WorldWideScience

Sample records for residual mass groups

  1. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  2. Tyrosine residues modification studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santrucek, Jiri; Strohalm, Martin; Kadlcik, Vojtech; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific reactivity in proteins is of great current interest in structural biology as it provides information about solvent accessibility and reactivity of the residue and, consequently, about protein structure and possible interactions. In the work presented tyrosine residues of three model proteins with known spatial structure are modified with two tyrosine-specific reagents: tetranitromethane and iodine. Modified proteins were specifically digested by proteases and the mass of resulting peptide fragments was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that there are only small differences in the extent of tyrosine residues modification by tetranitromethane and iodine. However, data dealing with accessibility of reactive residues obtained by chemical modifications are not completely identical with those obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. These interesting discrepancies can be caused by local molecular dynamics and/or by specific chemical structure of the residues surrounding

  3. Significance of residual abdominal masses in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmazyn, B.; Horev, G.; Kornreich, L.; Ash, S.; Goshen, Y.; Yaniv, I.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma who had complete clinical remission and residual abdominal mass after treatment. Material and methods: The charts and imaging findings of all children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma treated and followed at our medical center between 1988 and 1999 were reviewed for the presence, management, clinical course, and prognosis of residual mass. Results: Only children who achieved complete clinical remission were included. The study group consisted of 33 children (20 boys and 13 girls) aged 2.6-17.6 years (mean 7.2 years). Of these, seven (20.6 %) were found to have a residual abdominal mass. Two underwent second-look operation with no evidence of viable tumor on histology. The remaining five were followed by imaging studies for 2.2-9.1 years (mean 6.1 years); none relapsed. Conclusion: Residual mass is not uncommon in children with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. The presence of residual mass in a child with complete clinical remission does not alter the long-term prognosis. Therefore, in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and residual mass with no other signs of disease activity, expectant watching may be appropriate. (orig.)

  4. Mapping the N-Z plane: residual mass regularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.G.; Frank, A.; Velazquez, V.

    2004-01-01

    A new development in the study of the deviations between experimental nuclear masses and those calculated in the framework of the Finite Range Droplet Model is introduced. Some frequencies are isolated and used in a simple fit to reduce significantly the error width. The presence of this regular residual correlations suggests that the Strutinsky method of including microscopic fluctuations in nuclear masses could be improved. (Author)

  5. Complex scaling and residual flavour symmetry in the neutrino mass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Probir Roy

    2017-10-09

    Oct 9, 2017 ... Leptonic Dirac CP violation must be maximal while atmospheric neutrino mixing need not be exactly maximal. Each of the two Majorana phases, to be probed by the search for 0νββ decay, has to be zero or π and a normal neutrino mass hierarchy is allowed. Keywords. Neutrinos; residual flavour symmetry; ...

  6. Heavy residues from very mass asymmetric heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanold, K.A.

    1994-08-01

    The isotopic production cross sections and momenta of all residues with nuclear charge (Z) greater than 39 from the reaction of 26, 40, and 50 MeV/nucleon 129 Xe + Be, C, and Al were measured. The isotopic cross sections, the momentum distribution for each isotope, and the cross section as a function of nuclear charge and momentum are presented here. The new cross sections are consistent with previous measurements of the cross sections from similar reaction systems. The shape of the cross section distribution, when considered as a function of Z and velocity, was found to be qualitatively consistent with that expected from an incomplete fusion reaction mechanism. An incomplete fusion model coupled to a statistical decay model is able to reproduce many features of these reactions: the shapes of the elemental cross section distributions, the emission velocity distributions for the intermediate mass fragments, and the Z versus velocity distributions. This model gives a less satisfactory prediction of the momentum distribution for each isotope. A very different model based on the Boltzman-Nordheim-Vlasov equation and which was also coupled to a statistical decay model reproduces many features of these reactions: the shapes of the elemental cross section distributions, the intermediate mass fragment emission velocity distributions, and the Z versus momentum distributions. Both model calculations over-estimate the average mass for each element by two mass units and underestimate the isotopic and isobaric widths of the experimental distributions. It is shown that the predicted average mass for each element can be brought into agreement with the data by small, but systematic, variation of the particle emission barriers used in the statistical model. The predicted isotopic and isobaric widths of the cross section distributions can not be brought into agreement with the experimental data using reasonable parameters for the statistical model

  7. Constraining the mass of the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The mass of the Local Group (LG) is a crucial parameter for galaxy formation theories. However, its observational determination is challenging - its mass budget is dominated by dark matter that cannot be directly observed. To meet this end, the posterior distributions of the LG and its massive constituents have been constructed by means of constrained and random cosmological simulations. Two priors are assumed - the Λ cold dark matter model that is used to set up the simulations, and an LG model that encodes the observational knowledge of the LG and is used to select LG-like objects from the simulations. The constrained simulations are designed to reproduce the local cosmography as it is imprinted on to the Cosmicflows-2 data base of velocities. Several prescriptions are used to define the LG model, focusing in particular on different recent estimates of the tangential velocity of M31. It is found that (a) different vtan choices affect the peak mass values up to a factor of 2, and change mass ratios of MM31 to MMW by up to 20 per cent; (b) constrained simulations yield more sharply peaked posterior distributions compared with the random ones; (c) LG mass estimates are found to be smaller than those found using the timing argument; (d) preferred Milky Way masses lie in the range of (0.6-0.8) × 1012 M⊙; whereas (e) MM31 is found to vary between (1.0-2.0) × 1012 M⊙, with a strong dependence on the vtan values used.

  8. On the mass of the Local Group

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Roberto E.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-01

    We use recent proper motion measurements of the tangential velocity of M31, along with its radial velocity and distance, to derive the likelihood of the sum of halo masses of the Milky Way and M31. This is done using a sample halo pairs in the Bolshoi cosmological simulation of $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology selected to match properties and environment of the Local Group. The resulting likelihood gives estimate of the sum of masses of $M_{\\rm MW,200}+M_{\\rm M31,200}=$ $2.40_{-1.05}^{+1.95}\\times10^{1...

  9. Renormalization group evolution of Dirac neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Ratz, Michael; Schmidt, Michael Andreas

    2005-01-01

    There are good reasons why neutrinos could be Majorana particles, but there exist also a number of very good reasons why neutrinos could have Dirac masses. The latter option deserves more attention and we derive therefore analytic expressions describing the renormalization group evolution of mixing angles and of the CP phase for Dirac neutrinos. Radiative corrections to leptonic mixings are in this case enhanced compared to the quark mixings because the hierarchy of neutrino masses is milder and because the mixing angles are larger. The renormalization group effects are compared to the precision of current and future neutrino experiments. We find that, in the MSSM framework, radiative corrections of the mixing angles are for large tan β comparable to the precision of future experiments

  10. Abelian groups and quadratic residues in weak arithmetic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2010), s. 262-278 ISSN 0942-5616 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019401; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : bounded arithmetic * abelian group * Fermat's little theorem * quadratic reciprocity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.361, year: 2010 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/malq.200910009/abstract;jsessionid=9F636FFACB84C025FD90C7E6880350DD.f03t03

  11. Mass-to-light ratios of nearby groups of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Materne, J

    1980-01-01

    The application of a probability density function gives the possibility of determining groups of galaxies and membership probabilities of the galaxies in a reliable unbiased way. For the five nearest groups so defined, the mean mass-to-light ratio was derived using the concept of negative energy. These groups have a mass-to- light ratio of 16 M/sub (.)//L/sub (.)/. The probability function gives also the possibility of deriving masses of groups in a direct and independent way. (22 refs).

  12. Association of body mass index with decline in residual kidney function after initiation of dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Christiane; de Mutsert, Renée; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Krediet, Raymond T.; le Cessie, Saskia; Wanner, Christoph; Dekker, Friedo W.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; Büller, H. R.; de Charro, F. T. H.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Doorenbos, C. J.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; Frenken, L. A. M.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Grave, W.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; van Buren, M.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; van der Meulen, J.; van der Sande, F. M.; van Es, A.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a risk factor for loss of kidney function in the general population, but it is unknown whether it proceeds to affect residual kidney function when patients require dialysis. Our aim was to study the effects of body mass index (BMI) on decline in kidney function and risk to

  13. Amphoteric surfactants containing ?-hydroxy ester group and an amino acid residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa, A. M. F.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of amphoteric surfactants containing α-hydroxy ester group and an amino acid residue were prepared with the addition of epoxy derivatives (which were prepared from epoxidation of alkyl methacrylate to different types of amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, serine, threonine, aspartic and anthranilic acid.The structures of the prepared compounds were confirmed by infrared spectra, proton magnetic resonance spectra, Mass spectra and elementary analysis. Surface tension, Kraft point, foaming power, critical micelle concentration emulsion and Ca++ stabilities were determined. Antimicrobial activity and biodegradability were also screened.Se prepararon una serie de tensioactivos anfóteros conteniendo un grupo alfa hidroxi éster y un residuo de aminoácido por adición de derivados epoxy (obtenidos mediante epoxidación de metacrilato de alquilo a diferentes tipos de aminoácidos (glicina, alanina, valina, isoleucina, fenilalanina, tirosina, serina, treonina y ácidos aspártico y antranílico. Las estructuras de los compuestos preparados se confirmaron por los espectros de infrarrojo, de masa, resonancia magnética nuclear de protones y análisis elemental. Se determinaron la tensión superficial, el punto de Kraft, el poder espumante, la concentración micelar crítica en emulsión y las estabilidades de Ca++. También se estudiaron la actividad antimicrobiana y la biodegradabilidad.

  14. The Higgs mass derived from the U(3) Lie group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole; Bohr, Henrik; Jensen, Mogens O Stibius

    2015-01-01

    The Higgs mass value is derived from a Hamiltonian on the Lie group U(3) where we relate strong and electroweak energy scales. The baryon states of nucleon and delta resonances originate in specific Bloch wave degrees of freedom coupled to a Higgs mechanism which also gives rise to the usual gauge...... boson masses. The derived Higgs mass is around 125 GeV. From the same Hamiltonian, we derive the relative neutron to proton mass ratio and the N and Delta mass spectra. All compare rather well with the experimental values. We predict scarce neutral flavor baryon singlets that should be visible...... in scattering cross-sections for negative pions on protons, in photoproduction on neutrons, in neutron diffraction dissociation experiments and in invariant mass spectra of protons and negative pions in B-decays. The fundamental predictions are based on just one length scale and the fine structure constant...

  15. Effects of the application of different particle sizes of mill scale (residue) in mass red ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R.; Meller, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of particle size of mill scale, residue, when added to a mass ceramic. This residue rich in iron oxide may be used as pigment in the ceramics industry. The use of pigments in ceramic products is related to the characteristics of non-toxicity, chemical stability and determination of tone. The tendency to solubilize the pigment depends on the specific surface area. The residue study was initially subjected to physical and chemical characterization and added in a proportion of 5% at a commercial ceramic white burning, with different particle sizes. Both formulations were sintered at a temperature of 950 ° C and evaluated for: loss on ignition, firing linear shrinkage, water absorption, flexural strength and difference of tone. Samples with finer particles of mill scale 0.038 μ showed higher mechanical strength values in the order of 18 MPa. (author)

  16. Detection of colorectal masses in CT colonography: application of deep residual networks for differentiating masses from normal colon anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-01

    Even though the clinical consequences of a missed colorectal cancer far outweigh those of a missed polyp, there has been little work on computer-aided detection (CADe) for colorectal masses in CT colonography (CTC). One of the problems is that it is not clear how to manually design mathematical image-based features that could be used to differentiate effectively between masses and certain types of normal colon anatomy such as ileocecal valves (ICVs). Deep learning has demonstrated ability to automatically determine effective discriminating features in many image-based problems. Recently, residual networks (ResNets) were developed to address the practical problems of constructing deep network architectures for optimizing the performance of deep learning. In this pilot study, we compared the classification performance of a conventional 2D-convolutional ResNet (2D-ResNet) with that of a volumetric 3D-convolutional ResNet (3D-ResNet) in differentiating masses from normal colon anatomy in CTC. For the development and evaluation of the ResNets, 695 volumetric images of biopsy-proven colorectal masses, ICVs, haustral folds, and rectal tubes were sampled from 196 clinical CTC cases and divided randomly into independent training, validation, and test datasets. The training set was expanded by use of volumetric data augmentation. Our preliminary results on the 140 test samples indicate that it is feasible to train a deep volumetric 3D-ResNet for performing effective image-based discriminations in CTC. The 3D-ResNet slightly outperformed the 2D-ResNet in the discrimination of masses and normal colon anatomy, but the statistical difference between their very high classification accuracies was not significant. The highest classification accuracy was obtained by combining the mass-likelihood estimates of the 2D- and 3D-ResNets, which enabled correct classification of all of the masses.

  17. Mass balance of Mars' residual south polar cap from CTX images and other data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Calvin, W.; Cantor, B.; Haberle, R.; James, P. B.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Erosion of pits in the residual south polar cap (RSPC) of Mars concurrent with deposition and fluctuating cap boundaries raises questions about the mass balance and long term stability of the cap. Determining a mass balance by measurement of a net gain or loss of atmospheric CO2 by direct pressure measurements (Haberle, R.M. et al. [2014]. Secular climate change on Mars: An update using one Mars year of MSL pressure data. American Geophysical Union (Fall). Abstract 3947), although perhaps the most direct method, has so far given ambiguous results. Estimating volume changes from imaging data faces challenges, and has previously been attempted only in isolated areas of the cap. In this study we use 6 m/pixel Context Imager (CTX) data from Mars year 31 to map all the morphologic units of the RSPC, expand the measurement record of pit erosion rates, and use high resolution images to place limits on vertical changes in the surface of the residual cap. We find the mass balance in Mars years 9-31 to be -6 to +4 km3/♂y, or roughly -0.039% to +0.026% of the mean atmospheric CO2 mass/♂y. The indeterminate sign results chiefly from uncertainty in the amounts of deposition or erosion on the upper surfaces of deposits (as opposed to scarp retreat). Erosion and net deposition in this period appear to be controlled by summertime planetary scale dust events, the largest occurring in MY 9, another, smaller one in MY 28. The rates of erosion and the deposition observed since MY 9 appear to be consistent with the types of deposits and erosional behavior found in most of the residual cap. However, small areas (100 ♂y) of depositional and/or erosional conditions different from those occurring in the period since MY 9, although these environmental differences could be subtle.

  18. Masses for the Local Group and the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yang-Shyang; White, Simon D. M.

    2008-01-01

    We use the very large Millennium Simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony to calibrate the bias and error distribution of Timing Argument estimators of the masses of the Local Group and of the Milky Way. From a large number of isolated spiral spiral pairs similar to the Milky

  19. A technique for the assessment of the masses of residual plutonium in gloveboxes using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, B.; Godward, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    A means of measuring the mass of residual plutonium in gloveboxes in the size range 1 to 10 m 3 has been developed using multiple thermoluminescent detectors. By optimising the location and the number of detectors, and by using suitable filtration, the mean response from them has been made insensitive to the distribution and the composition of the plutonium. It is possible to detect 10 g of plutonium in the largest glovebox considered. The measurement and mass estimation processes have been reduced to simple operations which can be carried out by skilled industrial staff. The routine application of the technique has been arranged to minimise disturbance to be production work going on in the gloveboxes by making unattended measurements during silent hours

  20. Residue analysis of orthosulfamuron herbicide in fatty rice using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, orthosulfamuron residues were extracted from fatty (unpolished rice and rice straw using a modified QuEChERS method and analyzed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The matrix-matched calibration was linear over the concentration ranges of 0.01–2.0 mg/kg with determination coefficient (R2 ⩾ 0.997. The recovery rates at two fortification levels (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg were satisfactory and ranged between 88.1% and 100.6%, with relative standard deviation (RSD <8%. The limit of quantitation, 0.03 mg/kg, was lower than the maximum residue limit, 0.05 mg/kg, set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in the Republic of Korea. The developed method was applied successfully to field samples harvested at 116 days and none of the samples were positive for the residue.

  1. Evaluation of the U-Pu residual mass from spent fuel assemblies with passive and active neutronic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignan, G.; Martin-Deidier, L.

    1991-01-01

    The interpretation of passive and active neutronic measurements to evaluate the U-Pu residual mass in spent fuel assemblies is presented as follows: passive neutron measurements are well correlated to the plutonium mass, active neutron measurements give information linked to the fissile mass content of the assembly ( 235 U + 239 Pu + 241 Pu) and, using the passive neutron measurement, lead to the 235 U mass content of the assemblies

  2. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Brozek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horvath, R.

    2007-01-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification

  3. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, S. [Bundeskriminalamt (BKA), Forensic Science Institute KT23, Thaerstr. 11, D - 65193 Wiesbaden (Germany); Otto, M. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TU BAF), Institute for Analytical Chemistry, Leipziger Str. 29, D - 09599 Freiberg (Germany)], E-mail: matthias.otto@chemie.tu-freiberg.de; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M. [Bundeskriminalamt (BKA), Forensic Science Institute KT23, Thaerstr. 11, D - 65193 Wiesbaden (Germany); Brozek-Mucha, Z. [Instytut Ekspertyz Sadowych (IES), Westerplatte St. 9, PL - 31-033 Krakow (Poland); Biegstraaten, J. [Nederlands Forensisch Instituut (NFI), Fysische Technologie, Laan van Ypenburg 6, NL-2497 GB Den Haag (Netherlands); Horvath, R. [Kriminalisticky a Expertizny Ustav (KEU PZ), Institute of Forensic Science, Sklabinska 1, SK - 812 72 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-09-15

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  4. Comparison of skeletal muscle mass to fat-free mass ratios among different ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T; Bemben, M G; Kondo, M; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T

    2012-01-01

    Asians seem to have less skeletal muscle mass (SMM) than other ethnic groups, but it is not clear whether relative SMM, i.e., SMM / height square or SMM to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio, differs among different ethnic groups at the same level of body mass index (BMI). To compare the SMM to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio as well as anthropometric variables and body composition among 3 ethnic groups. Three hundred thirty-nine Japanese, 343 Brazilian, and 183 German men and women were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Muscle thickness (MTH) and subcutaneous fat thickness (FTH) were measured by ultrasound at nine sites on the anterior and posterior aspects of the body. FTH was used to estimate the body density, from which fat mass and fat-free mass (FFM) was calculated by using Brozek equation. Total SMM was estimated from ultrasound-derived prediction equations. Percentage body fat was similar among the ethnic groups in men, while Brazilians were higher than Japanese in women. In German men and women, absolute SMM and FFM were higher than in their Japanese and Brazilians counterparts. SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were similar among the ethnic groups in women, excluding SMM:FFM ratio in Brazilian. In men, however, these relative values (SMM index and SMM:FFM ratio) were still higher in Germans. After adjusting for age and BMI, the SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were lower in Brazilian men and women compared with the other two ethnic groups, while the SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were similar in Japanese and German men and women, excluding SMM:FFM ratio in women. Our results suggest that relative SMM is not lower in Asian populations compared with European populations after adjusted by age and BMI.

  5. Screening and confirmation criteria for hormone residue analysis using liquid chromatography accurate mass time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Engelen, M.C. van; Zuiderent, R.; Ramaker, R.

    2007-01-01

    An emerging trend is recognised in hormone and veterinary drug residue analysis from liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) based screening and confirmation towards accurate mass alternatives such as LC coupled with time-of-flight (TOF), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance

  6. Multiclass analysis of antibiotic residues in honey by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jose Luis Martínez; Aguilera-Luiz, María Del Mar; Romero-González, Roberto; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2009-03-11

    A method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of different veterinary drug residues (macrolides, tetracyclines, quinolones, and sulfonamides) in honey. Honey samples were dissolved with Na(2)EDTA, and veterinary residues were extracted from the supernatant by solid-phase extraction (SPE), using OASIS HLB cartridges. The separation and determination was carried out by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), using an electrospay ionization source (ESI) in positive mode. Data acquisition under MS/MS was achieved by applying multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of two ion transitions per compound to provide a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The method was validated, and mean recoveries were evaluated at three concentration levels (10, 50, and 100 microg/kg), ranging from 70 to 120% except for doxycycline, erythromycin, and tylmicosin with recovery higher than 50% at the three levels assayed. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the recoveries were less than 20% within the intraday precision and less than 25% within the interday precision. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were always lower than 4 microg/kg. The developed procedure was applied to 16 honey samples, and erythromycin, sarafloxacin, and tylosin were found in a few samples.

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL TESTS USING QUARTZITE RESIDUES AS COMPONENT OF CERAMIC MASS AT THE PORCELAIN STONEWARE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Mendes Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate through technological tests the use of quartzite residues as component at the the production of porcelain stoneware. Were collected five samples of quartzites called of green quartzite, black quartzite, pink quartzite, goldy quartzite, white quartzite. After, the raw materials were milled, passed by a sieve with a Mesh of 200# (Mesh and characterized by chemical analysis in fluorescence of x-rays and also analysis of the crystalline phases by diffraction of x-rays. The porcelain tiles mass is composed of five formulations containing 57% of feldspar, 37% of clay and 6% of residues of quartzite with different coloration. For the preparation of the specimens, it was used uniaxial pressing, which afterwards were synthesized at 1150°C, 1200°C and 1250°C. After the sintering, the specimens were submit for tests of technological characterization like: water absorption, linear shrinkage, apparently porosity, density and flexural strain at three points. The results presented in the fluorescence of x-rays showed a high-content of iron oxide on black quartzite that is why it was discarded the utilization of it in porcelain stoneware. All quartzite formulations had low water absorption achieved when synthesized at 1200°C, getting 0.1 to 0.36% without having gone through the atomization process. At the tests of flexural strain, all the quartzite had in acceptance limits, according to the European norm EN 100, overcoming 27 MPA at 1200°C

  8. Thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry study of woody residues and an herbaceous biomass crop using PCA techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C.J.; Velo, E.; Puigjaner, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Avinguda Diagonal 647, G2, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Meszaros, E.; Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 17, Budapest 1525 (Hungary)

    2007-10-15

    The devolatilization behaviour of pine and beech wood from carpentry residuals and an herbaceous product from an energy plantation (artichoke thistle) was investigated by thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry (TG/MS). The effect of three pre-treatments, hot-water washing, ethanol extraction and their combination, was also studied. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to help in the evaluation of the large data set of results. The characteristics of the thermal decomposition of the herbaceous crop are considerably different from that of the woody biomass samples. The evolution profiles of some characteristic pyrolysis products revealed that the thermal behaviour of wood and thistle is still considerably different after the elimination of some of the inorganic ions and extractive compounds, although the macromolecular components of the samples decompose at similar temperatures. With the help of the PCA calculations, the effect of the different pre-treatments on the production of the main pyrolysis products was evidenced. (author)

  9. A Rare Case of an Early Postoperative Obstructive Ileus in a Young Female Patient due to a Residual Trichobezoar Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Christopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichobezoar is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, whereby a mass forms most commonly in the stomach and duodenum of young females, from ingestion of hair, a condition known as trichophagia. We present a case of recurrent small bowel obstruction due to a residual hair mass that was removed surgically in a young female patient who had a laparotomy and gastrotomy for removal of a large gastric trichobezoar just two weeks prior to the current admission. This case illustrates the importance of a thorough inspection of the whole bowel to ensure that no residual bezoars remain after surgery.

  10. Use of the extraction residue of emeralds in a formulation mass of ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, R. F.; Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A.; Dutra, R.P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Companies involved in mining and beneficiation of emerald represent an important area of industrial development in Brazil, with a significant contribution to world production of this ore. As a result, large volumes of waste generated and emerald are constantly abandoned in the environment, contributing negatively to their preservation. On the other hand the interest in the use of mining waste as an additive in production of ceramic materials has grown among researchers in recent years. The ceramic industry is constantly seeking to expand the market for the sector and trying to improve product quality and increase the variety of applications. The technology of obtaining ceramic coating that uses waste from mining is still a largely unexplored market. Thus, the purpose of this study was to characterize the waste generated from mining emerald as well as to evaluate its potential use as raw material for production melting of ceramic tiles. Ceramic mixtures were prepared from raw materials characterized by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Five compositions were prepared using the waste codes of emeralds from 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Samples were prepared by pressing, sintered at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C and characterized to establish their mineralogical composition, water absorption, linear shrinkage and modulus of rupture. The results showed that the residue of emeralds studied can be embedded in the mass of ceramic tiles up to 20% in replacement of feldspar without compromising the end product properties. (author)

  11. Predictors of viable germ cell tumor in postchemotherapeutic residual retroperitoneal masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to identify predictors of viable germ cell tumor (GCT in postchemotherapeutic residual retroperitoneal masses. Materials and Methods: The pertinent clinical and pathologic data of 16 male patients who underwent postchemotherapeutic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre between 1994 and 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. It was found that all patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced testicular GCT. Results: Out of the 16 male patients, 2 (13%, 8 (50%, and 6 (37% had viable GCT, fibrosis, and teratoma, respectively. Ten (10 of the patients with prechemotherapeutic S1 tumor markers did not have viable GCT, and two of the six patients who had prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers have viable GCT. All tumor marker levels normalized after chemotherapy even in patients with viable GCT. Four patients had vascular invasion without viable GCT. Furthermore, four patients had more than 60% embryonal elements in the original pathology, but only 1 had viable GCT at PC-RPLND. Four of the five patients with immature teratoma had teratoma at PC-RPLND but no viable GCT; however, out of the four patients with mature teratoma, one had viable GCT and two had teratoma at PC-RPLND. Of the two patients with viable GCT, one had 100% embryonal cancer in the original pathology, prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers, history of orchiopexy, and no vascular invasion; the other patient had yolk sac tumor with 25% embryonal elements and 40% teratoma in the original pathology, and prechemotherapeutic S2 tumor markers. Conclusion: None of the clinical or pathological parameters showed a strong correlation with the presence of viable GCT in PC-RPLND. However, patients with ≥S2 may be at higher risk to have viable GCT. Further studies are needed to clarify this.

  12. EPA Selects Lawrence, Mass. Group for Brownfields Job Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, EPA announced that the Merrimack Valley Workforce Investment Board, of Lawrence, Mass., was one of 14 organizations nationwide selected to receive funding to operate environmental job training programs for local unemployed residents.

  13. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  14. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg"−"1) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg"−"1. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to

  15. Residual Stress Relaxation Induced by Mass Transport Through Interface of the Pd/SrTiO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarpour S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal interconnections having a small cross-section and short length can be subjected to very large mass transport due to the passing of high current densities. As a result, nonlinear diffusion and electromigration effects which may result in device failure and electrical instabilities may be manifested. Various thicknesses of Pd were deposited over SrTiO3 substrate. Residual stress of the deposited film was evaluated by measuring the variation of d-spacing versus sin2ψ through conventional X-ray diffraction method. It has been found that the lattice misfit within film and substrate might be relaxed because of mass transport. Besides, the relation between residual intrinsic stress and oxygen diffusion through deposited film has been expressed. Consequently, appearance of oxide intermediate layer may adjust interfacial characteristics and suppress electrical conductivity by increasing electron scattering through metallic films.

  16. A Quantitative Tool to Distinguish Isobaric Leucine and Isoleucine Residues for Mass Spectrometry-Based De Novo Monoclonal Antibody Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Chloe N.; Higgs, Richard E.; You, Jinsam; Gelfanova, Valentina; Hale, John E.; Knierman, Michael D.; Siegel, Robert; Gutierrez, Jesus A.

    2014-07-01

    De novo sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the determination of the complete amino acid (AA) sequence of a given protein based on the mass difference of detected ions from MS/MS fragmentation spectra. The technique relies on obtaining specific masses that can be attributed to characteristic theoretical masses of AAs. A major limitation of de novo sequencing by MS is the inability to distinguish between the isobaric residues leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile). Incorrect identification of Ile as Leu or vice versa often results in loss of activity in recombinant antibodies. This functional ambiguity is commonly resolved with costly and time-consuming AA mutation and peptide sequencing experiments. Here, we describe a set of orthogonal biochemical protocols, which experimentally determine the identity of Ile or Leu residues in monoclonal antibodies (mAb) based on the selectivity that leucine aminopeptidase shows for n-terminal Leu residues and the cleavage preference for Leu by chymotrypsin. The resulting observations are combined with germline frequencies and incorporated into a logistic regression model, called Predictor for Xle Sites (PXleS) to provide a statistical likelihood for the identity of Leu at an ambiguous site. We demonstrate that PXleS can generate a probability for an Xle site in mAbs with 96% accuracy. The implementation of PXleS precludes the expression of several possible sequences and, therefore, reduces the overall time and resources required to go from spectra generation to a biologically active sequence for a mAb when an Ile or Leu residue is in question.

  17. Evaluation of supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for pesticide residues in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, Víctor; Galera, María Martínez; Rajski, Łukasz; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2018-04-13

    Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry has been evaluated for pesticide residues in food. In order to check its advantages and limitations it was developed a method to identify and quantify 164 pesticides in three different matrices (tomato, orange and leek). A carbon dioxide gradient with methanol (containing 1 mM ammonium formate) was used allowing a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min that made the total run time of 12 min without any problem of overpressure. Addition of a post column flow 150 μL/min of Methanol with ammonium formate/formic acid was necessary to improve the ionization. The matrix effect study revealed that the percentages of pesticides with irrelevant matrix effect (suppression lower than 20%) was 99% in tomato, 87% in orange and 62% in leek, whereas significant suppression (higher than 50%) was not found in tomato and only 1% of the compounds in orange and 3% in leek.These results compare favorably with that typically obtained in LC-MS/MS. The absence of water in the mobile phase, also provided some important advantages regarding LC-MS/MS as (i) higher retention of polar compounds in the column, which elute with high sensitivity and good peak shape and (ii) a general increase of the sensitivity of the analysis, consequence of the high ionization and ion extraction efficiency. Pesticides evaluated were identified following the SANTE/11813/2017. At the spiking concentration of 5 μg/kg, 98% of the pesticides were identified in tomato, 98% in orange and 94% in leek, whereas for the concentration of 10 μg/kg all the compounds were identified in tomato and only spiromesifen was not identified in orange and leek. At the concentration of 20 μg/kg, spiromesifen was also identified in these two matrices. The linearity and reproducibility of the method were evaluated with results which guarantee high quality in the analytical measurements. Even though only 2 μL of final extract were injected, the

  18. Development of an improved high resolution mass spectrometry based multi-residue method for veterinary drugs in various food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2011-08-26

    Multi-residue methods for veterinary drugs or pesticides in food are increasingly often based on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Previous available time of flight (TOF) technologies, showing resolutions up to 15,000 full width at half maximum (FWHM), were not sufficiently selective for monitoring low residue concentrations in difficult matrices (e.g. hormones in tissue or antibiotics in honey). The approach proposed in this paper is based on a single stage Orbitrap mass spectrometer operated at 50,000 FWHM. Extracts (liver and kidney) which were produced according to a validated multi-residue method (time of flight detection based) could not be analyzed by Orbitrap because of extensive signal suppression. This required the improvement of established extraction and clean-up procedures. The introduced, more extensive deproteinzation steps and dedicated instrumental settings successfully eliminated these detrimental suppression effects. The reported method, covering more than 100 different veterinary dugs, was validated according to the EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EEC. Validated matrices include muscle, kidney, liver, fish and honey. Significantly better performance parameters (e.g. linearity, reproducibility and detection limits) were obtained when comparing the new method with the older, TOF based method. These improvements are attributed to the higher resolution (50,000 versus 12,000 FWHM) and the superior mass stability of the of the Orbitrap over the previously utilized TOF instrument. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of pesticides and veterinary drug residues in food by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiá, Ana [Food and Environmental Safety Research Group, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Research Center on Desertification (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GV), Carretera Moncada-Náquera, Moncada (Spain); Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin [Unit of Public Health, Hygiene and Environmental Health, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Center for Advanced Research in Public Health (CSISP-FISABIO), Valencia (Spain); Picó, Yolanda, E-mail: Yolanda.Pico@uv.es [Food and Environmental Safety Research Group, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Science, Toxicology and Legal Medicine, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Research Center on Desertification (CIDE, UV-CSIC-GV), Carretera Moncada-Náquera, Moncada (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-14

    Monitoring of pesticides and veterinary drug residues is required to enforce legislation and guarantee food safety. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the prevailing technique for assessing both types of residues because LC offers a versatile and universal separation mechanism suitable for non-gas chromatography (GC) amenable and the majority of GC-amenable compounds. This characteristic becomes more relevant when LC is coupled to MS because the high sensitivity and specificity of the detector allows to apply generic sample preparation procedures, which simultaneously extract a wide variety of residues with different physico-chemical properties. Determination of metabolites and degradation products, non-target suspected screening of an increasing number of residues, and even unknowns identification are also becoming inherent LC-MS advantages thanks to the latest advances. For routine analysis and, in particular, for official surveillance purposes in food control, analytical methods properly validated following strict guidelines are needed. After a brief introduction and an outline of the legislation applicable around the world, aspects such as improvement of specificity of high-throughput methods, resolution and mass accuracy of identification strategies and quantitative accuracy are critically reviewed in this article. In them, extraction, separation and determination are emphasized. The main objective is to offer an assessment of the state of the art and identify research needs and future trends in determining pesticide and veterinary drug residues in food by LC-MS. - Highlights: • An overview of status and future trends in this field. • Analytical method's compliance with guidelines to ensure reliability. • QuEChERS platform is a referent to extract both, pesticides and veterinary drugs in food. • The progress that liquid chromatography has shown in recent years is revised. • Determination of target, non-target and unknowns is

  20. Determination of pesticides and veterinary drug residues in food by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiá, Ana; Suarez-Varela, Maria Morales; Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of pesticides and veterinary drug residues is required to enforce legislation and guarantee food safety. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the prevailing technique for assessing both types of residues because LC offers a versatile and universal separation mechanism suitable for non-gas chromatography (GC) amenable and the majority of GC-amenable compounds. This characteristic becomes more relevant when LC is coupled to MS because the high sensitivity and specificity of the detector allows to apply generic sample preparation procedures, which simultaneously extract a wide variety of residues with different physico-chemical properties. Determination of metabolites and degradation products, non-target suspected screening of an increasing number of residues, and even unknowns identification are also becoming inherent LC-MS advantages thanks to the latest advances. For routine analysis and, in particular, for official surveillance purposes in food control, analytical methods properly validated following strict guidelines are needed. After a brief introduction and an outline of the legislation applicable around the world, aspects such as improvement of specificity of high-throughput methods, resolution and mass accuracy of identification strategies and quantitative accuracy are critically reviewed in this article. In them, extraction, separation and determination are emphasized. The main objective is to offer an assessment of the state of the art and identify research needs and future trends in determining pesticide and veterinary drug residues in food by LC-MS. - Highlights: • An overview of status and future trends in this field. • Analytical method's compliance with guidelines to ensure reliability. • QuEChERS platform is a referent to extract both, pesticides and veterinary drugs in food. • The progress that liquid chromatography has shown in recent years is revised. • Determination of target, non-target and unknowns is covered.

  1. American Mass Media and the Myth of Libertarianism: Toward an "Elite Power Group" Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan-Majid, Roya; Wolf, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Presents evidence of the demise of Libertarianism in the U.S. mass media system and proposes an "elite power group" model as an alternative explanation of the working of the mass media in the United States. (MG)

  2. Multiclass methods for the analysis of antibiotic residues in milk by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Rosanna; Saluti, Giorgio; Moretti, Simone; Diamanti, Irene; Giusepponi, Danilo; Galarini, Roberta

    2018-02-01

    Milk is an important and beneficial food from a nutritional point of view, being an indispensable source of high quality proteins. Furthermore, it is a raw material for many dairy products, such as yoghurt, cheese, cream etc. Before reaching consumers, milk goes through production, processing and circulation. Each step involves potentially unsafe factors, such as chemical contamination that can affect milk quality. Antibiotics are widely used in veterinary medicine for dry cow therapy and mastitis treatment in lactating cows, which can cause the presence of antimicrobial residues in milk. In order to ensure consumers' safety, milk is analyzed to make sure that the fixed Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) for antibiotics are not exceeded. Multiclass methods can monitor more drug classes through a single analysis, so they are faster, less time-consuming and cheaper than traditional methods (single-class); this aspect is particularly important for milk, which is a highly perishable food. Nevertheless, multiclass methods for veterinary drug residues in foodstuffs are real analytical challenges. This article reviews the major multiclass methods published for the determination of antibiotic residues in milk by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, with a special focus on sample preparation approaches.

  3. Occurrence of C-Terminal Residue Exclusion in Peptide Fragmentation by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    By screening a data set of 392 synthetic peptides MS/MS spectra, we found that a known C-terminal rearrangement was unexpectedly frequently occurring from monoprotonated molecular ions in both ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry upon low and high energy collision activated dissociations with QqTOF and TOF/TOF mass analyzer configuration, respectively. Any residue localized at the C-terminal carboxylic acid end, even a basic one, was lost, provided that a basic amino acid such arginine and to a lesser extent histidine and lysine was present in the sequence leading to a fragment ion, usually depicted as (bn-1 + H2O) ion, corresponding to a shortened non-scrambled peptide chain. Far from being an epiphenomenon, such a residue exclusion from the peptide chain C-terminal extremity gave a fragment ion that was the base peak of the MS/MS spectrum in certain cases. Within the frame of the mobile proton model, the ionizing proton being sequestered onto the basic amino acid side chain, it is known that the charge directed fragmentation mechanism involved the C-terminal carboxylic acid function forming an anhydride intermediate structure. The same mechanism was also demonstrated from cationized peptides. To confirm such assessment, we have prepared some of the peptides that displayed such C-terminal residue exclusion as a C-terminal backbone amide. As expected in this peptide amide series, the production of truncated chains was completely suppressed. Besides, multiply charged molecular ions of all peptides recorded in ESI mass spectrometry did not undergo such fragmentation validating that any mobile ionizing proton will prevent such a competitive C-terminal backbone rearrangement. Among all well-known nondirect sequence fragment ions issued from non specific loss of neutral molecules (mainly H2O and NH3) and multiple backbone amide ruptures (b-type internal ions), the described C-terminal residue exclusion is highly identifiable giving raise to a single fragment ion in

  4. Detection of chloramphenicol residue in bovine meat using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiastuti R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloramphenicol (CAP is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been banned in many countries due to its serius side effect to human. Detection of CAP residue in food has been determined to a minimum required performance limit (MRPL of 0.3 ng/g. The purpose of this research was to conduct the analysis of CAP residue in bovine meat by using LCMS and to study the presence of CAP residue in marketed bovine meat samples. LC separation was done on a Shimpack column C18 with ammonium acetate 10 mM/water as mobile phase, and ESI-MS analysis in negative ion mode. The coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.9981 at concentration of 0.125, 0.25, 0.63, 1,00 and 2.00 ng/g. Recovery at three fortification levels (0.25, 0.50 and 1.00 ng/g was in the range 77.5, 97.3 and 83.4%. The decision limit and the detection capability were 0.15 ng/g and 0.17 ng/g respectively. Analysis results of 52 marketed samples showed that CAP residue were detected in 9 samples in the concentration range of 0.14 to 2.70 ng/g and 6 among those positive samples were above the MRPL value. Therefore, it is important to increase the awareness and also to monitor regularly CAP residues in food originated from animal to provide safe food for the consumers.

  5. Determination of regulatory ionophore coccidiostat residues in feedstuffs at carry-over levels by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramenga, Arianna; Colagrande, Maria Novella; Campana, Guido; Scortichini, Giampiero; Migliorati, Giacomo; Compagnone, Dario

    2017-01-01

    In this study samples of feedstuffs were collected from different feed mills and animal farms located in central Italy and analyzed for ionophore coccidiostat residues at carry-over levels by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Since unavoidable cross-contamination of feedstuffs may occur during their production as well as distribution and storage, the collection of samples covered all these different stages. Residues of lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin and maduramicin were detected in 32.4% of samples, both at production and storage level. The maximum content for unavoidable carry-over set by Regulation (EU) No 574/2011 was exceeded in 11.3% of samples. The variability of the results highlighted the different approach of each investigated feed business operator to avoid any cross-contamination in non-target feed. The method developed in this study can be able to detect ionophore coccidiostats at low concentrations consequent to carry-over. PMID:28792977

  6. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10 13 - 2 x 10 15 h -1 M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to ∼5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  7. Experimental Assessment of the Mass of Ash Residue During the Burning of Droplets of a Composite Liquid Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Zakharevich, A. V.; Strizhak, P. A.; Syrodoi, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    An experimental study has been made of the regularities of burning of single droplets of typical compositions of a composite liquid fuel during the heating by an air flow with a varied temperature (600-900 K). As the basic components of the compositions of the composite liquid fuel, use was made of the: waste of processing (filter cakes) of bituminous coals of ranks K, C, and T, waste motor, turbine, and transformer oils, process mixture of mazut and oil, heavy crude, and plasticizer. The weight fraction of a liquid combustible component (petroleum) product) ranged within 0-15%. Consideration has been given to droplets of a composite liquid fuel with dimensions (radius) of 0.5 to 2 mm. Conditions of low-temperature initiation of combustion to ensure a minimum possible mass of solid incombustible residue have been determined. Petroleum products have been singled out whose addition to the composition of the composite liquid fuel tends to increase the ash mass (compared to the corresponding composition without a liquid combustible component). Approximation dependences have been obtained which permit predicting the influence of the concentration of the liquid petroleum product as part of the composite liquid fuel on the ash-residue mass.

  8. Residue analysis of sixty pesticides in red swamp crayfish using QuEChERS with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, a multi-residue analytical method using QuEChERS extraction and dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup followed by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for rapid determination of 60 pesticide residues in whole crayfish a...

  9. Analysis of nifursol residues in turkey and chicken meat using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Martin Vahl

    2005-01-01

    on conversion of nifursol and its metabolites with an intact 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid hydrazide (DNSH) side chain to the 2-nitrophenyl analogue of nifursol (NPDNSH) by treatment with dilute hydrochloric acid and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde. Nifuroxazide (salicylic acid (5-nitrofurfurylidene) hydrazide) added......Nifursol (3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (5-nitrofurfurylidene) hydrazide) is mainly used as a feed additive for the prevention of blackhead disease in turkeys. The objective of the present work was to establish information on nifursol residues in turkey and chicken meat. The analytical method was based...

  10. Pesticide residues determination in Polish organic crops in 2007-2010 applying gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walorczyk, Stanisław; Drożdżyński, Dariusz; Kowalska, Jolanta; Remlein-Starosta, Dorota; Ziółkowski, Andrzej; Przewoźniak, Monika; Gnusowski, Bogusław

    2013-08-15

    A sensitive, accurate and reliable multiresidue method based on the application of gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) has been established for screening, identification and quantification of a large number of pesticide residues in produce. The method was accredited in compliance with PN-EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard and it was operated under flexible scope as PB-11 method. The flexible scope of accreditation allowed for minor modifications and extension of the analytical scope while using the same analytical technique. During the years 2007-2010, the method was used for the purpose of verification of organic crop production by multiresidue analysis for the presence of pesticides. A total of 528 samples of differing matrices such as fruits, vegetables, cereals, plant leaves and other green parts were analysed, of which 4.4% samples contained pesticide residues above the threshold value of 0.01 mg/kg. A total of 20 different pesticide residues were determined in the samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Renormalization Group Invariance of the Pole Mass in the Multi-Higgs System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chungku

    2018-06-01

    We have investigated the renormalization group running of the pole mass in the multi-Higgs theory in two different types of gauge fixing conditions. The pole mass, when expressed in terms of the Lagrangian parameters, turns out to be invariant under the renormalization group with the beta and gamma functions of the symmetric phase.

  12. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  13. Analysis of glyphosate residues in cereals using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Johannesen, S.; Gabrielsen, Martin Vahl

    2003-01-01

    A fast and specific method for the determination of glyphosate in cereals is described. The method is based on extraction with water by ultrasonication. The samples are cleaned up and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on a polystyrene-based reverse-phase column (clean-up) in ser......A fast and specific method for the determination of glyphosate in cereals is described. The method is based on extraction with water by ultrasonication. The samples are cleaned up and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on a polystyrene-based reverse-phase column (clean...... monitored m/z 168--> 150 (glyphosate) and 170-->152 (internal standard 2- 13 (CN)-N-15-glyphosate) for quantification. The mean recovery was 85% ( n =32) at spiking levels from 0.03 to 0.33 mg kg(-1) . From 1998 to 2001, from the analysis of about 50 samples per annum, a reduction in the glyphosate residues...... was observed owing to a Danish trade decision not to use grain with glyphosate residues for milling or bread production....

  14. HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ARE CORRELATED WITH HOST GALAXY MASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Burke, David L.; Hicken, Malcolm; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    From Sloan Digital Sky Survey u'g'r'i'z' imaging, we estimate the stellar masses of the host galaxies of 70 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia, 0.015 10.8 M sun in a cosmology fit yields 1 + w = 0.22 +0.152 -0.108 , while a combination where the 30 nearby SNe instead have host masses greater than 10 10.8 M sun yields 1 + w = -0.03 +0.217 -0.143 . Progenitor metallicity, stellar population age, and dust extinction correlate with galaxy mass and may be responsible for these systematic effects. Host galaxy measurements will yield improved distances to SNe Ia.

  15. The masses of local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The death of the universal mass profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Arimoto, Nobuo; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile cannot be found to fit all of the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured solely for the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant with that of the Andromeda dSphs (at just beyond the 1σ level), where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (≳ 600 pc) and low-velocity dispersions (σ v < 5 km s –1 ), are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.

  16. The masses of local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The death of the universal mass profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Rise, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Rich, R. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ibata, Rodrigo A. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000, Strasbourg (France); Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Peñarrubia, Jorge [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Arimoto, Nobuo [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Casey, Caitlin M. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Koch, Andreas [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Königstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, British Columbia, Victoria V9E 2E7 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile cannot be found to fit all of the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured solely for the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant with that of the Andromeda dSphs (at just beyond the 1σ level), where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (≳ 600 pc) and low-velocity dispersions (σ {sub v} < 5 km s{sup –1}), are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.

  17. Screening for estrogen residues in calf urine: Comparison of a validated yeast estrogen bioassay and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Heskamp, H.H.; Lasaroms, J.J.P.; Sanders, M.B.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Groot, M.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    Within the European Union, the control for residues of illegal hormones in food-producing animals is based on urine analysis for a few target analytes using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and/or liquid chromatography¿tandem mass spectrometry. Recently, we developed a robust yeast bioassay

  18. Correlation between the Total Gravitating Mass of Groups and Clusters and the Supermassive Black Hole Mass of Brightest Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdán, Ákos; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2018-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) residing in the brightest cluster galaxies are over-massive relative to the stellar bulge mass or central stellar velocity dispersion of their host galaxies. As BHs residing at the bottom of the galaxy cluster’s potential well may undergo physical processes that are driven by the large-scale characteristics of the galaxy clusters, it is possible that the growth of these BHs is (indirectly) governed by the properties of their host clusters. In this work, we explore the connection between the mass of BHs residing in the brightest group/cluster galaxies (BGGs/BCGs) and the virial temperature, and hence total gravitating mass, of galaxy groups/clusters. To this end, we investigate a sample of 17 BGGs/BCGs with dynamical BH mass measurements and utilize XMM-Newton X-ray observations to measure the virial temperatures and infer the {M}500 mass of the galaxy groups/clusters. We find that the {M}{BH}{--}{kT} relation is significantly tighter and exhibits smaller scatter than the {M}{BH}{--}{M}{bulge} relations. The best-fitting power-law relations are {{log}}10({M}{BH}/{10}9 {M}ȯ )=0.20+1.74{{log}}10({kT}/1 {keV}) and {{log}}10({M}{BH}/{10}9 {M}ȯ ) = -0.80+1.72{{log}}10({M}{bulge}/{10}11 {M}ȯ ). Thus, the BH mass of BGGs/BCGs may be set by physical processes that are governed by the properties of the host galaxy group/cluster. These results are confronted with the Horizon-AGN simulation, which reproduces the observed relations well, albeit the simulated relations exhibit notably smaller scatter.

  19. Residue Modification and Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Structural and Metalation Properties of Metallothionein and Cysteine-Rich Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Irvine

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural information regarding metallothioneins (MTs has been hard to come by due to its highly dynamic nature in the absence of metal-thiolate cluster formation and crystallization difficulties. Thus, typical spectroscopic methods for structural determination are limited in their usefulness when applied to MTs. Mass spectrometric methods have revolutionized our understanding of protein dynamics, structure, and folding. Recently, advances have been made in residue modification mass spectrometry in order to probe the hard-to-characterize structure of apo- and partially metalated MTs. By using different cysteine specific alkylation reagents, time dependent electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, and step-wise “snapshot” ESI-MS, we are beginning to understand the dynamics of the conformers of apo-MT and related species. In this review we highlight recent papers that use these and similar techniques for structure elucidation and attempt to explain in a concise manner the data interpretations of these complex methods. We expect increasing resolution in our picture of the structural conformations of metal-free MTs as these techniques are more widely adopted and combined with other promising tools for structural elucidation.

  20. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin....... The deuterium labeling pattern of beta2-microglobulin is retained in the gaseous fragment ions by employing mild declustering conditions for electrospray ionization. A recently developed model peptide is used to arrive at such ion source declustering conditions that prevent the occurrence of intramolecular gas...

  1. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  2. High-throughput untargeted screening of veterinary drug residues and metabolites in tilapia using high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Chu, Xiaogang; Chang, James; Wang, Perry G; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-08

    An analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of one hundred and thirty-seven veterinary drug residues and metabolites from sixteen different classes in tilapia utilizing an improved fully non-targeted way of data acquisition with fragmentation. The automated on-line extraction procedure was achieved in a simple disposable pipet extraction. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC Q-Orbitrap) was used for the separation and detection of all the analytes. The methodology was validated by taking into consideration the guidelines specified in European SANCO/12571/2013 Guideline 2013 and Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The extraction recoveries ranged from 81% to 111%. The limits of decision ranged from 0.01 to 2.73 μg kg -1 and the detection capabilities ranged from 0.01 to 4.73 μg kg -1 . The one hundred and thirty-seven compounds behave dynamic 0.1-500 μg kg -1 , with correlation coefficient >0.99. The fully non-targeted data acquisition way improves both sensitivity and selectivity for the fragments, which is beneficial for screening performance and identification capability. This validated method has been successfully applied on screening of veterinary drug residues and metabolites in muscle of tilapia, an important and intensively produced fish in aquaculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. THE LOWEST-MASS MEMBER OF THE β PICTORIS MOVING GROUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2010-01-01

    We present spectral and kinematic evidence that 2MASS J06085283-2753583 (M8.5γ) is a member of the β Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG, age ∼12 Myr), making it the latest-type known member of this young, nearby association. We confirm low-gravity spectral morphology at both medium and high resolutions in the near-infrared. We present new radial velocity and proper motion measurements, and use these to calculate galactic location and space motion consistent with other high-probability members of the BPMG. The predicted mass range consistent with the object's effective temperature, surface gravity, spectral type, and age is 15-35 M Jup , placing 2MASS 0608-27 well within the brown dwarf mass regime. 2MASS J06085283-2753583 is thus confidently added to the short list of very low mass, intermediate age benchmark objects that inform ongoing searches for the lowest-mass members of nearby young associations.

  4. Mass Media Campaign Improves Cervical Screening across All Socio-Economic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jenny O.; Mullins, Robyn M.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Spittal, Matthew J.; Wakefield, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Low socio-economic status (SES) has been associated with lower cervical screening rates. Mass media is one known strategy that can increase cervical screening participation. This study sought to determine whether a mass media campaign conducted in Victoria, Australia, in 2005 was effective in encouraging women across all SES groups to screen. Data…

  5. Determination of cyanuric acid residues in catfish, trout, tilapia, salmon and shrimp by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karbiwnyk, Christine M.; Andersen, Wendy C.; Turnipseed, Sherri B.; Storey, Joseph M.; Madson, Mark R.; Miller, Keith E.; Gieseker, Charles M.; Miller, Ron A.; Rummel, Nathan G.; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2009-01-01

    In May 2007, investigators discovered that waste material from the pet food manufacturing process contaminated with melamine (MEL) and/or cyanuric acid (CYA) had been added to hog and chicken feeds. At this time, investigators also learned that adulterated wheat gluten had been used in the manufacture of aquaculture feeds. Concern that the contaminated feed had been used in aquaculture and could enter the human food supply prompted the development of a method for the determination of CYA residues in the edible tissues of fish and shrimp. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed as a sensitive technique for the analysis of CYA in catfish, tilapia, salmon, trout and shrimp tissue. CYA was extracted from ground fish or shrimp with an acetic acid solution, defatted with hexane, and isolated with a graphitic carbon black solid-phase extraction column. Residues were separated from matrix components using a porous graphitic carbon LC column, and then analyzed with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Selective reaction monitoring was performed on the [M-H] - m/z 128 ion resulting in the product ions m/z 85 and 42. Recoveries from catfish, tilapia and trout fortified with 10-100 μg kg -1 of CYA averaged 67% with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 18% (n = 107). The average method detection limit (MDL) for catfish, tilapia and trout is 3.5 μg kg -1 . An internal standard, 13 C 3 -labeled CYA, was used in the salmon and shrimp extractions. Average recovery of CYA from salmon was 91% (R.S.D. = 15%, n = 18) with an MDL of 7.4 μg kg -1 . Average recovery of CYA from shrimp was 85% (R.S.D. = 10%, n = 13) with an MDL of 3.5 μg kg -1

  6. Use of liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate pesticide residues in fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalt, Susana; Pozo, Oscar J; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the potential of coupling liquid chromatography with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF) for the determination of pesticides in a variety of fruit samples (orange peel and flesh, banana skin and flesh, strawberry and pear) has been explored. The quantitative application at residue levels has been proven for two insecticides (buprofezin and hexythiazox), which were satisfactorily determined at three concentration levels, 0.1, 1, and 5 mg/kg, obtaining a suitable linearity range (correlation coefficient>0.99) of more than 2 orders of magnitude. Satisfactory recoveries have been obtained for both compounds at the three levels tested in all sample matrices, with lowest calibration levels (LCL) of 0.075 and 0.01 mg/kg. The excellent potential of QTOF for identification purposes is illustrated by the high number of identification points (IPs) earned, up to 21, at the highest concentration of 5 mg/kg, or between 11 and 21 at the 0.1 and 1 mg/kg levels. The application of LC-QTOF MS to real samples revealed the presence of several positives at concentrations close to the LCL, all of which were confirmed with more than 11 IPs. The potential of QTOF for elucidation of nontarget analytes has also been demonstrated by the finding of one transformation product (TP) of buprofezin in a banana skin sample. This TP was identified by obtaining the full scan product ion spectra at different collision energies with acceptable accurate mass deviation. The work performed in this paper illustrates the suitability and excellent confirmatory potential of LC-QTOF MS for pesticides residues analysis in food samples.

  7. STELLAR AND TOTAL BARYON MASS FRACTIONS IN GROUPS AND CLUSTERS SINCE REDSHIFT 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giodini, S.; Pierini, D.; Finoguenov, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Boehringer, H.; Leauthaud, A.; Guzzo, L.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Capak, P.; Elvis, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Salvato, M.; McCracken, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate if the discrepancy between estimates of the total baryon mass fraction obtained from observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and of galaxy groups/clusters persists when a large sample of groups is considered. To this purpose, 91 candidate X-ray groups/poor clusters at redshift 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 1 are selected from the COSMOS 2 deg 2 survey, based only on their X-ray luminosity and extent. This sample is complemented by 27 nearby clusters with a robust, analogous determination of the total and stellar mass inside R 500 . The total sample of 118 groups and clusters with z ≤ 1 spans a range in M 500 of ∼10 13 -10 15 M sun . We find that the stellar mass fraction associated with galaxies at R 500 decreases with increasing total mass as M -0.37±0.04 500 , independent of redshift. Estimating the total gas mass fraction from a recently derived, high-quality scaling relation, the total baryon mass fraction (f stars+gas 500 = f stars 500 + f gas 500 ) is found to increase by ∼25%, when M 500 increases from (M) = 5 x 10 13 M sun to (M) = 7 x 10 14 M sun . After consideration of a plausible contribution due to intracluster light (11%-22% of the total stellar mass) and gas depletion through the hierarchical assembly process (10% of the gas mass), the estimated values of the total baryon mass fraction are still lower than the latest CMB measure of the same quantity (WMAP5), at a significance level of 3.3σ for groups of (M) = 5 x 10 13 M sun . The discrepancy decreases toward higher total masses, such that it is 1σ at (M) = 7 x 10 14 M sun . We discuss this result in terms of nongravitational processes such as feedback and filamentary heating.

  8. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2–4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods. - Highlights: • A TXRF method for PGM catalyst residue determination in API samples is presented. • Analysis can be performed using 10 μL of the internal standardized dissolved API. • The method is rapid, simple and suitable according to the USP requirements

  9. New tendencies in isotopic analysis of pesticide residues from wines by mass spectrometry in concordance with the European standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costinel, Diana; Lazar, Roxana Elena; Vremera, Raluca; Irimescu, Rodica; Saros-Rogobete, Gili

    2006-01-01

    Multi-isotope analysis, the determination of isotope ratios by mass spectrometry or magnetic resonance spectroscopy, becomes increasingly used in the food industry and by national food control laboratories as a method of authenticating both raw materials and finished products. These highly sophisticated techniques are capable of determining the botanical and geographical origin of a wide variety of foodstuffs, thus providing a means of detecting product adulteration and controlling mislabelling practices which are virtually impossible to circumvent. The European Union has officially adopted the used of isotope analysis as a means of controlling sugar addition in wines. Its successful implementation in the wine-producing Member States has considerably reduced the financial losses which the Community had incurred due to over - capitalisation. Coupling mass spectrometer with gas chromatograph is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of traces of pesticides from food. The presence of pesticides in foods is harmful for the nervous system, the cardiovascular apparatus and decreases the immunity of human body. In addition, ensuring the foods quality and safety is a requirement, which must be fulfilled for the integration in EU. The subject of this paper is the presentation of the tests results of the isotopic analysis for pesticide residues in wines, in concordance with European Standard. (authors)

  10. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  11. Pesticide residues in fruit samples: comparison of different QuEChERS methods using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christia, C; Bizani, E; Christophoridis, C; Fytianos, K

    2015-09-01

    Acetate- and citrate-buffered quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe (QuEChERS) pretreatment methods were evaluated for the determination of various pesticides in peaches, grapes, apples, bananas, pears, and strawberries from various regions of Greece, using LC-MS/MS. The purposes of this study were (i) to evaluate which type of QuEChERS method was the most appropriate and effective for each matrix; (ii) to apply the selected QuEChERS method for each matrix, in order to detect and quantify pesticide residues in various fruit samples using UPLC-MS/MS; (iii) to examine the concentration distribution of pesticide classes among fruit originating from various areas; and (iv) to assess pesticide concentration distribution between peel and flesh of fruit in order to evaluate the penetration of pesticide residues in the fruit flesh. Acetate-buffered QuEChERS was found to be the most suitable technique for most of the fruit matrices. According to the recovery values at two different concentration levels, peaches should preferably be treated by the citrate-buffered type, whereas grapes, bananas, apples, pears, and strawberries are best treated by the acetate-buffered version, although the differences in efficiency were small. The addition of graphitized carbon black significantly decreases the recovery of specific pesticides in all matrices except for strawberries. The majority of values do not exceed the official maximum residue levels set by the European Commission. Organophosphates proved to be the most commonly detected category along with triazines-triazoles-conazoles group and by carbamates. Apples and pears seem to be the most contaminated fruit matrices among those tested. Distribution of pesticide classes shows variations between different regions, suggesting different pesticide application practices. In the case of peaches and pears, there is an equal distribution of detected pesticides between peel and flesh, indicating penetration of contaminants into the

  12. Practical application of in silico fragmentation based residue screening with ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathry; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-07-15

    A screening concept for residues in complex matrices based on liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IMS-HRMS is presented. The comprehensive four-dimensional data (chromatographic retention time, drift time, mass-to-charge and ion abundance) obtained in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode was used for data mining. An in silico fragmenter utilizing a molecular structure database was used for suspect screening, instead of targeted screening with reference substances. The utilized data-independent acquisition mode relies on the MS E concept; where two constantly alternating HRMS scans (low and high fragmentation energy) are acquired. Peak deconvolution and drift time alignment of ions from the low (precursor ion) and high (product ion) energy scan result in relatively clean product ion spectra. A bond dissociation in silico fragmenter (MassFragment) supplied with mol files of compounds of interest was used to explain the observed product ions of each extracted candidate component (chromatographic peak). Two complex matrices (fish and bovine liver extract) were fortified with 98 veterinary drugs. Out of 98 screened compounds 94 could be detected with the in silico based screening approach. The high correlation among drift time and m/z value of equally charged ions was utilized for an orthogonal filtration (ranking). Such an orthogonal ion mobility based filter removes multiply charged ions (e.g. peptides and proteins from the matrix) as well as noise and artefacts. Most significantly, this filtration dramatically reduces false positive findings but hardly increases false negative findings. The proposed screening approach may offer new possibilities for applications where reference compounds are hardly or not at all commercially available. Such areas may be the analysis of metabolites of drugs, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, marine toxins, derivatives of sildenafil or novel designer drugs (new psychoactive substances

  13. Determination of pesticide residues in animal origin baby foods by gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Graziella; Pelosi, Patrizia; Attard Barbini, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    A simple, fast and multiresidue method for the determination of pesticide residues in baby foods of animal origin has been developed in order to check the compliance with the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) set at a general value of 0.01 mg/kg by Commission Directive 2006/125/EC for infant foods. The main classes of organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyrethroid compounds have been considered, which are mainly fat soluble pesticides. The analytical procedure consists in the extraction of baby food samples by acetonitrile (ACN) followed by a clean up using C18 solid-phase extraction column eluted with ACN. The compounds were determined by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry equipped with a Programmed Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injection and a backflush system. In order to compensate for matrix effects PTV and matrix matched standard calibrations have been used. The method has been fully validated for 57 pesticides according to the Document SANCO/12571/2013. Accuracy and precision (repeatability) have been studied by recoveries at two spiking levels, the Limit of Quantitation (LOQ) (0.003-0.008 mg/kg) and 10 time greater (0.03-0.08 mg/kg), and the results were in the acceptable range of 70-120% with Relative Standards Deviations (RSD) ≤20%. Selectivity, linearity, LOQ and uncertainty of measurement were also determined for all the compounds. The method has been also applied for the analysis of 18 baby food animal origin samples, bought form the local market in Rome (Italy), and no pesticide in the scope of the method has been found above the MRL or the LOQ.

  14. [Determination of 250 pesticide residues in vegetables using QuEChERS-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhi; Wang, Quanlin; Cao, Lili; Li, Yu; Shen, Hao; Shen, Jian; Zhang, Shufen; Man, Zhengyin

    2016-02-01

    A multiresidue analytical method for the determination of 250 pesticide residues in vegetables was developed by using QuEChERS-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The target compounds were extracted with acetonitrile containing 1% (v/v) acetic acid, purified by a mixed sorbent of MgSO4, primary secondary amine (PSA), graphitized carbon black (GCB) and C18, separated on a Waters ACQUITY™ UPLC BEH C18 column (100 mm x 2. 1 mm, 1.7 µm) and detected by UPLC-MS/MS. Anhydrous magnesium sulfate was used as a dewatering agent. The effects of the amounts of MgSO4, PSA, GCB and C18 added on the recoveries of 250 pesticides were investigated. The results showed that the purification effect was best when 300 mg MgSO4, 200 mg PSA, 10 mg GCB and 100 mg C18 in 2 mL of the extract were added. For the 250 pesticide residues, the limits of detection (LODs) of the method were from 0. 01 to 50. 00 g/kg. The recoveries obtained ranged from 60. 1% to 120% at three spiked levels in Chinese chives with the relative standard deviations between 3. 5% and 19. 5% using matrix matched external standard method. The results showed that the method is able to meet requirements of the multiresidue detection of the 250 pesticides in vegetable. The method has the advantages of rapidity, simplicity, high sensitivity and better purification effect. It is suitable for the rapid determination of the common pesticides in vegetables, and it provides a strong guarantee for the risk assessments of the quality and safety of vegetables.

  15. Recovery of Silver Using Adsorption Gels Prepared from Microalgal Residue Immobilized with Functional Groups Containing Sulfur or Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Khunathai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although biodiesel oil extracted from microalgae attracts much attention as one of the most promising green energies, its high production cost is a big problem, impeding its extensive use. In order to lower the production cost, the effective use of microalgal residue after extracting biofuel was investigated as a feed material of functional materials. In the present work, a new adsorbent for silver(I was prepared by immobilizing functional groups of polyethylene-polyamine or dithiooxamide, which exhibita high affinity for soft Lewis acids such as silver(I ions. Their adsorption behaviors for silver(I were investigated from aqueous nitrate and acidothiourea media. The effects of the concentrations of nitrate and thiourea, as well as of sulfuric acid, were qualitatively interpreted. From the study of adsorption isotherms on these gels, they were found to exhibita higher adsorption capacity than the majority of those reported to date.

  16. Density-body mass relationships: Inconsistent intercontinental patterns among termite feeding-groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsjö, Cecilia A. L.; Parr, Catherine L.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Meir, Patrick; Rahman, Homathevi; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Allometric relationships are useful for estimating and understanding resource distribution in assemblages with species of different masses. Damuth's law states that body mass scales with population density as M-0.75, where M is body mass and -0.75 is the slope. In this study we used Damuth's law (M-0.75) as a null hypothesis to examine the relationship between body mass and population density for termite feeding-groups in three different countries and regions (Cameroon, West Africa; Peru South America; and Malaysia SE Asia). We found that none of the feeding-groups had a relationship where M-0.75 while the data suggested that population density-body mass relationships for true soil-feeding termites in Cameroon (M2.7) and wood-feeding termites in Peru (M1.5) were significantly different from the expected values given by Damuth's law. The dominance of large-bodied true soil-feeding termites in Cameroon and the absence of fungus-growing termites from Peru suggest that these allometric patterns are due to heterogeneities in termite biogeographical evolution. Additionally, as these feeding-groups have higher population density than expected by their body masses it may be suggested that they also have a higher energy throughput than expected. The results presented here may be used to gain further understanding of resource distribution among termite feeding-groups across regions and an insight into the importance of evolutionary history and biogeography on allometric patterns. Further understanding of population density-body mass relationships in termite feeding-groups may also improve understanding of the role these feeding-groups play in ecosystem processes in different regions.

  17. Radiological conditions in areas of Kuwait with residues of depleted uranium. Report by an international group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    radiological assessment of compliance with international radiation protection criteria and standards for areas with residues of DU munitions that has been carried out under the auspices of the IAEA. The IAEA assembled an international team of senior experts, including a representative of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The team was led by R.H. Clarke, Chairman of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.The experts visited Kuwait in September 2001 to assess the sites identified by the Government of Kuwait and to evaluate the available information. The 11 locations selected for the investigation included sites of military action during the Gulf War in which DU munitions were used, sites where DU residues still exist and areas where concern has been expressed about the possible contamination of water and foodstuffs with DU. In February 2002 a mission was conducted to collect samples at the identified sites.The sampling team included scientists from the IAEA Secretariat and from the Spiez Laboratory in Switzerland, representing the UNEP, together with experts from the laboratory of the Radiation Protection Department of the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. Around 200 environmental samples, including soil, water and vegetation, were collected during the campaign and subsequently analysed. The international team of experts prepared a report describing the findings of the measurement programme and the subsequent assessment performed by the team. This report provides a detailed description of the IAEA's investigation of the radiological conditions in Kuwait in relation to residues of DU, the results of the radiological assessment, the overall and site specific findings and conclusions of the assessment, and the recommendations of the expert group. On the basis of the measurements carried out at the sites investigated in the IAEA's study and summarized in this report, DU does not pose a radiological hazard to the population of Kuwait. No persons who might

  18. THE STELLAR MASS–HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOW-MASS X-RAY GROUPS AT 0.5< z< 1 IN THE CDFS WITH CSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Mulchaey, John S.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Since z∼1, the stellar mass density locked in low-mass groups and clusters has grown by a factor of ∼8. Here, we make the first statistical measurements of the stellar mass content of low-mass X-ray groups at 0.5mass scales for wide-field optical and infrared surveys. Groups are selected from combined Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations in the Chandra Deep Field South. These ultra-deep observations allow us to identify bona fide low-mass groups at high redshift and enable measurements of their total halo masses. We compute aggregate stellar masses for these halos using galaxies from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) spectroscopic redshift survey. Stars comprise ∼3%–4% of the total mass of group halos with masses 10 12.8 mass of Fornax and one-fiftieth the mass of Virgo). Complementing our sample with higher mass halos at these redshifts, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass ratio decreases toward higher halo masses, consistent with other work in the local and high redshift universe. The observed scatter about the stellar–halo mass relation is σ∼0.25 dex, which is relatively small and suggests that total group stellar mass can serve as a rough proxy for halo mass. We find no evidence for any significant evolution in the stellar–halo mass relation since z≲1. Quantifying the stellar content in groups since this epoch is critical given that hierarchical assembly leads to such halos growing in number density and hosting increasing shares of quiescent galaxies

  19. Determination of cyanuric acid residues in catfish, trout, tilapia, salmon and shrimp by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karbiwnyk, Christine M. [Animal Drugs Research Center, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, P.O. Box 25087, Denver, CO 80225-0087 (United States)], E-mail: christine.karbiwnyk@fda.hhs.gov; Andersen, Wendy C.; Turnipseed, Sherri B. [Animal Drugs Research Center, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, P.O. Box 25087, Denver, CO 80225-0087 (United States); Storey, Joseph M.; Madson, Mark R. [Denver District Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, P.O. Box 25087, Denver, CO 80225-0087 (United States); Miller, Keith E. [Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 8401 Muirkirk Road, Laurel, MD 20708 (United States); Gieseker, Charles M.; Miller, Ron A.; Rummel, Nathan G.; Reimschuessel, Renate [University of Denver, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Denver, CO 80208 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    In May 2007, investigators discovered that waste material from the pet food manufacturing process contaminated with melamine (MEL) and/or cyanuric acid (CYA) had been added to hog and chicken feeds. At this time, investigators also learned that adulterated wheat gluten had been used in the manufacture of aquaculture feeds. Concern that the contaminated feed had been used in aquaculture and could enter the human food supply prompted the development of a method for the determination of CYA residues in the edible tissues of fish and shrimp. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed as a sensitive technique for the analysis of CYA in catfish, tilapia, salmon, trout and shrimp tissue. CYA was extracted from ground fish or shrimp with an acetic acid solution, defatted with hexane, and isolated with a graphitic carbon black solid-phase extraction column. Residues were separated from matrix components using a porous graphitic carbon LC column, and then analyzed with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Selective reaction monitoring was performed on the [M-H]{sup -}m/z 128 ion resulting in the product ions m/z 85 and 42. Recoveries from catfish, tilapia and trout fortified with 10-100 {mu}g kg{sup -1} of CYA averaged 67% with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 18% (n = 107). The average method detection limit (MDL) for catfish, tilapia and trout is 3.5 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. An internal standard, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-labeled CYA, was used in the salmon and shrimp extractions. Average recovery of CYA from salmon was 91% (R.S.D. = 15%, n = 18) with an MDL of 7.4 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. Average recovery of CYA from shrimp was 85% (R.S.D. = 10%, n = 13) with an MDL of 3.5 {mu}g kg{sup -1}.

  20. Matrix effect in analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoralov A.M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For modern food safety control are using techniques that allow to determinate a large number of components. So for determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables commonly used methods of gas and liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass-spectrometric detection. This system allows to carry out quantitative determination several hundreds of pesticides and their identification by the characteristic fragments of the mass spectrum. The main problem when using mass spectrometric detection is a matrix effect, which is caused by the influence of matrix components extracted with pesticides from the sample. In this work, attempts have been made to reduce the influence of the matrix in the analysis of pesticide residues by high performance liquid chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC / TOFMS.

  1. Mass of the Local Group from Proper Motions of Distant Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Roeland

    2010-09-01

    The Local Group and its two dominant spirals, the Milky Way and M31, have become the benchmark for testing many aspects of cosmological and galaxy formation theories, due to many exciting new discoveries in the past decade. However, it is difficult to put results in a proper cosmological context, because our knowledge of the mass M of the Local Group remains uncertain by a factor 4. In units of 10^{12} solar masses, a spherical infall model for the zero-velocity surface gives M 1.3; the sum of estimates for the Milky Way and M31 masses gives M 2.6; and the Local Group Timing argument for the M31 orbit gives M 5.6. It is possible to discriminate between the proposed masses by calculating the orbits of galaxies at the edge of the Local Group, which requires knowledge of transverse velocity components. We therefore propose to use ACS/WFC to determine the proper motions of the 4 dwarf galaxies near the edge of the Local Group {Cetus, Leo A, Tucana, Sag DIG} for which deep first epoch data {with 5-7 year time baselines} already exist in the HST Archive. Our team has extensive expertise with HST astrometric science, and our past/ongoing work for, e.g., Omega Cen, LMC/SMC and M31 show that the necessary astrometric accuracy is within the reach of HST's demonstrated capabilities. We have developed, tested, and published a new technique that uses compact background galaxies as astrometric reference sources, and we have already reduced the first epoch data. The final predicted transverse velocity accuracy, 36 km/s when averaged over the sample, will be sufficient to discriminate between each of the proposed Local Group masses at 2-sigma significance {4-sigma between the most extreme values}. Our project will yield the most accurate Local Group mass determination to date, and only HST can achieve the required accuracy.

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1...

  3. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the following... type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1% xylene...

  4. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  5. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1...

  7. New Beta-delayed Neutron Measurements in the Light-mass Fission Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agramunt, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Univ. Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); García, A.R. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Algora, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Univ. Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Äystö, J. [University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskyä (Finland); Caballero-Folch, R.; Calviño, F. [Secció d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Cano-Ott, D. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cortés, G. [Secció d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Univ. Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Eronen, T. [University of Jyväskylä, FI-40014 Jyväskyä (Finland); Gelletly, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gómez-Hornillos, M.B. [Secció d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2014-06-15

    A new accurate determination of beta-delayed neutron emission probabilities from nuclei in the low mass region of the light fission group has been performed. The measurements were carried out using the BELEN 4π neutron counter at the IGISOL-JYFL mass separator in combination with a Penning trap. The new results significantly improve the uncertainties of neutron emission probabilities for {sup 91}Br, {sup 86}As, {sup 85}As, and {sup 85}Ge nuclei.

  8. REVISED MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FOR NEARBY GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Yutong; Courteau, Stéphane; McDonald, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the cluster stellar mass-to-light (M*/L) ratio and cumulative stellar masses, derived on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis, for 12 massive (M 500 ∼ 10 14 -10 15 M ☉ ), nearby clusters with available optical imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 and X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our method involves a statistical cluster membership using both photometric and spectroscopic redshifts when available to maximize completeness while minimizing contamination effects. We show that different methods of estimating the stellar mass-to-light ratio from observed photometry result in systematic discrepancies in the total stellar masses and average mass-to-light ratios of cluster galaxies. Nonetheless, all conversion methodologies point to a lack of correlation between M*/L i and total cluster mass, even though low-mass groups contain relatively more blue galaxies. We also find no statistically significant correlation between M*/L i and the fraction of blue galaxies (g – i < 0.85). For the mass range covered by our sample, the assumption of a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF) yields an integrated M*/L i ≅ 1.7 ± 0.2 M ☉ /L i, ☉ , a lower value than used in most similar studies, though consistent with the study of low-mass galaxy groups by Leauthaud et al. A light (diet) Salpeter IMF would imply a ∼60% increase in M*/L i

  9. The interplay between scent trails and group-mass recruitment systems in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planqué, Robert; van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; Franks, Nigel R

    2013-10-01

    Large ant colonies invariably use effective scent trails to guide copious ant numbers to food sources. The success of mass recruitment hinges on the involvement of many colony members to lay powerful trails. However, many ant colonies start off as single queens. How do these same colonies forage efficiently when small, thereby overcoming the hurdles to grow large? In this paper, we study the case of combined group and mass recruitment displayed by some ant species. Using mathematical models, we explore to what extent early group recruitment may aid deployment of scent trails, making such trails available at much smaller colony sizes. We show that a competition between group and mass recruitment may cause oscillatory behaviour mediated by scent trails. This results in a further reduction of colony size to establish trails successfully.

  10. Size and attenuation CT (SACT) of residual masses in patients with follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: More than a status quo?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spira, Daniel; Vogel, Wichard; Sökler, Martin; Löffler, Sarah; Sauter, Alexander; Schulze, Maximilian; Horger, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate CT-attenuation ratio of residual masses in patients with follicular Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) at end-treatment compared to baseline mass density and determine its potential prognostic relevance. Materials and methods: 52 consecutive patients with FL presenting with residual masses after chemotherapy receiving whole-body-CECT at baseline, end-treatment, and post-treatment were identified retrospectively by a search of our electronic medical record database from 2002 through 2010. An attenuation ratio (AR), defined as the quotient of CT-attenuation [HU] between tumor and muscle was measured. Size was recorded as the product of long- and short-axis diameter of masses. In 38/52 patients a follow-up period of ≥2 years was available to correlate results with relapse-free survival. Results: AR and tumor size of masses significantly decreased in responders when baseline was compared to end-treatment (n = 70; p 1 at end-control the specificity and sensitivity for relapsing disease within 2 years reached 83% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-attenuation measurements of residual masses in patients with FL at end-control may aid in the risk stratification of early (≤2 years) relapsing disease.

  11. Variability of matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues after QuEChERS sample preparation of different food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS) instruments are among the most powerful analytical tools currently available to monitor pesticide residues in food, among other applications. However, both GC-MS and LC-MS are susceptible to matrix effects whi...

  12. [Determination of glufosinate residue in tea by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with precolumn derivatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yonghui; Liu, Zhengcai; Yang, Fang; Qiu, Yuanjin; Liu, Suzhen; Su, Zhijiao; Zhang, Qiong; Xue, Zhimin; Fang, Yu

    2012-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was established for the determination of glufosinate (GLUF) residue in tea. The GLUF was extracted with water for 30 min under ultrasonication, and cleaned-up using a C18 solid phase extraction cartridge, then derived using fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl) in borate buffer for 2 h. The separation was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with the mobile phases of acetonitrile and 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate aqueous solution (containing 0.2% (v/v) formic acid) in a gradient elution mode. The identification and quantification of the GLUF were carried out by MS/MS in negative electrospray ionization (ESI(-)) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, the quantification analysis was performed by external standard method. The calibration curve showed good linearity in the range of 2.5 - 50.0 microg/L with the correlation coefficient r2 > 0.999. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.10 mg/kg. The average recoveries of GLUF spiked at 0.10, 0.50 and 1.00 mg/kg levels in tea were between 61.6% and 81.4%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 3.2% and 8.4%. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive, accurate and suitable for the confirmation and quantification of GLUF in tea.

  13. Multi-residue determination of 210 drugs in pork by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiqiang; Chai, Tingting; Mu, Pengqian; Xu, Nana; Song, Yue; Wang, Xinlu; Jia, Qi; Qiu, Jing

    2016-09-09

    This paper presents a multi-residue analytical method for 210 drugs in pork using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-Q-Trap tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) within 20min via positive ESI in scheduled multi-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The 210 drugs, belonging to 21 different chemical classes, included macrolides, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, β-lactams, β-agonists, aminoglycosides, antiviral drugs, glycosides, phenothiazine, protein anabolic hormones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), quinolones, antifungal drugs, corticosteroids, imidazoles, piperidines, piperazidines, insecticides, amides, alkaloids and others. A rapid and simple preparation method was applied to process the animal tissues, including solvent extraction with an acetonitrile/water mixture (80/20, v/v), defatting and clean-up processes. The recoveries ranged from 52% to 130% with relative standard deviations (RSDs)<20% for spiked concentrations of 10, 50 and 250μg/kg. More than 90% of the analytes achieved low limits of quantification (LOQs)<10μg/kg. The decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ) values were in the range of 2-502μg/kg and 4-505μg/kg, respectively. This method is significant for food safety monitoring and controlling veterinary drug use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Multi-residue method for screening of pesticides in crops by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizawa, Haruna; Shima, Mikie; Ikehara, Chieko; Kobata, Masakazu; Sato, Motoaki

    2005-10-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for the screening of 82 pesticides/metabolites in a wide variety of crops, using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). After extraction with methanol, the filtered extracts were made up to 100 mL and a 2 mL aliquot was subjected to solid-phase extraction. Co-extractives were removed with a C18 mini-column, while pesticides were retained on 3 kinds of mini-columns (HLB, SAX, activated carbon), and then eluted with acetonitrile. Analysis was performed by LC/MS/MS, and MS acquisition parameters were established in positive and negative ESI modes. The utility of the method was demonstrated by the analysis of 6 crops (carrot, cabbage, onion, spinach, lemon, brown rice) and one mixed vegetable juice. Of 82 compounds tested, 75 in carrot and 62 in lemon were obtained with recoveries ranging from 70-120%. For all samples tested, 75 compounds could be obtained with recoveries of over 50%, and the detection limits of most compounds were lower than 0.01 microg/g. This method provides acceptable performance for analysis of these 75 compounds. Further, by using aliquots of the extracts with small-scale mini-columns, purified samples could be obtained. This proposed method with small matrix effects, is effective and suitable for screening of multiple residual pesticides by using LC/MS/MS.

  15. Simultaneous screening and confirmation of multiple classes of drug residues in fish by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shani; Gieseker, Charles; Reimschuessel, Renate; Decker, Christie-Sue; Carson, Mary C

    2009-11-13

    LC-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to screen and confirm 38 compounds from a variety of drug classes in four species of fish: trout, salmon, catfish, and tilapia. Samples were extracted with acetonitrile and hexane. The acetonitrile phase was evaporated, redissolved in water and acetonitrile, and analyzed by gradient chromatography on a phenyl column. MS(2) or MS(3) spectra were monitored for each compound. Qualitative method performance was evaluated by the analysis over several days of replicate samples of control fish, fish fortified with a drug mixture at 1 ppm, 0.1 ppm and 0.01 ppm, and fish dosed with a representative from each drug class. Half of the 38 drugs were confirmed at 0.01 ppm, the lowest fortification level. This included all of the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, the macrolides, malachite green, and most of the imidazoles. Florfenicol amine, metronidazole, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and most of the betalactams were confirmed at 0.1 ppm. Ivermectin and penicillin G were only detectable in the 1 ppm fortified samples. With the exception of amoxicillin, emamectin, metronidazole, and tylosin, residue presence was confirmed in all the dosed fish.

  16. Direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry of drug residues from latent fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Kristina; Wiley, Rachel; Waverka, Kristin; Fox, James; Dziekonski, Eric; Verbeck, Guido F

    2013-07-01

    Here, we present a method of extracting drug residues from fingerprints via Direct Analyte-Probed Nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DAPNe-NSI-MS). This instrumental technique provides higher selectivity and lower detection limits over current methods, greatly reducing sample preparation, and does not compromise the integrity of latent fingerprints. This coupled to Raman microscopy is an advantageous supplement for location and identification of trace particles. DAPNe uses a nanomanipulator for extraction and differing microscopies for localization of chemicals of interest. A capillary tip with solvent of choice is placed in a nanopositioner. The surface to be analyzed is placed under a microscope, and a particle of interest is located. Using a pressure injector, the solvent is injected onto the surface where it dissolves the analyte, and then extracted back into the capillary tip. The solution is then directly analyzed via NSI-MS. Analyses of caffeine, cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, and ecstasy have been performed successfully. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of ten tetracycline residues in muscle samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajda Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method for the determination of oxytetracycline (OTC, 4-epi oxytetracycline (4-epi OTC, tetracycline (TC, 4-epi tetracycline (4-epi TC, chlortetracycline (CTC, 4-epi chlortetracycline (4-epi CTC, doxycycline (DC, minocycline (MINO, methacycline (META and rolitetracycline (ROLI residues in muscles was developed. The procedure consisted of an oxalic acid extraction followed by protein removal with trichloroacetic acid. Further solid phase clean-up on polymeric (Strata X reversed phase columns was performed to obtain an extract suitable for LC-MS/MS analysis. The tetracyclines were separated on a C 18 analytical column with mobile phase consisting of 0.01% formic acid in acetonitrile and 0.01% formic acid in water in gradient mode. The method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The recoveries of all target compounds were 91.8% – 103.6%. The decision limits were from 109.0 to 119.8 μg/kg and detection capability varied within the range of 122.2 to 137.6 μg/kg, depending on the analyte.

  18. A Liquid Chromatography - Tandem Mass Spectrometry Approach for the Identification of Mebendazole Residue in Pork, Chicken, and Horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Lee

    Full Text Available A confirmatory and quantitative method of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS for the determination of mebendazole and its hydrolyzed and reduced metabolites in pork, chicken, and horse muscles was developed and validated in this study. Anthelmintic compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate after sample mixture was made alkaline followed by liquid chromatographic separation using a reversed phase C18 column. Gradient elution was performed with a mobile phase consisting of water containing 10 mM ammonium formate and methanol. This confirmatory method was validated according to EU requirements. Evaluated validation parameters included specificity, accuracy, precision (repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility, analytical limits (decision limit and detection limit, and applicability. Most parameters were proved to be conforming to the EU requirements. The decision limit (CCα and detection capability (CCβ for all analytes ranged from 15.84 to 17.96 μgkg-1. The limit of detection (LOD and the limit of quantification (LOQ for all analytes were 0.07 μgkg-1 and 0.2 μgkg-1, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to monitoring samples collected from the markets in major cities and proven great potential to be used as a regulatory tool to determine mebendazole residues in animal based foods.

  19. Pesticide residue determination in surface waters by stir bar sorptive extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, A; Fernández-Franzón, M; Ruiz, M J; Font, G; Picó, Y

    2009-03-01

    In this stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method, 16 pesticides were extracted from surface water samples by sorption onto 1 mm polydimethylsiloxane layer coated on a 10-mm-length stir bar magnet. After liquid desorption of the analytes with 1 ml of methanol, the detection was performed on a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with a triple quadrupole (QqQ) analyzer using selected reaction monitoring mode via electrospray ionization. Parameters affecting SBSE operation, including sample volume, salt addition, extraction time, stirring rate, and desorption conditions, have been evaluated. The optimized SBSE method required two 50 ml aliquots of surface water samples, one aliquot was added of 30% NaCl and stirred at 900 rpm during 1 h for testing five pesticides with log K(o/w) 3. The method was validated in spiked surface water samples at limits of quantifications (LOQs) and ten times the LOQs showing recoveries Albufera Lake and surrounding channels, showing that SBSE is a powerful tool for routine control analysis of pesticide residues in surface water.

  20. Detecting and confirming residual hotspots of lymphatic filariasis transmission in American Samoa 8 years after stopping mass drug administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen L; Sheridan, Sarah; Ryan, Stephanie; Roineau, Maureen; Andreosso, Athena; Fuimaono, Saipale; Tufa, Joseph; Graves, Patricia M

    2017-09-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) aims to eliminate the disease as a public health problem by 2020 by conducting mass drug administration (MDA) and controlling morbidity. Once elimination targets have been reached, surveillance is critical for ensuring that programmatic gains are sustained, and challenges include timely identification of residual areas of transmission. WHO guidelines encourage cost-efficient surveillance, such as integration with other population-based surveys. In American Samoa, where LF is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, and Aedes polynesiensis is the main vector, the LF elimination program has made significant progress. Seven rounds of MDA (albendazole and diethycarbamazine) were completed from 2000 to 2006, and Transmission Assessment Surveys were passed in 2010/2011 and 2015. However, a seroprevalence study using an adult serum bank collected in 2010 detected two potential residual foci of transmission, with Og4C3 antigen (Ag) prevalence of 30.8% and 15.6%. We conducted a follow up study in 2014 to verify if transmission was truly occurring by comparing seroprevalence between residents of suspected hotspots and residents of other villages. In adults from non-hotspot villages (N = 602), seroprevalence of Ag (ICT or Og4C3), Bm14 antibody (Ab) and Wb123 Ab were 1.2% (95% CI 0.6-2.6%), 9.6% (95% CI 7.5%-12.3%), and 10.5% (95% CI 7.6-14.3%), respectively. Comparatively, adult residents of Fagali'i (N = 38) had significantly higher seroprevalence of Ag (26.9%, 95% CI 17.3-39.4%), Bm14 Ab (43.4%, 95% CI 32.4-55.0%), and Wb123 Ab 55.2% (95% CI 39.6-69.8%). Adult residents of Ili'ili/Vaitogi/Futiga (N = 113) also had higher prevalence of Ag and Ab, but differences were not statistically significant. The presence of transmission was demonstrated by 1.1% Ag prevalence (95% CI 0.2% to 3.1%) in 283 children aged 7-13 years who lived in one of the suspected hotspots; and microfilaraemia in four individuals, all of whom lived in the

  1. Renormalization group and relations between scattering amplitudes in a theory with different mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulov, A.V.; Skalozub, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    In the Yukawa model with two different mass scales the renormalization group equation is used to obtain relations between scattering amplitudes at low energies. Considering fermion-fermion scattering as an example, a basic one-loop renormalization group relation is derived which gives possibility to reduce the problem to the scattering of light particles on the external field substituting a heavy virtual state. Applications of the results to problem of searching new physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed [ru

  2. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven

    2003-01-01

    We have shown recently that PrkC, which is involved in developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, is a Ser/Thr kinase with features of the receptor kinase family of eukaryotic Hanks kinases. In this study, we expressed and purified from Escherichia coli the cytoplasmic domain of PrkC containing...... the kinase and a short juxtamembrane region. This fragment, which we designate PrkCc, undergoes autophosphorylation in E.coli. PrkCc is further autophosphorylated in vitro, apparently through a trans-kinase, intermolecular reaction. PrkC also displays kinase activity with myelin basic protein. Using high...... mass accuracy electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified seven phosphorylated threonine and one serine residue in PrkCc. All the corresponding residues were replaced by systematic site-directed mutagenesis and the purified mutant...

  3. Estimating the mass of the Local Group using machine learning applied to numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, M.; Libeskind, N.; Lahav, O.; Hoffman, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new approach to calculating the combined mass of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31), which together account for the bulk of the mass of the Local Group (LG). We base our work on an ensemble of 30,190 halo pairs from the Small MultiDark simulation, assuming a ΛCDM (Cosmological Constant and Cold Dark Matter) cosmology. This is used in conjunction with machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, ANN) to investigate the relationship between the mass and selected parameters characterising the orbit and local environment of the binary. ANN are employed to take account of additional physics arising from interactions with larger structures or dynamical effects which are not analytically well understood. Results from the ANN are most successful when the velocity shear is provided, which demonstrates the flexibility of machine learning to model physical phenomena and readily incorporate new information. The resulting estimate for the Local Group mass, when shear information is included, is 4.9×1012Msolar, with an error of ±0.8×1012Msolar from the 68% uncertainty in observables, and a r.m.s. scatter interval of +1.7‑1.3×1012Msolar estimated scatter from the differences between the model estimates and simulation masses for a testing sample of halo pairs. We also consider a recently reported large relative transverse velocity of M31 and the Milky Way, and produce an alternative mass estimate of 3.6±0.3+2.1‑1.3×1012Msolar. Although the methods used predict similar values for the most likely mass of the LG, application of ANN compared to the traditional Timing Argument reduces the scatter in the log mass by approximately half when tested on samples from the simulation.

  4. Renormalisation group behaviour of O+ and 2+ glueball masses in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Schierholz, G.

    1982-07-01

    We calculate the 0 + and 2 + glueball masses at several values of the coupling and verify compatibility with the desired renormalisation group behaviour. The calculation uses momentum smeared glueball wave functions on a large 8 4 lattice and confirms our previous results obtained on smaller lattices. (orig.)

  5. The low-mass star and sub-stellar populations of the 25 Orionis group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Juan José; Briceño, César; Mateu, Cecilia; Hernández, Jesús; Vivas, Anna Katherina; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Allen, Lori

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a survey of the low-mass star and brown dwarf population of the 25 Orionis group. Using optical photometry from the CIDA (Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía `Francisco J. Duarte', Mérida, Venezuela) Deep Survey of Orion, near-IR photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy and low-resolution spectroscopy obtained with Hectospec at the MMT telescope, we selected 1246 photometric candidates to low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with estimated masses within 0.02 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 0.8 and spectroscopically confirmed a sample of 77 low-mass stars as new members of the cluster with a mean age of ˜7 Myr. We have obtained a system initial mass function of the group that can be well described by either a Kroupa power-law function with indices α3 = -1.73 ± 0.31 and α2 = 0.68 ± 0.41 in the mass ranges 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.08 and 0.08 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.5, respectively, or a Scalo lognormal function with coefficients m_c=0.21^{+0.02}_{-0.02} and σ = 0.36 ± 0.03 in the mass range 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.8. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of this numerous candidate sample, we have confirmed the east-west elongation of the 25 Orionis group observed in previous works, and rule out a possible southern extension of the group. We find that the spatial distributions of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in 25 Orionis are statistically indistinguishable. Finally, we found that the fraction of brown dwarfs showing IR excesses is higher than for low-mass stars, supporting the scenario in which the evolution of circumstellar discs around the least massive objects could be more prolonged.

  6. Flexible xxx-asp/asn and gly-xxx residues of equine cytochrome C in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c'-ions originating from specific cleavage at N-Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c'-ions originating from N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z'-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX.

  7. Flexible Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx Residues of Equine Cytochrome c in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization In-Source Decay Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c′-ions originating from specific cleavage at N–Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c′-ions originating from N–Cα bond cleavage at Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z′-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX. PMID:24349908

  8. Different Analytical Procedures for the Study of Organic Residues in Archeological Ceramic Samples with the Use of Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Rosiak, Angelina; Kwapińska, Marzena; Kwapiński, Witold

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the composition of organic residues present in pottery is an important source of information for historians and archeologists. Chemical characterization of the materials provides information on diets, habits, technologies, and original use of the vessels. This review presents the problem of analytical studies of archeological materials with a special emphasis on organic residues. Current methods used in the determination of different organic compounds in archeological ceramics are presented. Particular attention is paid to the procedures of analysis of archeological ceramic samples used before gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages and disadvantages of different extraction methods and application of proper quality assurance/quality control procedures are discussed.

  9. Validation of a multi-residue method for the determination of several antibiotic groups in honey by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Detlef A; Stachel, Carolin S; Gowik, Petra

    2012-07-01

    The presented multi-method was developed for the confirmation of 37 antibiotic substances from the six antibiotic groups: macrolides, lincosamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, pleuromutilines and diamino-pyrimidine derivatives. All substances were analysed simultaneously in a single analytical run with the same procedure, including an extraction with buffer, a clean-up by solid-phase extraction, and the measurement by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in ESI+ mode. The method was validated on the basis of an in-house validation concept with factorial design by combination of seven factors to check the robustness in a concentration range of 5-50 μg kg(-1). The honeys used were of different types with regard to colour and origin. The values calculated for the validation parameters-decision limit CCα (range, 7.5-12.9 μg kg(-1)), detection capability CCβ (range, 9.4-19.9 μg kg(-1)), within-laboratory reproducibility RSD(wR) (tylvalosin with 21.4 %), repeatability RSD(r) (tylvalosin with 21.1%), and recovery (range, 92-106%)-were acceptable and in agreement with the criteria of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The validation results showed that the method was applicable for the residue analysis of antibiotics in honey to substances with and without recommended concentrations, although some changes had been tested during validation to determine the robustness of the method.

  10. [Determination of eight pesticide residues in tea by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its uncertainty evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Beizhen; Cai, Haijiang; Song, Weihua

    2012-09-01

    A method was developed for the determination of eight pesticide residues (fipronil, imidacloprid, acetamiprid, buprofezin, triadimefon, triadimenol, profenofos, pyridaben) in tea by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sample was extracted by accelerated solvent extraction with acetone-dichloromethane (1:1, v/v) as solvent, and the extract was then cleaned-up with a Carb/NH2 solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The separation was performed on a Hypersil Gold C, column (150 mm x 2. 1 mm, 5 microm) and with the gradient elution of acetonitrile and 0. 1% formic acid. The eight pesticides were determined in the modes of electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The analytes were quantified by matrix-matched internal standard method for imidacloprid and acetamiprid, by matrix-matched external standard method for the other pesticides. The calibration curves showed good linearity in 1 - 100 microg/L for fipronil, and in 5 -200 microg/L for the other pesticides. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N> 10) were 2 p.g/kg for fipronil and 10 microg/kg for the other pesticides. The average recoveries ranged from 75. 5% to 115.0% with the relative standard deviations of 2.7% - 7.7% at the spiked levels of 2, 5, 50 microg/kg for fipronil and 10, 50, 100 microg/kg for the other pesticides. The uncertainty evaluation for the results was carried out according to JJF 1059-1999 "Evaluation and Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement". Items constituting measurement uncertainty involved standard solution, weighing of sample, sample pre-treatment, and the measurement repeatability of the equipment were evaluated. The results showed that the measurement uncertainty is mainly due to sample pre-treatment, standard curves and measurement repeatability of the equipment. The method developed is suitable for the conformation and quantification of the pesticides in tea.

  11. Evaluation of matrix effect in isotope dilution mass spectrometry based on quantitative analysis of chloramphenicol residues in milk powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiu Qin; Yang, Zong; Zhang, Qing He; Li, Hong Mei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We develop a strategy to evaluate matrix effect and its impact on the IDMS results. •Matrix effect and IDMS correction factor from different conditions are evaluated. •Ion suppression effect is observed in LLE and HLB pre-treated sample solutions. •Ion enhancement effect is found in MCX pre-treated sample solution. •IDMS correction factor in HLB and MCX solutions in three instruments is close to 1 -- Abstract: In the present study, we developed a comprehensive strategy to evaluate matrix effect (ME) and its impact on the results of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) in analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP) residues in milk powder. Stable isotope-labeled internal standards do not always compensate ME, which brings the variation of the ratio (the peak area of analyte/the peak area of isotope). In our investigation, impact factors of this variation were studied in the extraction solution of milk powder using three mass spectrometers coupled with different ion source designs, and deuterium-labeled chloramphenicol (D5-CAP) was used as the internal standard. ME from mobile phases, sample solvents, pre-treatment methods, sample origins and instruments was evaluated, and its impact on the results of IDMS was assessed using the IDMS correction factor (θ). Our data showed that the impact of ME of mobile phase on the correction factor was significantly greater than that of sample solvent. Significant ion suppression and enhancement effects were observed in different pre-treated sample solutions. The IDMS correction factor in liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) and molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) extract with different instruments was greater or less 1.0, and the IDMS correction factor in hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) and mix-mode cation exchange (MCX) extract with different instruments was all close to 1.0. To the instrument coupled with different ion source design, the impact of ME on IDMS quantitative results was

  12. A research on relationship between ABO blood groups and body mass index among Turkish seafarers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nas, Selçuk; Fışkın, Remzi

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate and to reveal the relationship between ABO blood groups and body mass index (BMI) and obesity among Turkish seafarers by using the health examination reports data obtained from 2009 to 2016. The data on age, gender, weight, height and blood groups obtained from 298,247 medical examination reports of Turkish seafarers were used with the official permission of Directorate General of Health for Border and Coastal Areas. Only 116,871 reports included blood group data. Regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were performed to survey relationship between variables. The results of the study were compared with other studies in the related literature. It has been revealed that AB Rh (-) group was associated the highest mean BMI value (mean: 25.952). It is suggested that seafarers with AB Rh (-) blood group, who have the highest mean BMI value, should pay special attention to their weight.

  13. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaud, Lauriane; Monteau, Fabrice; Deceuninck, Yoann; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Andre, Francois; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CCα) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 μg kg -1 range

  14. Residual tumor size and IGCCCG risk classification predict additional vascular procedures in patients with germ cell tumors and residual tumor resection: a multicenter analysis of the German Testicular Cancer Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Christian; Pfister, David; Busch, Jonas; Bingöl, Cigdem; Ranft, Ulrich; Schrader, Mark; Dieckmann, Klaus-Peter; Heidenreich, Axel; Albers, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Residual tumor resection (RTR) after chemotherapy in patients with advanced germ cell tumors (GCT) is an important part of the multimodal treatment. To provide a complete resection of residual tumor, additional surgical procedures are sometimes necessary. In particular, additional vascular interventions are high-risk procedures that require multidisciplinary planning and adequate resources to optimize outcome. The aim was to identify parameters that predict additional vascular procedures during RTR in GCT patients. A retrospective analysis was performed in 402 GCT patients who underwent 414 RTRs in 9 German Testicular Cancer Study Group (GTCSG) centers. Overall, 339 of 414 RTRs were evaluable with complete perioperative data sets. The RTR database was queried for additional vascular procedures (inferior vena cava [IVC] interventions, aortic prosthesis) and correlated to International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) classification and residual tumor volume. In 40 RTRs, major vascular procedures (23 IVC resections with or without prosthesis, 11 partial IVC resections, and 6 aortic prostheses) were performed. In univariate analysis, the necessity of IVC intervention was significantly correlated with IGCCCG (14.1% intermediate/poor vs 4.8% good; p=0.0047) and residual tumor size (3.7% size risk features must initially be identified as high-risk patients for vascular procedures and therefore should be referred to specialized surgical centers with the ad hoc possibility of vascular interventions. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between body mass index, fat mass and lean mass with SF-36 quality of life scores in a group of fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Laura; Canela, Miguel Angel; Rafecas, Magda

    2012-11-01

    Patients suffering from fibromyalgia (FM) had widespread musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, fatigue, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment and other symptoms, which seriously affects their quality of life (QoL), making it difficult to perform normal activities. Moreover, FM has been associated with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than in the general population. Weight reduction has been beneficial in both FM and other rheumatic patients. Obesity and overweight have been pointed as playing a relevant role in FM symptoms; however, it is necessary to find out more about this relationship. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat mass (fM) and lean mass (lM) with quality of life in a group of FM patients. 103 women, with a mean age of 53.74 ± 7.81, and members of different FM patient associations from Spain participated in our study. Some anthropometric measures were taken like weight, height, BMI, body fat mass and lean mass. FM patients QoL was assessed by the Short-Form Health Survey, SF-36 questionnaire. Statistical reports were based on mean, standard deviation and correlation, but significance was tested by nonparametric methods. BMI, fM and lM correlated differently with the specific SF-36 scores. BMI had a high negative correlation with emotional role, fM with bodily pain and lM almost with all scores but specially with emotional role, vitality and physical role. The outcome of this study reveals some interesting relationships, which need to be further investigated to improve the management of FM patients.

  16. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N. [Univ Aix Marseille, CNRS, Lab Chim Provence, Equipe Instrumentat and React Atmospher, UMR 6264, F-13331 Marseille 3 (France); Jaffrezo, J.L. [Univ Grenoble 1, CNRS, UMR 5183, Lab Glaciol and Geophys Environm, F-38402 St Martin Dheres (France)

    2010-07-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCIMS/MS). The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-R' respectively) and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO{sub 2}) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation) of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalization rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional

  17. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dron

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS. The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-R´ respectively and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO2 scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60

  18. Chemical residues in Dolphins from the US Atlantic coast including atlantic bottlenose obtained during the 1987/88 mass mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, D.W.; Haebler, R.; Potter, C.

    1991-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) collected during the 1987/88 mass mortality event along the Atlantic coast of the United States have been analyzed for anthropogenic chemical contaminants. Average contaminant concentrations in adult males were higher than the average concentrations measured in adult females. Females could be divided into two groups by contaminant concentrations, one with low concentrations, and another with concentrations 4.4 times (PCBs) to 8.9 times (p,p'-DDE) greater. Contaminant concentrations in bottlenose were generally greater than the concentrations measured in either common (Delphinus delphis) or white-sided (Lagernorhynchus acutus) dolphins from the western North Atlantic Ocean. A subset of animals screened for unusual chemical contaminants showed that numerous polybrominated chemicals were present, including polybrominated biphenyls and diphenyl ethers not previously found in marine mammals from U.S. coastal waters.

  19. Concentrations and dissipation of difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad residues in apples and soil, determined by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Jia, Chunhong; Zhao, Ercheng; Chen, Li; Yu, Pingzhong; Jing, Junjie; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-03-01

    A new combined difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad fungicide formulation, as an 11.7 % suspension concentrate (SC), has been introduced as part of a resistance management strategy. The dissipation of difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad applied to apples and the residues remaining in the apples were determined. The 11.7 % SC was sprayed onto apple trees and soil in Beijing, Shandong, and Anhui provinces, China, at an application rate of 118 g a.i. ha(-1), then the dissipation of difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad was monitored. The residual difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad concentrations were determined by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The difenoconazole half-lives in apples and soil were 6.2-9.5 and 21.0-27.7 days, respectively. The fluxapyroxad half-lives in apples and soil were 9.4-12.6 and 10.3-36.5 days, respectively. Difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad residues in apples and soil after the 11.7 % SC had been sprayed twice and three times, with 10 days between applications, at 78 and 118 g a.i. ha(-1) were measured. Representative apple and soil samples were collected after the last treatment, at preharvest intervals of 14, 21, and 28 days. The difenoconazole residue concentrations in apples and soil were 0.002-0.052 and 0.002-0.298 mg kg(-1), respectively. The fluxapyroxad residue concentrations in apples and soil were 0.002-0.093 and 0.008-1.219 mg kg(-1), respectively. The difenoconazole and fluxapyroxad residue concentrations in apples were lower than the maximum residue limits (0.5 and 0.8 mg kg(-1), respectively). An application rate of 78 g a.i. ha(-1) is therefore recommended to ensure that treated apples can be considered safe for humans to consume.

  20. A simple, fast and cheap non-SPE screening method for antibacterial residue analysis in milk and liver using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Magda Targa; Melo, Jéssica; Barreto, Fabiano; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Jank, Louise; Bittencourt, Michele Soares; Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Schapoval, Elfrides Eva Scherman

    2014-11-01

    In routine laboratory work, screening methods for multiclass analysis can process a large number of samples in a short time. The main challenge is to develop a methodology to detect as many different classes of residues as possible, combined with speed and low cost. An efficient technique for the analysis of multiclass antibacterial residues (fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides and trimethoprim) was developed based on simple, environment-friendly extraction for bovine milk, cattle and poultry liver. Acidified ethanol was used as an extracting solvent for milk samples. Liver samples were treated using EDTA-washed sand for cell disruption, methanol:water and acidified acetonitrile as extracting solvent. A total of 24 antibacterial residues were detected and confirmed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), at levels between 10, 25 and 50% of the maximum residue limit (MRL). For liver samples a metabolite (sulfaquinoxaline-OH) was also monitored. A validation procedure was conducted for screening purposes in accordance with European Union requirements (2002/657/EC). The detection capability (CCβ) false compliant rate was less than 5% at the lowest level for each residue. Specificity and ruggedness were also discussed. Incurred and routine samples were analyzed and the method was successfully applied. The results proved that this method can be an important tool in routine analysis, since it is very fast and reliable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Wide-Scope Screening Method for Multiclass Veterinary Drug Residues in Fish, Shrimp, and Eel Using Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, Sherri B; Storey, Joseph M; Lohne, Jack J; Andersen, Wendy C; Burger, Robert; Johnson, Aaron S; Madson, Mark R

    2017-08-30

    A screening method for veterinary drug residues in fish, shrimp, and eel using LC with a high-resolution MS instrument has been developed and validated. The method was optimized for over 70 test compounds representing a variety of veterinary drug classes. Tissues were extracted by vortex mixing with acetonitrile acidified with 2% acetic acid and 0.2% p-toluenesulfonic acid. A centrifuged portion of the extract was passed through a novel solid phase extraction cartridge designed to remove interfering matrix components from tissue extracts. The eluent was then evaporated and reconstituted for analysis. Data were collected with a quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer using both nontargeted and targeted acquisition methods. Residues were detected on the basis of the exact mass of the precursor and a product ion along with isotope pattern and retention time matching. Semiquantitative data analysis compared MS 1 signal to a one-point extracted matrix standard at a target testing level. The test compounds were detected and identified in salmon, tilapia, catfish, shrimp, and eel extracts fortified at the target testing levels. Fish dosed with selected analytes and aquaculture samples previously found to contain residues were also analyzed. The screening method can be expanded to monitor for an additional >260 veterinary drugs on the basis of exact mass measurements and retention times.

  2. A CORRELATION BETWEEN ABO BLOOD GROUPS AND BODY MASS INDEX AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbjit Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND ABO blood groups are associated with some important chronic diseases, obesity being the major risk factor is rising rapidly globally. The present study seeks to determine if there is any association between ABO blood groups and body mass index. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study involve 200 medical students, 102 boys and 98 girls in the age group of 18-23 years in the Government Medical College, Amritsar. Weight, height for BMI and blood groups were determined in order to find any association between ABO blood group and BMI. RESULTS Overweight and obesity was found more prevalent in boys than girls, 22.5% students were overweight and 15.5% were obese. The prevalence of overweight was (24.52% boys and 20.40% girls and prevalence of obesity was (25.49% boys and 5.10% girls. Blood group B was reported the most common blood groups (37.5% followed by blood group O (32.0%, while blood groups A and AB were found 19.5% and 11% of participants, respectively. The prevalence of overweight (BMI 25-29.9 among participants based on blood group O, A, AB and B was 29.69%, 25.64%, 18.18%, 16.00%, while obesity (BMI >30 among participants based on blood groups B, O, A and AB was 24.00%, 10.94%, 10.26% and 9.09%. CONCLUSION Prevalence of overweight and obesity was more in blood group O and B respectively and was more in males than females

  3. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, Julien [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: julien.dron@up.univ-mrs.fr; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF{sub 3}/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L{sup -1}. Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  4. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dron, Julien; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2007-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF 3 /methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L -1 . Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices

  5. Location selection of agricultural-residuals particleboard industry through group decision: The case study of northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Azizi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for locating agricultural-residuals particleboard industry in the northern provinces of Iran. Particleboard industry is the only Iranian wood and paper industry with an export potential and the use of agricultural residuals as the raw material can help with increasing the production in this industry, while reducing the damage to forest resources. The northern provinces of Iran are agricultural centers with ample amounts of agricultural residues. These provinces are, therefore, preferable to other provinces as the construction sites of particleboard plants. In the location selection model presented in this paper, the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method is used and the results indicate that the criterion of ‘material and production’ and the sub-criterion of ‘reliability of supply’ have the highest priorities, and that Golestan province is the best alternative.

  6. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  7. Renormalization group improved bottom mass from {Upsilon} sum rules at NNLL order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Valencia Univ. - CSIC (Spain). IFIC

    2012-09-15

    We determine the bottom quark mass from non-relativistic large-n {Upsilon} sum rules with renormalization group improvement at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order. We compute the theoretical moments within the vNRQCD formalism and account for the summation of powers of the Coulomb singularities as well as of logarithmic terms proportional to powers of {alpha}{sub s} ln(n). The renormalization group improvement leads to a substantial stabilization of the theoretical moments compared to previous fixed-order analyses, which did not account for the systematic treatment of the logarithmic {alpha}{sub s} ln(n) terms, and allows for reliable single moment fits. For the current world average of the strong coupling ({alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1183{+-}0.0010) we obtain M{sub b}{sup 1S}=4.755{+-}0.057{sub pert} {+-}0.009{sub {alpha}{sub s}}{+-}0.003{sub exp} GeV for the bottom 1S mass and anti m{sub b}(anti m{sub b})=4.235{+-}0.055{sub pert}{+-}0.003{sub exp} GeV for the bottom MS mass, where we have quoted the perturbative error and the uncertainties from the strong coupling and the experimental data.

  8. Determination of residues of fipronil and its metabolites in cauliflower by using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhan, Anil; Kumari, Beena; Duhan, Saroj

    2015-02-01

    Fipronil is a widely used insecticide with a well-described toxicological pathway. Recently it has been widely used in India to control vegetable pests. The present study has been carried out to observe the persistence pattern of fipronil and its metabolites-fipronil sulfone, fipronil sulfide, fipronil desulfinyl in cauliflower and soil so as to know the potential risk if any to consumers and environment. Fipronil was applied @ 56 g a.i. ha(-1). Samples of cauliflower and soil were collected periodically; processed using QuEChERS method and analyzed by GCMS/MS. In cauliflower, residues of fipronil and its metabolites reached below detectable level before 30 days of application whereas in soil about 95% of total fipronil residues got degraded within same time period. Washing and washing followed by cooking or boiling was found effective in reducing residues. A safe waiting period of 15 days is therefore suggested before consuming cauliflower.

  9. Dynamic spontaneous breaking of gauge invariance in asymptotically free theories. [Mechanism mass, group renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansel' m, A A; D' yakonov, D I [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of dynamic spontaneous breaking of the Coleman-Weinberg gauge invariance is discussed in which scalar fields assume nonzero mean values owing to quantum effects in higher orders of the perturbation theory. Group renormalization methods are used to study scalar electrodynamics and gauge theories similar to that of Yang and Mills; for these gauge theories it is established that by choosing proper constants it is possible to combine the acquisition of a mass by particles, owing to a dynamic violation of symmetry, with the asymptotic freedom of the theory. The symmetry violation is found to be closely related to infrared poles observed in effective charge for asymptotically free theories. The emerging masses of particles automatically cover these poles. It is proved that physical results due to symmetry violation do not depend, at least in the first non-trivial order of the perturbation theory, on the initial gauging of vector fields.

  10. Luminosities and mass-loss rates of Local Group AGB stars and red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Sloan, G. C.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Mass loss is one of the fundamental properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and through the enrichment of the interstellar medium, AGB stars are key players in the life cycle of dust and gas in the universe. However, a quantitative understanding of the mass-loss process is still largely lacking. Aims: We aim to investigate mass loss and luminosity in a large sample of evolved stars in several Local Group galaxies with a variety of metalliticies and star-formation histories: the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud, and the Fornax, Carina, and Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Methods: Dust radiative transfer models are presented for 225 carbon stars and 171 oxygen-rich evolved stars in several Local Group galaxies for which spectra from the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer are available. The spectra are complemented with available optical and infrared photometry to construct spectral energy distributions. A minimization procedure was used to determine luminosity and mass-loss rate (MLR). Pulsation periods were derived for a large fraction of the sample based on a re-analysis of existing data. Results: New deep K-band photometry from the VMC survey and multi-epoch data from IRAC (at 4.5 μm) and AllWISE and NEOWISE have allowed us to derive pulsation periods longer than 1000 days for some of the most heavily obscured and reddened objects. We derive (dust) MLRs and luminosities for the entire sample. The estimated MLRs can differ significantly from estimates for the same objects in the literature due to differences in adopted optical constants (up to factors of several) and details in the radiative transfer modelling. Updated parameters for the super-AGB candidate MSX SMC 055 (IRAS 00483-7347) are presented. Its current mass is estimated to be 8.5 ± 1.6 M⊙, suggesting an initial mass well above 8 M⊙ in agreement with estimates based on its large Rubidium abundance. Using synthetic photometry, we present and discuss colour-colour and

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the effect of galaxy group environment on active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Yjan A.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Owers, Matt S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Croom, Scott M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Loveday, Jonathan; Mahajan, Smriti; Wang, Lingyu

    2018-04-01

    In galaxy clusters, efficiently accreting active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially located in the infall regions of the cluster projected phase-space, and are rarely found in the cluster core. This has been attributed to both an increase in triggering opportunities for infalling galaxies, and a reduction of those mechanisms in the hot, virialized, cluster core. Exploiting the depth and completeness (98 per cent at r 9.9 in 695 groups with 11.53 ≤ log10(M200/M⊙) ≤ 14.56 at z 13.5, AGNs are preferentially found in the infalling galaxy population with 3.6σ confidence. At lower halo masses, we observe no difference in AGN fraction between core and infalling galaxies. These observations support a model where a reduced number of low-speed interactions, ram pressure stripping and intra-group/cluster medium temperature, the dominance of which increase with halo mass, work to inhibit AGN in the cores of groups and clusters with log10(M200/M⊙) > 13.5, but do not significantly affect nuclear activity in cores of less massive structures.

  12. Screening of the presence organophosphates and organochlorines pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Dillani; Aryana, Nurhani; Aristiawan, Yosi; Styarini, Dyah

    2017-01-01

    Pesticides is commonly used to improve the quality of agricultural product, especially in vegetables and fruits. Due to pesticide residues in the product become a concern to consumer health, monitoring and analysis of pesticide residues in agriculture product need to be established. The certified reference material (CRM) is often benefited to obtain accurate results in analysis. It is required as the quality control to improve quality assurance of the testing results. Unfortunately in Indonesia, the development of matrix CRM for the analysis of pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits is still limited. This study is aimed to determine the type of commodity and target analyte to be employed in the development of CRM for pesticides in vegetables and fruits. As the preliminary study, the screening of 11 commodities of fresh vegetables and fruits has been conducted to review the information about the presence of organophosphates (OPs) and organochlorines (OCs) in the sample. In this analysis, QuEChERS technique was used in the extraction process and the qualitative analysis was evaluated by using GC-MS. The results showed that strawberry and celery contain residues of pesticide chlorpyrifos. Further analysis of the commodity celery from seven different places has been conducted, resulting that from 3 of all 7 samples (43%) were positive containing chlorpyrifos. Therefore, the development of CRM for chlorpyrifos in celery will be our next research project.

  13. A renormalization group invariant line and an infrared attractive top-Higgs mass relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.; Schrempp, F.

    1992-10-01

    The renormalization group equations (RGE's) of the Standard Model at one loop in terms of the gauge couplings g 1,2,3, the top Yukawa coupling g t and the scalar self coupling λ are reexamined. For g 1,2 = 0, the general solution of the RGE's is obtained analytically in terms of an interesting special solution for the ratio λ/g 2 t as function of the ratio g 2 t /g 2 3 which i) represents an RG invariant line which is strongly infrared attractive ii) interpolates all known quasi-fixed points and iii) is finite for large g 2 t /g 2 3 (ultraviolet limit). All essential features survive for g 1,2 ≠ 0. The invariant line translates into an infrared attractive top-Higgs mass relation, which e.g. associates to the top masses m t = 130/145/200 GeV the Higgs masses m H ≅ 68-90/103-115/207 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  14. Dimensionless groups for multidimensional heat and mass transfer in adsorbed natural gas storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sphaier, L.A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Mecanica Teorica e Aplicada], E-mail: lasphaier@mec.uff.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper provides a new methodology for analyzing heat and mass transfer in gas storage via adsorption. The foundation behind the proposed methodology comprises a set of physically meaningful dimensionless groups. A discussion regarding the development of such groups is herein presented, providing a fully normalized multidimensional formulation for describing the transport mechanisms involved in adsorbed gas storage. After such presentation, data from previous literature studies associated with the problem of adsorbed natural gas storage are employed for determining realistic values for the developed parameters. Then, a one-dimensional test-case problem is selected for illustrating the application of the dimensionless formulation for simulating the operation of adsorbed gas reservoirs. The test problem is focused on analyzing an adsorbed gas discharge operation. This problem is numerically solved, and the solution is verified against previously published literature data. The presented results demonstrate how a higher heat of sorption values lead to reduced discharge capacities. (author)

  15. Development of QuEChERS-based extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantifying flumethasone residues in beef muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Hun; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Abd El-Aty, A M; Cho, Soon-Kil; Park, Jong-Hyouk; Kwon, Ki Sung; Park, Hee Ra; Kim, Hyung Soo; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Mi Ra; Shim, Jae-Han

    2012-12-01

    A rapid, specific, and sensitive method based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was developed and validated to quantify flumethasone residues in beef muscle. Methods were compared between the original as well as the EN quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS)-based extraction. Good linearity was achieved at concentration levels of 5-30 μg/kg. Estimated recovery rates at spiking levels of 5 and 10 μg/kg ranged from 72.1 to 84.6%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs)noise ratios (S/Ns) of 3 and 10, respectively. The method was successfully applied to analyze real samples obtained from large markets throughout the Korean Peninsula. The method proved to be sensitive and reliable and, thus, rendered an appropriate means for residue analysis studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The APOSTLE project: Local Group kinematic mass constraints and simulation candidate selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S.; Oman, Kyle A.; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    We use a large sample of isolated dark matter halo pairs drawn from cosmological N-body simulations to identify candidate systems whose kinematics match that of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies. We find, in agreement with the `timing argument' and earlier work, that the separation and approach velocity of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies favour a total mass for the pair of ˜5 × 1012 M⊙. A mass this large, however, is difficult to reconcile with the small relative tangential velocity of the pair, as well as with the small deceleration from the Hubble flow observed for the most distant LG members. Halo pairs that match these three criteria have average masses a factor of ˜2 times smaller than suggested by the timing argument, but with large dispersion. Guided by these results, we have selected 12 halo pairs with total mass in the range 1.6-3.6 × 1012 M⊙ for the APOSTLE project (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment), a suite of hydrodynamical resimulations at various numerical resolution levels (reaching up to ˜104 M⊙ per gas particle) that use the subgrid physics developed for the EAGLE project. These simulations reproduce, by construction, the main kinematics of the MW-M31 pair, and produce satellite populations whose overall number, luminosities, and kinematics are in good agreement with observations of the MW and M31 companions. The APOSTLE candidate systems thus provide an excellent testbed to confront directly many of the predictions of the Λ cold dark matter cosmology with observations of our local Universe.

  17. Determination of antibiotic residues in southern Baltic Sea sediments using tandem solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Siedlewicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to adapt analytical procedures for determining antibiotic residues in solid and aquatic samples to marine sediments and to investigate the occurrence of 9 sulfonamides, trimethoprim and 2 quinolones in southern Baltic Sea sediments. The analytical procedure was applied to sediment samples characterized as sand and silty sand. The validation results showed that a sensitive and efficient method applying tandem solid-phase extraction (SPE and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS was obtained. Analytes were determined in the lower ng g−1 range with good accuracy and precision. The proposed analytical procedure was applied to the analysis of 13 sediment samples collected from the Baltic Sea along the Polish coast. Concentrations of antibiotic residues in environmental samples were calculated based on external matrix-matched calibration. Residues of nine out of twelve of the above antibiotics were detected in sediment samples in a concentrations of up to 419.2 ng g−1 d.w. (dry weight. Sulfamethoxazole and sulfachloropyridazine were the most frequently detected compounds (58% of the analyzed samples. The occurrence frequency of trimethoprim was 42% and it was always detected simultaneously with sulfamethoxazole. Preliminary studies on the spatial distribution of the analyzed antibiotics indicate a high level of antibiotics occurring in the Pomeranian Bay and close to the mouths of Polish rivers. The study is the first one to demonstrate the occurrence of antibiotic residues in sediments of the Polish coastal area. The obtained results suggest that sediment can be an important secondary source of antibiotic residues in the marine environment.

  18. Qualitative and Quantitative Drug residue analyses: Florfenicol in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and supermarket meat by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shanoy C; Subbiah, Seenivasan; Gentles, Angella; Austin, Galen; Stonum, Paul; Brooks, Tiffanie A; Brooks, Chance; Smith, Ernest E

    2016-10-15

    A method for confirmation and detection of Florfenicol amine residues in white-tailed deer tissues was developed and validated in our laboratory. Tissue samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up on sorbent (Chem-elut) cartridges. Liguid chromatography (LC) separation was achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse plus C18 column with gradient elution using a mobile phase composed of ammonium acetate in water and methanol at a flow rate of 300μL/min. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out using liquid chromatography - heated electrospray ionization(HESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) interface. The limits of detection (LODs) for HESI and APCI probe were 1.8ng/g and 1.4ng/g respectively. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for HESI and APCI probe were 5.8ng/g and 3.4ng/g respectively. Mean recovery values ranged from 79% to 111% for APCI and 30% to 60% for HESI. The validated method was used to determine white-tailed deer florfenicol tissue residue concentration 10-days after exposure. Florfenicol tissue residues concentration ranged from 0.4 to 0.6μg/g for liver and 0.02-0.05μg/g for muscle and a trace in blood samples. The concentration found in the tested edible tissues were lower than the maximum residual limit (MRL) values established by the federal drug administration (FDA) for bovine tissues. In summary, the resulting optimization procedures using the sensitivity of HESI and APCI probes in the determination of florfenicol in white-tailed deer tissue are the most compelling conclusions in this study, to the extent that we have applied this method in the evaluation of supermarket samples drug residue levels as a proof of principle. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Structural characterization of product ions by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to support regulatory analysis of veterinary drug residues in foods Part 2: Benzimidazoles nitromidaz.....

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Analysis for identification and quantification of regulated veterinary drug residues in foods are usually achieved by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The instrument method requires the selection of characteristic ions, but structure elucidation is seldom perform...

  20. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  1. Radiological Conditions in Selected Areas of Southern Iraq with Residues of Depleted Uranium. Report by an International Group of Experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This publication describes the methods, assumptions and parameters used by the IAEA during the assessment of the post-conflict radiological conditions of the environment and populations in relation to the residues of depleted uranium munitions from 2003 that exist at four selected areas in southern Iraq. The studies conducted by the IAEA used the results of measurements provided by UNEP from the 2006-2007 environmental monitoring campaigns performed by the Iraqi Ministry for the Environment. It presents the data used, the results of the assessment, and the findings and conclusions in connection therewith.

  2. Leader-based and self-organized communication: modelling group-mass recruitment in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Bertrand; Deneubourg, Jean Louis; Detrain, Claire

    2012-11-21

    For collective decisions to be made, the information acquired by experienced individuals about resources' location has to be shared with naïve individuals through recruitment. Here, we investigate the properties of collective responses arising from a leader-based recruitment and a self-organized communication by chemical trails. We develop a generalized model based on biological data drawn from Tetramorium caespitum ant species of which collective foraging relies on the coupling of group leading and trail recruitment. We show that for leader-based recruitment, small groups of recruits have to be guided in a very efficient way to allow a collective exploitation of food while large group requires less attention from their leader. In the case of self-organized recruitment through a chemical trail, a critical value of trail amount has to be laid per forager in order to launch collective food exploitation. Thereafter, ants can maintain collective foraging by emitting signal intensity below this threshold. Finally, we demonstrate how the coupling of both recruitment mechanisms may benefit to collectively foraging species. These theoretical results are then compared with experimental data from recruitment by T. caespitum ant colonies performing group-mass recruitment towards a single food source. We evidence the key role of leaders as initiators and catalysts of recruitment before this leader-based process is overtaken by self-organised communication through trails. This model brings new insights as well as a theoretical background to empirical studies about cooperative foraging in group-living species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tamura, Motohide, E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  4. Renormalization-group equations of neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2018-05-01

    We borrow the general idea of renormalization-group equations (RGEs) to understand how neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters evolve when neutrinos propagate in a medium, highlighting a meaningful possibility that the genuine flavor quantities in vacuum can be extrapolated from their matter-corrected counterparts to be measured in some realistic neutrino oscillation experiments. Taking the matter parameter a≡ 2√{2}{G}F{N}_eE to be an arbitrary scale-like variable with N e being the net electron number density and E being the neutrino beam energy, we derive a complete set of differential equations for the effective neutrino mixing matrix V and the effective neutrino masses {\\tilde{m}}_i (for i = 1 , 2 , 3). Given the standard parametrization of V , the RGEs for {{\\tilde{θ}}_{12}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{13}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{23}, \\tilde{δ}} in matter are formulated for the first time. We demonstrate some useful differential invariants which retain the same form from vacuum to matter, including the well-known Naumov and Toshev relations. The RGEs of the partial μ- τ asymmetries, the off-diagonal asymmetries and the sides of unitarity triangles of V are also obtained as a by-product.

  5. [Rapid screening and confirmation of 205 pesticide residues in rice by QuEChERS and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cheng, Lei; Qu, Shichao; Huang, Daliang; Liu, Jiacheng; Cui, Han; Jia, Yanbo; Ji, Mingshan

    2015-10-01

    A method for rapid screening and confirmation of 205 pesticide residues in rice was developed by combining QuEChERS and high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TRAP/MS). The rice samples were extracted with acetonitrile, and then cleaned up with primary secondary amine (PSA), anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) and C18 adsorbent. Finally, the samples were detected by LC-Q-TRAP/MS in multiple reaction monitoring with information-dependent acquisition of enhanced product ion (MRM-IDA-EPI) mode followed with database searching. A total of 205 pesticide residues were confirmed by retention times, ion pairs and the database searching using EPI library, and quantified by external standard method. All the pesticides showed good linearities with linear correlation coefficients all above 0.995. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for the 205 pesticides were 0.5-10.0 μg/kg. The average recoveries of the 205 pesticides ranged from 62.4% to 127.1% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.0% - 20.0% at spiked levels of 10 μg/kg and 50 μg/kg, and only 20 min were needed for the analysis of an actual rice sample. In brief, the method is fast, accurate and highly sensitive, and is suitable for the screening and confirmation of pesticide residues in rice.

  6. Analysis of Veterinary Drug and Pesticide Residues Using the Ethyl Acetate Multiclass/Multiresidue Method in Milk by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniye Imamoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and simple multiclass, ethyl acetate (EtOAc multiresidue method based on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS detection was developed for the determination and quantification of 26 veterinary drugs and 187 total pesticide residues in milk. Sample preparation was a simple procedure based on liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate containing 0.1% acetic acid, followed by centrifugation and evaporation of the supernatant. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate with 0.1% acetic acid and centrifuged prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Chromatographic separation of analytes was performed on an Inertsil X-Terra C18 column with acetic acid in methanol and water gradient. The repeatability and reproducibility were in the range of 2 to 13% and 6 to 16%, respectively. The average recoveries ranged from 75 to 120% with the RSD (n=18. The developed method was validated according to the criteria set in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANTE/11945/2015. The validated methodology represents a fast and cheap alternative for the simultaneous analysis of veterinary drug and pesticide residues which can be easily extended to other compounds and matrices.

  7. Hyperfunction solutions of the zero rest mass equations and representations of LIE groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, hyperfunctions have arisen in an essential way in separate results in mathematical physics and in representation theory. In the setting of the twistor program, Wells, with others, has extended the Penrose transform to hyperfunction solutions of the zero rest mass equations, showing that the fundamental isomorphisms hold for this larger space. Meanwhile, Schmid has shown the existence of a canonical globalization of a Harish-Chandra module, V, to a representation of the group. This maximal globalization may be realized as the completion of V in a locally convex vector space in the hyperfunction topology. This thesis shows that the former is a particular case of the latter where the globalization can be done by hand. This explicit globalization is then carried out for a more general case of the Radon transform on homogeneous spaces

  8. EVOLUTION IN THE H I GAS CONTENT OF GALAXY GROUPS: PRE-PROCESSING AND MASS ASSEMBLY IN THE CURRENT EPOCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Kelley M. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Wilcots, Eric M., E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey α.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group ''proximity' membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

  9. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  10. Comprehensive profiling and marker identification in non-volatile citrus oil residues by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Guillaume; Boccard, Julien; Mehl, Florence; Debrus, Benjamin; Marcourt, Laurence; Merle, Philippe; Delort, Estelle; Baroux, Lucie; Sommer, Horst; Rudaz, Serge; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    The detailed characterization of cold-pressed lemon oils (CPLOs) is of great importance for the flavor and fragrance (F&F) industry. Since a control of authenticity by standard analytical techniques can be bypassed using elaborated adulterated oils to pretend a higher quality, a combination of advanced orthogonal methods has been developed. The present study describes a combined metabolomic approach based on UHPLC-TOF-MS profiling and (1)H NMR fingerprinting to highlight metabolite differences on a set of representative samples used in the F&F industry. A new protocol was set up and adapted to the use of CPLO residues. Multivariate analysis based on both fingerprinting methods showed significant chemical variations between Argentinian and Italian samples. Discriminating markers identified in mixtures belong to furocoumarins, flavonoids, terpenoids and fatty acids. Quantitative NMR revealed low citropten and high bergamottin content in Italian samples. The developed metabolomic approach applied to CPLO residues gives some new perspectives for authenticity assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. IX. THE LEO REGION H I CATALOG, GROUP MEMBERSHIP, AND THE H I MASS FUNCTION FOR THE LEO I GROUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Martin, Ann M.; Kent, Brian R.; Saintonge, Amelie; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.

    2009-01-01

    We present the catalog of H I sources extracted from the ongoing Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) extragalactic H I line survey, found within the sky region bounded by 9 h 36 m h 36 m and +08 0 0 . The H I catalog presented here for this 118 deg 2 region is combined with the ones derived from surrounding regions also covered by the ALFALFA survey to examine the large-scale structure in the complex Leo region. Because of the combination of wide sky coverage and superior sensitivity, spatial and spectral resolution, the ALFALFA H I catalog of the Leo region improves significantly on the numbers of low H I mass sources as compared with those found in previous H I surveys. The H I mass function of the Leo I group presented here is dominated by low-mass objects: 45 of the 65 Leo I members have M H I 8 M-odot, yielding tight constraints on the low-mass slope of the Leo I H I mass function. The best-fit slope is α ≅ -1.41 + 0.2 - 0.1. A direct comparison between the ALFALFA H I line detections and an optical search of the Leo I region proves the advantage of the ALFALFA strategy in finding low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs. These results suggest the existence of a significant population of low surface brightness, gas-rich, yet still very low H I mass galaxies, and may reflect the same type of morphological segregation as is seen in the Local Group. While the low-mass end slope of the Leo I H I mass function is steeper than that determined for luminosity functions of the group, the slope still falls short of the values predicted by simulations of structure formation in the lambda cold dark matter paradigm.

  12. Quantitative Multiclass Pesticide Residue Analysis in Apple, Pear, and Grape by Modified QuEChERS and Liquid Chromatography Coupled to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaretto, Juliana S; Viera, Mariela de S; Martins, Manoel L; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato

    2016-11-01

    Most of the analytical methods currently applied in food control laboratories are focused on the determination of target compounds using LC coupled to tandem MS, which is an effective technique, but low-resolution MS is limited. Thus, a method for determination of pesticide multiresidues in fruits (pear, apple, and grape) using a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method and LC coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) MS was developed and validated. The proposed method showed good linearity (r2 > 0.99) from 1 to 100 μg/L. Recoveries for blank samples spiked at 0.01, 0.04, and 0.10 mg/kg were between 66 and 122%, with RSDs apple, pear, and grape matrixes were 0.01 mg/kg for 112, 120, and 118 compounds, and 0.04 mg/kg for 22, 12, and 17 compounds, and average mass accuracy error was 3.2 ppm. LC with Q-TOF MS detection using protonated molecular ion and/or adducts and mass accuracy provided reliability for the method. The proposed method is effective for pesticide residue determination in apple, pear, and grape samples, proving that high-resolution MS using full scan mode can be a powerful and reliable technique for quantification purposes, being adequate for application in the surveillance of maximum residue limits set by different legislations.

  13. Dynamic behaviour and residual pattern of thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in Swiss chard using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Farha, Waziha; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kabir, Md Humayun; Im, So Jeong; Jung, Da-I; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Kim, Sung-Woo; Son, Young Wook; Kwon, Chan-Hyeok; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2015-05-01

    A simultaneous method was developed to analyse thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in Swiss chard using tandem mass spectrometry (in the positive electrospray ionisation mode using multiple reaction monitoring mode) to estimate the dissipation pattern and the pre-harvest residue limit (PHRL). Thiamethoxam (10%, WG) was sprayed on Swiss chard grown in two different areas under greenhouse conditions at the recommended dose rate of 10 g/20 L water. Samples were collected randomly up to 14 days post-application, extracted using quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe (QuEChERS) acetate-buffered method and purified via a dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) procedure. Matrix matched calibration showed good linearity with determination coefficients (R(2)) ⩾ 0.998. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.007 and 0.02 mg/kg. The method was validated in triplicate at two different spiked concentration levels. Good recoveries (n=3) of 87.48-105.61% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 10 were obtained for both analytes. The rate of disappearance of total thiamethoxam residues in/on Swiss chard was best described by first-order kinetics with half-lives of 6.3 and 4.2 days. We predicted from the PHRL curves that if the residues were <19.21 or 26.98 mg/kg at 10 days before harvest, then total thiamethoxam concentrations would be below the maximum residue limits during harvest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Research of nitroxynil residues in bovine milk following a single administration in the dry period by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Chirollo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitroxynil (NIT is a halogenated phenol used to control fascioliasis in cattle and sheep. The Commission Regulation EU No 37/2010 has established maximum residue limits for NIT in bovine and ovine muscle (400 μg kg−1, fat (200 μg kg−1, liver (20 μg kg−1 and kidney (400 μg kg−1, and more recently in bovine and ovine milk (20 μg kg−1. Thirty-five pregnant dairy cows were treated in this study with nitroxynil (340 mg/mL solution for injection at the recommended dose of 10 mg/kg body weight at the start of the dry period, i.e. 53 to 74 days before the expected calving. Calving occurred between 43 days and 79 days after treatment. The concentrations of NIT in the milk were monitored for up to 120 days after calving. NIT residues were extracted using acetonitrile; magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride were added to induce liquid-liquid partitioning and purified by dispersive solid phase extraction for clean-up. NIT was detected by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS in negative ionization mode. The highest concentrations of this drug were found in two animals at the first milking, 48 and 53 day post treatment with levels of 362 and 657 μg kg–1, respectively. NIT residues were below the limit of detection of the method (0.24 μg/kg–1 between 67 and 106 day post-treatment. Following calving, residues rapidly depleted in animals and were non-detectable from 10 to 38 days post-calving. In particular, in all animals milk resulted compliant (<20 μg/kg−1 three days post partum.

  15. Quantification of 8-α-hydroxy-mutilin as marker residue for tiamulin in rabbit tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Maes, An; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, a sensitive and specific method was developed and fully validated for the quantification of the EU marker residue of tiamulin, 8-α-hydroxy-mutilin, in rabbit muscle and liver tissues using liquid chromatography combined with positive heated electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with selection of the [M + H](+) ion in both quadrupoles 1 and 3, resulting in the SRM transition m/z 337.25 > 337.25 for quantification. Chromatography was performed using a Hypersil Gold C18 column using a gradient elution program with water and methanol as mobile phases. The sample preparation procedure for the analysis of 8-α-hydroxy-mutilin in liver and muscle samples consisted of three main steps: (1) extraction of the tissue matrix using 0.1 N hydrochloric acid/acetone (50/50, v/v), (2) hydrolysis of tiamulin and metabolites to 8-α-hydroxy-mutilin in alkaline medium at 45 °C, and (3) liquid-liquid extraction in acidic medium using ethyl acetate. This is the first method presenting fully validated results, encompassing a linearity of 50 to 2,000 μg/kg, within-run and between-run accuracy and precision, limit of quantification (50 μg/kg for both muscle and liver tissues), limit of detection (muscle, 11.9 μg/kg; liver, 20.6 μg/kg), extraction recovery (muscle, 66.2%; liver, 75.5%), signal suppression and enhancement (muscle, 51.7%; liver, 43.3%), carryover, applicability and practicability, and stability during storage and analysis. This novel method is therefore sensitive enough to be used for residue depletion studies of tiamulin in rabbits and for food safety monitoring with respect to MRL compliance of residues.

  16. [Determination of 51 carbamate pesticide residues in vegetables by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based on optimization of QuEChERS sample preparation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianzhu; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ruilong; Lin, Zixu; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dengfei; Lin, Dejuan; Xu, Dunming

    2013-12-01

    The raw extracts of six vegetables (tomato, green bean, shallot, broccoli, ginger and carrot) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in full scan mode combined with NIST library search to confirm main matrix compounds. The effects of cleanup and adsorption mechanisms of primary secondary amine (PSA) , octadecylsilane (C18) and PSA + C18 on co-extractives were studied by the weight of evaporation residue for extracts before and after cleanup. The suitability of the two versions of QuEChERS method for sample preparation was evaluated for the extraction of 51 carbamate pesticides in the six vegetables. One of the QuEChERS methods was the original un-buffered method published in 2003, and the other was AOAC Official Method 2007.01 using acetate buffer. As a result, the best effects were obtained from using the combination of C18 and PSA for extract cleanup in vegetables. The acetate-buffered version was suitable for the determination of all pesticides except dioxacarb. Un-buffered QuEChERS method gave satisfactory results for determining dioxacarb. Based on these results, the suitable QuEChERS sample preparation method and liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry under the optimized conditions were applied to determine the 51 carbamate pesticide residues in six vegetables. The analytes were quantified by matrix-matched standard solution. The recoveries at three levels of 10, 20 and 100 microg/kg spiked in six vegetables ranged from 58.4% to 126% with the relative standard deviations of 3.3%-26%. The limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N > or = 10) were 0.2-10 microg/kg except that the LOQs of cartap and thiofanox were 50 microg/kg. The method is highly efficient, sensitive and suitable for monitoring the 51 carbamate pesticide residues in vegetables.

  17. Neutron to proton mass difference, parton distribution functions and baryon resonances from dynamics on the Lie group u(3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole

    PiMinus invariant mass in B decays. We give a controversial prediction of the relative neutron to proton mass difference 0.138 % as originating in period doublings of certain parametric states. The group space dynamics communicates with real space via the exterior derivative which projects out quark and gluon...

  18. Spontaneous mass generation and the small dimensions of the Standard Model gauge groups U(1, SU(2 and SU(3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo García Fernández

    2017-02-01

    The result follows from strong antiscreening of the running coupling for those larger groups (with an appropriately small number of flavors together with scaling properties of the Dyson–Schwinger equation for the fermion mass.

  19. New Developments in Mass Spectrometry for Group-Type Analysis of Petroleum Cuts (First Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fafet A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of petroleum cuts constitutes a necessary stage to perfect understanding of the reaction mechanisms and to the description of the kinetics of certain refining processes such as hydrotreating or catalytic cracking. Mass spectrometry (MS, thanks to group-type quantitative analysis methods, enables to access detailed description of complex hydrocarbon mixtures such as middle distillates or heavy cuts such as vacuum distillates. But these methods are also subject to some drawbacks and we shall expose, thereunder, two examples of improvements. In a first part, the accuracy of MS quantification of thiophenic sulphured compounds in middle distillates is studied by intertechnique comparison with the results obtained by gas phase chromatography coupled to sulphur-specific detection by chemiluminescence (GC/SCD. Improving on the MS method is suggested. In the second part, a new system for introducing the sample in the spectrometer source, dedicated to group-type analysis of heavy cuts is described. Its validation, by comparison of the MS results to those of liquid chromatography (LC as well as its performances, is exposed.

  20. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  1. [Monitoring of the residue of fosthiazate in water samples using solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Xin; Fu, Chunmei; Liu, Sankang; Li, Zhangwan

    2004-11-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to determine the fosthiazate residue in water samples. The water samples were first filtered through cellulose filters (0.45 microm pore size). A 100 mL volume of filtered water, in which 1 mL of methanol has been added, was then passed through a pre-conditioned 3 cm C18 cartridge at a flow-rate of 1.5 mL/min. Elution was performed by 1 mL of methanol. The eluant was finally dried under reduced pressure for solvent evaporation. The volume was quantitatively adjusted to 0.5 mL with methanol. The analysis was carried out on GC/MS. The mass spectrometer was operated in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. According to mass spectrum of fosthiazate, three selected ions at m/z of 126, 195, 283, respectively, were monitored for identification and quantification. High sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by using this method. The limit of detection for fosthiazate in water samples was determined to be 56.4 ng/L. The linearity was demonstrated over a wide range of concentrations covering from 0.282 to 141 microg/L. The recoveries were more than 85.5% and the relative standard deviations for the overall procedure were less than 4.42%. The fosthiazate residue was detected in the water samples from a pool near cropland where fosthiazate was used. The results demonstrate the suitability of the SPE-GC/MS approach for the analysis of fosthiazate in water.

  2. Genetic multivariate calibration for near infrared spectroscopic determination of protein, moisture, dry mass, hardness and other residues of wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Durmuş

    2006-01-01

    Determination of wheat flour quality parameters, such as protein, moisture, dry mass by wet chemistry analyses takes long time. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) coupled with multivariate calibration offers a fast and nondestructive alternative to obtain reliable results. However, due to the complexity of the spectra obtained from NIR, some wavelength selection is generally required to improve the predictive ability of multivariate calibration methods. In this study, two different wheat data s...

  3. Improved prediction of residue flexibility by embedding optimized amino acid grouping into RSA-based linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of protein flexibility is vital for deciphering the corresponding functional mechanisms. This knowledge would help, for instance, in improving computational drug design and refinement in homology-based modeling. We propose a new predictor of the residue flexibility, which is expressed by B-factors, from protein chains that use local (in the chain) predicted (or native) relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and custom-derived amino acid (AA) alphabets. Our predictor is implemented as a two-stage linear regression model that uses RSA-based space in a local sequence window in the first stage and a reduced AA pair-based space in the second stage as the inputs. This method is easy to comprehend explicit linear form in both stages. Particle swarm optimization was used to find an optimal reduced AA alphabet to simplify the input space and improve the prediction performance. The average correlation coefficients between the native and predicted B-factors measured on a large benchmark dataset are improved from 0.65 to 0.67 when using the native RSA values and from 0.55 to 0.57 when using the predicted RSA values. Blind tests that were performed on two independent datasets show consistent improvements in the average correlation coefficients by a modest value of 0.02 for both native and predicted RSA-based predictions.

  4. Quantification, confirmation and screening capability of UHPLC coupled to triple quadrupole and hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry in pesticide residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalt, Susana; Sancho, Juan V; Pozo, Oscar J; Hernández, Félix

    2010-04-01

    The potential of three mass spectrometry (MS) analyzers (triple quadrupole, QqQ; time of flight, TOF; and quadrupole time of flight, QTOF) has been investigated and compared for quantification, confirmation and screening purposes in pesticide residue analysis of fruit and vegetable samples. For this purpose, analytical methodology for multiresidue determination of 11 pesticides, taken as a model, has been developed and validated in nine food matrices for the three mass analyzers coupled to ultra high pressure liquid chromatography. In all cases, limits of quantification around 0.01 mg/kg were reached, fulfilling the most restrictive case of baby-food analysis. Regarding absolute sensitivity, the lower limits of detection were obtained, as expected, for QqQ (100 fg), whereas slightly higher limits (300 fg) were obtained for both TOF and QTOF. Confirmative capacity of each analyzer was studied for each analyte based on the identification points (IPs) criterion, useful for a comprehensive comparison. QTOF mass analyzer showed the highest confirmatory capacity, although QqQ normally led to sufficient number of IPs, even at lower concentration levels. The potential of TOF MS was also investigated for screening purposes. To this aim, around 50 commercial fruits and vegetables samples were analyzed, searching for more than 400 pesticides. TOF MS proved to be an attractive analytical tool for rapid detection and reliable identification of a large number of pesticides thanks to the full spectrum acquisition at accurate mass with satisfactory sensitivity. This process is readily boosted when combined with specialized software packages, together with theoretical exact mass databases. Several pesticides (e.g. carbendazim in citrus and indoxacarb in grape) were detected in the samples. Further unequivocal confirmation of the identity was performed using reference standards and/or QTOF MS/MS experiments. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fermion Masses and Mixing in SUSY Grand Unified Gauge Models with Extended Gut Gauge Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chih-Lung

    2005-04-05

    The authors discuss a class of supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified gauge (GUT) models based on the GUT symmetry G x G or G x G x G, where G denotes the GUT group that has the Standard Model symmetry (SU(3){sub c} x SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}) embedded as a subgroup. As motivated from string theory, these models are constructed without introducing any Higgs field of rani two or higher. Thus all the Higgs fields are in the fundamental representations of the extended GUT symmetry or, when G = SO(10), in the spinorial representation. These Higgs fields, when acquiring their vacuum expectation values, would break the extended GUT symmetry down to the Standard Model symmetry. In this dissertation, they argue that the features required of unified models, such as the Higgs doublet-triplet splitting, proton stability, and the hierarchy of fermion masses and mixing angles, could have natural explanations in the framework of the extended SUSY GUTs. Furthermore, they argue that the frameworks used previously to construct SO(10) GUT models using adjoint Higgs fields can naturally arise from the SO(10) x SO(10) and SO(10) x SO(10) x SO(10) models by integrating out heavy fermions. This observation thus suggests that the traditional SUSY GUT SO(10) theories can be viewed as the low energy effective theories generated by breaking the extended GUT symmetry down to the SO(10) symmetry.

  6. Screening of 439 Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables by Gas Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Based on TOF Accurate Mass Database and Q-TOF Spectrum Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Xun; Li, Xiao-Ying; Chang, Qiao-Ying; Li, Yan; Jin, Ling-He; Pang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Chun-Lin

    2018-05-03

    Because of its unique characteristics of accurate mass full-spectrum acquisition, high resolution, and fast acquisition rates, GC-quadrupole-time-of-flight MS (GC-Q-TOF/MS) has become a powerful tool for pesticide residue analysis. In this study, a TOF accurate mass database and Q-TOF spectrum library of 439 pesticides were established, and the parameters of the TOF database were optimized. Through solid-phase extraction (SPE), whereby pesticides are extracted from fruit and vegetable substrates by using 40 mL 1% acetic acid in acetonitrile (v/v), purified by the Carbon/NH₂ SPE cartridge, and finally detected by GC-Q-TOF/MS, the rapid analysis of 439 pesticides in fruits and vegetables can be achieved. The methodology verification results show that more than 70 and 91% of pesticides, spiked in fruits and vegetables with concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/kg, respectively, saw recoveries that conform to the European Commission's criterion of between 70 and 120% with RSD ≤20%. Eighty-one percent of pesticides have screening detection limits lower than 10 μg/kg, which makes this a reliable analysis technology for the monitoring of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables. This technology was further validated for its characteristics of high precision, high speed, and high throughput through successful detection of 9817 samples during 2013-2015.

  7. Effect of the Protection of the Residual Aminopropyl Groups of a Chiral Stationary Phase Based on (+)-(18-Crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic Acid on the Chiral Resolution Behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Hwa; Cho, Yoon Jae

    2004-01-01

    The protection of the unreacted residual aminopropyl groups of CSP 2 was found to improve the retention and the resolution factors for the resolution of racemic compounds containing a primary amino group. However, the size of the protecting acyl group should not be too bulky. As a protecting acyl group, acetyl or butyryl group seems to be good enough for the improved retention and the improved resolution. However, the separation factors were found to decrease slightly when the unreacted residual aminopropyl groups of the CSP are protected by an acyl group.

  8. Effect of the Protection of the Residual Aminopropyl Groups of a Chiral Stationary Phase Based on (+)-(18-Crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic Acid on the Chiral Resolution Behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Hwa; Cho, Yoon Jae [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    The protection of the unreacted residual aminopropyl groups of CSP 2 was found to improve the retention and the resolution factors for the resolution of racemic compounds containing a primary amino group. However, the size of the protecting acyl group should not be too bulky. As a protecting acyl group, acetyl or butyryl group seems to be good enough for the improved retention and the improved resolution. However, the separation factors were found to decrease slightly when the unreacted residual aminopropyl groups of the CSP are protected by an acyl group.

  9. Multivariate study of parameters in the determination of pesticide residues in apple by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using experimental factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulra'uf, Lukman Bola; Tan, Guan Huat

    2013-12-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a solvent-less sample preparation method which combines sample preparation, isolation, concentration and enrichment into one step. In this study, multivariate strategy was used to determine the significance of the factors affecting the solid phase microextraction of pesticide residues (fenobucarb, diazinon, chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos) using a randomised factorial design. The interactions and effects of temperature, time and salt addition on the efficiency of the extraction of the pesticide residues were evaluated using 2(3) factorial designs. The analytes were extracted with 100 μm PDMS fibres according to the factorial design matrix and desorbed into a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detector. The developed method was applied for the analysis of apple samples and the limits of detection were between 0.01 and 0.2 μg kg(-)(1), which were lower than the MRLs for apples. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 0.1% and 13.37% with average recovery of 80-105%. The linearity ranges from 0.5-50 μg kg(-)(1) with correlation coefficient greater than 0.99. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of anthelmintic drug residues in milk using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with rapid polarity switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Michelle; Kinsella, Brian; Furey, Ambrose; Moloney, Mary; Cantwell, Helen; Lehotay, Steven J; Danaher, Martin

    2010-07-02

    A new UHPLC-MS/MS (ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry) method was developed and validated to detect 38 anthelmintic drug residues, consisting of benzimidazoles, avermectins and flukicides. A modified QuEChERS-type extraction method was developed with an added concentration step to detect most of the analytes at keeper to ensure analytes remain in solution. Using rapid polarity switching in electrospray ionisation, a single injection was capable of detecting both positively and negatively charged ions in a 13 min run time. The method was validated at two levels: the unapproved use level and at the maximum residue level (MRL) according to Commission Decision (CD) 2002/657/EC criteria. The decision limit (CCalpha) of the method was in the range of 0.14-1.9 and 11-123 microg kg(-1) for drugs validated at unapproved and MRL levels, respectively. The performance of the method was successfully verified for benzimidazoles and levamisole by participating in a proficiency study.

  11. Determination of ethephon residues in water by gas chromatography with cubic mass spectrometry after ion-exchange purification and derivatisation with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, A; Laporte, F; Bouchonnet, S; Communal, P-Y

    2006-03-03

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of residues of ethephon (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid) in drinking and surface water. The procedure is based on de-ionisation with an anion/cation-exchange resin, solid phase extraction by means of anion-exchange polystyrene-divinylbenzene extraction disks, elution with a mixture of methanol and 10 M hydrochloric acid (98/2, v/v), redisolution into acetonitrile after evaporation and silylation with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Quantification is performed by gas chromatography with ion-trap cubic mass spectrometric detection in the electron impact mode (GC-EI-MS3). Method validation was conducted using samples of mineral, tap, and river water that were fortified with ethephon at concentration levels ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 microg/L. The mean recovery from all the fortified samples (n = 36) amounted to 88% with a relative standard deviation of 17%. The method, therefore, was shown to allow accurate determination of ethephon residues in drinking and surface water with a limit of quantification of 0.1 microg/L.

  12. Activated sludge mass reduction and biodegradability of the endogenous residues by digestion under different aerobic to anaerobic conditions: Comparison and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, C G; Fall, C; Olguín, M T

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to identify suitable conditions for the in-situ reduction of excess sludge production by intercalated digesters in recycle-activated sludge (RAS) flow. The objective was to compare and model biological sludge mass reduction and the biodegradation of endogenous residues (XP) by digestion under hypoxic, aerobic, anaerobic, and five intermittent-aeration conditions. A mathematical model based on the heterotrophic endogenous decay constant (bH) and including the biodegradation of XP was used to fit the long-term data from the digesters to identify and estimate the parameters. Both the bH constant (0.02-0.05 d(-1)) and the endogenous residue biodegradation constant (bP, 0.001-0.004 d(-1)) were determined across the different mediums. The digesters with intermittent aeration cycles of 12 h-12 h and 5 min-3 h (ON/OFF) were the fastest, compared to the aerobic reactor. The study provides a basis for rating RAS-digester volumes to avoid the accumulation of XP in aeration tanks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of six polyether antibiotic residues in foods of animal origin by solid phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jing; Song, Ge; Ai, Lian-Feng; Li, Jian-Chen

    2016-04-01

    A new method using solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of six polyether antibiotics, including lasalocid, salinomycin, monensin, narasin, madubamycin and nigericin residues, in foods of animal origin. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and purified by ENVI-Carb SPE columns after comparing the impurity effect and maneuverability of several SPE cartridges. Subsequently, the analytes were separated on a Hypersil Gold column (2.1×150mm, 5μm) and analyzed by MS/MS detection. The limit of quantization (LOQ) for milk and chicken was 0.4μg/kg, and for chicken livers and eggs, it was 1μg/kg. The linearity was satisfactory with a correlation coefficient of >0.9995 at concentrations ranging from 2 to 100μg/L. The average recoveries of the analytes fortified at three levels ranged from 68.2 to 114.3%, and the relative standard deviations ranged from 4.5 to 12.1%. The method was suitable for quantitative analysis and confirmation of polyether antibiotic residues in foods of animal origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of Oxytetracycline and 4-Epi-Oxytetracycline Residues in Feathers and Edible Tissues of Broiler Chickens Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, Javiera; Pokrant, Ekaterina; Krogh, Magdalena; Briceño, Cristóbal; Hidalgo, Héctor; Maddaleno, Aldo; Araya-Jordán, Carolina; Martín, Betty San

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics have been widely used in poultry production for the treatment of bacterial diseases. However, drug residues can remain in products derived from animals after the cessation of the drug therapies. Feathers, in particular, have shown an affinity for antibiotics such as tetracycline, suggesting the persistence of these drugs in nonedible tissue. After the birds are slaughtered, feathers are ground into feather meals, which are used as organic fertilizer or an ingredient in animal diets, thereby entering into the food chain and becoming a potential risk for public health. To evaluate the depletion of oxytetracycline (OTC) and its metabolite 4-epi-oxytetracycline (4-epi-OTC) in the muscles, liver, and feathers, 64 broiler chickens, bred under controlled conditions, were treated orally with a commercial formulation of 10% OTC for 7 days. The analytes were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OTC and 4-epi-OTC were found in the feathers for 46 days, whereas they were found in the muscle and liver for only 12 and 6 days, respectively. These results prove that the analytes remain in feathers in higher concentrations than they do in edible tissues after treatment with tetracyclines. Thus, feather meals represent a potential source of antimicrobial residue contamination in the food chain.

  15. Comparison of sample digestion techniques for the determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in single-wall carbon nanotubes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinberg, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.grinberg@nrc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Sturgeon, Ralph E. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Diehl, Liange de O.; Bizzi, Cezar A. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M. [Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube material produced by laser ablation of renewable biochar in the presence of Ni and Co catalyst was characterized for residual catalyst (Co and Ni) as well as trace metal impurity content (Fe, Mo, Cr, Pb and Hg) by isotope dilution ICP-MS following sample digestion. Several matrix destruction procedures were evaluated, including a multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion, dry ashing at 450 °C and microwave-induced combustion with oxygen. Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements. Although laborious to execute, the multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion proved to be most reliable for recovery of the majority of the analytes, although content of Cr remained biased low for each approach, likely due to its presence as refractory carbide. - Highlights: • Determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. • Comparative study of digestion methodology combined with high precision isotope dilution ICP-MS for quantitation of elements of toxicologic relevance. • Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements.

  16. Automated multi-plug filtration cleanup for liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric pesticide multi-residue analysis in representative crop commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Fangbing; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Xu, Haowei; Qian, Meiyuan; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-02

    An automated multi-plug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method on modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. The automatic device was aimed to reduce labor-consuming manual operation workload in the cleanup steps. It could control the volume and the speed of pulling and pushing cycles accurately. In this work, m-PFC was based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with other sorbents and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in a packed tip for analysis of pesticide multi-residues in crop commodities followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) detection. It was validated by analyzing 25 pesticides in six representative matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100μg/kg. Salts, sorbents, m-PFC procedure, automated pulling and pushing volume, automated pulling speed, and pushing speed for each matrix were optimized. After optimization, two general automated m-PFC methods were introduced to relatively simple (apple, citrus fruit, peanut) and relatively complex (spinach, leek, green tea) matrices. Spike recoveries were within 83 and 108% and 1-14% RSD for most analytes in the tested matrices. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.997 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of ametoctradin residue in fruits and vegetables by modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingfeng; Liu, Xingang; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Li, Shasha; Xu, Hanqing; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-05-15

    A rapid, effective and sensitive method to quantitatively determine ametoctradin residue in apple, cucumber, cabbage, tomato and grape was developed and validated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The target compound was determined in less than 5.0 min using an electrospray ionisation source in positive mode (ESI+). The limit of detection was below 0.043 μg kg(-1), whereas the limits of quantification did not exceed 0.135 μg kg(-1) in all five matrices. The method showed excellent linearity (R(2)>0.9969) for the target compound. Recovery studies were performed in all matrices at three spiked levels (1, 10 and 100 μg L(-1)). The mean recoveries from five matrices ranged from 81.81% to 100.1%, with intra-day relative standard deviations (RSDr) in the range of 0.65-7.88% for the test compound. This method will be useful for the quick and routine detection of ametoctradin residues in potato, grape, cucumber, apple and tomato. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring method for determining multiple pesticide residues in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, G C R M; Monteiro, S H; Francisco, J G; Figueiredo, L A; Botelho, R G; Tornisielo, V L

    2015-05-15

    A quick and sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method, using dynamic multiple reaction monitoring and a 1.8-μm particle size analytical column, was developed to determine 57 pesticides in tomato in a 13-min run. QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method for samples preparations and validations was carried out in compliance with EU SANCO guidelines. The method was applied to 58 tomato samples. More than 84% of the compounds investigated showed limits of detection equal to or lower than 5 mg kg(-1). A mild (50%) matrix effect was observed for 72%, 25%, and 3% of the pesticides studied, respectively. Eighty-one percent of the pesticides showed recoveries ranging between 70% and 120%. Twelve pesticides were detected in 35 samples, all below the maximum residue levels permitted in the Brazilian legislation; 15 samples exceeded the maximum residue levels established by the EU legislation for methamidophos; and 10 exceeded limits for acephate and four for bromuconazole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of some selected pesticide residues in apple juice by solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography – mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hercegová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of solid phase microextraction (SPME for enrichment of pesticides from apple juice was investigated. Samples were diluted with water, extracted by solid-phase microextraction and analysed by gas chromatography using mass-spectrometry detector (MSD in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM. The method was tested for the following pesticides used mostly in fruit culturing at Slovakia: tebuthylazine, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, myclobutanil, cyprodinil, phosalone, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, kresoxim-methyl, methidathion, penconazole. All pesticides were extracted with polydimethylsiloxane fibre 100 μm thickness. The linear concentration range of application was 0.05 μg dm−3–10 μg dm−3. The method described provides detectabilities complying with the maximum residue levels (MRLs set by regulatory organizations for pesticides in apple juice matrices. The solvent – free SPME procedure was found to be quicker and more cost effective then the solvent extraction methods commonly used.

  20. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaud, Lauriane [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Monteau, Fabrice [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Deceuninck, Yoann [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Bichon, Emmanuelle [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Andre, Francois [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Le Bizec, Bruno [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: lebizec@vet-nantes.fr

    2007-03-14

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CC{alpha}) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} range.

  1. First results from the IllustrisTNG simulations: the stellar mass content of groups and clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillepich, Annalisa; Nelson, Dylan; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Torrey, Paul; Weinberger, Rainer; Genel, Shy; Naiman, Jill P.; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2018-03-01

    The IllustrisTNG project is a new suite of cosmological magnetohydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation performed with the AREPO code and updated models for feedback physics. Here, we introduce the first two simulations of the series, TNG100 and TNG300, and quantify the stellar mass content of about 4000 massive galaxy groups and clusters (1013 ≤ M200c/M⊙ ≤ 1015) at recent times (z ≤ 1). The richest clusters have half of their total stellar mass bound to satellite galaxies, with the other half being associated with the central galaxy and the diffuse intracluster light. Haloes more massive than about 5 × 1014 M⊙ have more diffuse stellar mass outside 100 kpc than within 100 kpc, with power-law slopes of the radial mass density distribution as shallow as the dark matter's ( - 3.5 ≲ α3D ≲ -3). Total halo mass is a very good predictor of stellar mass, and vice versa: at z = 0, the 3D stellar mass measured within 30 kpc scales as ∝(M500c)0.49 with a ˜0.12 dex scatter. This is possibly too steep in comparison to the available observational constraints, even though the abundance of The Next Generation less-massive galaxies ( ≲ 1011 M⊙ in stars) is in good agreement with the measured galaxy stellar mass functions at recent epochs. The 3D sizes of massive galaxies fall too on a tight (˜0.16 dex scatter) power-law relation with halo mass, with r^stars_0.5 ∝ (M_200c)^{0.53}. Even more fundamentally, halo mass alone is a good predictor for the whole stellar mass profiles beyond the inner few kiloparsecs, and we show how on average these can be precisely recovered given a single-mass measurement of the galaxy or its halo.

  2. Report of the working group on precision measurements. - Measurement of the W boson mass and width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, R.; Erler, J.; Kim, Y.-K.; Marciano, W.; Ashmanskas, W.; Baur, U.; Ellison, J.; Lancaster, M.; Nodulman, L.; Rha, J.; Waters, D.; Womersley, J.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for measuring the W mass and width in Run II. The basic techniques used to measure M W are described and the statistical, theoretical and detector-related uncertainties are discussed in detail. Alternative methods of measuring the W mass at the Tevatron and the prospects for M W measurements at other colliders are also described

  3. Variability of the lowest mass objects in the AB Doradus moving group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Johanna M.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Biller, Beth A.; Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Gallimore, Jack F.; Adenuga, Iyadunni J.; Best, William M. J.

    2018-02-01

    We present the detection of [3.6 μm] photometric variability in two young, L/T transition brown dwarfs, WISE J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047) and 2MASS J2244316+204343 (2M2244) using the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find a period of 16.4 ± 0.2 h and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.07 ± 0.04 per cent for W0047, and a period of 11 ± 2 h and amplitude of 0.8 ± 0.2 per cent for 2M2244. This period is significantly longer than that measured previously during a shorter observation. We additionally detect significant J-band variability in 2M2244 using the Wide-Field Camera on UKIRT. We determine the radial and rotational velocities of both objects using Keck NIRSPEC data. We find a radial velocity of -16.0_{-0.9}^{+0.8} km s-1 for 2M2244, and confirm it as a bona fide member of the AB Doradus moving group. We find rotational velocities of v sin i = 9.8 ± 0.3 and 14.3^{+1.4}_{-1.5} km s-1 for W0047 and 2M2244, respectively. With inclination angles of 85°+5-9 and 76°+14-20, W0047 and 2M2244 are viewed roughly equator-on. Their remarkably similar colours, spectra and inclinations are consistent with the possibility that viewing angle may influence atmospheric appearance. We additionally present Spitzer [4.5 μm] monitoring of the young, T5.5 object SDSS111010+011613 (SDSS1110) where we detect no variability. For periods <18 h, we place an upper limit of 1.25 per cent on the peak-to-peak variability amplitude of SDSS1110.

  4. MSPD procedure for determining buprofezin, tetradifon, vinclozolin, and bifenthrin residues in propolis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Thaíse Fernanda Santana; Aquino, Adriano; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira; Navickiene, Sandro

    2008-03-01

    A simple and effective extraction method based on matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) was developed to determine bifenthrin, buprofezin, tetradifon, and vinclozolin in propolis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode (GC-MS, SIM). Different method conditions were evaluated, for example type of solid phase (C(18), alumina, silica, and Florisil), the amount of solid phase and eluent (n-hexane, dichloromethane, dichloromethane-n-hexane (8:2 and 1:1, v/v) and dichloromethane-ethyl acetate (9:1, 8:2 and 7:3, v/v)). The best results were obtained using 0.5 g propolis, 1.0 g silica as dispersant sorbent, 1.0 g Florisil as clean-up sorbent, and dichloromethane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v) as eluting solvent. The method was validated by analysis of propolis samples fortified at different concentration levels (0.25 to 1.0 mg kg(-1)). Average recoveries (four replicates) ranged from 67% to 175% with relative standard deviation between 5.6% and 12.1%. Detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.05 to 0.10 mg kg(-1) and 0.15 to 0.25 mg kg(-1) propolis, respectively.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Hormonal Residues in Treated Waters Using Ultrahigh Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayco Guedes-Alonso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, hormone consumption has increased exponentially. Because of that, hormone compounds are considered emerging pollutants since several studies have determinted their presence in water influents and effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs. In this study, a quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of oestrogens (estrone, 17β-estradiol, estriol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, and diethylstilbestrol, androgens (testosterone, and progestogens (norgestrel and megestrol acetate has been developed to determine these compounds in wastewater samples. Due to the very low concentrations of target compounds in the environment, a solid phase extraction procedure has been optimized and developed to extract and preconcentrate the analytes. Determination and quantification were performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS. The method developed presents satisfactory limits of detection (between 0.15 and 9.35 ng·L−1, good recoveries (between 73 and 90% for the most of compounds, and low relative standard deviations (under 8.4%. Samples from influents and effluents of two wastewater treatment plants of Gran Canaria (Spain were analyzed using the proposed method, finding several hormones with concentrations ranged from 5 to 300 ng·L−1.

  6. Alendronate has a residual effect on bone mass in postmenopausal Danish women up to 7 years after treatment withdrawal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Yu Z; Tankó, László B; Alexandersen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    for 7, 5, or 3 yr, respectively. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, hip, and forearm was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Biochemical markers of bone turnover were induced serum C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) and osteocalcin. Women who received alendronate (2...... was found in women treated with alendronate 20 mg per day for 2 yr (9.7%, P=0.01 vs. placebo). The rate of bone loss after alendronate withdrawal was comparable to the bone loss observed in the placebo group. Bone markers tended to reverse back to normal levels, but were still affected even several years...

  7. [Simultaneous determination of pyraclostrobin and thiophanate-methyl and its metabolite carbendazim residues in soil and citrus by QuEChERS-liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuqin; Shi, Lihong; Wang, Fei; Sun, Caiyuan; Kang, Di; Zhang, Yuping; Chen, Lingzhu; Hu, Deyu

    2017-06-08

    A QuEChERS-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of pyraclostrobin, thiophanate-methyl and its metabolite carbendazim in soil and citrus. The samples were extracted with methanol or acetonitrile, purified by primary secondary amine (PSA), then separated by LC, detected in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry mode via positive electrospray ionization. The analytes were quantified by matrix-matched standard solutions with external standard method. The limits of quantification (LOQs) of pyraclostrobin, thiophanate-methyl and carbendazim in different matrices were 5.8-7.0 μg/kg, 9.3-14.1 μg/kg and 2.1-2.6 μg/kg, respectively. For all the samples, the spiked recoveries ranged from 75.48% to 109.18%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 0.60%-5.11% ( n =5). The method is quick, easy, effective, sensitive and accurate. The matrix-matched calibration solutions can efficiently compensate matrix effects of the pyraclostrobin, thiophanate-methyl and carbendazim in LC-MS/MS analysis. The established method can be applied to the residue analysis of the real samples of soil, citrus peel, citrus pulp and citrus fruits.

  8. Determination of pesticide residues in olives by liquid extraction surface analysis followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Almenar, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pesticides are essential in modern agriculture for crop protection, however, this use supposes a potential risk for human health and the environment. Traditional techniques of pesticide determination require the use of laborious and complex extraction methods to separate pesticides from the matrix, above all in fatty matrices like olives. For this reason, a new simple, rapid, cheap and selective method for the extraction and quantification of the most frequently used pesticides in olive growing has been developed. Pesticide determination was carried out by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC coupled with triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Mean recoveries were found in a range between 73 and 114% with relative standard deviations lower than 20% in most pesticides evaluated and the limits of detection (LODs and quantification (LOQs were lower than 4 μg· kg-1 and 8 μg· kg-1, respectively. Finally, this method was applied to the analysis of 25 olive samples where Dimethoate and Terbuthylazine were detected in some cases, but their results were lower than 15 μg· kg-1.Hoy en día los pesticidas son esenciales en la agricultura moderna para la protección de los cultivos pero su uso supone un riesgo para la salud y el medio ambiente. Las técnicas tradicionales de determinación de pesticidas requieren el uso de métodos de extracción complejos a fin de separar los pesticidas de la matriz, sobre todo en matrices grasas como las aceitunas. Por ello, se ha desarrollado un nuevo método simple, rápido, barato y selectivo para la extracción y cuantificación de los pesticidas más frecuentemente utilizados en el cultivo del olivo, empleando cromatografía líquida de ultra-resolución (UPLC acoplada a espectrometría de masas (MS/MS. Las recuperaciones alcanzadas variaron entre el 73 y 114% obteniendo desviaciones estándar relativas inferiores al 20%. Los límites de detección (LD y cuantificación (LQ fueron

  9. The influence of a residual group in low-molecular-weight allergoids of Artemisia vulgaris pollen on their allergenicity, IgE- and IgG-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirković, T; Gavrović-Jankulović, M; Prisić, S; Jankov, R M; Burazer, L; Vucković, O; Sporcić, Z; Paranos, S

    2002-11-01

    Reaction of epsilon-amino groups of lysine with potassium cyanate, maleic, or succinic anhydride leads to allergoids of low molecular weight. No study has been performed to compare their properties and investigate the influence of a residual group on allergenicity and human IgE- and IgG-binding of these derivatives. Allergoids of a pollen extract of Artemisia vulgaris were obtained by means of potassium cyanate, and succinic and maleic anhydride. Biochemical properties were investigated by determination of amino groups, enzyme activity, isoelectric focusing IEF and SDS-PAGE. IgE- and IgG-binding was determined using immunoblots and ELISA inhibition. Allergenicity was investigated by skin prick tests (SPT) on a group of 52 patients, of which 6 were control subjects, 30 were patients with no previous immunotherapy (IT), and 16 were patients undergoing immunotherapy. The same degree of amino-group modification (more than 85%), residual enzyme activity (less then 15%), IEF, and SDS-PAGE pattern were noted. In the immunoblots of IgE-binding, there was more pronounced reduction in the succinyl and maleyl derivatives than in the carbamyl one. IgG-binding was less affected by carbamylation than by acid anhydride modification. The SPT showed that the succinylated derivative had the most reduced allergenicity (98% showed a reduced wheal diameter when tested with the succinyl derivative, 87% with the maleyl allergoid, and 83% with the carbamyl allergoid). The most significant difference among allergoids could be seen in the group of patients with high skin reactivity (83% of patients showed no reaction to the succinyl derivative when compared to the value of 28% for the carbamyl derivative or 22% for the maleyl derivative). According to our results, all three modification procedures yielded allergoids with a similar extent of modification. No single biochemical parameter investigated in the study could predict the degree of reduced allergenicity in vivo. The most reduced

  10. Blood group genotyping: the power and limitations of the Hemo ID Panel and MassARRAY platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBean, Rhiannon S; Hyland, Catherine A; Flower, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), is a sensitive analytical method capable of resolving DNA fragments varying in mass by a single nucleotide. MALDI-TOF MS is applicable to blood group genotyping, as the majority of blood group antigens are encoded by single nucleotide polymorphisms. Blood group genotyping by MALDI-TOF MS can be performed using a panel (Hemo ID Blood Group Genotyping Panel, Agena Bioscience Inc., San Diego, CA) that is a set of genotyping assays that predict the phenotype for 101 antigens from 16 blood group systems. These assays involve three fundamental stages: multiplex target-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, allele-specific single base primer extension, and MALDI-TOFMS analysis using the MassARRAY system. MALDI-TOF MS-based genotyping has many advantages over alternative methods including high throughput, high multiplex capability, flexibility and adaptability, and the high level of accuracy based on the direct detection method. Currently available platforms for MALDI-TOF MS-based genotyping are not without limitations, including high upfront instrumentation costs and the number of non-automated steps. The Hemo ID Blood Group Genotyping Panel, developed and optimized in a collaboration between the vendor and the Blood Transfusion Service of the Swiss Red Cross in Zurich, Switzerland, is not yet widely utilized, although several laboratories are currently evaluating the MassARRAY system for blood group genotyping. Based on the accuracy and other advantages offered by MALDITOF MS analysis, in the future, this method is likely to become widely adopted for blood group genotyping, in particular, for population screening.

  11. Screening of 485 Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables by Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Based on TOF Accurate Mass Database and QTOF Spectrum Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Chun-Lin; Chang, Qiao-Ying; Li, Jian-Xun; Kang, Jian; Lu, Mei-Ling

    2018-03-22

    This paper uses the LC-quadrupole-time-of-flight MS technique to evaluate the behavioral characteristics of MSof 485 pesticides under different conditions and has developed an accurate mass database and spectra library. A high-throughput screening and confirmation method has been developed for the 485 pesticides in fruits and vegetables. Through the optimization of parameters such as accurate mass number, time of retention window, ionization forms, etc., the method has improved the accuracy of pesticide screening, thus avoiding the occurrence of false-positive and false-negative results. The method features a full scan of fragments, with 80% of pesticide qualitative points over 10, which helps increase pesticide qualitative accuracy. The abundant differences of fragment categories help realize the effective separation and qualitative identification of isomer pesticides. Four different fruits and vegetables-apples, grapes, celery, and tomatoes-were chosen to evaluate the efficiency of the method at three fortification levels of 5, 10, and 20 μg/kg, and satisfactory results were obtained. With this method, a national survey of pesticide residues was conducted between 2012 and 2015 for 12 551 samples of 146 different fruits and vegetables collected from 638 sampling points in 284 counties across 31 provincial capitals/cities directly under the central government, which provided scientific data backup for ensuring pesticide residue safety of the fruits and vegetables consumed daily by the public. Meanwhile, the big data statistical analysis of the new technique also further proves it to be of high speed, high throughput, high accuracy, high reliability, and high informatization.

  12. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization Q-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for the analysis of 451 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables: method development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Chow, Willis; Chang, James; Wong, Jon W

    2014-10-22

    This paper presents an application of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap MS) for the determination of 451 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables. Pesticides were extracted from samples using the QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) procedure. UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap MS in full MS scan mode acquired full MS data for quantification, and UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap Full MS/dd-MS(2) (i.e., data-dependent scan mode) obtained product ion spectra for identification. UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap MS quantification was achieved using matrix-matched standard calibration curves along with the use of isotopically labeled standards or a chemical analogue as internal standards to achieve optimal method accuracy. The method performance characteristics include overall recovery, intermediate precision, and measurement uncertainty evaluated according to a nested experimental design. For the 10 matrices studied, 94.5% of the pesticides in fruits and 90.7% in vegetables had recoveries between 81 and 110%; 99.3% of the pesticides in fruits and 99.1% of the pesticides in vegetables had an intermediate precision of ≤20%; and 97.8% of the pesticides in fruits and 96.4% of the pesticides in vegetables showed measurement uncertainty of ≤50%. Overall, the UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap MS demonstrated acceptable performance for the quantification of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables. The UHPLC/ESI Q-Orbitrap Full MS/dd-MS(2) along with library matching showed great potential for identification and is being investigated further for routine practice.

  13. 2MASS J13243553+6358281 Is an Early T-type Planetary-mass Object in the AB Doradus Moving Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Allers, Katelyn N.; Theissen, Christopher A.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Artigau, Étienne

    2018-02-01

    We present new radial velocity and trigonometric distance measurements indicating that the unusually red and photometrically variable T2 dwarf 2MASS J13243553+6358281 is a member of the young (∼150 Myr) AB Doradus moving group (ABDMG) based on its space velocity. We estimate its model-dependent mass in the range 11–12 M Jup at the age of the ABDMG, and its trigonometric distance of 12.7 ± 1.5 pc makes it one of the nearest known isolated planetary-mass objects. The unusually red continuum of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 in the near-infrared was previously suspected to be caused by an unresolved L + T brown dwarf binary, although it was never observed with high spatial resolution imaging. This new evidence of youth suggests that a low surface gravity may be sufficient to explain this peculiar feature. Using the new parallax we find that its absolute J-band magnitude is ∼0.4 mag fainter than equivalent-type field brown dwarfs, suggesting that the binary hypothesis is unlikely. The fundamental properties of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 follow the spectral type sequence of other known high-likelihood members of the ABDMG. The effective temperature of 2MASS J13243553+6358281 provides the first precise constraint on the L/T transition at a known young age and indicates that it happens at a temperature of ∼1150 K at ∼150 Myr, compared to ∼1250 K for field brown dwarfs.

  14. The interplay between scent trails and group-mass recruitment systems in ants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planque, R.; van den Berg, G.J.B.; Franks, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Large ant colonies invariably use effective scent trails to guide copious ant numbers to food sources. The success of mass recruitment hinges on the involvement of many colony members to lay powerful trails. However, many ant colonies start off as single queens. How do these same colonies forage

  15. A Three-Year Follow-Up Study of Antibiotic and Metal Residues, Antibiotic Resistance and Resistance Genes, Focusing on Kshipra—A River Associated with Holy Religious Mass-Bathing in India: Protocol Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Diwan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotic resistance (ABR is one of the major health emergencies for global society. Little is known about the ABR of environmental bacteria and therefore it is important to understand ABR reservoirs in the environment and their potential impact on health. Method/Design: Quantitative and qualitative data will be collected during a 3-year follow-up study of a river associated with religious mass-bathing in Central India. Surface-water and sediment samples will be collected from seven locations at regular intervals for 3 years during religious mass-bathing and in absence of it to monitor water-quality, antibiotic residues, resistant bacteria, antibiotic resistance genes and metals. Approval has been obtained from the Ethics Committee of R.D. Gardi Medical College, Ujjain, India (No. 2013/07/17-311. Results: The results will address the issue of antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance with a focus on a river environment in India within a typical socio-behavioural context of religious mass-bathing. It will enhance our understanding about the relationship between antibiotic residue levels, water-quality, heavy metals and antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli isolated from river-water and sediment, and seasonal differences that are associated with religious mass-bathing. We will also document, identify and clarify the genetic differences/similarities relating to phenotypic antibiotic resistance in bacteria in rivers during religious mass-bathing or during periods when there is no mass-bathing.

  16. A Three-Year Follow-Up Study of Antibiotic and Metal Residues, Antibiotic Resistance and Resistance Genes, Focusing on Kshipra-A River Associated with Holy Religious Mass-Bathing in India: Protocol Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Purohit, Manju; Chandran, Salesh; Parashar, Vivek; Shah, Harshada; Mahadik, Vijay K; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Tamhankar, Ashok J

    2017-05-29

    Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is one of the major health emergencies for global society. Little is known about the ABR of environmental bacteria and therefore it is important to understand ABR reservoirs in the environment and their potential impact on health. Quantitative and qualitative data will be collected during a 3-year follow-up study of a river associated with religious mass-bathing in Central India. Surface-water and sediment samples will be collected from seven locations at regular intervals for 3 years during religious mass-bathing and in absence of it to monitor water-quality, antibiotic residues, resistant bacteria, antibiotic resistance genes and metals. Approval has been obtained from the Ethics Committee of R.D. Gardi Medical College, Ujjain, India (No. 2013/07/17-311). The results will address the issue of antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance with a focus on a river environment in India within a typical socio-behavioural context of religious mass-bathing. It will enhance our understanding about the relationship between antibiotic residue levels, water-quality, heavy metals and antibiotic resistance patterns in Escherichia coli isolated from river-water and sediment, and seasonal differences that are associated with religious mass-bathing. We will also document, identify and clarify the genetic differences/similarities relating to phenotypic antibiotic resistance in bacteria in rivers during religious mass-bathing or during periods when there is no mass-bathing.

  17. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  18. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C.; Grassi, G.

    2015-01-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ( 3 He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the 239 Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and 235 U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the modeling approach

  19. Evaluation of clayey masses compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to obtain tubular ceramic membranes; Avaliacao das composicoes de massas argilosas a partir da incorporacao de residuo da industria de ceramica vermelha na obtencao de membranas ceramicas tubulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Adriano Lima da; Chaves, Alexsandra Cristina; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Neves, Gelmires de Araujo; Lira, Helio de Lucena, E-mail: adrianolimadasilva@hotmail.com, E-mail: alexsandra.chaves@ifap.edu.br, E-mail: brunobarretodemaufcg@hotmail.com, E-mail: gelmires@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-01-15

    The inappropriate residue disposal of red ceramic industry is very high. Nowadays, one of the major challenges is the investigation of processes to obtain alternative materials, enabling the use of these residues to manufacture new materials. This work's objective is to study clayey masses' compositions starting from the residue incorporation of the red ceramic industry to be used in tubular ceramic membranes. Two compositions of ceramic masses were established, composition A (50% of residue) and composition B (70% of residue). Granulometric analysis of the ceramic masses presented an average size of particles, what indicates membranes in the microfiltration scale. Another observed factor is related to the increase of residue amount, what favored a decrease in the ceramic mass' plasticity. A rise in the apparent porosity was also observed, probably because of a possible growing in the bigger pores numbers, due to the sintering high temperature and the elevation of residue quantity itself. (author)

  20. Simultaneous determination of three pesticide adjuvant residues in plant-derived agro-products using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zejun; Cao, Xiaolin; Su, Hang; Shao, Hua; Jin, Fen; Abd El-Aty, A M; Wang, Jing

    2017-12-15

    Herein, an accurate and reliable isotope-labelled internal standard method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of three polar pesticide adjuvants, namely 2-pyrrolidone, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and N-ethyl-2-pyrrolidone in plant-derived agro-products. Matrices, including apple, cabbage, tomato, cucumber, rice, and wheat were extracted with a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe "QuEChERS" method and purified with a new clean-up sorbent (Z-Sep). A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column (HILIC), exhibiting a lipophilic-hydrophilic character, was used to separate the three analytes over 10min using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Matrix effects in various matrices were evaluated and an isotope-labelled internal standard method was employed to compensate for ion enhancement/suppression effects. At three fortification levels (2.0, 5.0, and 20.0μg/kg), the mean recoveries ranged from 78.5 to 112.1% with relative standard deviations (RSDs)determination of the three tested pesticide adjuvant residues in agro-products of plant origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High-throughput screening of pesticide and veterinary drug residues in baby food by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Chu, Xiaogang; Ling, Yun; Huang, Junrong; Chang, James

    2014-06-20

    A new analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of 333 pesticide and veterinary drug residues in baby food. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize a generic extraction method. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization quadrupole Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI Q-Orbitrap) was used for the separation and detection of all the analytes. The method was validated by taking into consideration the guidelines specified in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and SANCO/12571/2013. The extraction recoveries were in a range of 79.8-110.7%, with coefficient of variation 0.99. The limits of detection for the analytes are in the range 0.01-5.35μgkg(-1). The limits of quantification for the analytes are in the range 0.01-9.27μgkg(-1). This method has been successfully applied on screening of pesticide and veterinary drugs in ninety-three commercial baby food samples, and tilmicosin, fenbendazole, tylosin tartrate and thiabendazole were detected in some samples tested in this study. The present study is very useful for fast screening of different food contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Simultaneous determination of ethephon, thidiazuron, diuroN residues in cotton by using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen; Shi, Yingzhu; Hou, Jianbo; Huang, Chaoqun; Zhao, Dong; Pan, Lulu; Dong, Suozhuai

    2014-02-01

    A method for the determination of ethephon, thidiazuron and diuron in cotton samples has been developed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The sample was extracted with methanol-water. The separation was carried out on a C8 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with methanol-water (6:4, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min, and the injection volume was 20 microL. Then the sample solution was analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS in negative ion mode with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). There were one precursor/two product ion transitions for each pesticide. The results showed that the working curves were linear in the range of 0-10 microg/L for ethephon and thidiazuron, and 0-1 microg/L for diuron. The correlation coefficients (r) were all over 0. 999. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) of ethephon, diuron were 40 microg/kg, that of thidiazuron was 4 microg/kg. The average recoveries varied from 89.4% to 100.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 5.7%-11.5% at three spiked levels (LOQ, 2LOQ and 4LOQ). The method is simple, rapid and accurate, and can meet the requirements of the domestic and international legislation. The method adapts to confirm the residues of ethephon, thidiazuron and diuron pesticides in cotton samples.

  3. Simultaneous determination of residues of thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in tobacco leaf and soil using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Banghua; Yu, Yurong; Zhang, Qingtao; Wang, Shouyi; Hu, Deyu; Zhang, Kankan

    2018-03-02

    A simple analytical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiamethoxam and its metabolite, clothianidin, in fresh tobacco leaf, soil and cured tobacco leaf using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Thiamethoxam and clothianidin in tobacco and soil samples were extracted with acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid and purified using an NH 2 -SPE column. The optimized method provided good linearity with coefficients of determination R 2  ≥ 0.9981. The limits of detection and quantification were between 0.006-0.12 and 0.02-0.4 mg/kg, respectively. Intra- and inter-day recovery assays were used to validate the established method. The average recoveries of thiamethoxam and clothianidin in fresh tobacco leaf, soil and cured tobacco leaf were 75.04-100.47%, 75.86-86.40% and 89.83-99.39%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were all clothianidin residues in actual tobacco and soil samples. The results indicated that the established method met the requirements for the analysis of trace amounts of thiamethoxam and clothianidin in fresh tobacco leaf, soil and cured tobacco leaf. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Simultaneous determination of thiamethoxam, clothianidin, and metazachlor residues in soil by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Silvia; Ares, Ana M; Bernal, José Luis; Nozal, María Jesús; Bernal, José

    2017-03-01

    A rapid pioneering method has been developed to simultaneously determine residues of three pesticides (thiamethoxam, clothianidin, and metazachlor) in soil by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometry detector (quadrupole time-of-flight). An efficient extraction procedure (90-105% average analyte recoveries) has also been proposed, involving solid-liquid extraction by a mixture of water and methanol (60:40, v/v), centrifugation, and concentration. A chromatographic analysis of the compounds was achieved in 5.5 min by means of a core-shell technology based column (Kinetex ® EVO C 18 , 50 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm, 100 Å). The mobile phase (0.3 mL/min, gradient elution mode) consisted of 0.1% v/v formic acid in water and 0.1% v/v formic acid in acetonitrile. The method was fully validated in terms of selectivity, detection and quantification limits, matrix effect, linearity, trueness, and precision. Low limits of detection and quantification were obtained, ranging from 0.2 to 3.0 μg/kg, which are similar to those published in previous studies, while the absence of a significant matrix effect allowed quantification of the pesticides with standard calibration curves. The proposed method was applied for an analysis of pesticides in several soil samples from experimental fields dedicated to oilseed rape cultivars. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fast and easy extraction combined with high resolution-mass spectrometry for residue analysis of two anticonvulsants and their transformation products in marine mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Bueno, M J; Boillot, C; Fenet, H; Chiron, S; Casellas, C; Gómez, E

    2013-08-30

    Environmental field studies have shown that carbamazepine (Cbz) is one of the most frequently detected human pharmaceuticals in different aquatic compartments. However, little data is available on the detection of this substance and its transformation products in aquatic organisms. This study was thus mainly carried out to optimize and validate a simple and sensitive analytical methodology for the detection, characterization and quantification of Cbz and oxcarbazepine (Ox), two anticonvulsants, and six of their main transformation products in marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis). A modified QuEChERS extraction method followed by analysis with liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used. The analyses were performed using two-stage fragmentation to reveal the different fragmentation pathways that are highly useful for the identification of isomeric compounds, a common problem when several transformation products are analyzed. The developed analytical method allowed determination of the target analytes in the lower ng/g concentration levels. The mean recovery ranged from 67 to 110%. The relative standard deviation was under 11% in the intra-day and 18% in the inter-day analyses, respectively. Finally, the method was applied to marine mussel samples collected from Mediterranean Sea cultures in southeastern France. Residues of the psychiatric drug Cbz were occasionally found at levels up to 3.5ng/g dw. Lastly, in this study, other non-target compounds, such as caffeine, metoprolol, cotinine and ketoprofen, were identified in the real samples analyzed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). V. AGE-DATING LOW-MASS COMPANIONS TO MEMBERS AND INTERLOPERS OF YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Riddle, Reed [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Flagg, Laura [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Liu, Michael C.; Howard, Andrew W.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Kotson, Michael C.; Baranec, Christoph [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Schlieder, Joshua E. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hinkley, Sasha [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, EX4 4QL Exeter (United Kingdom); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Rd NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Allers, Katelyn N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J., E-mail: bpbowler@caltech.edu [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); and others

    2015-06-10

    We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7–M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8–120 Myr) in the literature. Three of these are new companions identified in our AO imaging survey, and two others are confirmed to be comoving with their host stars for the first time. The inferred masses of the companions (∼10–100 M{sub Jup}) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars; therefore we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. The new M7 substellar companion 2MASS J02155892–0929121 C (40–60 M{sub Jup}) shows clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and, hence, youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ∼40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (≲100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li i λ6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (≲200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen-burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1″) companions (2MASS J06475229–2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (≳1 Gyr) tidally locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the

  7. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). V. AGE-DATING LOW-MASS COMPANIONS TO MEMBERS AND INTERLOPERS OF YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Riddle, Reed; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Flagg, Laura; Liu, Michael C.; Howard, Andrew W.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Kotson, Michael C.; Baranec, Christoph; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Hinkley, Sasha; Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Herczeg, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7–M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8–120 Myr) in the literature. Three of these are new companions identified in our AO imaging survey, and two others are confirmed to be comoving with their host stars for the first time. The inferred masses of the companions (∼10–100 M Jup ) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars; therefore we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. The new M7 substellar companion 2MASS J02155892–0929121 C (40–60 M Jup ) shows clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and, hence, youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ∼40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (≲100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li i λ6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (≲200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen-burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1″) companions (2MASS J06475229–2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (≳1 Gyr) tidally locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest

  8. The cysteine 34 residue of A1M/α1-microglobulin is essential for protection of irradiated cell cultures and reduction of carbonyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutardottir, S; Nilsson, E J C; Pallon, J; Gram, M; Åkerström, B

    2013-07-01

    α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a 26 kDa plasma and a tissue protein belonging to the lipocalin family. The reductase and free radical scavenger A1M has been shown to protect cells and extracellular matrix against oxidative and irradiation-induced damage. The reductase activity was previously shown to depend upon an unpaired cysteinyl side-chain, C34, and three lysyl side-chains, K92, 118, and 130, located around the open end of the lipocalin pocket. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the cell and matrix protection by A1M is a result of its reductase activity by using A1M-variants with site-directed mutations of the C34, K92, K118, and K130 positions. The results show that the C34 side-chain is an absolute requirement for protection of HepG2 cell cultures against alpha-particle irradiation-induced cell death, upregulation of stress response and cell cycle regulation genes. Mutation of C34 also resulted in loss of the reduction capacity toward heme- and hydrogen peroxide-oxidized collagen, and the radical species 2,2´-azino-bis (3-ethyl-benzo-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). Furthermore, mutation of C34 significantly suppressed the cell-uptake of A1M. The K92, K118, and K130 side-chains were of minor importance in cell protection and reduction of oxidized collagen but strongly influenced the reduction of the ABTS-radical. It is concluded that antioxidative protection of cells and collagen by A1M is totally dependent on its C34 amino acid residue. A model of the cell protection mechanism of A1M should be based on the redox activity of the free thiolyl group of the C34 side-chain and a regulatory role of the K92, K118, and K130 residues.

  9. An application of the 'end-point' method to the minimum critical mass problem in two group transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2003-01-01

    A two group integral equation derived using transport theory, which describes the fuel distribution necessary for a flat thermal flux and minimum critical mass, is solved by the classical end-point method. This method has a number of advantages and in particular highlights the changing behaviour of the fissile mass distribution function in the neighbourhood of the core-reflector interface. We also show how the reflector thermal flux behaves and explain the origin of the maximum which arises when the critical size is less than that corresponding to minimum critical mass. A comparison is made with diffusion theory and the necessary and somewhat artificial presence of surface delta functions in the fuel distribution is shown to be analogous to the edge transients that arise naturally in transport theory

  10. A comparison of thermoregulatory responses to exercise between mass-matched groups with large differences in body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervis, Sheila; Coombs, Geoff B; Chaseling, Georgia K; Filingeri, Davide; Smoljanic, Jovana; Jay, Ollie

    2016-03-15

    We sought to determine 1) the influence of adiposity on thermoregulatory responses independently of the confounding biophysical factors of body mass and metabolic heat production (Hprod); and 2) whether differences in adiposity should be accounted for by prescribing an exercise intensity eliciting a fixed Hprod per kilogram of lean body mass (LBM). Nine low (LO-BF) and nine high (HI-BF) body fat males matched in pairs for total body mass (TBM; LO-BF: 88.7 ± 8.4 kg, HI-BF: 90.1 ± 7.9 kg; P = 0.72), but with distinctly different percentage body fat (%BF; LO-BF: 10.8 ± 3.6%; HI-BF: 32.0 ± 5.6%; P mass and Hprod, possibly due to a lower mean specific heat capacity or impaired sudomotor control. However, thermoregulatory responses of groups with different adiposity levels should not be compared using a fixed Hprod in watts per kilogram lean body mass. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Relation between the left ventricular mass and the left coronary artery dimensions as determined by 16-channel multidetector CT: comparison between the normotensive group and the hypertensive group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Park, Kyung Joo; Tahk, Seung Jea; Kim, Sun Yong

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the left ventricular mass (LVM) and the left coronary artery dimension and to investigate the relationship between the two values in the normotensive group and hypertensive group with using 16-channel multidetector CT (MDCT). Among the patients who underwent a CT coronary angiogram procedure using 16-channel MDCT at Ajou University Hospital from October 2004 to February 2005, 33 patient became the subjects of this study. These 33 patients showed normal findings without calcification or stenosis of the coronary arteries. The total volume of the left ventricular wall was calculated using work-in-progress cardiac CT reconstruction software. The LVM could then be directly calculated by multiplying the left ventricular muscle volume by the myocardial tissue density, which was assumed to be 1.05 g/cm 3 . The coronary diameter was measured by a fixed threshold method from the transverse reformation images obtained along the long-axis of each coronary artery. We calculated the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the coronary arteries from the equation of π D2/4 (D = diameter). Regression analysis was performed for the relationship between LVM and the left coronary artery dimensions with using a linear least-squares method. Comparison between the normotensive group and the hypertensive group was done using the Student test. The average LVM was 127.9 ± 36.2 g (mean ± standard deviation) and the average left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was 74.7 ± 15.5 g in this study population. The average diameter of the coronary arteries was 4.38 ± 0.69 mm for the left coronary artery. In all the subjects (n = 33, r = 0.67, ρ = 0.000) and the normotensive group (n = 21, r = 0.68, ρ = 0.000), the LVM was significantly correlated with the CSA of the left coronary artery, but not in the hypertensive group (n= 12, r = 0.57, ρ = 0.062). In the hypertensive group, the CSA of the left coronary arteries per 100 g of muscle mass tended to decrease as

  12. On new scaling group of transformation for Prandtl-Eyring fluid model with both heat and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, Aneeqa Ashfaq; Malik, M. Y.; Tahir, M.; Zehra, Iffat

    2018-03-01

    A short communication is structured to offer a set of scaling group of transformation for Prandtl-Eyring fluid flow yields by stretching flat porous surface. The fluid flow regime is carried with both heat and mass transfer characteristics. To seek solution of flow problem a set of scaling group of transformation is proposed by adopting Lie approach. These transformations are used to step down the partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The reduced system is solved by numerical method termed as shooting method. A self-coded algorithm is executed in this regard. The obtain results are elaborated by means of figures and tables.

  13. Using velocity dispersion to estimate halo mass: Is the Local Group in tension with ΛCDM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Power, Chris; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Poulton, Rhys; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2018-06-01

    Satellite galaxies are commonly used as tracers to measure the line-of-sight (LOS)velocity dispersion (σLOS) of the dark matter halo associated with their central galaxy, and thereby to estimate the halo's mass. Recent observational dispersion estimates of the Local Group, including the Milky Way and M31, suggest σ ˜50 km s-1, which is surprisingly low when compared to the theoretical expectation of σ ˜100 km s-1 for systems of their mass. Does this pose a problem for Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM)? We explore this tension using the SURFS suite of N-body simulations, containing over 10000 (sub)haloes with well tracked orbits. We test how well a central galaxy's host halo velocity dispersion can be recovered by sampling σLOS of subhaloes and surrounding haloes. Our results demonstrate that σLOS is biased mass proxy. We define an optimal window in vLOS and projected distance (Dp) - 0.5 ≲ Dp/Rvir ≲ 1.0 and vLOS ≲ 0.5Vesc, where Rvir is the virial radius and Vesc is the escape velocity - such that the scatter in LOS to halo dispersion is minimized - σLOS = (0.5 ± 0.1)σv, H. We argue that this window should be used to measure LOS dispersions as a proxy for mass, as it minimises scatter in the σLOS-Mvir relation. This bias also naturally explains the results from McConnachie (2012), who used similar cuts when estimating σLOS, LG, producing a bias of σLG = (0.44 ± 0.14)σv, H. We conclude that the Local Group's velocity dispersion does not pose a problem for ΛCDM and has a mass of log M_{LG, vir}/M_{⊙}=12.0^{+0.8}_{-2.0}.

  14. The chemical evolution of Kurnub Group paleowater in the Sinai-Negev province-a mass balance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, E.; Jones, B.F.; Weinberger, G.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical evolution of the Kurnub Group paleowater was studied starting from rainwater in recharge areas of the Sinai and along groundwater flowpaths leading to the natural outlets of this regional aquifer. This was achieved by investigating the chemical composition of groundwater, ionic ratios, degrees of saturation with common mineral species, normative analysis of dissolved salts and by modeling of rock/water interaction and mixing processes occurring along groundwater flow paths. The initial groundwater composition used is from the Nakhel well in Sinai. It evolves from desert rainwater percolating through typical Kurnub Group lithology in Sinai. This rainwater dissolves mainly gypsum, halite and dolomite together with smaller amounts of marine aerosol and K-feldspar. At the same time it precipitates calcite, SiO 2 , smectite and degasses CO 2 . Between the area of Nakhel and the northern Negev the chemistry of Kurnub Group waters is influenced by dissolution of halite and lesser amounts of gypsum of surficial origin in recharge areas, small amounts of feldspars and of dolomite cement in sandstones eroded from the Arabo-Nubian igneous massif of Sinai and organic degradation-derived CO 2 . Concomitantly, there is precipitation of calcite, smectite, SiO 2 and probably analcime characteristic of sediments in continental closed basins. North of the Negev, the Kurnub Group fluids are diluted and altered by mixing with Judea Group aquifer groundwaters. On the E there is mixing with residual brines from the water body ancestral to the Dead Sea, prior to discharge into the Arava valley. Rock/water interaction indicated by NETPATH and PHREEQC modeling is in agreement with lithology and facies changes previously observed in the Kurnub Group sequence. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. [Risk groups in travel to tropical countries within the frame of mass tourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, F; Steffen, R; Schwarzenbach, F H

    1977-01-01

    More than 10,000 tourists returning from tropical countries have been asked about health problems during their stay abroad. Preliminary results from the first 5,550 questionnaires indicate that 74,8% had complaints of any kind concerning their health and 13,6% can be considered as having been ill. The frequency of complaints and illness in relation to different variables is shown and the possibility of definition of high risk groups is being discussed.

  16. Simultaneous determination of residues of metalaxyl, cyazofamid and a cyazofamid metabolite in tobacco leaves and soil by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sizhuo; Yu, Weiwei; Sun, Caiyuan; Zheng, Kunming; Zhang, Haizhen; Huang, Min; Hu, Deyu; Zhang, Kankan

    2018-04-01

    A simple method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of metalaxyl, cyazofamid and the cyazofamid metabolite 4-chloro-5-p-tolylimidazole-2-carbonitrile (CCIM) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The three target compounds were extracted from tobacco and soil with acetonitrile containing 0.1% acetic acid, and the extracts were purified using octadecylsilane. The proposed method showed satisfactory linearity (R 2 ≥ 0.9985) for the target compounds. The limits of detection for metalaxyl, cyazofamid and CCIM were 0.006, 0.06 and 0.06 mg/kg in soil and green tobacco leaves and 0.03, 0.3 and 0.3 mg/kg in cured tobacco leaves, respectively. The limits of quantification for metalaxyl, cyazofamid and CCIM were 0.02, 0.2 and 0.2 mg/kg in soil and green tobacco leaves and 0.1, 1 and 1 mg/kg in cured tobacco leaves, respectively. The average recoveries from soil and tobacco were 72.91-98.40% for metalaxyl, 76.73-105.80% for cyazofamid and 74.48-106.45% for CCIM. The relative standard deviation range was 1.23-6.99%. The developed method was successfully applied to analysis of residues of metalaxyl, cyazofamid and CCIM in real soil and tobacco samples. The results indicated that the established method could meet the requirement for the analysis of trace amounts of all three analytes in soil and tobacco. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Rapid screening and quantification of residual pesticides and illegal adulterants in red wine by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianyang; Fang, Pingping; Jiang, Juanjuan; Zhang, Feng; Yong, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-11-04

    A rapid method to screen and quantify multi-class analytic targets in red wine has been developed by direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled with triple quadruple tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS). A modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) procedure was used for increasing analytical speed and reducing matrix effect, and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in DART-MS/MS ensured accurate analysis. One bottle of wine containing 50 pesticides and 12 adulterants, i.e., preservatives, antioxidant, sweeteners, and azo dyes, could be totally determined less than 12min. This method exhibited proper linearity (R 2 ≥0.99) in the range of 1-1000ng/mL for pesticides and 10-5000ng/mL for adulterants. The limits of detection (LODs) were obtained in a 0.5-50ng/mL range for pesticides and 5-50ng/mL range for adulterants, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in a 1-100ng/mL range for pesticides and 10-250ng/mL range for adulterants. Three spiked levels for each analyte in wine were evaluated, and the recoveries were in a scope of 75-120%. The results demonstrated DART-MS/MS was a rapid and simple method, and could be applied to rapid analyze residual pesticides and illegal adulterants in a large quantities of red wine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of neonicotinoid pesticides residues in agricultural samples by solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen; Han, Chao; Qian, Yan; Ding, Huiying; Chen, Xiaomei; Xi, Junyang

    2011-07-15

    This work reports a new sensitive multi-residue liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for detection, confirmation and quantification of six neonicotinoid pesticides (dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, clothiandin, imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid) in agricultural samples (chestnut, shallot, ginger and tea). Activated carbon and HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges were used for cleaning up the extracts. Analysis is performed by LC-MS/MS operated in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, acquiring two specific precursor-product ion transitions per target compound. Quantification was carried by the internal standard method with D(4)-labeled imidacloprid. The method showed excellent linearity (R(2)≥0.9991) and precision (relative standard deviation, RSD≤8.6%) for all compounds. Limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 mg kg(-1) for chestnut, shallot, ginger sample and 0.02 mg kg(-1) for tea sample. The average recoveries, measured at three concentrations levels (0.01 mg kg(-1), 0.02 mg kg(-1) and 0.1 mg kg(-1) for chestnut, shallot, ginger sample, 0.02 mg kg(-1), 0.04 mg kg(-1) and 0.2 mg kg(-1) for tea sample), were in the range 82.1-108.5%. The method was satisfactorily validated for the analysis of 150 agricultural samples (chestnut, shallot, ginger and tea). Imidacloprid and acetamiprid were detected at concentration levels ranging from 0.05 to 3.6 mg kg(-1). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-class multi-residue analysis of veterinary drugs in meat using enhanced matrix removal lipid cleanup and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Limian; Lucas, Derick; Long, David; Richter, Bruce; Stevens, Joan

    2018-05-11

    This study presents the development and validation of a quantitation method for the analysis of multi-class, multi-residue veterinary drugs using lipid removal cleanup cartridges, enhanced matrix removal lipid (EMR-Lipid), for different meat matrices by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection. Meat samples were extracted using a two-step solid-liquid extraction followed by pass-through sample cleanup. The method was optimized based on the buffer and solvent composition, solvent additive additions, and EMR-Lipid cartridge cleanup. The developed method was then validated in five meat matrices, porcine muscle, bovine muscle, bovine liver, bovine kidney and chicken liver to evaluate the method performance characteristics, such as absolute recoveries and precision at three spiking levels, calibration curve linearity, limit of quantitation (LOQ) and matrix effect. The results showed that >90% of veterinary drug analytes achieved satisfactory recovery results of 60-120%. Over 97% analytes achieved excellent reproducibility results (relative standard deviation (RSD) meat matrices. The matrix co-extractive removal efficiency by weight provided by EMR-lipid cartridge cleanup was 42-58% in samples. The post column infusion study showed that the matrix ion suppression was reduced for samples with the EMR-Lipid cartridge cleanup. The reduced matrix ion suppression effect was also confirmed with 30%) for all tested veterinary drugs in all of meat matrices. The results showed that the two-step solid-liquid extraction provides efficient extraction for the entire spectrum of veterinary drugs, including the difficult classes such as tetracyclines, beta-lactams etc. EMR-Lipid cartridges after extraction provided efficient sample cleanup with easy streamlined protocol and minimal impacts on analytes recovery, improving method reliability and consistency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A rapid method based on hot water extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for analyzing tetracycline antibiotic residues in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogialli, Sara; Coradazzi, Cristina; Di Corcia, Antonio; Lagana, Aldo; Sergi, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    A rapid, specific, and sensitive procedure for determining residues of 4 widely used tetracycline antibiotics and 3 of their 4-epimers in cheese is presented. The method is based on the matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) technique followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). After dispersing samples of mozzarella, asiago, parmigiano, gruyere, emmenthal, and camembert on sand, target compounds were eluted from the MSPD column by passing through it 6 mL water heated at 70 degrees C. After acidification and filtration, 200 microL of the aqueous extract was directly injected into the LC column. For analyte identification and quantification, MS data acquisition was performed in the multireaction monitoring mode, selecting 2 precursor ion-to-product ion transitions for each target compound. Hot water appeared to be an efficient extractant, because absolute recoveries were no lower than 78%. Using demeclocycline as a surrogate analyte, recoveries of analyte added to the 6 types of cheeses at the 30 ng/g level were 96-117%, with relative standard deviation (RSD) not higher than 9%. Statistical analysis of the mean recovery data showed that the extraction efficiency was not dependent on the type of cheese analyzed. This result indicates that this method could be applied to other cheese types not considered here. At the lowest concentration considered, i.e., 10 ng/g, the accuracy of the method ranged between 90 and 107%, with RSDs not larger than 12%. Based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 10, limits of quantitation were estimated to be 1-2 ng/g.

  1. Food Safety is an Important Public Health Issue: Chloramphenicol Residues Determination by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivohlavek, Adela; Žuntar, Irena; Ivešić, Martina; Andačić, Ivana Mandić; Šikić, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Honey is used for nutritional, medicinal and industrial purposes and antibiotic residues may harm its quality and constitute a danger to human health. The broad spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol (CAP) was used for curative purposes in veterinary medicine, but is now forbidden in European Union (EU) because of its many serious side effects (e.g. aplastic anaemia, grey syndrome, severe bone marrow depression and hypersensitivity). The aim of this study was to facilitate analyses of the quality and safety of Croatian honey distributed to whole European Union market; an assessment that has not previously been made. CAP in honey was qualifying and quantifying by validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with negative electrospray ionisation method (LC-MS/MS). The target antibiotic was separated on chromatographic column Zorbax SB C18 (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 3.5 μm) with a gradient elution using acetonitrile - 0.1% formic acid mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min, with column temperature 35°C for CAP and 5D-CAP as internal standard. Homogenised honey samples were diluted with acetate buffer solution and extracted on Oasis Hydrophilic-Lipophilic-Balanced (HLB) sorbents. The method was used to analyse 280 domestic honey samples collected throughout Croatia between 2005.-2013. Recoveries of the method for real (acacia, chestnut, linden and flower) honey samples were 102% with RSD 8.4%. The value CCα and CCβ were 0.09 and 0.12 μg/kg, respectively. Results showed only three subsequent positive detections (1.1%) of CAP in honey. Analysed honey samples from Croatia showed good quality and safety what is the one of the main objective in consumer health policy in EU.

  2. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Jan; Bergman, Ann-Charlotte; Adamson, Ulf; Blombäck, Margareta; Wallén, Håkan; Jörneskog, Gun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. ► Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. ► The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. ► No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent – a phenomenon called “aspirin resistance”. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to “aspirin resistance” in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5–10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the α-chain: αK191, αK208, αK224, αK429, αK457, αK539, αK562, in the β-chain: βK233, and in the γ-chain: γK170 and γK273. Glycations were found at βK133 and γK75, alternatively γK85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [ 14 C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [ 14 C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013–0.084 and 0.12–0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9–100 μM aspirin) and physiologically (2–8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may mechanistically explain why aspirin facilitates fibrin degradation. We find no support for the idea that glycation of fibrin(ogen) interferes with acetylation of

  3. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Jan, E-mail: jan.svensson@ki.se [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Bergman, Ann-Charlotte [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamson, Ulf [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Blombaeck, Margareta [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of

  4. Boson-fermion mass splittings in four-dimensional heterotic string models with anomalous U(1) gauge groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Onogi, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    In four-dimensional heterotic string models with anomalous U(1) gauge groups, space-time supersymmetry (SUSY) breaks down spontaneously at one loop. In this paper, the Ward-Takahashi identity of broken SUSY in one-loop two-point amplitudes is investigated in all generalities. The boson-fermion mass splitting of any supersymmetric pair in an arbitrary model is proportional to the product of the D-term expectation value (the sum of (chirality)x(U(1) charge) of massless fermions in the model) and the U(1) charge of the external particle. In order to give a better understanding of the results, we present some examples of the mass splittings in a simple Z 3 orbifold model. (orig.)

  5. Detection of pyridaben residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: effect of household processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Choi, Ok-Ja; Rhee, Gyu-Seek; Chang, Moon-Ik; Kim, Heejung; Abid, Morad D N; Shin, Sung Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2015-07-01

    Following quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) and LC/MS/MS analysis, pyridaben residual levels were determined in unprocessed and processed hot pepper fruit and leaves. The linearities were satisfactory with determination coefficients (R(2)) in excess of 0.995 in processed and unprocessed pepper fruit and leaves. Recoveries at various concentrations were 79.9-105.1% with relative standard deviations ≤15%. The limits of quantitation of 0.003-0.012 mg/kg were very low compared with the maximum residue limits (2-5 mg/kg) set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Republic of Korea. The effects of various household processes, including washing, blanching, frying and drying under different conditions (water volume, blanching time and temperature) on residual concentrations were evaluated. Both washing and blanching (in combination with high water volume and time factor) significantly reduced residue levels in hot pepper fruit and leaves compared with other processes. In sum, the developed method was satisfactory and could be used to accurately detect residues in unprocessed and processed pepper fruit and leaves. It is recommended that pepper fruit/leaves be blanched after washing before being consumed to protect consumers from the negative health effects of detected pesticide residues. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Improvements in the analytical methodology for the residue determination of the herbicide glyphosate in soils by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero-Coy, A M; Ibáñez, M; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F

    2013-05-31

    The determination of glyphosate (GLY) in soils is of great interest due to the widespread use of this herbicide and the need of assessing its impact on the soil/water environment. However, its residue determination is very problematic especially in soils with high organic matter content, where strong interferences are normally observed, and because of the particular physico-chemical characteristics of this polar/ionic herbicide. In the present work, we have improved previous LC-MS/MS analytical methodology reported for GLY and its main metabolite AMPA in order to be applied to "difficult" soils, like those commonly found in South-America, where this herbicide is extensively used in large areas devoted to soya or maize, among other crops. The method is based on derivatization with FMOC followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, using triple quadrupole. After extraction with potassium hydroxide, a combination of extract dilution, adjustment to appropriate pH, and solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was applied to minimize the strong interferences observed. Despite the clean-up performed, the use of isotope labelled glyphosate as internal standard (ILIS) was necessary for the correction of matrix effects and to compensate for any error occurring during sample processing. The analytical methodology was satisfactorily validated in four soils from Colombia and Argentina fortified at 0.5 and 5mg/kg. In contrast to most LC-MS/MS methods, where the acquisition of two transitions is recommended, monitoring all available transitions was required for confirmation of positive samples, as some of them were interfered by unknown soil components. This was observed not only for GLY and AMPA but also for the ILIS. Analysis by QTOF MS was useful to confirm the presence of interferent compounds that shared the same nominal mass of analytes as well as some of their main product ions. Therefore, the selection of specific transitions was crucial to avoid interferences. The methodology developed

  7. A temperature and mass dependence of the linear Boltzmann collision operator from group theory point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, V.

    1996-01-01

    The Lie group of the transformations affecting the parameters of the linear Boltzmann collision operator such as temperature of background gas and ratio of masses of colliding particles and molecules is discovered. The group also describes the conservation laws for collisions and main symmetries of the collision operator. New algebraic properties of the collision operator are derived. Transformations acting on the variables and parameters and leaving the linear Boltzmann kinetic equation invariant are found. For the constant collision frequency the integral representation of solutions for nonuniform case in terms of the distribution function of particles drifting in a gas with zero temperature is deduced. The new exact relaxation solutions are obtained too. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in milk and muscle based on a simple and fast extraction procedure followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Jank, Louíse; Martins, Magda Targa; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Sirtori, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in veterinary medicine mainly for treatment and prevention of diseases. The aminoglycosides are one of the antibiotics classes that have been extensively employed in animal husbandry for the treatment of bacterial infections, but also as growth promotion. The European Union has issued strict Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for aminoglycosides in several animal origin products including bovine milk, bovine, swine and poultry muscle. This paper describes a fast and simple analytical method for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (spectinomycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, hygromycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin and neomycin) in bovine milk and bovine, swine and poultry muscle. For sample preparation, an extraction method was developed using trichloroacetic acid and clean up with low temperature precipitation and C18 bulk. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to carry out quantitative analysis and liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) was used to screening purposes. Both methods were validated according to the European Union Commission Directive 2002/657/EC. Good performance characteristics were obtained for recovery, precision, calibration curve, specificity, decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) in all matrices evaluated. The detection limit (LOD) and quantification limit (LOQ) were ranging from 5 to 100ngg(-1) and 12.5 to 250ngg(-1), respectively. Good linearity (r)-above 0.99-was achieved in concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 2.0×MRL. Recoveries ranged from 36.8% to 98.0% and the coefficient of variation from 0.9 to 20.2%, noting that all curves have been made into their own matrices in order to minimize the matrix effects. The CCβ values obtained in qualitative method were between 25 and 250ngg(-1). The proposed method showed to be simple, easy, and adequate for high-throughput analysis of a large

  9. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  10. New method to determine the total carbonyl functional group content in extractable particulate organic matter by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, J; Zheng, W; Marchand, N; Wortham, H

    2008-08-01

    A functional group analysis method was developed to determine the quantitative content of carbonyl functional groups in atmospheric particulate organic matter (POM) using constant neutral loss scanning-tandem mass spectrometry (CNLS-MS/MS). The neutral loss method consists in monitoring the loss of a neutral fragment produced by the fragmentation of a precursor ion in a collision cell. The only ions detected are the daughter ions resulting from the loss of the neutral fragment under study. Then, scanning the loss of a neutral fragment characteristic of a functional group enables the selective detection of the compounds bearing the chemical function under study within a complex mixture. The selective detection of carbonyl functional groups was achieved after derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH) by monitoring the neutral loss of C(6)F(5)N (181 amu), which was characteristic of a large panel of derivatized carbonyl compounds. The method was tested on 25 reference mixtures of different composition, all containing 24 carbonyl compounds at randomly determined concentrations. The repeatability and calibration tests were satisfying as they resulted in a relative standard deviation below 5% and a linear range between 0.01 and 0.65 mM with a calculated detection limit of 0.0035 mM. Also, the relative deviation induced by changing the composition of the mixture while keeping the total concentration of carbonyl functional groups constant was less than 20%. These reliability experiments demonstrate the high robustness of the developed procedure for accurate carbonyl functional group measurement, which was applied to atmospheric POM samples. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of a new screening method for the detection of antibiotic residues in muscle tissues using liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry with a LC-LTQ-Orbitrap instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtaud-Pessel, D; Jagadeshwar-Reddy, T; Verdon, E

    2011-10-01

    A liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed for screening meat for a wide range of antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. Full-scan mode under high resolution mass spectral conditions using an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer with resolving power 60,000 full width at half maximum (FWHM) was applied for analysis of the samples. Samples were prepared using two extraction protocols prior to LC-HRMS analysis. The scope of the method focuses on screening the following main families of antibacterial veterinary drugs: penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides, macrolides, tetracyclines, aminoglucosides and quinolones. Compounds were successfully identified in spiked samples from their accurate mass and LC retention times from the acquired full-scan chromatogram. Automated data processing using ToxId software allowed rapid treatment of the data. Analyses of muscle tissues from real samples collected from antibiotic-treated animals was carried out using the above methodology and antibiotic residues were identified unambiguously. Further analysis of the data for real samples allowed the identification of the targeted antibiotic residues but also non-targeted compounds, such as some of their metabolites.

  13. Effect of Using Different Vehicle Weight Groups on the Estimated Relationship Between Mass Reduction and U.S. Societal Fatality Risk per Vehicle Miles of Travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Tom P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Technologies Area. Building Technology and Urban Systems Division

    2016-08-22

    This report recalculates the estimated relationship between vehicle mass and societal fatality risk, using alternative groupings by vehicle weight, to test whether the trend of decreasing fatality risk from mass reduction as case vehicle mass increases, holds over smaller increments of the range in case vehicle masses. The NHTSA baseline regression model estimates the relationship using for two weight groups for cars and light trucks; we re-estimated the mass reduction coefficients using four, six, and eight bins of vehicle mass. The estimated effect of mass reduction on societal fatality risk was not consistent over the range in vehicle masses in these weight bins. These results suggest that the relationship indicated by the NHTSA baseline model is a result of other, unmeasured attributes of the mix of vehicles in the lighter vs. heavier weight bins, and not necessarily the result of a correlation between mass reduction and societal fatality risk. An analysis of the average vehicle, driver, and crash characteristics across the various weight groupings did not reveal any strong trends that might explain the lack of a consistent trend of decreasing fatality risk from mass reduction in heavier vehicles.

  14. Mass-invariance of the iron enrichment in the hot haloes of massive ellipticals, groups, and clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Werner, N.; Kaastra, J. S.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Gu, L.; Mao, J.; Urdampilleta, I.; Truong, N.; Simionescu, A.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray measurements find systematically lower Fe abundances in the X-ray emitting haloes pervading groups (kT ≲ 1.7 keV) than in clusters of galaxies. These results have been difficult to reconcile with theoretical predictions. However, models using incomplete atomic data or the assumption of isothermal plasmas may have biased the best fit Fe abundance in groups and giant elliptical galaxies low. In this work, we take advantage of a major update of the atomic code in the spectral fitting package SPEX to re-evaluate the Fe abundance in 43 clusters, groups, and elliptical galaxies (the CHEERS sample) in a self-consistent analysis and within a common radius of 0.1r500. For the first time, we report a remarkably similar average Fe enrichment in all these systems. Unlike previous results, this strongly suggests that metals are synthesised and transported in these haloes with the same average efficiency across two orders of magnitude in total mass. We show that the previous metallicity measurements in low temperature systems were biased low due to incomplete atomic data in the spectral fitting codes. The reasons for such a code-related Fe bias, also implying previously unconsidered biases in the emission measure and temperature structure, are discussed.

  15. Development of a multi-residue analytical methodology based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for screening and trace level determination of pharmaceuticals in surface and wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Meritxell; Petrović, Mira; Barceló, Damiá

    2006-11-15

    This paper describes development, optimization and validation of a method for the simultaneous determination of 29 multi-class pharmaceuticals using off line solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Target compounds include analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), lipid regulators, psychiatric drugs, anti-histaminics, anti-ulcer agent, antibiotics and beta-blockers. Recoveries obtained were generally higher than 60% for both surface and wastewaters, with exception of several compounds that yielded lower, but still acceptable recoveries: ranitidine (50%), sotalol (50%), famotidine (50%) and mevastatin (34%). The overall variability of the method was below 15%, for all compounds and all tested matrices. Method detection limits (MDL) varied between 1 and 30ng/L and from 3 to 160ng/L for surface and wastewaters, respectively. The precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), ranged from 0.2 to 6% and from 1 to 11% for inter and intra-day analysis, respectively. A detailed study of matrix effects was performed in order to evaluate the suitability of different calibration approaches (matrix-matched external calibration, internal calibration, extract dilution) to reduce analyte suppression or enhancement during instrumental analysis. The main advantages and drawbacks of each approach are demonstrated, justifying the selection of internal standard calibration as the most suitable approach for our study. The developed analytical method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical residues in WWTP influents and effluents, as well as in river water. For both, river and wastewaters, the most ubiquitous compounds belonged to the group of anti-inflammatories and analgesics, antibiotics, the lipid regulators being acetaminophen, trimethoprim, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, atenolol, propranolol, mevastatin, carbamazepine and ranitidine the most frequently

  16. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Metal Cans Pt. 63, Subpt. KKKK, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart KKKK of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass... Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typicalorganic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1% Xylene, 1% toluene, and...

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Metal Furniture Pt. 63, Subpt. RRRR, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass... Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic percent HAP, by mass Aliphatic 2 0.03 1% Xylene, 1...

  18. Changes in body mass, stature and BMI in South African elite U18 Rugby players from different racial groups from 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandt, Justin; Green, Mervin; Masimla, Herman; Lambert, Mike

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences between racial groups for body mass, stature and body mass index (BMI) in South African elite U18 rugby players and whether there were significant changes in these measurements between 2002 and 2012. Self-reported body mass and stature were obtained from U18 players (n = 4007) who attended the national tournament during this period. BMI was calculated for each player.White players were 9.8 kg heavier than black players, who were 2.3 kg heavier than coloured players (P body mass of all groups increased from 2002 to 2012 (P body mass, stature and BMI of elite under-18 rugby players in South Africa were significantly different between racial groups. This has implications for transforming the game to make it representative of the South African population.

  19. Consultants Group Meeting on Development of Cost-Effective Diets for Use in Mass Production of Tsetse Flies. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    The increasing demand for employing tsetse SIT for area-wide tsetse and trypanosomosis management programmes on mainland Africa has compelled the IAEA to concentrate on the development of semi-automated processes for standardising laborious and quality sensitive components of the sterile male mass production. The size of facilities required to produce the sterile males will continue to increase with time and demand. The current diet for tsetse is decontaminated vertebrate blood and it will need to be supplied to centres without access to a suitable local blood source. In view of the increasing demand for sterile male tsetse and uncertainty of obtaining high quality decontaminated blood locally, ways need to be explored to ensure availability of inexpensive, standard quality diets. Towards this goal a consultants group meeting on the development of cost-effective diets for tsetse was held at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria from 17 to 21 July 2000. The major objective of the consultants group meeting was to identify research that is needed to ensure the availability of large quantities of high quality diet for tsetse mass production. Seven papers were presented and discussed. A visit was made to the Entomology Unit, at the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratories, Seibersdorf to see the present tsetse rearing facility and the various steps of blood processing and quality assurance used in the evaluation of blood quality before use for colony feeding. The meeting noted that commercially available products are used to prepare standard diets for screwworm mass production. These products have not yet been adequately evaluated for tsetse. However, it is necessary to improve the current procedure applied to the use fresh blood. Possibilities of utilising commercially available dietary ingredients should also be explored. A three-step approach was proposed: Improvement and optimisation of the current blood collection, processing etc.; Use of additives

  20. [Determination of seven strobilurin fungicide residues in Chinese herbs by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with solid phase extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yule; Huang, Chaoqun; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Xiaomei; Mo, Weimin

    2013-03-01

    An LC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneously determination of seven strobilurin fungicide residues in Chinese herbs. The strobilurin fungicides include Z-metominostrobin, kresoxim-methyl, dimoxystrobin, picoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, azoxystrobin and trifloxystrobin. The sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned-up by an amino SPE column. The seven strobilurin fungicide residues were separated on a C18 column with gradient elution of 1.0 per thousand formic acid and methanol as mobile phases, and detected by ESI-MS in positive ion and selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. External standard method was used to the quantification with good linear relationships (r > or = 0. 996). The LOQs were 2 micro g/kg for dimoxystrobin, picoxystrobin and trifloxystrobin, 4 mciro g/kg for pyraclostrobin and azoxystrobin, 10 micro g/kg for Z-metominostrobin and kresoxim-methyl. The recoveries were from 60.4% to 110% with the RSDs between 1.2% and 17%. The developed method is suitable for the determination and confirmation of the seven strobilurin fungicide residues in the three of Eight Zhes ( Ophiopogon japonicus (Thunb.), Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. and Corydalis yanhusuo W T Wang).

  1. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  2. The Impact of Star Formation Histories on Stellar Mass Estimation: Implications from the Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Puzia, Thomas H.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2017-11-01

    Building on the relatively accurate star formation histories (SFHs) and metallicity evolution of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies derived from resolved color-magnitude diagram modeling, we carried out a comprehensive study of the influence of SFHs, metallicity evolution, and dust extinction on the UV-to-near-IR color-mass-to-light ratio (color-{log}{{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ)) distributions and M ⋆ estimation of local universe galaxies. We find that (1) the LG galaxies follow color-{log}{{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) relations that fall in between the ones calibrated by previous studies; (2) optical color-{log}{{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) relations at higher [M/H] are generally broader and steeper; (3) the SFH “concentration” does not significantly affect the color-{log}{{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) relations; (4) light-weighted ages }λ and metallicities }λ together constrain {log}{{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) with uncertainties ranging from ≲0.1 dex for the near-IR up to 0.2 dex for the optical passbands; (5) metallicity evolution induces significant uncertainties to the optical but not near-IR {{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) at a given }λ and }λ ; (6) the V band is the ideal luminance passband for estimating {{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (λ) from single colors, because the combinations of {{{\\Upsilon }}}\\star (V) and optical colors such as B - V and g - r exhibit the weakest systematic dependences on SFHs, metallicities, and dust extinction; and (7) without any prior assumption on SFHs, M ⋆ is constrained with biases ≲0.3 dex by the optical-to-near-IR SED fitting. Optical passbands alone constrain M ⋆ with biases ≲0.4 dex (or ≲0.6 dex) when dust extinction is fixed (or variable) in SED fitting. SED fitting with monometallic SFH models tends to underestimate M ⋆ of real galaxies. M ⋆ tends to be overestimated (or underestimated) at the youngest (or oldest) }{mass}.

  3. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  4. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Large Appliances Pt. 63, Subpt. NNNN, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart NNNN of Part 63—Default Organic HAP... type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1% Xylene...

  6. Association of body mass index and waist circumference with hypertension among school children in the age group of 5-16 years belonging to lower income group and middle income group in National Capital Territory of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kapil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Hypertension is one of the most common diseases world-wide and the prevalence in school-aged children appears to be increasing perhaps as a result of increased prevalence of obesity. Thus, the present study was planned to establish an association between body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC with hypertension amongst school children in the age group of 5-16 years belonging to lower income group (LIG and middle income group (MIG in National Capital Territory of Delhi. Materials and Methods: Population proportionate to size methodology was adopted to select 30 clusters/schools in each LIG and MIG category. About 170 children from each school were selected randomly with the help of random number tables. Anthropometric measurements of weight, height and WC and blood pressure measurements were taken by using standard methodology. Results: The prevalence of high systolic blood pressure (SBP in LIG and MIG school population was 2.8% and 4.1% respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in LIG and MIG school population was 2.7% and 4.2%, respectively. Statistical positive correlation was observed between BMI and WC with SBP and DBP. Thus, it can be inferred that children with high WC and BMI are more likely to have hypertension.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF PYRETHROID RESIDUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND FOOD SAMPLES BY ENHANCED SOLVENT EXTRACTION/SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abstract summarizes pyrethorid methods development research. It provides a summary of sample preparation and analytical techniques such as supercritical fluid extraction, enhance solvent extraction, gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

  8. Analysis of banned veterinary drugs and herbicide residues in shellfish by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Geng-Ruei; Chen, Hui-Shan; Lin, Feng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Seafood safety is a crucial public health concern for consumers. In this study, we applied a validated method to analyze the residue of banned veterinary drugs in shellfish, namely chloramphenicol, malachite green, leucomalachite green, and nitrofuran metabolites; additionally, the QuEChERS method was employed to detect 76 herbicides by LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS. In total, 42 shellfish samples, which included hard clams, freshwater clams, and oysters, were collected from aquafarms and production areas in Taiwan during 2012. Our results revealed 3.8 ng/g of chloramphenicol in one hard clam, 19.9–32.1 ng/g of ametryn in two hard clams, 16.1–60.1 ng/g of pendimethalin in four hard clams, and 17.0 ng/g of mefenacet in one oyster, indicating that 19.1% of the samples contained residues from banned veterinary drugs and pesticides. These data can be used to monitor the residue of veterinary drugs and pesticides in aquatic organisms and as a reference for food safety. - Highlights: • A certified method was employed for analyzing residues of banned veterinary drugs and herbicides in shellfish samples. • The trace levels of chloramphenicol, ametryn, pendimethalin were detected in hard clam samples. • For ensuring food safety, continual monitoring of aquatic products is necessary.

  9. On-line solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for insect repellent residue analysis in surface waters using atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins-Delgado, Daniel; García-Sillero, Daniel; Díaz-Cruz, M Silvia; Barceló, Damià

    2018-04-06

    Insect repellents (IRs) are a group of organic chemicals whose function is to prevent the ability of insects of landing in a surface. These compounds have been found in the environment and may pose a risk to non-target organisms. In this study, an on-line solid phase extraction - high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry multiresidue method was developed using an atmospheric photoionization source (SPE-HPLC-(APPI)-MS/MS). The use of the APPI as an alternative ionization technique to electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) allowed expanding the range of analytical techniques suitable for the analysis of IRs, so far relied in gas chromatography. High sensitivity and precision was reached with method limits of quantification between 0.2 and 4.6 ng l -1 and interday and intraday precision equal or below 15%. The validated method was applied to the study of surface water samples from three European river basins with different flow regime (Adige River in Italy, Sava River in the Balkans, and Evrotas River in Greece). The results showed that two IRs (DEET and Bayrepel) were ubiquitous in the Sava and Evrotas basins, reaching concentrations as high as 105 μg l -1 of Bayrepel in the Sava River, and 5 μg l -1 of DEET in the Evrotas River. Densely populated areas and effluent waste waters are pointed out as the responsible for this pollution. In the alpine river Adige, only three samples showed low levels of IRs (6.01-37.8 ng l -1 ). The concentrations measured were used to perform an environmental risk assessment based on the hazard quotients (HQs) estimation approach by using the chronic and acute eco-toxicity data available. The results revealed that despite the high frequency and eventually high concentrations of these IRs determined in the three basins, only few sites were at risk, with 1 < HQs < 3.3. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cluster size statistic and cluster mass statistic: two novel methods for identifying changes in functional connectivity between groups or conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Alex; Schwarzbauer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Functional connectivity has become an increasingly important area of research in recent years. At a typical spatial resolution, approximately 300 million connections link each voxel in the brain with every other. This pattern of connectivity is known as the functional connectome. Connectivity is often compared between experimental groups and conditions. Standard methods used to control the type 1 error rate are likely to be insensitive when comparisons are carried out across the whole connectome, due to the huge number of statistical tests involved. To address this problem, two new cluster based methods--the cluster size statistic (CSS) and cluster mass statistic (CMS)--are introduced to control the family wise error rate across all connectivity values. These methods operate within a statistical framework similar to the cluster based methods used in conventional task based fMRI. Both methods are data driven, permutation based and require minimal statistical assumptions. Here, the performance of each procedure is evaluated in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, utilising a simulated dataset. The relative sensitivity of each method is also tested on real data: BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI scans were carried out on twelve subjects under normal conditions and during the hypercapnic state (induced through the inhalation of 6% CO2 in 21% O2 and 73%N2). Both CSS and CMS detected significant changes in connectivity between normal and hypercapnic states. A family wise error correction carried out at the individual connection level exhibited no significant changes in connectivity.

  11. Process combination of thermo pressure hydrolysis and fermentation for innovative processing of residual biogenous mass; Verfahrenskombination aus Thermodruckhydrolyse und Vergaerung zur innovativen Verwertung biogener Restmassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prechtl, S.; Merkl, M.; Schieder, D.; Schneider, R.; Bischof, F. [Applikations- und Technikzentrum fuer Energieverfahrens-, Umwelt- und Stroemungstechnik (ATZ-EVUS), Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The described processing technique consisting of topped thermal hydrolysis and downstream fermentation is particularly suitable for wet, low-structure organic waste. High turnover rates at short treatment times permit to minimize residues effectively, yield a fair amount of biogas and allow compact design because of low fermenter volumes, which has a positive impact on investment cost. (orig.) [German] Das vorgestellt Verwertungsverfahren bestehend aus vorgeschalteter thermischer Hydrolyse und nachgeschalteter Vergaerung eignet sich besonders fuer nasse, strukturarme organische Abfaelle. Hohe Umsatzraten bei kurzen Behandlungszeiten ermoeglichen eine gute Reststoffminimierung und Biogasausbeute sowie eine kompakte Bauweise durch kleine Fermentervolumina, was sich positiv auf die Investitionskosten auswirkt. (orig.)

  12. QuEChERS GC-MS validation and monitoring of pesticide residues in different foods in the tomato classification group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Restrepo, Andrés; Gallo Ortiz, Andrés Fernando; Hoyos Ossa, Duvan Esteban; Peñuela Mesa, Gustavo Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to validate (SANCO/12495/2011 and NTC-ISO/IEC 17025) multi-residue multi-class methods using QuEChERS sample preparation and GC-MS for the analysis of regulated pesticides in tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum), tamarillos (Solanum betaceum) and goldenberries (Physalis peruviana). These Latin American products are representative and widely produced in Antioquia (Colombia). Sample preparation followed the UNE-EN 15662 method (150 mg MgSO4, 25mg primary secondary amines and 25mg of octadecylsiloxane for cleanup; graphitized carbon black was added for tomatoes). Extracts were injected using a programmed temperature-vaporizing injector. The residues were validated over a range from 0.02 mg/kg to 0.20 mg/kg, with 24 analytes validated in tomatoes, 33 in tamarillos and 28 in goldenberries. An initial risk assessment was enabled by monitoring 24 samples in the municipalities of El Peñol, Marinilla and San Vicente Ferrer. Risks were found for tomatoes, but no significant risks were found for tamarillos or goldenberries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dimerization Is Not a Determining Factor for Functional High Affinity Human Plasminogen Binding by the Group A Streptococcal Virulence Factor PAM and Is Mediated by Specific Residues within the PAM a1a2 Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97–125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83–145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1–2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg126-His127) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg113, His114, Glu116, Arg126, His127), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. PMID:24962580

  14. Dimerization is not a determining factor for functional high affinity human plasminogen binding by the group A streptococcal virulence factor PAM and is mediated by specific residues within the PAM a1a2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J; Ploplis, Victoria A; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-08-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97-125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83-145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1-2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg(126)-His(127)) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg(113), His(114), Glu(116), Arg(126), His(127)), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼ 1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} imaging can accurately distinguish between mature teratoma and necrosis in {sup 18}F-FDG-negative residual masses after treatment of non-seminomatous testicular cancer: a preclinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1772, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Centre Francois Baclesse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Caen (France); Briand, Melanie; Dutoit, Soizic; Deslandes, Edwiges; Poulain, Laurent [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1772, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Bohn, Pierre; Rouvet, Jean; Modzelewski, Romain; Vera, Pierre [Henri Becquerel Cancer Center and Rouen University Hospital and QuantIF- LITIS (EA4108), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rouen (France); Lasnon, Charline [Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Chasle, Jacques [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Pathology Department, Caen (France); Vela, Antony [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Radiophysics Unit, Caen (France); Carreiras, Franck [Universite de Cergy Pontoise, UFR Sciences et Techniques, ERRMECe, EA 1391, Institut des materiaux, Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2011-02-15

    We assessed whether imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin could distinguish mature teratoma from necrosis in human non-seminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT) post-chemotherapy residual masses. Human embryonal carcinoma xenografts (six/rat) were untreated (controls) or treated to form mature teratomas with low-dose cisplatin and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) over a period of 8 weeks. In another group, necrosis was induced in xenografts with high-dose cisplatin plus etoposide (two cycles).{sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) small animal positron emission tomography (SA PET) imaging was performed in three rats (one control and two treated for 4 and 8 weeks with cisplatin+ATRA). Imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression was performed in six rats bearing mature teratomas and two rats with necrotic lesions on a microSPECT/CT device after injection of the tracer [{sup 99m}Tc]HYNIC-RGD [6-hydrazinonicotinic acid conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys)]. Correlative immunohistochemistry studies of human and mouse {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression were performed. Cisplatin+ATRA induced differentiation of the xenografts. After 8 weeks, some glandular structures and mesenchymal cells were visible; in contrast, control tumours showed undifferentiated tissues. SA PET imaging showed that mature teratoma had very low avidity for {sup 18}F-FDG [mean standardised uptake value (SUV{sub mean}) = 0.48 {+-} 0.05] compared to untreated embryonal carcinoma (SUV{sub mean} = 0.92 {+-} 0.13) (p = 0.005). {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} imaging accurately distinguished mature teratoma (tumour to muscle ratio = 4.29 {+-} 1.57) from necrosis (tumour to muscle ratio = 1.3 {+-} 0.26) (p = 0.0002). Immunohistochemistry studies showed that {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression was strong in the glandular structures of mature teratoma lesions and negative in host stroma. Imaging {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin accurately distinguished mature teratoma from

  16. A Higgs at 125.1 GeV and baryon mass spectra derived from a Common U(3) Lie group framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole; Bohr, Henrik; Jensen, Mogens O Stibius

    2015-01-01

    Baryons are described by a Hamiltonian on an intrinsic U(3) Lie group configuration space with electroweak degrees of freedom originating in specific Bloch wave factors. By opening the Bloch degrees of freedom pairwise via a U(2) Higgs mechanism, the strong and electroweak energy scales become...... related to yield the Higgs mass 125.085+/-0.017 GeV and the usual gauge boson masses. From the same Hamiltonian we derive both the relative neutron to proton mass ratio and the N and Delta mass spectra. All compare rather well with the experimental values. We predict neutral flavour baryon singlets...... to be sought for in negative pions scattering on protons or in photoproduction on neutrons and in invariant mass like Σ+c(2455)D- from various decays above the open charm threshold, e.g. at 4499, 4652 and 4723 MeV. The fundamental predictions are based on just one length scale and the fine structure coupling...

  17. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Bjorn J.A.; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G.J.; Smyth, Wesley G.; Armstrong Hewitt, S.; Ginkel, van Leen; Nielen, Michel W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance

  18. The use of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection of analysis of agrochemical residues and mycotoxines in food - challenges and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field of food contaminant analysis, the most significant development of recent years has been the integration of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), coupled to tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS), into analytical applications. In this review, we describe the emergence o...

  19. Impact of surface and residual stresses and electro-/magnetostatic axial loading on the suspended nanomechanical based mass sensors: A theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stachiv, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 21 (2014), "214310-1"-"214310-7" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : suspended nanomechanical resonators * mass sensors Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  20. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  1. Size distributions of non-volatile particle residuals (Dp<800 nm at a rural site in Germany and relation to air mass origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tuch

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle size distributions at a continental background site in Eastern Germany were examined for a one-year period. Particles were classified using a twin differential mobility particle sizer in a size range between 3 and 800 nm. As a novelty, every second measurement of this experiment involved the removal of volatile chemical compounds in a thermodenuder at 300°C. This concept allowed to quantify the number size distribution of non-volatile particle cores – primarily associated with elemental carbon, and to compare this to the original non-conditioned size distribution. As a byproduct of the volatility analysis, new particles originating from nucleation inside the thermodenuder can be observed, however, overwhelmingly at diameters below 6 nm. Within the measurement uncertainty, every particle down to particle sizes of 15 nm is concluded to contain a non-volatile core. The volume fraction of non-volatile particulate matter (non-conditioned diameter < 800 nm varied between 10 and 30% and was largely consistent with the experimentally determined mass fraction of elemental carbon. The average size of the non-volatile particle cores was estimated as a function of original non-conditioned size using a summation method, which showed that larger particles (>200 nm contained more non-volatile compounds than smaller particles (<50 nm, thus indicating a significantly different chemical composition. Two alternative air mass classification schemes based on either, synoptic chart analysis (Berliner Wetterkarte or back trajectories showed that the volume and number fraction of non-volatile cores depended less on air mass than the total particle number concentration. In all air masses, the non-volatile size distributions showed a more and a less volatile ("soot" mode, the latter being located at about 50 nm. During unstable conditions and in maritime air masses, smaller values were observed compared to stable or continental conditions

  2. Comparison of Lateral Flow Assay, Kidney Inhibition Swab, and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Penicillin G Residues in Sow Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelver, Weilin L; Chakrabarty, Shubhashis; Smith, David J

    2017-03-01

    Sows (n = 126) were administered penicillin G; urine, collected at slaughter, was screened by kidney inhibition swab (KIS; 4 h testing time) and then stored at -80 °C (∼1200 days) until analysis by lateral flow assay (LF, ∼5 min testing time) and tandem quadrupole LC-MS/MS (TQ) analysis. The stability of penicillin in urine during storage was verified using TQ analyses. Quantitative results were well-correlated (R 2 = 0.98) with only a ∼10% decrease in penicillin concentration during the 3-year storage period. KIS retesting of stored samples returned results consistent with the original analyses. Lateral flow assay results were highly correlated with the KIS and TQ results. A KIS positive sample, which was not confirmed by TQ or LF, was assayed by Triple-TOF LC-MS to determine the cause of the apparent false positive. This study suggests LF can be used to quickly and efficiently screen for penicillin G residues before slaughter.

  3. Efeitos da Heterogeneidade de Variância Residual entre Grupos de Contemporâneos na Avaliação Genética de Bovinos de Corte Effects of Heterogeneity of Residual Variance among Contemporary Groups on Genetic Evaluation of Beef Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carvalheiro

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar, por meio de dados simulados, o efeito da heterogeneidade de variância residual entre grupos de contemporâneos (GC sobre as avaliações genéticas de bovinos de corte, e comparar o uso de uma avaliação genética ponderada (R¹Isigmae² em relação à avaliação que pressupõe homogeneidade de variância (R=Isigmae². A característica estudada foi ganho de peso pós-desmame corrigido para 345 dias, sendo esta simulada com variância fenotípica de 300 kg² e herdabilidade igual a 0,4. A estrutura de um conjunto real de dados foi utilizada para fornecer os GC e os pais referentes às observações de cada animal. Cinco níveis de heterogeneidade de variância residual foram considerados de forma que os componentes de variância fossem, na média, iguais aos da situação de homogeneidade de variância. Na medida em que níveis mais acentuados de heterogeneidade de variância residual foram considerados, os animais foram selecionados dos GC com maior variabilidade, especialmente com pressão de seleção intensa. Em relação à consistência de predição, os produtos e as vacas tiveram seus valores genéticos preditos mais afetados pela heterogeneidade de variância residual do que os touros. O fator de ponderação utilizado reduziu, mas não eliminou o efeito da heterogeneidade de variância. As avaliações genéticas ponderadas apresentaram resultados iguais ou superiores àqueles obtidos pelas avaliações que assumiram homogeneidade de variância. Mesmo quando não necessário, o uso de avaliações ponderadas produziu resultados não inferiores às avaliações que assumiram homogeneidade de variância.The objective of this study was to investigate, via simulated data, the effect of heterogeneity of residual variance among contemporary groups (CG on genetic evaluation of beef cattle, and to compare a weighted genetic evaluation procedure (R¹Isigmae² with one that assumes homogeneity of

  4. Application of a hybrid ordered mesoporous silica as sorbent for solid-phase multi-residue extraction of veterinary drugs in meat by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Natalia; Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-08-12

    A quick, sensitive and selective analytical reversed-phase multi-residue method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ion-trap mass spectrometry detector (UHPLC-IT-MS/MS) operating in both positive and negative ion mode was developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 veterinary drug residues (β-blockers, β-agonists and Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)) in meat samples. The sample treatment involved a liquid-solid extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. SBA-15 type mesoporous silica was synthetized and modified with octadecylsilane, and the resulting hybrid material (denoted as SBA-15-C18) was applied and evaluated as SPE sorbent in the purification of samples. The materials were comprehensively characterized, and they showed a high surface area, high pore volume and a homogeneous distribution of the pores. Chromatographic conditions and extraction procedure were optimized, and the method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method detection limits (MDLs) and the method quantification limits (MQLs) were determined for all the analytes in meat samples and found to range between 0.01-18.75μg/kg and 0.02-62.50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries for 15 of the target analytes ranged from 71 to 98%. In addition, for comparative purpose SBA-15-C18 was evaluated towards commercial C18 amorphous silica. Results revealed that SBA-15-C18 was clearly more successful in the multi-residue extraction of the 23 mentioned analytes with higher recovery values. The method was successfully tested to analyze prepacked preparations of mince bovine meat. Traces of propranolol, ketoprofen and diclofenac were detected in some samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Artificial neural network modelling of pharmaceutical residue retention times in wastewater extracts using gradient liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Kelly; Miller, Thomas H; Martins, Claudia P B; Edge, Anthony M; Cowan, David A; Barron, Leon P

    2015-05-29

    The modelling and prediction of reversed-phase chromatographic retention time (tR) under gradient elution conditions for 166 pharmaceuticals in wastewater extracts is presented using artificial neural networks for the first time. Radial basis function, multilayer perceptron and generalised regression neural networks were investigated and a comparison of their predictive ability for model solutions discussed. For real world application, the effect of matrix complexity on tR measurements is presented. Measured tR for some compounds in influent wastewater varied by >1min in comparison to tR in model solutions. Similarly, matrix impact on artificial neural network predictive ability was addressed towards developing a more robust approach for routine screening applications. Overall, the best neural network had a predictive accuracy of <1.3min at the 75th percentile of all measured tR data in wastewater samples (<10% of the total runtime). Coefficients of determination for 30 blind test compounds in wastewater matrices lay at or above R(2)=0.92. Finally, the model was evaluated for application to the semi-targeted identification of pharmaceutical residues during a weeklong wastewater sampling campaign. The model successfully identified native compounds at a rate of 83±4% and 73±5% in influent and effluent extracts, respectively. The use of an HRMS database and the optimised ANN model was also applied to shortlisting of 37 additional compounds in wastewater. Ultimately, this research will potentially enable faster identification of emerging contaminants in the environment through more efficient post-acquisition data mining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel method for the rapid and specific extraction of multiple β2 -agonist residues in food by tailor-made Monolith-MIPs extraction disks and detection by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Gan, Ning; Chen, Yinji; Ding, Qingqing; Huang, Jie; Lin, Saichai; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua

    2016-09-01

    A quick and specific pretreatment method based on a series of extraction clean-up disks, consisting of molecularly imprinted polymer monoliths and C18 adsorbent, was developed for the specific enrichment of salbutamol and clenbuterol residues in food. The molecularly imprinted monolithic polymer disk was synthesized using salbutamol as a template through a one-step synthesis process. It can simultaneously and specifically recognize salbutamol and clenbuterol. The monolithic polymer disk and series of C18 disks were assembled with a syringe to form a set of tailor-made devices for the extraction of target molecules. In a single run, salbutamol and clenbuterol can be specifically extracted, cleaned, and eluted by methanol/acetic acid/H2 O. The target molecules, after a silylation derivatization reaction were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The parameters including solvent desorption, sample pH, and the cycles of reloading were investigated and discussed. Under the optimized extraction and clean-up conditions, the limits of detection and quantitation were determined as 0.018-0.022 and 0.042-0.049 ng/g for salbutamol and clenbuterol, respectively. The assay described was convenient, rapid, and specific; thereby potentially efficient in the high-throughput analysis of β2 -agonists residues in real food samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgård Jensen, Christian; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying...

  8. Determination of Pesticide Residues in Honeybees using Modified QUEChERS Sample Work-Up and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaneta Bargańska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing emissions of chemical compounds to the environment, especially of pesticides, is one of factors that may explain present honeybee colony losses. In this work, an analytical method employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was optimized for the simultaneous screening of 19 pesticides which have not been yet determined in honeybee samples from northern Poland (Pomerania. The sample preparation, based on the QuEChERS method combining salting-out liquid-liquid extraction to acetonitrile and a dispersive-SPE clean-up, was adjusted to honeybee samples by adding a small amount of hexane to eliminate beeswax. The recovery of analytes ranged from 70% to 120% with relative standard deviation ≤20%. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.91–25 ng/g. A total of 19 samples of honeybees from suspected pesticide poisoning incidents were analyzed, in which 19 different pesticides were determined.

  9. [Simultaneous determination of glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium residues in tea by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with pre-column derivatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Xiaoquan; Xiao, Haijun; Liu, Binqiu

    2015-10-01

    A method was developed for the determination of glyphosate (GLY) and glufosinate-ammonium (GLUF) in tea using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The sample was extracted with ultrapure water and dichloromethane for 30 min under ultrasonication, followed by a simple cleanup with a C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, and then GLY and GLUF were derivatized using 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (FMOC-Cl) in borate buffer for 2 h. The derivatives of GLY and GLUF were separated on a Waters C18 column (50 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) in a gradient elution mode, and finally detected with positive electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS ) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The quantification analysis was performed by external standard method. The method showed a good linearity (r > 0. 990) in the range of 0.003 125-0.1 mg/L. The limits of detection (LODs) of GLY and GLUF were 0.03 mg/kg. At the spiked levels of 0.375, 1.5 and 4.5 mg/kg, the recoveries of GLY and GLUF were 87.37%-99.11% and 81.44% -86.17% respectively, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) (n = 6) of GLY and GLUF were 0.68%-1.35% and 1.01%-2.33%, respectively. This method is simple, rapid and characterized with acceptable sensitivity and accuracy to meet the requirements for the analysis of GLY and GLUF simultaneously in tea.

  10. SG1120-1202: Mass-quenching as Tracked by UV Emission in the Group Environment at z=0.37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Jonathan T.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2017-02-01

    We use the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain WFC3/F390W imaging of the supergroup SG1120-1202 at z=0.37, mapping the UV emission of 138 spectroscopically confirmed members. We measure total (F390W-F814W) colors and visually classify the UV morphology of individual galaxies as “clumpy” or “smooth.” Approximately 30% of the members have pockets of UV emission (clumpy) and we identify for the first time in the group environment galaxies with UV morphologies similar to the “jellyfish” galaxies observed in massive clusters. We stack the clumpy UV members and measure a shallow internal color gradient, which indicates that unobscured star formation is occurring throughout these galaxies. We also stack the four galaxy groups and measure a strong trend of decreasing UV emission with decreasing projected group distance ({R}{proj}). We find that the strong correlation between decreasing UV emission and increasing stellar mass can fully account for the observed trend in (F390W-F814W)-{R}{proj}, I.e., mass-quenching is the dominant mechanism for extinguishing UV emission in group galaxies. Our extensive multi-wavelength analysis of SG1120-1202 indicates that stellar mass is the primary predictor of UV emission, but that the increasing fraction of massive (red/smooth) galaxies at {R}{proj} ≲ 2 R 200 and existence of jellyfish candidates is due to the group environment.

  11. Characteristics of invasive breast cancer and overall survival of patients eligible for mass breast cancer screening in Guadeloupe compared to those of the preceding age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhel, Philippe; Borja De Mozota, Daphné; Gaumond, Stéphanie; Deloumeaux, Jacqueline

    2017-10-01

    Mass breast cancer screening is offered to French women between the ages of 50 and 74. In the French overseas department of Guadeloupe, where the population is of mostly African ancestry, a low age at diagnosis of breast cancer has been reported, as for African-Americans. This raises the question of whether breast cancer is more aggressive in the age group preceding that eligible for mass screening (40-49) in Guadeloupe. We compared the tumor-related prognostic factors, first line therapy and overall survival rates of breast cancer cases diagnosed between the 40-49 and 50-74 age groups, based on reports of the cancer registry of Guadeloupe for the period 2008-2013. The characteristics studied, risk of death after breast cancer (HR 0.84 [95% CI: 0.58-1.22] and overall survival, did not differ significantly between the two groups, except for higher tumor size (28.8 vs 24.0; p=0.004) in the younger group. These results do not show a pattern of more aggressive breast cancer in the age group preceding that eligible for mass screening in Guadeloupe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. End-group characterisation of poly(propylene glycol)s by means of electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anthony T; Slade, Susan E; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H

    2008-10-01

    The end-group functionalisation of a series of poly(propylene glycol)s has been characterised by means of electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). A series of peaks with mass-to-charge ratios that are close to that of the precursor ion were used to generate information on the end-group functionalities of the poly(propylene glycol)s. Fragment ions resulting from losses of both of the end groups were noted from some of the samples. An example is presented of how software can be used to significantly reduce the length of time involved in data interpretation (which is typically the most time-consuming part of the analysis).

  13. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  14. Simultaneous determination of kasugamycin and validamycin-A residues in cereals by consecutive solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Chenchen; Li, Huidong; Nie, Yan; Fang, Liping; Chen, Zilei

    2018-03-01

    Two polar aminoglycosides, kasugamycin and validamycin-A, were determined in cereals (brown rice, wheat and corn) by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The analytes were extracted from samples using methanol and water (70:30, v/v) at pH 5.5, purified using both a hydrophilic-hydrophobic-balanced cartridge and a strong cation-exchange cartridge, and then analysed using multiple reaction monitoring in positive electrospray ionisation mode with a special ReproSil 100 C 18 high-performance liquid chromatography column. This newly proposed method yielded good sensitivity and excellent chromatographic performance. The limits of quantification for kasugamycin and validamycin-A were 4.1 µg/kg and 1.0 µg/kg, respectively. The recoveries for both compounds at three fortification levels (4, 100 and 500 µg/kg for kasugamycin; 1, 10 and 100 µg/kg for validamycin-A) ranged from 75% to 110%, and the relative standard deviations were below 15%.

  15. Application of dispersive solid-phase extraction and ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry in food additive residue analysis of red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Shen, Hao-Yu; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-11-09

    A novel and effective dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE) procedure with rapid magnetic separation using ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic polymer as an adsorbent was developed. The new procedure had excellent clean-up ability for the selective removal of the matrix in red wine. An accurate, simple, and rapid analytical method using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives (i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, sodium cyclamate, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid, and neotame) in red wine was also used and validated. Recoveries ranging from 78.5% to 99.2% with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.46% to 6.3% were obtained using the new method. All target compounds showed good linearities in the tested range with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9993. The limits of quantification for the nine food additives were between 0.10 μg/L and 50.0 μg/L. The proposed dSPE-UFLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied in the food-safety risk monitoring of real red wine in Zhejiang Province, China. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with a quadrupole/linear ion trap instrument for the analysis of pesticide residues in olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, M D; Ferrer, C; Ulaszewska, M; García-Reyes, J F; Molina-Díaz, A; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2007-11-01

    This article describes the development of an enhanced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for the analysis of pesticides in olive oil. One hundred pesticides belonging to different classes and that are currently used in agriculture have been included in this method. The LC-MS method was developed using a hybrid quadrupole/linear ion trap (QqQ(LIT)) analyzer. Key features of this technique are the rapid scan acquisition times, high specificity and high sensitivity it enables when the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode or the linear ion-trap operational mode is employed. The application of 5 ms dwell times using a linearly accelerating (LINAC) high-pressure collision cell enabled the analysis of a high number of pesticides, with enough data points acquired for optimal peak definition in MRM operation mode and for satisfactory quantitative determinations to be made. The method quantifies over a linear dynamic range of LOQs (0.03-10 microg kg(-1)) up to 500 microg kg(-1). Matrix effects were evaluated by comparing the slopes of matrix-matched and solvent-based calibration curves. Weak suppression or enhancement of signals was observed (ion (EPI) and MS3 were developed.

  17. Pesticides residues in water treatment plant sludge: validation of analytical methodology using liquid chromatography coupled to Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moracci, Luiz Fernando Soares

    2008-01-01

    The evolving scenario of Brazilian agriculture brings benefits to the population and demands technological advances to this field. Constantly, new pesticides are introduced encouraging scientific studies with the aim of determine and evaluate impacts on the population and on environment. In this work, the evaluated sample was the sludge resulted from water treatment plant located in the Vale do Ribeira, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The technique used was the reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Compounds were previously liquid extracted from the matrix. The development of the methodology demanded data processing in order to be transformed into reliable information. The processes involved concepts of validation of chemical analysis. The evaluated parameters were selectivity, linearity, range, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification and robustness. The obtained qualitative and quantitative results were statistically treated and presented. The developed and validated methodology is simple. As results, even exploring the sensitivity of the analytical technique, the work compounds were not detected in the sludge of the WTP. One can explain that these compounds can be present in a very low concentration, can be degraded under the conditions of the water treatment process or are not completely retained by the WTP. (author)

  18. Multi-residue analysis method for analysis of pharmaceuticals using liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC-TOF/MS) in water sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaim, Fouad Fadhil; Abdullah, Md Pauzi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a developed method using solid - phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography - time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-TOF/MS) was developed and validated for quantification and confirmation of eleven pharmaceuticals with different therapeutic classes in water samples, Malaysia. These compounds are caffeine (CAF), prazosin (PRZ), enalapril (ENL), carbamazepine (CBZ), nifedipine (NFD), levonorgestrel (LNG), simvastatin (SMV), hydrochlorothiazide (HYD), gliclazide (GLIC), diclofenac-Na (DIC-Na) and mefenamic acid (MEF). LC was performed on a Dionex Ultimate 3000/LC 09115047 (USA) system. Chromatography was performed on a Thermo Scientific C18 (250 mm × 2.1 mm, i.d.: 5μm) column. Several parameters were optimised such as; mobile phase, gradient elution, collision energy and solvent elution for extraction of compounds from water. The recoveries obtained ranged from 30-148 % in river water. Five pharmaceutical compounds were detected in the surface water samples: caffeine, prazosin, enalpril, diclofenac-Na and mefenamic acid. The developed method is precise and accepted recoveries were got. In addition, this method is suitable to identify and quantify trace concentrations of pharmaceuticals in surface water.

  19. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  20. Multi-residue analysis of legacy POPs and emerging organic contaminants in Singapore's coastal waters using gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C

    2015-08-01

    A gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) based method was developed for determination of 86 hydrophobic organic compounds in seawater. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was employed for sequestration of target analytes in the dissolved phase. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and florisil chromatography were utilized for determination of concentrations in suspended sediments (particulate phase). The target compounds included multi-class hydrophobic contaminants with a wide range of physical-chemical properties. This list includes several polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, methyl triclosan, chlorobenzenes, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Spiked MilliQ water and seawater samples were used to evaluate the method performance. Analyte recoveries were generally good, with the exception of some of the more volatile target analytes (chlorobenzenes and bromobenzenes). The method is very sensitive, with method detection limits typically in the low parts per quadrillion (ppq) range. Analysis of 51 field-collected seawater samples (dissolved and particulate-bound phases) from four distinct coastal sites around Singapore showed trace detection of several polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other legacy POPs, as well as several current-use emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). Polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, bromobenzenes, dechlorane plus isomers (syn-DP, anti-DP) and methyl triclosan were frequently detected at appreciable levels (2-20,000pgL(-1)). The observed concentrations of the monitored contaminants in Singapore's marine environment were generally comparable to previously reported levels in other coastal marine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of these emerging contaminants of concern in Singapore or Southeast Asia. The developed method may prove beneficial for future environmental monitoring of hydrophobic organic contaminants

  1. Analyses of organochlorine pesticides residues in eels (Anguilla anguilla from Lake Garda using Gas chromatography coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Federico Labella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Garda is located in Insubria region, that is known for being the most populated and industrialized area of Italy (Camusso et al., 2001. Therefore, the Lake water, and also the fish species present, could be affected by environmental contamination.  European eel (Anguilla anguilla are considered as suitable matrix for biomonitoring environmental contaminants in European water (Belpaire et al., 2007, being widespread in many European waters and highly contaminated by lipophilic compounds, due to the high lipid content (up to 40% (Larsson et al., 1991. Moreover, eel is an edible species (its farming currently supplies approximately 45,000 tons/year (Nielsen et al., 2008, so it also represents a public health issue. Based on these considerations, the aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of fourteen organochlorine pesticides (OCs in forty-five eels (Anguilla anguilla from Lake Garda, using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE procedure for the analytes extraction and Gas chromatography coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS for the analysis of OCs. GC-MS/MS analysis was developed and validated according to the SANTE/11945/2015 guidelines.  Uncontaminated eel sample (previously checked for the presence of OCs and considered blank with a concentration of compounds < Limit of Detection were used for all procedure's optimization steps. For all the OCs analysed, satisfactory results were achieved. Regarding eel samples, several pesticides were detected, but DDTs (DDT and its metabolites were found with the highest prevalence (92 %. The concentration rage was from not detected (n.d. to 19000 ng g-1. Although DDTs levels in the environment are declining (Albaiges et al., 2011, they continue to bioaccumulate in tissues of human and animal and biomagnify in food chains.

  2. Validation of an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify illicit drug and pharmaceutical residues in wastewater using accuracy profile approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Cécile; Roosen, Martin; Levi, Yves; Karolak, Sara

    2017-06-02

    The analysis of biomarkers in wastewater has become a common approach to assess community behavior. This method is an interesting way to estimate illicit drug consumption in a given population: by using a back calculation method, it is therefore possible to quantify the amount of a specific drug used in a community and to assess the consumption variation at different times and locations. Such a method needs reliable analytical data since the determination of a concentration in the ngL -1 range in a complex matrix is difficult and not easily reproducible. The best analytical method is liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry coupling after solid-phase extraction or on-line pre-concentration. Quality criteria are not specially defined for this kind of determination. In this context, it was decided to develop an UHPLC-MS/MS method to analyze 10 illicit drugs and pharmaceuticals in wastewater treatment plant influent or effluent using a pre-concentration on-line system. A validation process was then carried out using the accuracy profile concept as an innovative tool to estimate the probability of getting prospective results within specified acceptance limits. Influent and effluent samples were spiked with known amounts of the 10 compounds and analyzed three times a day for three days in order to estimate intra-day and inter-day variations. The matrix effect was estimated for each compound. The developed method can provide at least 80% of results within ±25% limits except for compounds that are degraded in influent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of a method for assaying sulfonamide antimicrobial residues in cheese: hot-water extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Giorgio; Bogialli, Sara; Curini, Roberta; Di Corcia, Antonio; Laganá, Aldo

    2006-06-28

    Several sulfonamide antimicrobials (SAAs) are largely used in veterinary medicine. A rapid, specific, and sensitive procedure for determining 12 SAAs in cheese is presented. The method is based on the matrix solid-phase dispersion technique followed by liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS) equipped with an electrospray ion source. Target compounds were extracted from Mozzarella, Asiago, Parmigiano, Emmenthal, and Camembert cheese samples by 6 mL of water modified with 10% methanol and heated at 120 degrees C. The addition of methanol to hot water served to improve remarkably extraction yields of the most lipophilic SAAs, that is, sulfadimethoxine and sulfaquinoxaline. After acidification and filtration, 100 microL of the aqueous extract was injected in the LC column. MS data acquisition was performed in the multireaction monitoring mode, selecting two precursor-to-product ion transitions for each target compound. Methanol-modified hot water appeared to be an efficient extractant, because absolute recovery ranged between 67 and 88%. Using sulfamoxole as surrogate analyte, recovery of the 12 analytes spiked in the five types of cheese considered at the 50 ng/g level ranged between 75 and 105% with RSD not higher than 11%. Statistical analysis of the mean recovery data showed that the extraction efficiency was not affected by the type of cheese analyzed. This result indicates this method could be applied to other cheese types not considered here. The accuracy of the method was determined at three spike levels, that is, 20, 50, and 100 ng/g, and varied between 73 and 102% with relative standard deviations ranging between 4 and 12%. On the basis of a signal-to-noise ratio of 10, limits of quantification were estimated to be <1 ng/g.

  4. Gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry of Pinot Noir wine volatile compounds (δ13C) and solid residues (δ13C, δ15N) for the reassessment of vineyard water-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E; Vogiatzaki, Maria; Zufferey, Vivian

    2017-09-29

    This paper describes a novel approach to reassess the water status in vineyards based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of wine volatile organic compounds (δ 13 C VOC/VPDB ) and bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, and the C/N molar ratios of the wine solid residues (δ 13 C SR/VPDB , δ 15 N SR/Air-N2 ). These analyses link gas chromatography/combustion and elemental analysis to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS, EA/IRMS). Field-grown cultivars of Pinot Noir grapevines were exposed during six growing seasons (2009-2014) to controlled soil water availability, while maintaining identical the other environmental variables and agricultural techniques. Wines were produced from the grapes by the same oenological protocol. This permitted for the assessment of the effects in the biochemistry of wines solely induced by the changes in the plant-soil water status. This mimicked the more recurrent and prolonged periods of soil water deficiency due to climate changes. Water stress in grapevine was assessed by the measurement of the predawn leaf water potential (Ψ pd ) and the stable carbon isotope composition of the berry sugars during harvest (must sugars). For quantitation purposes and the normalization of the measured stable carbon isotope ratios of the VOCs, the wine samples were spiked with three standard compounds with known concentration and δ 13 C VPDB values. VOCs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and GC/C/IRMS. δ 13 C values were obtained for eighteen VOCs. The solid residues were obtained by freeze-drying wine aliquots and were analyzed for their C and N content and isotope composition by EA/IRMS. All the isotopic ratios (δ 13 C SR , δ 15 N SR , δ 13 C VOC ) are highly correlated with the Ψ pd values, indicating that the proposed gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry approach is a useful tool to

  5. Identification of ortho-Substituted Benzoic Acid/Ester Derivatives via the Gas-Phase Neighboring Group Participation Effect in (+)-ESI High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blincoe, William D; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Saurí, Josep; Pierson, Nicholas A; Joyce, Leo A; Mangion, Ian; Sheng, Huaming

    2018-04-01

    Benzoic acid/ester/amide derivatives are common moieties in pharmaceutical compounds and present a challenge in positional isomer identification by traditional tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A method is presented for exploiting the gas-phase neighboring group participation (NGP) effect to differentiate ortho-substituted benzoic acid/ester derivatives with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS 1 ). Significant water/alcohol loss (>30% abundance in MS 1 spectra) was observed for ortho-substituted nucleophilic groups; these fragment peaks are not observable for the corresponding para and meta-substituted analogs. Experiments were also extended to the analysis of two intermediates in the synthesis of suvorexant (Belsomra) with additional analysis conducted with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), density functional theory (DFT), and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) studies. Significant water/alcohol loss was also observed for 1-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazoles but not for the isomeric 2-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazole analogs. IMS-MS, NMR, and DFT studies were conducted to show that the preferred orientation of the 2-substituted triazole rotamer was away from the electrophilic center of the reaction, whereas the 1-subtituted triazole was oriented in close proximity to the center. Abundance of NGP product was determined to be a product of three factors: (1) proton affinity of the nucleophilic group; (2) steric impact of the nucleophile; and (3) proximity of the nucleophile to carboxylic acid/ester functional groups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Evaluation of Teaching Methods in Mass CPCR Training in Different Groups of the Society, an Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Hamed; Bahrami, Mojtaba; Malekpour, Abdorrasoul; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Allahyary, Elaheh; Amini, Mitra; Abdorahimi, Mehdi; khani, Sara; Kalantari Meibodi, Mohammad; Kojuri, Javad

    2015-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of different methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPCR) training in 3 different groups of the society. In a prospective and observational study of 2000 individuals in 3 different groups including G1, G2, and G3 4 different protocols of CPCR training were applied and their efficacy was compared between the groups. Also, 12 months after the study course, 460 participants from 3 groups were asked to take apart in a theoretical and practical examination to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the 4 protocols. Among 2000 individuals took a parted in the study, 950 (47.5%) were G1, 600 (30%) were G2, and 450 (22.5%) were G3. G1 in 4 groups were 2.37 and 2.65 times more successful in pretest theoretical and 2.61 and 18.20 times more successful in practical examinations compared with G2 and G3 and gained highest improvement in CPCR skills. Other groups also showed significantly improved CPCR skills. Comparison of different methods of CPCR learning showed that the workshop using interactive lecture as well as human model, educational film, and reference CPCR book has the highest efficacy in all groups. This protocol of CPCR training showed more efficacy in long-term postdelayed evaluation. On the contrary, medical students had better long-term outcomes from the course. Although G1 and G2 obtained better results in learning CPCR skills, in G3 also the theoretical and practical knowledge were improved significantly. This course increased confidence for doing CPCR in all groups of the study. Considering that the most of the bystanders at emergency states are general population, training this group of the society and increasing their confidence about performing CPCR can be so effective and lifesaving at emergency states. (Clinical trial. Gov registration: NCT02120573).

  7. Residue depletion of oxytetracycline (OTC) and 4-epi-oxytetracycline (4-epi-OTC) in broiler chicken's claws by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo, J; Pokrant, E; Araya, D; Briceño, C; Hidalgo, H; Maddaleno, A; Araya-Jordán, C; San Martin, B

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in poultry production for the treatment of bacterial diseases. However, residues may remain in products and by-products destined for human consumption or animal feeding. The claws of chickens, which are a by-product of the poultry industry, can directly or indirectly enter the food chain as meals destined to feed other productive animals. Thus, it becomes necessary to determine and quantify antimicrobial residues present in this matrix. The objective of the study was to assess the depletion of oxytetracycline (OTC) and its metabolite 4-epi-OTC in broiler chicken's claws. Claws of 32 broilers treated with a therapeutic dosage of 10% OTC during 7 days were analysed. Samples were taken at days 3, 9, 15 and 19 post-treatment. As for the control group, eight broiler chickens were raised under the same conditions. Extraction was carried out through EDTA-McIlvaine buffer, and clean-up employed a SPE C-18 Sep-Pak®. Instrumental analysis was performed through LC-MS/MS. The concentrations of both analytes were determined in claw samples until day 19 post-treatment. Average concentrations were within the LOD (20 μg kg - 1 ) and LOQ (22 µg kg - 1 ) for OTC and 84 μg kg - 1 for 4-epi-OTC. Withdrawal times (WDTs) of 39 days for OTC and 54 days for 4-epi-OTC were established in claws based on 95% confidence. These findings demonstrate that claws can be a source of antimicrobial residue entry into the food chain, since the results showed that OTC and its metabolite can be found in chicken's claws for long periods, even exceeding the average lifespan of a broiler chicken.

  8. BANYAN. V. A SYSTEMATIC ALL-SKY SURVEY FOR NEW VERY LATE-TYPE LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-01-10

    We present the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) catalog, consisting of 228 new late-type (M4-L6) candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs) with an expected false-positive rate of ∼13%. This sample includes 79 new candidate young brown dwarfs and 22 planetary-mass objects. These candidates were identified through the first systematic all-sky survey for late-type low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in YMGs. We cross-matched the Two Micron All Sky Survey and AllWISE catalogs outside of the galactic plane to build a sample of 98,970 potential ≥M5 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and calculated their proper motions with typical precisions of 5-15 mas yr{sup –1}. We selected highly probable candidate members of several YMGs from this sample using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II). We used the most probable statistical distances inferred from BANYAN II to estimate the spectral type and mass of these candidate YMG members. We used this unique sample to show tentative signs of mass segregation in the AB Doradus moving group and the Tucana-Horologium and Columba associations. The BASS sample has already been successful in identifying several new young brown dwarfs in earlier publications, and will be of great interest in studying the initial mass function of YMGs and for the search of exoplanets by direct imaging; the input sample of potential close-by ≥M5 dwarfs will be useful to study the kinematics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and search for new proper motion pairs.

  9. Quantification in mass units of group 1 grass allergens by a monoclonal antibody-based sandwich ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arilla, M C; Ibarrola, I; Eraso, E; Aguirre, M; Martínez, A; Asturias, J A

    2001-08-01

    Grass pollen extracts currently used for allergy diagnosis and immunotherapy are a complex mixture of proteins of which only a few have allergenic activity. Lol p 1 is one of the most important allergens in grass pollen extracts. To develop a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of Lol p 1 and other group 1 allergens from grass species, and to assess its suitability for quantifying this group of allergens. Balb/c mice immunized with recombinant Lol p 1 were used for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Screening of hybridomas was performed by direct ELISA, and selected monoclonal antibodies were immobilized on ELISA plates and incubated with samples containing group 1 allergens. Bound allergens were detected by a combination of biotinylated Lol p 1-specific monoclonal antibody and peroxidase-streptavidin conjugate. The assay is based on three Lol p 1-specific monoclonal antibodies with different epitope specificities. The optimized ELISA measured Lol p 1 concentrations ranging from 125 to 1000 ng/mL and could quantify group 1 allergen from grass species belonging to the Pooidea subfamily. The assay does not depend on anti-sera production or availability of human sera and thus reactives can be produced in unlimited amounts. This sensitive and specific Lol p 1 assay will be helpful both for quantifying the group 1 allergen content of Pooideae pollen extracts intended for clinical use and for studying cross-reactivities among pollen extracts.

  10. Simultaneous analysis of aminoglycosides with many other classes of drug residues in bovine tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using an ion-pairing reagent added to final extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehotay, Steven J; Lightfield, Alan R

    2018-01-01

    The way to maximize scope of analysis, sample throughput, and laboratory efficiency in the monitoring of veterinary drug residues in food animals is to determine as many analytes as possible as fast as possible in as few methods as possible. Capital and overhead expenses are also reduced by using fewer instruments in the overall monitoring scheme. Traditionally, the highly polar aminoglycoside antibiotics require different chromatographic conditions from other classes of drugs, but in this work, we demonstrate that an ion-pairing reagent (sodium 1-heptanesulfonate) added to the combined final extracts from two sample preparation methods attains good separation of 174 targeted drugs, including 9 aminoglycosides, in the same 10.5-min ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. The full method was validated in bovine kidney, liver, and muscle tissues according to US regulatory protocols, and 137-146 (79-84%) of the drugs gave between 70 and 120% average recoveries with ≤ 25% RSDs in the different types of tissues spiked at 0.5, 1, and 2 times the regulatory levels of interest (10-1000 ng/g depending on the drug). This method increases sample throughput and the possible number of drugs monitored in the US National Residue Program, and requires only one UHPLC-MS/MS method and instrument for analysis rather than two by the previous scheme. Graphical abstract Outline of the streamlined approach to monitor 174 veterinary drugs, including aminoglycosides, in bovine tissues by combining two extracts of the same sample with an ion-pairing reagent for analysis by UHPLC-MS/MS.

  11. Development of multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in cereal matrices by isotopic dilution associated to liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry after pressurized liquid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mrabet, Khadija

    2008-01-01

    Pesticides are nowadays considered as toxic for human health. The maximal residues levels authorized in water and foodstuff are more and more strict. Therefore, selective analytical techniques are necessary for their identification and their quantification. The aim of this thesis was to develop a multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides by isotopic dilution associated to liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS"2) after pressurized liquid extraction. In a first step, an analysis method of phenyl-ureas and triazines in groundwater by isotopic dilution associated to LC/MS"2 after solid phase extraction has been developed. The method has been validated and evaluated by participating to an inter-laboratory study. Concerning cereals, an extraction method of pesticides associated to an analysis by LC/MS"2 has been developed for thirty-eight pesticides representative of twenty-six chemicals families and fourteen labeled compounds in wheat. The analysis has been carried out in reversed phase chromatography. Separation and detection conditions have been optimized. A global analytical protocol consisting of a pressurized liquid extraction step using acetonitrile at 100 deg. C and at 100 bars and followed by purification step of the resulting extract on a polymeric sorbent was developed. The developed method enables to extract thirty-eight pesticides and fourteen labeled compounds from wheat with recovery yield about 85% (RSD =4%, n=3). Moreover, the results show that the application of isotopic dilution can be complex. Although some improvements need to be added regarding experimentation of aged matrices or contaminated samples, the potential of the method has been demonstrated. (author) [fr

  12. Residue analysis of four diacylhydrazine insecticides in fruits and vegetables by Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingang; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Li, Yuanbo; Song, Wenchen; Zheng, Yongquan

    2011-08-01

    The new analytical method using Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) procedure for simultaneous determination of diacylhydrazine insecticide residues in fruits and vegetables was developed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The four insecticides (tebufenozide, methoxfenozide, chromafenozide, and halofenozide) were extracted from six fruit and vegetable matrices using acetonitrile and subsequently cleaned up using primary secondary amine (PSA) or octadecylsilane (C18) as sorbent prior to UPLC-MS/MS analysis. The determination of the target compounds was achieved in less than 3.0 min using an electrospray ionization source in positive mode (ESI+) for tebufenozide, methoxfenozide, and halofenozide and in negative mode (ESI-) for chromafenozide. The limits of detection were below 0.6 μg kg(-1), while the limit of quantification did not exceed 2 μg kg(-1) in different matrices. The QuEChERS procedure by using two sorbents (PSA and C18) and the matrix-matched standards gave satisfactory recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) values in different matrices at four spiked levels (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 1 mg kg(-1)). The overall average recoveries for this method in apple, grape, cucumber, tomato, cabbage, and spinach at four levels ranged from 74.2% to 112.5% with RSDs in the range of 1.4-13.8% (n = 5) for all analytes. This study provides a theoretical basis for China to draw up maximum residue limits and analytical method for diacylhydrazine insecticide in vegetables and fruits.

  13. Fat-Free Mass and Fasting Glucose Values in Patients with and without Statin Therapy Assigned to Age Groups between 75 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dzien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aging-associated changes in body composition result in an increased cardiometabolic risk. A tremendous reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality can be obtained by statin therapy. Statins are well tolerated, with myopathy as the most serious negative side effect. Some recently published studies indicate that the incidence of type 2 diabetes might be increased during intensified statin therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate whether statin therapy has an influence on the aging-associated changes in fat-free mass (FFM. Methods: A total of 3,280 persons attending a medical outdoor center between January 2005 and July 2011 were assigned to 3 age groups from 75 years. Clinical data, body mass index (BMI, and body composition were evaluated in the different age groups in patients with and without statin therapy. To analyze the impact of statin use on FFM, we regressed a patient's FFM on an interaction term between statin use and age and other control variables. Results: Aging was associated with a decrease in BMI and FFM, while fat mass continuously increased up to the age of >75 years. This was paralleled by a continuous increase in fasting glucose levels in patients with and without statin therapy. The loss of FFM between the age group 75 years was more pronounced in statin-treated patients (10.88% than in non-statin users (8.47%. Creatine phosphokinase values revealed a decrease of 7.77 U/l between the age groups 75 years in non-statin users and of 14.75 U/l in statin users. Statistical analysis indicated that the effect of statin therapy on FFM is more pronounced in younger than in older patients. Conclusions: Patients under statin therapy seem to be more vulnerable to the aging-associated lowering of FFM. Diagnostic procedures and interventions to prevent a loss of muscle mass might be of particular advantage in elderly patients under statin therapy.

  14. PhosProtect - a novel and superior compound to tag and protect phospho-groups during mass spectrometry based phospho-proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Value Proposition The PhosProtect compound alone (developed and tested, IP secured)* • protects phospho-groups during tandem mass spectrometry, thus reducing problematic neutral loss of phosphate. • provides unique phospho-tag by causing isotopic distribution patterns in MS and MS/MS data. The PhosProtect...... compound covalently bound to column material (in progress , IP secured)** • Combines enrichment, protection and tagging of phospho-peptides and phospho-lipids in one easy workflow....

  15. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Compounds Containing Carboxyl Groups Using CdTe and CuO Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Megumi Sakurai; Taro Sato; Jiawei Xu; Soichi Sato; Tatsuya Fujino

    2018-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of compounds containing carboxyl groups was carried out by using semiconductor nanoparticles (CdTe and CuO) as the matrix. Salicylic acid (Sal), glucuronic acid (Glu), ibuprofen (Ibu), and tyrosine (Tyr) were ionized as deprotonated species (carboxylate anions) by using electrons ejected from CdTe after the photoexcitation. When CuO was used as the matrix, the peak intensity of Tyr became high compared with that obtained with CdTe....

  16. Enumeration of sugars and sugar alcohols hydroxyl groups by aqueous-based acetylation and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method is described for enumerating hydroxyl groups on analytes in aqueous media is described, and applied to some common polyalcohols (erythritol, mannitol, and xylitol) and selected carbohydrates. The analytes were derivatized in water with vinyl acetate in presence of sodium phosphate buffer. ...

  17. A new stem group echinoid from the Triassic of China leads to a revised macroevolutionary history of echinoids during the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeffrey R.; Hu, Shi-xue; Zhang, Qi-Yue; Petsios, Elizabeth; Cotton, Laura J.; Huang, Jin-Yuan; Zhou, Chang-yong; Wen, Wen; Bottjer, David J.

    2018-01-01

    The Permian-Triassic bottleneck has long been thought to have drastically altered the course of echinoid evolution, with the extinction of the entire echinoid stem group having taken place during the end-Permian mass extinction. The Early Triassic fossil record of echinoids is, however, sparse, and new fossils are paving the way for a revised interpretation of the evolutionary history of echinoids during the Permian-Triassic crisis and Early Mesozoic. A new species of echinoid, Yunnanechinus luopingensis n. sp. recovered from the Middle Triassic (Anisian) Luoping Biota fossil Lagerstätte of South China, displays morphologies that are not characteristic of the echinoid crown group. We have used phylogenetic analyses to further demonstrate that Yunnanechinus is not a member of the echinoid crown group. Thus a clade of stem group echinoids survived into the Middle Triassic, enduring the global crisis that characterized the end-Permian and Early Triassic. Therefore, stem group echinoids did not go extinct during the Palaeozoic, as previously thought, and appear to have coexisted with the echinoid crown group for at least 23 million years. Stem group echinoids thus exhibited the Lazarus effect during the latest Permian and Early Triassic, while crown group echinoids did not.

  18. Analysis of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect mass-observable relations using South Pole Telescope observations of an X-ray selected sample of low-mass galaxy clusters and groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Mohr, J.; Saro, A.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.;  uhada, R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-02-25

    We use microwave observations from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) to examine the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures of a sample of 46 X-ray selected groups and clusters drawn from ~6 deg2 of the XMM–Newton Blanco Cosmology Survey. These systems extend to redshift z = 1.02 and probe the SZE signal to the lowest X-ray luminosities (≥1042 erg s-1) yet; these sample characteristics make this analysis complementary to previous studies. We develop an analysis tool, using X-ray luminosity as a mass proxy, to extract selection-bias-corrected constraints on the SZE significance and Y_500 mass relations. The former is in good agreement with an extrapolation of the relation obtained from high-mass clusters. However, the latter, at low masses, while in good agreement with the extrapolation from the high-mass SPT clusters, is in tension at 2.8σ with the Planck constraints, indicating the low-mass systems exhibit lower SZE signatures in the SPT data. We also present an analysis of potential sources of contamination. For the radio galaxy point source population, we find 18 of our systems have 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey sources within 2 arcmin of the X-ray centre, and three of these are also detected at significance >4 by SPT. Of these three, two are associated with the group brightest cluster galaxies, and the third is likely an unassociated quasar candidate. We examine the impact of these point sources on our SZE scaling relation analyses and find no evidence of biases. We also examine the impact of dusty galaxies using constraints from the 220 GHz data. The stacked sample provides 2.8σ significant evidence of dusty galaxy flux, which would correspond to an average underestimate of the SPT Y_500 signal that is (17 ± 9)per cent in this sample of low-mass systems. Finally, we explore the impact of future data from SPTpol and XMM-XXL, showing that it will lead to a factor of 4 to 5 tighter

  19. PSYM-WIDE: A Survey for Large-separation Planetary-mass Companions to Late Spectral Type Members of Young Moving Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Marie-Eve; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Wolf, Christian; Magnier, Eugene A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of a direct imaging survey for very large separation (>100 au), low-mass companions around 95 nearby young K5-L5 stars and brown dwarfs. They are high-likelihood candidates or confirmed members of the young (≲150 Myr) β Pictoris and AB Doradus moving groups (ABDMG) and the TW Hya, Tucana-Horologium, Columba, Carina, and Argus associations. Images in I\\prime and z\\prime filters were obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini South to search for companions down to an apparent magnitude of z\\prime ˜ 22-24 at separations ≳20″ from the targets and in the remainder of the wide 5.‧5 × 5.‧5 GMOS field of view. This allowed us to probe the most distant region where planetary-mass companions could be gravitationally bound to the targets. This region was left largely unstudied by past high-contrast imaging surveys, which probed much closer-in separations. This survey led to the discovery of a planetary-mass (9-13 {M}{Jup}) companion at 2000 au from the M3V star GU Psc, a highly probable member of ABDMG. No other substellar companions were identified. These results allowed us to constrain the frequency of distant planetary-mass companions (5-13 {M}{Jup}) to {0.84}-0.66+6.73% (95% confidence) at semimajor axes between 500 and 5000 au around young K5-L5 stars and brown dwarfs. This is consistent with other studies suggesting that gravitationally bound planetary-mass companions at wide separations from low-mass stars are relatively rare.

  20. Selection of greenery plants' group tolerant to mineralized human wastes for their inclusion into intrasystem mass exchange of BTLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Kalacheva, Galina; Ushakova, Sofya; Trifonov, Sergey V.; Pavlova, Anastasiya

    2016-07-01

    A possible way solving the inclusion problem of the human liquid wastes containing sodium chloride into intrasystem mass exchange of bio-technical life support system (BTLSS) is selection of such species of greenery plants that can utilize sodium chloride, be edible for a human and have rather a high productivity. Our previous works showed that salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea L. was a promising candidate for sodium chloride inclusion into BTLSS mass exchange. However, with the aim of creation of more various human diet possibilities a set of greenery plants cultivated by the water culture method was estimated. Based on preliminary experiments the plants Brassica juncea L., Nasturtium officinale R. Br., Lepidium sativum angustifolia L. and Salicornia europaea L. were chosen as the investigation objects. The nutrient solution for greenery plant's cultivation was obtained after harvesting the wheat plants grown on the solution with mineralized human wastes' addition. The results of the first stage of the investigations carried out showed that plants of Brassica juncea and Lepidium sativum angustifolia are unpromising for their inclusion into BTLSS because of a set of physiological characteristics. On the next stage of investigations, an experimental model of closed ecosystem was created. For that purpose the plants of Salicornia europaea and Nasturtium officinale were introduced in the phototroph unit structure. It was determined that there was deficiency of main macronutrients for Salicornia europaea and Nasturtium officinale including sodium for Salicornia europaea. The deficiency had an effect on plants productivity and on carry-over of sodium from solution by Salicornia europaea. Thus in the future experiment it is necessary to carry out desalinization of solution by Salicornia europaea plants. Nasturtium officinale, that is rich in essential fatty acids and contributes into variety of human vegetable diet is planned to be cultivated by the

  1. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  2. New Low-mass Stars in the 25 Orionis Stellar Group and Orion OB1a Sub-association from SDSS-III/BOSS Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Genaro; Downes, Juan José; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Covey, Kevin R.; Tapia, Mauricio; Hernández, Jesús; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Briceño, César

    2017-07-01

    The Orion OB1a sub-association is a rich low-mass star (LMS) region. Previous spectroscopic studies have confirmed 160 LMSs in the 25 Orionis stellar group (25 Ori), which is the most prominent overdensity of Orion OB1a. Nonetheless, the current census of the 25 Ori members is estimated to be lower than 50% complete, leaving a large number of members to be still confirmed. We retrieved 172 low-resolution stellar spectra in Orion OB1a observed as ancillary science in the SDSS-III/BOSS survey, for which we classified their spectral types and determined physical parameters. To determine memberships, we analyzed the {{{H}}}α emission, Li I λ6708 absorption, and Na I λλ8183, 8195 absorption as youth indicators in stars classified as M type. We report 50 new LMSs spread across the 25 Orionis, ASCC 18, and ASCC 20 stellar groups with spectral types from M0 to M6, corresponding to a mass range of 0.10≤slant m/{M}⊙ ≤slant 0.58. This represents an increase of 50% in the number of known LMSs in the area and a net increase of 20% in the number of 25 Ori members in this mass range. Using parallax values from the Gaia DR1 catalog, we estimated the distances to these three stellar groups and found that they are all co-distant, at 338 ± 66 pc. We analyzed the spectral energy distributions of these LMSs and classified their disks into evolutionary classes. Using H-R diagrams, we found a suggestion that 25 Ori could be slightly older than the other two observed groups in Orion OB1a.

  3. High-throughput method for macrolides and lincosamides antibiotics residues analysis in milk and muscle using a simple liquid-liquid extraction technique and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Louise; Martins, Magda Targa; Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Campos Motta, Tanara Magalhães; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara

    2015-11-01

    A fast and simple method for residue analysis of the antibiotics classes of macrolides (erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, tilmicosin and spiramycin) and lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) was developed and validated for cattle, swine and chicken muscle and for bovine milk. Sample preparation consists in a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with acetonitrile, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS), without the need of any additional clean-up steps. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a C18 column and a mobile phase composed by acidified acetonitrile and water. The method was fully validated according the criteria of the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Validation parameters such as limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy, repeatability, specificity, reproducibility, decision limit (CCα) and detection capability (CCβ) were evaluated. All calculated values met the established criteria. Reproducibility values, expressed as coefficient of variation, were all lower than 19.1%. Recoveries range from 60% to 107%. Limits of detection were from 5 to 25 µg kg(-1).The present method is able to be applied in routine analysis, with adequate time of analysis, low cost and a simple sample preparation protocol. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Quantification of bupivacaine hydrochloride and isoflupredone acetate residues in porcine muscle, beef, milk, egg, shrimp, flatfish, and eel using a simplified extraction method coupled with liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hyun; Park, Jin-A; Zheng, Weijia; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Seong-Kwan; Choi, Jeong-Min; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Afifi, Nehal A; Shim, Jae-Han; Chang, Byung-Joon; Kim, Jin-Suk; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2017-10-15

    In this study, a simple analytical approach has been developed and validated for the determination of bupivacaine hydrochloride and isoflupredone acetate residues in porcine muscle, beef, milk, egg, shrimp, flatfish, and eel using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A 0.1% solution of acetic acid in acetonitrile combined with n-hexane was used for deproteinization and defatting of all tested matrices and the target drugs were well separated on a Waters Xbridge™ C18 analytical column using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% acetic acid (A) and 0.1% solution of acetic acid in methanol (B). The linearity estimated from six-point matrix-matched calibrations was good, with coefficients of determination ≥0.9873. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for bupivacaine hydrochloride and isoflupredone acetate were 1 and 2ngg -1 , respectively. Recovery percentages in the ranges of 72.51-112.39% (bupivacaine hydrochloride) and 72.58-114.56% (isoflupredone acetate) were obtained from three different fortification concentrations with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of bupivacaine hydrochloride and isoflupredone acetate from porcine muscle, beef, milk, egg, shrimp, flatfish, and eel samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Salmon Muscle Adherence to Polymer Coatings and Determination of Antibiotic Residues by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zumelzu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistent adhesion of salmon muscle to food container walls after treatment with urea solution was observed. This work evaluated the diffusion of antibiotics from the salmon muscle to the polyethylene terephthalate (PET coating protecting the electrolytic chromium coated steel (ECCS plates. New aquaculture production systems employ antibiotics such as florfenicol, florfenicol amine, oxytetracycline, and erythromycin to control diseases. The introduction of antibiotics is a matter of concern regarding the effects on human health and biodiversity. It is important to determine their impact on the adhesion of postmortem salmon muscle to can walls and the surface and structural changes affecting the functionality of multilayers. This work characterized the changes occurring in the multilayer PET polymer and steel of containers by electron microscopy, 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR analyses. A robust mass spectrometry methodology was employed to determine the presence of antibiotic residues. No evidence of antibiotics was observed on the protective coating in the range between 0.001 and 2.0 ng/mL; however, the presence of proteins, cholesterol, and alpha-carotene was detected. This in-depth profiling of the matrix-level elements is relevant for the use of adequate materials in the canning export industry.

  6. Use of the extraction residue of emeralds in a formulation mass of ceramic tiles; Utilizacao do residuo da extracao de esmeraldas em uma formulacao de massa de revestimento ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, R. F., E-mail: ronaldofcavalcante@gmail.com [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica - PPgEM - UFRN, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova, RN (Brazil); Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A., E-mail: rmaribondo@ufrnet.br, E-mail: paskocimas_ca@hotmail.com [Departamento de Engenharia Materiais - DEMAT - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova, RN (Brazil); Dutra, R.P.S., E-mail: ricardodutra@ct.ufpb.br [Departamento de Engenharia Materiais - DEMAT - UFPB - Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Companies involved in mining and beneficiation of emerald represent an important area of industrial development in Brazil, with a significant contribution to world production of this ore. As a result, large volumes of waste generated and emerald are constantly abandoned in the environment, contributing negatively to their preservation. On the other hand the interest in the use of mining waste as an additive in production of ceramic materials has grown among researchers in recent years. The ceramic industry is constantly seeking to expand the market for the sector and trying to improve product quality and increase the variety of applications. The technology of obtaining ceramic coating that uses waste from mining is still a largely unexplored market. Thus, the purpose of this study was to characterize the waste generated from mining emerald as well as to evaluate its potential use as raw material for production melting of ceramic tiles. Ceramic mixtures were prepared from raw materials characterized by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Five compositions were prepared using the waste codes of emeralds from 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Samples were prepared by pressing, sintered at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C and characterized to establish their mineralogical composition, water absorption, linear shrinkage and modulus of rupture. The results showed that the residue of emeralds studied can be embedded in the mass of ceramic tiles up to 20% in replacement of feldspar without compromising the end product properties. (author)

  7. Benefits of Group Living Include Increased Feeding Efficiency and Lower Mass Loss during Desiccation in the Social and Inbreeding Spider Stegodyphus dumicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanthournout, Bram; Greve, Michelle; Bruun, Anne; Bechsgaard, Jesper; Overgaard, Johannes; Bilde, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Group living carries a price: it inherently entails increased competition for resources and reproduction, and may also be associated with mating among relatives, which carries costs of inbreeding. Nonetheless, group living and sociality is found in many animals, and understanding the direct and indirect benefits of cooperation that override the inherent costs remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Individuals in groups may benefit from more efficient management of energy or water reserves, for example in the form of reduced water or heat loss from groups of animals huddling, or through reduced energy demands afforded by shared participation in tasks. We investigated the putative benefits of group living in the permanently social spider Stegodyphus dumicola by comparing the effect of group size on standard metabolic rate, lipid/protein content as a body condition measure, feeding efficiency, per capita web investment, and weight/water loss and survival during desiccation. Because energetic expenditure is temperature sensitive, some assays were performed under varying temperature conditions. We found that feeding efficiency increased with group size, and the rate of weight loss was higher in solitary individuals than in animals in groups of various sizes during desiccation. Interestingly, this was not translated into differences in survival or in standard metabolic rate. We did not detect any group size effects for other parameters, and group size effects did not co-vary with experimental temperature in a predictive manner. Both feeding efficiency and mass loss during desiccation are relevant ecological factors as the former results in lowered predator exposure time, and the latter benefits social spiders which occupy arid, hot environments. PMID:26869936

  8. Benefits of group living include increased feeding efficiency and lower mass loss during desiccation in the social and inbreeding spider Stegodyphus dumicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram eVanthournout

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Group living carries a price: it inherently entails increased competition for resources and reproduction, and may also be associated with mating among relatives, which carries costs of inbreeding. Nonetheless, group living and sociality is found in many animals, and understanding the direct and indirect benefits of cooperation that override the inherent costs remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Individuals in groups may benefit from more efficient management of energy or water reserves, for example in the form of reduced water or heat loss from groups of animals huddling, or through reduced energy demands afforded by shared participation in tasks. We investigated the putative benefits of group living in the permanently social spider Stegodyphus dumicola by comparing the effect of group size on standard metabolic rate, lipid/protein content as a body condition measure, feeding efficiency, per capita web investment and weight/water loss and survival during desiccation. Because energetic expenditure is temperature sensitive, some assays were performed under varying temperature conditions. We found that feeding efficiency increased with group size, and the rate of weight loss was higher in solitary individuals than in animals in groups of various sizes during desiccation. Interestingly, this was not translated into differences in survival or in standard metabolic rate. We did not detect any group size effects for other parameters, and group size effects did not co-vary with experimental temperature in a predictive manner. Both feeding efficiency and mass loss during desiccation are relevant ecological factors as the former results in lowered predator exposure time, and the latter benefits social spiders which occupy arid, hot environments.

  9. Buried Volume Analysis for Propene Polymerization Catalysis Promoted by Group 4 Metals: a Tool for Molecular Mass Prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura; Cavallo, Luigi; Talarico, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the steric properties of homogeneous single site catalysts for propene polymerization using the percentage of buried volume (%VBur) as molecular descriptor is reported. The %VBur calculated on the neutral precursors of the active species seems to be a reliable tool to explain several experimental data related to the propene insertion and to the monomer chain transfer. Interestingly, a linear correlation between the buried volume calculated for a large set of neutral precursors and the energetic difference between propagation and termination steps calculated by DFT methods is found for Group 4 metal catalysts. The “master curves” derived for Ti, Zr and Hf confirm not only that the %VBur is an appropriate molecular descriptor for the systems considered but also that it could be used as tool for a large computational screening of new ligands.

  10. Buried Volume Analysis for Propene Polymerization Catalysis Promoted by Group 4 Metals: a Tool for Molecular Mass Prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2015-10-02

    A comparison of the steric properties of homogeneous single site catalysts for propene polymerization using the percentage of buried volume (%VBur) as molecular descriptor is reported. The %VBur calculated on the neutral precursors of the active species seems to be a reliable tool to explain several experimental data related to the propene insertion and to the monomer chain transfer. Interestingly, a linear correlation between the buried volume calculated for a large set of neutral precursors and the energetic difference between propagation and termination steps calculated by DFT methods is found for Group 4 metal catalysts. The “master curves” derived for Ti, Zr and Hf confirm not only that the %VBur is an appropriate molecular descriptor for the systems considered but also that it could be used as tool for a large computational screening of new ligands.

  11. The last dinosaurs of Brazil: The Bauru Group and its implications for the end-Cretaceous mass extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEPHEN L. BRUSATTE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The non-avian dinosaurs died out at the end of the Cretaceous, ~66 million years ago, after an asteroid impact. The prevailing hypothesis is that the effects of the impact suddenly killed the dinosaurs, but the poor fossil record of latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian dinosaurs from outside Laurasia (and even more particularly, North America makes it difficult to test specific extinction scenarios. Over the past few decades, a wealth of new discoveries from the Bauru Group of Brazil has revealed a unique window into the evolution of terminal Cretaceous dinosaurs from the southern continents. We review this record and demonstrate that there was a diversity of dinosaurs, of varying body sizes, diets, and ecological roles, that survived to the very end of the Cretaceous (Maastrichtian: 72-66 million years ago in Brazil, including a core fauna of titanosaurian sauropods and abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods, along with a variety of small-to-mid-sized theropods. We argue that this pattern best fits the hypothesis that southern dinosaurs, like their northern counterparts, were still diversifying and occupying prominent roles in their ecosystems before the asteroid suddenly caused their extinction. However, this hypothesis remains to be tested with more refined paleontological and geochronological data, and we give suggestions for future work.

  12. The last dinosaurs of Brazil: The Bauru Group and its implications for the end-Cretaceous mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Candeiro, Carlos R A; Simbras, Felipe M

    2017-01-01

    The non-avian dinosaurs died out at the end of the Cretaceous, ~66 million years ago, after an asteroid impact. The prevailing hypothesis is that the effects of the impact suddenly killed the dinosaurs, but the poor fossil record of latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) dinosaurs from outside Laurasia (and even more particularly, North America) makes it difficult to test specific extinction scenarios. Over the past few decades, a wealth of new discoveries from the Bauru Group of Brazil has revealed a unique window into the evolution of terminal Cretaceous dinosaurs from the southern continents. We review this record and demonstrate that there was a diversity of dinosaurs, of varying body sizes, diets, and ecological roles, that survived to the very end of the Cretaceous (Maastrichtian: 72-66 million years ago) in Brazil, including a core fauna of titanosaurian sauropods and abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods, along with a variety of small-to-mid-sized theropods. We argue that this pattern best fits the hypothesis that southern dinosaurs, like their northern counterparts, were still diversifying and occupying prominent roles in their ecosystems before the asteroid suddenly caused their extinction. However, this hypothesis remains to be tested with more refined paleontological and geochronological data, and we give suggestions for future work.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Gas Fueling of Spiral Galaxies in the Local Universe. I. The Effect of the Group Environment on Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Popescu, C. C.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Andrae, E.; Baldry, I. K.; Gunawardhana, M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Madore, B. F.; Seibert, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Alpaslan, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Driver, S. P.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Lopez-Sanchez, A. R.; Loveday, J.; Rushton, M.

    2017-03-01

    We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for group masses of 1012.5-1014.0 M ⊙) on the current star formation rate (SFR) of a pure, morphologically selected sample of disk-dominated (I.e., late-type spiral) galaxies with redshift ≤0.13. The sample embraces a full representation of quiescent and star-forming disks with stellar mass M * ≥ 109.5 M ⊙. We focus on the effects on SFR of interactions between grouped galaxies and the putative intrahalo medium (IHM) of their host group dark matter halos, isolating these effects from those induced through galaxy-galaxy interactions, and utilizing a radiation transfer analysis to remove the inclination dependence of derived SFRs. The dependence of SFR on M * is controlled for by measuring offsets Δlog(ψ *) of grouped galaxies about a single power-law relation in specific SFR, {\\psi }* \\propto {M}* -0.45+/- 0.01, exhibited by non-grouped “field” galaxies in the sample. While a small minority of the group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals and a large majority of satellites exhibit levels of ψ * statistically indistinguishable from their field counterparts, for all M *, albeit with a higher scatter of 0.44 dex about the field reference relation (versus 0.27 dex for the field). Modeling the distributions in Δlog(ψ *), we find that (I) after infall into groups, disk-dominated galaxies continue to be characterized by a similar rapid cycling of gas into and out of their interstellar medium shown prior to infall, with inflows and outflows of ˜1.5-5 x SFR and ˜1-4 x SFR, respectively; and (II) the independence of the continuity of these gas flow cycles on M * appears inconsistent with the required fueling being sourced from gas in the circumgalactic medium on scales of ˜100 kpc. Instead, our data favor ongoing fueling of satellites from the IHM of the host group halo on ˜Mpc scales, I.e., from gas not initially associated with the galaxies upon infall. Consequently, the color

  14. Charge symmetry breaking via Δ I = 1 group theory or by the u-d quark mass difference and direct photon exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coon, S.A.; Scadron, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Charge symmetry breaking (CSB) in the strong N N interaction is believed to have its origins at the quark level. However, the meson-exchange potentials which successfully describe the empirical CSB utilize instead values of the Δ I = 1 π η and ρ ω mixing obtained with the aid of group theory from a hadronic tadpole Hamiltonian introduced by Coleman and Glashow to describe electromagnetic mass splitting in hadronic isospin multiplets. We review i) the CSB N N potentials so constructed and their nuclear charge asymmetry effects, i i) the universal scale of the Coleman-Glashow tadpole, and i i i) the quark loop evaluation of both meson mass differences and meson mixing. The latter quark loop calculations, which use chiral symmetry to evaluate the integrals, demonstrate clearly that the u-d constituent quark mass difference, long suspected as the origin of CSB, does quantitatively yield the universal Coleman-Glashow tadpole scale which underlies the successful meson-exchange description of CSB in nuclear physics. (Author) 38 refs., 3 figs

  15. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chunlin; Guo Bin; Wang Xiaoying; Li Jie; Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo; Ouyang Shan; Yao Shouzhuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. ► Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. ► Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N 4 -acetyl and N-OH metabolites. ► PreS–IDA–EPI in LC–QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography–hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC–QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71–109% with RSDs 4 -acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC–QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67–116%), precision (RSDs −1 ) to meet the acceptance criteria for all the sulfonamide–tissue combinations. Thus, the integration of the matrix-independent SEP/MAC procedure and the multiparameter matching algorithm with the unit-resolution LC–QqLIT instrument can serve as a valuable semi-targeted discovery strategy for rapid screening and reliable quantitative/confirmatory analysis of real samples.

  16. Determination of C10-chloroalkane residues in fish matrices by short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry applying single pure and representative synthesised chlorodecanes as standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaume, Florence; Coelhan, Mehmet; Parlar, Harun

    2006-01-01

    A new chlorodecane (CD) standard was developed consisting of five single compounds with 5-9 Cl-atoms, with which it was possible to determine chlorodecane residues in fish matrices from different countries using short column gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low resolution mass spectrometry (SCGC/ECNI-LRMS). The concentrations found were between 4.8 and 30.2 ng/g fat. Pentachlorodecanes could not be detected in all samples. For an evaluation of the new CD-standard, the fish matrices were also quantified by several other polychlorinated decane (CP10) standards with different chlorine grade: 50, 55, 63.5, 65, and 70%. The concentrations found differed unsurprisingly considerable among the applied standards. Considering only these CP10:50-70% standards that showed the highest similarity in peak patterns with the fish samples, the differences in observed chlorodecane concentrations between these standards and the new CD-standard were low, varying only 1-16%. The CP10:50-70% standards were further quantified with the new CD-standard (chlorine content, 58.2%) with neglectable observed differences to the CP10:60, 63.5, and 65% standards. Highest differences were observed to the CP10:50, 55, and 70% standards. By this work, the quantification of eco-toxicologically relevant C10-chloroparaffins using the new CD-standard has led to reproducible and reliable results, which indicates further that these compounds are still a concerning class of substances in environmental fish samples

  17. Simultaneous determination of platinum group elements and rhenium in rock samples using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after cation exchange separation followed by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotsuka, Kazunori; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A simple and precise determination method for platinum group elements (PGEs) and Re in rock samples was developed using isotope dilution coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). Cation exchange separation was employed for simplicity, because it is applicable to group separation and simultaneous isotopic measurement in contrast with the widely used anion exchange separation which entails separate elution. However, its application to ID-ICP-MS has been limited due to spectral interferences from impurities retained in the PGE fraction even after ion chromatography. To overcome this limitation, solvent extraction using N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) in chloroform was successfully applied for further purification. After the examination of optimum experimental parameters in cation exchange separation and solvent extraction using synthetic PGE solution, the established procedure was applied to the determination of PGEs and Re in some geochemical reference materials. The obtained results agreed well with the literature data determined using the different digestion methods (NiS fire assay and the use of a high-pressure asher) within the analytical uncertainties of each other. Significant difference in reproducibility between Ru, Ir, Pt and Os group, and Pd and Re group was observed in the results for BHVO-2 and JA-2. By considering the error factors affecting analytical reproducibility, we concluded that the difference is ascribed to the sample heterogeneity of minor minerals enriched in Ru, Ir, Pt and Os

  18. Lysine 356 is a critical residue for binding the C-6 phospho group of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate to the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Lin, K; Correia, J J; Pilkis, S J

    1992-08-15

    Lysine 356 has been implicated by protein modification studies as a fructose-2,6-bisphosphate binding site residue in the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (Kitajima, S., Thomas, H., and Uyeda, K. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 13995-14002). However, Lys-356 is found in the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain (Bazan, F., Fletterick, R., and Pilkis, S. J. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646). In order to ascertain whether Lys-356 is involved in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase catalysis and/or domain/domain interactions of the bifunctional enzyme, Lys-356 was mutated to Ala, expressed in Escherichia coli, and then purified to homogeneity. Circular dichroism experiments indicated that the secondary structure of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was not significantly different from that of the wild-type enzyme. The Km for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the Ki for the noncompetitive inhibitor, fructose 6-phosphate, for the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were 2700- and 2200-fold higher, respectively, than those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the maximal velocity and the Ki for the competitive product inhibitor, inorganic phosphate, were unchanged compared to the corresponding values of the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme, which exhibits substrate inhibition, there was no inhibition by substrate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant. In the presence of saturating substrate, inorganic phosphate, which acts by relieving fructose-6-phosphate and substrate inhibition, is an activator of the bisphosphatase. The Ka for inorganic phosphate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was 1300-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. The kinetic properties of the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were essentially identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. The results demonstrate that: 1) Lys-356 is a critical residue in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase for binding the 6

  19. Using positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and H/D exchange study phosphoryl group transfer reactions involved in amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Mei-Juan; Zhang, He; Liao, Chao; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Fang, Hua; Zheng, Zhen-Yu; Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Wu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESI-MS n , HRMS and H/D exchange were used. • The fragmentation pathways of NPAAE-BFA in ESI-MS n were described. • Fragment ions involved in phosphorus group’s rearrangement reactions were observed. • Two rearrangement mechanisms about phosphorylation–dephosphorylation were proposed. - Abstract: As mini-chemical models, amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A (compounds 2a–2d) were synthesized and investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in combination with H/D exchange. To further confirm the fragments’s structures, off-line Fourier transform resonance tandem mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS/MS) was also performed. The fragmentation rules of compounds 2a–2d have been summarized and the plausible schemes for the fragmentation pathways were proposed. In this study, one dephosphorylated ion and two phosphorylated ions were observed in ESI-MS 2 spectra of [M + Na] + ions for compounds 2a–2d. The possible mechanisms about phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were proposed and confirmed by H/D exchange. For the “dephosphorylation” rearrangement, a nitrogen atom was migrated from the phosphoryl group to the carbon atom of Brefeldin A’s backbone with losing a molecule of C 3 H 7 PO 3 (122 Da). For the “phosphorylation” rearrangement, an oxygen atom of one phosphoryl group attacked the sideward phosphorus atom to form a nine-member ring intermediate, then two steps of C-H covalent bond cleavage with consecutive migration of hydrogen atom to lose a molecule of C 16 H 20 O 2 (244 Da). The two proposed rearrangement mechanisms about phosphoryl group transfer might be valuable for the structure analysis of other analogs and provide insights into elucidating the dynamic process of the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation of proteins

  20. Using positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and H/D exchange study phosphoryl group transfer reactions involved in amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Mei-Juan; Zhang, He; Liao, Chao; Qiu, Ying-Kun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); Fang, Hua [The Third Institute of Oceanography of the State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Yu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Gao, Xiang [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); Zhao, Yu-Fen [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wu, Zhen, E-mail: wuzhen@xmu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiang-An South Road, Xiamen 361102 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ESI-MS{sup n}, HRMS and H/D exchange were used. • The fragmentation pathways of NPAAE-BFA in ESI-MS{sup n} were described. • Fragment ions involved in phosphorus group’s rearrangement reactions were observed. • Two rearrangement mechanisms about phosphorylation–dephosphorylation were proposed. - Abstract: As mini-chemical models, amino acid ester isopropyl phosphoramidates of Brefeldin A (compounds 2a–2d) were synthesized and investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in combination with H/D exchange. To further confirm the fragments’s structures, off-line Fourier transform resonance tandem mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS/MS) was also performed. The fragmentation rules of compounds 2a–2d have been summarized and the plausible schemes for the fragmentation pathways were proposed. In this study, one dephosphorylated ion and two phosphorylated ions were observed in ESI-MS{sup 2} spectra of [M + Na]{sup +} ions for compounds 2a–2d. The possible mechanisms about phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were proposed and confirmed by H/D exchange. For the “dephosphorylation” rearrangement, a nitrogen atom was migrated from the phosphoryl group to the carbon atom of Brefeldin A’s backbone with losing a molecule of C{sub 3}H{sub 7}PO{sub 3} (122 Da). For the “phosphorylation” rearrangement, an oxygen atom of one phosphoryl group attacked the sideward phosphorus atom to form a nine-member ring intermediate, then two steps of C-H covalent bond cleavage with consecutive migration of hydrogen atom to lose a molecule of C{sub 16}H{sub 20}O{sub 2} (244 Da). The two proposed rearrangement mechanisms about phosphoryl group transfer might be valuable for the structure analysis of other analogs and provide insights into elucidating the dynamic process of the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation of proteins.

  1. Grouping of Petroleum Substances as Example UVCBs by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry to Enable Chemical Composition-Based Read-Across.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Fabian A; Russell, William K; Luo, Yu-Syuan; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Roy, Tim; Boogaard, Peter J; Ketelslegers, Hans B; Rusyn, Ivan

    2017-06-20

    Substances of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, and Biological materials (UVCBs), including many refined petroleum products, present a major challenge in regulatory submissions under the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) and US High Production Volume regulatory regimes. The inherent complexity of these substances, as well as variability in composition obfuscates detailed chemical characterization of each individual substance and their grouping for human and environmental health evaluation through read-across. In this study, we applied ion mobility mass spectrometry in conjunction with cheminformatics-based data integration and visualization to derive substance-specific signatures based on the distribution and abundance of various heteroatom classes. We used petroleum substances from four petroleum substance manufacturing streams and evaluated their chemical composition similarity based on high-dimensional substance-specific quantitative parameters including m/z distribution, drift time, carbon number range, and associated double bond equivalents and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. Data integration and visualization revealed group-specific similarities for petroleum substances. Observed differences within a product group were indicative of batch- or manufacturer-dependent variation. We demonstrate how high-resolution analytical chemistry approaches can be used effectively to support categorization of UVCBs based on their heteroatom composition and how such data can be used in regulatory decision-making.

  2. Determination of platinum group elements and gold in reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with nickel sulphide fire-assay collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcelli, C.P.R.; Figueiredo, A.M.G.; Sarkis, J.E.S.; Kakazu, M.; Enzweiler, J.

    2002-01-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after NiS fire assay were used to determine platinum group elements (PGE) and Au in the geological reference materials peridotite GPt-3 and pyroxene peridotite GPt-4 (IGGE, China). INAA has been one of the most useful analytical techniques for PGEs and Au determination, due to its high sensitivity and accuracy. After the fire assay, the NiS button is dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid, leaving a residue of insoluble PGE sulphides; the solution is filtered and the filter is directly irradiated with neutrons. In more recent years, ICP-MS with nickel fire assay collection and tellurium coprecipitation has been used as a mean of analysing PGE, with the main advantage of avoiding problems of losses of PGE during the HCl digestion of the NiS button. Buttons were prepared by mixing the sample (10-15 g) with fluxes, nickel and sulphur in a fire clay crucible and fused at temperatures around 1000 deg C. For NAA, the filters containing the PGEs and Au were irradiated at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor at IPEN. The measurements of the induced gamma-ray activity were carried out in an hyperpure Ge detector. In general, the results obtained by the two techniques were in good agreement with recommended values. INAA results exhibited higher values than the recommended values for Pd and Pt in GPt-3, while the opposite effect was observed for GPt-4 sample. Ru was not detected by INAA. On the other hand, Rh and Ir were determined more accurately by INAA (relative errors better than 10%). The ICP-MS analytical technique showed better detection limits, and all the PGE were determined. Results obtained for Pt and Pd presented accuracy better than 5% while losses were observed for Os and Ir. (author)

  3. MassAI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A software tool for general analysis and data-mining of mass-spectrometric datasets. The program features a strong emphasis on scan-by-scan identification and results-transparency. MassAI also accommodates residue level analysis of labelled runs, e.g. HDX.......A software tool for general analysis and data-mining of mass-spectrometric datasets. The program features a strong emphasis on scan-by-scan identification and results-transparency. MassAI also accommodates residue level analysis of labelled runs, e.g. HDX....

  4. 1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-butylimidazolium bromide for carboxyl group derivatization: potential applications in high sensitivity peptide identification by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiaoqiang; Zhou, Yuan; Hou, Chunyan; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-03-01

    The cationic reagent 1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-butylimidazolium bromide (BAPI) was exploited for the derivatization of carboxyl groups on peptides. Nearly 100% derivatization efficiency was achieved with the synthetic peptide RVYVHPI (RI-7). Furthermore, the peptide derivative was stable in a 0.1% TFA/water solution or a 0.1% (v/v) TFA/acetonitrile/water solution for at least one week. The effect of BAPI derivatization on the ionization of the peptide RI-7 was further investigated, and the detection sensitivity was improved >42-fold via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), thus outperforming the commercial piperazine derivatization approach. Moreover, the charge states of the peptide were largely increased via BAPI derivatization by electrospray ionization (ESI) MS. The results indicate the potential merits of BAPI derivatization for high sensitivity peptide analysis by MS.

  5. Accumulation of logging residue in first thinnings of Scots pine and Norway spruce. Impact of top bucking diameter of roundwood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, T.; Nurmi, J. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Kannus (Finland)), e-mail: tommi.raisanen@metla.fi

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impacts of changes in the minimum top diameter of roundwood on the accumulation of logging residue. The aim was also to compare estimates of residue accumulation calculated by tree-specific biomass models with field measurements from thinnings. Felling experiments were performed in first thinnings of pine and spruce to evaluate the model calculations. In the felling, mean relative masses of the tree tops of spruce were nearly doubled with each increment of 2 cm in the top diameter. Respectively in pine, the mean relative tree top mass was increased by 50-60 % when the top diameter was increased by 2 cm. The mass of total residue (tree top and all delimbed branches) was similarly increased, but the differences were not as large. Compared to pine, a lesser variation in the crown mass of the spruce sample resulted in a more accurate model prediction of masses of tree tops and total residue. The results indicate that the residue accumulation from a small group of trees cannot be predicted very reliably, but when a larger tree population or area is considered, the model predictions are enhanced to a more practicable level. (orig.)

  6. Single histidine residue in head-group region is sufficient to impart remarkable gene transfection properties to cationic lipids: evidence for histidine-mediated membrane fusion at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V V; Pichon, C; Refregiers, M; Guerin, B; Midoux, P; Chaudhuri, A

    2003-08-01

    Presence of endosome-disrupting multiple histidine functionalities in the molecular architecture of cationic polymers, such as polylysine, has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance their in vitro gene delivery efficiencies. Towards harnessing improved transfection property through covalent grafting of endosome-disrupting single histidine functionality in the molecular structure of cationic lipids, herein, we report on the design, the synthesis and the transfection efficiency of two novel nonglycerol-based histidylated cationic amphiphiles. We found that L-histidine-(N,N-di-n-hexadecylamine)ethylamide (lipid 1) and L-histidine-(N,N-di-n-hexadecylamine,-N-methyl)ethylamide (lipid 2) in combination with cholesterol gave efficient transfections into various cell lines. The transfection efficiency of Chol/lipid 1 lipoplexes into HepG2 cells was two order of magnitude higher than that of FuGENE(TM)6 and DC-Chol lipoplexes, whereas it was similar into A549, 293T7 and HeLa cells. A better efficiency was obtained with Chol/lipid 2 lipoplexes when using the cytosolic luciferase expression vector (pT7Luc) under the control of the bacterial T7 promoter. Membrane fusion activity measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that the histidine head-groups of Chol/lipid 1 liposomes mediated membrane fusion in the pH range 5-7. In addition, the transgene expression results using the T7Luc expression vector convincingly support the endosome-disrupting role of the presently described mono-histidylated cationic transfection lipids and the release of DNA into the cytosol. We conclude that covalent grafting of a single histidine amino acid residue to suitable twin-chain hydrophobic compounds is able to impart remarkable transfection properties on the resulting mono-histidylated cationic amphiphile, presumably via the endosome-disrupting characteristics of the histidine functionalities.

  7. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Chunlin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Guo Bin, E-mail: binnguo@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Wang Xiaoying [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Li Jie [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Ouyang Shan [Food Inspection and Quarantine Center, Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of the People' s Republic of China, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Yao Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2012-08-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N{sup 4}-acetyl and N-OH metabolites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PreS-IDA-EPI in LC-QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography-hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC-QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71-109% with RSDs < 20%) and decreased matrix interferences (-9 to 19%) of multiresidual sulfonamide extraction from different tissue samples. The novel use of neutral loss scan of 66 Da (NLS) or precursor ion scanning of m/z 108 (PreS) in positive ion mode was found to achieve more comprehensive coverage of protonated molecular ions of a wide array of sulfonamides including N{sup 4}-acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC-QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67-116%), precision (RSDs < 25%), and sensitivity (LOQs {<=} 7.5 ng

  8. Multi-class, multi-residue analysis of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and novel flame retardants in fish using fast, low-pressure gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Lehotay, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method for analysis of POPs and novel flame retardants in catfish was developed. ► The method is based on a QuEChERS extraction, d-SPE clean-up and low pressure GC/MS–MS. ► The method validation demonstrated good recoveries and low detection limits. ► The method was successfully applied for analysis of catfish samples from the market. - Abstract: A multi-class, multi-residue method for the analysis of 13 novel flame retardants, 18 representative pesticides, 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 7 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in catfish muscle was developed and evaluated using fast low pressure gas chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LP-GC/MS–MS). The method was based on a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction with acetonitrile and dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up with zirconium-based sorbent prior to LP-GC/MS–MS analysis. The developed method was evaluated at 4 spiking levels and further validated by analysis of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) 1974B and 1947. Sample preparation for a batch of 10 homogenized samples took about 1 h/analyst, and LP-GC/MS–MS analysis provided fast separation of multiple analytes within 9 min achieving high throughput. With the use of isotopically labeled internal standards, recoveries of all but one analyte were between 70 and 120% with relative standard deviations less than 20% (n = 5). The measured values for both SRMs agreed with certified/reference values (72–119% accuracy) for the majority of analytes. The detection limits were 0.1–0.5 ng g −1 for PCBs, 0.5–10 ng g −1 for PBDEs, 0.5–5 ng g −1 for select pesticides and PAHs and 1–10 ng g −1 for flame retardants. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of catfish samples from the market.

  9. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  10. Identification of skeletal muscle mass depletion across age and BMI groups in health and disease--there is need for a unified definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Müller, M J

    2015-03-01

    Although reduced skeletal muscle mass is a major predictor of impaired physical function and survival, it remains inconsistently diagnosed to a lack of standardized diagnostic approaches that is reflected by the variable combination of body composition indices and cutoffs. In this review, we summarized basic determinants of a normal lean mass (age, gender, fat mass, body region) and demonstrate limitations of different lean mass parameters as indices for skeletal muscle mass. A unique definition of lean mass depletion should be based on an indirect or direct measure of skeletal muscle mass normalized for height (fat-free mass index (FFMI), appendicular or lumbal skeletal muscle index (SMI)) in combination with fat mass. Age-specific reference values for FFMI or SMI are more advantageous because defining lean mass depletion on the basis of total FFMI or appendicular SMI could be misleading in the case of advanced age due to an increased contribution of connective tissue to lean mass. Mathematical modeling of a normal lean mass based on age, gender, fat mass, ethnicity and height can be used in the absence of risk-defined cutoffs to identify skeletal muscle mass depletion. This definition can be applied to identify different clinical phenotypes like sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity or cachexia.

  11. The effect of hydroxyl functional groups and molar mass on the viscosity of non-crystalline organic and organic–water particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Grayson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The viscosities of three polyols and three saccharides, all in the non-crystalline state, have been studied. Two of the polyols (2-methyl-1,4-butanediol and 1,2,3-butanetriol were studied under dry conditions, the third (1,2,3,4-butanetetrol was studied as a function of relative humidity (RH, including under dry conditions, and the saccharides (glucose, raffinose, and maltohexaose were studied as a function of RH. The mean viscosities of the polyols under dry conditions range from 1.5  ×  10−1 to 3.7  ×  101 Pa s, with the highest viscosity being that of the tetrol. Using a combination of data determined experimentally here and literature data for alkanes, alcohols, and polyols with a C3 to C6 carbon backbone, we show (1 there is a near-linear relationship between log10 (viscosity and the number of hydroxyl groups in the molecule, (2 that on average the addition of one OH group increases the viscosity by a factor of approximately 22 to 45, (3 the sensitivity of viscosity to the addition of one OH group is not a strong function of the number of OH functional groups already present in the molecule up to three OH groups, and (4 higher sensitivities are observed when the molecule has more than three OH groups. Viscosities reported here for 1,2,3,4-butanetetrol particles are lower than previously reported measurements using aerosol optical tweezers, and additional studies are required to resolve these discrepancies. For saccharide particles at 30 % RH, viscosity increases by approximately 2–5 orders of magnitude as molar mass increases from 180 to 342 g mol−1, and at 80 % RH, viscosity increases by approximately 4–5 orders of magnitude as molar mass increases from 180 to 991 g mol−1. These results suggest oligomerization of highly oxidized compounds in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA could lead to large increases in viscosity, and may be at least partially responsible for the high

  12. A personal memory of the history of the group of energy and mass transference; Una memoria personal de la historia del grupo de transferencia de energia y masa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Eduardo [Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) de la UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    An object that is exposed to sunlight heats up. Based on the everyday experiences, this is a claim that the majority of us would agree. In a more technical note, this object increases its temperature and internal energy. Reflection for a moment, perhaps we would come to the conclusion that the energy captured by the object exposed to solar radiation could be used in a useful fashion. It would require a much longer time of reflection and analysis to imagine the method to convert the heat into useful energy. It is precisely this analysis that has been the objective of the group of energy and mass transference of the Center for Energy Research since its foundation, and probably will remain so while it can be identified as a group of scientific research. In the following pages we will feature briefly, from a personal stand point of view the history of the work, successes and failures of the group since its inception till the present. [Spanish] Un objeto que se expone a la luz solar se calienta. Basados en la experiencia cotidiana, esta es una aseveracion con la que la mayoria de nosotros estaria de acuerdo. Dicho de manera mas tecnica, este objeto aumenta su temperatura y su energia interna. Reflexionando un instante, quiza llegariamos a la conclusion que la energia capturada por el objeto expuesto a la radiacion solar podria ser usada de manera util. Se requeriria un tiempo mucho mas largo de reflexion y analisis para imaginar el metodo para convertir el calor en energia util. Precisamente este analisis ha sido el objetivo del grupo de Transferencia de Energia y Masa del Centro de Investigacion en Energia desde su fundacion, y probablemente lo seguira siendo mientras se le pueda identificar como un grupo de investigacion cientifica. En las paginas siguientes resenaremos brevemente desde un punto de vista personal la historia del trabajo, exitos y fracasos del grupo desde su inicio hasta el presente.

  13. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan, E-mail: malo@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  14. Consultants Group Meeting on Production System Analysis and Economics for Tsetse Fly Mass-Rearing and the Use of the Sterile Insect Technique in Eradication Programmes in Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    A consultants' group met in Vienna from 23 September - 3 October 1991 to explore 'Production System Analysis and Economics for Tsetse Fly Mass-rearing and the Use of the Sterile Insect Technique in Eradication Programmes in Africa'. This report is based on their observations during working visits to the Entomology Unit of the IAEA Agricultural Laboratory at Seibersdorf, and on information supplied by the tsetse team and staff of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division's Insect and Pest Control Section. The consultants conducted a technical, operational and financial review of present rearing methods, equipment, philosophies and production capacities, taking into account one of the recommendations made at the 6th Session of the ''FAO Commission on African Animal Trypanosomiasis'' held in June 1991 in Harare, Zimbabwe. This recommendation, related to the use of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), states that {sup F}AO, through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, should further investigate and improve the use of sterile insects to strengthen the efficacy of tsetse surveys and, where applicable, consider teh use of the SIT to support eradication campaigns where other techniques on their own will not achieve this objective''. In investigating the potential for improved tsetse mass-rearing and analyzing the present costs of pupa/distributable sterile fly production, the consultants noted that: 1. The Seibersdorf Tsetse Unit is conducting an effective research and development programme which strives to emulate a production facility while continuing to pursue R and D. The capacity of the present facility in Seibersdorf is practically limited to a colony size of about 150,000 breeding females. The release of sterile males in an eradication campaign of economical relevance would require a colony containing more than 500,000 female flies. Such a population can only be maintained in an organizational, operational and financially justifiable manner if the rearing technology is transferred from an

  15. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry identification of large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian Salgård; Dam-Nielsen, Casper; Arpi, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G can be adequately identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Previous studies show varying results, with an identification rate from below 50% to 100%. Large colony beta-hemolytic streptococci containing Lancefield groups A, C, and G isolated from blood cultures between January 1, 2007 and May 1, 2012 were included in the study. Isolates were identified to the species level using a combination of phenotypic characteristics and 16s rRNA sequencing. The isolates were subjected to MALDI-ToF analysis. We used a two-stage approach starting with the direct method. If no valid result was obtained we proceeded to an extraction protocol. Scores above 2 were considered valid identification at the species level. A total of 97 Streptococcus pyogenes, 133 Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and 2 Streptococcus canis isolates were tested; 94%, 66%, and 100% of S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis, respectively, were correctly identified by MALDI-ToF. In most instances when the isolates were not identified by MALDI-ToF this was because MALDI-ToF was unable to differentiate between S. pyogenes and S. dysgalactiae. By removing two S. pyogenes reference spectra from the MALDI-ToF database the proportion of correctly identified isolates increased to 96% overall. MALDI-ToF is a promising method for discriminating between S. dysgalactiae, S. canis, and S. equi, although more strains need to be tested to clarify this.

  16. Rapid and interference-free analysis of nine B-group vitamins in energy drinks using trilinear component modeling of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Wu, Hai-Long; Yin, Xiao-Li; Gu, Hui-Wen; Xiao, Rong; Xie, Li-Xia; Liu, Zhi; Fang, Huan; Wang, Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a rapid and interference-free method based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of nine B-group vitamins in various energy drinks. A smart and green strategy that modeled the three-way data array of LC-MS with second-order calibration methods based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) and alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) algorithms was developed. By virtue of "mathematical separation" and "second-order advantage", the proposed strategy successfully solved the co-eluted peaks and unknown interferents in LC-MS analysis with the elution time less than 4.5min and simple sample preparation. Satisfactory quantitative results were obtained by the ATLD-LC-MS and APTLD-LC-MS methods for the spiked recovery assays, with the average spiked recoveries ranging from 87.2-113.9% to 92.0-111.7%, respectively. These results acquired from the proposed methods were confirmed by the LC-MS/MS method, which shows a quite good consistency with each other. All these results demonstrated that the developed chemometrics-assisted LC-MS strategy had advantages of being rapid, green, accurate and low-cost, and it could be an attractive alternative for the determination of multiple vitamins in complex food matrices, which required no laborious sample preparation, tedious condition optimization or more sophisticated instrumentations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of six parabens residues in fresh-cut vegetables using QuEChERS with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, an optimized QuEChERS sample preparation method was developed to analyze residues of six parabens: methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl-, isopropyl-, n-butyl-, and isobutyl-paraben in five fresh-cut vegetables (potato, broccoli, carrot, celery and cabbage) with high performance liquid chromatogr...

  18. Development of a new screening method for the detection of antibiotic residues in muscle tissues using liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry with a LC-LTQ-Orbitrap instrument.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, a liquid chromatography- high resolution mass spectrometry method was developed for the screening in meat of a wide range of antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. Full scan mode under high resolution mass spectral conditions using LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer with resolving power 60.000 FWHM was applied for analysis of the samples. Samples were prepared using two extractions protocols prior to LC-MS analysis. The scope of the method focuses on the...

  19. An appraisal of mass differences between individual tyres, axles and axle groups of a selection of heavy vehicles in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available study of 2 666 heavy vehicles (HVs) with Gross Combination Mass, (GCM) > 3 500 kg was conducted, where the mass (or weight) of each tyre (approximately 47 242 tyres (or wheels)) was measured. The measurements were done at slow speed over the SIM device...

  20. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Canova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  1. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Canova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  2. Residues from waste incineration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrup, T.; Juul Pedersen, A.; Hyks, J.; Frandsen, F.J.

    2009-08-15

    The overall objective of the project was to improve the understanding of the formation and characteristics of residues from waste incineration. This was done focusing on the importance of the waste input and the operational conditions of the furnace. Data and results obtained from the project have been discussed in this report according to the following three overall parts: i) mass flows and element distribution, ii) flue gas/particle partitioning and corrosion/deposition aspects, and iii) residue leaching. This has been done with the intent of structuring the discussion while tacitly acknowledging that these aspects are interrelated and cannot be separated. Overall, it was found that the waste input composition had significant impact of the characteristics of the generated residues. A similar correlation between operational conditions and residue characteristics could not be observed. Consequently, the project recommend that optimization of residue quality should focus on controlling the waste input composition. The project results showed that including specific waste materials (and thereby also excluding the same materials) may have significant effects on the residue composition, residue leaching, aerosol and deposit formation.It is specifically recommended to minimize Cl in the input waste. Based on the project results, it was found that a significant potential for optimization of waste incineration exist. (author)

  3. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  4. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ∼ 0.8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Jian, Hung-Yu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P.; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)—stellar mass (M * ) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M * relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10 14 M ☉ ), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4σ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar mass—the mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent galaxies for more

  5. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ∼ 0.8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Jian, Hung-Yu [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Foucaud, Sebastien [Department of Earth Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, N°88, Tingzhou Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 11677, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Heinis, Sebastien [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, MD 20742 (United States); Phleps, Stefanie [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Chen, Wen-Ping [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Lee, Chien-Hsiu [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W., E-mail: lihwailin@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-02-10

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)—stellar mass (M {sub *}) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M {sub *} relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4σ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar mass—the mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent

  6. Selection of basic data for numerical modeling of rock mass stress state at Mirny Mining and Processing Works, Alrosa Group of Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokiy, IB; Zoteev, OV; Pul, VV; Pul, EK

    2018-03-01

    The influence of structural features on the strength and elasticity modulus is studied in rock mass in the area of Mirny Mining and Processing Works. The authors make recommendations on the values of physical properties of rocks.

  7. On root class residuality of HNN-extensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tieudjo, D.

    2004-08-01

    A sufficient condition or root-class residuality of HNN-extensions with root-class residual base group is proven; namely if G = -1 1Ht = K, φ> is the HNN-extension with base group A, stable letter t and associated subgroups H and K via the isomorphism φ, then G is root-class residual if group A is root-class residual and there exists a homomorphism σ of group G onto some group of a root-class such that σ is one-to-one on H. For the particular case when H = K and σ is the identical map, it is shown that G is root-class residual if and only if A is root-class residual and subgroup H of A is root-class separable. These results are generalized to multiple HNN-extensions. (author)

  8. Role of mammography in evaluating residual cancer of locally advanced breast carcinoma after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy : compared with clinical examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Cho, Jae Min; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Byung Chan; Lee, Kyong Sik; Lee, Yong Hee

    1997-01-01

    To compare the usefulness of mammography and clinical examination in the evaluation of residual cancer of locally-advanced breast carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among 67 patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma who were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 18, aged 35-67 (mean, 48) years, underwent mammography before and after this therapy. The 18 sets of mammographs were analyzed retrospectively and compared with the results of clinical examination based on histologic diagnosis. On histologic examinations, 16 of 18 patients (89%) were found to have residual cancer, but in one of these 16, mammography did not show this same result. On mammography, residual cancer was found in 16 patients, but in one of this group, histologic examination did not reveal the same finding. Clinically, a complete response was shown by four patients, and a partial response by 11 ; three showed no response. On histolgogic examination, three of the four patients with complete clinical response were found to have residual cancer. Post-treatment mammographic findings showed that 11 patients had measurable mass ; all of these had residual cancer (positive predictive value : 100%). However, five of seven patients in whom no measurable mass was evident also had residual cancer. Seven of 8 patients in whom microcalcifications were seen on mammography were found to have residual cancer (positive predictive value : 88%). The sensitivity of mammography in predicting residual cancer was greater than that of clinical examination (94% vs 81%), even when microscopic residual cancer was considered as a complete response (92% vs 77%). The specificity of mammography was the same as that of clinical examination(50% vs 50%, 20% vs 20%). In evaluating residual cancer of locally-advanced breast carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemotheragy, mammography is more accurate and informative than clincal examination. In predicting residual cancer, however, it is not accurate enough to replace

  9. Residual gravimetric method to measure nebulizer output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio None, Laurent; Grimbert, Daniel; Bordenave, Joelle; Benoit, Guy; Furet, Yves; Fauroux, Brigitte; Boissinot, Eric; De Monte, Michele; Lemarié, Etienne; Diot, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a residual gravimetric method based on weighing dry filters to measure the aerosol output of nebulizers. This residual gravimetric method was compared to assay methods based on spectrophotometric measurement of terbutaline (Bricanyl, Astra Zeneca, France), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurement of tobramycin (Tobi, Chiron, U.S.A.), and electrochemical measurements of NaF (as defined by the European standard). Two breath-enhanced jet nebulizers, one standard jet nebulizer, and one ultrasonic nebulizer were tested. Output produced by the residual gravimetric method was calculated by weighing the filters both before and after aerosol collection and by filter drying corrected by the proportion of drug contained in total solute mass. Output produced by the electrochemical, spectrophotometric, and HPLC methods was determined after assaying the drug extraction filter. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between the residual gravimetric method (x axis) and assay methods (y axis) in terms of drug mass output (y = 1.00 x -0.02, r(2) = 0.99, n = 27). We conclude that a residual gravimetric method based on dry filters, when validated for a particular agent, is an accurate way of measuring aerosol output.

  10. Analysis of hazardous organic residues from sodium hydrosulfite industry and utilization as raw materials in a novel solid lubricant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jiwu [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Zhou, Fengshan; Lv, Fengzhu; Han, Feng; Lu, Jinbo; Meng, Xianghai [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ye, Zhengfang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xing, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are analyzed and the main compounds are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2 Prime -dithiodiethanol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the homemade solid lubricant is observed to have good lubricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The clean process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution. - Abstract: The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are demonstrated to be convertible into a novel solid lubricant. Identification and isolation of the organic residues are achieved by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). FTIR and GC-MS provide important information about the residues and the two main components obtained by column chromatography are further analyzed by NMR. The main organic residues are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2 Prime -dithiodiethanol which have potential applications in petroleum drilling because of their S-S and/or C-S functional groups. The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the influence of different adsorbents on the lubricity is investigated and discussed. This homemade lubricant is observed to have good lubricity and by increasing the concentration of the commercial solid lubricant M, the lubricity diminishes. The process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution.

  11. Analysis of hazardous organic residues from sodium hydrosulfite industry and utilization as raw materials in a novel solid lubricant production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Jiwu; Zhang, Yihe; Zhou, Fengshan; Lv, Fengzhu; Han, Feng; Lu, Jinbo; Meng, Xianghai; Chu, Paul K.; Ye, Zhengfang; Xing, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are analyzed and the main compounds are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2′-dithiodiethanol. ► The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the homemade solid lubricant is observed to have good lubricity. ► The clean process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution. - Abstract: The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are demonstrated to be convertible into a novel solid lubricant. Identification and isolation of the organic residues are achieved by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). FTIR and GC–MS provide important information about the residues and the two main components obtained by column chromatography are further analyzed by NMR. The main organic residues are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2′-dithiodiethanol which have potential applications in petroleum drilling because of their S–S and/or C–S functional groups. The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the influence of different adsorbents on the lubricity is investigated and discussed. This homemade lubricant is observed to have good lubricity and by increasing the concentration of the commercial solid lubricant M, the lubricity diminishes. The process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution.

  12. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  13. MS-on-shell quark mass relation up to four loops in QCD and a general SU(N) gauge group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquard, Peter; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias; Wellmann, David

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compute the relation between heavy quark masses defined in the modified minimal subtraction and on-shell scheme. Detailed results are presented for all coefficients of the SU(N_c) colour factors. The reduction of the four-loop on-shell integrals is performed for a general QCD gauge parameter. Some of the about 380 master integrals are computed analytically, others with high numerical precision based on Mellin-Barnes representations, and the rest numerically with the help of FIESTA. We discuss in detail the precise numerical evaluation of the four-loop master integrals. Updated relations between various short-distance masses and the MS quark mass to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy are provided for the charm, bottom and top quark. We discuss the dependence on the renormalization and factorization scale.

  14. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  15. The Mass-Dimension Relationships in the Mussels Mytilus Galloprovincialis (Mollusca, Bivalvia from Different Phenotypical Groups in Periphyton Populations near Odessa Coast, the North-Western Part of Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govorin I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data of the size-mass indices in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819 from three phenotypic groups - brown, dark violet (black and “zebra” (brown with radial black stripes shells in the periphyton settlements on the concrete traverses near Odessa coast, the North-western part of Black Sea (Ukraine, in March-November 2014-2015 are presented. A comparative evaluation has been made on the relationships of total mass of the mollusks, wet and dry mass of their soft body and mass of the shells on the one hand, and the size of animals (length of its shells on the other hand, in the each of phenotypical groups from the five marine beach areas. It is shown, that in the marine areas with different degrees of isolation from the open sea by coast-protection engineering constructions, the mussels from different phenotypes have almost the same size-mass characteristics. Only the dry weight of soft animal body, which indicated to fatness of mollusk and therefore demonstrated his biological prosperity in specific hydrological conditions, can serve as a reliable criterion which can mark the shellfish habitats with different gradients of environmental factors.

  16. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  17. Multi-residue method for the determination of over 400 priority and emerging pollutants in water and wastewater by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Molina, José; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2014-07-11

    This article describes the development and validation of a liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of over 400 multi-class priority and emerging pollutants with different physicochemical properties in environmental waters (surface water and wastewater). The proposed approach is based on the use of a database consisting of retention time/exact mass (of selected ions) pairs implemented with specific software for data analysis. The targeted list comprises 430 contaminants belonging to different compound categories, including 105 multiclass pharmaceuticals (analgesics/anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, lipid regulators, β-blockers, antiepileptic/psychiatrics ulcer healings, diuretics, hormones and bronchodilatadors), life-style products (caffeine, nicotine), 21 drugs of abuse and their metabolites, 279 pesticides and some of their more relevant metabolites, nitrosamines, flame retardants, plasticizers and perfluorinated compounds. The proposed approach included a simple offline solid phase extraction (SPE) step using polymeric cartridges (Oasis HLB) with 200mL of water sample loaded, followed by analysis by rapid resolution liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) in both positive and negative modes. The identification of the positive findings is accomplished with the data from accurate masses of the target ions along with retention time data and characteristic in-source fragment ions. The overall method performance was satisfactory with limits of quantification lower than 10ngL(-1) for the 44% of studied compounds. Recoveries between 50% and 130% were obtained for the 65% of the analytes (281 compounds). Matrix effects occurring with wastewater matrices were also assessed. The developed method was applied to the determination of target analytes in real surface water and wastewater samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A N; Webster, G A [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P J [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  19. Determination of Pesticide Residues in Cannabis Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to quantify to what extent cannabis consumers may be exposed to pesticide and other chemical residues through inhaled mainstream cannabis smoke. Three different smoking devices were evaluated in order to provide a generalized data set representative of pesticide exposures possible for medical cannabis users. Three different pesticides, bifenthrin, diazinon, and permethrin, along with the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, which are readily available to cultivators in commercial products, were investigated in the experiment. Smoke generated from the smoking devices was condensed in tandem chilled gas traps and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Recoveries of residues were as high as 69.5% depending on the device used and the component investigated, suggesting that the potential of pesticide and chemical residue exposures to cannabis users is substantial and may pose a significant toxicological threat in the absence of adequate regulatory frameworks.

  20. Characterization of microwave liquefied bamboo residue and its potential use in the generation of nanofibrillated cellulosic fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiulong Xie; Chung Hse; Chunjie Li; Todd F. Shupe; Tingxing Hu; Jinqiu Qi; Cornelis F. De Hoop

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo raw feedstocks with large particle size (20−80 mesh) were subjected to a microwave liquefaction system, and the liquefied products were separated into biopolyols and liquefied residues. Biopolyols were first analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC−MS), and the main components were sugar derivatives with 2−4 hydroxyl groups and phenolic compounds...

  1. 40 CFR 180.627 - Fluopicolide; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combined residues of fluopicolide and its metabolite, 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). Commodity Parts per... brassica, group 4 25 Vegetable, leaves of root and tuber, group 2 15.0 Vegetable, root, subgroup 1A, except...

  2. A simple multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in fruits and vegetables using a methanolic extraction and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: optimization and extension of scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanot, V; Goscinny, S; Deridder, M

    2015-03-06

    In 2004, a new multi-residue pesticides method had been published using methanol as extraction solvent. Our goal for this study was to optimize the analytical scheme while extending the compound scope from 19 to 200 pesticides. The main changes from the original method take place at the sample extraction and processing with a special attention to make the overall method fit for routine analysis with minimal cost. Hence, after a quick Ultra-Turrax homogenization with a methanolic solution, the sample is simply diluted before the separation and detection by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and MS/MS detection for quantitative and confirmatory purposes. The performance of the method including limits of quantification (LOQs), linearity, matrix effect, precision was evaluated during validation in accordance with the European Union SANCO/12571/2013 regulatory guidelines. Two representative matrices, lettuce and orange, were selected and fortified at two concentration levels for these experiments. At the LOQ and ten times the LOQ, recoveries of the analytes were mostly within 70-120%, with coefficients of variation lower than 25% in intra-day repeatability conditions. In addition to being simple and fast, these results demonstrate the suitability of the optimized method for the analysis of large scope pesticides in routine laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  4. Incorporation feasibility of leather residues in bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, J.B. [Minho Univ. (Portugal). Civil Engineering Dept.; Valente, A.; Pires, M.J. [Inst. of Development and Innovation Technology of Minho, Braga (Portugal); Tavares, T. [Biological Engineering Dept., Univ. of Minho, Braga (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    The footwear industry has strips of leather as one of its by-products. These leather residues, due to their high chromium content, can be regarded as a threat to the environment, particularly if no care is taken with their disposal. With the incorporation of the residues in ceramic products, after trituration, is possible to neutralise the eventual toxicity of chromium. In a laboratory study we produced prismatic bricks using clay from the region and incorporating 1, 3 and 5% (by mass) of leather residues. This corresponds at about 20, 60 and 100% (by apparent volume). The moulds were filled up with paste and, in order to have some compactness, the ceramic paste was compressed with a spatula. After that, it began the process of drying and burning the bricks. They were tested to flexure, compression and leaching. The results showed that the toxicity of chromium disappeared in the bricks. The mechanical tests showed a decrease in strength for the specimens with leather residue. The compressive strength decreases about 22% for 1% of incorporation of leather residue. However, as bricks were lighter and more porous, we can expect that they are better for thermal isolation. (orig.)

  5. Solid-phase extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis of pesticides in water: method performance and application in a reconnaissance survey of residues in drinking water in Greater Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Thomas L; Mohamed, Mahmoud A; Ali, Hannah

    2007-01-24

    Monitoring of water resources for pesticide residues is often needed to ensure that pesticide use does not adversely impact the quality of public water supplies or the environment. In many rural areas and throughout much of the developing world, monitoring is often constrained by lack of testing facilities; thus, collection of samples and shipment to centralized laboratories for analysis is required. The portability, ease of use, and potential to enhance analyte stability make solid-phase extraction (SPE) an attractive technique for handling water samples prior to their shipment. We describe performance of an SPE method targeting a structurally diverse mixture of 25 current-use pesticides and two common degradates in samples of raw and filtered drinking water collected in Greater Cairo, Egypt. SPE was completed in a field laboratory in Egypt, and cartridges were shipped to the United States for elution and high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative and reproducible recovery of 23 of 27 compounds (average = 96%; percent relative standard deviation = 21%) from matrix spikes (1 microg L-1 per component) prepared in the field and from deionized water fortified similarly in the analytical laboratory was obtained. Concurrent analysis of unspiked samples identified four parent compounds and one degradate in drinking water samples. No significant differences were observed between raw and filtered samples. Residue levels in all cases were below drinking water and "harm to aquatic-life" thresholds, indicating that human and ecological risks of pesticide contamination were relatively small; however, the study was limited in scale and scope. Further monitoring is needed to define spatial and temporal variation in residue concentrations. The study has demonstrated the feasibility of performing studies of this type using SPE to extract and preserve samples in the field. The approach should be broadly

  6. Studies of evaporation residue products from krypton and argon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, F.; Ferguson, R.L.; Britt, H.C.; Erkkila, B.H.; Blann, M.; Gutbrod, H.H.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1978-01-01

    Mass distributions of evaporation residue (ER) products from 86 Kr-bombardments of 70 Ge and 74 Ge have been obtained by a time-of-flight method at energies ranging from the interaction barrier to 706 MeV. ER excitation functions have also been obtained for a variety of target and projectile combinations. Results are compared with statistical model calculations and with results obtained from γ-measurements. It is deduced that at the lowest impact parameters, the reaction products belong to the ER group, in contrast with the angular momentum hypothesis of Lefort. Cross sections were found to be consistent with an angular momentum limit arising from the onset of fission. (orig.) [de

  7. Characterization of Nα-Fmoc-protected dipeptide isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)): effect of protecting group on fragmentation of dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, M; Raju, B; Srinivas, R; Sureshbabu, V V; Vishwanatha, T M; Hemantha, H P

    2011-07-30

    A series of positional isomeric pairs of Fmoc-protected dipeptides, Fmoc-Gly-Xxx-OY/Fmoc-Xxx-Gly-OY (Xxx=Ala, Val, Leu, Phe) and Fmoc-Ala-Xxx-OY/Fmoc-Xxx-Ala-OY (Xxx=Leu, Phe) (Fmoc=[(9-fluorenylmethyl)oxy]carbonyl) and Y=CH(3)/H), have been characterized and differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS(n)). In contrast to the behavior of reported unprotected dipeptide isomers which mainly produce y(1)(+) and/or a(1)(+) ions, the protonated Fmoc-Xxx-Gly-OY, Fmoc-Ala-Xxx-OY and Fmoc-Xxx-Ala-OY yield significant b(1)(+) ions. These ions are formed, presumably with stable protonated aziridinone structures. However, the peptides with Gly- at the N-terminus do not form b(1)(+) ions. The [M+H](+) ions of all the peptides undergo a McLafferty-type rearrangement followed by loss of CO(2) to form [M+H-Fmoc+H](+). The MS(3) collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these ions helps distinguish the pairs of isomeric dipeptides studied in this work. Further, negative ion MS(3) CID has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. The MS(3) of [M-H-Fmoc+H](-) of isomeric peptide acids produce c(1)(-), z(1)(-) and y(1)(-) ions. Thus the present study of Fmoc-protected peptides provides additional information on mass spectral characterization of the dipeptides and distinguishes the positional isomers. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A multi-residue method for the analysis of pesticides and pesticide degradates in water using HLB solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, M.L.; Smalling, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for the analysis of over 60 pesticides and degradates in water by HLB solid-phase extraction and gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry. Method recoveries and detection limits were determined using two surface waters with different dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. In the lower DOC water, recoveries and detection limits were 80%-108% and 1-12 ng/L, respectively. In the higher DOC water, the detection limits were slightly higher (1-15 ng/L). Additionally, surface water samples from four sites were analyzed and 14 pesticides were detected with concentrations ranging from 4 to 1,200 ng/L. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  9. Validation of an off line solid phase extraction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of systemic insecticide residues in honey and pollen samples collected in apiaries from NW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Chao, María; Agruña, María Jesús; Flores Calvete, Gonzalo; Sakkas, Vasilis; Llompart, María; Dagnac, Thierry

    2010-07-05

    The use of pesticides to protect crops against plagues and insects is one of the most important ways to assure agricultural quality and productivity. However, bad application practices may cause the contamination of different environmental compartments and animal species, as a consequence of migration or accumulation of those compounds. Fipronil, imidacloprid and thiametoxam are systemic or systemic-like insecticides widely used in maize crops. Their heavy action in the nervous system of target insects also means a high toxicity to non-target pollinator insects such as honey bees which can get in touch with them through pollen and nectar during foraging activities. These insecticides have even been suspected to cause a significant decrease of honeybee colonies that has been observed in many countries since the past decade. Since September 1st 2008, the European Commission set new MRLs in food and feed of plant and animal origin. The pesticides included in this study have MRLs in honey and pollen between 10 and 50 ng g(-1). In the present work, an analytical method was developed with the aim of determining residues of fipronil and some of its metabolites (fipronil sulfone, fipronil sulfide, fipronil desulfinyl and fipronil carboxamide), thiamethoxam and imidacloprid in honey and pollen samples. The extraction optimization was performed using a Doehlert experimental design by studying two factors, the mixture and the ratio of solvents used. Prior to the extraction procedure, raw hive samples containing honey, pollen and wax were centrifuged at 4000 rpm. The upper solid material was removed, and 1 g of the lower phase was mixed with 3 mL of the optimized mixture of methanol/water (10/90). The extract was passed through a florisil cartridge and the target compounds were eluted with methanol and analysed by LC-MS/MS in selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The method was validated according to the guidelines included in the SANCO/10684/2009 document and the ISO

  10. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures

  11. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... for policy makers and courts in awarding damages in a large number of real-world accident cases....

  12. Chemoselective synthesis of functional homocysteine residues in polypeptides and peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Gharakhanian, EG; Deming, TJ

    2016-01-01

    A methodology was developed for efficient, chemoselective transformation of methionine residues into stable, functional homocysteine derivatives. Methionine residues can undergo highly chemoselective alkylation reactions at low pH to yield stable sulfonium ions, which could then be selectively demethylated to give stable alkyl homocysteine residues. This mild, two-step process is chemoselective, efficient, tolerates many functional groups, and provides a means for creation of new functional b...

  13. Mass spectroscopy investigation of the effect of gamma irradiation on the mean value of the number of ethoxy groups in the triton X-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés Díaz, Gilmer; Rodríguez Calvo, Simón; Pérez Gramatges, Aurora; Fernández Lima, Francisco Alberto; Rapado Paneque, Manuel; Ponciano, Cassia Ribero R.; Frota da Silveira, Enio

    2007-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source on the structure of a nonionic surfactant, namely TRITON X-100, was investigated. Three main regions can be distinguished in the behavior of the mean value of ethoxy groups with an increase in the absorbed dose. However just a slightly decrease on this mean value was obtained when the dose range from 0 to 70 kGy. (author)

  14. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part I: Furan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Nau, Patrick; Koppmann, Julia; Lackner, Alexander; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    Fuels of the furan family, i.e. furan itself, 2-methylfuran (MF), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) are being proposed as alternatives to hydrocarbon fuels and are potentially accessible from cellulosic biomass. While some experiments and modeling results are becoming available for each of these fuels, a comprehensive experimental and modeling analysis of the three fuels under the same conditions, simulated using the same chemical reaction model, has - to the best of our knowledge - not been attempted before. The present series of three papers, detailing the results obtained in flat flames for each of the three fuels separately, reports experimental data and explores their combustion chemistry using kinetic modeling. The first part of this series focuses on the chemistry of low-pressure furan flames. Two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of furan were studied at two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7) using an analytical combination of high-resolution electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) in Bielefeld and gas chromatography (GC) in Nancy. The time-of-flight MBMS with its high mass resolution enables the detection of both stable and reactive species, while the gas chromatograph permits the separation of isomers. Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. A single kinetic model was used to predict the flame structure of the three fuels: furan (in this paper), 2-methylfuran (in Part II), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (in Part III). A refined sub-mechanism for furan combustion, based on the work of Tian et al. [Combustion and Flame 158 (2011) 756-773] was developed which was then compared to the present experimental results. Overall, the agreement is encouraging. The main reaction pathways involved in furan combustion were delineated computing the rates of formation and consumption of all species. It is seen that the

  15. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part I: Furan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Nau, Patrick; Koppmann, Julia; Lackner, Alexander; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Fuels of the furan family, i.e. furan itself, 2-methylfuran (MF), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) are being proposed as alternatives to hydrocarbon fuels and are potentially accessible from cellulosic biomass. While some experiments and modeling results are becoming available for each of these fuels, a comprehensive experimental and modeling analysis of the three fuels under the same conditions, simulated using the same chemical reaction model, has – to the best of our knowledge – not been attempted before. The present series of three papers, detailing the results obtained in flat flames for each of the three fuels separately, reports experimental data and explores their combustion chemistry using kinetic modeling. The first part of this series focuses on the chemistry of low-pressure furan flames. Two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of furan were studied at two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7) using an analytical combination of high-resolution electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) in Bielefeld and gas chromatography (GC) in Nancy. The time-of-flight MBMS with its high mass resolution enables the detection of both stable and reactive species, while the gas chromatograph permits the separation of isomers. Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. A single kinetic model was used to predict the flame structure of the three fuels: furan (in this paper), 2-methylfuran (in Part II), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (in Part III). A refined sub-mechanism for furan combustion, based on the work of Tian et al. [Combustion and Flame 158 (2011) 756-773] was developed which was then compared to the present experimental results. Overall, the agreement is encouraging. The main reaction pathways involved in furan combustion were delineated computing the rates of formation and consumption of all species. It is seen that the

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Low-mass stars in 25 Ori group and Orion OB1a (Suarez+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, G.; Downes, J. J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.; Covey, K. R.; Tapia, M.; Hernandez, J.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Stassun, K. G.; Briceno, C.

    2017-09-01

    The V, R, and I photometry used in this work was obtained from the Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA) Deep Survey of Orion (CDSO) catalog (Downes et al. 2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/444/1793), which was constructed by coadding the multi-epoch optical observations from the CIDA Variability Survey of Orion (CVSO; Briceno et al. 2005, Cat. J/AJ/129/907). The sensitivity limits of the CDSO covers the Low-Mass Star (LMS) and Brown Dwarf (BD) population of 25 Ori and its surroundings within the region 79.7°Eisenstein et al. 2011AJ....142...72E). The BOSS spectrograph has plates with 1000 fibers of 2'' diameter spanning a field of view of 3.0° in diameter and covering a wavelength range from 3560Å to 10400Å with a resolution of R=1560 at 3700Å and R=2650 at 9000Å (Gunn et al. 2006AJ....131.2332G; Smee et al. 2013AJ....146...32S). (4 data files).

  17. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model.

  18. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part II: 2-Methylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed. PMID:24518895

  19. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part II: 2-Methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed.

  20. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part III: 2,5-Dimethylfuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Casimir; Tran, Luc-Sy; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This work is the third part of a study focusing on the combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan and selected alkylated derivatives, i.e. furan in Part I, 2-methylfuran (MF) in Part II, and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) in the present work. Two premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of DMF were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) under two equivalence ratios (φ=1.0 and 1.7). Mole fractions of reactants, products, and stable and radical intermediates were measured as a function of the distance to the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a reaction mechanism that was further developed in the present series, including Part I and Part II. A reasonable agreement between the present experimental results and the simulation is observed. The main reaction pathways of DMF consumption were derived from a reaction flow analysis. Also, a comparison of the key features for the three flames is presented, as well as a comparison between these flames of furanic compounds and those of other fuels. An a priori surprising ability of DMF to form soot precursors (e.g. 1,3-cyclopentadiene or benzene) compared to less substituted furans and to other fuels has been experimentally observed and is well explained in the model. PMID:24518851

  1. Determination of glufosinate ammonium and its metabolite (AE F064619 and AE F061517) residues in water by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry after ion exchange cleanup and derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, A; Beguin, S; Sochor, H; Communal, P Y

    2000-11-01

    An analytical method for the determination of glufosinate ammonium and its principal metabolites, AE F064619 and AE F061517, in water of two different hardnesses (5 and 30 DH, French hardness) has been developed and validated. Samples were spiked at different levels (0. 05 and 0.5 microgram/L) and were purified by column chromatography on ion-exchange resins. After derivatization with glacial acetic acid and trimethylarthoacetate mixture, the derivatives were quantified by using capillary gas chromatography with an ion-trap tandem mass spectrometric detector. Analytical conditions for MS/MS detection were optimized, and the quantification was carried out on the areas of the most representative ions. The limit of quantification was validated at 0.05 microgram/L for each compound. The mean recovery value and the relative standard deviation (n = 20) were 92.0% and 17. 8% for glufosinate ammonium, 90.2% and 15.8% for AE F064619, and 89. 7% and 12.7% for AE F061517.

  2. Multi-residue method for determination of 58 pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in water using solvent demulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Rombaldi, Caroline; Arias, Jean Lucas de Oliveira; Marube, Liziane Cardoso; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and efficient sample pretreatment using solvent-based de-emulsification dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SD-DLLME) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was studied for the extraction of 58 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and pesticides from water samples. Type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, salt addition, amount of salt and type of demulsification solvent were evaluated. Limits of quantification (LOQ) in the range from 0.0125 to 1.25 µg L(-1) were reached, and linearity was in the range from the LOQ of each compound to 25 μg L(-1). Recoveries ranged from 60% to 120% for 84% of the compounds, with relative standard deviations lower than 29%. The proposed method demonstrated, for the first time, that sample preparation by SD-DLLME with determination by LC-MS/MS can be successfully used for the simultaneous extraction of 32 pesticides and 26 PPCPs from water samples. The entire procedure, including the extraction of 58 organic compounds from the aqueous sample solution and the breaking up of the emulsion after extraction with water, rather than with an organic solvent, was environmentally friendly. In addition, this technique was less expensive and faster than traditional techniques. Finally, the analytical method under study was successfully applied to the analysis of all 58 pesticides and PPCPs in surface water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of drug residues in urine of dogs receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization- tandem mass spectrometry: is there an environmental or occupational risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamscher, Gerd; Mohring, Siegrun A I; Knobloch, Anna; Eberle, Nina; Nau, Heinz; Nolte, Ingo; Simon, Daniela

    2010-04-01

    Cytotoxic drugs, previously used only in human medicine, are increasingly utilized for cancer treatment in veterinary practice. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography (LC)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) method to determine vincristine, vinblastine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin in canine urine. Sample pretreatment consisted of liquid-liquid extraction, and LC separation was carried out on an RP C(18) column employing a 0.5% formic acid/methanol gradient system. The analytes were detected in positive ion mode using the MS-MS scan mode. The mean recoveries in six different urine samples were between 64.2% and 86.9%. Limits of quantitation were 0.5 microg/L for vincristine and vinblastine, 1 microg/L for cyclophosphamide, and 5 microg/L for doxorubicin; limits of detection were approximately 0.25 microg/L for vincristine, vinblastine, and cyclophosphamide and 0.5 microg/L for doxorubicin. It could be demonstrated that all investigated drugs are found in urine of dogs undergoing chemotherapy. In samples from day 1 after chemotherapy, as much as 63 microg/L vincristine, 111 microg/L vinblastine, and 762 microg/L doxorubicin could be detected. Cyclophosphamide showed only minor concentrations on day 1, but up to 2583 microg/L could be found directly after chemotherapy. These initial data show that there might be a potential contamination risk when administering cytotoxics in veterinary medicine.

  4. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction coupled to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of tetracycline residues in infant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-González, David; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2017-04-15

    The use of salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) combined with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of tetracyclines in infant foods based on meat and vegetables or in milk. To obtain satisfactory extraction efficiencies for the studied analytes, several parameters affecting the SALLE procedure were optimized. Analytical performances of the method were satisfactory, obtaining limits of quantification lower than 0.48μgkg -1 in all cases. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (%, RSD) was below 11.3%. The extraction efficiency for fortified samples ranged from 89.2 to 96.8%, with RSDs lower than 7.3%. Matrix effect was evaluated for all samples studied, being lower than |21|% in all cases. In relation to the low solvent consumption, the proposed methodology could be considered rapid, cheap and environmentally friendly. Its applicability has been successfully tested in a wide range of infant foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-residue determination of the sorption of illicit drugs and pharmaceuticals to wastewater suspended particulate matter using pressurised liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David R; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2011-11-04

    Presented is the first comprehensive study of drugs of abuse on suspended particulate matter (SPM) in wastewater. Analysis of SPM is crucial to prevent the under-reporting of the levels of analyte that may be present in wastewater. Analytical methods to date analyse the aqueous part of wastewater samples only, removing SPM through the use of filtration or centrifugation. The development of an analytical method to determine 60 compounds on SPM using a combination of pressurised liquid extraction, solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (PLE-SPE-LC-MS/MS) is reported. The range of compounds monitored included stimulants, opioid and morphine derivatives, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, dissociative anaesthetics, drug precursors, and their metabolites. The method was successfully validated (parameters studied: linearity and range, recovery, accuracy, reproducibility, repeatability, matrix effects, and limits of detection and quantification). The developed methodology was applied to SPM samples collected at three wastewater treatment plants in the UK. The average proportion of analyte on SPM as opposed to in the aqueous phase was 10% with regard to methadone, EDDP, EMDP, BZP, fentanyl, nortramadol, norpropoxyphene, sildenafil and all antidepressants (dosulepin, amitriptyline, nortriptyline, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine). Consequently, the lack of SPM analysis in wastewater sampling protocol could lead to the under-reporting of the measured concentration of some compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey Data I: Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since Z similar to 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; Perfecto, R.; Song, J; Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Vikram, V.

    2016-01-10

    Using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z similar to 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift. We incorporate the uncertainties associated with cluster mass, redshift, and BCG stellar mass measurements into an analysis of a redshift-dependent BCG-cluster mass relation, m(*) proportional to (M-200/1.5 x 10(14)M(circle dot))(0.24 +/- 0.08)(1+z)(-0.19 +/- 0.34), and compare the observed relation to the model prediction. We estimate the average growth rate since z = 1.0 for BCGs hosted by clusters of M-200,M-z = 10(13.8)M(circle dot); at z = 1.0: m(*, BCG) appears to have grown by 0.13 +/- 0.11 dex, in tension at the similar to 2.5 sigma significance level with the 0.40 dex growth rate expected from the semi-analytic model. We show that the build-up of extended intracluster light after z = 1.0 may alleviate this tension in BCG growth rates.

  7. Optimization and application of parallel solid-phase extraction coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of 11 aminoglycoside residues in honey and royal jelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinran; Yang, Shupeng; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yongxin; Huang, Jingping; Wang, Peng; Wu, Cuiling; Zhou, Jinhui

    2018-03-23

    A robust and sensitive method of solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was established and performed for the simultaneous determination of eleven aminoglycosides (AGs) in royal jelly and honey. After sample extraction by a phosphate buffer containing trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and ethylenediaminetetracetic acid disodium salt (Na 2 EDTA), the extraction solution was subjected to a parallel solid-phase extraction for clean-up prior to the LC-MS/MS analysis. The same method was applied to analyze two completely different matrices, honey and royal jelly. Good sensitivity, repeatability, and recovery were obtained by using the mobile phase without an ion-pairing reagent such as heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) or sodium heptanesulfonate. The calibration curves of the honey and royal jelly samples exhibited a good linear response (R 2  > 0.99) at six concentrations in the range of 10-1000 μg/mL. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of the AGs ranged from 10 to 25 μg/kg in the honey and from 12.5 to 25 μg/kg in the royal jelly. The recoveries of the AGs for the honey and royal jelly samples were in the range of 79.48% to 108.95% and 74.61% to 113.70% respectively and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 1.23% and 9.59%, and between 1.51% and 9.98%, respectively. The proposed approach has been allowed in China as a reference method for the simultaneous determination of eleven AGs in honey and royal jelly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  9. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  10. Processes of change in quality of life, weight self-stigma, body mass index and emotional eating after an acceptance-, mindfulness- and compassion-based group intervention (Kg-Free) for women with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira, Lara; Cunha, Marina; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of Kg-Free: an acceptance-, mindfulness- and compassion-based group intervention for women with overweight and obesity at post-treatment and 3-month follow-up and explored the psychological processes that underlie changes in quality of life, weight self-stigma, body mass index and emotional eating at post-treatment. Overall, 53 women completed Kg-Free. At post-treatment and 3-month follow-up, participants reported increased quality of life, mindfulness and self-compassion abilities and decreased weight self-stigma, emotional eating, shame, weight-related experiential avoidance, self-criticism and body mass index. Shame and self-criticism reductions were important mediators of changes in health-related outcomes, whereas weight-related experiential avoidance, mindfulness and self-compassion mediated changes in weight and eating-related outcomes.

  11. An investigation into utilising gestational body mass index as a screening tool for adverse birth outcomes and maternal morbidities in a group of pregnant women in Khayelitsha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, HR; Visser, J; Tomlinson, M; Rotheram-Borus, MJ; Gissane, C; Harwood, J; LeRoux, I

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the gestational body mass index (BMI) method to screen for adverse birth outcomes and maternal morbidities. Design This was a substudy of a randomised controlled trial, the Philani Mentor Mothers’ study. Setting and subjects The Philani Mentor Mothers’ study took place in a peri-urban settlement, Khayelitsha, between 2009 and 2010. Pregnant women living in the area in 2009-2010 were recruited for the study. Outcome measures Maternal anthropometry (height and weight) and gestational weeks were obtained at baseline to calculate the gestational BMI, which is maternal BMI adjusted for gestational age. Participants were classified into four gestational BMI categories: underweight, normal, overweight and obese. Birth outcomes and maternal morbidities were obtained from clinic cards after the births. Results Pregnant women were recruited into the study (n = 1 058). Significant differences were found between the different gestational BMI categories and the following birth outcomes: maternal (p-value = 0.019), infant hospital stay (p-value = 0.03), infants staying for over 24 hours in hospital (p-value = 0.001), delivery mode (p-value = 0.001), birthweight (p-value = 0.006), birth length (p-value = 0.007), birth head circumference (p-value = 0.007) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (p-value = 0.001). Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has used the gestational BMI method in a peri-urban South African pregnant population. Based on the findings that this method is able to identify unfavourable birth outcomes, it is recommended that it is implemented as a pilot study in selected rural, peri-urban and urban primary health clinics, and that its ease and effectiveness as a screening tool is evaluated. Appropriate medical and nutritional advice can then be given to pregnant women to improve both their own and their infants’ birth-related outcomes and maternal morbidities

  12. Monitoring of Some Pesticides Residue in Consumed tea in Tehran Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Amirahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea is an agricultural product of the leaves, leaf buds, and internodes of various cultivars and sub-varieties of the Camellia sinensis plant, processed and vulcanized using various methods. Tea is a main beverage in Iranian food basket so should be free from toxic elements such as pesticides residue. There is no data bank on the residue of pesticides in the consumed black tea in Iran. The present study is the first attempt for monitoring of 25 pesticide residues from different chemical groups in tea samples obtained from local markets in Tehran, I.R. Iran during the period 2011. A reliable and accurate method based on spiked calibration curve and QuEChERS sample preparation was developed for determination of pesticide residues in tea by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The using of spiked calibration standards for constructing the calibration curve substantially reduced adverse matrix-related effects and negative recovery affected by GCB on pesticides. The recovery of pesticides at 3 concentration levels (n = 3 was in range of 81.4 - 99.4%. The method was proved to be repeatable with RSDr lower than 20%. The limits of quantification for all pesticides were <=20 ng/g. 53 samples from 17 imported and manufactured brand were analyzed. Detectable pesticides residues were found in 28.3% (15 samples of the samples. All of the positive samples were contaminated with unregulated pesticides (Endosulfan Sulfate or Bifenthrin which are established by ISIRI. None of the samples had contamination higher than maximum residue limit set by EU and India.

  13. Monitoring of some pesticides residue in consumed tea in Tehran market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamedani Morteza Pirali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tea is an agricultural product of the leaves, leaf buds, and internodes of various cultivars and sub-varieties of the Camellia sinensis plant, processed and vulcanized using various methods. Tea is a main beverage in Iranian food basket so should be free from toxic elements such as pesticides residue. There is no data bank on the residue of pesticides in the consumed black tea in Iran. The present study is the first attempt for monitoring of 25 pesticide residues from different chemical groups in tea samples obtained from local markets in Tehran, I.R. Iran during the period 2011. A reliable and accurate method based on spiked calibration curve and QuEChERS sample preparation was developed for determination of pesticide residues in tea by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The using of spiked calibration standards for constructing the calibration curve substantially reduced adverse matrix-related effects and negative recovery affected by GCB on pesticides. The recovery of pesticides at 3 concentration levels (n = 3 was in range of 81.4 - 99.4%. The method was proved to be repeatable with RSDr lower than 20%. The limits of quantification for all pesticides were ≤20 ng/g. 53 samples from 17 imported and manufactured brand were analyzed. Detectable pesticides residues were found in 28.3% (15 samples of the samples. All of the positive samples were contaminated with unregulated pesticides (Endosulfan Sulfate or Bifenthrin which are established by ISIRI. None of the samples had contamination higher than maximum residue limit set by EU and India.

  14. Development of an NPP residual lifetime evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regano, M.; Ibanez, M.; Hevia, F.

    1993-01-01

    Various reasons have given rise to the need for residual life management of Spain's nuclear power plants which lead to the a project for the development of a residual lifetime evaluation system managed by UNESA and supported by the owner groups. This project is described. 1 fig

  15. Residual Wage Differences by Gender: Bounding the Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Chris N.; Patrinos, Harry A.

    1996-01-01

    Uses data from the 1986 Canadian labor market activity survey file to derive estimates of residual gender wage gap differences. Investigates these estimates' dependence on experimental design and on assumptions about discrimination-free wage structures. Residual differences persist, even after restricting the sample to a group of highly motivated,…

  16. Evaluation of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebdoua, Samira; Lazali, Mohamed; Ounane, Sidi Mohamed; Tellah, Sihem; Nabi, Fahima; Ounane, Ghania

    2017-06-01

    A total of 160 samples of 13 types of fresh fruits and vegetables from domestic production and import were analysed to detect the presence of pesticide residues. Analysis was performed by multi-residual extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In 42.5% of the tested samples, no residues were found and 12.5% of samples contained pesticide residues above maximum residue limits. Risk assessment for long-term exposure was done for all pesticides detected in this study. Except chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin, exposure to pesticides from vegetables and fruits was below 1% of the acceptable daily intake. Short-term exposure assessment revealed that in seven pesticide/commodity combinations, including three pesticides (chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin), the acute reference dose had been exceeded.

  17. Alcohol biodiesel from frying oil residues; Biodiesel etilico a partir de oleo de fritura residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festa, Brunna Simoes; Marques, Luiz Guilherme da Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IVIG/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Inst. Virtual Internacional de Mudancas Globais], E-mail: lguilherme@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the reaction optimization and production of biodiesel through the use of frying residual oil made available by the restaurant placed at the PETROBRAS Research Center (CENPES-RJ), using ethanol, so that to permit the production of sustainable bio diesel. The environmental gains obtained by the utilization of residual oil, avoiding that this oil be released in the nature, and the economic gains coming from the generation and utilization of ethanol allowing the production of biodiesel be an viable alternative. The obtained results during laboratory tests shown that biodiesel produced from the transesterification in alkaline medium, of the frying residual oil collected presented a reaction yield of approximately 80% considering in mass.

  18. Drug and chemical residues in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussman, H C

    1975-02-01

    Given the large number of chemical substances that may find their way into the food supply, a system is needed to monitor their presence. The U. S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Inspection Program routinely tests for chemical residues in animals coming to slaughter. Pesticides, heavy metals, growth promotants (hormones and hormonelike agents), and antibiotics are included. Samples are taken statistically so that inferences as to national incidence of residues can be drawn. When a problem is identified, a more selective sampling is designed to help follow up on the initial regulatory action. In testing for pesticides, only DDT and dieldrin are found with any frequency and their levels are decreasing; violative residues of any chlorinated hydrocarbon are generally a result of an industrial accident rather than agricultural usage. Analyses for heavy metals have revealed detectable levels of mercury, lead, and others, but none at levels that are considered a health hazard. Of the hormone or hormonelike substances, only diethylstilbestrol has been a residue problem and its future is uncertain. The most extensive monitoring for veterinary drugs is on the antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, streptomycin, and the tetracycline group of antibiotics that constitute the bulk of the violations; their simultaneous use prophylactically and therapeutically has contributed to the problem in certain cases. A strong, well-designed user education program on proper application of pesticides, chemicals, and veterinary drugs appears to be one method of reducing the incidence of unwanted residues.

  19. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  20. Using of sawing quartzite fine residual for obtaining ceramic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, L.F.P.M.; Souza, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Quartzite is a metamorphic rock that is consisting mainly of quartz. In Paraiba there is a mining activity of this rock, in the region of Varzea and Junco do Serido especially where many wastes are created, including the sawing residue. The objective is to use the waste cited as the ceramic component coating mass, thereby replacing the quartz. Initially, the raw materials samples were taken and the chemical analysis was done of them. This passed the comminution process to achieve the required minimum particle size. After this, a formulation which added the residue in ceramic mass was made. The specimens were subjected to sintering and it was later made physical tests according to NBR 13818. The results show that the residue can replace the quartz ceramic mass successfully, but not as good as the original raw material. (author)

  1. Zinc and group V element co-implantation in indium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Ridgway, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Group V elements with mass ranging from 35 to 122 amu have been co-implanted with Zn in InP substrates. Co-implantation with all group V elements drastically reduced Zn out-diffusion and to a certain extent also inhibited Zn in-diffusion. The reduction in out-diffusion was insensitive to the group V element mass and thus, to implantation-induced damage. We believe the group V element excess created an In-vacancy excess that enhanced Zn substitution into the In sublattice. A maximum hole concentration of 7x10 18 cm -3 was achieved with P co-implantation. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling clearly showed a decrease in hole concentration as a function of increasing group V element mass. This was attributed to differences in compensating residual implantation-induced damage

  2. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  3. Leptonic Dirac CP violation predictions from residual discrete symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Girardi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group Gf, and that Gf is broken to specific residual symmetries Ge and Gν of the charged lepton and neutrino mass terms, we derive sum rules for the cosine of the Dirac phase δ of the neutrino mixing matrix U. The residual symmetries considered are: i Ge=Z2 and Gν=Zn, n>2 or Zn×Zm, n,m≥2; ii Ge=Zn, n>2 or Zn×Zm, n,m≥2 and Gν=Z2; iii Ge=Z2 and Gν=Z2; iv Ge is fully broken and Gν=Zn, n>2 or Zn×Zm, n,m≥2; and v Ge=Zn, n>2 or Zn×Zm, n,m≥2 and Gν is fully broken. For given Ge and Gν, the sum rules for cos⁡δ thus derived are exact, within the approach employed, and are valid, in particular, for any Gf containing Ge and Gν as subgroups. We identify the cases when the value of cos⁡δ cannot be determined, or cannot be uniquely determined, without making additional assumptions on unconstrained parameters. In a large class of cases considered the value of cos⁡δ can be unambiguously predicted once the flavour symmetry Gf is fixed. We present predictions for cos⁡δ in these cases for the flavour symmetry groups Gf=S4, A4, T′ and A5, requiring that the measured values of the 3-neutrino mixing parameters sin2⁡θ12, sin2⁡θ13 and sin2⁡θ23, taking into account their respective 3σ uncertainties, are successfully reproduced.

  4. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  5. Peptides containing internal residues of pyroglutamic acid: proton NMR characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The proton NMR characteristics of internal pyroglutamic acid (Glp; 5-oxoproline) residues in seven tripeptides of the general structure Boc-Xxx-Glp-Yyy-NH 2 were studied. In general, the chemical shifts of several diagnostic protons moved downfield on going from the Glu-containing peptides (Boc-Xxx-Glu-Yyy-NH 2 ) to the corresponding Glp-containing peptides. The C-2 proton of the Xxx residue was shifted by about 1.1 ppm. The N-2 proton of the Yyy residue was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. The C-2 proton of the Glx residue itself was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. One of the Glx C-3 protons was also shifted by about 0.5 ppm, but the other remained essentially unchanged. Finally, the Glx C-4 protons were shifted by about 0.3 ppm. Internal Glu residues are readily converted chemically into internal Glp residues. This conversion also occurs as a side reaction during HP cleavage of the protecting group from Glu(OBzl) residues. The spontaneous fragmentation of serum proteins C3, C4 and λ 2 -macroglobulin under denaturing conditions is probably due to regioselective hydrolysis of an internal Glp residue formed in each of these proteins upon denaturation. These proton NMR characteristics may be useful in establishing the presence of internal Glp residues in synthetic and natural peptides

  6. A novel optimised and validated method for analysis of multi-residues of pesticides in fruits and vegetables by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE)-dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE)-retention time locked (RTL)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with Deconvolution reporting software (DRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Gouri; Tyagi, Yogesh Kumar; Gupta, Rajinder Kumar

    2011-08-01

    A rapid, effective and ecofriendly method for sensitive screening and quantification of 72 pesticides residue in fruits and vegetables, by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) followed by dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE), retention time locked (RTL) capillary gas-chromatographic separation in trace ion mode mass spectrometric determination has been validated as per ISO/IEC: 17025:2005. Identification and reporting with total and extracted ion chromatograms were facilitated to a great extent by Deconvolution reporting software (DRS). For all compounds LOD were 0.002-0.02mg/kg and LOQ were 0.025-0.100mg/kg. Correlation coefficients of the calibration curves in the range of 0.025-0.50mg/kg were >0.993. To validate matrix effects repeatability, reproducibility, recovery and overall uncertainty were calculated for the 35 matrices at 0.025, 0.050 and 0.100mg/kg. Recovery ranged between 72% and 114% with RSD of <20% for repeatability and intermediate precision. The reproducibility of the method was evaluated by an inter laboratory participation and Z score obtained within ±2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  8. Demographic, health-related, and work-related factors associated with body mass index and body fat percentage among workers at six Connecticut manufacturing companies across different age groups: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Jennifer L; Dugan, Alicia G; Faghri, Pouran D; Gorin, Amy A; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Kenny, Anne M; Cherniack, Martin G; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace interventions that consider the multifactorial nature of obesity are needed to reduce and prevent obesity among adults. Furthermore, the factors associated with obesity may differ for workers across age groups. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify demographic, health-related, and work-related factors associated with baseline and changes in body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (BFP) and among Connecticut manufacturing workers acrossage groups. BMI and BFPof 758 workers from six Connecticut manufacturing companies were objectively measuredat two time points approximately 36 months apart. Demographic, health-related, and work-related factors wereassessed via questionnaire. All variables were included in linear regression models to identify factors associated with baseline and changes in BMI and BFP for workers in 3 age groups: 55 years (28 %). There were differences in baseline and changes in BMI and BFP among manufacturing workers across age groups. Being interested in changing weight was significantly (p gender (BMI p = 0.04), female gender (BFP p gender (BMI p = 0.02), female gender (BFP p gender (BFP p 55 year age category. Few factors were associated with change in BMI or BFP across any age category. Among manufacturing workers, we identified associations between individual, health-related, and work-related factors and baseline BMIand BFP that differed by age. Such results support the use of strategies tailored to the challenges faced by workers in specific age groups rather than adopting a one size fits all approach. Effective interventions should consider a full range of individual, health-related, and work-related factors. More work must be done to identify factors or strategies associated with changes in obesity over time.

  9. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  10. Hydrogen bond strengths in phosphorylated and sulfated amino acid residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaya Rapp

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the addition of an oxoanion functional group, usually a phosphate group and less commonly a sulfate group, leads to diverse structural and functional consequences in protein systems. Building upon previous studies of the phosphoserine residue (pSer, we address the distinct nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in phosphotyrosine (pTyr and sulfotyrosine (sTyr residues. We derive partial charges for these modified residues and then study them in the context of molecular dynamics simulation of model tripeptides and sulfated protein complexes, potentials of mean force for interacting residue pairs, and a survey of the interactions of modified residues among experimental protein structures. Overall, our findings show that for pTyr, bidentate interactions with Arg are particularly dominant, as has been previously demonstrated for pSer. sTyr interactions with Arg are significantly weaker, even as compared to the same interactions made by the Glu residue. Our work sheds light on the distinct nature of these modified tyrosine residues, and provides a physical-chemical foundation for future studies with the goal of understanding their roles in systems of biological interest.

  11. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  12. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  13. Dissipation and residue of bifenthrin in wheat under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xiangwei; Jiang, Naiwen; Liu, Fengmao; Liu, Congyun; Wang, Suli

    2013-02-01

    Field trials were carried out to investigate the dissipation and residue levels of bifenthrin in wheat. After extraction with acetonitrile, the samples were cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction and detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The half-lives of bifenthrin in wheat seedlings ranged from 2.4 to 10.5 days. At harvest time, the terminal residues of bifenthrin were below the maximum residue limit (0.5 mg/kg) set by Codex Alimentarius Committee or European Union in wheat grain, which suggested that the use of this pesticide was safe for humans. However, the relatively high residue levels of bifenthrin in wheat straw should be paid attention to.

  14. Recognition of Streptococcus pseudoporcinus Colonization in Women as a Consequence of Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Group B Streptococcus Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Grundy, Maureen; Rubin, Mayer; Harris, Renee; Miller, Jo-Anne; Romagnoli, Mark; Hanlon, Ann; Tekle, Tsigereda; Ellis, Brandon C; Witter, Frank R; Carroll, Karen C

    2015-12-01

    During a 14-month period of using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for group B streptococcus (GBS) identification, we recovered 32 (1%) Streptococcus pseudoporcinus isolates from 3,276 GBS screening cultures from female genital sources (25 isolates from pregnant women and 7 from nonpregnant women). An additional two S. pseudoporcinus isolates were identified from a urine culture and a posthysterectomy wound culture. These isolates were found to cross-react with three different GBS antigen agglutination kits, PathoDx (Remel) (93%), Prolex (Pro-Lab Diagnostics) (38%), and Streptex (Remel) (53%). New approaches to bacterial identification in routine clinical microbiology laboratories may affect the prevalence of S. pseudoporcinus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Characterization of solid residues from coal liquefaction processes. Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, J.; McDougall, W.M.; Kybett, B.D.; Neufeld, C.

    1981-01-01

    Various coal liquefaction and beneficiation processes are being investigated by independent research groups sponsored by the Canadian Federal Government. These processes include the co-processing of heavy oils and bitumen with coal, oxygen removal and hydrogenation of coal and supercritical gas extraction of coal. The end products, gaseous and liquid fuels and insoluble organic residues, vary with the experimental conditions. The physical properties and origin of the insoluble residue may influence such factors as degree of conversion, efficiency of the process, and ultimately, gaseous and liquid yields. One of the most suitable methods of assessing the nature of the insoluble residues is the use of petrography. This report deals with petrographic assessment of the coals and residues from various coal conversion processes; attempts were made to characterize the solid phases in the residues; to assess them in a quantitative manner and where possible; to correlate the results with experimental data; and to assess their effects on conversion. (30 refs.)

  16. Residues from waste incineration. Final report. Rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrup, T.; Juul Pedersen, A.; Hyks, J.; Frandsen, F.J.

    2010-04-15

    The overall objective of the project was to improve the understanding of the formation and characteristics of residues from waste incineration. This was done focusing on the importance of the waste input and the operational conditions of the furnace. Data and results obtained from the project have been discussed in this report according to the following three overall parts: i) mass flows and element distribution, ii) flue gas/particle partitioning and corrosion/deposition aspects, and iii) residue leaching. This has been done with the intent of structuring the discussion while tacitly acknowledging that these aspects are interrelated and cannot be separated. Overall, it was found that the waste input composition had significant impact of the characteristics of the generated residues. A similar correlation between operational conditions and residue characteristics could not be observed. Consequently, the project recommend that optimization of residue quality should focus on controlling the waste input composition. The project results showed that including specific waste materials (and thereby also excluding the same materials) may have significant effects on the residue composition, residue leaching, aerosol and deposit formation.It is specifically recommended to minimize Cl in the input waste. Based on the project results, it was found that a significant potential for optimization of waste incineration exist. (Author)

  17. Residual contamination and corrosion on electrochemically marked uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Bullock, J.S.; Bennett, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Residual contamination and potential corrosion problems on uranium parts resulting from PHB-1 and PHB-1E electroetchants have been investigated using ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and light microscopy (LM). The effectiveness of various solvent cleaning sequences and the influence of the use of an abrasive cleaner were evaluated. The marking thicknesses and chlorine distributions were determined

  18. Analysis of pesticide residues Or a needle in a barn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinsen, H.; Cesio, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work is about the analysis of pesticide residues as well as the study of soil, air, water and organisms. The solvents used depend on the matrix, types of pesticides, analysis and the equipment. The chromatography engaged with mass spectrometry is one of the most used techniques.

  19. A comparative research on obesity hypertension by the comparisons and associations between waist circumference, body mass index with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and the clinical laboratory data between four special Chinese adult groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ou; Leng, Jian-Hang; Yang, Fen-Fang; Yang, Hai-Ming; Zhang, Hu; Li, Zeng-Fang; Zhang, Xing-Yu; Yuan, Cheng-Da; Li, Jia-Jia; Pan, Qi; Liu, Wei; Ren, Yan-Jun; Liu, Bing; Liu, Qing-Min; Cao, Cheng-Jian

    2018-01-01

    The obesity-hypertension pathogenesis is complex. From the phenotype to molecular mechanism, there is a long way to clarify the mechanism. To explore the association between obesity and hypertension, we correlate the phenotypes such as the waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SB), and diastolic blood pressure (DB) with the clinical laboratory data between four specific Chinese adult physical examination groups (newly diagnosed untreated just-obesity group, newly diagnosed untreated obesity-hypertension group, newly diagnosed untreated just-hypertension group, and normal healthy group), and the results may show something. To explore the mechanisms from obesity to hypertension by analyzing the correlations and differences between WC, BMI, SB, DB, and other clinical laboratory data indices in four specific Chinese adult physical examination groups. This cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2012 to July 2014, and 153 adult subjects, 34 women and 119 men, from 21 to 69 years, were taken from four characteristic Chinese adult physical examination groups (newly diagnosed untreated just-obesity group, newly diagnosed untreated obesity-hypertension group, newly diagnosed untreated just-hypertension group, and normal healthy group). The study was approved by the ethics committee of Hangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention. WC, BMI, SB, DB, and other clinical laboratory data were collected and analyzed by SPSS. Serum levels of albumin (ALB),alanine aminotransferase (ALT), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), uric acid (Ua), and TC/HDLC (odds ratio) were statistically significantly different between the four groups. WC statistically significantly positively correlated with BMI, ALT, Ua, and serum levels of glucose (GLU), and TC/HDLC, and negatively with ALB, HDLC, and serum levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB). BMI

  20. Effects of body mass index on the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Selcuk Isoglu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To examine the the effect of body mass index (BMI on PNL results and complications with a large number of patients. Materials and Methods A total of 958 patients were included in the study, who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy in our clinic between 2008 and 2015. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to their body mass index. Patients with a BMI < 30 kg/m2 were classified as group 1 (n:676 and patients with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 were classified as group 2 (n:282. Achieving stone-free status or having residual stones of ≤ 4 mm were considered as operational success. Results The mean age was 47.9 years for group 1 and 48.9 years for group 2 patients. At postoperative first month CT analysis, residual stone was not observed in 466 patients (69% of group 1 and 20 (72% patients of group 2. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of stone-free status (p=0.348. There was no significant difference between two groups complications. Also, there was no difference between the groups for requiring additional intervention (p=0.924. No other complications were observed in the patients. Conclusions BMI does not affect the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy as well as complication rate.

  1. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  2. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  3. Hydrogenation upgrading of heavy oil residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichko, A.A.; Maloletnev, A.S.; Mazneva, O.A.; Galkina, N.I. [Fossil Fuel Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation and Gasification Dept.; Suvorov, U.P.; Khadjiev, S.N. [Inst. Oil and Chemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation of Heavy Residues Dept.

    1997-12-31

    At present time in the world there is no simple and effective technology at low pressure (<15-20 MPa) which could give the opportunity to use oil residues for distillate fractions production. In Russia a process for hydrogenation (up 6 MPa hydrogen pressure) of high boiling point (b.p. >520 C) oil products, including high S, V and Ni contents ones, into distillates, feedstock for catalytic cracking (b.p. 360-520 C) and metal concentrates. The main point of the new process is as follows: the water solution of catalytic additive, for which purpose water soluble metal salts of VI-VIII groups are used, is mixed with heavy oil residues, dispersed and then subjected to additional supercavitation in a special apparatus. (orig.)

  4. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures

  5. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  6. Residual stress analysis in reactor pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Pont, D.

    1991-08-01

    Residual stresses in cladding and welded attachments could contribute to the problem of stress-corrosion cracking in boiling-water reactors (BWR). As part of a larger program aimed at quantifying residual stress in BWR components, models that would be applicable for predicting residual stress in BWR components are reviewed and documented. The review includes simple methods of estimating residual stresses as well as advanced finite-element software. In general, simple methods are capable of predicting peak magnitudes of residual stresses but are incapable of adequately characterizing the distribution of residual stresses. Ten groups of researchers using finite-element software are reviewed in detail. For each group, the assumptions of the model, possible simplifications, material property data, and specific applications are discussed. The most accurate results are obtained when a metallurgical simulation is performed, transformation plasticity effects are included, and the heating and cooling parts of the welding thermal cycle are simulated. Two models are identified which can provide these features. The present state of these models and the material property data available in the literature are adequate to quantify residual stress in BWR components

  7. Differential fragmentation patterns of pectin oligogalacturonides observed by nanoelectrospray quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry using automated spectra interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutenda, Kudzai E; Matthiesen, Rune; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides of different degrees of polymerization (DP) and methyl esterification (DE) were structurally analyzed by nanoESI quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry. The fragmentation patterns of the oligogalacturonides were compared using the program 'Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist...... with free carboxylic acid groups underwent higher water loss compared to fully methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides under the same fragmentation conditions. Cross-ring cleavage, in which fragmentation occurs across the ring system of the galacturonate residue and signified by unique mass losses...... water loss than methyl-esterified ones will be postulated. In addition, the VEMS program was extended to automatically interpret and assign the fragment ions peaks generated in this study....

  8. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  9. Niclosamide residues in milk and organs of lactating goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hindi, A.M.; Sidra, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    14 C-Niclosamide was administered to two groups of lactating goats at levels of 2ppm for five consecutive days and 10ppm as a single dose. Residues of the molluscicide in milk, if at all present, did not exceed 0.001 ppm at any time. About 50% of the administered activity was excreted in faeces, while 30% excreted through urine in animals surviving 6 days after withdrawal. The unchanged molluscicide is present only in relatively trace amounts. The highest residues in organs were found in the liver of both groups (0.01-0.04 ppm). From the results it could be concluded that absorbed niclosamide is completely metabolised and rapidly eliminated through urine, leaving little or no residues of the unchanged molluscicide. Little or no residues were detected in lean muscles and milk which are consumed by humans. There is no preferential deposition of the molluscicide or its metabolites in fat

  10. Targeting cysteine residues of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease by reactive free radical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A; Sehajpal, P K; Ogiste, J S; Lander, H M

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring free radical with many functions. The oxidized form of NO, the nitrosonium ion, reacts with the thiol group of cysteine residues resulting in their modification to S-nitrosothiols. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (HIV-PR) has two cysteine residues that are conserved amongst different viral isolates found in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In an active dimer, these residues are located near the surface of the protease. We have found that treatment of HIV-PR with different NO congeners results in loss of its proteolytic activity and simultaneous formation of S-nitrosothiols. Sodium nitroprusside inhibited HIV-PR up to 70% and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine completely inhibited the protease within 5 min of treatment. The pattern of inhibition by NO donors is comparable to its inhibition by N-acetyl pepstatin. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the modification of HIV-PR by NO as that of S-nitrosation. Our findings point towards a possible role of NO in mediating resistance to HIV-1 infection.

  11. Characterization of peptide-oligonucleotide heteroconjugates by mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, O N; Kulkarni, S; Aldrich, J V; Barofsky, D F

    1996-01-01

    Two peptide-oligothymidylic acids, prepared by joining an 11 residue synthetic peptide containing one internal carboxyl group (Asp side chain) to amino-linker-5'pdT6 and amino-linker-5'pdT10 oligonucleotides, were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) on a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer and by electrospray ionization (ESI) on a triple-quadrupole system. These synthetic compounds model peptide-nucleic acid heteroconjugates encountered in antisense research an...

  12. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  13. Fermion masses and multiplicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramond, P.

    1986-01-01

    A general survey and analysis of fermion masses is presented in terms of both the known low energy gauge structure and of the simplest GUT structure. The replication of fermion families is discussed in the context of possible family group structures. Sample family gauge groups are presented in the cases of three and four chiral families, using ABJ and Witten anomalies to restrict the maximal gauged family group. The possible relevance of the family group to the fermion mass hierarchy is discussed in the context of various models. (author)

  14. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of selected herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, J.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Scribner, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the extraction and analysis of eight herbicides and five degradation products using solid-phase extraction from natural water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. This method was developed for dimethenamid; flufenacet; fluometuron and its degradation products, demethylfluometuron (DMFM), 3-(trifluromethyl)phenylurea (TFMPU), 3-(trifluromethyl)-aniline (TFMA); molinate; norflurazon and its degradation product, demethylnorflurazon; pendamethalin; the degradation product of prometryn, deisopropylprometryn; propanil; and trifluralin. The eight herbicides are used primarily in the southern United States where cotton, rice, and soybeans are produced. The exceptions are dimethenamid and flufenacet, which are used on corn in the Midwest. Water samples received by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas, are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then passed through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica (C-18) to extract the compounds. The herbicides and their degradation products are removed from the column by ethyl acetate elution. The eluate is evaporated under nitrogen, and components then are separated, identified, and quantified by injecting an aliquot of the concentrated extract into a high-resolution, fused-silica capillary column of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer under selected-ion mode. Method detection limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ?g/L for all compounds with the exception of TFMPU, which has a method detection limit of 0.32 ?g/L. The mean absolute recovery is 107 percent. This method for the determination of herbicides and their degradation products is valuable for acquiring information about water quality and compound fate and transport in water.

  15. Vesícula residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. U. Coelho

    Full Text Available Our objective is to report three patients with recurrent severe upper abdominal pain secondary to residual gallbladder. All patients had been subjected to cholecystectomy from 1 to 20 years before. The diagnosis was established after several episodes of severe upper abdominal pain by imaging exams: ultrasonography, tomography, or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Removal of the residual gallbladder led to complete resolution of symptoms. Partial removal of the gallbladder is a very rare cause of postcholecystectomy symptoms.

  16. Residual number processing in dyscalculia ?

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and ca...

  17. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  18. The tyrosyl residues in creatine kinase. Modification by iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattoum, A; Kassab, R; Pradel, L A

    1975-10-20

    The effect of the iodination of tyrosyl residues in creatine kinase from rabbit muscle has been investigated at alkaline pH after reversible masking of the reactive thiol groups. The conversion of 4-5 tyrosyl residues to monoiodotyrosines as measured by spectrotitration and by radioactive iodine labelling resulted in almost total loss of enzymic activity. The modified enzyme was unable to bind its nucleotide substrates but no significant conformational change was revealed by optical rotatory dispersion or Stokes radius measurements. However, change in the reactivity of some non-essential thiol groups, presumably those located near the active thiol groups, was observed.

  19. Group therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: In his review 'Genesis of Unified Gauge Theories' at the symposium in Honour of Abdus Salam (June, page 23), Tom Kibble of Imperial College, London, looked back to the physics events around Salam from 1959-67. He described how, in the early 1960s, people were pushing to enlarge the symmetry of strong interactions beyond the SU(2) of isospin and incorporate the additional strangeness quantum number. Kibble wrote - 'Salam had students working on every conceivable symmetry group. One of these was Yuval Ne'eman, who had the good fortune and/or prescience to work on SU(3). From that work, and of course from the independent work of Murray Gell- Mann, stemmed the Eightfold Way, with its triumphant vindication in the discovery of the omega-minus in 1964.' Yuval Ne'eman writes - 'I was the Defence Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in London and was admitted by Salam as a part-time graduate student when I arrived in 1958. I started research after resigning from the Embassy in May 1960. Salam suggested a problem: provide vector mesons with mass - the problem which was eventually solved by Higgs, Guralnik, Kibble,.... (as described by Kibble in his article). I explained to Salam that I had become interested in symmetry. Nobody at Imperial College at the time, other than Salam himself, was doing anything in groups, and attention further afield was focused on the rotation - SO(N) - groups. Reacting to my own half-baked schemes, Salam told me to forget about the rotation groups he taught us, and study group theory in depth, directing me to Eugene Dynkin's classification of Lie subalgebras, about which he had heard from Morton Hamermesh. I found Dynkin incomprehensible without first learning about Lie algebras from Henri Cartan's thesis, which luckily had been reproduced by Dynkin in his 1946 thesis, using his diagram method. From a copy of a translation of Dynkin's thesis which I found in the British Museum Library, I

  20. Mass discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeckman, A. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1978-12-15

    In thermal ionization mass spectrometry the phenomenon of mass discrimination has led to the use of a correction factor for isotope ratio-measurements. The correction factor is defined as the measured ratio divided by the true or accepted value of this ratio. In fact this factor corrects for systematic errors of the whole procedure; however mass discrimination is often associated just with the mass spectrometer.

  1. Negative mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analysed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive mass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given. (paper)

  2. Observation of the hot GDR in neutron-deficient thorium evaporation residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Dioszegi, I.; Eisenman, K.; Heckman, P.; Hofman, D.J.; Kelly, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nanal, V.; Pennington, T.; Siemssen, R.H.; Thoennessen, M.; Varner, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    The giant dipole resonance built on excited states was observed in very fissile nuclei in coincidence with evaporation residues. The reaction 48 Ca+ 176 Yb populated evaporation residues of mass A=213-220 with a cross section of ∼200 μb at 259 MeV. The extracted giant dipole resonance parameters are in agreement with theoretical predictions for this mass region

  3. Analysis and radiological assessment of residues containing NORM materials resulting from earlier activities including modelling of typical industrial residues. Pt. 1. Historical investigation of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and concepts for site identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, Andreas; Niedermayer, Matthias; Sitte, Beate; Hamel, Peter Michael

    2007-01-01

    Natural radionuclides are part of the human environment and of the raw materials used. Technical processes may cause their accumulation in residues, and the result will be so-called NORM materials (Naturally occurring radioactive material). The amended Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV 2001) specifies how the public should be protected, but there are also residues dating back before the issuing of the StrlSchV 2001, the so-called NORM residues. The project intended to assess the risks resulting from these residues. It comprises four parts. Part 1 was for clarification of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and for the development of concepts to detect them. The criterion for their radiological relevance was their activity per mass unit and the material volume accumulated through the centuries. The former was calculated from a wide bibliographic search in the relevant literature on radiation protection, while the mass volume was obtained by a detailed historical search of the consumption of materials that may leave NORM residues. These are, in particular, residues from coal and ore mining and processing. To identify concrete sites, relevant data sources were identified, and a concept for identification of concrete NORM residues was developed on this basis. (orig.) [de

  4. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Identification of chemical signatures of gunshot residues in different fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Joao Carlos Dias de

    2010-01-01

    The modern forensic science goes hand in hand with scientific research. The forensic scientists are faced every day with many cases requiring the analysis of residues from firing gun (gunshot residues). This works describes the development of a methodology to determine chemical signatures of shots from a firearm, by measuring the concentrations of Pb, Ba e Sb in the residues from these shots deposited near the entrance hole of bullets, based on the technique with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). Shots were performed on five types of target-fabrics and collected testimonies from regions close to the entrance hole of projectiles. The results showed that the method enabled us to identify and distinguish the residues of the .38 caliber revolver and pistols .40 and 9mm caliber. The use of ternary graphs as a tool for data analysis helped to identify specific patterns of distribution of blank samples and gunshot residues deposited after firing revolvers and pistols. The methodology enabled the assignment of the origin of the shot through the confirmation of the residues collected also from the hands of shooters. As a result the methodology in police procedures and aims to add a valuable contribution to forensic investigations. (author)

  6. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry in connection with a chromatographic separation for ultra trace determinations of platinum group elements (Pt, Pd, Ru, Ir) in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Heumann, K G

    2000-09-01

    An isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometric (ID-ICP-QMS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the platinum group elements Pt, Pd, Ru, and Ir in environmental samples. Spike solutions, enriched with the isotopes 194Pt, 108Pd, 99Ru, and 191Ir, were used for the isotope dilution step. Interfering elements were eliminated by chromatographic separation using an anion-exchange resin. Samples were dissolved with aqua regia in a high pressure asher. Additional dissolution of possible silicate portions by hydrofluoric acid was usually not necessary. Detection limits of 0.15 ng x g(-1), 0.075 ng x g(-1), and 0.015 ng x g(-1) were achieved for Pt, Pd, Ru, and Ir, respectively, using sample weights of only 0.2 g. The reliability of the ID-ICP-QMS method was demonstrated by analyzing a Canadian geological reference material and by participating in an interlaboratory study for the determination of platinum and palladium in a homogenized road dust sample. Surface soil, sampled at different distances from a highway, showed concentrations in the range of 0.1-87 ng x g(-1). An exponential decrease of the platinum and palladium concentration with increasing distance and a small anthropogenic contribution to the natural background concentration of ruthenium and iridium was found in these samples.

  7. Fat and muscle mass in different groups of pre-pubertal and pubertal rural children. Cross-cultural comparisons between Sahelian (rural Senegal) and Amazonian (Beni River, Bolivia) children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefice, Eric; Luna Monrroy, Selma J; Lopez Rodriguez, Ronald W; Ndiaye, Gnagna

    2011-07-01

    An increase in fat accretion is essential for triggering the puberty spurt. Hence, nutritional constraints may influence puberty timing. To measure changes in fat and muscle mass in children living in natural environments but with different nutritional exposures. Cross-comparisons of children from rural Senegal and lowland (Amazonian) Bolivia were carried out. Anthropometric measurements of stature, weight, four subcutaneous skin-folds (triceps, biceps, subscapular, supra-iliac) and arm circumference were made. Children were divided into two age groups (5-9.9-year-olds or 'pre pubescents' (n = 381) and 10-15-year-olds or 'pubescents' (n = 692)). Senegalese girls menstruated later than Bolivian girls and Senegalese boys also matured later than Bolivian boys. Bolivian children displayed more fat and muscle before puberty and during puberty than the Senegalese. They also had more fat deposited on the trunk. There were substantial differences in living conditions and nutritional patterns between both locations. In Senegal, nutritional stress is likely to appear early during in utero life and to persist throughout the growth period, including puberty. This leads to a deficit in fat accretion before and during puberty that is associated with a considerable delay in puberty occurrence. In Bolivia, such stress is far less severe. Variability in puberty should be analysed taking into account these differences.

  8. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  9. Multi-elemental characterization of tunnel and road dusts in Houston, Texas using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry: Evidence for the release of platinum group and anthropogenic metals from motor vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spada, Nicholas; Bozlaker, Ayse; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical method for PGEs, main group, transition and rare earth metals developed. ► Comprehensive characterization of road and tunnel dust samples was accomplished. ► PGEs in dusts arise from autocatalyst attrition. ► Mobile sources also contributed to Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. ► All other elements, including rare earths arose from crustal sources. - Abstract: Platinum group elements (PGEs) including Rh, Pd, and Pt are important tracers for vehicular emissions, though their measurement is often challenging and difficult to replicate in environmental campaigns. These challenges arise from sample preparation steps required for PGE quantitation, which often cause severe isobaric interferences and spectral overlaps from polyatomic species of other anthropogenically emitted metals. Consequently, most previous road dust studies have either only quantified PGEs or included a small number of anthropogenic elements. Therefore a novel analytical method was developed to simultaneously measure PGEs, lanthanoids, transition and main group elements to comprehensively characterize the elemental composition of urban road and tunnel dusts. Dust samples collected from the vicinity of high-traffic roadways and a busy underwater tunnel restricted to single-axle (predominantly gasoline-driven) vehicles in Houston, TX were analyzed for 45 metals with the newly developed method using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (DRC-q-ICP–MS). Average Rh, Pd and Pt concentrations were 152 ± 52, 770 ± 208 and 529 ± 130 ng g −1 respectively in tunnel dusts while they varied between 6 and 8 ng g −1 , 10 and 88 ng g −1 and 35 and 131 ng g −1 in surface road dusts. Elemental ratios and enrichment factors demonstrated that PGEs in dusts originated from autocatalyst attrition/abrasion. Strong evidence is also presented for mobile source emissions of Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. However

  10. The importance of antibiotic residues presence detection in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Samaržija

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic residues are the most present inhibitory substances in milkhaving undesirable effect on human health, technological characteristics and the quality of milk and dairy products. In order to protect consumer's health and to ensure high quality milk production, European Union (EU regulation 2377/90 sets a maximum permitted levels for antibiotic residues in milk. Although the presence of antibiotic residues in milk can be due to animal diseases treatment, and in the case of milking animals, they are mostly present after mastitis treatment. The aim of this work is to stress the importance of the continuous control on antibiotic residues presence in milk, due to the role that milk and dairy products have in human nutrition. In this paper, different groups of antibiotics, mechanisms of theirs action, mistakes occurring in dairy products manufacture as well as the methods for theirs detection are described.

  11. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  12. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  13. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  14. Structural analysis of isomeric chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides using regioselective 6-O-desulfation method and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ting; Her, Guor-Rong

    2014-09-16

    A strategy based on a regioselective 6-O-desulfation reaction and negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was developed for the structural delineation of isomeric chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides. Product ions resulting from the glycosidic cleavage provided information about the number of sulfate groups in each sugar residue. After the regioselective 6-O-desulfation reaction, the number of sulfate groups on each residue was obtained using a tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction product. The sulfation pattern could be obtained based on the product ions of analytes before and after the desulfation reaction. The strategy was demonstrated using a series of tetrasaccharides prepared from shark cartilage chondroitin sulfate D. Among the 12 identified tetrasaccharides, six structures had not been reported before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  16. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  17. Combinatorial construction of toric residues

    OpenAIRE

    Khetan, Amit; Soprounov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The toric residue is a map depending on n+1 semi-ample divisors on a complete toric variety of dimension n. It appears in a variety of contexts such as sparse polynomial systems, mirror symmetry, and GKZ hypergeometric functions. In this paper we investigate the problem of finding an explicit element whose toric residue is equal to one. Such an element is shown to exist if and only if the associated polytopes are essential. We reduce the problem to finding a collection of partitions of the la...

  18. Mixed-waste treatment -- What about the residuals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.; Carpenter, C.; Cummins, L.; Haas, P.; MacInnis, J.; Maxwell, C.

    1993-01-01

    Incineration currently is the best demonstrated available technology for the large inventory of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste. However, molten salt oxidation (MSO) is an alternative thermal treatment technology with the potential to treat a number of these wastes. Of concern for both technologies is the final waste forms, or residuals, that are generated by the treatment process. An evaluation of the two technologies focuses on 10 existing DOE waste streams and current hazardous-waste regulations, specifically for the delisting of ''derived-from'' residuals. Major findings include that final disposal options are more significantly impacted by the type of waste treated and existing regulations than by the type of treatment technology; typical DOE waste streams are not good candidates for delisting; and mass balance calculations indicate that MSO and incineration generate similar quantities (dry) and types of residuals

  19. Recycling crop residues for use in recirculating hydroponic crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    As part of bioregenerative life support feasibility testing by NASA, crop residues are being used to resupply elemental nutrients to recirculating hydroponic crop production systems. Methods for recovering nutrients from crop residues have evolved from water soaking (leaching) to rapid aerobic bioreactor processing. Leaching residues recovered the majority of elements but it also recovered significant amounts of soluble organics. The high organic content of leachates was detrimental to plant growth. Aerobic bioreactor processing reduced the organic content ten-fold, which reduced or eliminated phytotoxic effects. Wheat and potato production studies were successful using effluents from reactors having with 8- to 1-day retention times. Aerobic bioreactor effluents supplied at least half of the crops elemental mass needs in these studies. Descriptions of leachate and effluent mineral content, biomass productivity, microbial activity, and nutrient budgets for potato and wheat are presented.

  20. Alternatives to crop residues for soil amendment

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J.M.; Unger, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Metadata only record In semiarid agroecosystems, crop residues can provide important benefits of soil and water conservation, nutrient cycling, and improved subsequent crop yields. However, there are frequently multiple competing uses for residues, including animal forage, fuel, and construction material. This chapter discusses the various uses of crop residues and examines alternative soil amendments when crop residues cannot be left on the soil.

  1. Residual Structures in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2010-01-01

    Several alternatives are available for specifying the residual structure in latent growth curve modeling. Two specifications involve uncorrelated residuals and represent the most commonly used residual structures. The first, building on repeated measures analysis of variance and common specifications in multilevel models, forces residual variances…

  2. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    a pair of residuals generated by Compact Disc Player. However, these residuals depend on the performance of position servos in the Compact Disc Player. In other publications of the same authors a pair of decoupled residuals is derived. However, the computation of these alternative residuals has been...

  3. NEUTRINO MASS

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Boris

    1988-01-01

    This is a review article about the most recent developments on the field of neutrino mass. The first part of the review introduces the idea of neutrino masses and mixing angles, summarizes the most recent experimental data then discusses the experimental prospects and challenges in this area. The second part of the review discusses the implications of these results for particle physics and cosmology, including the origin of neutrino mass, the see-saw mechanism and sequential dominance, and la...

  4. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  5. Monitoring Antibiotic Residues and Corresponding Antibiotic Resistance Genes in an Agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser M. Awad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs have been commonly reported due to the overuse worldwide of antibiotics. Antibiotic overuse disturbs the environment and threatens public human health. The objective of this study was to measure the residual concentrations of veterinary antibiotics in the tetracycline group (TCs, including tetracycline (TC and chlortetracycline (CTC, as well as those in the sulfonamide group (SAs, including sulfamethazine (SMT, sulfamethoxazole (SMX, and sulfathiazole (STZ. We also isolated the corresponding ARGs in the agroecosystem. Four sediment samples and two rice paddy soil samples were collected from sites near a swine composting facility along the Naerincheon River in Hongcheon, Korea. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS was employed with a solid-phase extraction method to measure the concentration of each antibiotic. ARGs were identified by the qualitative polymerase chain-reaction using synthetic primers. SAs and their corresponding ARGs were highly detected in sediment samples whereas TCs were not detected except for sediments sample #1. ARGs for TCs and SAs were detected in rice paddy soils, while ARGs for TCs were only found in sediment #2 and #4. Continuous monitoring of antibiotic residue and its comprehensive impact on the environment is needed to ensure environmental health.

  6. MAGNIFICATION BY GALAXY GROUP DARK MATTER HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Jes; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Leauthaud, Alexie; Tanaka, Masayuki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Capak, Peter [NASA Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 220-6 Caltech, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); George, Matthew R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    We report on the detection of gravitational lensing magnification by a population of galaxy groups, at a significance level of 4.9{sigma}. Using X-ray-selected groups in the COSMOS 1.64 deg{sup 2} field, and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies as sources, we measure a lensing-induced angular cross-correlation between the samples. After satisfying consistency checks that demonstrate we have indeed detected a magnification signal, and are not suffering from contamination by physical overlap of samples, we proceed to implement an optimally weighted cross-correlation function to further boost the signal to noise of the measurement. Interpreting this optimally weighted measurement allows us to study properties of the lensing groups. We model the full distribution of group masses using a composite-halo approach, considering both the singular isothermal sphere and Navarro-Frenk-White profiles, and find our best-fit values to be consistent with those recovered using the weak-lensing shear technique. We argue that future weak-lensing studies will need to incorporate magnification along with shear, both to reduce residual systematics and to make full use of all available source information, in an effort to maximize scientific yield of the observations.

  7. Residual Z{sub 2} symmetries and leptonic mixing patterns from finite discrete subgroups of U(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, Anjan S. [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Patel, Ketan M. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali,Knowledge City, Sector 81, S A S Nagar, Manauli 140 306 (India)

    2017-01-30

    We study embedding of non-commuting Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m}, m≥3 symmetries in discrete subgroups (DSG) of U(3) and analytically work out the mixing patterns implied by the assumption that Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m} describe the residual symmetries of the neutrino and the charged lepton mass matrices respectively. Both Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m} are assumed to be subgroups of a larger discrete symmetry group G{sub f} possessing three dimensional faithful irreducible representation. The residual symmetries predict the magnitude of a column of the leptonic mixing matrix U{sub PMNS} which are studied here assuming G{sub f} as the DSG of SU(3) designated as type C and D and large number of DSG of U(3) which are not in SU(3). These include the known group series Σ(3n{sup 3}), T{sub n}(m), Δ(3n{sup 2},m), Δ(6n{sup 2},m) and Δ{sup ′}(6n{sup 2},j,k). It is shown that the predictions for a column of |U{sub PMNS}| in these group series and the C and D types of groups are all contained in the predictions of the Δ(6N{sup 2}) groups for some integer N. The Δ(6N{sup 2}) groups therefore represent a sufficient set of G{sub f} to obtain predictions of the residual symmetries Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m}.

  8. 下组煤底板岩层阻渗性实测研究%In-situ Test on Reduction Infiltration Characteristics of Rock Mass under the Lower Coal Group Floor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭德春; 张蕊; 邵明喜; 黄震

    2017-01-01

    The information which shows the impermeability of rock mass can be obtained by the in situ water injection tests.The experimental resuhs of three test periods with different lithologies and structures under the lower coal group floor in Yangcun Coal Mine were introduced.The initial water pressures,fractured water pressure and their corresponding permeability coefficients were discussed,as well as the relevance between flow rate,seepage resistance and pressureinfiltration state.The results show that the resistance ability of structural disturbance floor is weak,and those positions exhibit the behaviour of low resistance and high permeability.The floor with better integrity and original state structure shows strong resistance ability with higher initial infiltration pressure,and it still has strong resistance ability in the pressure-infiltration state.The impermeability of rock mass is mainly controlled by its structure and fracture,but not by its lithology.The result also shows the thick sandstone under the lower coal group floor in Yangcun Coal Mine is an effective impermeable layer with a good preservation effect.%底板原位压渗试验能够获得丰富的反映底板岩层阻渗性的信息,本文介绍了杨村矿下组煤底板3个不同岩性结构测试段的原位压渗试验成果,基于压渗过程曲线分析讨论了测试岩层起始导渗的水压力和渗透系数、压裂导通状态的水压力和渗透系数、压渗过程的压渗流量和渗流阻力的变化与导渗状态的关联性,得到如下认识:构造扰动部位底板阻渗能力薄弱,具有低阻强渗特点;完整性较好的原状结构底板岩层阻渗性较强,不但起始导渗的水压条件较高,而且导渗状态表现为高阻弱渗特点;底板岩层的阻渗性与岩性的关联性不明显,主要受制于岩层的原始结构条件和裂隙性状;杨村煤矿下组煤底板厚层砂岩是很好的隔水层,具有良好的隔水效果.

  9. Evaluation of heavy metals in hazardous automobile shredder residue thermal residue and immobilization with novel nano-size calcium dispersed reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Hyeon; Truc, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Lee, Byeong-Kyu; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to synthesize and apply a nano-size calcium dispersed reagent as an immobilization material for heavy metal-contaminated automobile shredder residues (ASR) dust/thermal residues in dry condition. Simple mixing with a nanometallic Ca/CaO/PO4 dispersion mixture immobilized 95-100% of heavy metals in ASR dust/ther