives to nitrogen fertilization in corn agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Morgan E; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Snapp, Sieglinde; McSwiney, Claire P; Baldock, Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Concerns about energy security and climate change have increased biofuel demand, particularly ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstocks (e.g., food crop residues). A central challenge to cropping for cellulosic ethanol is the potential environmental damage from increased fertilizer use. Previous analyses have assumed that cropping for carbohydrate in residue will require the same amount of fertilizer as cropping for grain. Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that increases in biomass in response to fertilization are not uniform across biochemical classes (carbohydrate, protein, lipid, lignin) or tissues (leaf and stem, grain, reproductive support). Although corn grain responds vigorously and nonlinearly, corn residue shows only modest increases in carbohydrate yields in response to high levels of fertilization (25% increase with 202 kg N ha(-1)). Lignin yields in the residue increased almost twice as much as carbohydrate yields in response to nitrogen, implying that residue feedstock quality declines as more fertilizer is applied. Fertilization also increases the decomposability of corn residue, implying that soil carbon sequestration becomes less efficient with increased fertilizer. Our results suggest that even when corn is grown for grain, benefits of fertilization decline rapidly after the ecosystem's N demands are met. Heavy application of fertilizer yields minimal grain benefits and almost no benefits in residue carbohydrates, while degrading the cellulosic ethanol feedstock quality and soil carbon sequestration capacity.

  17. Espresso coffee residues as a nitrogen amendment for small-scale vegetable production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Soraia; Marques dos Santos Cordovil, Cláudia S C

    2015-12-01

    Espresso coffee grounds constitute a residue which is produced daily in considerable amounts, and is often pointed out as being potentially interesting for plant nutrition. Two experiments (incubations and field experiments) were carried out to evaluate the potential nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) supply for carrot (Daucus carota L.), spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) nutrition. Immobilisation of nitrogen and phosphorus was detected in all the incubations and, in the field experiments, germination and yield growth were decreased by the presence of espresso coffee grounds, in general for all the species studied. The study showed an inhibition of N and P mineralisation and a reduction of plant germination and growth. Further research is required to determine whether this is related to the immobilising capacity of the residue or possibly due to the presence of caffeine. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosano Edmilson José

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (15N released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea, velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha-1 of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground parts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha-1 of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean, and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with 15N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experiment al period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox.

  19. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose [Estacao Experimental de Agronomia de Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Centro de Acao Regional; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Cantarella, Heitor [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas (IAC), SP (Brazil). Centro de Solos e Recursos Agroambientais; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social e Bioestatistica

    2003-03-01

    Nitrogen ({sup 15}N) released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea), velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima) and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha{sup -1} of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground arts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 x 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf) and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean), and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with {sup 15}N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experimental period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox. (author)

  20. Residual nitrogen fertilization effect of common bean production on succeeding corn intercropped with Congo grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos de Almeida Carmeis Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Crop production in conservation systems involving intercropped cultivations mainly with corn have been proposed as a technology to promote sustainability in the Brazilian Cerrado areas. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of residual nitrogen fertilization applied in common bean on subsequent corn sole or intercropped with Congo grass (Urochloa ruziziensis in no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in randomized blocks with three replicates in a split-plot design. The treatments were composed by two cropping systems (sole and intercropped with Congo grass, and the sub-plots were five doses of nitrogen (0; 40; 80; 120 and 160 kg of N ha-1, applied in topdressing on common-bean (previous crop. There was no effect of cropping systems and residual amount of nitrogen application in the vegetative and reproductive development of corn. Corn intercropped with Congo grass leaded an adequate formation of crop residue and total land covering target at sustainability of no-tillage system.

  1. Nitrogen availability from residues-based biochar at two pyrolisis temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscione, Aline Renee; Silveira Bibar, Maria Paula; de Andrade, Cristiano Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Biochar has been studied for several applications, such as soil quality improvement, heavy metals remediation and N2O mitigation. Considering the soil quality improvement aspect it is desirable to evaluate if the nitrogen content in biochar samples obtained from several residues used as the biomass sources could be available for plants. Samples of sewage sludge (SS), coffee grounds (CG), chicken manure (CM) and fungi mycelia (FM) were pyrolyzed at two temperatures, 400 and 700 oC (indicated by the number 4 and 7 in this abstract, respectively), in order to obtain the biochar samples. The Kjeldahl nitrogen of biochar was (% m/m): 3.0 (CM4, CG7, FM7 and CG4); 2.0 (CM7 e SS4); 3.4 (FM7); 1.4 (SS7), with organic carbon (potassium dichromate method) ranging from 2.0 to 3.0% for all but CG4 (6%). The C/N ratio of biochar samples was: 9 (CM4, SS4 and CG7); 11 (CM7); 15 (SS7); 7 (FM4 and FM7); 21 (CG4). The eight soil + biochar resulting mixtures, prepared using the equivalent to 60 t/ha of biochar (about 3% w/w), and one additional control treatment (no biochar added) were incubated for 90 days, with four replications of each treatment per time evaluated. Inorganic nitrogen and soil pH measurements were performed for all treatments at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of incubation. Soil moisture was kept at 40% soil water holding capacity, by weighting, during the experiment. The data was submitted to ANOVA with Tukey's average comparison test (p pyrolisis temperatures. After five days of incubation SS4 and CM4 showed significant inorganic nitrogen release compared to all other treatments, behavior repeated at all the following times evaluated. For CM7, FM4 and FM7 maximum nitrogen availability was observed after 15 days, while it occurred after 90 days for SS4. After 90 days, only SS4 and CM4 presented a positive nitrogen balance, reaching 8 and 9 % of the nitrogen added by biochar samples release to the soil, respectively. A first order kinetic model was adjusted for SS4

  2. Phenol Adsorption on Nitrogen-enriched Activated Carbon Prepared from Bamboo Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Zhang; Xiao-Juan Jin; Jian-Min Gao; Xiu-Dong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons prepared from bamboo residues were characterized by means of BET, XPS, and elemental analysis. Then adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effects of various physicochemical parameters such as contact time, temperature, pH, and initial concentration. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 120 min at a phenol concentration of 250 mg/L. When the pH was 4 and 0.1 g of the carbon absorbent and 100 mL of phenol solution at 250 mg/L were used, t...

  3. Release of nitrogen precursors from coal and biomass residues in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    This work was undertaken with the aim of quantifying the relative amounts of NH{sub 3} and HCN released from different residues during their devolatilization under fluidized bed conditions. The results were compared with data collected for bituminous coals of different origin. The relation between amounts of HCN and NH{sub 3} released and the levels of NOX and N{sub 2}O formed during cocombustion was also addressed. The partitioning of nitrogen between volatiles and char was also quantified. The pyrolysis studies were undertaken in a small fluidized bed reactor of 80 mm of ID and 500 mm high using an inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}). The HCN and NH{sub 3} were quantified by bubbling the pyrolysis gases in absorbing solutions which were subsequently analyzed with selective electrodes. The combustion studies were carried out on a pilot installation. The fluidized bed combustor is square in cross section with each side being 300 mm long. There is secondary air supply to the freeboard at different heights to deal with high volatile fuels as almost all waste materials are. The temperatures in the bed and in the freeboard and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The results obtained suggest that, while coal releases nitrogen mostly as HCN, residues like RDF and sewage sludge give out fuel-N in greater quantities as NH{sub 3}. Residues at fluidized bed combustion (FBC) temperatures release more than 80% of the fuel-N with the volatiles. The NH{sub 3} evolved during pyrolysis acted as a reducing agent on NOX emissions. The presence of calcium significantly reduces the emission of N{sub 2}O probably by interfering with HCN chemistry. With high amounts of residues in the fuel mixture, the relative importance of char on the nitrogen chemistry substantially decreases. By using cocombustion, it is possible to reduce fuel-N conversion to NOX and N{sub 2}O, by tuning the amounts of coal and residue in the mixture. 29 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of Residue Nitrogen Concentration and Time Duration on Carbon Mineralization Rate of Alfalfa Residues in Regions with Different Climatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeid shafiei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Various factors like climatic conditions, vegetation, soil properties, topography, time, plant residue quality and crop management strategies affect the decomposition rate of organic carbon (OC and its residence time in soil. Plant residue management concerns nutrients recycling, carbon recycling in ecosystems and the increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Plant residue decomposition is a fundamental process in recycling of organic matter and elements in most ecosystems. Soil management, particularly plant residue management, changes soil organic matter both qualitatively and quantitatively. Soil respiration and carbon loss are affected by soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, solar radiation and precipitation. In natural agro-ecosystems, residue contains different concentrations of nitrogen. It is important to understand the rate and processes involved in plant residue decomposition, as these residues continue to be added to the soil under different weather conditions, especially in arid and semi-arid climates. Material and methods Organic carbon mineralization of alfalfa residue with different nitrogen concentrations was assessed in different climatic conditions using split-plot experiments over time and the effects of climate was determined using composite analysis. The climatic conditions were classified as warm-arid (Jiroft, temperate arid (Narab and cold semi-arid (Sardouiyeh using cluster analysis and the nitrogen (N concentrations of alfalfa residue were low, medium and high. The alfalfa residue incubated for four different time periods (2, 4, 6 and 8 months. The dynamics of organic carbon in different regions measured using litter bags (20×10 cm containing 20 g alfalfa residue of 2-10 mm length which were placed on the soil surface. Results and discussion The results of this study showed that in a warm-arid (Jiroft, carbon loss and the carbon decomposition rate constant were low in a cold semi

  5. Utilization of residual nitrogen (15N) from cover crop and urea by corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edson Cabral da; Muraoka, Takashi; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Buzetti, Salatier; Veloso, Marcos Emanuel da Costa

    2006-01-01

    The majority of N from mineral fertilizers and cover crops is usually not used by the very next corn crop, but can be absorbed by follow-up crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of residual nitrogen from urea, sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea) and millet (Pennisetum americanum) labeled with 15 N, applied to no-tillage corn in the previous growing season, in a Red Latosol of the Cerrado. The study was conducted in an experimental farm of the Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Ilha Solteira, in Selviria county (MS), Brazil, in different areas. The experiment had a randomized complete block design, with 15 treatments and four replications. Treatments were applied to corn crop in the 2001/02 and 2003/04 growing seasons. They were distributed in a 3 x 5 factorial layout, representing the combination of three cover crops: sunnhemp, millet and spontaneous vegetation (fallow) and five N rates (as urea): 0, 30, 80, 130, and 180 kg ha-1 of N. After corn harvest, the two areas were followed in the dry season and were followed by corn crop in the 2002/03 (experiment 1) and 2003/04 (experiment 2) growing seasons, using the same fertilizer rate on all plots to distinguish the residual effect of N sources. The average use of residual N from the millet and sunnhemp residues (above-ground part) by corn crop was less than 3.5 and 3 %, respectively, of the initial amount. The corn uptake of residual N from urea increased in a quadratic manner in experiment 1 and linearly in experiment Two as a response to the applied N rates, and the recover was below 3 %. The cover crop type did not affect the use of residual N of urea by corn, and vice-versa. (author)

  6. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and residue management practices on ammonia emissions from subtropical sugarcane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    mudi, Sanku Datta; Wang, Jim J.; Dodla, Syam Kumar; Arceneaux, Allen; Viator, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from soil is a loss of nitrogen (N) nutrient for plant production as well as an issue of air quality, due to the fact that it is an active precursor of airborne particulate matters. Ammonia also acts as a secondary source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when present in the soil. In this study, the impacts of different sources of N fertilizers and harvest residue management schemes on NH3 emissions from sugarcane production were evaluated based on an active chamber method. The field experiment plots consisting of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN)) and two common residue management practices, namely residue retained (RR) and residue burned (RB), were established on a Commerce silt loam. The NH3 volatilized following N fertilizer application was collected in an impinger containing diluted citric acid and was subsequently analyzed using ion chromatography. The NH3 loss was primarily found within 3-4 weeks after N application. Average seasonal soil NH3 flux was significantly greater in urea plots with NH3-N emission factor (EF) twice or more than in UAN plots (2.4-5.6% vs. 1.2-1.7%). The RR residue management scheme had much higher NH3 volatilization than the RB treatment regardless of N fertilizer sources, corresponding to generally higher soil moisture levels in the former. Ammonia-N emissions in N fertilizer-treated sugarcane fields increased with increasing soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) up to 45-55% observed in the field. Both N fertilizer sources and residue management approaches significantly affected NH3 emissions.

  7. Decomposition and nitrogen release patterns of Gliricidia sepium tree residues under controlled incubation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintu, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Tree legumes can serve as nitrogen (N) source for cereals in resource poor farms where chemical fertilizer is financially unaffordable. Over the past decade, ICRAF and partners have developed several 'fertilizer tree systems' that are low-cost, easy to manage, highly productive and profitable. These have been widely disseminated in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. However, much work remains to broaden the scientific underpinning of these systems and develop the management principles to guide further research and dissemination into areas beyond the initial pilot research areas. Gliricidia sepium roots and leaves, as individual components and as a mixture, were incubated in an 15 N labeled acidic Ultisol under controlled laboratory conditions. Decomposition was monitored as CO 2 evolution and inorganic N released over time. The aim was to determine inorganic soil N and pH dynamics as affected by residue quality. This study used 15 N dilution method to determine 'percent N derived from tree residues (%Ndfr) of G. sepium residues. The greatest attribute of this technique is its ability to distinguish between residue-N and soil derived N. The possibility to distinguish between the major N forms (nitrate and ammonium-N) and their quantities at different stages of decomposition exists, according to this study. This information is valuable in predicting the fate of applied residue N in actual field situations, since the forms and quantity of available soil N determine the magnitude of N loss to the environment or utilization by crop under respective field conditions and practices. The 15 N dilution method, leading to computation of %Ndfr therefore, offers an invaluable qualitative and quantitative way of measuring N mineralization from agroforestry residues. Our results showed that NO 3 -Ndfr remained low through out the study, indicating that loss of Ndfr via NO 3 -N leaching would probably not be an important concern. However, inorganic N availability from

  8. Wheat nitrogen fertilizer residues on an ultisol from the IX Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouanet M, Juan Luis; Pino N, Ines; Nario M, Adriana; Jobet, Claudio; Parada V, Ana Maria; Videla L, Ximena

    2005-01-01

    The soil nitrogen fertilizer residue is a relevant issue on a wheat production system at the IX Region of Chile, due to the high level of yield and use of resources, having an environmental impact from the use of fertilizer economy. The N-soil residue, not absorb by the plant, can be leach and contaminate the groundwater with nitrates or be redistributed by erosion. The application of isotopic techniques, using fertilizer labeled with 15 N, providing the quantitative information of the fate of this nutrient in the plant-soil system, important in the rate formulation based on the nitrogen use efficiency and in the benefit/cost relation. An assay was carried out in an Ultisol Metrenco Soil (Family fine, mixed, mesic, Typic Paleudults) at Pumalal locality. A Kumpa wheat variety was used, with a control treatment and five N rates applied as Urea labeled with 10% 15 N a.e., split in four times during the crop growth cycle. Total N (Kjeldhal) and 15 N optical emission spectrometer were determined in grain and straw samples harvested in February. Before to the next sow on may, soil sample were taken with an 3 cm diameter hugger (0-20; 20-40 and 40-60 cm depth). The samples were air dried, sieved and analyzed for total N and 15 N. The parameters determined for each depth were: N total (%), 15 N a.e. to obtain the plant-soil system N fertilizer recovery and its N residues in the soil profile. The wheat yield obtained was related with a cubic model using the N fertilizer rate applied (R 2 =0.75). The highest yield for the grain, 9.8 Mg ha -1 , was obtained applying 197 k ha -1 of N, with 45% of 15 N recovered by the grain. Nevertheless, the soil-crop system obtained a high 15 N recovery (>88%), in the soil remained 32-60% as N residue, being not used by the plant during the growth period. Between 27-54% of the 15 N total residue was found at the 0-20 cm soil depth, portion that is susceptible of distribution by erosion, implied in the use of fertilizer economy. Around 4

  9. Multi-Seasonal Nitrogen Recoveries from Crop Residue in Soil and Crop in a Temperate Agro-Ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Hu

    Full Text Available In conservation tillage systems, at least 30% of the soil surface was covered by crop residues which generally contain significant amounts of nitrogen (N. However, little is known about the multi-seasonal recoveries of the N derived from these crop residues in soil-crop systems, notably in northeastern China. In a temperate agro-ecosystem, 15N-labeled maize residue was applied to field surfaces in the 1st year (2009. From the 2nd to 4th year (2010-2012, one treatment halted the application of maize residue, whereas the soil in the second treatment was re-applied with unlabeled maize residue. Crop and soil samples were collected after each harvest, and their 15N enrichments were determined on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to trace the allocation of N derived from the initially applied maize residue in the soil-crop systems. On average, 8.4% of the maize residue N was recovered in the soil-crop in the 1st year, and the vast majority (61.9%-91.9% was recovered during subsequent years. Throughout the experiment, the cumulative recovery of the residue N in the crop increased gradually (18.2%-20.9%, but most of the residue N was retained in the soil, notably in the 0-10 cm soil layer. Compared to the single application, the sequential residue application significantly increased the recovery of the residue N in the soil profile (73.8% vs. 40.9% and remarkably decreased the total and the initially applied residue derived mineral N along the soil profile. Our results suggested that the residue N was actively involved in N cycling, and its release and recovery in crop and soil profile were controlled by the decomposition process. Sequential residue application significantly enhanced the retention and stabilization of the initially applied residue N in the soil and retarded its translocation along the soil profile.

  10. Multi-Seasonal Nitrogen Recoveries from Crop Residue in Soil and Crop in a Temperate Agro-Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiao; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Hongtu; Wu, Yeye; Cui, Jiehua; Sun, Ci; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    In conservation tillage systems, at least 30% of the soil surface was covered by crop residues which generally contain significant amounts of nitrogen (N). However, little is known about the multi-seasonal recoveries of the N derived from these crop residues in soil-crop systems, notably in northeastern China. In a temperate agro-ecosystem, 15N-labeled maize residue was applied to field surfaces in the 1st year (2009). From the 2nd to 4th year (2010-2012), one treatment halted the application of maize residue, whereas the soil in the second treatment was re-applied with unlabeled maize residue. Crop and soil samples were collected after each harvest, and their 15N enrichments were determined on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to trace the allocation of N derived from the initially applied maize residue in the soil-crop systems. On average, 8.4% of the maize residue N was recovered in the soil-crop in the 1st year, and the vast majority (61.9%-91.9%) was recovered during subsequent years. Throughout the experiment, the cumulative recovery of the residue N in the crop increased gradually (18.2%-20.9%), but most of the residue N was retained in the soil, notably in the 0-10 cm soil layer. Compared to the single application, the sequential residue application significantly increased the recovery of the residue N in the soil profile (73.8% vs. 40.9%) and remarkably decreased the total and the initially applied residue derived mineral N along the soil profile. Our results suggested that the residue N was actively involved in N cycling, and its release and recovery in crop and soil profile were controlled by the decomposition process. Sequential residue application significantly enhanced the retention and stabilization of the initially applied residue N in the soil and retarded its translocation along the soil profile.

  11. Residual recovery and yield performance of nitrogen fertilizer applied at sugarcane planting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Coutinho Junqueira Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe low effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizer (N is a substantial concern that threatens global sugarcane production. The aim of the research reported in this paper was to assess the residual effect of N-fertilizer applied at sugarcane planting over four crop seasons in relation to sugarcane crop yield. Toward this end three field experiments were established in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, during February of 2005 and July of 2009, in a randomized block design with four treatments: 0, 40, 80 and 120 kg ha−1 of N applied as urea during sugarcane planting. Within each plot, a microplot was established to which 15N-labeled urea was applied. The application of N at planting increased plant cane yield in two of the three sites and sucrose content at the other, whereas the only residual effect was higher sucrose content in one of the following ratoons. The combined effect was an increase in sugar yield for three of the 11 crop seasons evaluated. Over the crop cycle of a plant cane and three ratoon crops, only 35 % of the applied N was recovered, split 75, 13, 7 and 5 % in the plant cane, first, second and third ratoons, respectively. These findings document the low efficiency of N recovery by sugarcane, which increases the risk that excessive N fertilization will reduce profitability and have an adverse effect on the environment.

  12. Barley Benefits from Organic Nitrogen in Plant Residues Applied to Soil using 15N Isotope Dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadalla, A.M.; Galal, Y.G.M.; Abdel Aziz, H.A.; El-Degwy, S.M.A.; Abd El-Haleem, M.

    2008-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in pots (sandy soil cultivated with Barley plant) under greenhouse conditions, at Inshas, Egypt. The aim was to evaluate the transformation of nitrogen applied either as mineral form ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , or as organic-material-N (plant residues) .Basal recommended doses of P and K were applied. Labeled 15 N as( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 (5 % a.e) or plant residues (ground leuceana forage, compost, and mixture of them) were applied at a rate of 20 kg N/ ha). 15 N technique was used to evaluate N-uptake and fertilizer use efficiency. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design under greenhouse conditions. The obtained results showed that the dry weight of barley shoots was positively affected by reinforcement of mineral- N with organic-N. On the other hand, the highest dry weight was estimated with leuceana either applied alone or reinforced with mineral N. Similar trend was noticed with N uptake but only with organic N, while with treatment received 50% organic-N. plus 50% mineral- N. the best value of N uptake was recorded with mixture of leuceana and compost. The amount of Ndff was lowest where fertilizer 15 N was applied alone. Comparing Ndff for the three organic treatments which received a combination of fertilizer- 15 N+organic-material-N, results showed that the highest Ndff was occurred with mixture of leuceana and compost, whereas the lowest was induced with individual leuceana treatment. 15 N recovery in shoots of barley ranged between 22.14 % to 82.16 %. The lowest occurred with application of mineral 15 N alone and; the highest occurred where mineral 15 N was mixed with compost or leucaena-compost mixture

  13. [Effects of nitrogen management on maize nitrogen utilization and residual nitrate nitrogen in soil under maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Wen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Qun; Yong, Tai-Wen; Liu, Wei-Guo; Yang, Feng; Mao, Shu-Ming

    2014-10-01

    A large amount of nitrogen (N) fertilizers poured into the fields severely pollute the environment. Reasonable application of N fertilizer has always been the research hotpot. The effects of N management on maize N utilization and residual nitrate N in soil under maize/soybean and maize/ sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems were reported in a field experiment in southwest China. It was found that maize N accumulation, N harvest index, N absorption efficiency, N contribution proportion after the anthesis stage in maize/soybean relay strip intercropping were increased by 6.1%, 5.4%, 4.3%, and 15.1% than under maize/sweet potato with an increase of 22.6% for maize yield after sustainable growing of maize/soybean intercropping system. Nitrate N accumulation in the 0-60 cm soil layer was 12.9% higher under maize/soybean intercropping than under maize/sweet potato intercropping. However, nitrate N concentration in the 60-120 cm soil layer when intercropped with soybean decreased by 10.3% than when intercropped with sweet potato, indicating a decrease of N leaching loss. Increasing of N application rate enhanced N accumulation of maize and decreased N use efficiency and significantly increased nitrate concentration in the soil profile except in the 60-100 cm soil layer, where no significant difference was observed with nitrogen application rate at 0 to 270 kg · hm(-2). Further application of N fertilizer significantly enhanced nitrate leaching loss. Postponing N application increased nitrate accumulation in the 60-100 cm soil layer. The results suggested that N application rates and ratio of base to top dressing had different influences on maize N concentration and nitrate N between maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato intercropping. Maize N concentration in the late growing stage, N harvest index and N use efficiency under maize/soybean intercropping increased (with N application rate at 180-270 kg · hm(-2) and ratio of base to top dressing = 3:2:5) and

  14. The Effects of Source and Rate of Nitrogen Fertilizer and Irrigation on Nitrogen Uptake of Silage Corn and Residual Soil Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Khodshenas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing irrigation demand for corn production, along side with draws of ground water from stressed water sources, should be limited due to scarce resources and environmental protection aspects. Nitrogen fertilizer applied at rates higher than the optimum requirement for crop production may cause an increase in nitrate accumulation below the root zone and pose a risk of nitrate leaching. Improving nitrogen management for corn production has a close relation with soil water content. In this study, we investigated the effects of source and rate of nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation on silage corn production and nitrogen concentration, nitrogen uptake and residual soil nitrate in two depths. Materials and Methods: This experiment carried out as split spli- plot in a Randomized Complete Block design (RCBD with three replications, in Arak station (Agricultural research center of markazi province, 34.12 N, 49.7 E; 1715 m above mean sea level during three years. The soil on the site was classified as a Calcaric Regosols (loamy skeletal over fragmental, carbonatic, thermic, calcixerollic xerochrepts. Main plots were irrigation treatments based on 70, 100 and 130 mm cumulative evaporation from A class Pan. Sub plots were two kinds of nitrogen fertilizers (Urea and Ammonium nitrate and sub sub-plots were five levels of nitrogen rates (0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kgN.ha-1. Nitrogen fertilizer rates were split into three applications: 1/3 was applied at planting, 1/3 at 7-9 leaf stage and 1/3 remainder was applied before tasseling as a banding method. Phosphorus was applied at a rate of 150 kg.ha-1in each season and potassium at a rate of 30kg.ha-1 (only in first growth season based on soil testing as triple super phosphate and potassium sulfate, respectively. The corn variety of single cross 704 was planted at 20 m2 plots. The plants were sampled at dough stage from the two rows and weighted in each plot. Plant samples were dried in a forced air

  15. Transformations of ammonium nitrogen in upland and floored soils amended with crop residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulakh, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of crop residues on the nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen immobilization and NH 4 + -fixation of 15 NH 4 + -N at varying soil moisture levels was investigated under laboratory conditions. In a period of 96h, about 34 per cent of 15 NH 4 + -N nitrified in the upland soil (60 per cent saturation), whereas it was only 11 per cent in flooded soil (120 per cent saturation). Addition of straw progressively increased nitrification in the flooded soil (but not in upland soil) and with 1.0 per cent straw, the amount of 15 NH 4 + -N nitrified was almost equal at all the three moisture levels studied. Incorporation of straw increased the immobilization of added N from 12 to 29 per cent in upland soil but its effect was negligible in the submerged soil. Fixed NH 4 + -N which ranged from 1 to 9 per cent of added N was not influenced either by straw or by soil moisture. The contribution of fertilizer N towards total denitrification losses decreased from 69 per cent in aerobic soil (without straw) to 30 per cent in anaerobic soil due to reduced nitrification of applied NH 4 + -N. These results confirm that losses of applied N through denitrification could be reduced if the source of N is ammoniacal fertilizers. (author). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 16 refs

  16. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of...

  17. The Effect of Fungicide Residues and Yeast Assimilable Nitrogen on Fermentation Kinetics and H2S Production during Cider Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau IV, Thomas Francis

    2016-01-01

    The Virginia cider industry has grown rapidly in the past decade, and demands research-based recommendations for cider fermentation. This study evaluated relationships between the unique chemistry of apples and production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cider fermentations. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and composition and residual fungicides influence H2S production by yeast during fermentation, but these factors have to date only been studied in wine grape fermentations. This ...

  18. Long Term Sugarcane Crop Residue Retention Offers Limited Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates in Australian Wet Tropical Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Elizabeth A.; Thorburn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1) reduce emissions [e.g., those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N) fertilizer application], and (2) increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks (e.g., by retaining instead of burning crop residues). Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial...

  19. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  20. Nitrogen immobilization and mineralization during initial decomposition of 15N-labelled pea and barley residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    The immobilization and mineralization of N following plant residue incorporation were studied in a sandy loam soil using N-15-labelled field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) straw. Both crop residues caused a net immobilization of soil-derived inorganic N during...... the complete incubation period of 84 days. The maximum rate of N immobilization was found to 12 and 18 mg soil-derived N g(-1) added C after incorporation of pea and barley residues, respectively. After 7 days of incubation, 21% of the pea and 17% of the barley residue N were assimilated by the soil microbial...... the decomposition of the barley residue. The net mineralization of residue-derived N was 2% in the barley and 22% in the pea residue treatment after 84 days of incubation. The results demonstrated that even if crop residues have a relative low C/N ratio (15), transient immobilization of soil N in the microbial...

  1. The fate of nitrogen from crop residues of broccoli, leek and sugar beet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de F.J.; Berge, ten H.F.M.; Smit, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental concern has lead to legislation on fertilization to reduce nutrient losses to the environment. Reducing N input may be inadequate for crops that have a high N content in their residues. Reducing N input will negatively affect yield, but the residues remain. Management of crop residues

  2. Perspectives of the generation of carbon credits on the basis of the attainment of a fertilizer - exploitation of residues of biomass of brazilian agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, Caterina Velleca

    2009-01-01

    In this work, whose approach is unknown in literature, the main lines of direction for the implementation of a Mechanism of Clean Development are presented, as well as the possibilities of generation of Certified Reduction of Emission and its valuation. By means of adjusted systems, indicated in literature, the approach amounts of carbonic gas had been raised that could be gotten, choosing itself for this work, the process of gasification of residues of biomass in some Brazilian agricultural cultures. In relation to the carbonic gas produced in the process it is suggested that to quantify the carbon credits, the capture is made through its setting in the production of a fertilizer that had its approach value searched in the market. To prove this possibility experiments in laboratory scale had become, holding back the CO 2 in the fertilizer ammonium bicarbonate. Thermogravimetric analyses, spectra infra-red ray, X-rays diffraction and CHN had been made and had confirmed that the product was the fertilizer ammonium bicarbonate. For the numerical values, it had been consulted in referring bibliographies, the Brazilian agricultural cultures with indices of production of known residues, establishing then a numerical database for the formation of the corresponding values. The results of this wok allow to affirm that a great potentiality for the exploitation of the resultant gases of the gasification of the residues of biomass, mainly of the carbonic gas in the production of a fertilizer exists and, with the possibility of implementation of a Mechanism of Clean Development in the country. (author)

  3. Compared cycling in a soil-plant system of pea and barley residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    the 1-3 year period, residual organic labelled N from different residues declined at similar rates, mean decay constant: 0.18 yr(-1). After 3 years, 45% of the barley and on average 32% of the pea residue N were present as soil organic N. The proportion of residue N remaining in the soil after 3 years...... of decomposition was most strongly correlated with the total and soluble N concentrations in the residue. The ratio (% inorganic N derived from residues):(% organic N derived from residues) was used as a measure of the rate residue N stabilization. From initial values of 3-7 the ratios declined to on average 1...... and 35% of the pea residue N were unaccounted for. Since these apparent losses are comparable to almost twice the amounts of pea and barley residue N taken up by the perennial ryegrass crop, there seems to be a potential for improved crop residue management in order to conserve nutrients in the soil...

  4. Dynamics of dissolved and extractable organic nitrogen upon soil amendment with crop residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, G.H.; Hoffland, E.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is increasingly recognized as a pivotal pool in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle. Numerous devices and sampling procedures have been used to estimate its size, varying from in situ collection of soil solution to extraction of dried soil with salt solutions. Extractable

  5. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  6. Weed management practice and cropping sequence impact on soil residual nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inefficient N uptake by crops from N fertilization and/or N mineralized from crop residue and soil organic matter results in the accumulation of soil residual N (NH4-N and NO3-N) which increases the potential for N leaching. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of weed management ...

  7. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Residual nitrogen-15 recovery by corn as influenced by tillage and fertilization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, D.R.; Cruse, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tillage systems that create different surface residue conditions may also affect the recovery of residual fertilizer N during subsequent growing seasons. This study evaluated the recovery of residual labeled N fertilizer in the soil by corn (Zea mays L.) for two tillage systems and two fertilization methods. Five atom % 15 N-enriched 28% urea-ammonium nitrate solution (UAN) at 224 kg N ha -1 was either surface-applied in the fall before any primary tillage or banded (knifed in) just before planting in the spring. Continuous corn was grown with either fall moldboard-plow (MP) or ridge-till (RT) systems. After the initial growing season, the recovery of residual labeled N in the soil by corn was determined for three consecutive growing seasons, and the soil profile was sampled periodically to measure residual 15 N in the organic and inorganic pools. One year after labeled UAN application, from 16 to 27% of the initial 15 N applied was found in the organic N pool and only 1% as inorganic N[NH 4 +(NO 2 +NO 3 )-N]. After four seasons, residual 15 N in the organic N pool ranged from 13 to 24%. Less than 0.5% remained as inorganic N. Regression analyses indicated that about 5 kg 15 N ha -1 year -1 became available for both MP and RT systems with banded N, so the amounts were small. Total residual 15 N recovery by corn grain plus stover for three seasons ranged from 1.7 to 3.5%, and was greatest for spring-banded fertilizer. Because the amounts of residual 15 N utilized were too small to affect corn growth, this N source appears to be negligible when considering corn-N needs

  9. Determination of daminozide residues in apples using gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, J.H.W.; Dijk, A.G. van; Wagenaar, R.; Quirijns, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    A method was developed for the determination of daminozide in apples using gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD). Daminozide is hydrolysed to 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) by alkaline digestion. The UDMH generated is distilled from the apple matrix, derivatized with

  10. Effect of feeding tamarind kernel powder extract residue on digestibility, nitrogen availability and ruminal fermentation in wethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was to examine in vivo digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal fermentation of tamarind (Tamarind indica kernel powder extract residue (TKPER compared to soybean products and by-products in wethers. Methods Four wethers with initial body weight (BW of 51.6±5.5 kg were assigned in a 4×4 Latin square design to investigate nutritional characteristics of TKPER, dry heat soybean (SB, dry soybean curd residue (SBCR and soybean meal (SBM feeding with ryegrass straw (R at a ratio of 1:1 at 2% of BW in dry matter (DM on a daily basis. Results The digestibility of DM, crude protein, and ether extract (EE of TKPER-R diet were 57.0%, 87.0%, and 86.0%, respectively. Higher non-fiber carbohydrates digestibility was observed in TKPER-R diet (83.2% than in SB-R diet (73.9%, p<0.05. Wethers fed the TKPER-R diet had lower retention of nitrogen (N and ruminal ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N contents at 4 h after feeding than those fed the SBM-R diet (p<0.05, which had values similar to the SB-R or SBCR-R diet. The TKPER feeding had higher propionate (C3 and lower butyrate content, as well as lower acetate to propionate ratio (C2:C3 in rumen fluid than SBM feeding at 4 h after feeding (p<0.05. Conclusion TKPER did not bring any side effect to the wethers although it was lack of fiber, and could be used as a high protein and energy ingredient in concentrate with appropriate roughage to meet the fiber requirement for ruminants.

  11. Effect of feeding tamarind kernel powder extract residue on digestibility, nitrogen availability and ruminal fermentation in wethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Nakanishi, Takashi; Sato, Yoshiaki; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kei; Kumagai, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was to examine in vivo digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal fermentation of tamarind (Tamarind indica) kernel powder extract residue (TKPER) compared to soybean products and by-products in wethers. Methods Four wethers with initial body weight (BW) of 51.6±5.5 kg were assigned in a 4×4 Latin square design to investigate nutritional characteristics of TKPER, dry heat soybean (SB), dry soybean curd residue (SBCR) and soybean meal (SBM) feeding with ryegrass straw (R) at a ratio of 1:1 at 2% of BW in dry matter (DM) on a daily basis. Results The digestibility of DM, crude protein, and ether extract (EE) of TKPER-R diet were 57.0%, 87.0%, and 86.0%, respectively. Higher non-fiber carbohydrates digestibility was observed in TKPER-R diet (83.2%) than in SB-R diet (73.9%, p<0.05). Wethers fed the TKPER-R diet had lower retention of nitrogen (N) and ruminal ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) contents at 4 h after feeding than those fed the SBM-R diet (p<0.05), which had values similar to the SB-R or SBCR-R diet. The TKPER feeding had higher propionate (C3) and lower butyrate content, as well as lower acetate to propionate ratio (C2:C3) in rumen fluid than SBM feeding at 4 h after feeding (p<0.05). Conclusion TKPER did not bring any side effect to the wethers although it was lack of fiber, and could be used as a high protein and energy ingredient in concentrate with appropriate roughage to meet the fiber requirement for ruminants. PMID:27221250

  12. Dynamics of mature pea residue nitrogen turnover in unplanted soil under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of N-15-labelled mature, pea (Pisum sativum L.) residue turnover in soil were studied in two 3 yr experiments, using residue sizes of soil in the field. During the initial 10 days of decomposition there was a sharp decline in the amount of N-15 in organic...... in the biomass N, indicating that unlabelled soil N was immobilized in the biomass in the second experiment, despite the high residue N concentration. The total residual organic N-15 and the N-15 in the biomass declined with average decay constants of 0.44 and 0.65 yr-1, respectively, for the 10 d to 1 yr period...... mineralizable after 2 yr of decomposition, indicating that the remaining residue N-15 was present in rather recalcitrant soil organic matter. After 90 days of decomposition N-15 unaccounted for corresponded to 10% of the input, increasing to 20-30% after 2-3 yr of decomposition. The main part of the N...

  13. Erratum to: Estimating the crop response to fertilizer nitrogen residues in long-continued field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattson, L

    2012-01-01

    to previous N input rates, the experimental design for testing needs to be examined. Experimental designs that suspend the customary N inputs, leaving the test crop unfertilized, ignore any interaction between the rate of N applied in the past and the rate applied in the test year. We estimated...... and N offtake when the residual effect originated from organic applications, but the interaction was not significant when mineral N fertilizer had been used in the past, making the residual effect of N applied in the past additive to the effect of N applied in the test year. The dry matter (DM) grain...

  14. Development and application of the water vapour nitrogen (WVN) process for sodium residues removal at the prototype fast reactor, dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.B.; Mason, L.; Husband, W.; Macdonald, A.J.; Smith, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The decommissioning programme for the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's two fast reactors at Dounreay is currently at the early implementation stage. UKAEA embarked upon an extensive development programme in 1994, to qualify the water vapour nitrogen (WVN) process for treating alkali metal residues. The aim of this programme was to identify a safe operational envelope that could be applied to a wide range of residue types and specific reactor geometries. Four stages of the development programme have been completed. The first stage was an extensive programme of approximately 100 small-scale tests. The second stage involved pilot scale tests up to 10 kg. The third stage involved the formation of an alliance of five companies and construction of an industrial pilot scale facility, for up to 1 000 kg, at Janetstown, ten miles from Dounreay. The fourth stage refined the process by cleaning actual sodium residues within various storage vessels and the secondary sodium circuits, with the aim of having a robust process for cleaning the reactor vessel. This paper summarizes the tests and the potential solutions too many of the issues identified during the course of the development programme. It also covers the lessons learnt from completing the cleaning of the storage vessels and secondary circuits. Finally, the next stage is also discussed. This covers the construction of a new on-site facility to clean vessels and plant items with tritiated sodium residues and further on-going development of the WVN process for cleaning the reactor vessel, in the quest to avoid unstable reactions. (author)

  15. Residual effect of sugar cane ratoon of urea nitrogen foliar application to plant cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.; Lara Cabezas, W.A.R.; Coleti, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The residual effect of urea - N, foliar applied to plant cane, on sugar cane ratoon is studied. Setts grown in drums containing washed sand are used. 180 days from planting, foliar fertilizer (43.5% urea solution) labelled with 3.95 atom % 15 N is applied. The first harvest is made 7 days after application and final harvest of resprouting at 123 days. (M.A.C.) [pt

  16. Nitrogen washing from C3 and C4 cover grasses residues by rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Crop species with the C4 photosynthetic pathway are more efficient in assimilating N than C3 plants, which results in different N amounts prone to be washed from its straw by rain water. Such differences may affect N recycling in agricultural systems where these species are grown as cover crops. In this experiment, phytomass production and N leaching from the straw of grasses with different photosynthetic pathways were studied in response to N application. Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum and congo grass (Brachiaria ruziziensis with the C4 photosynthetic pathway, and black oat (Avena Strigosa and triticale (X Triticosecale, with the C3 photosynthetic pathway, were grown for 47 days. After determining dry matter yields and N and C contents, a 30 mm rainfall was simulated over 8 t ha-1 of dry matter of each plant residue and the leached amounts of ammonium and nitrate were determined. C4 grasses responded to higher fertilizer rates, whereas N contents in plant tissue were lower. The amount of N leached from C4 grass residues was lower, probably because the C/N ratio is higher and N is more tightly bound to organic compounds. When planning a crop rotation system it is important to take into account the difference in N release of different plant residues which may affect N nutrition of the subsequent crop.

  17. Nitrógeno residual y lixiviado del fertilizante en el sistema suelo-planta-zeolitas Residual and leached nitrogen in soil plant zeolite systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Civeira

    2011-12-01

    mineralización de nitrógeno y la retención de humedad. El mayor nivel de N absorbido en NZ1 se correspondió con un descenso en el N residual significativamente inferior al tratamiento N mientras que el N lixiviado resultó similar. En cambio, cuando la dosis de zeolitas fue mayor (NZ2, el nivel de N absorbido por el maíz fue similar al del tratamiento N, mientras que el N lixiviado se incrementó significativamente respecto de los tratamientos N y NZ1 evidenciando una liberación más tardía del N a la solución del suelo. Estos resultados sugieren que la sincronización entre el patrón de liberación de N del sistema suelo-fertilizante-zeolita y el de absorción del maíz dependió de la dosis de zeolita que acompañó al fertilizante. Mientras que en NZ1 dicha sincronización mejoró la performance del fertilizante, en el tratamiento NZ2 el N retenido por las zeolitas no estuvo disponible para el maíz, siendo detectado como lixiviado al fin del experimento.The N use efficiency in agroecosystems is considered low mainly because of N losses by processes such as nitrate leaching. These losses could be mitigated by incorporating natural zeolites to the N fertilizer formulations. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of natural zeolites additions to formulations with N fertilizers on the contents of residual N and leached N in a soil under maize crop. The hypothesis of this study was that zeolite addition to N fertilizer could reduce the residual and leached N levels but could also affect the plant N availability. A greenhouse experiment was conducted under controlled conditions from February to April 2009. Corn was planted (Zea mays L. in pots which were maintained at field capacity. Zeolite and nitrogen fertilizer (Urea [(NH22CO], solid granules, 46-0-0 were added together as a dry physical mixture, at the beginning of the experiment. The treatments were T: control, Z1: 120 kg ha-1 zeolite, Z2: 200 kg ha-1 zeolite, N: 200 kg N ha-1, NZ1: 120 kg ha

  18. Nitrogen fertilization (15NH4NO3 of palisadegrass and residual effect on subsequent no-tillage corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Borghi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is required in large amounts by plants and their dinamics in corn and perennial forages intercropped is little known. This study analyzed the efficiency of nitrogen fertilization (15NH4NO3 applied after corn grain harvest to palisadegrass (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu in intercrops sown at two times, as well as the N residual effect on the subsequent corn crop. The field experiment was performed in Botucatu, São Paulo State, in southeastern Brazil, on a structured Alfisol under no-tillage. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design in a split plot scheme with four replications. The main plots consisted of two intercropping systems (corn and palisadegrass sown together and palisadegrass sown later, at corn top-dressing fertilization. The subplots consisted of four N rates (0, 30, 60, and 120 kg ha-1 N. The subplots contained microplots, in which enriched ammonium nitrate (15NH4NO3 was applied at the same rates. The time of intercrop sowing affected forage dry matter production, the amount of fertilizer-derived N in and the N use efficiency by the forage plants. Nitrogen applied in autumn to palisadegrass intercropped with corn, planted either at corn sowing or at N top-dressing fertilization, increased the forage yield up to a rate of 60 kg ha-1. The amount of fertilizer-derived N by the forage plants and the fertilizer use efficiency by palisadegrass were highest 160 days after fertilization for both intercrop sowing times, regardless of N rates. Residual N did not affect the N nutrition of corn plants grown in succession to palisadegrass, but increased grain yield at rates of 60 and 120 kg ha-1 N, when corn was grown on palisadegrass straw from the intercrop installed at corn fertilization (top-dressing. Our results indicated that the earlier intercropping allowed higher forage dry matter production. On the other hand, the later intercrop allowed a higher corn grain yield in succession to N-fertilized palisadegrass.

  19. Nitrous oxide emissions from yellow brown soil as affected by incorporation of crop residues with different carbon-to-nitrogen ratios: a case study in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Iqbal, Javed; Hu, Ronggui; Shaaban, Muhammad; Cai, Jianbo; Chen, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the influence of crop residues decomposition on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, a field study was performed with application of crop residues with different C:N ratios in a bare yellow brown soil at the experimental station of Zhangjiachong at Zigui, China. We set up six experimental treatments: no crop residue (CK), rapeseed cake (RC), potato stalk (PS), rice straw (RS), wheat straw (WS), and corn straw (CS). The carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) ratios of these crop residues were 7.5, 32.9, 40.4, 65.7, and 90.9, respectively. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using a static closed chamber method. N2O emissions were significantly enhanced by incorporation of crop residues. Cumulative N2O emissions negatively correlated with C:N ratio (R (2) = 0.9821) of the crop residue, but they were positively correlated with average concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon. Nitrogen emission fraction, calculated as N2O-N emissions originated from the crop residues N, positively correlated with C:N ratio of the residues (P emissions because a significant correlation (P emissions in all treatments except the control. In contrast, a significant relationship between soil moisture and N2O emissions was found in the control only. Furthermore, N2O emission significantly correlated (P nitrogen contents can significantly alter soil N2O flux rates; and (2) soil biotic as well as abiotic variables are critical in determining soil-atmospheric N2O emissions after crop residue incorporation into soil.

  20. Nitrogen release from decomposing residues of leguminous cover crops and their effect on maize yield on depleted soils of Bukoba District, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baijukya, F.P.; Ridder, de N.; Giller, K.E.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen release patterns from decomposing shoot residues of Tephrosia candida, Crotalaria grahamiana, Mucuna pruriens, Macrotyloma axillare, Macroptillium atropurpureum and Desmodium intortum were studied in the laboratory for a period of 22 weeks in a sandy clay soil and 10 weeks in a clay soil

  1. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  2. Tracking the conversion of nitrogen during pyrolysis of antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues using XPS and TG-FTIR-MS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Zhu, Xiangdong; 3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Yang, Shijun; Wang, Liang; 3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Liu, Yuchen; 3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Qian, Feng; Yao, Wenqing; 3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Zhang, Shicheng; 3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" data-affiliation=" (Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention - LAP3, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China))" >Chen, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues (AMFRs), which are emerging solid pollutants, have been recognized as hazardous waste in China since 2008. Nitrogen (N), which is an environmental sensitivity element, is largely retained in AMFR samples derived from fermentation substrates. Pyrolysis is a promising technology for the treatment of solid waste. However, the outcomes of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs are still unknown. In this study, the conversion of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs was tracked using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and online TG-FTIR-MS (Thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared-Mass spectrometry) technology. In the AMFR sample, organic amine-N, pyrrolic-N, protein-N, pyridinic-N, was the main N-containing species. XPS results indicated that pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N were retained in the AMFR-derived pyrolysis char. More stable species, such as N-oxide and quaternary-N, were also produced in the char. TG-FTIR-MS results indicated that NH 3 and HCN were the main gaseous species, and their contents were closely related to the contents of amine-N and protein-N, and pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N of AMFRs, respectively. Increases in heating rate enhanced the amounts of NH 3 and HCN, but had less of an effect on the degradation degree of AMFRs. N-containing organic compounds, including amine-N, nitrile-N and heterocyclic-N, were discerned from the AMFR pyrolysis process. Their release range was extended with increasing of heating rate and carbon content of AMFR sample. This work will help to take appropriate measure to reduce secondary pollution from the treatment of AMFRs. - Highlights: • Hazardous AMFR material was treated by slow pyrolysis reaction. • TG-FTIR-MS were used to study the N conversion for pyrolysis gas and bio-oil. • NH 3 and HCN were observed as the main N-containing gas species. • XPS were used to study the N conversion for pyrolysis char. • Stable species, such as N-oxide and quaternary-N, were

  3. Long Term Sugarcane Crop Residue Retention Offers Limited Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates in Australian Wet Tropical Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Elizabeth A; Thorburn, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1) reduce emissions [e.g., those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N) fertilizer application], and (2) increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks (e.g., by retaining instead of burning crop residues). Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial inputs of N fertilizer and which produces large amounts of crop residues ('trash'). Management of N fertilizer and trash affects soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and hence GHG emissions. Trash has historically been burned at harvest, but increasingly is being retained on the soil surface as a 'trash blanket' in many countries. The potential for trash retention to alter N fertilizer requirements and sequester SOC was investigated in this study. The APSIM model was calibrated with data from field and laboratory studies of trash decomposition in the wet tropics of northern Australia. APSIM was then validated against four independent data sets, before simulating location × soil × fertilizer × trash management scenarios. Soil carbon increased in trash blanketed soils relative to SOC in soils with burnt trash. However, further increases in SOC for the study region may be limited because the SOC in trash blanketed soils could be approaching equilibrium; future GHG mitigation efforts in this region should therefore focus on N fertilizer management. Simulated N fertilizer rates were able to be reduced from conventional rates regardless of trash management, because of low yield potential in the wet tropics. For crops subjected to continuous trash blanketing, there was substantial immobilization of N in decomposing trash so conventional N fertilizer rates were required for up to 24 years after trash blanketing commenced. After this period, there was potential to reduce N fertilizer

  4. Long term sugarcane crop residue retention offers limited potential to reduce nitrogen fertilizer rates in Australian wet tropical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Anne Meier

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The warming of world climate systems is driving interest in the mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. In the agricultural sector, practices that mitigate GHG emissions include those that (1 reduce emissions (e.g. those that reduce nitrous oxide (N2O emissions by avoiding excess nitrogen (N fertilizer application, and (2 increase soil organic carbon (SOC stocks (e.g. by retaining instead of burning crop residues. Sugarcane is a globally important crop that can have substantial inputs of N fertilizer and which produces large amounts of crop residues (‘trash’. Management of N fertilizer and trash affects soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and hence GHG emissions. Trash has historically been burned at harvest, but increasingly is being retained on the soil surface as a ‘trash blanket’ in many countries. The potential for trash retention to alter N fertilizer requirements and sequester SOC was investigated in this study. The APSIM model was calibrated with data from field and laboratory studies of trash decomposition in the wet tropics of northern Australia. APSIM was then validated against four independent data sets, before simulating location  soil  fertilizer  trash management scenarios. Soil carbon increased in trash blanketed soils relative to SOC in soils with burnt trash. However, further increases in SOC for the study region may be limited because the SOC in trash blanketed soils could be approaching equilibrium; future GHG mitigation efforts in this region should therefore focus on N fertilizer management. Simulated N fertilizer rates were able to be reduced from conventional rates regardless of trash management, because of low yield potential in the wet tropics. For crops subjected to continuous trash blanketing, there was substantial immobilization of N in decomposing trash so conventional N fertilizer rates were required for up to 24 yr after trash blanketing commenced. After this period, there was potential to

  5. Adaptive nitrogen and integrated weed management in conservation agriculture: impacts on agronomic productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and herbicide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeogbe, Anthony Imoudu; Das, T K; Bhatia, Arti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2017-04-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) immobilization and weed interference in the early phase of implementation of conservation agriculture (CA) affects crop yields. Yet, higher fertilizer and herbicide use to improve productivity influences greenhouse gase emissions and herbicide residues. These tradeoffs precipitated a need for adaptive N and integrated weed management in CA-based maize (Zea mays L.)-wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend Fiori & Paol] cropping system in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) to optimize N availability and reduce weed proliferation. Adaptive N fertilization was based on soil test value and normalized difference vegetation index measurement (NDVM) by GreenSeeker™ technology, while integrated weed management included brown manuring (Sesbania aculeata L. co-culture, killed at 25 days after sowing), herbicide mixture, and weedy check (control, i.e., without weed management). Results indicated that the 'best-adaptive N rate' (i.e., 50% basal + 25% broadcast at 25 days after sowing + supplementary N guided by NDVM) increased maize and wheat grain yields by 20 and 14% (averaged for 2 years), respectively, compared with whole recommended N applied at sowing. Weed management by brown manuring (during maize) and herbicide mixture (during wheat) resulted in 10 and 21% higher grain yields (averaged for 2 years), respectively, over the weedy check. The NDVM in-season N fertilization and brown manuring affected N 2 O and CO 2 emissions, but resulted in improved carbon storage efficiency, while herbicide residuals in soil were significantly lower in the maize season than in wheat cropping. This study concludes that adaptive N and integrated weed management enhance synergy between agronomic productivity, fertilizer and herbicide efficiency, and greenhouse gas mitigation.

  6. CREDIT SYSTEM AND CREDIT GUARANTEE PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Turgay GECER

    2012-01-01

    Credit system is an integrated architecture consisted of financial information, credit rating, credit risk management, receivables and credit insurance systems, credit derivative markets and credit guarantee programs. The main purpose of the credit system is to provide the functioning of all credit channels and to make it easy to access of credit sources demanded by all of real and legal persons in any economic system. Credit guarantee program, the one of prominent elements of the credit syst...

  7. The Effects of Source and Rate of Nitrogen Fertilizer and Irrigation on Nitrogen Uptake of Silage Corn and Residual Soil Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Khodshenas; J. Ghadbeiklou; M. Dadivar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Growing irrigation demand for corn production, along side with draws of ground water from stressed water sources, should be limited due to scarce resources and environmental protection aspects. Nitrogen fertilizer applied at rates higher than the optimum requirement for crop production may cause an increase in nitrate accumulation below the root zone and pose a risk of nitrate leaching. Improving nitrogen management for corn production has a close relation with soil water conten...

  8. Simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by air under calcium oxide assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongliang; Liu, Renlong; Shu, Jiancheng; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Leaching tests of electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) indicated that high contents of soluble manganese and ammonia-nitrogen posed a high environmental risk. This work reports the results of simultaneous stripping recovery of ammonia-nitrogen and precipitation of manganese by air under calcium oxide assist. The ammonia-nitrogen stripping rate increased with the dosage of CaO, the air flow rate and the temperature of EMR slurry. Stripped ammonia-nitrogen was absorbed by a solution of sulfuric acid and formed soluble (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)3H(SO4)3. The major parameters that effected soluble manganese precipitation were the dosage of added CaO and the slurry temperature. Considering these two aspects, the efficient operation conditions should be conducted with 8 wt.% added CaO, 60°C, 800 mL min(-1) air flow rate and 60-min reaction time. Under these conditions 99.99% of the soluble manganese was precipitated as Mn3O4, which was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDS analyses. In addition, the stripping rate of ammonia-nitrogen was 99.73%. Leaching tests showed the leached toxic substances concentrations of the treated EMR met the integrated wastewater discharge standard of China (GB8978-1996).

  9. Effects of biodiesel made from swine and chicken fat residues on carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddern, Vivian; Cunha Junior, Anildo; De Prá, Marina C; Busi da Silva, Marcio L; Nicoloso, Rodrigo da S; Higarashi, Martha M; Coldebella, Arlei; de Abreu, Paulo G

    2017-07-01

    The effects of two alternative sources of animal fat-derived biodiesel feedstock on CO 2 , CO, NO x tailpipe emissions as well as fuel consumption were investigated. Biodiesel blends were produced from chicken and swine fat waste (FW-1) or floating fat (FW-2) collected from slaughterhouse wastewater treatment processes. Tests were conducted in an unmodified stationary diesel engine operating under idling conditions in attempt to simulate slow traffic in urban areas. Significant reductions in CO (up to 47% for B100; FW-2) and NO x (up to 20% for B5; FW-2 or B100; FW-1) were attained when using biodiesel fuels at the expense of 5% increase in fuel consumption. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to elucidate possible associations among gas (CO 2 , CO, and NO x ) emissions, cetane number and iodine index with different sources of feedstock typically employed in the biodiesel industry. NO x , cetane number and iodine index were inversely proportional to CO 2 and biodiesel concentration. High NO x emissions were reported from high iodine index biodiesel derived especially from forestry, fishery and some agriculture feedstocks, while the biodiesel derived from animal sources consistently presented lower iodine index mitigating NO x emissions. The obtained results point out the applicability of biodiesel fuels derived from fat-rich residues originated from animal production on mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. The information may encourage practitioners from biodiesel industry whilst contributing towards development of sustainable animal production. Emissions from motor vehicles can contribute considerably to the levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The use of biodiesel to replace or augment diesel can not only decrease our dependency on fossil fuels but also help decrease air pollution. Thus, different sources of feedstocks are constantly being explored for affordable biodiesel production. However, the amount of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon

  10. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover and carbon content of a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleeem Abbasi, M.; Tahir, M. Mahmood; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2015-02-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in soil-plant systems. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water-filled pore space) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues, i.e., the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata, incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed a wide variation in total N, C, lignin, polyphenols and C / N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of Glycine max and the shoot and root of Trifolium repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% recovery of N that had been released from these added resources. The roots of Glycine max and Zea mays and the shoot of Zea mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation. After an initial immobilization, leaves of Populus euramericana, Robinia pseudoacacia and Elaeagnus umbellata exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively, and representing a 16, 32 and 33% N recovery, respectively. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C / N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin / N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol / N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and (lignin + polyphenol) : N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating a

  11. Quantifying biological nitrogen fixation of different catch crops, and residual effects of roots and tops on nitrogen uptake in barley using in-situ 15N labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Sørensen, Peter; Li, F C

    2015-01-01

    Contributions of legume-based catch crops (LBCCs) to succeeding cereals may be significant. We quantified biological N fixation (BNF) and residual N effects of contrasting CC tops and roots. Methods BNF of three LBCCs (red clover, winter vetch, perennial ryegrass-red clover mixture) was quantified...... in microplots by 15N labelling. Their residual effects on spring barley were tested against two non-LBCCs (perennial ryegrass, fodder radish) after spring incorporation of CC tops or roots in monoliths. Total N accumulated in LBCCs was 153–226 kg N ha−1, of which 62–66 % was derived from BNF in tops and 31...

  12. Availability of nitrogen in 15N-labelled mature pea residues to subsequent crops in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of N in N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues to subsequent autumn-sown or spring-sown crops was studied in two experiments in field microplots. The residues were incorporated in the soil in August or September. Winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and winter oilseed...... incorporation of the residues. At maturity, the pea residue N constituted soil did not significantly influence the amount of non-labelled soil (+ fertilizer) N accumulated by crops. The recovery of pea residue N in successive autumn-sown crops of barley......, oilseed rape and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was 14, 3 and 2% respectively; spring-sown barley, oilseed rape and wheat recovered only 6, 2 and 2% respectively. Similarly, the amount of non-labelled soil N accumulated was almost twice as high in autumn-sown crops as compared to spring-sown crops...

  13. Common bean growth, N uptake and seed production in sandy loam soil as affected by application of plant residues, nitrogen and irrigation level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, A.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Field experiment was conducted at the experimental farm, Inshas, atomic energy authority, egypt. Common bean seeds e.v. Nebrasks were cultivated in sandy loan soil using drip irrigation system prepared for this purpose. Two water regimes, i.e., 100% (793.0 m 3 /fed.) and 65% (513.0 m 3 /fed.) of maximum available water were used in main plots. Where in sub plots two fertilizers types were applied i.e., soybean plant residues which contains N 15 labelled as an organic matter without any addition of any fertilizer and nitrogen as chemical fertilizer without using organic matter. The obtained results indicated that, application of plant residues was superior for total seed yield comparing to nitrogen fertilization treatments. This N source with irrigation level of 793.33 m 3 /fed. had a slight increase in total seed yield comparing with (513.0 m 3 /fed.). Irrigation level of 513.0 m 3 /fed. (65% MAW) as well as application of soybean plant residues showed the highest value of water use efficiency. The highest value of N seed percentage was obtained irrigation level with (513.0 m 3 /fed.). Soybean plant residues improved and increased seeds N content, and total seeds protein content. Both N chemical and irrigation level (65% Maw) recorded highest values with N 15 % atom excess. This result has been obtained at two growth stages and seed yield. The same trend of N 15 % atom excess reflected N utilized with both growth stages and seed yield

  14. Spatial variability of residual nitrate-nitrogen under two tillage systems in central Iowa: A composite three-dimensional resistant and exploratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B. P.; Kanwar, R. S.

    1994-02-01

    Soil nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) data arranged on a three-dimensional grid were analyzed to compare tillage effect on the spatial distribution of residual NO3-N in the soil profile of agricultural plots drained by subsurface tiles. A three-dimensional median-based resistant (to outlier(s)) approach was developed to polish the spatially located data on soil NO3-N affected by directional trends (nonstationarity in the mean) in three major directions (row, column, and depth) and along the horizontal diagonal directions of the grid. Effect of preferential or nonpreferential path of transport of NO3-N in the vertical direction defined as sample hole effect was also removed to make the data trend-free across holes. Composite three-dimensional semivariogram models (along horizontal and vertical directions) were used to describe the spatial structure of residual soil nitrate distribution. Two plots in the same field, one under each tillage system (conventional tillage and no tillage), were studied. In each plot, soil samples were collected at five depths (30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 cm) from 35 sites (holes) arranged on a 7×5 regular grid of 7.6×7.6 m. In the conventional tillage plot, residual NO3-N concentrations decreased gradually to a depth of 90 cm and increased beyond this depth. The coefficient of variation, however, became gradually smaller, showing more uniform distribution for greater depths. In the no-tillage plot, trends were similar to those in the conventional tillage system, but were spatially more stable across the profile. Structural analyses indicated that under conventional tillage, the semivariogram of residual soil nitrate distribution was linear in the horizontal and vertical directions. In contrast, the semivariograms for no-tillage showed nugget-type behavior, indicating a lack of spatial structure in the residual soil nitrate.

  15. Residual effect of nitrogen fertilization and Azospirillum brasilense inoculation in the maize cultureEfeito residual da adubação nitrogenada e inoculação de Azospirillum brasilense na cultura do milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Huzar Novakowiski

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diazotrophic bacteria Azospirillum brasilense is an organism able to fix nitrogen of atmosphere and produce plant hormones. Nevertheless, there is lack of information with regard to use in field conditions, especially in production systems that have presence of animals in a determined year period. The objective of paper was to evaluate the association of the nitrogen residual effect of fertilization in pasture winter and the inoculation with A. brasilense in the maize culture. Were carried two experiments in Guarapuava (PR in season 2008/09 with randomized block design with split plots in three replication. The main parcel consisted of application 5 levels of N (0, 75, 150, 225 e 300 kg ha-1 in pasture of black oat and ryegrass occupied by bovines and 4 treatments in the maize (T1 = control; T2 = inoculation of A. brasilense; T3 = 75 kg ha-1 of N; T4 = 150 kg ha-1 of N. Were evaluated: plants population, ears per plant, productivity, mass thousand grains, damage grains, row per ear and grains per row. There was residual effect of nitrogen applied in the pasture on maize culture. The mass thousand grains and the number of rows per ear of maize presented quadratic response for increase of nitrogen level in the pasture. The inoculation of A. brasilense provided higher productivity than control same with increase the nitrogen level applied in the pasture, with quadratic response in the experiment 1 and linear in the experiment 2.A bactéria diazotrófica Azospirillum brasilense é um organismo capaz de fixar nitrogênio da atmosfera e produzir hormônios vegetais. No entanto, há carência de informações a respeito de seu uso em condições de campo, sobretudo em sistemas de produção que tem a presença de animais em um determinado período do ano. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a associação do efeito residual da adubação nitrogenada na pastagem de inverno e a inoculação de A. brasilense na cultura do milho. Foram conduzidos dois

  16. Effect of tillage and crop residues management on mungbean (vigna radiata (L.) wilczek) crop yield, nitrogen fixation and water use efficiency in rainfed areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, W.; Shehzadi, S.; Shah, S.M.; Shah, Z.

    2010-01-01

    reference crop, the biological nitrogen fixed by mungbean ranged from 37.00 to 82.59 kg ha/sup -1/ whereas with maize as a reference crop, it ranged from 34.74 to 70.78 kg ha/sup -1/ under different treatments. In comparison, non-fixing (reference) crops of sorghum and maize derived up to 16.6 and 15.5% of their nitrogen from the labelled fertilizer, respectively. These results suggested that crop productivity, BNF and WUE in the rainfed environment can be improved with minimum tillage and crop residues retention. (author)

  17. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using soil sampled from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ul...

  18. Evaluation of Tillage, Residue Management and Nitrogen Fertilizer Effects on CO2 Emission in Maize (Zea Mays L. Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooholla Moradi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC states that future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs will continue to increase and cause climatic change (16. These conditions are also true for Iran. The three greenhouse gases associated with agriculture are carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O. The three GHGs associated with agriculture CO2, CH4, and N2O differ in their effectiveness in trapping heat and in their turnover rates in the atmosphere. This environmental change will have serious impacts on different growth and development processes of crops. Increasing temperature could affect physiological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration and partitioning of photoassimilates. Farmers are not able to change or manage the climatic conditions, but some factors such as soil, water, seed and agricultural practices can be managed to reduce the adverse impacts of climate change (32. Mitigation and adaptation are two known ways for reducing the negative impacts of climate change. Mitigation strategies are associated with decreasing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions through management practices such as reducing chemical fertilizer application, mechanization, increasing carbon storage in agroecosystems, planting biofuel crops and moving towards organic farming (42, etc. Material and Methods: This study was carried out at the experimental field of the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2011 and was repeated in 2012. The Research Station (36°16´N, 59°36´E is located at about 985 m a.s.l. Average temperature and precipitation rate of the research station in two years are shown in Figure. 1. The three-factor experiment was set up in a strip-split-plot arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The experimental treatments were tillage systems (conventional and reduced tillage and residual management (remaining and leaving of maize residual assigned to main plots

  19. Automated multi-filtration cleanup with nitrogen-enriched activated carbon material as pesticide multi-residue analysis method in representative crop commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Yifan; Wang, Qiuxiao; Wu, Yangliu; Xu, Lanshu; Jin, Xiaojuan; Pan, Canping

    2017-09-15

    An automated multi-filtration cleanup (Auto m-FC) method with nitrogen-enriched activated carbon material based on modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. It was applied to pesticide multi-residue analysis in six representative crop commodities. The automatic device was aimed to improve the cleanup efficiency and reduce manual operation workload in cleanup step. By controlling extracts volume, flow rate and Auto m-FC cycles, the device could finish cleanup process accurately. In this work, nitrogen-enriched activated carbon mixed with alternative sorbents and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) was packed in a column for Auto m-FC and followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) detection. This newly developed carbon material showed excellent cleanup performance. It was validated by analyzing 23 pesticides in six representative matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100μg/kg. Water addition volume, salts, sorbents, Auto m-FC procedure including the flow rate and the Auto m-FC cycles for each matrix were optimized. Then, three general Auto m-FC methods were introduced to high water content, high oil and starch content, difficult commodities. Spike recoveries were within 82 and 106% and 1-14% RSD for all analytes in the tested matrices. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination over 0.997 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Food quantity and quality of cassava affected by leguminous residues and inorganic nitrogen application in a soil of low natural fertility of the humid tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gomes Moura-Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the quality and quantity of biofortified cassava root in a humid tropical environment can be modified with the application of a combination of low- and high-quality residues of leguminous tree species. The experiment was designed as a 6 × 2 factorial (a combination of 4 legume species versus 2 levels of nitrogen with 4 replications in a randomized block design and the following treatments: Gliricidia + Acacia, Gliricidia + Leucaena, Gliricidia + Clitoria, Leucaena + Acacia, Leucaena + Clitoria, and a control without legumes. We analyzed the shoot weight, number of roots/plant, root weight, root production, proximate composition, as well as the mineral, carotenoid, and pro-vitamin A contents. Root production increased with the application of high-quality residues. The protein level influenced the carotenoid content. The allelopathic effect of exotic genera — Leucaena and Acacia —, especially when combined, can decrease the mineral content such as potassium and, therefore, reduce the accumulation of starch.

  1. Effects of solid-liquid separation on recovering residual methane and nitrogen from digested dairy cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Rintala, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of optimizing methane and nitrogen recovery of samples obtained from farm biogas digester (35 degrees C) and post-storage tank (where digested material is stored for 9-12 months) was studied by separating the materials into different fractions using 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.25 mm sieves....... Mass-balances revealed that digested material mainly consists of 2 mm (18-27%) fractions, while fractions between 2 and 0.25 mm made the rest. Incubation of solid fractions >0.25 mm of digester material at 35 degrees C resulted in specific methane yields of 0.060-0.085 m(3) kg(-1) volatile solids (VS...

  2. Recovery of Silver Using Adsorption Gels Prepared from Microalgal Residue Immobilized with Functional Groups Containing Sulfur or Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunathai, Kanjana; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ohto, Keisuke; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Kurata, Minoru; Atsumi, Kinya; Fukuda, Hiroaki; Alam, Shafiq

    2017-06-10

    Although biodiesel oil extracted from microalgae attracts much attention as one of the most promising green energies, its high production cost is a big problem, impeding its extensive use. In order to lower the production cost, the effective use of microalgal residue after extracting biofuel was investigated as a feed material of functional materials. In the present work, a new adsorbent for silver(I) was prepared by immobilizing functional groups of polyethylene-polyamine or dithiooxamide, which exhibita high affinity for soft Lewis acids such as silver(I) ions. Their adsorption behaviors for silver(I) were investigated from aqueous nitrate and acidothiourea media. The effects of the concentrations of nitrate and thiourea, as well as of sulfuric acid, were qualitatively interpreted. From the study of adsorption isotherms on these gels, they were found to exhibita higher adsorption capacity than the majority of those reported to date.

  3. Recovery of Silver Using Adsorption Gels Prepared from Microalgal Residue Immobilized with Functional Groups Containing Sulfur or Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Khunathai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although biodiesel oil extracted from microalgae attracts much attention as one of the most promising green energies, its high production cost is a big problem, impeding its extensive use. In order to lower the production cost, the effective use of microalgal residue after extracting biofuel was investigated as a feed material of functional materials. In the present work, a new adsorbent for silver(I was prepared by immobilizing functional groups of polyethylene-polyamine or dithiooxamide, which exhibita high affinity for soft Lewis acids such as silver(I ions. Their adsorption behaviors for silver(I were investigated from aqueous nitrate and acidothiourea media. The effects of the concentrations of nitrate and thiourea, as well as of sulfuric acid, were qualitatively interpreted. From the study of adsorption isotherms on these gels, they were found to exhibita higher adsorption capacity than the majority of those reported to date.

  4. MODELING CREDIT RISK THROUGH CREDIT SCORING

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cantemir CALIN; Oana Cristina POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Credit risk governs all financial transactions and it is defined as the risk of suffering a loss due to certain shifts in the credit quality of a counterpart. Credit risk literature gravitates around two main modeling approaches: the structural approach and the reduced form approach. In addition to these perspectives, credit risk assessment has been conducted through a series of techniques such as credit scoring models, which form the traditional approach. This paper examines the evolution of...

  5. Buffalo heifers selected for lower residual feed intake have lower feed intake, better dietary nitrogen utilisation and reduced enteric methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Kundu, S S; Datt, C; Prusty, S; Kumar, M; Sontakke, U B

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the utilisation of the residual feed intake (RFI) as a feed efficiency selection tool and its relationship with methane emissions. Eighteen Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) heifers were fed ad libitum with total mixed ration (TMR) for 120 days. Based on linear regression models involving dry matter intake (DMI), average daily gain (ADG) and mid-test metabolic body size (MBW 0.75 ), heifers were assigned into low and high RFI groups. The RFI varied from -0.09 to +0.12 kg DM/day with average RFI of -0.05 and 0.05 kg DM/day in low and high RFI heifers respectively. Low RFI heifers ate 11.6% less DM each day, yet average daily gain (ADG) and feed utilisation were comparable among low and high RFI groups. Low RFI heifers required significantly (p  .05) among low and high RFI groups. Although the nitrogen balance was similar among heifers of low and high RFI groups, nitrogen metabolism was significantly higher (p > .05) in high RFI heifers. Comparison of data from heifers exhibiting the low (n = 9) and high (n = 9) RFI showed that the low RFI heifers have lower enteric methane production and methane losses than high RFI heifers. In conclusion, results of this study revealed that selection of more efficient buffalo heifers has multiple benefits, such as decreased feed intake and less emission of methane. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Desempenho de genótipos de milho cultivados com diferentes quantidades de palha de aveia-preta e doses de nitrogênio Corn genotype performance under black oat crop residues and nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir de Oliveira Ferreira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resposta de genótipos de milho (Zea mays L., cultivado em sistema de plantio direto, a diferentes quantidades de palha de aveia-preta (Avena strigosa Schreb. e doses de nitrogênio. O experimento foi conduzido em um Latossolo Vermelho eutrófico, em delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso em parcelas subsubdivididas, com três repetições. As parcelas principais foram representadas pelas quantidades de palha na superfície do solo (sem palha, 5,16 e 10,32 mg ha-1. As subparcelas foram representadas por três genótipos de milho e as subsubparcelas constituíram-se das doses 0, 60, 120, 180 e 240kg ha-1 de nitrogênio. O aumento da dose de nitrogênio reduziu a requeima das folhas e promoveu o suprimento adequado de nitrogênio das plantas de milho em todos os tratamentos com palha de aveia-preta. Os genótipos de milho diferenciaram-se quanto à produtividade de grãos, ao aproveitamento do nitrogênio mineralizado da palha e ao comprimento do sistema radicular, quando submetidos a diferentes quantidades de palha de aveia-preta e de nitrogênio.The objective of this work was to assess the performance of corn (Zea maysL. genotypes as affected by inputs of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. residues applied on the soil surface and nitrogen fertilization under no-tillage system in a Typical Haplustox. The experiment was carried out in a complete randomized block design, arranged in split-split plots with three replicates. The main plots consisted of the amount of crop residues on the soil surface (no crop residue, 5.16 and 10.32 mg ha-1. The split plots were three corn genotypes, and the split-split plots were five nitrogen rates: 0, 60, 120, 180, and 240kg ha-1. An increase in the nitrogen rates decreased nitrogen deficiency and provided an adequate nitrogen supply for corn, under all the amounts of black oat residues. The corn genotypes grown with different amounts of black oat residues and nitrogen

  7. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C₁₈ solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg⁻¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg⁻¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg⁻¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues.

  8. Behaviour and fate of animal waste nitrogen and soluble ions in the agricultural environment with particular reference to rice. Part of a coordinated programme on agricultural nitrogen residues with particular reference to their conservation as fertilizers and behaviour as potential pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.

    1976-11-01

    The fate of residual nitrogen and its fertilizer efficiency following application to rice plants in pots under controlled laboratory conditions have been studied. Nitrogen was applied as 15 N labelled fecal waste from goat and hog, and as chemical fertilizer (ammonium sulphate) respectively. Animal waste nitrogen was less effective than ammonium sulphate nitrogen in terms of rice yield. On the other hand residual nitrogen in the high soil layers was much higher for the organic nitrogen application and there appeared to be lower losses by volatilization (20-30% for animal waste N, 30-40% for ammonium sulphate nitrogen). Leaching losses were minimal and similar for both kinds of N-application (ca. 1%). Similar results were obtained under field conditions with alluvial, and ''sandy'' soils respectively. Plant recovery of N was greater from ammonium sulphate than from animal waste but overall losses in total balance studies appeared greater for N applied as ammonium sulphate under otherwise comparable conditions (30-40% of N applied as ammonium sulphate and 19-32% of N applied as fecal waste)

  9. Nitrogen fixation by groundnut and velvet bean and residual benefit to a subsequent maize crop Fixação de nitrogênio por amendoim e mucuna e benefício residual para uma cultura de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambate Okito

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical fertilisers are rarely avaiable to poor farmers, for whom the nitrogen (N is often the most limiting element for cereal grain production. The objective of this study was to quantify the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea and velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens crops using the 15N natural abundance (delta15N technique and to determine their residual effect and that of a natural fallow, on growth and N accumulation by two rustic maize varieties. The contribution of BNF calculated from delta15N data was 40.9, 59.6 and 30.9 kg ha-1, for groundnut, velvet bean and the natural fallow, respectively. The only legume grain harvested was from the groundnut, which yielded approximately 1.000 kg ha-1. The subsequent maize varieties ("Sol de Manhã" and "Caiana Sobralha" yielded between 1.958 and 2.971 kg ha-1, and were higher after velvet bean for both maize varieties and "Sol da Manhã" groundnut, followed by "Caiana" after groundnut and, finally, the natural fallow. For a small-holder producer the most attractive system is the groundnut followed by maize, as, in this treatment, both groundnut and maize grain harvest are possible. However, a simple N balance calculation indicated that the groundnut-maize sequence would, in the long term, deplete soil N reserves, while the velvet bean-maize sequence would lead to a build up of soil nitrogen.Fertilizantes químicos raramente estão disponíveis aos agricultores com poucos recursos econômicos, e assim o N é, freqüentemente, um elemento mais limitante para a produção de grãos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar a contribuição da fixação biológica de nitrogênio (FBN às culturas de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea e mucuna (Mucuna pruriens, por meio da técnica de abundância natural de 15N e determinar o efeito residual das leguminosas e do pousio sobre o crescimento e acumulação de N em duas variedades de milho. A contribuição da FBN calculada a

  10. Credit report accuracy and access to credit

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B. Avery; Paul S. Calem; Glenn B. Canner

    2004-01-01

    Data that credit-reporting agencies maintain on consumers' credit-related experiences play a central role in U.S. credit markets. Analysts widely agree that the data enable these markets to function more efficiently and at lower cost than would otherwise be possible. Despite the great benefits of the current system, however, some analysts have raised concerns about the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, and consistency of consumer credit records and about the effects of data problems on the ...

  11. Co-production of bio-ethanol, xylonic acid and slow-release nitrogen fertilizer from low-cost straw pulping solid residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Wu, Xinxing; Huang, Yang; Zhou, Xuelian; He, Juan; Huang, Caoxing; Lai, Chenhuan; Li, Xin; Yong, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    A novel bio-refinery sequence yielding varieties of co-products was developed using straw pulping solid residue. This process utilizes neutral sulfite pretreatment which under optimal conditions (160 °C and 3% (w/v) sulfite charge) provides 64.3% delignification while retaining 90% of cellulose and 67.3% of xylan. The pretreated solids exhibited excellent enzymatic digestibility, with saccharification yields of 86.9% and 81.1% for cellulose and xylan, respectively. After pretreatment, the process of semi-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (S-SSF) and bio-catalysis was investigated. The results revealed that decreased ethanol yields were achieved when solid loading increased from 5% to 30%. An acceptable ethanol yield of 76.8% was obtained at 20% solid loading. After fermentation, bio-catalysis of xylose remaining in fermentation broth resulted in near 100% xylonic acid (XA) yield at varied solid loadings. To complete the co-product portfolio, oxidation ammoniation of the dissolved lignin successfully transformed it into biodegradable slow-release nitrogen fertilizer with excellent agricultural properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Credit Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Credit Management System. Outsourced Internet-based application. CMS stores and processes data related to USAID credit programs. The system provides information...

  13. Refundable Tax Credits

    OpenAIRE

    Congressional Budget Office

    2013-01-01

    In 1975, the first refundable tax credit—the earned income tax credit (EITC)—took effect. Since then, the number and cost of refundable tax credits—credits that can result in net payments from the government—have grown considerably. Those credits will cost $149 billion in 2013, CBO estimates, mostly for the EITC and the child tax credit.

  14. NCA & Credit Guarantees

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stooppn

    Credit Act? 2.1 What is a credit guarantee? The National Credit Act provides, subject to certain exemptions, that the Act generally applies to every credit agreement (eg, money-lending transactions irrespective of .... Lubbe 1984 THRHR 383; De Wet and Van Wyk Kontraktereg 391; Pretorius 2001 SA Merc LJ. 95; Sonnekus ...

  15. CREDIT CARD FRAUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lăcrămioara BALAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Credit card fraud is the misuse of a credit card to make purchases without authorization or counterfeiting acredit card. Credit cards are the most often used electronic payment instrument. Types of credit card fraud are: onlinecredit card fraud, advance payments, stolen card numbers, shave and paste, de-emboss/re-emboss etc. If current growthrates continue, credit cards and debit cards will each exceed the number of paid checks before the end of the decade. Asthe industry continues to expand and offer credit to more and more consumers, fraud will also grow.

  16. Coupled effects of mulching and nitrogen fertilization on crop yield, residual soil nitrate, and water use efficiency of summer maize in the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanjun; Meng, Yan; Cai, Miao; Zhou, Jianbin

    2017-11-01

    Appropriate water-saving and nitrogen management strategies are critical for achieving sustainable agricultural development in dry sub-humid areas of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The present study was conducted in 2004, 2005, 2008, and 2012 based on a long-term field experiment and aimed to investigate the coupled impacts of mulching and N fertilization on maize yield, water use efficiency (WUE), and residual soil nitrate (RSN) accumulated in the soil profile (0-200 cm). The results demonstrated that mulch is conducive to increasing summer maize yield. The plastic film-mulched ridge and straw-mulched furrow (RF) treatment significantly increased maize yield across the studied period, while the straw mulch (SM) treatment did not significantly increase maize yield until the third experimental year. Compared with SM, the RF treatment showed more significant and positive effects on maize yield, WUE, and RSN accumulated in the 0-200 cm soil depth. N fertilization significantly increased maize yield and WUE, but no significant differences were observed when 120 and 240 kg N ha -1 were applied. The N240 treatment was characterized by relatively high NO 3 - -N accumulation in 0-200 cm soil depth and low ratios of soil nitrate in the upper to the lower soil layers, indicating a considerable potential for NO 3 - -N leaching. Averaged across years, economic optimum N fertilizer rates (Nops) were 154, 148, and 150 kg N ha -1 for the no mulch, RF, and SM treatments, respectively. This suggested that 25.8-51.2% of N rate can be reduced while maintaining an acceptably high maize yield. Additionally, understanding NO 3 - -N depth distribution in 0-100 cm soil profile can adequately predict and represent the characteristics of NO 3 - -N accumulated in the 100-200 cm and 0-200 cm soil layers because of their significant correlations, thus saving time and money. In conclusion, the practice of RF combined with properly reduced farmers' N rate (~ 150 kg N ha -1 ) is the

  17. Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Keiluweit; J.J. Bougoure; L. Zeglin; D.D. Myrold; P.K. Weber; J. Pett-Ridge; M. Kleber; P.S. Nico

    2012-01-01

    Amino sugars in fungal cell walls (such as chitin) represent an important source of nitrogen (N) in many forest soil ecosystems. Despite the importance of this material in soil nitrogen cycling, comparatively little is known about abiotic and biotic controls on and the timescale of its turnover. Part of the reason for this lack of information is the inaccessibility of...

  18. Credit Card Quiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students design credit cards and discover for themselves the mathematical realities of buying on credit. Employs multiple-intelligence theory to increase the chance that all students will be reached. (YDS)

  19. Credit Union Headquarters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) is the independent federal agency that charters and supervises federal credit unions. NCUA, backed of the full faith...

  20. 40 CFR 91.207 - Credit calculation and manufacturer compliance with emission standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... engine family in kW (sales weighted). The power of each configuration is the rated output in kilowatts as... emission standards. (a) For each engine family, certification emission credits (positive or negative) are... of nitrogen credit status for an engine family, whether generating positive credits or negative...

  1. Modern bank's credit risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šabović Šerif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Credit risk is the most important risk banks have to face with. It occurs due to an obligation created because of debtors' capital and interest rate nonpayment. Debtors obligations non-fulfilment may lead to great losses and insolvency in bank's business. Credit risk is the crucial reason of bank's insolvency. Over 80% of bank's balance sheet is exposed to credit risk.

  2. Evaluating residues from batai trees (Paraserianthes falcataria) as alternative sources of nitrogen for grain corn (zeas mays l.) in the humid tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaharah, A.R.; Chintu, R.; Ghizan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of chemical fertilizers for mitigating N deficiency is unsustainable in many tropical areas because of economic constraints and possible deleterious effects on environmental quality. Although organic inputs such as green manures and litter from legumes have shown some potential for improving soil N status, the synchrony of N release from these residues with crop demand needs to be seriously addressed. The potential of above- and below-ground residues of Batai (Paraserianthes falcataria) to improve soil N availability and uptake by corn in an Ultisol (Bungor series) was evaluated under field and controlled conditions. The effect of residue quality on the kinetics of N release and accumulation in the soil was studied in field and laboratory incubation studies, whilst N uptake by grain corn was quantified using direct and indirect 1 5 N isotope labeling techniques. Treatments consist of fresh leaves, roots and 1:1 mixture of roots and leaves of Batai. Residue quality in terms of lignin + polyphenol-to-N ratio, and N mineralization was in the order roots 3 -N leaching occurred between 30 and 60 days after treatment (DAT). Significant amounts of Ca, Mg and K were also leached beyond 20 cm after 60 days. Both 15 N-labeling methods showed that N recovery in corn was much higher in the root than the leaf treatments. However, integrating Batai residues with an inorganic N source could be a more effective management strategy for improving N use efficiency and mitigating soil acidity. (Author)

  3. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  4. Thinking Beyond Credit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Credit is often seen as an indispensable vehicle for the poor to get out of poverty, or as the tool that allows farmers to get access to new technologies, to increase productivity and their incomes. But many existing credit programmes often undermine farmers’ independence, tie them into dependency

  5. Dual Credit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, legislation to improve access to dual-credit programs and to reduce disparities in access and completion--particularly for low income and underrepresented students--was enacted. The new law focused on expanding access to College in the High School but acknowledged issues in other dual-credit programs and reinforced the notion that cost…

  6. Rural Credit in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barslund, Mikkel Christoffer; Tarp, Finn

    This paper uses a survey of 932 rural households to uncover how the rural credit market operates in four provinces of Vietnam. Households obtain credit through formal and informal lenders, but formal loans are almost entirely for production and asset accumulation. Interest rates fell from 1997...

  7. Credit Constraints in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  8. Credit Risk Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamore, Stephen; Ohene Djan, Kwame; Alon, Ilan

    2018-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of scholarly research on credit risk measurement during the last 57 years applying bibliometric citation analysis and elaborates an agenda for future research. The bibliography is compiled using the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web...... of Science (WOS) database and includes all articles with citations over the period 1960–2016. Specifically, the review is carried out using 1695 articles across 72 countries published in 442 journals by 2928 authors. The findings suggest that credit risk research is multifaceted and can be classified...... into six streams: (1) defaultable security pricing, (2) default intensity modeling, (3) comparative analysis of credit models, (4) comparative analysis of credit markets, (5) credit default swap (CDS) pricing, and (6) loan loss provisions. The article contributes through synthesizing and identifying...

  9. Winter cover crop seeding rate and variety effects during eight years of organic vegetables: III. Cover crop residue quality and nitrogen mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter cover crops (CC) can improve nutrient-use efficiency in tillage-intensive systems. Shoot residue quality and soil mineral N following incorporation of rye (Secale cereale L.), legume-rye, and mustard CC was determined in December to February or March during the first 8 yr of the Salinas Orga...

  10. Utilização de resíduos da indústria de couro como fonte nitrogenada para o capim-elefante Use of leather industry residues as nitrogen sources for elephantgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Quintão Lima de Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Uma grande variedade de produtos tóxicos é emitida durante o processo de tratamento do couro nos curtumes que usam o cromo III para obter o couro wet blue. O resíduo sólido (raspas e aparas contém cerca de 3 % de Cr III, que representa um sério problema ambiental e não tem, atualmente, destino adequado. O resíduo de couro após extração de Cr (colágeno foi utilizado como fonte nitrogenada para o capim-elefante (Pennisetum purpureum Schum cv. Napier, em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo, aplicando-se quatro doses do colágeno (4, 8, 16 e 32 t ha-1 e três tratamentos adicionais (testemunha; adubação com N mineral e resíduo de couro wet blue- sem a extração do Cr. O colágeno é uma boa fonte nitrogenada alternativa para crescimento do capim-elefante até a dose de 16 t ha-1. O resíduo de couro wet blue não disponibilizou N durante o cultivo de capim-elefante. Isso mostra que a extração do Cr utilizando-se o ácido fosfórico é fundamental para uso do rejeito de couro como fonte nitrogenada na agricultura. A aplicação do colágeno supriu a necessidade de N para plantas de capim-elefante, semelhantemente à adubação com N mineral.Large amounts of solid wastes are produced in tanneries, which use chromium (III to obtain wet blue leather hides. The solid residues (leather scraps and strips contain around 3 % chromium (III, which represent a serious environmental problem and, presently, have no adequate destination. The leather waste after chromium extraction (collagen was used as a nitrogen source for elephantgrass- Pennisetum purpureum Schum cv. Napier. Four doses of collagen (4, 8, 16, and 32 t ha-1 and three additional treatments (control; mineral fertilizer N; and wet blue leather residue without Cr extraction were used. Collagen as alternative nitrogen source has a positive effect on elephantgrass growth at rates up to 16 t ha-1. Little N became available to elephantgrass plants after application of wet blue leather residues

  11. Residual deposits (residual soil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Residual soil deposits is accumulation of new formate ore minerals on the earth surface, arise as a result of chemical decomposition of rocks. As is well known, at the hyper genes zone under the influence of different factors (water, carbonic acid, organic acids, oxygen, microorganism activity) passes chemical weathering of rocks. Residual soil deposits forming depends from complex of geologic and climatic factors and also from composition and physical and chemical properties of initial rocks

  12. Credit Risk Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, David

    and students in finance, at quantitative analysts in banks and other financial institutions, and at regulators interested in the modeling aspects of credit risk. David Lando considers the two broad approaches to credit risk analysis: that based on classical option pricing models on the one hand......Credit risk is today one of the most intensely studied topics in quantitative finance. This book provides an introduction and overview for readers who seek an up-to-date reference to the central problems of the field and to the tools currently used to analyze them. The book is aimed at researchers...

  13. CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Haugbølle, Kim

    2010-01-01

    was a framework of indicators relevant in building and real estate and applicable in the Nordic and Baltic countries as well as a proposal for a set of key indicators. The study resulting in CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework has been based on 28 case studies of evaluation practises in the building and real...... regulations in the countries participating in CREDIT. The Performance Indicator Framework encompassed 187 indicators grouped in 7 main groups of indicators and 42 sub-groups. Based on the CREDIT case studies it was concluded that there neither is link between certain indicators and specific building types...

  14. Trust and Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    The present paper is an answer to the question, how did trust and credit emerge. The systems of trust and credit reduce the environmental and contextual complexities in which trust and credit are embedded. The paper analyses the forms of this reduction in a number of stages in the evolution...... of history from the present risk of modern systems back to early modernity, the Reformation and the high medieval Revolutions in law, organization and theology. It is not a history of economics, but a history of the conditions of some communication codes used in economic systems....

  15. Credit Risk Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, David

    Credit risk is today one of the most intensely studied topics in quantitative finance. This book provides an introduction and overview for readers who seek an up-to-date reference to the central problems of the field and to the tools currently used to analyze them. The book is aimed at researchers...... and students in finance, at quantitative analysts in banks and other financial institutions, and at regulators interested in the modeling aspects of credit risk. David Lando considers the two broad approaches to credit risk analysis: that based on classical option pricing models on the one hand...

  16. Development of credit derivatives trading

    OpenAIRE

    Kunovjánek, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis is focused on the structure and development of credit derivatives market. The thesis provides a basic summary for insight into credit derivatives market. The first part deals with general specifications of derivatives, their structure, functions and relevant categorization. The main chapter is dedicated to the most frequently used variants of credit derivatives, namely, credit default swap, total return swap and credit-linked note. Predominantly traded credit default swap ...

  17. Credit risk management in banks

    OpenAIRE

    Pětníková, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is managing credit risk in banks, as the most significant risk faced by banks. The aim of this work is to define the basic techniques, tools and methods that are used by banks to manage credit risk. The first part of this work focuses on defining these procedures and describes the entire process of credit risk management, from the definition of credit risk, describing credit strategy and policy, organizational structure, defining the most used credit risk mi...

  18. Credit derivatives: new financial instruments for controlling credit risk

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Neal

    1996-01-01

    One of the risks of making a bank loan or investing in a debt security is credit risk, the risk of borrower default. In response to this risk, new financial instruments called credit derivatives have been developed in the past few years. Credit derivatives can help banks, financial companies, and investors manage the credit risk of their investments by insuring against adverse movements in the credit quality of the borrower. If a borrower defaults, the investor will suffer losses on the inves...

  19. Latinos in the Credit Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Access to consumer credit as a means of building wealth is one of the least examined forms of social inequality. The recent economic crisis in the United States has brought attention to the significance of consumer credit in our nation's economy; however, less understood are the specific obstacles and barriers that prevent low-income individuals from reaching the "American Dream." In an exploratory manner, this study compared credit access, credit literacy, and credit experience of low-income...

  20. Credit derivatives and risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S. Gibson

    2007-01-01

    The striking growth of credit derivatives suggests that market participants find them to be useful tools for risk management. I illustrate the value of credit derivatives with three examples. A commercial bank can use credit derivatives to manage the risk of its loan portfolio. An investment bank can use credit derivatives to manage the risks it incurs when underwriting securities. An investor, such as an insurance company, asset manager, or hedge fund, can use credit derivatives to align its...

  1. Models of Credit Risk Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiu Alina

    2011-01-01

    Credit risk is defined as that risk of financial loss caused by failure by the counterparty. According to statistics, for financial institutions, credit risk is much important than market risk, reduced diversification of the credit risk is the main cause of bank failures. Just recently, the banking industry began to measure credit risk in the context of a portfolio along with the development of risk management started with models value at risk (VAR). Once measured, credit risk can be diversif...

  2. Forest fuel reduces the nitrogen load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundborg, A.

    1993-03-01

    A study of the literature was made on the basis of the following hypothesis: ''If nitrogen-rich felling residues are removed from the forest, the nitrogen load on the forest ecosystem is decreased and the risk of nitrogen saturation also decreases''. The study was designed to provide information on how the nitrogen situation is influenced if felling residues are removed from nitrogen-loaded forests and used as fuel. Felling residues release very little nitrogen during the first years after felling. They can immobilize nitrogen from the surroundings, make up a considerable addition to the nitrogen store in the soil, but also release nitrogen in later stages of degradation. The slash has an influence on the soil climate and thus on soil processes. Often there is an increase in the mineralization of litter and humus below the felling residues. At the same time, nitrification is favoured, particularly if the slash is left in heaps. Felling residues contain easily soluble nutrients that stimulate the metabolization of organic matter that otherwise is rather resistant to degradation. The slash also inhibits the clear-cut vegetation and its uptake of nitrogen. These effects result in increased leaching of nitrogen and minerals if the felling residues are left on the site. (99 refs.)

  3. CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Haugbølle, Kim

    2010-01-01

    was a framework of indicators relevant in building and real estate and applicable in the Nordic and Baltic countries as well as a proposal for a set of key indicators. The study resulting in CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework has been based on 28 case studies of evaluation practises in the building and real...... estate sector each addressing three interlinked levels: building/ projects level, company or enterprise level and benchmarking system level. Additionally it has been based on dialogue with researchers and professional organisation, international research and standardisation work and national building...... regulations in the countries participating in CREDIT. The Performance Indicator Framework encompassed 187 indicators grouped in 7 main groups of indicators and 42 sub-groups. Based on the CREDIT case studies it was concluded that there neither is link between certain indicators and specific building types...

  4. 75 FR 80866 - Credit Rating Standardization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63573; File No. 4-622] Credit Rating... desirability of: Standardizing credit ratings terminology, so that all credit rating agencies issue credit... credit [[Page 80867

  5. Disponibilidad de agua, nitrógeno y azufre en barbechos con y sin control de malezas en distintos niveles de residuos Water, nitrogen and sulphur availability in fallows with and without weed control and different residue levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Fernández

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Con el fin de evaluar el efecto de los residuos vegetales sobre la eficiencia de almacenamiento de agua, la dinámica de nitrógeno y azufre disponible durante el barbecho con y sin presencia de malezas, se realizaron 10 ensayos con distintos niveles de residuos (A: 10.000 kg MS ha-1, M: 5.000 kg MS ha-1, B: menor a 2.000 kg MS ha-1 en Haplustoles de las regiones planicie con tosca y planicie medanosa de La Pampa y Sur de Córdoba. En cada tratamiento de residuos se dividieron las parcelas en dos subtratamientos de manejo de malezas: tratamiento con malezas (malezas y sin malezas (barbecho. Se realizaron determinaciones de: textura, densidad aparente, punto de marchitez permanente, materia orgánica total. Al inicio y al final del barbecho se midió el contenido de agua en el suelo, nitratos (N, azufre de sulfatos solubles y adsorbidos (S en 0-0,2 m de profundidad. Al comienzo del barbecho todos los sitios presentaron altos contenidos de agua útil (entre 51 y 100%. A pesar de ello, nuestros resultados mostraron que al finalizar el barbecho el nivel de residuos tuvo un efecto positivo en los contenidos de agua con una diferencia entre A y B de 33%. Con presencia de las malezas, no se pudo comprobar una ventaja por parte de los residuos y la diferencia entre A y B fue de 10%. El factor que más influyó en los contenidos de agua fue la presencia de malezas. Los contenidos de N y de S disponible no fueron influenciados por los distintos niveles de residuos, constatándose un mayor efecto de malezas. En el tratamiento con malezas se vería comprometida la siembra del cultivo de girasol por menor disponibilidad de agua y además se afectaría el rendimiento en 200 kg ha-1 por la menor disponibilidad de N y en 600 kg ha-1 por menor disponibilidad de S disponible en el nivel A de residuos.In order to study the effect of crop residues on the efficiency of water storage, available nitrogen and sulphate dynamics during fallow with and without weed

  6. Identification of hardly biodegradable residuals (sulfur- and nitrogen-containing substances) during waste water treatment, including the development of analytical methods; Identifizierung von schwer abbaubaren Reststoffen (stickstoff- und schwefelhaltigen Verbindungen) bei der Abwasserbehandlung, einschliesslich analytischer Methodenentwicklung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehle, E.; Huber, A.; Metzger, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Organic residuals in sewage, which are not removed completely by waste water treatment may be relevant in environmental toxicology and may disturb drinking water treatment processes. The organic residuals must be identified before new techniques to eliminate these substances from waste water can be developed and steps can be taken to prevent them from polluting waste waters. In the research project sum parameters of sulfur- and nitrogen-containing substances in municipal waste water were determined. A new method was developed to determine the organic sulfur in compounds absorbed on activated carbon (AOS). The determination of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was calculated as the difference between total nitrogen and the sum of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N, NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N and NO{sub 2}{sup -}N. The removal of organic substances from the inorganic matrix was only possible for standard solutions, but not for real samples. More than 60 substances contributing to the sum parameters could be identified with GC-MS and GC-AED, an most of them could be quantified. 30-70% of the sulfur-containing substances detected with GC-AED could be identified. With the GC-MS screening method 21 drugs or drug metabolites could be identified and partly quantified. Hydrophilic organic residuals were identified and quantified with high performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV- and fluorescence detectors and also with a mass detector (ESI-MS-MS). With the methods described only a small percentage of the sum of AOS and DON could be detected, although new materials for the solid phase enrichment and new analytical methods, such as HPLC-MS-MS were used. In order to get information about the degree of elimination (absorption or degradation) of different drugs in a municipal sewage plant, laboratory-scale tests under aerobic conditions were performed. A batch reactor containing drugs in environmentally relevant concentrations and a suspension of activated sludge was coupled online with HPLC

  7. Effects of Synchronization of Carbohydrate and Protein Supply in Total Mixed Ration with Korean Rice Wine Residue on Ruminal Fermentation, Nitrogen Metabolism and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Holstein Steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Min Yu; Kim, Hyun J.; Seo, J. K.; Park, T. S.; Yoon, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Ha, Jong K.

    2012-01-01

    Three Holstein steers in the growing phase, each with a ruminal cannula, were used to test the hypothesis that the synchronization of the hourly rate of carbohydrate and nitrogen (N) released in the rumen would increase the amount of retained nitrogen for growth and thus improve the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (EMPS). In Experiment 1, in situ degradability coefficients of carbohydrate and N in feeds including Korean rice wine residue (RWR) were determined. In Experiment 2, three total mixed ration (TMR) diets having different rates of carbohydrate and N release in the rumen were formulated using the in situ degradability of the feeds. All diets were made to contain similar contents of crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) but varied in their hourly pattern of nutrient release. The synchrony index of the three TMRs was 0.51 (LS), 0.77 (MS) and 0.95 (HS), respectively. The diets were fed at a restricted level (2% of the animal’s body weight) in a 3×3 Latin-square design. Synchronizing the hourly supply of energy and N in the rumen did not significantly alter the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, NDF or acid detergent fiber (ADF) (p>0.05). The ruminal NH3-N content of the LS group at three hours after feeding was significantly higher (pruminal NH3-N, pH and VFA concentration among the three groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). In addition, the purine derivative (PD) excretion in urine and microbial-N production (MN) among the three groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). In conclusion, synchronizing dietary energy and N supply to the rumen did not have a major effect on nutrient digestion or microbial protein synthesis (MPS) in Holstein steers. PMID:25049518

  8. O processo ANAMMOX como alternativa para tratamento de águas residuárias, contendo alta concentração de nitrogênio The ANAMMOX process as an alternative for treatment of water with high containing nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina B. Scheeren

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da escala de produção agropecuária e agroindustrial traz, como consequência, a necessidade por alternativas para a mitigação dos impactos ambientais. As cadeias produtivas de proteína animal (ex.: suinocultura, bovinocultura e avicultura produzem efluentes com elevada concentração de compostos nitrogenados. Neste contexto, o processo ANAMMOX (do inglês Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation se constitui em uma nova estratégia de alto desempenho visando remover compostos nitrogenados de águas residuárias, agropecuárias e agroindustriais, sob condições quimiolitoautotróficas. Este artigo apresenta uma revisão bibliográfica de trabalhos publicados nos últimos 15 anos sobre estudos deste processo, discutindo sua rota metabólica, demonstrando os micro-organismos envolvidos e os parâmetros de controle do processo, além de estudos desenvolvidos no Brasil e possíveis aplicações.The increase in agriculture and agro-industrial scale production brings the necessity for alternatives to mitigate environmental impacts. The animal protein production chains (e.g. swine, cattle and poultry produce effluents with high concentration of nitrogen compounds. In this context, the ANAMMOX (Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation process is a new strategy for nitrogen removal in a high rate from agricultural and agro-industrial wastewaters under chemolithoautotrophic conditions. This paper presents a literature review of papers published in the last 15 years about the ANAMMOX process, discussing their metabolic pathway, microorganisms, main control parameters as well as studies conducted in Brazil and application possibilities.

  9. Effects of Synchronization of Carbohydrate and Protein Supply in Total Mixed Ration with Korean Rice Wine Residue on Ruminal Fermentation, Nitrogen Metabolism and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Holstein Steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yu Piao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Three Holstein steers in the growing phase, each with a ruminal cannula, were used to test the hypothesis that the synchronization of the hourly rate of carbohydrate and nitrogen (N released in the rumen would increase the amount of retained nitrogen for growth and thus improve the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (EMPS. In Experiment 1, in situ degradability coefficients of carbohydrate and N in feeds including Korean rice wine residue (RWR were determined. In Experiment 2, three total mixed ration (TMR diets having different rates of carbohydrate and N release in the rumen were formulated using the in situ degradability of the feeds. All diets were made to contain similar contents of crude protein (CP and neutral detergent fiber (NDF but varied in their hourly pattern of nutrient release. The synchrony index of the three TMRs was 0.51 (LS, 0.77 (MS and 0.95 (HS, respectively. The diets were fed at a restricted level (2% of the animal’s body weight in a 3×3 Latin-square design. Synchronizing the hourly supply of energy and N in the rumen did not significantly alter the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, NDF or acid detergent fiber (ADF (p>0.05. The ruminal NH3-N content of the LS group at three hours after feeding was significantly higher (p0.05. In addition, the purine derivative (PD excretion in urine and microbial-N production (MN among the three groups were not significantly different (p>0.05. In conclusion, synchronizing dietary energy and N supply to the rumen did not have a major effect on nutrient digestion or microbial protein synthesis (MPS in Holstein steers.

  10. Recommendations for Alternative Credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderman, Ed; And Others

    Following a review of the mathematics topics taught in accounting, electronics, auto, food and clothing, and metals courses at Linn-Benton Community College, Albany, Oregon, recommendations were made to grant one semester of mathematics credit for completing a two-year sequence of these courses. The other required semester of mathematics should be…

  11. Earned Income Tax Credit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. van Oers; R.A. de Mooij (Ruud)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn recent policy discussions in the Netherlands, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) has been put forward as an effective instrument to reduce the unemployment rate among low-skilled workers. Using the MIMIC model, this article shows that a targeted EITC at low incomes indeed seems

  12. Measuring Credit Spread Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.J. Campbell-Pownall (Rachel); R. Huisman (Ronald)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIt is widely known that the small but looming possibility of default renders the expected return distribution for financial products containing credit risk to be highly skewed and fat tailed. In this paper we apply recent techniques developed for incorporating the additional risk faced

  13. Teaching Debits and Credits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamos, Thomas

    1973-01-01

    One of the most difficult concepts for beginning accounting students is an understanding of debits and credits. A rule has been formulated which covers most other rules: Beginning balances and increases appear on the same side of the account as the account appears in the fundamental equation (assets = liabilities + capital). (SC)

  14. Waiting for tax credits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the effect of tax credits and related legislation under consideration by Congress on the economics of the renewable energy industry. The topics discussed in the article include conflicting industry opinion on financial incentives, the effectiveness of current incentives, and alternative approaches. The article also includes a sidebar on tax incentives offered by state programs

  15. Introduction of Credit Derivatives and Valuation of Credit Default Swap

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lu

    2006-01-01

    The credit derivative market was established at the beginning of the 1990s since the emergence of credit derivatives fits the rapid development of the whole derivatives market. However, compare to other derivative market, this market is still small and incomplete. As with other derivatives, credit derivatives can be used to either take more risk or hedge it, hence various credit derivatives instruments are accepted and widely used by market participants such as banks, insurance companies, etc...

  16. Dynamic Virtual Credit Card Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Ian; Li, Jiangtao; Li, Ninghui

    Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce. We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate multiple virtual credit card numbers that are either usable for a single transaction or are tied with a particular merchant. We call the scheme dynamic because the virtual credit card numbers can be generated without online contact with the credit card issuers. These numbers can be processed without changing any of the infrastructure currently in place; the only changes will be at the end points, namely, the card users and the card issuers. We analyze the security requirements for dynamic virtual credit card numbers, discuss the design space, propose a scheme using HMAC, and prove its security under the assumption the underlying function is a PRF.

  17. Dynamic Diversification in Corporate Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Jin, Xisong

    We characterize diversification in corporate credit using a new class of dynamic copula models which can capture dynamic dependence and asymmetry in large samples of firms. We also document important differences between credit spread and equity return dependence dynamics. Modeling a decade...... the crisis and remain high as well. The most important shocks to credit dependence occur in August of 2007 and in August of 2011, but interestingly these dates are not associated with significant changes to median credit spreads....

  18. Suitability of peanut residue as a nitrogen source for a rye cover crop Resíduos da cultura de amendoim como fonte de nitrogênio para uma cultura de cobertura de centeio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipling Shane Balkcom

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leguminous winter cover crops have been utilized in conservation systems to partially meet nitrogen (N requirements of succeeding summer cash crops, but the potential of summer legumes to reduce N requirements of a winter annual grass, used as a cover crop, has not been extensively examined. This study assessed the N contribution of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. residues to a subsequent rye (Secale cereale L. cover crop grown in a conservation system on a Dothan sandy loam (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Plinthic Kandiudults at Headland, AL USA during the 2003-2005 growing seasons. Treatments were arranged in a split plot design, with main plots of peanut residue retained or removed from the soil surface, and subplots as N application rates (0, 34, 67 and 101 kg ha-1 applied in the fall. Peanut residue had minimal to no effect on rye biomass yields, N content, carbon (C /N ratio, or N, P, K, Ca and Zn uptake. Additional N increased rye biomass yield, and N, P, K, Ca, and Zn uptakes. Peanut residue does not contribute significant amounts of N to a rye cover crop grown as part of a conservation system, but retaining peanut residue on the soil surface could protect the soil from erosion early in the fall and winter before a rye cover crop grows sufficiently to protect the typically degraded southeastern USA soils.Culturas leguminosas de inverno tem sido utilizadas em sistemas conservacionistas para suprimento parcial das necessidades de nitrogênio (N de culturas subseqüentes de verão, mas o potencial destas culturas leguminosas de verão no sentido de reduzir as necessidades de N de gramíneas anuais de inverno, utilizadas como culturas de cobertura, ainda não foi extensivamente estudado. Este trabalho avaliou a contribuição dos resíduos de uma cultura de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea L. sobre as necessidades de N de uma cultura subsequente de centeio (Secale cereale L. como cobertura desenvolvida dentro de um sistema conservacionista, em um

  19. The African Credit Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana Andrianova; Badi H. Baltagi; Panicos O. Demetriades; David Fielding

    2010-01-01

    We put forward a plausible explanation of African financial underdevelopment in the form of a bad credit market equilibrium. Utilising an appropriately modified IO model of banking, we show that the root of the problem could be unchecked moral hazard (strategic loan defaults) or adverse selection (a lack of good projects). We provide empirical evidence from a large panel of African banks which suggests that loan defaults are a major factor inhibiting bank lending when the quality of regulatio...

  20. Credit scoring methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtek, Martin; Kočenda, Evžen

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, 3-4 (2006), s. 152-167 ISSN 0015-1920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/05/0931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : banking sector * credit scoring * discrimination analysis Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.190, year: 2006 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1050_s_152_167.pdf

  1. Are carbon credits effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    Is it possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by assigning a value to CO 2 ? That's the concept behind carbon credits. Their advantage: they set targets but let companies decide how to meet them. Of all the processes that can be used to reduce air pollution, the cap and trade system is the best way to meet global targets on a national or continental scale. The system's efficiency is based on setting a ceiling for emissions: this is the cap. The emissions quotas are negotiable goods that can be traded on a market: this is the 'trade'. No company can exceed its quotas, but it can choose how to meet them: decreasing its emissions by changing its production processes, buying carbon credits sold by companies that have exceeded their targets, or using clean development mechanisms. For a carbon credit system to function correctly on an economic level, it's essential to meet one condition: don't allocate too many emissions quotas to the companies involved. If they receive too many quotas, it's not hard for them to meet their objectives without changing their production processes. The supply of carbon credits currently exceeds demand. The price per ton of CO 2 is collapsing, and companies that have exceeded their targets are not rewarded for their efforts. Efficient though it may be, the cap and trade system cannot be the only way to fight CO 2 emissions. In Europe, it presently covers 40% of the CO 2 emissions by targeting utilities and industries that consume the most fossil fuels. But it cannot be extended to some sectors where pollution is diffuse. In transportation, for example, it's not possible to impose such a requirement. For that sector, as well as for the building sector, a suitable system of taxes might be effective and incentive

  2. Follow Up: Credit Card Caution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    In "Pushing Plastic," ("The New England Journal of Higher Education", Summer 2007), John Humphrey notes that many college administrators justify their credit card solicitations by suggesting that credit card access will help students learn to manage their own finances. Instead, credit card debt will teach thousands of students…

  3. Credit-proofing fundamentals for a solid credit policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydiatt, I.

    2003-01-01

    This Power Point presentation presented the basics of a credit policy with reference to corporate objectives, governance, credit definitions, subjective/objective elements, quantification of full risk, management, monitoring, reporting and gate-keeping processes. Options for a credit policy were described as being approval authority grids, confidentiality issues, credit scoring, corporate risk levels, follow-up collection calling, and procedures on unapproved exposures. Recommendations for setting risk and credit limits were also presented with a note emphasizing that in the past 6 months credit evaluation processes have had to deal with the media risk, a new risk that has not been seen before. This risk can be addressed by careful monitoring of stock prices. The paper also presented recommendations for what to look for as indicators and how to deal with risk in volatile price periods. Credit tools for volatile times were described. 1 tab

  4. The nitrogen fertilizer utilization and nitrogen balance by winter wheat in sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou Changlin; Wang Hengyu

    2003-01-01

    The effects of different fertilization stage on wheat yield, nitrogen uptake, utilization, residue, distribution and nitrogen balance were studied by potted plant experiment. The results showed that the highest yield obtained appeared in the treatment of topdressing on shooting age when 1/2 nitrogen fertilizer applied as base fertilizer. Topdressing on earning stage reached higher yield than that on regreening stage on the case of lower nitrogen applied. There was no difference between these two treatment if higher nitrogen applied. Nitrogen plant uptake in 1/2 nitrogen as topdressing treatment was significantly higher than that of all as base fertilizer, which mainly because of improved efficiency of nitrogen fertilizer. 31.7%-66.8% of residue nitrogen in soil was distributed in 0-40 cm soil layer after harvest and proportion of residue nitrogen in this layer was increased when nitrogen fertilizer applied later. However, in the treatment of all nitrogen applied as base fertilizer and topdressing on regreening stage, proportion of residue nitrogen in the subsoil was higher than topdressing in later state, which in 80-100 cm depth was even exceeded that in the topsoil

  5. Value of credit bureau reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brković Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient system of credit information sharing contributes to solving the problem of information asymmetry on the credit and financial markets in general. The consequences of the global economic and financial crisis revealed an increasing demand for reliable information and data which could close the existing gap in their insufficiency, misuse or inadequate analytical value for the economic and financial policy makers. In that sense, more attention is directed to the usefulness of credit information sharing and the practical value of information and data contained in credit bureau reports for the purposes of achieving the overall economic policy goals. The fulfillment of that role depends mostly on the credit information sharing system and its characteristics, participants, and procedures. A credit bureau report in the best possible manner reflects all advantages and disadvantages of the established credit information exchange system in terms of its analytical value for the purposes of efficient macroeconomic and macrofinancial policies.

  6. INFLUENCE OF LEGUME RESIDUE AND NITROGEN FERTILIZER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    designed crop rotation creates farm diversity and improves soil condition and fertility. Despite its associated ... management practices like crop rotation which is fundamental to a sustainable cropping system. 10062 .... as chlorophyll, nucleotides, alkaloids, proteins, enzymes, hormones and vitamins[19]. The higher grain ...

  7. Permit trading and credit trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan-Tjeerd; R. Dijstra, Bouwe

    This paper compares emissions trading based on a cap on total emissions (permit trading) and on relative standards per unit of output (credit trading). Two types of market structure are considered: perfect competition and Cournot oligopoly. We find that output, abatement costs and the number....... Environmental policy can lead to exit, but also to entry of firms. Entry and exit have a profound impact on the performance of the schemes, especially under imperfect competition. We find that it may be impossible to implement certain levels of total industry emissions. Under credit trading several levels...... of firms are higher under credit trading. Allowing trade between permit-trading and credit-trading sectors may increase in welfare. With perfect competition, permit trading always leads to higher welfare than credit trading. With imperfect competition, credit trading may outperform permit trading...

  8. Permit trading and credit trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan-Tjeerd; R. Dijstra, Bouwe

    This paper compares emissions trading based on a cap on total emissions (permit trading) and on relative standards per unit of output (credit trading). Two types of market structure are considered: perfect competition and Cournot oligopoly. We find that output, abatement costs and the number...... of firms are higher under credit trading. Allowing trade between permit-trading and credit-trading sectors may increase in welfare. With perfect competition, permit trading always leads to higher welfare than credit trading. With imperfect competition, credit trading may outperform permit trading....... Environmental policy can lead to exit, but also to entry of firms. Entry and exit have a profound impact on the performance of the schemes, especially under imperfect competition. We find that it may be impossible to implement certain levels of total industry emissions. Under credit trading several levels...

  9. Credit constraints and consumer spending

    OpenAIRE

    Beaton, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between aggregate consumer spending and credit availability in the United States. The author finds that consumer spending falls (rises) in response to a reduction (increase) in credit availability. Moreover, she provides a formal assessment of the possibility that credit availability is particularly important for consumer spending when it undergoes large changes. In this respect, she estimates a consumption function in which only large expansions and contr...

  10. Credit demand in Mozambican manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byiers, Bruce; Rand, John; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses two industrial firm surveys to identify the key determinants of credit demand in Mozambican manufacturing. We construct five different measures of being credit constrained and estimate desired debt demand. Besides firm size and ownership structure, we find evidence that general...... manager education and business association membership are associated with whether a firm is credit constrained or not. Using our preferred measure of credit constraint suggests that around 43 per cent of the firms surveyed are constrained, and these enterprises would almost triple their debt burden...

  11. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  12. CREDIT RISK. DETERMINATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA GRUIESCU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The internationalization of financial flows and banking and the rapid development of markets have changed the financial sector, causing him to respond with force and imagination. Under these conditions, the concerns of financial and banking institutions, rating institutions are increasingly turning to find the best solutions to hedge risks and maximize profits. This paper aims to present a number of advantages, but also limits the Merton model, the first structural model for modeling credit risk. Also, some are extensions of the model, some empirical research and performance known, others such as state-dependent models (SDM, which together with the liquidation process models (LPM, are two recent efforts in the structural models, show different phenomena in real life.

  13. Concurrent credit portfolio losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicking, Joachim; Guhr, Thomas; Schäfer, Rudi

    2018-01-01

    We consider the problem of concurrent portfolio losses in two non-overlapping credit portfolios. In order to explore the full statistical dependence structure of such portfolio losses, we estimate their empirical pairwise copulas. Instead of a Gaussian dependence, we typically find a strong asymmetry in the copulas. Concurrent large portfolio losses are much more likely than small ones. Studying the dependences of these losses as a function of portfolio size, we moreover reveal that not only large portfolios of thousands of contracts, but also medium-sized and small ones with only a few dozens of contracts exhibit notable portfolio loss correlations. Anticipated idiosyncratic effects turn out to be negligible. These are troublesome insights not only for investors in structured fixed-income products, but particularly for the stability of the financial sector. JEL codes: C32, F34, G21, G32, H81.

  14. Credit concession through credit scoring: Analysis and application proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Amat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study herein develops and tests a credit scoring model which can help financial institutions in assessing credit requests.  Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study has the objective of answering two questions: (1 Which ratios better discriminate the companies based on their being solvent or insolvent? and (2 What is the relative importance of these ratios? To do this, several statistical techniques with a multifactorial focus have been used (Multivariate Analysis of Variance, Linear Discriminant Analysis, Logit and Probit Models. Several samples of companies have been used in order to obtain and to test the model.  Findings: Through the application of several statistical techniques, the credit scoring model has been proved to be effective in discriminating between good and bad creditors.  Research limitations:  This study focuses on manufacturing, commercial and services companies of all sizes in Spain; Therefore, the conclusions may differ for other geographical locations. Practical implications:  Because credit is one of the main drivers of growth, a solid credit scoring model can help financial institutions assessing to whom to grant credit and to whom not to grant credit. Social implications: Because of the growing importance of credit for our society and the fear of granting it due to the latest financial turmoil, a solid credit scoring model can strengthen the trust toward the financial institutions assessment’s.  Originality/value: There is already a stream of literature related to credit scoring. However, this paper focuses on Spanish firms and proves the results of our model based on real data. The application of the model to detect the probability of default in loans is original.

  15. A forma de aplicação da uréia e dos resíduos vegetais afeta a disponibilidade de nitrogênio The addition form of crop residues and urea interfers on nitrogen availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Ernani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O método de aplicação dos resíduos vegetais e dos fertilizantes nitrogenados pode afetar as reações do nitrogênio no solo, principalmente no plantio direto. O presente trabalho objetivou avaliar esses efeitos na disponibilidade de N para o milho em dois solos, em casa-de-vegetação. Combinações de métodos (ausência, incorporada ou na superfície de adição de palha de aveia (0,4kg m-2 e uréia (50mg N kg-1 foram aplicadas em unidades experimentais (7dm³ vaso-1 de dois solos, perfazendo um fatorial 3 x 3 x 2. O milho foi semeado no dia da aplicação dos tratamentos e as plantas foram cultivadas durante trinta dias, sobre um Neossolo e um Nitossolo, respectivamente com 50 e 520g kg-1 de argila e 8 e 48g kg-1 de matéria orgânica. A aplicação de palha de aveia, principalmente sobre a superfície do solo, beneficiou o desenvolvimento das plantas, possivelmente pela manutenção de maior quantidade de umidade nos solos. A aplicação de uréia não afetou nenhum parâmetro vegetal no solo argiloso, talvez porque a decomposição da matéria orgânica liberou mais N do que a imobilização ocasionada durante a decomposição da palha; no solo arenoso, entretanto, a uréia foi benéfica quando incorporada ao solo, e prejudicial quando adicionada na superfície, provavelmente devido à toxidez de amônia. Dessa forma, o efeito da decomposição da palha de aveia na disponibilidade de N foi função do teor de matéria orgânica original do solo.Management of both crop residues and nitrogen fertilizers affects soil N reactions especially on no-till systems. The magnitude of these effects on N availability to maize was evaluated in a greenhouse study. Combinations of oat straw and urea (absence, soil incorporated or surface applied were added to experimental units (7-dm³ per pot of two soils, in a 3 x 3 x 2 factorial combination. Plants were sown just following treatments addition, and grown for thirty days in two soils (Typic

  16. Credit Cards. Bulletin No. 721. (Revised.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Linda Kirk

    This cooperative extension bulletin provides basic information about credit cards and their use. It covers the following topics: types of credit cards (revolving credit, travel and entertainment, and debit); factors to consider when evaluating a credit card (interest rates, grace period, and annual membership fee); other credit card costs (late…

  17. 12 CFR 703.6 - Credit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit analysis. 703.6 Section 703.6 Banks and... ACTIVITIES § 703.6 Credit analysis. A Federal credit union must conduct and document a credit analysis on an... Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. A Federal credit union must update this analysis at least annually...

  18. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  19. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  20. Optimization of manuring with fermentation residues in order to reduce the nitrogen emissions and optimization of the humus balance; Optimierung der Gaerrestduengung zur Reduzierung der Stickstoffemissionen und Optimierung der Humusbilanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Kurt [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Kulturpflanzenwissenschaften

    2011-07-01

    On the one hand, the introduction of a biogas plant is connected with the possibility of optimizing the internal nutrient cycles and the reduction of nitrogen losses. On the other hand, the improper handling of the digestate and ''stupid'' cropping systems increase the nitrogen emissions significantly. Therefore, biogas plants are faced with many challenges in order to optimize the nutrient cycling, to reduce their nitrogen losses to a minimum and to keep the humus balance in mind. From this perspective, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on some opportunities for optimization.

  1. An Anonymous Credit Card System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulaki, Elli; Bellovin, Steven

    Credit cards have many important benefits; however, these same benefits often carry with them many privacy concerns. In particular, the need for users to be able to monitor their own transactions, as well as bank’s need to justify its payment requests from cardholders, entitle the latter to maintain a detailed log of all transactions its credit card customers were involved in. A bank can thus build a profile of each cardholder even without the latter’s consent. In this paper, we present a practical and accountable anonymous credit system based on ecash, with a privacy preserving mechanism for error correction and expense-reporting.

  2. Armenia - Water to Market Credit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The analysis of WtM credit used baseline and final follow-up Farming Practices Survey (FPS) data to summarize beneficiary and loan characteristics, as well as to...

  3. Costly Credit and Sticky Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy Qian Liu; Liang Wang; Randall Wright

    2015-01-01

    We construct a model where money and credit are alternative payment instruments, use it to analyze sluggish nominal prices, and confront the data. Equilibria entail price dispersion, where sellers set nominal terms that they may keep fixed when aggregate conditions change. Buyers use cash and credit, with the former (latter) subject to inflation (transaction costs). We provide strong analytic results and exact solutions for money demand. Calibrated versions match price-change data well, with ...

  4. Credit Stagnation in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Adolfo Barajas; Roberto Steiner

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the recent marked slowdown in bank credit to the private sector in Latin America. Based on the study of eight countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Mexico, and Venezuela), the magnitude of the slowdown is documented, comparing it to historical behavior and to slowdown episodes in other regions of the world. Second, changes in bank balance sheets are examined to determine whether the credit slowdown is merely a reflection of a slowdown in bank deposi...

  5. Effect of different nitrogen application types on nitrogen utilization efficiency and fate of fertilizer for sugacane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jianfeng; Wei Dongping; Liu Huanyu; Chen Chaojun; Lan Libin; Liang He

    2013-01-01

    A pot experiment in greenhouse was conducted with 15 N-labeled urea 5 g/pot (equal to 450 kg · hm -2 ) total nitrogen by three kinds of treatments of disposable bottom application nitrogen before sowing (T1), 50% nitrogen before sowing and 50% nitrogrn during tillering stage (T2), and 30% nitrogen before sowing, 30% nitrogen during tillering stage and 40% nitrogen applied during elongation stage (T3) to investigate the use efficiency and fate of fertilizer nitrogen using the sugarcane cultivar ROC22. Results showed that almost 18% ∼ 29% of total N uptake by sugarcane was supplied by fertilizer, and 71% ∼ 82% N derived from soil and seed-stem. Nitrogen use efficiency ranged from 21.0% to 34.52%, with 15 N-fertilizer residue of 37.61% ∼ 44.13%, and 15 N-fertilizer loss of 21.35% ∼ 41.39% among three treatments. Under the three levels of nitrogen application, residual was 15 N-fertilizer was mainly distributed in 0 ∼ 20 cm top soil. The uptake of nitrogen and the proportion of total N from fertilizer in sugarcane plant, the yield of stalk and sugar after the nitrogen applied, and the use efficiency and residue ratio of 15 N-fertilizer increased significantly over time, while loss rate of 15 N-fertilizer decreased significantly with a slight decline trend of nitrogen distribution and sucrose accumulation in stalk. The results also indicated that after the nitrogen applied the amounts 15 N-fertilizer residue in 0 ∼ 20 cm top soil showed a rising trend, but dropped in 20 ∼ 40 cm soil profile. From the viewpoints of economic benefit and ecological benefit, the nitrogen fertilizer applied of T3 could be optimal treatment. (authors)

  6. The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano Manzoni; Robert B. Jackson; John A. Trofymow; Amilcare Porporato

    2008-01-01

    Plant residue decomposition and the nutrient release to the soil play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycling. Although decomposition rates vary strongly with climate, nitrogen immobilization into litter and its release in mineral forms are mainly controlled by the initial chemical composition of the residues. We used a data set of ~2800 observations to show...

  7. Residual risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing the residual risk of transmission of HIV by blood transfusion. An epidemiological approach assumed that all HIV infections detected serologically in first-time donors were pre-existing or prevalent infections, and that all infections detected in repeat blood donors were new or incident infections. During 1986 - 1987,0,012%.

  8. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-30

    This report gave a record of the composition of several samples of residues from carbonization of various hydrogenation residue from processing some type of coal or tar in the Bergius process. These included Silesian bituminous coal processed at 600 atm. with iron catalyst, in one case to produce gasoline and middle oil and in another case to produce heavy oil excess, Scholven coal processed at 250 atm. with tin oxalate and chlorine catalyst, Bruex tar processed in a 10-liter oven using iron catalyst, and a pitch mixture from Welheim processed in a 10-liter over using iron catalyst. The values gathered were compared with a few corresponding values estimated for Boehlen tar and Gelsenberg coal based on several assumptions outlined in the report. The data recorded included percentage of ash in the dry residue and percentage of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, total sulfur, and volatile sulfur. The percentage of ash varied from 21.43% in the case of Bruex tar to 53.15% in the case of one of the Silesian coals. Percentage of carbon varied from 44.0% in the case of Scholven coal to 78.03% in the case of Bruex tar. Percentage of total sulfur varied from 2.28% for Bruex tar to a recorded 5.65% for one of the Silesian coals and an estimated 6% for Boehlen tar. 1 table.

  9. THE CREDIT AND CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DURING THE CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitan Gheorghe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of credit risk management to ensure the financial system stability,the paper presents financial and real sector interaction highlighting that credit growth based on increase of creditdemand, of income, of assets prices, of currency availability, the interest rate differential between countries andrelaxation of regulatory framework, leaves banks more vulnerable to subsequent downturn in economic activity andasset prices. It also outlines the steps taken or those I think that should be implemented in terms of improving creditrisk management, implementation of regulatory measures to limit credit expansion, enforcing the regulatoryrequirements for covering the expected and unexpected losses, introduction of new surveillance tools aimed to leadto a more resilient financial system.

  10. 75 FR 60651 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... strategies for financial and correspondent services, including the ability of the proposed corporate credit... NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 704 RIN 3133-AD80 Corporate Credit Unions AGENCY...) setting forth the requirements and process for chartering corporate federal credit unions. DATES: Comments...

  11. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  12. 49 CFR 536.4 - Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSFER AND TRADING OF FUEL ECONOMY CREDITS § 536.4 Credits. (a) Type and vintage... category, and model year of origin (vintage). (b) Application of credits. All credits earned and applied are calculated, per 49 U.S.C. 32903(c), in tenths of a mile per gallon by which the average fuel...

  13. 12 CFR 561.12 - Consumer credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consumer credit. 561.12 Section 561.12 Banks... AFFECTING ALL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.12 Consumer credit. The term consumer credit means credit extended... real estate and chattel liens secured by mobile homes and leases of personal property to consumers that...

  14. 76 FR 79531 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... exclude CLF stock subscriptions, based on the asset's negligible credit risk and to facilitate corporate... removing paragraphs (c)(3) and (f)(4) and adding paragraph (h) to read as follows: Sec. 704.6 Credit risk... NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 704 RIN 3133-AD95 Corporate Credit Unions AGENCY...

  15. 49 CFR 260.13 - Credit reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... appropriations, direct payment of a Credit Risk Premium by the Applicant or a non-Federal infrastructure partner... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Credit reform. 260.13 Section 260.13... REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT FINANCING PROGRAM Overview § 260.13 Credit reform. The Federal Credit Reform Act...

  16. Trade credit: Elusive insurance of firm growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bams, Dennis; Bos, Jaap; Pisa, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Firms depend heavily on trade credit. This paper introduces a trade credit network into a structural model of the economy. In an empirical analysis of the model, we find that trade credit is an elusive insurance: as long as a firm is financially unconstrained and times are good, more trade credit

  17. Lending and Credit Monitoring Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica IOAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of a bank’s activities depend to a significant extent on the quality of the credit portfolio that it holds, as well as on the credit tracking and control system. The purpose and functioning of such inter-banking systems differs from one bank to another. Loans require an increasingly efficient type of internal surveillance of activity. Following the clients’ behavior and performances, as well as their entire activity is a particularly important phase and absolutely necessary in the course of a loan. The purpose of this activity is, generally, that of identifying, as early as possible, of clues about any problems that may appear during the course of the loan, so as to make possible, as early as can be, the taking of remedial measures with a view to anticipate the deterioration of the loan’s debt. An open communication between the bank and the loan’s beneficiary is an essential condition for an efficient tracking program. Another basic element is the rigorous and complete filling out of the credit papers. The credit files are the backbone of the of the loan monitoring process because these contain all of the documents which may offer to the credit officer, accounting expert, as well as other interested parties a permanent, chronological record of the loan relation.

  18. The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Stefano; Jackson, Robert B; Trofymow, John A; Porporato, Amilcare

    2008-08-01

    Plant residue decomposition and the nutrient release to the soil play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycling. Although decomposition rates vary strongly with climate, nitrogen immobilization into litter and its release in mineral forms are mainly controlled by the initial chemical composition of the residues. We used a data set of approximately 2800 observations to show that these global nitrogen-release patterns can be explained by fundamental stoichiometric relationships of decomposer activity. We show how litter quality controls the transition from nitrogen accumulation into the litter to release and alters decomposers' respiration patterns. Our results suggest that decomposers lower their carbon-use efficiency to exploit residues with low initial nitrogen concentration, a strategy used broadly by bacteria and consumers across trophic levels.

  19. 78 FR 77721 - Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access for Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access for Credit Unions AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Notice of Funding Opportunity. SUMMARY: The National Credit...

  20. 78 FR 2449 - Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access for Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access for Credit Unions AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Notice of Funding Opportunity. SUMMARY: The National Credit...

  1. 78 FR 33445 - Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access For Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access For Credit Unions AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Notice of Funding Opportunity. SUMMARY: The National Credit...

  2. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  3. Credit Rationing Effects of Credit Value-at-Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Slijkerman; D.J.C. Smant (David); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBanks provide risky loans to firms which have superior information regarding the quality of their projects. Due to asymmetric information the banks face the risk of adverse selection. Credit Value-at-Risk (CVaR) regulation counters the problem of low quality, i.e. high risk, loans and

  4. Characterization of organic nitrogen in IBCSP coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruge, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the content and distribution of organic nitrogen in a series of IBCSP coals and their isolated macerals. The specific objectives were: to determine the bulk nitrogen contents for coals, isolated macerals, oxidation products and residues, solvent extracts and their liquid chromatographic fractions, and pyrolyzates; to determine the distribution of organic nitrogen in all coal derivatives enumerated in Objective 1 which are Gas Chromatography (GC)-amenable. This will be accomplished by GC-Thermionic Specific Detectors; to determine the molecular structure of the major nitrogen compounds detected in Objective 2, using mass spectrometry.

  5. Credit Policy within BRD Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraru Camelia

    2017-01-01

    It has been found that credit is indispensable to an economy, which is why the method of granting itis significant and, in this sense, the function of the bank of financial analyst plays an important rolein orienting resources towards the most efficient placements.

  6. Brownfields New Markets Tax Credits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Brownfi elds Solutions factsheet is intended for brownfields stakeholders interested in how the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program can be used as a financing mechanism in brownfields cleanup and redevelopment.

  7. Learning in a credit economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assenza, T.; Berardi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we analyze a credit economy à la Kiyotaki and Moore (JPE, 1997) enriched with learning dynamics. Both borrowers and lenders need to make expectations about the future price of the collateral, and under heterogeneous learning this can have interesting con- sequences for the economy when

  8. Credit Supply and Corporate Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amore, Mario Daniele; Schneider, Cédric; Zaldokas, Alminas

    We present evidence that banking development plays a key role in technological progress. We focus on firms’ innovative performance, measured by patent-based metrics, and employ exogenous variations in banking development arising from the staggered deregulation of banking activities across U.S. st...... by a greater ability of deregulated banks to geographically diversify credit risk....

  9. Methodology of Credit Analysis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slađana Neogradi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of research presented in this paper refers to the definition of methodology for the development of credit analysis in companies and its application in lending operations in the Republic of Serbia. With the developing credit market, there is a growing need for a well-developed risk and loss prevention system. In the introduction the process of bank analysis of the loan applicant is presented in order to minimize and manage the credit risk. By examining the subject matter, the process of processing the credit application is described, the procedure of analyzing the financial statements in order to get an insight into the borrower's creditworthiness. In the second part of the paper, the theoretical and methodological framework is presented applied in the concrete company. In the third part, models are presented which banks should use to protect against exposure to risks, i.e. their goal is to reduce losses on loan operations in our country, as well as to adjust to market conditions in an optimal way.

  10. Credit Supply and Corporate Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amore, Mario Daniele; Schneider, Cédric; Žaldokas, Alminas

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence that banking development plays a key role in technological progress. We focus on manufacturing firms' innovative performance, measured by patent-based metrics, and employ exogenous variations in banking development arising from the staggered deregulation of banking activities ...... that these results are strongly driven by a greater ability of deregulated banks to geographically diversify credit risk....

  11. A Mechanism for Anonymous Credit Card Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shinsuke; Yanase, Tatsuro

    This paper proposes a mechanism for anonymous credit card systems, in which each credit card holder can conceal individual transactions from the credit card company, while enabling the credit card company to calculate the total expenditures of transactions of individual card holders during specified periods, and to identify card holders who executed dishonest transactions. Based on three existing mechanisms, i.e. anonymous authentication, blind signature and secure statistical data gathering, together with implicit transaction links proposed here, the proposed mechanism enables development of anonymous credit card systems without assuming any absolutely trustworthy entity like tamper resistant devices or organizations faithful both to the credit card company and card holders.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A CREDIT POLICY FOR MARKETS SUBJECT TO CREDIT RATIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobov A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective credit policy is an essential condition for bank’s successful operation. In this article methods of developing a credit policy that accounts for information asymmetry and «reverse selection» effect in the credit market are considered. In the course of research, relationships between interest rates, “pass” credit score, total bank’s income, average profitability of a credit product and the amount of capital required to be allocated to a new product, were revealed. Noting these relationships, bank’s credit department is able to set optimal interest rates, credit score and capital, as well as to apply credit rationing, if necessary.

  13. Credit securitization and credit derivatives: Financial instruments and the credit risk management of middle market commercial loan portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Henke, Sabine; Burghof, Hans-Peter; Rudolph, Bernd

    1998-01-01

    Banks increasingly recognize the need to measure and manage the credit risk of their loans on a portfolio basis. We address the subportfolio "middle market". Due to their specific lending policy for this market segment it is an important task for banks to systematically identify regional and industrial credit concentrations and reduce the detected concentrations through diversification. In recent years, the development of markets for credit securitization and credit derivatives has provided n...

  14. Reports on...Credit and Other Financial Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRW Information Systems and Services, Orange, CA.

    This document contains 29 two-page reports on credit, business credit, direct marketing, and real estate data prepared by the credit reporting company, TRW, for consumers. Topics covered are the following: consumer credit reports, how to obtain a copy of a consumer credit report, how credit bureaus compile consumer credit reports, the role of…

  15. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  16. Performance Consulting: Get CREDIT from Your Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Vicki; Chalmers, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses client satisfaction criteria relevant to human performance consultants and explains the CREDIT model that represents what clients consider most important. Examines CREDIT: Client needs, Relationships, demonstrating Expertise and experience, creating Deliverables, Interpersonal skills, and Tracking and project managing. (LRW)

  17. Fish marketing and credit in Viet Nam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lem, Audun

    2004-01-01

    .... State-owned financial institutions play a major role in financing capital expenditure while working capital requirements are mainly met by informal sources of credit. However, future investment requirements and credit needs are greater than currently available.

  18. From subprime mortgages to subprime credit cards

    OpenAIRE

    Margo Anderson

    2008-01-01

    Since the 2005 changes to bankruptcy law made subprime products safer for credit card companies, they are promoting more cards to consumers with poor credit. High up-front fees and penalties may call for consumer caution.

  19. British and American attitudes toward credit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bijou; James, Simon; Lester, David

    2006-04-01

    American university students owned more than twice as many credit cards as British university students. However, scores on a credit card attitude scale predicted the number of cards owned by respondents in both countries.

  20. Portfolio Optimization for Multiple Group Credit Unions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willis, John

    1999-01-01

    ...) to diversify, credit unions now have the opportunity to market their services to specific employee groups or industries which can reduce the overall risk to the credit unions' health or solvency...

  1. Scoring Models of Bank Credit Policy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Hanic; Emina Zunic; Adnan Dzelihodzic

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present how credit scoring models can be used in financial institutions, in this case in banks, in order to simplify credit lending. Unlike traditional models of credit analysis, scoring models provides valuation based on numerical score who represent clients’ possibility to fulfil their obligation. Using credit scoring models, bank can create a numerical snapshot of consumers risk profile. One of the most important characteristic of scoring models is objectivity w...

  2. Developing emission reduction credit trading in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Texas Air Control Board has begun to develop a system of emission reduction credit training. The system will be developed incrementally over time. The first step, banking of VOC and NO x Emission Reduction Credits, began March 15, 1993. Additional programs under study and development include NO x RACT trading, emission credits for motor vehicle scrappage and alternative fuel conversion, and establishment of community organizations to generate and acquire emission reduction credits for economic development purposes

  3. STATE CREDIT RATING MARK: PRESENT DOMESTIC REALITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalko, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses the problematic aspects of credit ratings and ranking. The economic and legal aspects of ranking relations are addressed. It is concluded that a low credit standing of Ukraine is a sign of our country’s low debt sustainability.It is proved that both for Ukraine and for economically developed countries, the issue of credit ratings is quite important, and at times problematic. The issue is related to the development of the national and international financial credit resour...

  4. KARAKTERISTIK PERUSAHAAN DAN CREDIT RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erma Wahdani Permanasari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of characteristic of firm to the level of creditrisk. Characteristics of the firm is proxied by size, leverage, spread ownership, net profit margin,return on equity, industry type and scope of the company’s operations. Measurement of level creditrisk uses PT Pefindo bond rating. Annual reports of listed companies in PT Pefindo and IndonesiaStock Exchange (IDX 2010-2011 are collected based on purposive sampling techniques. Thepopulation is 238 companies. Sample used amounted to 84 companies. The analysis model usedin this study is multiple linear regression. Results of this study indicate that the level of corporatecredit risk in Indonesia is high because it is below the 50.00%. The test result of multiple regressionshowed that firm of characteristic affect the level of credit risk. Firm characteristics that affectthe level of credit risk are size, leverage, dispersion of ownership, net profit margin and returnon equity.

  5. Credit rating dynamics and competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    I analyze the market for credit ratings with competition between more than two rating agencies. How can honest rating behavior be achieved, and under which conditions can a new honest rating agency successfully invade a market with inflating incumbents? My model predicts cyclic dynamics if sophis......I analyze the market for credit ratings with competition between more than two rating agencies. How can honest rating behavior be achieved, and under which conditions can a new honest rating agency successfully invade a market with inflating incumbents? My model predicts cyclic dynamics...... if sophisticated investors have a high impact on agencies’ reputation. In contrast, if trusting investors have the main impact, then the dynamics exhibits a saddle point rather than cycles. In this case, regulatory support for honest rating agencies is only needed for a limited time, but the effect is sustainable...

  6. Credit risk & forward price models

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Raquel Medeiros

    2006-01-01

    Doutoramento em Gestão This thesis consists of three distinct parts. Part I introduces the basic concepts and the notion of general quadratic term structures (GQTS) essential in some of the following chapters. Part II focuses on credit risk models and Part III studies forward price term structure models using both the classical and the geometrical approach. Part I is organized as follows. Chapter 1is divided in two main sections. The first section presents some of ...

  7. 47 CFR 97.505 - Element credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Element credit. 97.505 Section 97.505... SERVICE Qualifying Examination Systems § 97.505 Element credit. (a) The administering VEs must give credit... operator license grant: Elements 2 and 3. (2) An unexpired (or expired but within the grace period for...

  8. 48 CFR 1632.607 - Tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Tax credit. 1632.607... 1632.607 Tax credit. FAR 32.607 has no practical application to FEHBP contracts. The statutory... may not offset debts to the Fund by a tax credit which is solely a Government obligation. ...

  9. 27 CFR 46.223 - Tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax credit. 46.223 Section... for Sale on April 1, 2009 Tax Liability Calculation § 46.223 Tax credit. The dealer is allowed a credit of up to $500 against the total floor stocks tax. However, controlled groups are eligible for only...

  10. 48 CFR 2132.607 - Tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Tax credit. 2132.607... Contract Debts 2132.607 Tax credit. FAR 32.607 has no practical application to FEGLI Program contracts. The... Government, contractors may not offset debts to the Fund by a tax credit that is solely a Government...

  11. Overcoming credit card fraud in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the. South African Banking Risk Intelligence Centre ... A credit card is a convenient method of payment, but it does carry risks. The enormous ... does not exist in a vacuum. Often credit card fraud is. 'linked with other crimes, such as burglary, mail theft and organised crime'.13. TYPES OF CREDIT CARD FRAUD.

  12. 76 FR 54991 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... believes the credit risk of carrying this asset is negligible and warrants such treatment, as CLF stock is... credit union excludes the consolidated assets of such programs from risk-weighted assets pursuant to... paragraphs (c)(3) and (f)(4) and adding new p(h) to read as follows: Sec. 704.6 Credit risk management...

  13. Credit in Acceptance Sampling on Attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Chris A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Credit is introduced in acceptance sampling on attributes and a Credit Based Acceptance sampling system is developed that is very easy to apply in practice.The credit of a producer is defined as the total number of items accepted since the last rejection.In our sampling system the sample size for a

  14. 78 FR 25101 - Credit Ratings Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69433; File No. 4-661] Credit Ratings... examine issues in connection with the possibility of developing a credit rating assignment system. The... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Davey at (212) 336-0075, Office of Credit Ratings, Securities and...

  15. 40 CFR 91.1307 - Credit calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... family in kW (sales weighted). The power of each configuration is the rated output in kilowatts as....1307 Credit calculation. For each participating engine family, emission credits (positive or negative... for an engine family whether generating positive or negative in-use emission credits: ER04oc96.053...

  16. 76 FR 34010 - Credit Risk Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... 2501-AD53 Credit Risk Retention AGENCIES: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Treasury (OCC... credit risk retention requirements of section 15G of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as added by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (``Credit Risk NPR'' or ``proposed rule...

  17. Rare Disasters and Credit Market Puzzles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Du, Du; Elkamhi, Redouane

    to the real economy and not to bond prices can simultaneously explain several key empirical regularities in credit markets. Our model captures the empirical level and volatility of credit spreads, generates a flexible credit risk term structure, and provides a good fit to a century of observed spreads...

  18. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitora Cibele Daher Botelho Monteiro Pró-Reitora de Ensino Fabíola de Amério Ney Silva Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação Hélio Gomes Filho Pró-Reitor de Extensão Eugênio Ferreira Naegele da Silva Pró-Reitor de Desenvolvimento Institucional Roberto Moraes Pessanha Editora-chefe Inez Barcellos de AndradeCoordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Desiely Silva GusmãoEdinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosInez Barcellos de AndradeJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTMiriam Fontelle (UNIFLU e UNESARodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Apoio TécnicoCarlos David PascoDenia Cristina da Silva BarretoGisele Carvalho da Silva Costa Nogueira Bolsista de Iniciação CientíficaJáder da Mota SiqueiraJúlio Fontoura Gonçalves de LimaSamara Melo RodriguesWanessa Alves Duarte Revisão de Texto Edinalda Maria Almeida da SilvaVania Cristina Alexandrino Bernardo Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Diego Melo Gomes CapaAndré da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica Inez Barcellos de Andrade CopidesqueCláudia de Souza CaetanoCatalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIPB688 Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 2007 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,2007- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Borzan Indústria Gráfica | Tel.: (22 3211-9274

  19. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Reitora Cibele Daher Botelho Monteiro Vice-Diretor Geral Jefferson Manhães de Azevedo Coordenadora de Pós-Graduação Vera Raimunda Amério Asseff Coordenador de Pesquisa Rogério Atem de Carvalho Editora-Chefe Maria Amelia Ayd Correa Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes FerreiraConselho Editorial Dalila Silva MelloMarcos Antonio Cruz MoreiraRoberta de Sousa RamalhoVicente de Paulo Santos de Oliveira Organizadores deste número Maria Inês Paes FerreiraJosé Augusto Ferreira da SilvaJader Lugon JuniorPedro Paulo Gomes Watts RodriguesMariana Rodrigues de Carvalhaes PinheiroKarla Aguiar KuryBrunna Rocha WerneckSamara Melo RodriguesJúlio Fontoura Gonçalves de LimaGabriel Pereira CostaJáder da Mota Siqueira Apoio Técnico Amanda de Andrade SantosCarlos David PascoDenia Cristina da Silva BarretoGisele Carvalho da Silva Costa Nogueira Bolsistas de Iniciação CientíficaJáder da Mota SiqueiraJúlio Fontoura Gonçalves de LimaSamara Melo RodriguesWanessa Alves Duarte Revisão de TextoEdinalda Maria Almeida da SilvaVania Cristina Alexandrino Bernardo Projeto GráficoAndré da Silva CruzDaniel Marques Sardinha Diagramação Daniel Marques SardinhaVladimir de Abreu Braga Barbosa Capa Daniel Marques Sardinha Revisão Técnica Flávia Gomes de Abreu SiqueiraVanessa Vasconcelos  Lopes Assistente de EditoraçãoCláudia de Souza Caetano Catalogação Antonio Soares das Chagas Filho Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIPBoletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 2, n. 2 (jul. / dez. 2008. InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ: Essentia Editora, 2008 - v. : il. 14 cm. SemestralISSN 1981-6197Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos até 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação,Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense a partir de 2009. 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. II.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Impressão: Gráfica e Editora GSA | Tel.: (27 3232-1266

  20. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Diretora Geral Cibele Daher Botelho Monteiro Vice-Diretora Geral Jefferson Manhães de Azevedo Coordenadora de Pós-Graduação Vera Raimunda Amério Asseff Coordenador de Pesquisa Rogério Atem de Carvalho Editora-Chefe Maria Amelia Ayd Correa Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Dalila Silva MelloMarcos Antonio Cruz MoreiraRoberta de Sousa RamalhoVicente de Paulo Santos de Oliveira Organizadores deste número Maria Inês Paes FerreiraMariana Rodrigues de Carvalhaes PinheiroTathiana Chaves de Souza Apoio Técnico Gisele Carvalho da Silva Costa NogueiraCarlos David Pasco Bolsistas de Iniciação Científica Felipe Eliakim SilvaSamara Melo Rodrigues Revisão de Texto Edinalda Maria Almeida da Silva Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzDaniel Marques Sardinha Diagramação Daniel Marques Sardinha Capa Daniel Marques Sardinha Revisão Técnica Flávia Gomes de Abreu SiqueiraVanessa Vasconcelos Lopes Assistente de Editoração Cláudia de Souza Caetano Catalogação Antonio Soares das Chagas Filho Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 2, n. 1 (jan./jun. 2008. Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológicade Campos. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego.Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ: Essentia Editora, 2008 - v. : il. 14 cm. SemestralISSN 1981-6197 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológicade Campos. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Gráfica e Editora GSA | Tel.: (27 3232-1266

  1. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Diretora Geral Cibele Daher Botelho Monteiro Vice-Diretora Geral Jefferson Manhães de Azevedo Coordenadora de Pós-Graduação Vera Raimunda Amério Asseff Coordenador de Pesquisa Rogério Atem de Carvalho Editora-Chefe Maria Amelia Ayd Correa Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Dalila Silva MelloMarcos Antonio Cruz MoreiraRoberta de Sousa RamalhoVicente de Paulo Santos de Oliveira Organizadores deste número Maria Inês Paes FerreiraMariana Rodrigues de Carvalhaes PinheiroTathiana Chaves de Souza Apoio Técnico Gisele Carvalho da Silva Costa NogueiraCarlos David Pasco Bolsistas de Iniciação Científica Felipe Eliakim SilvaSamara Melo Rodrigues Revisão de Texto Edinalda Maria Almeida da Silva Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzDaniel Marques Sardinha Diagramação Daniel Marques Sardinha Capa Daniel Marques SardinhaDiego Tavares Ventapane Lopes Revisão Técnica Flávia Gomes de Abreu SiqueiraVanessa Vasconcelos Lopes Assistente de Editoração Cláudia de Souza Caetano Catalogação Antonio Soares das Chagas Filho Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, n. 2 (jul./dez. 2007. Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológicade Campos. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego.Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ: Essentia Editora, 2007 - v. : il. 14 cm. SemestralISSN 1981-6197 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológicade Campos. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: GSA Gráfica e Editora | Tel.: (27 3232-1266

  2. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . .

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia FluminenseReitorLuiz Augusto Caldas PereiraPró-Reitor de EnsinoCarlos Márcio LimaPró-Reitor de Pesquisa e InovaçãoJosé Augusto Ferreira da SilvaPró-Reitora de ExtensãoPaula Aparecida Martins Borges BastosPró-Reitora de Desenvolvimento InstitucionalAna Lúcia CampinhoCoordenadora da Essentia EditoraKíssila da Conceição RibeiroConselho EditorialConselho ConsultivoDesiely Silva GusmãoEdinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosInez Barcellos de AndradeJefferson Manhães de AzevedoKíssila da Conceição RibeiroLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes NeyAdalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTRodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFFEquipe EditorialRevisão de Língua PortuguesaEdson Carlos NascimentoDenise Rena HaddadRevisão de Língua InglesaHélvia Pereira Pinto BastosCapa, Projeto GráficoAndré da Silva CruzDiagramaçãoCláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraCatalogação e Revisão TécnicaHenrique Barreiros AlvesLogotipoMarcos Antonio Esquef MacielDados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIPV567 Vértices / Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. -Vol.1, n. 1 (dez. 1997 - . - Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: EssentiaEditora, 1997-QuadrimestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia -IF Fluminense a partir de jan.2009.ISSN 1415-2843 (versão impressaISSN 1809-2667 (versão eletrônica1. Educação - Periódicos. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciênciae Tecnologia Fluminense.CDD - 370.5Revista Indexada em:Instituto Brasileiro em Ciência e Tecnologia/Sistema de Editoração Eletrônico de Revistas (IBICT/SEERSistema Regional de Información en Línea para Revistas Científicasde América Latina, el Caribe, Espanã y Portugal (LATINDEXDirectory Open Access Journals (DOAJRevista filiada à:Associação Brasileira de Editores CientíficosTiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Globalprint Editora Gráfica LTDA-ME. | Tel.: (31 3198-1100A revista Vértices é uma publicação científica do Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Os artigos assinados são de responsabilidade exclusiva dos autores e não expressam, necessariamente, a opinião do Conselho Editorial.É permitida a reprodução total ou parcial dos artigos desta revista, desde que citada a fonte.

  3. Credits

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    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitor Luiz Augusto Caldas Pereira Pró-Reitor de Ensino Carlos Márcio Lima Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação José Augusto Ferreira da Silva Pró-Reitora de Extensão Paula Aparecida Martins Borges Bastos Pró-Reitora de Desenvolvimento Institucional Ana Lúcia Campinho Coordenadora da Essentia Editora Kíssila da Conceição Ribeiro Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Desiely Silva GusmãoEdinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosInez Barcellos de AndradeJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTRodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Equipe Editorial Revisão de Língua Portuguesa Edson Carlos NascimentoIsabela Bastos de CarvalhoKíssila Ferreira de SouzaPriscila Matos MonkenRosângela Caldas Revisão de Língua Inglesa Hélvia Pereira Pinto Bastos Capa, Projeto Gráfico André da Silva Cruz Diagramação Cláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraMariana de Almeida Reis Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade Logotipo Marcos Antonio Esquef Maciel Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP V567 Vértices / Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. -Vol.1, n. 1 (dez. 1997 - . - Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: EssentiaEditora, 1997- QuadrimestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia -IF Fluminense a partir de jan.2009. ISSN 1415-2843 (versão impressaISSN 1809-2667 (versão eletrônica 1. Educação - Periódicos. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciênciae Tecnologia Fluminense. CDD - 370.5 Revista Indexada em: Instituto Brasileiro em Ciência e Tecnologia/Sistema de Editoração Eletrônico de Revistas (IBICT/SEER Sistema Regional de Información en Línea para Revistas Científicasde América Latina, el Caribe, Espanã y Portugal (LATINDEX Directory Open Access Journals (DOAJ Revista filiada à: Associação Brasileira de Editores Científicos Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Impressoart Editora Gráfica Ltda. | Tel.: (41 3348-2728 A revista Vértices é uma publicação científica do Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. Os artigos assinados são de responsabilidade exclusiva dos autores e não expressam, necessariamente, a opinião do Conselho Editorial. É permitida a reprodução total ou parcial dos artigos desta revista, desde que citada a fonte.

  4. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . .

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia FluminenseReitorLuiz Augusto Caldas PereiraPró-Reitor de EnsinoCarlos Márcio LimaPró-Reitor de Pesquisa e InovaçãoJosé Augusto Ferreira da SilvaPró-Reitora de ExtensãoPaula Aparecida Martins Borges BastosPró-Reitora de Desenvolvimento InstitucionalAna Lúcia CampinhoEditora-chefeKíssila da Conceição RibeiroConselho EditorialConselho ConsultivoDesiely Silva GusmãoEdinalda Maria Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosInez Barcellos de AndradeJefferson Manhães de AzevedoKíssila da Conceição RibeiroLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes NeyAdalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTRodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFFEquipe EditorialRevisão de Língua PortuguesaEdson Carlos NascimentoDenise Rena HaddadRevisão de Língua InglesaHélvia Pereira Pinto BastosCapa, Projeto GráficoAndré da Silva CruzDiagramaçãoCláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraCatalogação e Revisão TécnicaHenrique Barreiros AlvesLogotipoMarcos Antonio Esquef MacielDados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIPV567 Vértices / Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense. -Vol.1, n. 1 (dez. 1997 - . - Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: EssentiaEditora, 1997-QuadrimestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia -IF Fluminense a partir de jan.2009.ISSN 1415-2843 (versão impressaISSN 1809-2667 (versão eletrônica1. Educação - Periódicos. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciênciae Tecnologia Fluminense.CDD - 370.5Revista Indexada em:Instituto Brasileiro em Ciência e Tecnologia/Sistema de Editoração Eletrônico de Revistas (IBICT/SEERSistema Regional de Información en Línea para Revistas Científicasde América Latina, el Caribe, Espanã y Portugal (LATINDEXDirectory Open Access Journals (DOAJRevista filiada à:Associação Brasileira de Editores CientíficosTiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Globalprint Editora Gráfica LTDA-ME. | Tel.: (31 3198-1100A revista Vértices é uma publicação científica do Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Os artigos assinados são de responsabilidade exclusiva dos autores e não expressam, necessariamente, a opinião do Conselho Editorial.É permitida a reprodução total ou parcial dos artigos desta revista, desde que citada a fonte.

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    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitora Cibele Daher Botelho Monteiro Pró-Reitora de Ensino Fabíola de Amério Ney Silva Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação Hélio Gomes Filho Pró-Reitor de Extensão Eugênio Ferreira Naegele da Silva Pró-Reitor de Desenvolvimento Institucional Guiomar do Rosário Valdez Editora-chefe Inez Barcellos de AndradeCoordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Edinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTMiriam Fontelle (UNIFLU e UNESARodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Organizadores deste númeroMaria Inês Paes FerreiraJader Lugon JuniorLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JúniorBolsista de Iniciação CientíficaLeonardo Neves dos Santos Revisão de Língua Portuguesa e Inglesa Edson Carlos Nascimento Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Diego Melo Gomes CapaAndré da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de AndradeMichele Siqueira Pessanha CopidesqueEdson Carlos Nascimento Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP B688      Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 2011 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,2011- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Clicheria Cromos Ltda. | Tel.: (41 3021-5337

  6. CREDITS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABASAHEB GARWARE COLLEGE, PUNE: Anagha Kale, Vaishali Shejval, Charushila Sonawane, Monali Rahalkar, Nitin Phadnis, Ameya Champhenkar, Kalyani Damle, Sulabha Karandikar, Vasudeo Kshirsagar, Maithili Jog, Amita Oka, Dhanashree Paranjape, Kavita Patil, Subhash Kulkarni, Ketaki Varkhedkar, Sunando ...

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    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitor Luiz Augusto Caldas Pereira Pró-Reitor de Ensino Carlos Márcio Lima Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação José Augusto Ferreira da Silva Pró-Reitora de Extensão Paula Aparecida Martins Borges Bastos Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Edinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTRodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Organizadores deste número Maria Inês Paes FerreiraJader Lugon JuniorLuiz de Pinedo Quinto Júnior Bolsista de Iniciação Científica Camilla Cardoso da Costa Revisão de Língua Portuguesa e Inglesa Isabela Bastos de CarvalhoKissila Ferreira de SouzaPriscila Matos MonkenRosângela Caldas Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Cláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraMariana de Almeida Reis Capa André da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP B688      Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 2011 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,2011- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Impressoart Editora Gráfica Ltda. | Tel.: (41 3348-2728

  8. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitor Luiz Augusto Caldas Pereira Pró-Reitor de Ensino Carlos Márcio Lima Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação José Augusto Ferreira da Silva Pró-Reitora de Extensão Paula Aparecida Martins Borges BastosEditora-Chefe Inez Barcellos de Andrade Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Edinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTMiriam Fontelle (UNIFLU e UNESARodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Organizadores deste númeroMaria Inês Paes FerreiraJader Lugon JuniorLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JúniorLuiz Felipe Umbelino dos SantosBolsista de Iniciação CientíficaCamilla Cardoso da Costa Revisão de Língua Portuguesa e Inglesa Edson Carlos Nascimento Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Cláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraDiego Melo Gomes CapaAndré da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade CopidesqueEdson Carlos NascimentoDados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP B688      Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 2011 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,2011- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Meneghitti's Gráfica e Editora Ltda. | Tel.: (21 2136-6999

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    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitor Luiz Augusto Caldas Pereira Pró-Reitor de Ensino Carlos Márcio Lima Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação José Augusto Ferreira da Silva Pró-Reitora de Extensão Paula Aparecida Martins Borges Bastos Editora-Chefe Inez Barcellos de AndradeCoordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Edinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTRodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Organizadores deste númeroMaria Inês Paes FerreiraJader Lugon JuniorLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JúniorBolsista de Iniciação CientíficaCamilla Cardoso da Costa Revisão de Língua Portuguesa e Inglesa Edson Carlos NascimentoIsabela Bastos de CarvalhoKissila Ferreira de SouzaPriscila Matos MonkenRosângela Caldas Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Cláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraFernando de Prado Matos BettencourtMariana de Almeida Reis CapaAndré da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP B688      Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 1998 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,1998- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplaresImpressão: Impressoart Editora Gráfica Ltda. | Tel.: (41 3348-2728

  10. Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

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    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ministério da EducaçãoSecretaria de Educação Profissional e TecnológicaInstituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense Reitor Luiz Augusto Caldas Pereira Pró-Reitor de Ensino Carlos Márcio Lima Pró-Reitor de Pesquisa e Inovação José Augusto Ferreira da Silva Pró-Reitora de Extensão Paula Aparecida Martins Borges BastosEditora-Chefe Inez Barcellos de Andrade Coordenação Editorial do Boletim Maria Inês Paes Ferreira Conselho Editorial Conselho Consultivo Edinalda Almeida da SilvaHelvia Pereira Pinto BastosJefferson Manhães de AzevedoLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JuniorMaria Amelia Ayd CorrêaMaria Inês Paes FerreiraPedro de Azevedo Castelo BrancoRegina Coeli Martins AquinoRogério Atem de CarvalhoRomeu e Silva NetoSaid Sérgio Martins AuattSalvador TavaresSergio VasconcelosSilvia Lúcia dos Santos BarretoSynthio Vieira de AlmeidaVania Cristina Alexandrino BernardoVicente de Paulo Santos OliveiraWander Gomes Ney Adalberto Cardoso (IESP/UERJAntonio Carlos Secchin (UFRJAntônio José da Silva Neto (IPRJ/UERJAsterio Kiyoshi Tanaka (UNIRIO e UFRJErica Maria Pellegrini Caramaschi (UFRJFernando Benedicto Mainier (UFFFernando Pruski (UFVFrancisco de Assis Esteves (UFRJGaudêncio Frigotto (UFFHamilton Jorge de Azevedo (UFRRJHelder Gomes Costa (UFFIná Elias de Castro (UFRJJader Lugon Junior (IFF/UERJ/SENAIJanete Bolite Frant (UNIBANJosé Abdallah Helayël-Neto (CBPF/MCTMiriam Fontelle (UNIFLU e UNESARodrigo Valente Serra (ANPRonaldo Pinheiro da Rocha Paranhos (UENFSérgio Arruda de Moura (UENFVera Lucia Marques da Silva (FBPNVirgínia Maria Gomes de Mattos Fontes (UFF Organizadores deste númeroMaria Inês Paes FerreiraJader Lugon JuniorLuiz de Pinedo Quinto JúniorBolsista de Iniciação CientíficaCamilla Cardoso da Costa Revisão de Língua Portuguesa e Inglesa Edson Carlos NascimentoIsabela Bastos de CarvalhoKissila Ferreira de SouzaPriscila Matos MonkenRosângela Caldas Projeto Gráfico André da Silva CruzEric Moreira Carvalho Diagramação Cláudia Marcia Alves FerreiraFernando Prado de Matos BettencourtMariana de Almeida Reis CapaAndré da Silva Cruz Revisão Técnica e Catalogação Inez Barcellos de Andrade Dados de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP B688      Boletim do Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego / InstitutoFederal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Fluminense.Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. - Vol. 1, no. 1(jan./jun. 2011 - .- Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ: Essentia Editora,2011- SemestralCentro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Campos - CEFET Camposaté 2008. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia - IF Fluminense apartir de 2009. ISSN versão impressa 1981-6197ISSN versão eletrônica 2177-4560 1. Engenharia ambiental. I. Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência eTecnologia Fluminense. II. Observatório Ambiental Alberto Ribeiro Lamego. CDD - 628 Tiragem: 1000 exemplares Impressão: Meneghitti's Gráfica e Editora Ltda. | Tel.: (21 2136-6999

  11. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  12. 75 FR 17083 - Fiduciary Duties at Federal Credit Unions; Mergers and Conversions of Insured Credit Unions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Parts 701, 708a, and 708b Fiduciary Duties at Federal Credit Unions; Mergers and Conversions of Insured Credit Unions; Correction AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration. ACTION: Notice...

  13. Credit Hours with No Set Time: A Study of Credit Policies in Asynchronous Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasuhn, Frederick Carl

    2014-01-01

    U.S. public university system policies were examined to learn how credit hours were determined for asynchronous online education. Findings indicated that (a) credit hour meaning and use are not consistent, (b) primary responsibility for credit hour decisions was at the local level, and (c) no policies exist to guide credit hour application for…

  14. Sex of respondent and credit attitudes as predictors of credit card use and debt payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Michael; Eckrich, Donald W

    2006-06-01

    Researchers have suggested there may be sex differences in attitudes towards credit card possession and use. Undergraduates, 41 men and 41 women, completed a survey regarding their attitudes towards credit, credit card use, and repayment. Analysis indicated sex played a significant moderating role between number of credit cards used and the importance of paying off monthly balances. Women possessed more credit cards than men and engaged in more frequent shopping. Number of credit cards increased with paying off of monthly balances. Data are discussed in terms of the importance of managing credit card debt in an increasingly cashless society.

  15. Virtual Nitrogen Losses from Organic Food Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell Noll, L.; Galloway, J. N.; Leach, A. M.; Seufert, V.; Atwell, B.; Shade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is necessary for crop and animal production, but when it is lost to the environment, it creates a cascade of detrimental environmental impacts. The nitrogen challenge is to maximize the food production benefits of Nr, while minimizing losses to the environment. The first nitrogen footprint tool was created in 2012 to help consumers learn about the Nr losses to the environment that result from an individual's lifestyle choices. The nitrogen lost during food production was estimated with virtual nitrogen factors (VNFs) that quantify the amount of nitrogen lost to the environment per unit nitrogen consumed. Alternative agricultural systems, such as USDA certified organic farms, utilize practices that diverge from conventional production. In order to evaluate the potential sustainability of these alternative agricultural systems, our team calculated VNFs that reflect organic production. Initial data indicate that VNFs for organic grains and organic starchy roots are comparable to, but slightly higher than conventional (+10% and +20% respectively). In contrast, the VNF for organic vegetables is significantly higher (+90%) and the VNF for organic legumes is significantly lower (-90%). Initial data on organic meat production shows that organic poultry and organic pigmeat are comparable to conventional production (both <5% difference), but that the organic beef VNF is significantly higher (+30%). These data show that in some cases organic and conventional production are comparable in terms of nitrogen efficiency. However, since conventional production relies heavily on the creation of new reactive nitrogen (Haber-Bosch, biological nitrogen fixation) and organic production primarily utilizes already existing reactive nitrogen (manure, crop residue, compost), the data also show that organic production contributes less new reactive nitrogen to the environment than conventional production (approximately 70% less). Therefore, we conclude that on a local

  16. A Network Model of Credit Risk Contagion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Qiang Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A network model of credit risk contagion is presented, in which the effect of behaviors of credit risk holders and the financial market regulators and the network structure are considered. By introducing the stochastic dominance theory, we discussed, respectively, the effect mechanisms of the degree of individual relationship, individual attitude to credit risk contagion, the individual ability to resist credit risk contagion, the monitoring strength of the financial market regulators, and the network structure on credit risk contagion. Then some derived and proofed propositions were verified through numerical simulations.

  17. EFFECTS OF MUCUNA ( MUCUNA UTILIS L.) RESIDUE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The field experiment was conducted at two locations: University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (UNAAB) and Olowo-Papa (OP) in Ogun state both in Forest-savannah transition zone of Nigeria to investigate the response of three upland rice cultivars (O.sativa) to mucuna residue incorporation and Nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the ...

  18. Nitrogen Risk Assessment Model for Scotland: I. Nitrogen leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Dunn

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nitrogen Risk Assessment Model for Scotland (NIRAMS has been developed for prediction of streamwater N concentrations draining from agricultural land in Scotland. The objective of the model is to predict N concentrations for ungauged catchments, to fill gaps in monitoring data and to provide guidance in relation to policy development. The model uses nationally available data sets of land use, soils, topography and meteorology and has been developed within a Geographic Information System (GIS. The model includes modules to calculate N inputs to the land, residual N remaining at the end of the growing season, weekly time-series of leached N and transport of N at the catchment scale. This paper presents the methodology for calculating N balances for different land uses and for predicting the time sequence of N leaching after the end of the growing season. Maps are presented of calculated residual N and N leaching for the whole of Scotland and the spatial variability in N leaching is discussed. The results demonstrate the high variability in N leaching across Scotland. The simulations suggest that, in the areas with greatest residual N, the losses of N are not directly proportional to the amount of residual N, because of their coincidence with lower rainfall. In the companion paper, the hydrological controls on N transport within NIRAMS are described, and results of the full model testing are presented. Keywords: nitrogen, diffuse pollution, agriculture, leaching, land use, model, national, catchment

  19. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  20. Risk management in Lithuanian and Irish credit unions: Trends and impacts on credit union development

    OpenAIRE

    Kaupelyte, Dalia; McCarthy, Olive

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine the Irish and Lithuanian credit union movements in terms of risk management and risk performance, and to discuss credit union risk regulation. Risk management in credit unions often closely relates to credit union development stages so that as credit unions mature, higher standards of risk management should be implemented. In some cases these changes are accompanied by shifts in the regulatory framework. A comparison of the situations in Lithuania and Ire...

  1. Statistical credit risk assessment model of small and very small enterprises for Lithuanian credit unions

    OpenAIRE

    Špicas, Renatas

    2017-01-01

    While functioning in accordance with the new, business and efficiency-oriented operating model, credit unions develop and begin functioning outside the community. It is universally recognised in scientific literature that as credit unions expand their activities beyond a community, social relations with credit union members weaken and the credit unions lose their social control element, which help them to better assess and manage information asymmetry and credit risk. So far, the analysis of ...

  2. Non-conventional fuel tax credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeoet, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    Coal-seam methane, along with certain other non-conventional fuels, is eligible for a tax credit. This production tax credit allowed coal-seam methane producers to receive $0.7526 per million Btu of gas sold during 1986. In 1987, this credit rose to $0.78 per million Btu. The tax credit is a very significant element of the economic analysis of current coal-seam methane projects. In today's spot market, gas prices are around $1.50 per million Btu. Allowing for costs of production, the gas producer will net more income from the tax credit than from the sale of the gas. The Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax Act of 1980 is the source of this tax credit. There were some minor changes made by subsequent legislation, but most of the tax credit has remained intact. Wells must be drilled by 1990 to qualify for the tax credit but the production from such wells is eligible for the tax credit until 2001. Projections have been made, showing that the tax credit should increase to $0.91 per million Btu for production in 1990 and $1.34 per million Btu in 2000. Variables which may decrease the tax credit from these projections are dramatically lower oil prices or general economic price deflation

  3. Feed intake, digestibility, nitrogen utilization, ruminal condition and blood metabolites in wethers fed ground bamboo pellets cultured with white-rot fungus (Ceriporiopsis subvermispora) and mixed with soybean curd residue and soy sauce cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Michimasa; Okano, Kanji; Ieki, Hajime; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Tadokoro, Osamu; Sano, Yoshinori; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2013-09-01

    Three types of bamboo pellets as a ruminant feed: P1 (ground bamboo (GB) cultured with the fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CGB) : soybean curd residue (T) : soy sauce cake (S) in a 5:4:1 ratio on a dry matter (DM) basis); P2 (GB : T : S = 5:4:1 on a DM basis); and P3 (CGB : T : S = 5.5:0.8:3.7 on a DM basis) were prepared. Four wethers were assigned in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the applicability of the bamboo pellets. The experimental treatments were C (control): fed alfalfa hay cubes (AC) only, and T1, T2 and T3: fed P1, P2, and P3 with AC by 1:1 on a DM basis, respectively. The digestibility of the DM, organic matter and acid detergent fiber of P1 were significantly higher than those of P2 and P3 (P residue improved nutritional quality of ground bamboo because of its high digestibility and TDN content. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  4. Credit, Money, and Aggregate Demand.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernanke, Ben S; Blinder, Alan S

    1988-01-01

    Standard models of aggregate demand treat money and credit asymmetrically; money is given a special status, while loans, bonds, and other debt instruments are lumped together in a "bond market" and suppressed by Walras' Law. This makes bank liabilities central to the monetary transmission mechanism, while giving no role to bank assets. We show how to modify a textbook IS-UI model so as to permit a more balanced treatment. As in Tobin (1969) and Brunner-Meltzer (1972), the key assumption is th...

  5. Decomposição, liberação e volatilização de nitrogênio em resíduos culturais de mucuna-cinza (Mucuna cinerea Decomposition, release and volatilization of nitrogen from velvet bean (Mucuna cinerea residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Gustavo Teixeira Ribas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available As leguminosas possibilitam a incorporação biológica de nitrogênio aos sistemas de produção. Contudo, existe pouco conhecimento sobre a decomposição, liberação e volatilização de nitrogênioassociados à diferentes doses de seus resíduos. Objetivouse, neste trabalho avaliar a decomposição, a liberação e a volatilização de nitrogênio de diferentes doses de mucuna-cinza (Mucuna cinerea Piper & Tracy. O experimento constou de tratamentos com 12 (C12 ou 25 (C25 Mg ha-1 de composto orgânico: C12AV0 (sem leguminosa; C12AV4 (4 Mg ha-1 de resíduo; C12AV8 (8 Mg ha-1; C12AV12 (12 Mg ha-1; C25; AV12 (12 Mg ha-1 e testemunha absoluta. Adotou-se o delineamento de blocos casualizados e cinco repetições. Foram determinadas as taxas de decomposição do adubo verde e liberação de N, o teor de N-mineral no solo e a volatilização de N-NH3. A liberação de N (t½=28 dias foi mais rápida que a decomposição do resíduo (t½=38 dias. Essa liberação de N eleva rapidamente os teores de N-mineral do solo e resulta também em maior elevação da volatilização de N-NH3. O incremento das doses de 8 para 12 Mg ha-1 de mucuna resultou em aumento mais que proporcional da volatilização acumulada de N-NH3, atingindo 30 kg ha-1 após 30 dias.The use of leguminous species allows the biological incorporation of nitrogen into cropping systems. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about the decomposition, release and volatilization of nitrogen associated with the decomposition of different quantities of residues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the decomposition of the biomass, the release and volatilization of nitrogen from different doses of velvet bean (Mucuna cinerea Piper & Tracy residues. The treatments were established either with 12 (C12 or 25 (C25 Mg ha-1 of organic compost: C12AV0 (without residue; C12AV4 (4 Mg ha-1 of residue; C12AV8 (8 Mg ha-1; C12AV12 (12 Mg ha-1; C25; AV12 (12 Mg ha-1 and a control. The randomized

  6. Evaluation of the Impact of Alveolar Nitrogen Excretion on Indices Derived from Multiple Breath Nitrogen Washout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Nielsen, Jorgen G.; Horsley, Alex R.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence has now accumulated describing the advantages of multiple breath washout tests over conventional spirometry in cystic fibrosis (CF). Although the majority of studies have used exogenous sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) as the tracer gas this has also led to an increased interest in nitrogen washout tests, despite the differences between these methods. The impact of body nitrogen excreted across the alveoli has previously been ignored. Methods A two-compartment lung model was developed that included ventilation heterogeneity and dead space (DS) effects, but also incorporated experimental data on nitrogen excretion. The model was used to assess the impact of nitrogen excretion on washout progress and accuracy of functional residual capacity (FRC) and lung clearance index (LCI) measurements. Results Excreted nitrogen had a small effect on accuracy of FRC (1.8%) in the healthy adult model. The error in LCI calculated with true FRC was greater (6.3%), and excreted nitrogen contributed 21% of the total nitrogen concentration at the end of the washout. Increasing DS and ventilation heterogeneity both caused further increase in measurement error. LCI was increased by 6–13% in a CF child model, and excreted nitrogen increased the end of washout nitrogen concentration by 24–49%. Conclusions Excreted nitrogen appears to have complex but clinically significant effects on washout progress, particularly in the presence of abnormal gas mixing. This may explain much of the previously described differences in washout outcomes between SF6 and nitrogen. PMID:24039916

  7. Evaluation of the impact of alveolar nitrogen excretion on indices derived from multiple breath nitrogen washout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Nielsen

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence has now accumulated describing the advantages of multiple breath washout tests over conventional spirometry in cystic fibrosis (CF. Although the majority of studies have used exogenous sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 as the tracer gas this has also led to an increased interest in nitrogen washout tests, despite the differences between these methods. The impact of body nitrogen excreted across the alveoli has previously been ignored.A two-compartment lung model was developed that included ventilation heterogeneity and dead space (DS effects, but also incorporated experimental data on nitrogen excretion. The model was used to assess the impact of nitrogen excretion on washout progress and accuracy of functional residual capacity (FRC and lung clearance index (LCI measurements.Excreted nitrogen had a small effect on accuracy of FRC (1.8% in the healthy adult model. The error in LCI calculated with true FRC was greater (6.3%, and excreted nitrogen contributed 21% of the total nitrogen concentration at the end of the washout. Increasing DS and ventilation heterogeneity both caused further increase in measurement error. LCI was increased by 6-13% in a CF child model, and excreted nitrogen increased the end of washout nitrogen concentration by 24-49%.Excreted nitrogen appears to have complex but clinically significant effects on washout progress, particularly in the presence of abnormal gas mixing. This may explain much of the previously described differences in washout outcomes between SF6 and nitrogen.

  8. 12 CFR 701.2 - Federal credit union bylaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal credit union bylaws. 701.2 Section 701.2 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.2 Federal credit union bylaws. (a) Federal credit...

  9. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit Banks...

  10. 17 CFR 256.255 - Accumulated deferred investment tax credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... investment tax credits. 256.255 Section 256.255 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... investment tax credits. (a) This account shall be credited and account 411.5, Investment tax credit, debited with investment tax credits deferred by companies which do not apply such credits as a reduction of the...

  11. 49 CFR 536.8 - Conditions for trading of credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions for trading of credits. 536.8 Section... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSFER AND TRADING OF FUEL ECONOMY CREDITS § 536.8 Conditions for trading of credits. (a) Trading of credits. If a credit holder wishes to trade credits to...

  12. Credit allocation for research institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-P.; Guo, Q.; Yang, K.; Han, J.-T.; Liu, J.-G.

    2017-05-01

    It is a challenging work to assess research performance of multiple institutes. Considering that it is unfair to average the credit to the institutes which is in the different order from a paper, in this paper, we present a credit allocation method (CAM) with a weighted order coefficient for multiple institutes. The results for the APS dataset with 18987 institutes show that top-ranked institutes obtained by the CAM method correspond to well-known universities or research labs with high reputation in physics. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the CAM method when citation links are added or rewired randomly quantified by the Kendall's Tau and Jaccard index. The experimental results indicate that the CAM method has better performance in robustness compared with the total number of citations (TC) method and Shen's method. Finally, we give the first 20 Chinese universities in physics obtained by the CAM method. However, this method is valid for any other branch of sciences, not just for physics. The proposed method also provides universities and policy makers an effective tool to quantify and balance the academic performance of university.

  13. Credit Monitoring – a Core of Credit Risk Management: Theory and Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Jurevičienė

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: Purpose of the article is to identify credit monitoring as a keystone of credit risk management in banks. CRM is widely discussed in scientific literature and in reports of institutions undertaking credit risk or supervisory bodies. However majority of such investigations are based on implementation of numerous quantitative or qualitative methods used for credit risk assessment before granting a loan or for credit portfolio risk management. There is a lack of information or investigations made on estimation of the need of credit monitoring in credit risk management process. Scientific aim: Scientific aim is to structure the early warning signs that reflect the condition of credits. Methodology/methods: The paper is based on analysis and resumption of various scientific and professional articles related to organization of credit process in banks. It combines results of assessments of credit monitoring importance in credit risk management process made by theoretical studies as well as investigation of experts. Findings: Finding of the article is presentation of credit monitoring tools that should be applied for corporate (and individual clients via modification of original credit agreement. Conclusions: (limits, implications etc Conclusion of the article is that credit monitoring is a keystone in credit risk management process. The purpose of credit monitoring is to detect in time possible worsening of the loan and to react (make changes in loan agreement. The simplest tool for credit monitoring is to identify early warning signs in time that could be assorted into four groups: EWS of business environment; EWS with regard to management, EWS regarding collateral, EWS in financial analysis. Limitation of investigation is impossibility of evaluation of importance of monitoring process in practice except investigation of experts (employees directly responsible for credit business.

  14. Residual N effects from livestock manure inputs to soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Jaap; Bechini, Luca; Bittman, Shabtai

    Organic inputs including livestock manures provide nitrogen (N) to crops beyond the year of their application. This so-called residual N effect should be taken into account when making decisions on N rates for individual fields, but also when interpreting N response trials in preparation...... of recommendations. This paper addresses general principles of residual N effects, gives literature-based estimates of them, and reviews to which extent residual N effects are included in ecommendations and regulations in selected countries....

  15. THE COOPERATIVE CREDIT MUTUAL IN BRAZIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio Baptista da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of the reality of credit unions in Brazil, in view of the singular importance of credit unions for the whole society as an alternative to private resources in favor of members of the community where they are located. It confirms that, in Brazil, the mutual credit unions, besides being presented as one of the viable options within the financial system, are also seen as an alternative by which some sectors of society promote the humanization of the financial system by offering credit and return on capital with fairer interest rates.

  16. Phenomena and parameters important to burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Dehart, M.D.; Wagner, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, a significant number of studies have been directed at understanding the phenomena and parameters important to implementation of burnup credit in out-of-reactor applications involving pressurized-water- reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The efforts directed at burnup credit involving boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel have been more limited. This paper reviews the knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries in the study of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation for transport and dry cask storage is given. (author)

  17. Information Asymmetry and Credit Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena TUPANGIU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Information asymmetry defines relationships where an agent holds information while another does not hold it. Thus, to the extent that one of the parties to the financing agreement has information more or less accurate than another, the asymmetry of information appears to be a major constraint in the financing of a project. Banks, in their capacity of financial intermediary, operate the transfer of funds to agents in need of financing, to the borrowers, being necessary in this process to have more information in order to benefit of expertise in assessing borrowers. The research of information asymmetry and credit risk consists of interrogating the following aspects: information issues between the bank and borrowers; settlement of information issues; bank’s activism towards information asymmetry. In our approach we will look at the first aspect, namely the information issues between the bank and the borrowers.

  18. FACTORING- CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADELA IONESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Capital is the main factor of production, business development becomes virtually impossible without taking into account the financial market and the resources it provides to businesses. Any business, regardless of its degree of development, is involving direct contact with financial markets, namely the institutions that mediate mobilization of capital and the services they provide. Understanding the functioning of the financial system, the specific financial mechanisms through which savings are allocated to support capital investments and the costs and risks involved is essential for the development of a solid base for business. In this context, factoring operations can support economic agents, allowing a transfer of commercial receivables from their holder to a factor who commits to their recovery and guarantee such operations even if temporary or permanent insolvency of the debtor . Thus, factoring is a complex technique in at least two aspects, of the debt and the transfer of credit. . Factoring is a means of financing business, especially export-import transactions, less known in Romania. Maybe because of poor business environment popularize the term is as little known as it was a few years ago the leasing. Present in Romanian legislation since 2002, factoring appears as a contract between one party (called adherent, providing goods or service and a banking company or a financial institution specialized (called factor, which the last one shall finance debts pursuing and preservation against credit risks and adherent gives factor by way of sale, debts arising from the sale of goods or services to third parties. The article is divided into three parts. In the first part we defined the concept of factoring and international factoring, then I presented the advantages and development of factoring in Romania, and the last part conclusions.

  19. The two-child limit for Universal Credit and Child Tax Credit

    OpenAIRE

    MACHIN, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Richard Machin explores the background to, and likely impact of, the two-child limit on the child element in Universal Credit and the Child Tax Credit, which was introduced by the Welfare Reform and Work Act 2016

  20. Credit where none is due? Authorized user account status and "piggybacking credit"

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B. Avery; Kenneth P. Brevoort; Glenn B. Canner

    2010-01-01

    An "authorized user" is a person who is permitted by a revolving account holder to use an account without being legally liable for any charges incurred. The Federal Reserve's Regulation B, which implements the 1974 Equal Credit Opportunity Act, requires that information on spousal authorized user accounts be reported to the credit bureaus and considered when lenders evaluate credit history. Since creditors generally furnish to the credit bureaus information on all authorized user accounts, wi...

  1. Credit Cycle and Adverse Selection Effects in Consumer Credit Markets – Evidence from the HELOC Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calem, P.; Cannon, M.; Nakamura, L.I.

    2011-01-01

    We empirically study how the underlying riskiness of the pool of home equity line of credit originations is affected over the credit cycle. Drawing from the largest existing database of U.S. home equity lines of credit, we use county-level aggregates of these loans to estimate panel regressions on

  2. Who Gets the Credit? Who Pays the Consequences? The Illinois Tuition Tax Credit. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arohi; Keenan, Nancy

    In 1999, Illinois enacted a tuition tax credit program. Tax credit supporters suggest tax credits help low-income students. However, opponents argue that they disproportionately benefit higher-income families whose children are already attending private schools and may decrease already limited resources available to public schools. New data from…

  3. The "Negative" Credit Card Effect: Credit Cards as Spending-Limiting Stimuli in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Celia; Hunt, Maree; Peters, Heather L.; Veliu, Bahrie; Harper, David

    2010-01-01

    The "credit card effect" describes a finding where greater value is given to consumer items if credit card logos are present. One explanation for the effect is that credit cards elicit spending behavior through associative learning. If this is true, social, economic and historical contexts should alter this effect. In Experiment 1, Year…

  4. The Case Against Tuition Tax Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    Tuition tax credits for private elementary and secondary schools would be bad law, bad economics, and bad public policy. These points are made in this twenty-first chapter of a book on school law. Legal arguments against tax credits are based on a number of court decisions concerning church-state separation, particularly the Supreme Court decision…

  5. 78 FR 72537 - Credit Union Service Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... there is an inherent risk that a subsidiary CUSO could adversely affect the investing credit union and... supervisory authority (SSA). CUSOs engaging in certain complex or high-risk activities are required to... credit union industry by acting as a collaborative means to share risk, manage costs, and deliver...

  6. 76 FR 13896 - Equal Credit Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... creditors disclose additional information on FCRA adverse action notices. Specifically, a person must... that a creditor obtained information from a consumer reporting agency. Consistent with section 1100F of... action would need to provide a credit score and information relating to that credit score to those...

  7. Dynamic Dependence and Diversification in Corporate Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Jin, Xisong

    We characterize dependence and tail dependence in corporate credit using a new class of dynamic copula models which can capture dynamic dependence and asymmetry in large samples of firms. We also document important differences between the dependence dynamics for credit spreads and equity returns....

  8. Effectief credit management door betere control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiel van der Veb; Bram Bikker; Rien Braakman

    2008-01-01

    Credit management neemt toe in belang. Oorzaken hiervan zijn onder meer de toenemende concurrentiedruk, nieuwe regelgeving zoals Basel II en de grotere focus op werkkapitaal in het kader van sturen op aandeelhouderswaarde. Publicaties over credit management richten zich overwegend op proces- en

  9. ED Strengthens Credit Management and Debt Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Ralph J.

    1982-01-01

    This interview with the comptroller for the U.S. Department of Education focuses on efforts to improve credit management and debt collection. Topics discussed are the credit management initiative, the extent of the problem, improvements, the Housing and Facilities Loan Program, and the significance of the Debt Collection Act of 1982. (JOW)

  10. Do capital flows change domestic credit allocation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samarina, Anna; Bezemer, Dirk

    Since the 1990s, domestic bank credit has been reallocated away from lending to non-financial business and toward households. An expanding literature discusses negative effects on growth and stability of this change in credit allocation. We research its drivers. We hypothesize that if foreign

  11. Credit Risk Evaluation : Modeling - Analysis - Management

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrspohn, Uwe

    2002-01-01

    An analysis and further development of the building blocks of modern credit risk management: -Definitions of default -Estimation of default probabilities -Exposures -Recovery Rates -Pricing -Concepts of portfolio dependence -Time horizons for risk calculations -Quantification of portfolio risk -Estimation of risk measures -Portfolio analysis and portfolio improvement -Evaluation and comparison of credit risk models -Analytic portfolio loss distributions The thesis contributes to the evaluatio...

  12. Business and Default Cycles for Credit Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, S.J.; Lucas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Various economic theories are available to explain the existence of credit and default cycles. There remains empirical ambiguity, however, as to whether these cycles coincide. Recent papers suggest by their empirical research set-up that they do, or at least that defaults and credit spreads tend to

  13. Credit Ratings and Bank Monitoring Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakamura, L.I.; Roszbach, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we use credit rating data from two Swedish banks to elicit evidence on these banks’ loan monitoring ability. We do so by comparing the ability of bank ratings to predict loan defaults relative to that of public ratings from the Swedish credit bureau. We test the banks’ abilility to

  14. Adam Smith, Religion, and Tuition Tax Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kern

    1983-01-01

    Examines tuition tax credit programs in framework of Adam Smith's ideas on the economic impact of established churches. Finds that tuition tax credits would amount to state expenditures to relieve the financial burden of parochial school parents and would allow churches to invest commercially to maintain their charitable functions. (JW)

  15. Trade credit, collateral liquidation, and borrowing constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabbri, D.; Menichini, A.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that firms’ suppliers are better able to extract value from the liquidation of assets in default and have an information advantage over other creditors, the paper derives six predictions on the use of trade credit. (1) Financially unconstrained firms (with unused bank credit lines) take

  16. College Student Performance and Credit Card Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Palmer, Todd Starr

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between credit card usage, employment, and academic performance among a group of college students with credit cards. Results reveal that the students differed significantly in the level of anxiety felt from carrying debt, perceived need to work, and perceived impact of employment on academic performance. (Contains 57…

  17. Dynamic Dependence and Diversification in Corporate Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Jin, Xisong

    We characterize dependence and tail dependence in corporate credit using a new class of dynamic copula models which can capture dynamic dependence and asymmetry in large samples of firms. We also document important differences between the dependence dynamics for credit spreads and equity returns...

  18. MBS Ratings and the Mortgage Credit Boom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashcraft, A.; Goldsmith-Pinkham, P.; Vickery, J.

    2010-01-01

    We study credit ratings on subprime and Alt-A mortgage-backed securities (MBS) deals issued between 2001 and 2007, the period leading up to the subprime crisis. The fraction of highly-rated securities in each deal is decreasing in mortgage credit risk (measured either ex-ante or ex-post), suggesting

  19. Tuition Tax Credits: Issues of Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterall, James S.

    To examine equity issues involving proposed Federal income tax credits for private school tuition, the author uses data from the Bureau of the Census and other governmental sources to estimate the effects of tuition tax credit (TTC) plans. After discussing equity and educational policy, he compares would-be TTC recipients--private school families…

  20. Forecasting the value of credit scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Shakila; Ahmad, Noryati; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, credit scoring system plays an important role in banking sector. This process is important in assessing the creditworthiness of customers requesting credit from banks or other financial institutions. Usually, the credit scoring is used when customers send the application for credit facilities. Based on the score from credit scoring, bank will be able to segregate the "good" clients from "bad" clients. However, in most cases the score is useful at that specific time only and cannot be used to forecast the credit worthiness of the same applicant after that. Hence, bank will not know if "good" clients will always be good all the time or "bad" clients may become "good" clients after certain time. To fill up the gap, this study proposes an equation to forecast the credit scoring of the potential borrowers at a certain time by using the historical score related to the assumption. The Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) is used to measure the accuracy of the forecast scoring. Result shows the forecast scoring is highly accurate as compared to actual credit scoring.

  1. CONTINGENCIES FOR MEASUREMENT OF THE CREDIT RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela BARBULESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Financial Crisis, which affected various banks, some of them very important banks, highlighted the importance of an accurate credit risk measurement in order to be able to overcome it. There are a variety of such credit risk measurement models, so we can say that banks face a real dilemma when having to choose the most appropriate one. The aim of this paper is to examine the most popular methods used to measure the credit risk and to identify the strengths and the weaknesses of each one of it. The research was accomplished from a double perspective, in which the conceptual methodological approach is correlated to a variety of references to practical actions aiming the measurement and the prevention of credit risk. The study includes the presentation of the objectives of credit risk analysis, the most appropriate moments for doing such an analysis, the steps that have to be done in order to measure the credit risk, the errors that can overcome in the credit risk measurement system, generated by the misclassifications of the studied company, and the presentation of the specific information of financial creditors. The findings expressed in this paper were mainly the result of a qualitative analysis which showed that there is no best model for credit risk measurement, each one having both strengths and weaknesses, some providing a comprehensive analysis of the individual customer’s financial strength others allowing banks permanently monitor fluctuating default risk and identify the possibly problems at an early stage.

  2. 75 FR 64785 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... scheme, including risk-based capital requirements; impose new prompt corrective action requirements... Investigations; and Involuntary Liquidation of Federal Credit Unions and Adjudication of Creditor Claims... management (ALM) and credit risk, and whether to make modifications in the area of corporate governance. NCUA...

  3. 76 FR 41590 - Equal Credit Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Rule generally requires a creditor to provide a risk-based pricing notice to a consumer when the.... SUMMARY: Section 701 of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) requires a creditor to notify a credit... content required by both the ECOA and the FCRA adverse action provisions, so that creditors can use the...

  4. Facilitating SME Financing through Improved Credit Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    International Committee on Credit Reporting

    2014-01-01

    The general principles for credit reporting were issued by the World Bank in September 2011. Since then, the World Bank and the international committee on credit reporting (ICCR) have been leading efforts towards the implementation of the general principles worldwide. This report is one of the concrete outputs of the work following the general principles. It addresses one of the most signi...

  5. Sovereign Credit Risk, Liquidity and ECB Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelizzon, Loriana; Subrahmanyam, Marti G.; Tomio, Davide

    This paper explores the interaction between credit risk and liquidity, in the context of the intervention by the European Central Bank (ECB), during the Euro-zone crisis. The laboratory for our investigation is the Italian sovereign bond market, the largest in the Euro-zone. We use a unique data...... between changes in Italian sovereign credit risk and liquidity in the secondary bond market, conditional on the level of credit risk, measured by the Italian sovereign credit default swap (CDS) spread. We demonstrate the existence of a threshold of 500 basis points (bp) in the CDS spread, above which...... there is a structural change in this relationship. Other global systemic factors also a ffect market liquidity, but the speci c credit risk of primary dealers plays only a modest role in a ffecting market liquidity, especially under conditions of stress. Moreover, the data indicate that there is a clear structural...

  6. Issues for effective implementation of burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Wagner, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, burnup credit has been used in the criticality safety evaluation for storage pools at pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and considerable work has been performed to lay the foundation for use of burnup credit in dry storage and transport cask applications and permanent disposal applications. Many of the technical issues related to the basic physics phenomena and parameters of importance are similar in each of these applications. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States has never been fully integrated and the implementation of burnup credit to each of these applications is dependent somewhat on the specific safety bases developed over the history of each operational area. This paper will briefly review the implementation status of burnup credit for each application area and explore some of the remaining issues associated with effective implementation of burnup credit. (author)

  7. Models for assessing and managing credit risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neogradi Slađana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with the definition of a model for assessing and managing credit risk. Risk is an inseparable component of any average and normal credit transaction. Looking at the different aspects of the identification and classification of risk in the banking industry as well as representation of the key components of modern risk management. In the first part of the essay will analyze how the impact of credit risk on bank and empirical models for determining the financial difficulties in which the company can be found. Bank on the basis of these models can reduce number of approved risk assets. In the second part, we consider models for improving credit risk with emphasis on Basel I, II and III, and the third part, we conclude that the most appropriate model and gives the best effect for measuring credit risk in domestic banks.

  8. Tight gas sand tax credit yields opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, F.W.; Osburn, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service on Apr. 1, 1991, released the inflation adjustments used in the calculations of Non-Conventional Fuel Tax Credits for 1990. The inflation adjustment, 1.6730, when applied to the base price of $3/bbl of oil equivalent, adjusts the tax credit to $5.019/bbl for oil and 86.53 cents/MMBTU for gas. The conversion factor for equivalent fuels is 5.8 MMBTU/bbl. Unfortunately, the tax credit for tight formation gas continues to be unadjusted for inflation and remains 52 cents/MMBTU. As many producers are aware, the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 expanded the dates of eligibility and the usage for-Non-Conventional Fuel Tax Credits. Among other provisions, eligible wells may be placed in service until Jan. 1, 1992, and once in place may utilize the credit for production through Dec. 31, 2002. Both dates are 2 year extensions from previous regulations

  9. CREDIT INSURANCE DURING THE FINANCIAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia CLIPICI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In international economic relations, credit is an indispensable element, being viewed by most specialists as the engine of a national economy, due to the role of the driving investments and based on them, the employment, the increase in the production, etc., the use and typology according to the duration and nature of the operations performed. Export credits are, along with the other types of loans, part of the specialized loan category held in the portfolio of most commercial banks. Export credits or export pre-financing credits are loans granted by banks to business entities with production made for export in order to support or promote it, or to cope with exceptional needs occurred in the period of making the export production. This paper describes recent trends noticed in export credit insurance, especially from 2008 to 2011.

  10. Determinants of SME credit worthiness under Basel rules: the value of credit history information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dainelli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Basel III Accord has reportedly had an impact on SME financing. In this paper, we aim to highlight the determinants of SME credit worthiness. We use credit history in addition to financial ratios and “hybrid” indicators that have been built by mixing credit history with financial statement data. We develop a failure prediction logit model on 187 Italian SMEs. The use of short-term credit lines is the most important variable. Contrary to common understanding, capitalization levels do not affect ratings. Lastly, credit worthiness is sensitive to sale profitability.

  11. 12 CFR 614.4720 - Letters of credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS Banks for Cooperatives and Agricultural Credit Banks Financing International Trade § 614.4720 Letters of credit. Banks for cooperatives and agricultural credit banks, under policies adopted by their boards of directors...

  12. 12 CFR 619.9145 - Farm Credit Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Credit Bank. 619.9145 Section 619.9145 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9145 Farm Credit Bank. The term Farm Credit Bank refers to a bank resulting from the mandatory merger of the Federal land...

  13. 12 CFR 705.8 - State-chartered credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State-chartered credit unions. 705.8 Section 705.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN PROGRAM FOR CREDIT UNIONS § 705.8 State-chartered credit unions. State...

  14. 12 CFR 705.7 - Loans to participating credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loans to participating credit unions. 705.7 Section 705.7 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN PROGRAM FOR CREDIT UNIONS § 705.7 Loans to participating credit unions...

  15. 12 CFR 710.9 - Federally insured state credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federally insured state credit unions. 710.9 Section 710.9 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION § 710.9 Federally insured state credit unions. A federal insured state credit union...

  16. 12 CFR 741.206 - Corporate credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate credit unions. 741.206 Section 741.206 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS... Unions That Also Apply to Federally Insured State-Chartered Credit Unions § 741.206 Corporate credit...

  17. 77 FR 74103 - Alternatives to the Use of Credit Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... list would effectively transfer credit union risk management to NCUA. Credit union boards and... transactions based on their credit unions' unique risk preferences, portfolio objectives, and balance sheet... to, credit risk. Market credit spreads for various asset classes experience variability depending on...

  18. 12 CFR 704.6 - Credit risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit risk management. 704.6 Section 704.6... CREDIT UNIONS § 704.6 Credit risk management. (a) Policies. A corporate credit union must operate according to a credit risk management policy that is commensurate with the investment risks and activities...

  19. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  20. Global Credit Crunch and Accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk BENGÜ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of economic crisis is accepted to have entered management literature following the 1929 economic crisis. Can accounting be blamed for economic or financial crises? Is it fair to say that a defect or negligence in accounting and auditing played a role in the occurrence and rapid dissemination of the current global credit crunch? In other words, is it possible to find a link between the reasons for or results of the global financial crisis and the basic principles of accounting, the generally accepted accounting principles, the prevalent accounting approaches, methods and practices, the regulations on accounting, accounting audit and any relevant professional or legal regulation and accounting culture and values? The objective of this communiqué is to open the above-mentioned questions up for discussion. The answers to these questions are quite important, in that they will provide clues that can be used to shape the future of accounting and auditing. This study is expected to be inspirational for further empirical studies to be carried out in this domain.

  1. Credit Participation and Credit Source Selection of Vietnam Small and Medium Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Anh Hoang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to investigate the motivation behind the decision to participate in the credit market of SMEs from perspectives of behavioral finance and social capital theories. In addi- tion, the study also examines the effect of behavioral finance and social capital factors on the credit source selection among SMEs. This study’s design strategy involves conducting questionnaire sur- veys to SMEs owners and statistical techniques to analyze the determinants of credit participation and credit source selection of borrowers. The findings showed that personal traits of SMEs owners/ managers in terms of behavioral finance factors such as debt and risk attitudes, present biased and overconfidence and firms networking also have impacts on the firms’ credit participation and credit source selection. The research is one of the few studies that consider the influence of behavioral finance factors on firms financing decision. Furthermore, our result also contributes to explain the common use of informal credit market in developing countries.

  2. 12 CFR 567.12 - Purchased credit card relationships, servicing assets, intangible assets (other than purchased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... assets, intangible assets (other than purchased credit card relationships and servicing assets), credit... credit card relationships, servicing assets, intangible assets (other than purchased credit card..., intangible assets (other than purchased credit card relationships and servicing assets), credit-enhancing...

  3. Acquired Credit Unions: Drivers of Takeover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raymond Sant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study acquired credit unions and analyze their financial performance up to six years prior to merger, on a quarterly basis. The primary focus is on balance sheet (asset liability management and profitability variables (return on assets. We find that acquired credit unions during the period 2008 (third quarter to 2014 (first quarter experienced negative return on assets for several quarters prior to their takeover. This was the result of a declining loan portfolio and increasing charge offs. In spite of decreasing lending activity, such credit unions continued to increase their deposits, i.e., adding to their cost base. Due to declining loans, their net interest margin as a proportion of deposits was also in decline. We argue that this is an indicator of poor management ability. Furthermore, our analysis finds that operating expenses were increasing over time, something that has been documented in previous literature also for smaller credit unions and is attributable to lack of economies of scale. The average asset size of the acquired credit unions in our sample is about $22 million just before acquisition. We attribute our findings to poor business strategy followed by such credit unions. We also conclude that signs of trouble are evident up to two years before merger on average and regulatory policy may have to become more proactive to manage the consolidation challenge faced by the credit union industry in general.

  4. Credit risk assessment: Evidence from banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghodrati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring different risk factors such as credit risk in banking industry has been an interesting area of studies. The artificial neural network is a nonparametric method developed to succeed for measuring credit risk and this method is applied to measure the credit risk. This research’s neural network follows back propagation paradigm, which enables it to use historical data for predicting future values with very good out of sample fitting. Macroeconomic variables including GDP, exchange rate, inflation rate, stock price index, and M2 are used to forecast credit risk for two Iranian banks; namely Saderat and Sarmayeh over the period 2007-2011. Research data are being tested for ADF and Causality Granger tests before entering the ANN to achieve the best lag structure for the research model. MSE and R values for the developed ANN in this research respectively are 86×〖10〗^(-4 and 0.9885, respectively. The results showed that ANN was able to predict banks’ credit risk with low error. Sensibility analyses which has accomplished on this research’s ANN corroborates that M2 has the highest effect on the ANN’s credit risk and should be considered as an additional leading indicator by Iran’s banking authorities. These matters confirm validation of macroeconomic notions in Iran’s credit systematic risk.

  5. Credit Risk and Regional Economic Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vaněk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to bridge the areas of credit risk and regional economic disparities, and investigates the relationship between credit risk and economic indicators in the Czech Republic at the regional (NUTS 3 level. This relationship is consecutively examined using graphical and correlation analysis, regression techniques, and different types of clustering methods. Regions are then clustered into three groups according to their economic similarities and disparities. Subsequently, it is shown on the real data that region-specific information has the potential to be utilizable in credit scoring and possibly other applications.

  6. Credit Spreads Across the Business Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Stenbo

    that accounts for both business cycle and jump risk, and show by estimation that the model captures the counter-cyclical level and pro-cyclical slope of empirical credit spread curves. In addition, I provide a new procedure for estimation of idiosyncratic jump risk, which is consistent with observed shocks......This paper studies how corporate bond spreads vary with the business cycle. I show that both level and slope of empirical credit spread curves are correlated with the state of the economy, and I link this to variation in idiosyncratic jump risk. I develop a structural credit risk model...... to firm fundamentals....

  7. A dynamic model of unsecured credit

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel R. Sanches

    2010-01-01

    The author studies the terms of credit in a competitive market in which sellers (lenders) are willing to repeatedly finance the purchases of buyers (borrowers) by engaging in a credit relationship. The key frictions are: (i) the lender is unable to observe the borrower's ability to repay a loan; (ii) the borrower cannot commit to any long-term contract; (iii) it is costly for the lender to contact a borrower and to walk away from a contract; and (iv) transactions within each credit relationsh...

  8. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D.; Lake, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the US experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed

  9. Rare disasters, credit, and option market puzzles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Du, Du; Elkamhi, Redouane

    2017-01-01

    calibrated to the real economy can simultaneously explain several key empirical regularities in equity, credit, and options markets. Our model captures the empirical level and volatility of credit spreads, generates a flexible credit risk term structure, and provides a good fit to a century of observed...... spreads. The model also matches high-yield and collaterized debt obligation tranche spreads, equity market moments, and index option skewness. Finally, our model implies a time-varying relationship between bond and option prices that depends on the state of the economy and that explains the conflicting...

  10. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D.; Lake, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the U.S. experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed. (author)

  11. Credit Spreads Across the Business Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Stenbo

    This paper studies how corporate bond spreads vary with the business cycle. I show that both level and slope of empirical credit spread curves are correlated with the state of the economy, and I link this to variation in idiosyncratic jump risk. I develop a structural credit risk model...... that accounts for both business cycle and jump risk, and show by estimation that the model captures the counter-cyclical level and pro-cyclical slope of empirical credit spread curves. In addition, I provide a new procedure for estimation of idiosyncratic jump risk, which is consistent with observed shocks...

  12. Scale and space dependencies of Nitrogen variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Castellanos, M. T.; Cartagena, M. C.; Ribas, F.; Cabello, M. J.; Arce, A.; Bird, N. R. A.

    2012-04-01

    In this study we use the relative entropy (E(δ)) to investigate residual effects on wheat and grain, biomass and nitrogen content, of fertigation treatments applied to a previous crop. The wheat crop covered nine subplots from a previous experiment on melon response to fertigation. Each subplot had previously received a different level of applied nitrogen and plants from the previous melon crop had already taken up the applied nitrogen. Many factors affect these variables, causing it to vary at different scales creating a non uniform distribution. E(δ), and their increments between scales, were used to identify the scale at which the variable had a maximum structure and compare with the scaling behavior of the nitrogen applied. The E(δ)is particularly appropriate for this because of does not require any prior assumptions to the structure of the data and it is easy to calculate. The results showed that the applied nitrogen through fertirrigation dominated the wheat and grain biomass response as well as nitrogen content of the whole plant; surprisingly grain nitrogen content didn't show the same structure than the applied nitrogen. At the same time, there was a noticeable structure variation in the biomass and nitrogen content at the smaller scales that correspond to the melon cropping due to uptake of the applied nitrogen by the previous crop. The E(δ) and the increments in E(δ) help us to detect changes in the scaling behavior of all the variables studied, showing at which scale there is a maximum structure. These results are in agreement with previous studies.

  13. Nitrogen cycling in summer active perennial grass systems in South Australia: Non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, V.V.S.R.; Kroker, S.J.; Hicks, M.; Davoren, W.; Descheemaeker, K.K.E.; Llewellyn, R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-symbiotic nitrogen (N2) fixation by diazotrophic bacteria is a potential source for biological N inputs in non-leguminous crops and pastures. Perennial grasses generally add larger quantities of above- and belowground plant residues to soil, and so can support higher levels of soil biological

  14. Taxation, credit constraints and the informal economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia P. Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends Evans and Jovanovic (1989's entrepreneurship model to incorporate the informal sector. Specifically, entrepreneurs can operate either in the formal sector – in which they have limited access to credit markets and must pay taxes – or in the informal sector – in which they can avoid paying taxes, but have no access to credit markets. In addition, technology in the informal sector is both less productive and more labor intensive than that in the formal sector. We calibrate the model to the Brazilian economy, and evaluate the impact of credit frictions and taxation on occupational choices, aggregate output and inequality. Removing all distortions can improve aggregate efficiency considerably, largely because this induces entrepreneurs to switch to the formal sector, where the technology is superior. Most of this effect comes from removing credit market frictions, but taxes on formal businesses are also important. The elimination of distortions can also reduce income inequality substantially.

  15. Sovereign Credit Risk, Liquidity, and ECB Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelizzon, Loriana; Subrahmanyam, Marti G.; Tomio, Davide

    This paper examines the dynamic relationship between credit risk and liquidity in the sovereign bond market in the context of the European Central Bank (ECB) interventions. Using comprehensive set of liquidity measures obtained from a detailed, quote-level dataset for the largest interdealer market...... for Italian government bonds, we show that changes in credit risk, as measured by the credit default swap (CDS) spread, generally drive the liquidity of the market. The relationship is stronger and tighter when the CDS spread is above 500 basis points. This threshold was estimated endogenously and can...... be ascribed mainly to changes in margins and collateral. Moreover, we show that the long-term refinancing operations (LTRO) intervention by the ECB weakened the sensitivity of the liquidity provision by the market makers to changes in the Italian government's credit risk, by providing them with vastly...

  16. Prefrontal system dysfunction and credit card debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Marcello; Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2004-10-01

    Credit card use often involves a disadvantageous allocation of finances because they allow for spending beyond means and buying on impulse. Accordingly they are associated with increased bankruptcy, anxiety, stress, and health problems. Mounting evidence from functional neuroimaging and clinical studies implicates prefrontal-subcortical systems in processing financial information. This study examined the relationship of credit card debt and executive functions using the Frontal System Behavior Scale (FRSBE). After removing the influences of demographic variables (age, sex, education, and income), credit card debt was associated with the Executive Dysfunction scale, but not the Apathy or Disinhibition scales. This suggests that processes of conceptualizing and organizing finances are most relevant to credit card debt, and implicates dorsolateral prefrontal dysfunction.

  17. The public control of credit unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto García Müller

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Public control is the activity of investigation or review by the government takes over a company, to verify the conformity of its actions to law. This paper analyzes the control over credit unions.

  18. New Market Tax Credit Qualified Census Tract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, a division of the US Department of the Treasury, administers the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC). The...

  19. Credit and savings: stepping stones from poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an interview with Mariame Dem, Zonal Program Manager for West Africa, concerning Oxfam's contribution to financial assets of women in helping them to achieve sustainable livelihoods. It was known that credit could improve the status of women and bargaining position within their household by giving them their own money. Dem said that the program has given grants for revolving credit funds, built women's literacy skills, and has kept them in touch with credit management organizations. Moreover, she said that Oxfam has invested in many micro-credit schemes for the empowerment of women. Their partners have set up a learning group and plan to train and network in the coming years.

  20. Managing Carbon Footprints under the Trade Credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate how the retailer adjusts optimal ordering policy in the presence of cap-and-trade system and trade credit, and the corresponding changes of the retailer’s total costs and carbon footprint. Trade credit is one of the most used short-term financing tools. Our study shows that carbon emissions trading will shorten the ordering cycle for products that emit more carbon dioxide during the storage stage, and therefore reduce the buying behavior stimulation effect of trade credit on these products. Under the cap-and-trade system, the retailer’s total cost may increase or decrease, depending on the combination of carbon cap allocated to the retailer and the carbon price. Moreover, trade credit and the corresponding cost of capital affect the retailer’s carbon emission reduction strategy by changing the retailers’ consolidated cost during the ordering and inventory holding stages.

  1. College Student Credit Card Usage and Debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the concerns related to credit card usage by college students. Offers information student affairs professionals can use to help college students make responsible choices. (Contains 26 references.) (GCP)

  2. Emission credits : what are they worth?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilman, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    The current cost of making a carbon transaction was discussed with particular reference to a time-line when emissions trading will become more cost-effective and streamlined for quicker results. This paper described how companies are dealing with the risk of emissions trading in terms of pricing and the expected financial impacts of owning a new commodity. The incorporation of emissions credits and trading activities into a company's balance sheet was also described in terms of how banks will consider a company's credit when calculating their loan potential. It was noted that some credits will be valued higher than others based on their historical background. The financial impact that credits have on company assets was addressed in terms of measuring reputation management. The importance of developing a financial plan for effective management was emphasized in terms of evaluating emissions reduction projects and future options. 17 refs., 2 figs

  3. Tax credit synfuels influence coal markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morey, M.; Leshock, C. [Resource Data International, Boulder, CO (USA)

    2000-05-01

    The recent introduction of synthetic coal products has upset the balance between supply and demand in the US coal market. The imbalance is being driven by the operation of more than 40 facilities that were rapidly pushed into commercial service to meet a 1 July 1998 deadline to qualify for a tax credit. A study by Resource Data International found that synthetic coal will increase in importance and become a critical issue for both coal producers and consumers until 31 December 2007 when the credit expires. The tax credit is granted to qualifying fuels that have undergone a chemical change. However, many plants tout their use of waste coal, pond fines and other mining wastes. The credit amount is based on calorific value. RDI found that 44 synfuel plants were operating to some degree during 1999 with 10 being a West Virginia, 8 in Kentucky and 7 in Pennsylvania. 2 figs.

  4. Securitization, Credit Rating and Issuers’ Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Palmada Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the growth of securitization through Credit Receivables Investment Funds (Fundos de Investimento em Direitos Creditórios - FIDCs in Brazil in recent years, this work aims to investigate empirically the relationship between securitization and credit rating in the Brazilian market. All issues of FIDCs held by banks and registered in the CVM from 2005 to July 2010 were analyzed. The two hypotheses discussed by Gorton and Souleles (2005 were confirmed to Brazilian financial institutions. There is evidence of an implied contract between the transferor companies and investors in securitizations made via FIDCs. Companies with higher credit risk, worst ratings, tend to securitize more. However no relationship was found between securitization and asset value, amount of loans or capital ratio.

  5. Status of burnup credit implementation in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, P.

    1998-01-01

    Burnup credit is currently not used for the storage of spent fuel in the reactor pools in Switzerland, but credit is taken for integral burnable absorbers. Interest exists to take credit of burnup in future for the storage in a central away-from-reactor facility presently under construction. For spent fuel transports to foreign reprocessing plants the regulations of the receiving countries must be applied in addition to the Swiss licensing criteria. Burnup credit has been applied by one Swiss PWR utility for such transports in a consistent manner with the licensing practice in the receiving countries. Measurements of reactivity worths of small spent fuel samples in a Swiss zero-power research reactor are at an early stage of planning. (author)

  6. Credit risk management in the power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.

    2002-01-01

    Deregulation of the electric power industry has the potential to put power businesses at market risk particularly when the value of an asset or liability will change with market movements. Market risk gives rise to credit risk where a contract cannot be fulfilled. This presentation describes how credit risks can be identified and measured. Most practitioners use some variant of value-at-risk (VAR) technology for measuring market risk. Under this approach, risk is determined by the volatility implied by the market. Volatility of electricity prices and natural gas prices has increased significantly in Alberta in recent years. The consequence is an increase in both market and credit risk. The author described the difference between the two risks and their significance. An overview of credit risk management with derivatives, an over-the counter contract, was also presented. The author also discusses issue of protection buyers in the event of a failed contract. 9 figs

  7. College credit for in-house training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, K.; Getty, C.; Knief, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI) and similar organizations may be of considerable help to the industry to the extent that college credit can be awarded for certain activities in reactor site training programs. The credit recommendations generally may be used at local colleges. They also may be applied (along with credit for college-level activities such as correspondence and on-campus courses, proficiency testing, and other evaluations) to degrees granted by the Regent's External Degree Program (REX) and other organizations. This paper describes the principle features of the PONSI and REX programs. PONSI's first credit evaluation at a nuclear plant - Consolidated Edison's Indian Point 2 - is summarized. Recent proposals for an explicit nuclear degree through REX are also described briefly

  8. The market for tradable renewable energy credits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, David

    2002-01-01

    As states seek to foster the development of renewable energy resources, some have introduced renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) which require retailers of electricity to derive a specified amount of their energy supply from renewable energy resources. RPSs in Texas, Arizona, Wisconsin and Nevada allow for or require the use of tradable renewable energy credits. The price of such credits is expected to reflect the cost premium for generating electricity from renewable resources relative to the market price of conventionally generated electricity. Using the market to trade renewable energy credits exposes buyers and sellers to risks of imperfect information, poor performance, and opportunism. These risks can be managed through contractual arrangements and regulatory requirements pertaining to property rights in credits, pricing, term of the contract, and assurance of performance

  9. Health insurance premium tax credit. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This document contains final regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.These final regulations provide guidance to individuals related to employees who may enroll in eligible employer-sponsored coverage and who wish to enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the premium tax credit.

  10. Credit Default Swap Valuation with Counterparty Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Seng Yuen; Kwok, Yue Kuen

    2005-01-01

    Using the reduced form framework with inter-dependent default correlation, we perform valuation of credit default swap with counterparty risk. The inter-dependent default risk structure between the protection buyer, protection seller and the reference entity in a credit default swap are characterized by their correlated default intensities, where the default intensity of one party increases when the default of another party occurs. We explore how settlement risk and replacement cost affect th...

  11. Grant credit lines for energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramatikov, P.; Iliev, I.

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission established a mechanism of credit lines to integrate more quickly the Bulgarian economy to the open international markets. Thereby it was enabled certain Bulgarian banks to provide grant loans to private companies in the industrial sector for projects of improvement of the energy efficiency of their production. The Bulgarian experience in using of two European credit lines and their role in the current economic crisis is presented in this paper. (authors)

  12. CREDIT INSURANCE DURING THE FINANCIAL CRISIS

    OpenAIRE

    Emilia CLIPICI

    2013-01-01

    In international economic relations, credit is an indispensable element, being viewed by most specialists as the engine of a national economy, due to the role of the driving investments and based on them, the employment, the increase in the production, etc., the use and typology according to the duration and nature of the operations performed. Export credits are, along with the other types of loans, part of the specialized loan category held in the portfolio of most commercial banks. Export c...

  13. Firm Heterogeneity, Credit Constraints, and Endogenous Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Torben Klarl; Alfred Maussner

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the role of firm heterogeneity under credit constraints for economic growth. We focus on firm size, innovativeness and credit constraints in a semi-endogenous growth model reflecting recent empirical findings on firm heterogeneity. It allows for an explicit solution for transitional growth and balanced growth path productivity as well as the growth maximizing firm heterogeneity. This enables us to draw inference about the impact of key policy parameters of the mod...

  14. Micro Credit and Gender: A Critical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem BALKIZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro credit programs, which are based on lending money on interest and encouraging savings, have been first been used in Southern countries and are now being implemented worldwide. Mainly aimed at the rural poor, particularly poor women, micro credit programs seek to ensure sustainable economic development in line with the requirements of global capitalism and to include women in the productive activities of the market. Micro credit has been made institutionalized based on three main paradigms, namely financial sustainability, poverty alleviation and women’s empowerment. In micro credit programs, where the emphasis on women’s empowerment is strong, the lack of a social gender perspective is striking. In fact, women may face patriarchal pressure and restrictions at the start in access to loans, loan usage models, participation to the productive activities in the market and during loan repayment. Thus the allegation that by way of micro credit, women will be empowered in terms of economic, social and political means in the family and society becomes questionable. This article, by problematizing women’s relationship with micro credit, will discuss social gender relationships which prevent them from making use of these programs as they wish and from achieving the results they intend

  15. Mammography screening credit card and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, D V; Kumar, N B; Clark, R A; Yag, C

    1992-07-15

    Screening for breast cancer using mammography has been shown to be effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The authors attempted to determine if use of a wallet-size plastic screening "credit" card would increase participants' compliance for subsequent mammograms when compared with traditional methods of increasing compliance. Two hundred and twenty consecutive women, ages 40-70 years, undergoing their first screening mammography were recruited and assigned randomly to four groups receiving (1) a reminder plastic credit card (2) reminder credit card with written reminder; (3) appointment card; and (4) verbal recommendation. Return rates of the four groups were determined after 15 months. The return rate for subsequent mammograms was significantly higher for participants (72.4%) using the credit card than for participants (39.8%) exposed to traditional encouragement/reminders (P less than 0.0001). The credit card was designed to show the participant's screening anniversary, and the durability of the card may have been a factor in increasing the return rate. The use of reminder credit cards may increase compliance for periodic screening examinations for other cancers and other chronic diseases.

  16. Modelling the predictive performance of credit scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Wei Shen

    2013-07-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this empirical paper was to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems in Taiwan. Motivation for the study: Corporate lending remains a major business line for financial institutions. However, in light of the recent global financial crises, it has become extremely important for financial institutions to implement rigorous means of assessing clients seeking access to credit facilities. Research design, approach and method: Using a data sample of 10 349 observations drawn between 1992 and 2010, logistic regression models were utilised to examine the predictive performance of credit scoring systems. Main findings: A test of Goodness of fit demonstrated that credit scoring models that incorporated the Taiwan Corporate Credit Risk Index (TCRI, micro- and also macroeconomic variables possessed greater predictive power. This suggests that macroeconomic variables do have explanatory power for default credit risk. Practical/managerial implications: The originality in the study was that three models were developed to predict corporate firms’ defaults based on different microeconomic and macroeconomic factors such as the TCRI, asset growth rates, stock index and gross domestic product. Contribution/value-add: The study utilises different goodness of fits and receiver operator characteristics during the examination of the robustness of the predictive power of these factors.

  17. Credit card spending limit and personal finance: system dynamics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Pejić Bach

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Credit cards have become one of the major ways for conducting cashless transactions. However, they have a long term impact on the well being of their owner through the debt generated by credit card usage. Credit card issuers approve high credit limits to credit card owners, thereby influencing their credit burden. A system dynamics model has been used to model behavior of a credit card owner in different scenarios according to the size of a credit limit. Experiments with the model demonstrated that a higher credit limit approved on the credit card decreases the budget available for spending in the long run. This is a contribution toward the evaluation of action for credit limit control based on their consequences.

  18. WHAT INFLUENCE CREDIT CARD DEBTS IN YOUNG CONSUMERS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shah ALAM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines empirically antecedents of the credit card debts in young consumers in Malaysia. We examine whether easy access to credit card, credit card related knowledge, aggressive promotion by credit card industry, low minimum payment requirement and attitude towards credit cards influence credit card debts in the younger generation. Regression model was used to meet the objectives. These findings based on a sample of 240 young credit card holders, show that the factors that affect credit card debts are credit card related knowledge, aggressive promotion by credit card industry and low minimum payment requirements. These findings also provide insights for both bank management and policy-makers to improve the bank performance in terms of credit card debts.

  19. Credit Scoring Models: Lack of Information and the Use of Data from a Credit Risk Register

    OpenAIRE

    Verónica Balzarotti; Fernando Castelpoggi

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to study the problem created by the lack of information about the credit history of some debtors in the databases used to develop credit scoring models and the use of information about behavior compiled by a credit risk register as a potential solution to the problem. The paper analyzes two problems: (i) the need to provide a credit risk estimation of debtors whose behavior is unknown (because they are deleted from the databases without indication of the reas...

  20. Determinants of SME credit worthiness under Basel rules: the value of credit history information

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Dainelli; Francesco Giunta; Fabrizio Cipollini

    2013-01-01

    The Basel III Accord has reportedly had an impact on SME financing. In this paper, we aim to highlight the determinants of SME credit worthiness. We use credit history in addition to financial ratios and “hybrid” indicators that have been built by mixing credit history with financial statement data. We develop a failure prediction logit model on 187 Italian SMEs. The use of short-term credit lines is the most important variable. Contrary to common understanding, capitalization levels do not a...

  1. Mineralization of residual fertilizer nitrogen in soil after rice harvest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, S.; Sarkar, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Remineralization of immobilized 15 N labelled urea N applied to rice crop at the rate of 180 kg N/ha was determined. Mineral N increased rapidly up to 14 days of incubation and thereafter remained more or less constant. The recovery of fertilizer as mineral N varied between 0.7 and 3.1 μg/g soil. The percent mineralization of labelled organic N ranged between 3.1 and 9.5. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  2. Effect of soil-bound residues of malathion on microbial activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Iqbal, Z.; Asi, M.R.; Tahira, R.; Chudhary, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of soil-bound residues of malathion on CO/sub 2/ evolution, dehydrogenase activity and some nitrogen transformations in a loam soil was investigated under laboratory conditions. The soil samples containing bound residues arising from 10 mg g-1 of the applied malathion were mixed in equal quantity with fresh soil and compared with solvent extracted control soil without bound residues (extracted in the same way as soil containing bound residues). Another control comprising un extracted fresh soil without bound residues was also kept to study the effect of solvent extraction on the biological activity. Rate of Carbon mineralization (CO/sub 2/ evolution) was decreased in the presence of soil-bound residues of malathion. Bound residues also affected dehydrogenase activity of soil. Over 40% inhibition of dehydrogenase activity was observed after 4 days and the inhibition persisted at least for 12 days. Nitrogen mineralization was stimulated in soil containing bound residues of malathion and this stimulatory effect increased with time of incubation. Nitrification was partially inhibited in the presence of soil-bound residues of malathion. The inhibitory effect of the soil-bound residues on nitrification did not show much variation with time. The soil-bound residues did not affect denitrification rate (N/sub 2/O evolution). Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) was partially inhibited in soil amended with bound residues of malathion and the inhibitory effect persisted for at least one week. In general, soil bound residues of malathion inhibited CO/sub 2/ evolution, dehydrogenase activity, nitrification and nitrogen fixation while mineralization of nitrogen was stimulated. Denitrification was not affected by the applied insecticide. (author)

  3. Crediting Businesses as a Form of Financial Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinichenko Liudmyla L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the modern methods of crediting businesses in Ukraine have been considered and practical recommendations on choosing a particular form and method of crediting, which depends on the characteristics of the borrower activities, its creditworthiness, crediting purposes and objects have been offered. Today the most common crediting methods in the banking practice are: credit line, overdraft, non-instalment term credit. Each of these methods has its own characteristics, which are suitable for specific areas of the organization activity. It has been found that the credit line benefit is that the borrower is given an opportunity within the fixed limit to use the credit funds immediately at the moment the need arises, which in its turn allows reducing the cost of the credit servicing, however, the main disadvantage of this method of crediting is that in the case of difficulties with the repayment of the previous tranche the bank may reduce or cancel the credit limit and enter an additional fee on the unclaimed credit line limit. Overdraft crediting is characterized by a rapid procedure of obtaining a credit, can be granted without security, does not have a targeted character, allows providing payments from the current account, at the same time the interest rate on the overdraft is higher than that on other credits, and another disadvantage is the requirement of mandatory and in a certain, relatively short time repaying the credit. Crediting in terms of lump-sum cash disbursement is characterized by simplicity in granting and consistency in the organization of the crediting process, but the accrual of interests occurs immediately after the transfer of funds to the borrower on the full amount of the received credit. Thus, when deciding on obtaining a bank credit the entrepreneur has to choose one or another method of crediting taking into account all the advantages and disadvantages of the chosen method.

  4. To what extent does banks' credit stimulate economic growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the extent to which banks' credit affects economic growth in Nigeria. The data used was collected from the Central Bank of Nigeria statistical bulletin for a period of 24 years from 1990 to 2013. We used credit to the private sector, credit to the public sector and inflation to proxy commercial bank credit ...

  5. 12 CFR 704.3 - Corporate credit union capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Corporate credit union capital. 704.3 Section... CORPORATE CREDIT UNIONS § 704.3 Corporate credit union capital. (a) Capital plan. A corporate credit union... strategies which provide for the building of capital consistent with regulatory requirements, the maintenance...

  6. 12 CFR 614.4810 - Standby letters of credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standby letters of credit. 614.4810 Section 614.4810 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS Banks for Cooperatives and Agricultural Credit Banks Financing International Trade § 614.4810 Standby...

  7. The National Credit Act Regarding Suretyships and Reckless Lending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of the National Credit Act a credit provider may conclude a credit agreement with a consumer only after he has made a proper financial assessment and concludes that the consumer will be able to satisfy all of his obligations under all his credit agreements. However, a practice of not conducting this affordability ...

  8. 12 CFR 706.2 - Unfair credit practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unfair credit practices. 706.2 Section 706.2 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS CREDIT... attachment, execution, or other process on real or personal property held, owned by, or due to the consumer...

  9. 77 FR 41048 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and... Reconciling the premium tax credit with advance credit payments. * * * * * (b) * * * (6) * * * Example 5...

  10. 20 CFR 227.5 - Employer tax credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employer tax credits. 227.5 Section 227.5... SUPPLEMENTAL ANNUITIES § 227.5 Employer tax credits. Employers are entitled to tax credits if they pay non.... The tax credits for each month equal the sum of the reductions for employer pensions in the...

  11. 20 CFR 606.20 - Cap on tax credit reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cap on tax credit reduction. 606.20 Section 606.20 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.20 Cap on tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (f) of...

  12. 20 CFR 606.23 - Avoidance of tax credit reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Avoidance of tax credit reduction. 606.23 Section 606.23 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.23 Avoidance of tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (g) of...

  13. 12 CFR 702.307 - Incentives for new credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incentives for new credit unions. 702.307 Section 702.307 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Alternative Prompt Corrective Action for New Credit Unions § 702.307 Incentives...

  14. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  15. Determinants of Household Demand for Credit Use in Myanmar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the results, farming, as occupation is a major driver of demand for credit highlights the need for farmers to have access to timely credit in food production in study. Moreover, female headed households demand for more credit than male underscores policy relevance of improving female access to credit to meet ...

  16. Credit worthiness and loan repayment performance among farmer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Credit worthiness and loan repayment performance among farmer cooperators in Owerri Agricultural Zone of Imo State, Nigeria. ... policies that will improve the linkage between farmer cooperatives and formal credit sources in the area. Keywords: Credit worthiness, loan repayment, farmers, cooperative societies and credit ...

  17. 12 CFR 702.108 - Risk mitigation credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk mitigation credit. 702.108 Section 702.108... CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification § 702.108 Risk mitigation credit. (a) Who may apply. A credit union may apply for a risk mitigation credit if on any of the current or three preceding effective dates...

  18. 76 FR 16235 - Corporate Credit Unions, Technical Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... inadvertently included particular investments that did not--when subject to the other credit risk and asset... NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 707 RIN 3133-AD58 Corporate Credit Unions, Technical Corrections AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: In...

  19. 25 CFR 140.23 - Credit at trader's risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit at trader's risk. 140.23 Section 140.23 Indians....23 Credit at trader's risk. Credit given Indians will be at the trader's own risk, as no assistance... accept pawns or pledges of personal property by Indians to obtain credit or loans. ...

  20. Credit and Debit Card Usage and Cash Flow Management Control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2012-10-27

    Oct 27, 2012 ... credit cards in developing countries which are yet to advance in technology. Key words: Debit cards, credit cards, commercial banks, Kenya. Introduction. The development of credit card is probably the most significant phenomenon in the banking industry. Since the first credit card was issued in 1730, there.

  1. Indian Kisan Credit Card Scheme: An Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra Mehta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kisan Credit Card (KCC has now been regarded as the only medium of short-term credit for agriculture. The Kisan Credit Card (KCC scheme was introduced by the Finance Minister in his budget speech in the year 1998-99. From the year 1998-99, the scheme was implemented by public sector commercial banks, RRBs (Regional Rural Banks and cooperative banks in the country. It has emerged as an innovative credit distribution system to meet the production credit requirements of the farmers in a timely and easy manner. The present paper is aimed to study role of Kisan Credit Card in the rural credit facilitation in India.

  2. Inventory and Credit Decisions under Day-Terms Credit Linked Demand and Allowance for Bad Debts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to stimulate demand of their product, firms generally give credit period to their customers. However, selling on credit exposes the firms to the additional dimension of bad debts expense (i.e., customer’s default. Moreover, credit period through its influence on demand becomes a determinant of inventory decisions and inventory sold on credit gets converted to accounts receivable indicating the interaction between the two. Since inventory and credit decisions are interrelated, inventory decisions must be determined jointly with credit decisions. Consequently, in this paper, a mathematical model is developed to determine inventory and credit decisions jointly. The demand rate is assumed to be a logistic function of credit period. The accounts receivable carrying cost along with an explicit consideration of bad debt expense which have been often ignored in previous models are incorporated in the present model. The discounted cash flow approach (DCF is used to develop the model and the objective is to maximize the present value of the firm’s net profit per unit time. Finally, numerical example and sensitivity analysis have been done to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  3. Trade credit supply, market power and the matching of trade credit terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabbri, D.; Klapper, L.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the decision of firms to extend trade credit to customers and its relation with their financing decisions. We use a novel firm-level database with unique information on market power in both output and input markets and on the amount, terms and payment history of trade credit

  4. The Evaluation of Trade Credit Insurance in Lithuanian Business Market as a Credit Risk Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezgovko Aleksandra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s trade, the vast majority of commercial transactions in both domestic and international trade are concluded by applying trade credit terms. The aim of this article is to analyse the trade credit insurance and, according to the methodology, to evaluate it as a credit risk management tool in the context of Lithuanian business market. The authors have proposed a methodology that combines theoretical and practical research methods. First of all, with assistance of qualitative analysis, the alternative external credit risk management tools were examined. Such analysis allows not only to identify the advantages, disadvantages and benefits of researched risk management tools but also to assess the efficiency and rationality of trade credit insurance in the context of alternative methods. In order to carry out an assessment in the practical aspect, considering the lack of statistical data, it was decided additionally to perform an expert evaluation. After performing an assessment of trade credit insurance, it was concluded that in international trade, with a large buyer portfolio and high sales volume, the trade credit insurance becomes the most effective and rational way to manage credit risk, which eliminates the losses because of the debtor’s insolvency or bankruptcy, manages countries and sector’s risks and helps to discipline the debtor, what determines the decline in overdue accounts frequencies, amounts and volumes.

  5. Information Sharing and Credit Rationing : Evidence from the Introduction of a Public Credit Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.; Degryse, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the first evidence on how the introduction of information sharing via a public credit registry affects banks’ lending decisions. We employ a unique dataset containing detailed information on credit card applications and decisions from one of the leading banks in China. While we do not

  6. Credit-Card Bill Seeks to Protect Students but Could Limit Their Access to Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    Congress passed legislation last week that would shield students and other consumers from sudden spikes in interest rates and fees, but that could make it harder for young people to access credit to pay for college. The legislation would extend broad new consumer protections to all credit-card holders, offering special protections to college…

  7. Overrated credit risk: three essays on credit risk in turbulent times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, D.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Credit markets have shown a dramatic development at the start of the 21st century. Increased regulatory pressure on financial institutions has spurred the development of innovative products that allow for transfer of credit risk. These developments lay at the base of the largest financial crisis

  8. Comparative Research on Romanian SMEs Crediting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin - Mihai MAGDA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In an efficient market economy, economic growth and welfare is based on the existence of a powerful SME sector. As proven in the context of the nowadays crisis, a powerful and well-developed SME sector can successfully cope with economic challenges and can adapt more easily to a negative economic context, insuring, in the same time, the premises for the economic recovery and the population welfare. Therefore, one of the most important concerns for the developing countries is the development of the SME segment, which obviously supposes the accumulation of capital. Considering the post-revolutionary economic history of Romania, the shift from a centrally planned economy to the market economy, and afterwards the financial crisis that has started in 2008, at present the SME segment is being developed especially through loans granted by the commercial banks, taken into account the low absorption rate of European funds and the insignificant and incoherent governmental financing programs. Therefore, this paper is important and actual as it synthetically and relatively simply presents the way in which Romanian commercial banks determine which SMEs may be financed, after performing a quantitative / financial analysis of the applicants in order to correctly determine the credit risk as a result of assessing and interpreting the main economic and financial indexes. We will also present the actual macro-economical stage (crediting terms, credit risk, credit demand, etc, as well as the main similarities and differences occurring in the SMEs crediting process at the Romanian commercial banks.

  9. Theoretical concept of credit risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragosavac Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the banking business and the economy, exposure to different types of risk becomes greater. Identifying all risks and adequate measures have become an extremely important factor in business success in the increasingly complex economic conditions. Risks in business, in the last ten years have become the burning issue in debates among the scientific experts. With the aim of stable development of its business and equal participation in a large competitive market, primarily in order to protect its depositors and preserve system stability and liquidity, banks have to incorporate into their strategic goals the strategies of banking risks. Credit risk is of great value within the overall risks that accompany the business activity of banks, economy, and other forms of business organization. Its nature and presence in all segments of the business activities speak enough about its importance and the need for its management. Permanently growing trend of credit risk is a reality faced by not only the banking organization, but also the subjects in the economic and non-economic sector, which makes the issue of credit risk extremely important and relevant. The subject of this paper is a theoretical analysis of credit risk in banking business. Banking operations are increasingly exposed to credit risk, which indicates the inability of banks to settle their claims based on previously approved loans, and this is the case-in-point for this specific research subject.

  10. STATE ADJUSTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL SECTOR: CREDIT FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Skoryk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the credit provision for agricultural enterprises by banking institutions of Ukraine. It has been argued that banking sector is biggest financial contributor for agricultural entities. It has been proved that the essence of  state adjustment for credit provision for agricultural business is to create a favorable credit provision policy with help of partial compensation of interest rates on loans of banking institutions. It has been reasoned that reducing credit provision for agricultural producers in time of the financial crisis was due to several factors. It has been proved that efficient management is impossible without replenishment amounts of financial resources to increase working capital and investment activities of economic entities and, hence, increase their profitability. It has been argued that replenishment is possible by attracting investment, which in turn will make it possible to replenish, renew fixed assets and increase profitability of businesses. It is necessary total participation of state regulators to address these issues. Key words: credit provision  of agricultural enterprises, banking institutions, state adjustment, loans. JEL: Q 14

  11. The judicial system of credit banking in Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Tutuianu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the transition period to the market economy, the currency, the bank, the credit, play an important role in the national economy. Known since the time of Hamurabi, the credit has expanded, experiencing a growth in Moldavia as well, along with the growth of commercial activity, represented by loans, credit transaction, the apparition of credit title based mortgaged, but especially after 1834, when the birth of a credit institution was planned, in the form of action based anonymus societies.

  12. International capital tax evasion and the foreign tax credit puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberley Scharf

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the role of international tax evasion for the choice of an optimal foreign tax credit by a capital exporting region. Since a foreign tax credit raises the opportunity cost of concealing foreign source income, it can be employed to discourage evasion activity. The existence of international tax evasion possibilities could thus help rationalize a choice of tax credit in excess of a deduction-equivalent credit level. Our analysis shows that, in general the optimal credit will...

  13. Correlates of credit card ownership in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2005-06-01

    In a sample of 352 students, correlates of credit card ownership differed by sex. For both men and women, credit card ownership was predicted by their affective attitude toward credit cards. However, whereas for men concern with money as a tactic for gaining power predicted credit card ownership, for women feelings of insecurity about having sufficient money and having a conservative approach to money predicted credit card ownership.

  14. Regulatory status of burnup credit for dry storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    During 1999, the Spent Fuel Project Office of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) introduced technical guidance for allowing burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis of casks for transporting or storing spent fuel from pressurized water reactors. This paper presents the recommendations embodied by the current NRC guidance, discusses associated technical issues, and reviews information needs and industry priorities for expanding the scope and content of the guidance. Allowable analysis approaches for burnup credit must account for the fuel irradiation variables that affect spent fuel reactivity, including the axial and horizontal variation of burnup within fuel assemblies. Consistent with international transport regulations, the burnup of each fuel assembly must be verified by pre-loading measurements. The current guidance limits the credited burnup to no more than 40 GWd/MTU and the credited cooling time to five years, imposes a burnup offset for fuels with initial enrichments between 4 and 5 wt% 235U, does not include credit for fission products, and excludes burnup credit for damaged fuels and fuels that have used burnable absorbers. Burnup credit outside these limits may be considered when adequately supported by technical information beyond that reviewed to-date by the NRC staff. The guidance further recommends that residual subcritical margins from the neglect of fission products, and any other nuclides not credited in the licensing-basis analysis, be estimated for each cask design and compared against estimates of the maximum reactivity effects associated with remaining computational uncertainties and potentially nonconservative modeling assumptions. The NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is conducting a research program to help develop the technical information needed for refining and expanding the evolving guidance. Cask vendors have announced plans to submit the first NRC license applications for burnup credit later this year

  15. Credit Institutions Management Evaluation using Quantitative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Dardac

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Credit institutions supervising mission by state authorities is mostly assimilated with systemic risk prevention. In present, the mission is orientated on analyzing the risk profile of the credit institutions, the mechanism and existing systems as management tools providing to bank rules the proper instruments to avoid and control specific bank risks. Rating systems are sophisticated measurement instruments which are capable to assure the above objectives, such as success in banking risk management. The management quality is one of the most important elements from the set of variables used in the quoting process in credit operations. Evaluation of this quality is – generally speaking – fundamented on quantitative appreciations which can induce subjectivism and heterogeneity in quotation. The problem can be solved by using, complementary, quantitative technics such us DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis.

  16. Credit Institutions Management Evaluation using Quantitative Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Dardac

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Credit institutions supervising mission by state authorities is mostly assimilated with systemic risk prevention. In present, the mission is orientated on analyzing the risk profile of the credit institutions, the mechanism and existing systems as management tools providing to bank rules the proper instruments to avoid and control specific bank risks. Rating systems are sophisticated measurement instruments which are capable to assure the above objectives, such as success in banking risk management. The management quality is one of the most important elements from the set of variables used in the quoting process in credit operations. Evaluation of this quality is – generally speaking – fundamented on quantitative appreciations which can induce subjectivism and heterogeneity in quotation. The problem can be solved by using, complementary, quantitative technics such us DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis.

  17. Estimation of transition probabilities of credit ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gan Chew; Hin, Pooi Ah

    2015-12-01

    The present research is based on the quarterly credit ratings of ten companies over 15 years taken from the database of the Taiwan Economic Journal. The components in the vector mi (mi1, mi2,⋯, mi10) may first be used to denote the credit ratings of the ten companies in the i-th quarter. The vector mi+1 in the next quarter is modelled to be dependent on the vector mi via a conditional distribution which is derived from a 20-dimensional power-normal mixture distribution. The transition probability Pkl (i ,j ) for getting mi+1,j = l given that mi, j = k is then computed from the conditional distribution. It is found that the variation of the transition probability Pkl (i ,j ) as i varies is able to give indication for the possible transition of the credit rating of the j-th company in the near future.

  18. Credit risk evaluation based on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Gu, Jing; Zhou, Zongfang

    2016-07-01

    Social media has been playing an increasingly important role in the sharing of individuals' opinions on many financial issues, including credit risk in investment decisions. This paper analyzes whether these opinions, which are transmitted through social media, can accurately predict enterprises' future credit risk. We consider financial statements oriented evaluation results based on logit and probit approaches as the benchmarks. We then conduct textual analysis to retrieve both posts and their corresponding commentaries published on two of the most popular social media platforms for financial investors in China. Professional advice from financial analysts is also investigated in this paper. We surprisingly find that the opinions extracted from both posts and commentaries surpass opinions of analysts in terms of credit risk prediction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ombud’s Corner: due credit!

    CERN Document Server

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2016-01-01

    Patents, copyrights, trademarks… there are many ways to protect intellectual property and yet, despite these precautionary measures, it seems that colleagues sometimes still slip up: plots done by one person are used in another’s presentation without being appropriately credited, citations are wrongly assigned, references are inaccurate…   Plagiarism and misappropriation do not only happen in the worlds of art, music and literature. Often in our world, during the preparation phase of a scientific paper or even just in their daily work, scientists are required to share the work of many contributors and sometimes they do not keep track of who did what. No-one minds as long as this stays within the limits of teamwork, in which credits are distributed evenly and nobody’s contribution gets forgotten. Problems arise however, when one person’s work ends up being presented by another without the correct credit, or indeed when someone is held back from p...

  20. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  1. Modeling a Distribution of Mortgage Credit Losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gapko, Petr; Šmíd, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 23 (2010), s. 1-23 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/0965; GA ČR GD402/09/H045 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova - GAUK(CZ) 46108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Credit Risk * Mortgage * Delinquency Rate * Generalized Hyperbolic Distribution * Normal Distribution Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/E/gapko-modeling a distribution of mortgage credit losses-ies wp.pdf

  2. Changing credit limits, changing business cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    In the last half-century, capital markets across the industrialized world have undergone massive deregulation, involving large increases in the loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of house- holds and firms. We study the business-cycle implications of this phenomenon in an es- timated dynamic general...... economies, due to credit constraints becoming non-binding more often. The non-monotonic relationship be- tween credit market conditions and macroeconomic fluctuations carries important lessons for regulatory and macroprudential policymakers. While reducing the average LTV ratio may unintentionally increase...... macroeconomic volatility, a countercyclical LTV ratio proves to be successful in dampening business cycle fluctuations and, most importantly, avoiding dramatic output drops....

  3. CAUTIOUS PRACTICE IN ACCOUNTANCY CREDIT UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Iren RADU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The constitution of the specific risk prevision refers to their creation and is realized including in the cost the sum representing the level of the necessary specific risk provisions, in case there is no provision. The constitutions, regulation and the utilization of specific risk provisions will be realized using the credit currency and/or the investments they correct. Specific risk provisions are to be determined only for the client’s balance sheet engagements. The calculation for the necessary volume of provisions is realized for each and every credit contract referring to the final client classification category.

  4. A random matrix approach to credit risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münnix, Michael C; Schäfer, Rudi; Guhr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We estimate generic statistical properties of a structural credit risk model by considering an ensemble of correlation matrices. This ensemble is set up by Random Matrix Theory. We demonstrate analytically that the presence of correlations severely limits the effect of diversification in a credit portfolio if the correlations are not identically zero. The existence of correlations alters the tails of the loss distribution considerably, even if their average is zero. Under the assumption of randomly fluctuating correlations, a lower bound for the estimation of the loss distribution is provided.

  5. Modeling a Distribution of Mortgage Credit Losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gapko, Petr; Šmíd, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 10 (2012), s. 1005-1023 ISSN 0013-3035 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045; GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 46108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : credit risk * mortgage * delinquency rate * generalized hyperbolic distribution * normal distribution Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.194, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/smid-modeling a distribution of mortgage credit losses.pdf

  6. Documentary Credit Transfer and Other Financing from What Can Match as Product of Credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libardo Quintero Salazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When a contract of international sale of goods is mediated by a form of payment as the documentary credit, exporters that initially lack financial resources to produce or obtain merchandise that then will be delivered to the importer, look as first natural possibility of financing the transfer for the documentary credit. Now not always the credit can be transferable in accordance with the Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credits (UCP – because, for example, the importer or the financial entity do not want it in that way. Given the above scenario, this article aims to provide solutions, explaining legal alternatives for the exporter that is not in the UCP-, to use the money that might correspond as a result of the documentary credit, to finance the production or acquisition of goods against other traders, and then reselling them to the importer. It concludes that the exporter can achieve such immediate funding - similar to what encourage the transfer of documentary credit - using to their relations with the supplier, figures as the assignment of a future credit, banker’s acceptance and contract terms.

  7. Residual N effects from livestock manure inputs to soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroder, J.J.; Bechini, L.; Bittman, S.; Brito, M.P.; Delin, S.; Lalor, S.T.J.; Morvan, T.; Chambers, B.J.; Sakrabani, R.; Sørensen, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    Organic inputs including livestock manures provide nitrogen (N) to crops beyond the year of their application. This so-called residual N effect should be taken into account when making decisions on N rates for individual fields, but also when interpreting N response trials in preparation of

  8. Islamic Banking Existence and Domestic Credit: Study at Seven Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Yuafi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically investigates the determinants of domestic credit across a wide range of 7 countries; these are United Kingdom, Malaysia, Egypt, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain and Indonesia. We use dynamic panel estimation to examine effects of exchange rate, inflation, lending interest rate, banking crisis and existence of wholesale Islamic banking on domestic credit. We obtain several notable empirical results. First, the lending interest rate, banking crisis negatively and insignificantly contribute to domestic credit. The existence of Islamic bank has positive and insignificant contribution to domestic credit, while exchange rate positively and significantly contributes to domestic credit.  Inflation negatively and significantly contributes to domestic credit. Second, banking crisis and existence of wholesale Islamic banking show insignificant effect on domestic credit. Third, we find that today’s domestic credit is depended on domestic credit in the previous year.DOI: 10.15408/aiq9i2.4906

  9. Formal and informal credit in four provinces of Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barslund, Mikkel; Tarp, Finn

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a survey of 932 rural households to uncover how the rural credit market operates in Vietnam. Households obtain credit through formal and informal lenders. Formal loans are almost entirely for production and asset accumulation, while informal loans are used for consumption smoothen......This paper uses a survey of 932 rural households to uncover how the rural credit market operates in Vietnam. Households obtain credit through formal and informal lenders. Formal loans are almost entirely for production and asset accumulation, while informal loans are used for consumption...... smoothening. The determinants of formal and informal credit demand are distinct. While credit rationing depends on education and credit history, in particular, regional differences in the demand for credit are striking. A 'one size fits all' approach to credit policy in Vietnam would be inappropriate...

  10. Agricultural pesticide residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuehr, F.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of tracer techniques in the study of agricultural pesticide residues is reviewed under the following headings: lysimeter experiments, micro-ecosystems, translocation in soil, degradation of pesticides in soil, biological availability of soil-applied substances, bound residues in the soil, use of macro- and microautography, double and triple labelling, use of tracer labelling in animal experiments. (U.K.)

  11. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.5 What is...

  12. Agricultural credit repayment in Finoteselam town, northwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of loans to consumption ends. Family planning, creating enabling conditions for insurance markets, and enhancing labour markets are areas of policy concerns that could further improve loan repayment performances. Key words: Agricultural credit, determinants, microfinance, ACSI, northwestern Ethiopia, Finoteselam ...

  13. Trade credit, collateral liquidation and borrowing constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabbri, D.; Menichini, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper proposes a model of collateralized bank and trade credit. Firms use a two-input technology. Assuming that the supplier is better able to extract value from existing assets and has an information advantage over other creditors, the paper derives a series of predictions. (1) Financially

  14. 47 CFR 90.910 - Bidding credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for 800 MHz Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.910 Bidding credits. A winning bidder that qualifies as a very small business, as defined in § 90.912...

  15. 5 CFR 550.708 - Creditable service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... creditable for computing an employee's severance pay under § 550.707: (a) Civilian service as an employee (as... the National Guard, when performed by an employee who returns to civilian service through the exercise of a restoration right provided by law, Executive order, or regulation; (d) Service performed by an...

  16. Sovereign Credit Risk, Liquidity and ECB Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelizzon, Loriana; Subrahmanyam, Marti G.; Tomio, Davide

    This paper explores the interaction between credit risk and liquidity, in the context of the intervention by the European Central Bank (ECB), during the Euro-zone crisis. The laboratory for our investigation is the Italian sovereign bond market, the largest in the Euro-zone. We use a unique data ...

  17. Dynamic Dependence and Diversification in Corporate Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Jin, Xisong

    2018-01-01

    We characterize dependence in corporate credit and equity returns for 215 firms using a new class of large-scale dynamic copula models. Copula dependence and especially tail dependence are highly variable and persistent, increase significantly in the financial crisis, and have remained high since...

  18. The History of the Student Credit Hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Jessica M.

    2003-01-01

    Traces the history of the student credit hour, designed at the end of the 19th century to translate high school work to college admissions officers. It was expanded to higher education to record elective course work and became widespread in response to calls to document workload and institutional productivity. (SLD)

  19. Trade credit and the supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabbri, D.; Klapper, L.F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies supply chain financing. We investigate why a firm extends trade credit to its customers and how this decision relates to its own financing. We use a novel firm-level database with unique information on market power in both output and input markets and on the amount, terms, and

  20. WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark (CB5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the specification of WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark first phase (depletion calculations), given. The second phase - criticality calculations for the WWER-1000 fuel pin cell, will be given after the evaluation of the results, obtained at the first phase. The proposed benchmark is a continuation of the WWER benchmark activities in this field (Author)

  1. The investment tax credit under monopolistic competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, DP; Heijdra, BJ

    This pager develops a dynamic model of monopolistic competition with finite lives. It investigates the welfare properties of an investment tax credit (ITC) for both finite and infinite lives. For infinite lives, it shows that, lacking lump-sum taxes, an ITC suffices to attain a second-best solution.

  2. School Facilities and Tax Credit Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    The tax credit portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (also known as the economic stimulus package or ARRA) has three different entities that can be used for various school construction including new, modernization, renovation and acquisition of sites for school projects. The bond rule notice and allocations have been issued…

  3. 32 CFR 643.116 - Credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... buildings, without charge for rent or services, to any credit union organized under State law or to any... that, in either case, that 95 percent of the membership is composed of Federal employees, including former Federal employees who acquire membership while employed by the Federal Government and retained...

  4. Application of burnup credit concept to transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamura, Yoshiaki; Nakagome, Yoshihiro.

    1994-01-01

    For the design and safety assessment of the casks for transporting spent fuel, the fuel contained in them has been assumed to be new fuel. The reason is, it was difficult to evaluate the variation of the reactivity of fuel, and the research on the affecting factors and the method of measuring burnup were not much advanced. Recently, high burnup fuel has been adopted, and initial degree of enrichment rose. The research has been advanced for pursuing the economy of the casks for spent fuel, and burnup credit has become applicable to their design and safety assessment. As the result, the containing capacity increases by about 20%. When burnup credit is considered, it is necessary to confirm accurately the burnup of spent fuel. The burnup dependence of the concentration of fissile substances and neutron emissivity, the coolant void dependence of the concentration of fissile substances, and the relation of neutron multiplication rate with initial degree of enrichment or burnup are discussed. The conceptual design of casks considering burnup credit and its assessment, the merit, problem and the countermeasures to it when burnup credit is introduced are described. (K.I.)

  5. 76 FR 59237 - Equal Credit Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... communities, governmental entities, and creditors to identify business and community development needs and... and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act or Act), requires that financial institutions collect and report information concerning credit applications made by women or minority-owned businesses and by small...

  6. Emissions credits from natural gas vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.F.; Kodjak, D.

    1997-01-01

    Dedicated natural gas vehicles (NGVs) often are capable of testing to lower than federally required engine certification standards. NGVs often meet inherently low emission vehicle (ILEV) and ultra low emission vehicle (ULEV) standards. Over the useful life of the vehicle, a significant amount of mobile source emission reduction credits (MSERCs) can be generated. This paper will discuss key elements of establishing a workable methodology to quantify the emissions benefits generated through the purchase and use of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles instead of heavy-duty diesel vehicles. The paper will focus on a public fleet of transit buses owned by the Massachusetts Bay Transit Agency, the Massachusetts Port Authority, and a private fleet of waste haulers. Public fleets may generate emission credits as a key compliance option to offset emission shortfalls from changes to the Employee Commute Options (ECO) program, the Inspection and Maintenance program, and facilitate annual surface transportation conformity. Private fleets may generate emission credits for open market trading to area and stationary sources seeking to buy credits from mobile sources, where allowed by EPA and state policy

  7. 76 FR 31451 - Equal Credit Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... implemented by the Board's Regulation B. In addition to the general prohibition against discrimination..., Credit, Discrimination, Federal Reserve System, Marital status discrimination, Penalties, Religious...

  8. Burnup credit effect on proposed cask payloads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, I.K.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Cask Systems Development Program (CSDP) is to develop a variety of cask systems which will allow safe and economical movement of commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste from the generator to the Federal repository or Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Program schedule objectives for the initial phase of the CSDP include the development of certified spent fuel cask systems by 1995 to support Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management shipments from the utilities beginning in the late 1990s. Forty-nine proposals for developing a family of spent fuel casks were received and comparisons made. General conclusions that can be drawn from the comparisons are that (1) the new generation of casks will have substantially increased payloads in comparison to current casks, and (2) an even greater payload increase may be achievable with burnup credit. The ranges in the payload estimates do not allow a precise separation of the payload increase attributable to the proposed allowance of fuel burnup credit, as compared wilt the no-burnup-credit case. The beneficial effects of cask payload increases on overall costs and risks of transporting spent fuel are significant; therefore further work aimed toward taking advantage of burnup credit is warranted

  9. SME Credit Financing, Financial Development and Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the impact of small and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs) credit financing and financial market development and their shocks on the output growth of Nigeria. The study estimated a VAR model for Nigeria using 1970-2013 annual data series. Unit root tests and cointegration are carried out. The study ...

  10. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates a structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of competition is derived from the estimated

  11. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known I Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates it structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of compelition is derived from the

  12. 75 FR 73000 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... correcting adjustments necessary to conform with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) that were... report, signed by the chief executive officer and the chief accounting officer or chief financial officer... either the chief accounting officer or chief financial officer of the corporate credit union to sign the...

  13. Credit price optimisation within retail banking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... the problem of determining optimal prices to quote prospective customers in credit retail is addressed such ..... customer segment c ∈ C. The motivation is that data availability in some of the customer segments may .... price to quote customer segment c ∈ C. This variable is, within the context of stochastic.

  14. Teaching the Rules of Debit and Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Andrew J.

    1974-01-01

    A fundamental method of explaining the basic accounting principles and concepts (debit, credit, basic accounting equation) which includes visual aids, reference to local businesses, and drill, does much toward increasing the student's skill and enhancing his understanding of the subject matter. (Sample transparencies are included.) (Author/AJ)

  15. MICRO-CREDIT AND POVERTY ALLEVIATION:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    holds and those who cannot otherwise receive loans to set up micro-enterprises'. It is. ' The credit is usually provided through a number .... deny information gathered by using one—onaone interviews. Secondary data were also used. It involved a ..... and collection systems. This may require the designing of simple contract ...

  16. 78 FR 57927 - Credit Risk Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ..., Collateral B. Proposed General Definitions III. General Risk Retention Requirement A. Minimum Risk Retention... Commercial Real Estate Loans 1. Ability To Repay 2. Loan-to-Value Requirement 3. Collateral Valuation 4. Risk... 43, 244, 373, et al. 17 CFR Part 246 24 CFR Part 267 Credit Risk Retention; Proposed Rule #0;#0...

  17. Trading biomass or GHG emission credits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurijssen, J; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Global biomass potentials are considerable but unequally distributed over the world. Countries with Kyoto targets could import biomass to substitute for fossil fuels or invest in bio-energy projects in the country of biomass origin and buy the credits (Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint

  18. 75 FR 75648 - Corporate Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... Board, National Credit Union Administration, 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314- 3428. Hand... library at 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314, by appointment weekdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m... Attorney, Office of General Counsel; and Lisa Henderson, Staff Attorney, Office of General Counsel, at the...

  19. Understanding Credit Risk: A Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servatka, Maros; Theocharides, George

    2011-01-01

    This classroom experiment introduces students to the notion of credit risk and expected return, by allowing them to trade on comparable corporate bond issues from two types of markets: investment-grade and high-yield markets. Investment-grade issues have a lower probability of default than high-yield issues and thus provide a lower yield.…

  20. COGEMA/TRANSNUCLEAIRE's experience with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanzy, Y.; Guillou, E.

    1998-01-01

    Facing a continuous increase in the fuel enrichments, COGEMA and TRANSNUCLEAIRE have implemented step by step a burnup credit programme to improve the capacity of their equipment without major physical modification. Many authorizations have been granted by the French competent authority in wet storage, reprocessing and transport since 1981. As concerns transport, numerous authorizations have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, those authorizations are restricted to PWR Fuel type assemblies made of enriched uranium. The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the systems are evaluated by calculations performed with well qualified French codes developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APPOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The authorizations are based on the assurance that the burnup considered is met on the least irradiated part of the fuel assemblies. Besides, the most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is restricted to major actinides only. This conservative approach allows not to take credit for any axial profile. On the operational side, the procedures have been reevaluated to avoid misloadings and a burnup verification is made before transport, storage and reprocessing. Depending on the level of burnup credit, it consists of a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice in France and Germany and new improvements are still in progress: extended qualifications of the codes are made to enable the use of six selected fission products in the criticality evaluations. (author)

  1. CREDIT RISK MINIMIZATION WAYS AND PRICING OF BANKING SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Gladkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate accounting of own expenses on rendering banking services and forming reasonable prices for them make it possible for commercial banks to adequately react to market situation changes. Credit risk minimization comprises: credit rationing (in Russia according to RF Central Bank norms; credit diversification; credit structuring; and forming reserves to cover respective bank risks (also in accordance with RF CB documents. Effective is bank credit hedging (insuring through credit derivatives. Most advanced at international finance markets are such risk minimization systems as Basel-II and IRBA. Pricing models based on individual assessment of each borrower’s risk class (Risk Based Pricing approach are widely used.

  2. CORRELATED ANALYSIS OF CLIENT-CREDIT COST WITH THE ONE OF SUPPLIER - CREDIT COST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRELA MONEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The given client-credit has associated several types of costs. If a company gives client-credit for a certain period of time, then it will have to finance its activity from other sources. Another aspect is the one related to the size of allotted sum. The sum that must be covered does not equal the turnover. The impact on financing the operating cycle is found usually only under the form of expenses which are made up of variable costs (because amortization must not be paid, the profit is included in the price. Thus, the sum which must be covered is not related to the non-cashed turnover from the client-credit, but only to variable costs. This will be the sum that must be covered from the financing sources. Supplier-credit is a source attracted, usually it has no cost.

  3. Consumer credit as an economic good, and modern trends in the banking consumer credit in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasev Kirill Sergeevich

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, consumer credit is seen as an economic good, it analyzes the classification features, as well as presents current trends of development of bank consumer lending in Russia.

  4. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Credit on Economic Growth, Unemployment and Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangasa Augustinus Sipahutar

    2016-06-01

                  Effect of credit on economic growth, unemployment and poverty provides evidence from Indonesia on the role of banks credit for promoting economic growth and reducing both unemployment and poverty.  To document the link between banks credit and economic growth, we estimate a VAR model and variance decompositions of annual GDP per capita growth rates to examine what proxy measures of banks credit are most important in accounting for economic growth over time and how much they contribute to explaining economic growth.  We also estimate an ECM to document the relationship between banks credit to both unemployment and poverty.  This paper revealed bi-direction causality between banks credit and economic growth.  Banks credit promotes economic growth and economic growth affects credit depth and financial development.  Furthermore, banks credit is a growth accelerating factor on Indonesian economic growth.  Banks credit is an endogenous growth and a good predictor on Indonesian economy. Our estimation model explained that credit allocated by banks increases business escalation to the real sectors then promotes economic growth, decreases unemployment rate through increasing in labor demanded, increases income and then decrease poverty.  This overall transmission mechanism just occurred through presence of banks credit by increasing money supply to the real sectors, promotes growth and social welfare.   Keywords :  banks credit, economic growth, growth accelerating factor, poverty, unemployment   JEL Classification : E51, E52, E58

  6. Comment on Geoengineering with seagrasses: is credit due where credit is given?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreska, Matthew P. J.; McGlathery, Karen J.; Emmer, Igino M.; Needelman, Brian A.; Emmett-Mattox, Stephen; Crooks, Stephen; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Myers, Doug

    2018-03-01

    In their recent review, ‘Geoengineering with seagrasses: is credit due where credit is given?,’ Johannessen and Macdonald (2016) invoke the prospect of carbon offset-credit over-allocation by the Verified Carbon Standard as a pretense for their concerns about published seagrass carbon burial rate and global stock estimates. Johannessen and Macdonald (2016) suggest that projects seeking offset-credits under the Verified Carbon Standard methodology VM0033: Methodology for Tidal Wetland and Seagrass Restoration will overestimate long-term (100 yr) sediment organic carbon (SOC) storage because issues affecting carbon burial rates bias storage estimates. These issues warrant serious consideration by the seagrass research community; however, VM0033 does not refer to seagrass SOC ‘burial rates’ or ‘storage.’ Projects seeking credits under VM0033 must document greenhouse gas emission reductions over time, relative to a baseline scenario, in order to receive credits. Projects must also monitor changes in carbon pools, including SOC, to confirm that observed benefits are maintained over time. However, VM0033 allows projects to conservatively underestimate project benefits by citing default values for specific accounting parameters, including CO2 emissions reductions. We therefore acknowledge that carbon crediting methodologies such as VM0033 are sensitive to the quality of the seagrass literature, particularly when permitted default factors are based in part on seagrass burial rates. Literature-derived values should be evaluated based on the concerns raised by Johannessen and Macdonald (2016), but these issues should not lead to credit over-allocation in practice, provided VM0033 is rigorously followed. These issues may, however, affect the feasibility of particular seagrass offset projects.

  7. A Political Approach of the Popular Credit: Pierre-Joseph Proudhon and the mutual credit

    OpenAIRE

    Cyrille Ferraton; David Vallat

    2011-01-01

    Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s ideas on credit and money have been considered to be not very relevant and above all unrealistic. However, they have known an uncommon posterity. They influenced Silvio Gesell who is John Maynard Keynes’s reference. This article analyses Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s exchange bank plan. We show that Pierre- Joseph Proudhon’s ideas on credit and money are opened to criticism but require a reexamination because we can draw many lessons from them.

  8. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  9. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    of the marine nitrogen cycle and its influence on atmospheric CO 2 , in: The Ocean Carbon Cycle and Climate, edited by: Follows, M., and Oguz, T., Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, 97-148, 2004. ISBN 1402020864. Citation Naqvi, Syed. 2006. "Marine nitrogen cycle...]. nitrogen_cycle> All text is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license. Please see the Encyclopedia of Earth's website for Terms of Use information. Supported...

  10. Determination of nitrogen absorption and endogenous nitrogen secretion in the digestive tract of pigs fed with nitrogen-15-labelled dried whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, G.; Souffrant, W.; Koehler, R.; Zebrowska, T.

    1977-01-01

    Two fistulated pigs weighing between 15kg and 54kg were given experimental diets containing 15 N-labelled dried whey. The labelled experimental diets were given once only. Samples of the digesta were taken from the duodenum and terminal ileum at various intervals of time up to 48h after feeding the labelled protein feed. The digesta were separated into the four following fractions: Residue on centrifugation, proteins, peptides and free amino acids. The secretion of endogenous nitrogen in the duodenum was 12.5g/24h in pigs having a live weight of 50kg. The endogenous nitrogen was found to be relatively uniformly distributed among the four fractions. The rate of secretion of endogenous nitrogen showed a continuous decrease during 24h. The secretion of endogenous nitrogen in the terminal ileum was 54 to 60mg of nitrogen per kilogram live weight. After passage through the small intestine the greater part of the free amino acids in digesta was of exogenous origin. In the protein fraction most came from endogenous proteins. A true absorption of 17% of nitrogen was determined in the duodenum. The amount of nitrogen absorbed in the terminal part of the small intestine was, on average, 90% relative to the nitrogen intake. The true digestibility calculated with the amount of 15 N in food and faeces was 98%. (author)

  11. Developments in nitrogen generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, C.L.; Abrardo, J.M.; Himmelberger, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three process cycles for the production of nitrogen by the cryogenic separation of air are described in detail. These cycles are: (1) a waste expander cycle; (2) an air expander cycle; and (3) a cycle for producing large quantities of gaseous nitrogen. Each cycle has distinct advantages for various production ranges and delivery pressures. A dicussion of key parameters that must be considered when selecting a cycle to meet specific product requirements is presented. The importance of high plant reliability and a dependable liquid nitrogen back up system is also presented. Lastly, a discussion of plant safety dealing with the hazards of nitrogen, enriched oxygen, and hydrocarbons present in the air is reviewed

  12. Financial Credit Outcomes of IDA Participation: Longitudinal Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Birkenmaeier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Financially vulnerable families often struggle with low credit scores. Thus, improved participant credit is often a goal of asset development programs, such as the Individual Development Account (IDA program, but little is known about the long-term credit outcomes of participation. This article reports the final results of a three-year longitudinal exploratory study of credit outcomes for IDA participants. Using a convenience sample of IDA participants and non-participants (N = 164, data were analyzed using nonparametric and Chi-square for independence tests. Results indicate that participant credit scores improvements are achieved and maintained. Credit score is not a meaningful indicator of program completion, time to completion, or type of asset purchased for participants. Those who completed the IDA program within two years experienced the highest credit gains. Future research with larger samples is needed to further assess the impact of credit scores on program participation and completion.

  13. Arbitrary Deprivation of an Unregistered Credit Provider's Right to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbitrary Deprivation of an Unregistered Credit Provider's Right to Claim Restitution of Performance Rendered Opperman v Boonzaaier (24887/2010) 2012 ZAWCHC 27 (17 April 2012) and National Credit Regulator v Opperman 2013 2 SA 1 (CC)

  14. [Residual neuromuscular blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Schmartz, D

    2017-06-01

    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.

  15. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain trace amounts of both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant and residuals.

  16. Credit counseling: a substitute for consumer financial literacy?

    OpenAIRE

    Disney, Richard; Gathergood, John; Weber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Is financial literacy a substitute or complement for financial advice? In this paper we analyze the decision by consumers to seek financial advice in the form of credit counseling concerning their credit and debt. Credit counseling is an important component of the consumer credit sector for consumers facing debt problems. We combine instrumental variable approaches to account for the endogeneity of an individual’s financial situation to financial literacy, and the endogeneity of financial lit...

  17. Banks’ Performance Enhancement: A Framework for Valid Documentation of Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamat Azim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Credit is the business and recovery is the core issue of banks. Documentation of transactions is indispensible to effect complete and timely recovery of banks’ credits. The valid credit documentation, that ensures recovery, has fostering impact on the performance of banks. This research study is based on critical review of literature and aframework for the valid documentation of credits has been developed to enhance the performance of banks.

  18. Commercial Credit Value Evaluation and Illustration Analysis on Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Gong, Huaping

    Taobao website online transaction evaluation has been well accepted, but its value has not been measured. This paper quantifies the value of commercial credit of salers in bringing sale purchase on Taobao website through three aspects of data as credit score buyer to saler, number of comments and rate of bad comments. The illustration results on Taobao online transaction credit evaluation show that number of comments, credit score and rate of bad comments have significant impact on sale revenue.

  19. Improving Credit Scorecard Modeling Through Applying Text Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Ghailan; Hoda M.O. Mokhtar; Osman Hegazy

    2016-01-01

    In the credit card scoring and loans management, the prediction of the applicant’s future behavior is an important decision support tool and a key factor in reducing the risk of Loan Default. A lot of data mining and classification approaches have been developed for the credit scoring purpose. For the best of our knowledge, building a credit scorecard by analyzing the textual data in the application form has not been explored so far. This paper proposes a comprehensive credit scorecard model ...

  20. 26 CFR 1.25A-3 - Hope Scholarship Credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hope Scholarship Credit. 1.25A-3 Section 1.25A-3... Rates During A Taxable Year § 1.25A-3 Hope Scholarship Credit. (a) Amount of the credit—(1) In general. Subject to the phaseout of the education tax credit described in § 1.25A-1(c), the Hope Scholarship Credit...

  1. CREDIT MANAGEMENT MODEL WITH A GIVEN LOSS RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena G. Snegova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the credit limit model with a given loss rate. Applying this model, it is possible to increase the profitability of the bank’s product in the case of fast loans issued in the form of credit cards. Author offers a method for simulating of credit limit utilization functions. It is formulated and solved the problem of finding the optimal credit limit for the borrower.

  2. Nitrogen fertiliser replacement values for organic amendments appear to increase with N application rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijbeek, R.; Berge, ten H.F.M.; Whitmore, A.P.; Barkusky, D.; Schroder, J.J.; Ittersum, van M.K.

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply from organic amendments [such as farmyard manure (FYM), slurries or crop residues] to crops is commonly expressed in the amendment’s Nitrogen Fertiliser Replacement Value (NFRV). Values for NFRV can be determined by comparison of crop yield or N uptake in amended plots against

  3. Recycling the nutrients in residues from methane digesters of aquatic macrophytes for new biomass production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisak, M. D.; Williams, L. D.; Ryther, J. H.

    1980-04-01

    The floating freshwater macrophyte Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth) was fermented anaerobically to produce 0.4 l of biogas/g volatile solids at 60% methane with a bioconversion efficiency of 47%. Both the liquid and solid digester residues were a rich source of nutrients that were recycled to produce additional biomass. An approximate balance of the nitrogen recycled through the culture-digester-culture system indicated that nitrogen was conserved within the digester. All of the nitrogen originally added to the digester in the form of shredded water hyacinths could be found in the liquid (48%) and solid (52%) residues; 65.5% of the nitrogen in these residues could be reassimilated by cultures of water hyacinths. This study indicated the potential of bioconversion of aquatic macrophytes to methane as a possible means of both producing and conserving energy.

  4. Credit reporting, relationship banking, and loan repayment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Shirzad Kebria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to determine factors influencing on loan repayment in one of Iranian banks named Sepah Bank over the period 2012-2013. The study selects a sample of 290 bank’s customers who received loans and, using logistic regression technique, tries to find whether or not qualitative as well as quantitative characteristics of loan receivers influence on repayment of loans. The results indicate that history of outstanding debt as well as customers’ past experiences with banks had meaningful relationships with having bad credit and non-payment of loans. In our survey, having a bad credit in the past had positive relationship with non-payment of loans but long-term customers had negative relationship with non-payment of loans. In addition, working capital turnover ratio, cash ratio, total liabilities, current assets and loan value had significant impact on non-repayment of the loan facilities.

  5. Strategic interaction in undeveloped credit markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the strategic interaction between informal and formal lenders in undeveloped credit markets. In a model with adverse selection, loan seniority, market power, and differences in the cost of lending, it is shown that under general conditions a co-funding equilibrium will be a Nas...... evidence and the emerging discussion of how to best ensure financial viability and outreach of microfinance institutions......This paper studies the strategic interaction between informal and formal lenders in undeveloped credit markets. In a model with adverse selection, loan seniority, market power, and differences in the cost of lending, it is shown that under general conditions a co-funding equilibrium will be a Nash...

  6. Portfolio Allocation Subject to Credit Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio de Deus Oliveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Credit Risk is an important dimension to be considered in the risk management procedures of financial institutions. Is a particularly useful in emerging markets where default rates on bank loan products are usually high. It is usually calculated through highly costly Monte Carlo simulations which consider different stochastic factors driving the uncertainly associated to the borrowers liabilities. In this paper, under some restrictions, we drive closed form formulas for the probability distributions of default rates of bank loans products involving a big number of clients. This allows us to quickly obtain the credit risk of such products. Moreover, using these probability distributions, we solve the problem of optimal portfolio allocation under default risk.

  7. Residuation in orthomodular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajda Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that every idempotent weakly divisible residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law can be transformed into an orthomodular lattice. The converse holds if adjointness is replaced by conditional adjointness. Moreover, we show that every positive right residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law and two further simple identities can be converted into an orthomodular lattice. In this case, also the converse statement is true and the corresponence is nearly one-to-one.

  8. Credit scoring based on social network data

    OpenAIRE

    MASYUTIN A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Social networks accumulate huge amounts of information, which can provide valuable insights on people s behavior. In this paper, we use social data from Vkontakte, Russias most popular social network, to discriminate between the solvent and delinquent debtors of credit organizations. Firstly, we present the datacenter architecture for social data retrieval. It has several functions, such as client matching, user profile parsing, API communication and data storing. Secondly, we develop two cre...

  9. An overview and history of credit reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Furletti

    2002-01-01

    On April 5, 2002, the Payment Cards Center of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia held a workshop that explored the uses and evolution of credit reporting companies. Leading the workshop was a group of executives from TransUnion LLC : Tony Capaldi, Group Vice President for the Eastern Region; Dan Brackle, Vice President, Philadelphia; and Chet Wiermanski, Vice President, Analytical Services. Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, TransUnion is a leading global provider of information and de...

  10. Sport in a Credit Crunched Consumer Culture

    OpenAIRE

    John D. Horne

    2009-01-01

    This brief rapid response article suggests a few ways in which modern competitive sport and large-scale sport events have developed in line with the logic of (late) capitalist modernity. It considers the impact of the credit crunch for recent trends in sport and suggests that the sociological study of sport faces the same concerns as other sociological domains of interest during the current economic conditions whilst having its own specific public issues and private troubles to consider.

  11. Taxation of credit unions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оксана Георгіївна Волкова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of income taxation of credit unions in Ukraine by the tax on profits of enterprises and tax of revenues of their members accrued on the interest of contributions (deposits on deposit accounts and mutual funds the tax to incomes of physical persons. The consequences of the influence of tax rules on capitalization of unions and the level of their financial support is defined

  12. Continuing Education Credits | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are pleased to be able to offer continuing education credits to Registered Dietitians. Registered Dietitians This event is pending for approval by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 2 CPEUs.  Procedure  Immediately after the event, a link to a short questionnaire will be sent to you by email. Please complete the questionnaire online and print out your certificate of completion.  |

  13. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    OpenAIRE

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known I Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates it structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of compelition is derived from the estimated conjectural variation elasticity. Our empirical results show that there is no evidence of market power.

  14. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE IN CREDIT INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    IOV DANIELA RODICA

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning financial performance is one of the objectives of the annual financial statements of credit institutions. The main source containing this information is profit and loss statement. A correct and complete information can not be limited to this annual report. Understanding the concept of financial performance requires a holistic approach of the entity. An overview of information on financial performance will be achieved by coordinating information about the...

  15. Credit Market Development and Human Capital Accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Wai-Hong

    2008-01-01

    In a two period overlapping generations economy with asymmetric information, we investigate the interaction between credit market development and human capital accumulation. As is typical, young borrowers supply their endowed unit of labor time to earn wage income which is used as internal funds. In contrast to conventional setups, young lenders distribute theirs between acquiring education and working for earnings. Through identifying the risk types of borrowers by a costly screening tech...

  16. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  17. Sovereign Credit Risk, Liquidity, and European Central Bank Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelizzon, Loriana; Subrahmanyam, Marti G.; Tomio, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We examine the dynamic relation between credit risk and liquidity in the Italian sovereign bond market during the eurozone crisis and the subsequent European Central Bank (ECB) interventions. Credit risk drives the liquidity of the market. A 10% change in the credit default swap (CDS) spread lead...

  18. 32 CFR 231.7 - Procedures-domestic credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... installation's military members and civilian employees from the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA... property. (i) Criteria governing the assignment of space and construction of new space for credit unions... Federal Credit Union Act (12 U.S.C. 1770). The provision of no-cost office space for a period not to...

  19. 7 CFR 1466.36 - Environmental credits for conservation improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM General Administration § 1466.36 Environmental credits for conservation... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental credits for conservation improvements...

  20. 20 CFR 601.4 - Certification for tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification for tax credit. 601.4 Section 601.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADMINISTRATIVE... and Additional Tax Credit and Grant Purposes § 601.4 Certification for tax credit. (a) Within 30 days...

  1. 76 FR 50931 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of... relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care... plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and claim the premium tax credit, and to Exchanges that...

  2. 78 FR 7264 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains final regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit... Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the premium tax credit. DATES: Effective date: These...

  3. Analysis Of Demand For Informal And Formal Credit Among Small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of credit as an instrument of agricultural transformation cannot be overemphasized; however, several credit programme have been implemented with reported low performance due to inability of the farmers\\' enterprise to pay back both principal and cost of capital. The study therefore, investigated demand for credit ...

  4. 7 CFR 3550.160 - Refinancing with private credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and credit history. Reasonable rates and terms are those commercial rates and terms that borrowers are... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Refinancing with private credit. 3550.160 Section... Refinancing with private credit. (a) Objective. RHS direct loan programs are not intended to supplant or...

  5. Credit procurement and utilization by rural farmers from selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the procurement and utilization of credit by the rural farmers from selected rural credit institutions for sustainable agricultural production and development in Imo State, Nigeria. Two sets of structured questionnaires were administered to the 220 respondents (loan beneficiaries) and the credit institutions ...

  6. Resource Productivity And Economic Efficiency Of Farm Credit And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resource Productivity And Economic Efficiency Of Farm Credit And Non Farm Credit Users In Rivers State, Nigeria. ... Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria ... Results of data analysis showed that farm land and capital input were more productive among Farm Credit Users while labour input was more productive ...

  7. Credit Usage, Hire Purchase Costs, and Consumer Protection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyzes credit purchase practices in Gaborone, Botswana. Adopting a survey and a disguised interview technique, data was collected and analyzed on the usage rate of credit purchases. The hire purchase, which was the most popular form of credit, was examined in greater detail with respect to the costs of hire ...

  8. 75 FR 8392 - Low Income Housing Tax Credit Tenant Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... each state agency administering low-income housing tax credits (LIHTCs) to furnish HUD information... Lists the Following Information Title Of Proposal: Low Income Housing Tax Credit Tenant Database. Omb... low-income housing tax credits (LIHTCs) to furnish HUD information concerning the race, ethnicity...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1502-4 - Consolidated foreign tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consolidated foreign tax credit. 1.1502-4... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-4 Consolidated foreign tax credit. (a) In general. The credit under section 901 for taxes paid or accrued to any foreign country or...

  10. 77 FR 8127 - Foreign Tax Credit Splitting Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Tax Credit Splitting Events AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final and... affect taxpayers claiming foreign tax credits. The text of the temporary regulations also serves as the... that if there is a foreign tax credit splitting event with respect to a foreign income tax paid or...

  11. 76 FR 68841 - New Markets Tax Credit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program, which is jointly administered by the Community Development... New Markets Tax Credit Program was authorized by the Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000 (Pub. L... subsidized financing (e.g., historic tax credits, Section 108 loan guarantees) to help finance NMTC...

  12. 77 FR 8184 - Foreign Tax Credit Splitting Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Foreign Tax Credit Splitting Events AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of... these proposed regulations. The regulations affect taxpayers claiming foreign tax credits. Special... of the Federal Register.] Sec. 1.909-6 Pre-2011 foreign tax credit splitting events. [The text of...

  13. Expanding Choice: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Ross, John K.

    2009-01-01

    The evidence advanced in this report demonstrates that using tax credits to fund scholarships for students is both well-established and sound practice. Three existing credits allow taxpayer funds to flow to faith-based organizations, and one of those, the Qualified Endowment Credit, rewards contributions to more than a thousand charitable…

  14. 26 CFR 1.1502-3 - Consolidated tax credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consolidated tax credits. 1.1502-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-3 Consolidated tax credits. (a) Determination of...) Consolidated limitation based on amount of tax. (i) Notwithstanding the amount of the consolidated credit...

  15. Expanding Choice: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Ross, John K.

    2009-01-01

    One of the oldest and more popular forms of school choice in the United States is educational tax credits. Like many other types of school choice, educational tax credits enable parents to send their children to the K-12 school of their choice, public or private, religious or non-religious. One type of educational tax credits, tax-credit…

  16. The Term Structure of Credit Spreads on Euro Corporate Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landschoot, A.

    2003-01-01

    Although there is a broad literature on structural credit risk models, there has been little empirical testing of these models.In this paper we examine the term structure of credit spreads on euro corporate bonds and the empirical validation of structural credit risk models.The latter provide a

  17. 12 CFR 221.104 - Federal credit unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal credit unions. 221.104 Section 221.104... MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.104 Federal credit unions. For text of the interpretation on Federal credit unions, see 12 CFR 220.110. ...

  18. 75 FR 80678 - Conversions of Insured Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Parts 708a and 708b RIN 3133-AD84; 3133-AD85 Conversions of Insured Credit Unions AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Interim final rule with request for comments. SUMMARY...

  19. 76 FR 13504 - Conversions of Insured Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Parts 708a and 708b RIN 3133-AD84; 3133-AD85 Conversions of Insured Credit Unions AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: NCUA is confirming as final a...

  20. Sectoral Analysis Of Credit Mobilization In Ghana | Ahiawodzi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Credit developments in Ghana, have been examined, with the focus on credit mobilization (savings), sectoral allocation, and cost between 1993 to 2004. The methodology adopted for the study-involved computation of averages, ratios, percentages and elasticity of demand. The study revealed that mobilization of credit was ...