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Sample records for residual interaction contribution

  1. Contribution of the residue at position 4 within classical nuclear localization signals to modulating interaction with importins and nuclear targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kate M; Di Antonio, Veronica; Bellucci, Luca; Thomas, David R; Caporuscio, Fabiana; Ciccarese, Francesco; Ghassabian, Hanieh; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Forwood, Jade K; Jans, David A; Palù, Giorgio; Alvisi, Gualtiero

    2018-08-01

    Nuclear import involves the recognition by importin (IMP) superfamily members of nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within protein cargoes destined for the nucleus, the best understood being recognition of classical NLSs (cNLSs) by the IMPα/β1 heterodimer. Although the cNLS consensus [K-(K/R)-X-(K/R) for positions P2-P5] is generally accepted, recent studies indicated that the contribution made by different residues at the P4 position can vary. Here, we apply a combination of microscopy, molecular dynamics, crystallography, in vitro binding, and bioinformatics approaches to show that the nature of residues at P4 indeed modulates cNLS function in the context of a prototypical Simian Virus 40 large tumor antigen-derived cNLS (KKRK, P2-5). Indeed, all hydrophobic substitutions in place of R impaired binding to IMPα and nuclear targeting, with the largest effect exerted by a G residue at P4. Substitution of R with neutral hydrophobic residues caused the loss of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between the P4 residue side chains and IMPα. Detailed bioinformatics analysis confirmed the importance of the P4 residue for cNLS function across the human proteome, with specific residues such as G being associated with low activity. Furthermore, we validate our findings for two additional cNLSs from human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase catalytic subunit UL54 and processivity factor UL44, where a G residue at P4 results in a 2-3-fold decrease in NLS activity. Our results thus showed that the P4 residue makes a hitherto poorly appreciated contribution to nuclear import efficiency, which is essential to determining the precise nuclear levels of cargoes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution to the study of the interactions between residual stresses and oxygen dissolution in a reactive deformable solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this PhD work is to highlight the interactions between the mechanical stress and the chemical composition within diffusion of matter process for a reactive solid. The chronological evolution of our work goes from a parametric numerical study to an experimental study and reveals the role of mechanical stresses on the oxygen diffusion process. Different origins of mechanical stress were first numerically analysed from the point of view of their impacts on the process of oxygen diffusion into a metal (Zr) or a ceramic (UO 2 ) subjected to an oxidizing environment. This approach allowed us: - to identify a surface treatment (shot-peening) able to generate a residual specific stress field, as a starting point for an experimental study implementation in order to validate the numerical study conclusions; - to highlight the ability of the stress field on the stabilisation of the morphology of an undulated metal/oxide interface (case of Zr). In the experimental approach, different techniques were used to characterize the material (GDOS, SEM, TGA, hole-drilling method, micro-hardness tests). They permitted the detection of a strong influence of shot-peening on the oxidation rate. The comparison of experimental and numerical simulation results reveals strong interactions between stress and compositions fields induced by the different treatments (shot-peening and/or pre-oxidation). This study opens up many opportunities in the understanding of multi-physics coupling effects being very useful for the optimization of mechanical and chemical surface-treatments, able furthermore to favour the diffusion (nitriding, cementation) or to slow it down (corrosion). (author) [fr

  3. Identification of NAD interacting residues in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecular cofactors or ligands play a crucial role in the proper functioning of cells. Accurate annotation of their target proteins and binding sites is required for the complete understanding of reaction mechanisms. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ or NAD is one of the most commonly used organic cofactors in living cells, which plays a critical role in cellular metabolism, storage and regulatory processes. In the past, several NAD binding proteins (NADBP have been reported in the literature, which are responsible for a wide-range of activities in the cell. Attempts have been made to derive a rule for the binding of NAD+ to its target proteins. However, so far an efficient model could not be derived due to the time consuming process of structure determination, and limitations of similarity based approaches. Thus a sequence and non-similarity based method is needed to characterize the NAD binding sites to help in the annotation. In this study attempts have been made to predict NAD binding proteins and their interacting residues (NIRs from amino acid sequence using bioinformatics tools. Results We extracted 1556 proteins chains from 555 NAD binding proteins whose structure is available in Protein Data Bank. Then we removed all redundant protein chains and finally obtained 195 non-redundant NAD binding protein chains, where no two chains have more than 40% sequence identity. In this study all models were developed and evaluated using five-fold cross validation technique on the above dataset of 195 NAD binding proteins. While certain type of residues are preferred (e.g. Gly, Tyr, Thr, His in NAD interaction, residues like Ala, Glu, Leu, Lys are not preferred. A support vector machine (SVM based method has been developed using various window lengths of amino acid sequence for predicting NAD interacting residues and obtained maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC 0.47 with accuracy 74.13% at window length 17

  4. Profile Monitors Based on Residual Gas Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P; Giacomini, T; Peters, A

    2005-01-01

    The precise determination of transverse beam profiles at high current hadron accelerators has to be performed non-interceptingly. Two methods will be discussed based on the excitation of the residual gas molecules by the beam particles: Firstly, by beam induced fluorescence (BIF) light is emitted from the residual gas molecules and is observed with an image intensified CCD camera. At most laboratories N2 gas is inserted, which has a large cross section for emission in the blue wave length region. Secondly, a larger signal strength is achieved by detecting the ionization products in an Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM). By applying an electric field all ionization products are accelerated toward a spatial resolving Micro-Channel Plate. The signal read-out can either be performed by observing the light from a phosphor screen behind the MCP or electronically by a wire array. Methods to achieve a high spatial resolution and a fast turn-by-turn readout capability are discussed. Even though various approaches at dif...

  5. Identification of mannose interacting residues using local composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Agarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose binding proteins (MBPs play a vital role in several biological functions such as defense mechanisms. These proteins bind to mannose on the surface of a wide range of pathogens and help in eliminating these pathogens from our body. Thus, it is important to identify mannose interacting residues (MIRs in order to understand mechanism of recognition of pathogens by MBPs. RESULTS: This paper describes modules developed for predicting MIRs in a protein. Support vector machine (SVM based models have been developed on 120 mannose binding protein chains, where no two chains have more than 25% sequence similarity. SVM models were developed on two types of datasets: 1 main dataset consists of 1029 mannose interacting and 1029 non-interacting residues, 2 realistic dataset consists of 1029 mannose interacting and 10320 non-interacting residues. In this study, firstly, we developed standard modules using binary and PSSM profile of patterns and got maximum MCC around 0.32. Secondly, we developed SVM modules using composition profile of patterns and achieved maximum MCC around 0.74 with accuracy 86.64% on main dataset. Thirdly, we developed a model on a realistic dataset and achieved maximum MCC of 0.62 with accuracy 93.08%. Based on this study, a standalone program and web server have been developed for predicting mannose interacting residues in proteins (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/premier/. CONCLUSIONS: Compositional analysis of mannose interacting and non-interacting residues shows that certain types of residues are preferred in mannose interaction. It was also observed that residues around mannose interacting residues have a preference for certain types of residues. Composition of patterns/peptide/segment has been used for predicting MIRs and achieved reasonable high accuracy. It is possible that this novel strategy may be effective to predict other types of interacting residues. This study will be useful in annotating the function

  6. Prediction of interface residue based on the features of residue interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiong; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2017-11-07

    Protein-protein interaction plays a crucial role in the cellular biological processes. Interface prediction can improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the related processes and functions. In this work, we propose a classification method to recognize the interface residue based on the features of a weighted residue interaction network. The random forest algorithm is used for the prediction and 16 network parameters and the B-factor are acting as the element of the input feature vector. Compared with other similar work, the method is feasible and effective. The relative importance of these features also be analyzed to identify the key feature for the prediction. Some biological meaning of the important feature is explained. The results of this work can be used for the related work about the structure-function relationship analysis via a residue interaction network model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interplay between symmetries and residual interactions in rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwiok, S.; Kvasil, J.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Using the space rotation and translation invariance of the nuclear Hamiltonian, the residual interactions for a rotating nucleus are constructed. The connection is found between the Goldstone modes of motion (spurious states) and the symmetries of equations of motion in Random Phase Approximation for states near the yrast line. (author). 18 figs

  9. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  10. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  11. Identification of residue pairing in interacting β-strands from a predicted residue contact map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Wenxuan; Gong, Haipeng

    2018-04-19

    Despite the rapid progress of protein residue contact prediction, predicted residue contact maps frequently contain many errors. However, information of residue pairing in β strands could be extracted from a noisy contact map, due to the presence of characteristic contact patterns in β-β interactions. This information may benefit the tertiary structure prediction of mainly β proteins. In this work, we propose a novel ridge-detection-based β-β contact predictor to identify residue pairing in β strands from any predicted residue contact map. Our algorithm RDb 2 C adopts ridge detection, a well-developed technique in computer image processing, to capture consecutive residue contacts, and then utilizes a novel multi-stage random forest framework to integrate the ridge information and additional features for prediction. Starting from the predicted contact map of CCMpred, RDb 2 C remarkably outperforms all state-of-the-art methods on two conventional test sets of β proteins (BetaSheet916 and BetaSheet1452), and achieves F1-scores of ~ 62% and ~ 76% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. Taking the prediction of the more advanced RaptorX-Contact as input, RDb 2 C achieves impressively higher performance, with F1-scores reaching ~ 76% and ~ 86% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. In a test of structural modeling using the top 1 L predicted contacts as constraints, for 61 mainly β proteins, the average TM-score achieves 0.442 when using the raw RaptorX-Contact prediction, but increases to 0.506 when using the improved prediction by RDb 2 C. Our method can significantly improve the prediction of β-β contacts from any predicted residue contact maps. Prediction results of our algorithm could be directly applied to effectively facilitate the practical structure prediction of mainly β proteins. All source data and codes are available at http://166.111.152.91/Downloads.html or the GitHub address of https://github.com/wzmao/RDb2C .

  12. Universal relationship connecting various two-body effective residual interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuepfer, W.; Huber, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Starting from a momentum space analysis of the two-body matrix elements, a relation has been established between the size of the model space actually used in a specific calculation and the relevant properties of the effective residual interaction. It turns out that the two-body transition density acts like a filter function on the Fourier transform of the force; it exhibits a distinct structure which clearly reflects the size and the detailed properties of the configuration space actually used. From an investigation of this filter function an equivalence criterion for different effective residual two-body interactions has been established both for closed and open shell nuclei. This result can be used to construct simple although realistic effective forces. As an example, a model for a separable residual interaction is proposed in which the corresponding parameters are being clearly related to the nuclear radius (i.e., the mass number), to the quantum numbers (i.e., the angular momentum) of the state under consideration and to the size of the configuration space used. For a number of examples this force has been applied successfully for the description of low energy properties of both closed and open shell nuclei

  13. The residual proton-neutron interaction and nuclear collectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The essential role of the valence, residual p-n interaction in the development of collectivity, though long known in general terms, has recently become increasingly apparent. A brief review of the p-n interaction is given, including some very basic nuclear data that illustrate its effects and the phenomenological N p N n scheme and the P-factor. This is followed by a discussion of recent experimental extractions of p-n matrix elements throughout the periodic table and theoretical efforts to understand them, in terms of both Shell and Nilsson models. 20 refs., 13 figs

  14. Contribution of cation-π interactions to the stability of Sm/LSm oligomeric assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucić, Ivana D; Nikolić, Milan R; Stojanović, Srđan Đ

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have analyzed the influence of cation-π interactions to the stability of Sm/LSm assemblies and their environmental preferences. The number of interactions formed by arginine is higher than lysine in the cationic group, while histidine is comparatively higher than phenylalanine and tyrosine in the π group. Arg-Tyr interactions are predominant among the various pairs analyzed. The furcation level of multiple cation-π interactions is much higher than that of single cation-π interactions in Sm/LSm interfaces. We have found hot spot residues forming cation-π interactions, and hot spot composition is similar for all aromatic residues. The Arg-Phe pair has the strongest interaction energy of -8.81 kcal mol(-1) among all the possible pairs of amino acids. The extent of burial of the residue side-chain correlates with the ΔΔG of binding for residues in the core and also for hot spot residues cation-π bonded across the interface. Secondary structure of the cation-π residues shows that Arg and Lys preferred to be in strand. Among the π residues, His prefers to be in helix, Phe prefers to be in turn, and Tyr prefers to be in strand. Stabilization centers for these proteins showed that all the five residues found in cation-π interactions are important in locating one or more of such centers. More than 50 % of the cation-π interacting residues are highly conserved. It is likely that the cation-π interactions contribute significantly to the overall stability of Sm/LSm proteins.

  15. Agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soil and aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Two FAO/IAEA coordinated research programmes are concerned with isotopic tracer-aided studies of agrochemical residue-biota interactions in soils and aquatic ecosystems. They currently involve 18 studies in 14 countries: Brazil, Canada, Egypt, F.R. Germany, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Malaysia, Thailand, Turkey, USA and USSR. The aim was to develop, standardize and apply labelled substrate techniques for comparative assays of primary autotrophic and microheterotrophic production and decay, and complementary tracer techniques to determine the fate, persistence and bioconcentration of trace contaminants. Comparable data were studied concerning the current status of water bodies and likely changes due to contaminants. Soil capacity to decompose undesirable contaminants and residues, and to promote desirable transformations were studied. The techniques were also applied as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, with priority given to rice ecosystems

  16. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self-consistent, exper......Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self......, TIP4P or TIP3P; i.e., each water model requires specific water-charged molecule interaction potentials. New models (models 1 and 3) are thus described for both water models. Uncertainties in relative free energies of charged residues are ~2 kcal/mol with the new parameters, due to variations in system...

  17. Scoring protein interaction decoys using exposed residues (SPIDER): a novel multibody interaction scoring function based on frequent geometric patterns of interfacial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashan, Raed; Zheng, Weifan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the structure of protein-protein complexes in computational docking experiments remains a formidable challenge. It has been recognized that identifying native or native-like poses among multiple decoys is the major bottleneck of the current scoring functions used in docking. We have developed a novel multibody pose-scoring function that has no theoretical limit on the number of residues contributing to the individual interaction terms. We use a coarse-grain representation of a protein-protein complex where each residue is represented by its side chain centroid. We apply a computational geometry approach called Almost-Delaunay tessellation that transforms protein-protein complexes into a residue contact network, or an undirectional graph where vertex-residues are nodes connected by edges. This treatment forms a family of interfacial graphs representing a dataset of protein-protein complexes. We then employ frequent subgraph mining approach to identify common interfacial residue patterns that appear in at least a subset of native protein-protein interfaces. The geometrical parameters and frequency of occurrence of each "native" pattern in the training set are used to develop the new SPIDER scoring function. SPIDER was validated using standard "ZDOCK" benchmark dataset that was not used in the development of SPIDER. We demonstrate that SPIDER scoring function ranks native and native-like poses above geometrical decoys and that it exceeds in performance a popular ZRANK scoring function. SPIDER was ranked among the top scoring functions in a recent round of CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions) blind test of protein-protein docking methods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Weak-interaction contributions to hyperfine splitting and Lamb shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eides, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Weak-interaction contributions to hyperfine splitting and the Lamb shift in hydrogen and muonium are discussed. The problem of sign of the weak-interaction contribution to HFS is clarified, and simple physical arguments that make this sign evident are presented. It is shown that weak-interaction contributions to HFS in hydrogen and muonium have opposite signs. A weak-interaction contribution to the Lamb shift is obtained. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Contributions to the workshop `Residual ponds from open pit brown coal mining`; Beitraege zum Workshop ``Braunkohlebergbaurestseen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The contributions to the workshop ``Investigations on flooding in residual ponds from open-pit mining`` deal, inter alia, with the hydrochemical development of flushing waters, the stability of the water quality of residual lakes, especially under the impact of land contamination, the influence of brine receipts by flushed residual lakes, and with the microbiological ecology of residual lakes from mining. Furthermore, geophysical studies for demonstrating paths of flow and for calculating the depth and volume of residual lakes from open-pit mining are discussed. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die Beitraege zu dem Workshop `Untersuchungen zu Flutungen in Tagebaurestseen` befassen sich unter anderem mit der hydrochemischen Entwicklung von Flutungsgewaessern, mit der Qualitaetsstabilitaet von Restseewaessern - insbesonders bei Einwirkung von Altlasten - und mit den Einfluessen von Solezufluessen bei Restseeflutung sowie mit Untersuchungen zur mikrobiologischen Oekologie in Bergbaurestseen. Desweiteren werden geophysikalische Untersuchungen zum Nachweis von Fliesswegen und die Tiefen- und Volumenberechnung eines Tagebaurestlochsees erlaeutert. (MSK)

  20. Contributions to the workshop `Residual ponds from open pit brown coal mining`; Beitraege zum Workshop ``Braunkohlebergbaurestseen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The contributions to the workshop ``Investigations on flooding in residual ponds from open-pit mining`` deal, inter alia, with the hydrochemical development of flushing waters, the stability of the water quality of residual lakes, especially under the impact of land contamination, the influence of brine receipts by flushed residual lakes, and with the microbiological ecology of residual lakes from mining. Furthermore, geophysical studies for demonstrating paths of flow and for calculating the depth and volume of residual lakes from open-pit mining are discussed. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die Beitraege zu dem Workshop `Untersuchungen zu Flutungen in Tagebaurestseen` befassen sich unter anderem mit der hydrochemischen Entwicklung von Flutungsgewaessern, mit der Qualitaetsstabilitaet von Restseewaessern - insbesonders bei Einwirkung von Altlasten - und mit den Einfluessen von Solezufluessen bei Restseeflutung sowie mit Untersuchungen zur mikrobiologischen Oekologie in Bergbaurestseen. Desweiteren werden geophysikalische Untersuchungen zum Nachweis von Fliesswegen und die Tiefen- und Volumenberechnung eines Tagebaurestlochsees erlaeutert. (MSK)

  1. Amino acid residues that contribute to substrate specificity of class A beta-lactamase SME-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majiduddin, Fahd K; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-08-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics are used as antibiotics of last resort because they possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and are not easily hydrolyzed by beta-lactamases. Recently, class A enzymes, such as the SME-1, NMC-A, and IMI-1 beta-lactamases, have been identified with the capacity to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. Traditional class A beta-lactamases, such as TEM-1 and SHV-1, are unable to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics and exhibit some differences in sequence from those that are able to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. The positions that differ may contribute to the unique substrate specificity of the class A carbapenemase SME-1. Codons in the SME-1 gene representing residues 104, 105, 132, 167, 237, and 241 were randomized by site-directed mutagenesis, and functional mutants were selected for the ability to hydrolyze imipenem, ampicillin, or cefotaxime. Although several positions are important for hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics, no single position was found to uniquely contribute to carbapenem hydrolysis. The results of this study support a model whereby the carbapenemase activity of SME-1 is due to a highly distributed set of interactions that subtly alter the structure of the active-site pocket.

  2. Amino Acid Residues That Contribute to Substrate Specificity of Class A β-Lactamase SME-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majiduddin, Fahd K.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Carbapenem antibiotics are used as antibiotics of last resort because they possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and are not easily hydrolyzed by β-lactamases. Recently, class A enzymes, such as the SME-1, NMC-A, and IMI-1 β-lactamases, have been identified with the capacity to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. Traditional class A β-lactamases, such as TEM-1 and SHV-1, are unable to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics and exhibit some differences in sequence from those that are able to hydrolyze carbapenem antibiotics. The positions that differ may contribute to the unique substrate specificity of the class A carbapenemase SME-1. Codons in the SME-1 gene representing residues 104, 105, 132, 167, 237, and 241 were randomized by site-directed mutagenesis, and functional mutants were selected for the ability to hydrolyze imipenem, ampicillin, or cefotaxime. Although several positions are important for hydrolysis of β-lactam antibiotics, no single position was found to uniquely contribute to carbapenem hydrolysis. The results of this study support a model whereby the carbapenemase activity of SME-1 is due to a highly distributed set of interactions that subtly alter the structure of the active-site pocket. PMID:16048956

  3. Computational Analysis of the Interaction Energies between Amino Acid Residues of the Measles Virus Hemagglutinin and Its Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqi Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV causes an acute and highly devastating contagious disease in humans. Employing the crystal structures of three human receptors, signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM, CD46, and Nectin-4, in complex with the measles virus hemagglutinin (MVH, we elucidated computationally the details of binding energies between the amino acid residues of MVH and those of the receptors with an ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO method. The calculated inter-fragment interaction energies (IFIEs revealed a number of significantly interacting amino acid residues of MVH that played essential roles in binding to the receptors. As predicted from previously reported experiments, some important amino-acid residues of MVH were shown to be common but others were specific to interactions with the three receptors. Particularly, some of the (non-polar hydrophobic residues of MVH were found to be attractively interacting with multiple receptors, thus indicating the importance of the hydrophobic pocket for intermolecular interactions (especially in the case of Nectin-4. In contrast, the electrostatic interactions tended to be used for specific molecular recognition. Furthermore, we carried out FMO calculations for in silico experiments of amino acid mutations, finding reasonable agreements with virological experiments concerning the substitution effect of residues. Thus, the present study demonstrates that the electron-correlated FMO method is a powerful tool to search exhaustively for amino acid residues that contribute to interactions with receptor molecules. It is also applicable for designing inhibitors of MVH and engineered MVs for cancer therapy.

  4. The contribution of coevolving residues to the stability of KDO8P synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon H Ackerman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary tree of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate (KDO8P synthase (KDO8PS, a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of bacterial endotoxin, is evenly divided between metal and non-metal forms, both having similar structures, but diverging in various degrees in amino acid sequence. Mutagenesis, crystallographic and computational studies have established that only a few residues determine whether or not KDO8PS requires a metal for function. The remaining divergence in the amino acid sequence of KDO8PSs is apparently unrelated to the underlying catalytic mechanism.The multiple alignment of all known KDO8PS sequences reveals that several residue pairs coevolved, an indication of their possible linkage to a structural constraint. In this study we investigated by computational means the contribution of coevolving residues to the stability of KDO8PS. We found that about 1/4 of all strongly coevolving pairs probably originated from cycles of mutation (decreasing stability and suppression (restoring it, while the remaining pairs are best explained by a succession of neutral or nearly neutral covarions.Both sequence conservation and coevolution are involved in the preservation of the core structure of KDO8PS, but the contribution of coevolving residues is, in proportion, smaller. This is because small stability gains or losses associated with selection of certain residues in some regions of the stability landscape of KDO8PS are easily offset by a large number of possible changes in other regions. While this effect increases the tolerance of KDO8PS to deleterious mutations, it also decreases the probability that specific pairs of residues could have a strong contribution to the thermodynamic stability of the protein.

  5. Conserved residues of the human mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase mediate interactions with heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-08-19

    C-type cytochromes are distinguished by the covalent attachment of a heme cofactor, a modification that is typically required for its subsequent folding, stability, and function. Heme attachment takes place in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and, in most eukaryotes, is mediated by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS). HCCS is the primary component of the eukaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathway, known as System III. The catalytic function of HCCS depends on its ability to coordinate interactions between its substrates: heme and cytochrome c. Recent advancements in the recombinant expression and purification of HCCS have facilitated comprehensive analyses of the roles of conserved residues in HCCS, as demonstrated in this study. Previously, we proposed a four-step model describing HCCS-mediated cytochrome c assembly, identifying a conserved histidine residue (His154) as an axial ligand to the heme iron. In this study, we performed a systematic mutational analysis of 17 conserved residues in HCCS, and we provide evidence that the enzyme contains two heme-binding domains. Our data indicate that heme contacts mediated by residues within these domains modulate the dynamics of heme binding and contribute to the stability of the HCCS-heme-cytochrome c steady state ternary complex. While some residues are essential for initial heme binding (step 1), others impact the subsequent release of the holocytochrome c product (step 4). Certain HCCS mutants that were defective in heme binding were corrected for function by exogenous aminolevulinic acid (ALA, the precursor to heme). This chemical "correction" supports the proposed role of heme binding for the corresponding residues.

  6. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Contribution of Eucalyptus Harvest Residues and Nitrogen Fertilization to Carbon Stabilization in Ultisols of Southern Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cristina Caparelli Oliveira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Eucalyptus forests in southern Bahia (BA are planted in soils with a sandy surface layer and humid tropical climate, conditions that lead to soil carbon (C decomposition. Recent studies have shown that nitrogen (N may be important for soil C stabilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of Eucalyptus harvest residues and nitrogen fertilization to C stabilization in Ultisols of southern BA. The experiment was conducted in Eucalyptus clonal plantations cultivated in two regions of Eunápolis, BA, Brazil, with different clay content: southern region (140 g kg-1 of clay and western region (310 g kg-1 of clay. Five treatments were evaluated: one control (CTR, without Eucalyptus harvest residues and N fertilization, and four treatments with harvest residues combined with four rates of N fertilization: 0, 25, 50, and 100 kg ha-1. Soil samples were collected from the 0.00-0.10, 0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.40, and 0.40-0.60 m layers at the beginning and the end of the experiment (36 months. The amount of C and N and the C and N isotopic ratio (δ13C and δ15N of particulate organic matter (POM and mineral-associated organic matter (MAOM were determined. In the southern region after 36 months, the C-MAOM stocks in the 0.00-0.10 m layer of the CTR decreased by 33 %. The addition of harvest residue followed by 100 kg ha-1 N increased C-POM and N-POM stocks (0.00-0.10 m compared to the CTR, and the final N-POM stocks and residue-C recovery in the surface soil layer were positively correlated with the increase in N fertilization rates. In the western region, residue maintenance resulted in increased C-MAOM stocks (0.00-0.10 m compared to the CTR, but an increase in N availability reduced this increment. The increase in N fertilization rates did not alter C stocks, but reduced N stocks of POM and MAOM in the upper soil layer. At the end of the experiment, N fertilizer recovery (0.00-0.60 m was similar among the regions evaluated. In

  8. Identification of transmembrane domain 6 & 7 residues that contribute to the binding pocket of the urotensin II receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Brian J; Domazet, Ivana; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Yan, Li Ping; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2009-04-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic undecapeptide, is the natural ligand of the urotensin II (UT) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. In the present study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TMDs) six and seven of the rat urotensin II receptor (rUT) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the receptor. Each residue in the R256(6.32)-Q283(6.59) fragment of TMD6 and the A295(7.31)-T321(7.57) fragment of TMD7 was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA) or the negatively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate (MTSES) sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of TMD6 mutants F268C(6.44) and W278C(6.54) and TMD7 mutants L298C(7.34), T302C(7.38), and T303C(7.39) to (125)I-U-II. MTSES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of two additional mutants, namely L282C(6.58) in TMD6 and Y300C(7.36) in TMD7. These results suggest that specific residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the rUT receptor. This approach, which allowed us to identify key determinants in TMD6 and TMD7 that contribute to the UT receptor binding pocket, enabled us to further refine our homology-based model of how U-II interacts with its cognate receptor.

  9. Prediction of vitamin interacting residues in a vitamin binding protein using evolutionary information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bharat; Gupta, Sudheer; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-02-07

    The vitamins are important cofactors in various enzymatic-reactions. In past, many inhibitors have been designed against vitamin binding pockets in order to inhibit vitamin-protein interactions. Thus, it is important to identify vitamin interacting residues in a protein. It is possible to detect vitamin-binding pockets on a protein, if its tertiary structure is known. Unfortunately tertiary structures of limited proteins are available. Therefore, it is important to develop in-silico models for predicting vitamin interacting residues in protein from its primary structure. In this study, first we compared protein-interacting residues of vitamins with other ligands using Two Sample Logo (TSL). It was observed that ATP, GTP, NAD, FAD and mannose preferred {G,R,K,S,H}, {G,K,T,S,D,N}, {T,G,Y}, {G,Y,W} and {Y,D,W,N,E} residues respectively, whereas vitamins preferred {Y,F,S,W,T,G,H} residues for the interaction with proteins. Furthermore, compositional information of preferred and non-preferred residues along with patterns-specificity was also observed within different vitamin-classes. Vitamins A, B and B6 preferred {F,I,W,Y,L,V}, {S,Y,G,T,H,W,N,E} and {S,T,G,H,Y,N} interacting residues respectively. It suggested that protein-binding patterns of vitamins are different from other ligands, and motivated us to develop separate predictor for vitamins and their sub-classes. The four different prediction modules, (i) vitamin interacting residues (VIRs), (ii) vitamin-A interacting residues (VAIRs), (iii) vitamin-B interacting residues (VBIRs) and (iv) pyridoxal-5-phosphate (vitamin B6) interacting residues (PLPIRs) have been developed. We applied various classifiers of SVM, BayesNet, NaiveBayes, ComplementNaiveBayes, NaiveBayesMultinomial, RandomForest and IBk etc., as machine learning techniques, using binary and Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) features of protein sequences. Finally, we selected best performing SVM modules and obtained highest MCC of 0.53, 0.48, 0.61, 0

  10. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    interaction of proteins and peptides with membranes (Segrest ... favour surface activity have been described by Eisenberg et ... amphipathicity and propensity for α-helical conformation ..... Membrane destabilisation occurs due to electrostatic.

  11. The empirical residual proton-neutron interaction and the onset of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The critical role of the residual valence p-n interaction in the development and evolution of collectivity, and the onset of shape/phase transitions, is discussed from the standpoint of phenomenological approaches, and empirical extraction of individual p-n interaction strengths, and simple model calculation of them. 22 refs., 18 figs

  12. EVALUATING AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYER CONTRIBUTIONS USING INTERACTIVE NETWORK SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sargent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line".

  13. Residual correlation in two-proton interferometry from Λ-proton strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fuqiang

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the residual effect of Λp strong interactions in pp correlations with one proton from Λ decays. It is found that the residual correlation is about 10% of the Λp correlation strength, and has a broad distribution centered around q≅40 MeV/c. The residual correlation cannot explain the observed structure on the tail of the recently measured pp correlation function in central Pb+Pb collisions by NA49 at the Super Proton Synchrotron. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  14. Effect of Context on the Contribution of Individual Harmonics to Residue Pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockel, Hedwig E; Alsindi, Sami; Hardy, Charles; Carlyon, Robert P

    2017-12-01

    There is evidence that the contribution of a given harmonic in a complex tone to residue pitch is influenced by the accuracy with which the frequency of that harmonic is encoded. The present study investigated whether listeners adjust the weights assigned to individual harmonics based on acquired knowledge of the reliability of the frequency estimates of those harmonics. In a two-interval forced-choice task, seven listeners indicated which of two 12-harmonic complex tones had the higher overall pitch. In context trials (60 % of all trials), the fundamental frequency (F0) was 200 Hz in one interval and 200 + ΔF0 Hz in the other. In different (blocked) conditions, either the 3rd or the 4th harmonic (plus the 7th, 9th, and 12th harmonics), were replaced by narrowband noises that were identical in the two intervals. Feedback was provided. In randomly interspersed test trials (40 % of all trials), the fundamental frequency was 200 + ΔF0/2 Hz in both intervals; in the second interval, either the third or the fourth harmonic was shifted slightly up or down in frequency with equal probability. There were no narrowband noises. Feedback was not provided. The results showed that substitution of a harmonic by noise in context trials reduced the contribution of that harmonic to pitch judgements in the test trials by a small but significant amount. This is consistent with the notion that listeners give smaller weight to a harmonic or frequency region when they have learned that this frequency region does not provide reliable information for a given task.

  15. Interaction torque contributes to planar reaching at slow speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshi Fumihiko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How the central nervous system (CNS organizes the joint dynamics for multi-joint movement is a complex problem, because of the passive interaction among segmental movements. Previous studies have demonstrated that the CNS predictively compensates for interaction torque (INT which is arising from the movement of the adjacent joints. However, most of these studies have mainly examined quick movements, presumably because the current belief is that the effects of INT are not significant at slow speeds. The functional contribution of INT for multijoint movements performed in various speeds is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of INT to a planer reaching in a wide range of motion speeds for healthy subjects. Methods Subjects performed reaching movements toward five targets under three different speed conditions. Joint position data were recorded using a 3-D motion analysis device (50 Hz. Torque components, muscle torque (MUS, interaction torque (INT, gravity torque (G, and net torque (NET were calculated by solving the dynamic equations for the shoulder and elbow. NET at a joint which produces the joint kinematics will be an algebraic sum of torque components; NET = MUS - G - INT. Dynamic muscle torque (DMUS = MUS-G was also calculated. Contributions of INT impulse and DMUS impulse to NET impulse were examined. Results The relative contribution of INT to NET was not dependent on speed for both joints at every target. INT was additive (same direction to DMUS at the shoulder joint, while in the elbow DMUS counteracted (opposed to INT. The trajectory of reach was linear and two-joint movements were coordinated with a specific combination at each target, regardless of motion speed. However, DMUS at the elbow was opposed to the direction of elbow movement, and its magnitude varied from trial to trial in order to compensate for the variability of INT. Conclusion Interaction torque was important at

  16. Prediction of vitamin interacting residues in a vitamin binding protein using evolutionary information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwar Bharat

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vitamins are important cofactors in various enzymatic-reactions. In past, many inhibitors have been designed against vitamin binding pockets in order to inhibit vitamin-protein interactions. Thus, it is important to identify vitamin interacting residues in a protein. It is possible to detect vitamin-binding pockets on a protein, if its tertiary structure is known. Unfortunately tertiary structures of limited proteins are available. Therefore, it is important to develop in-silico models for predicting vitamin interacting residues in protein from its primary structure. Results In this study, first we compared protein-interacting residues of vitamins with other ligands using Two Sample Logo (TSL. It was observed that ATP, GTP, NAD, FAD and mannose preferred {G,R,K,S,H}, {G,K,T,S,D,N}, {T,G,Y}, {G,Y,W} and {Y,D,W,N,E} residues respectively, whereas vitamins preferred {Y,F,S,W,T,G,H} residues for the interaction with proteins. Furthermore, compositional information of preferred and non-preferred residues along with patterns-specificity was also observed within different vitamin-classes. Vitamins A, B and B6 preferred {F,I,W,Y,L,V}, {S,Y,G,T,H,W,N,E} and {S,T,G,H,Y,N} interacting residues respectively. It suggested that protein-binding patterns of vitamins are different from other ligands, and motivated us to develop separate predictor for vitamins and their sub-classes. The four different prediction modules, (i vitamin interacting residues (VIRs, (ii vitamin-A interacting residues (VAIRs, (iii vitamin-B interacting residues (VBIRs and (iv pyridoxal-5-phosphate (vitamin B6 interacting residues (PLPIRs have been developed. We applied various classifiers of SVM, BayesNet, NaiveBayes, ComplementNaiveBayes, NaiveBayesMultinomial, RandomForest and IBk etc., as machine learning techniques, using binary and Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM features of protein sequences. Finally, we selected best performing SVM modules and

  17. Magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems: Spin and orbital contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, A., E-mail: a.secchi@science.ru.nl [Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lichtenstein, A.I. [Universitat Hamburg, Institut für Theoretische Physik, Jungiusstraße 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Katsnelson, M.I. [Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles, when the electronic system is in a symmetry-broken phase. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green’s functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic field, spin–orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole–dipole interaction). The expressions of all these magnetic interactions are determined in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green’s functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin–orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin–orbital contributions to magnetism, providing expressions that can be computed within a tight-binding Dynamical Mean Field Theory.

  18. Reactive control processes contributing to residual switch cost and mixing cost across the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Lisa R; Karayanidis, Frini; Fulham, Ross; Provost, Alexander; Michie, Patricia T; Heathcote, Andrew; Hsieh, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    In task-switching paradigms, performance is better when repeating the same task than when alternating between tasks (switch cost) and when repeating a task alone rather than intermixed with another task (mixing cost). These costs remain even after extensive practice and when task cues enable advanced preparation (residual costs). Moreover, residual reaction time mixing cost has been consistently shown to increase with age. Residual switch and mixing costs modulate the amplitude of the stimulus-locked P3b. This mixing effect is disproportionately larger in older adults who also prepare more for and respond more cautiously on these "mixed" repeat trials (Karayanidis et al., 2011). In this paper, we analyze stimulus-locked and response-locked P3 and lateralized readiness potentials to identify whether residual switch and mixing cost arise from the need to control interference at the level of stimulus processing or response processing. Residual mixing cost was associated with control of stimulus-level interference, whereas residual switch cost was also associated with a delay in response selection. In older adults, the disproportionate increase in mixing cost was associated with greater interference at the level of decision-response mapping and response programming for repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. These findings suggest that older adults strategically recruit greater proactive and reactive control to overcome increased susceptibility to post-stimulus interference. This interpretation is consistent with recruitment of compensatory strategies to compensate for reduced repetition benefit rather than an overall decline on cognitive flexibility.

  19. Contribution of microorganisms to non-extractable residue formation during biodegradation of ibuprofen in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Karolina M., E-mail: karolina.nowak@ufz.de [UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology V), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Girardi, Cristobal; Miltner, Anja [UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Gehre, Matthias [UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Schäffer, Andreas [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research (Biology V), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kästner, Matthias [UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Non-extractable residues (NER) formed during biodegradation of organic contaminants in soil are considered to be mainly composed of parent compounds or their primary metabolites with hazardous potential. However, in the case of biodegradable organic compounds, the soil NER may also contain microbial biomass components, for example fatty acids (FA) and amino acids (AA). After cell death, these biomolecules are subsequently incorporated into non-living soil organic matter (SOM) and are stabilised ultimately forming hardly extractable residues of biogenic origin. We investigated biodegradation of {sup 13}C{sub 6}-ibuprofen, in particular the metabolic incorporation of the {sup 13}C-label into FA and AA and their fate in soil over 90 days. {sup 13}C-FA and {sup 13}C-AA amounts in the living microbial biomass fraction initially increased, then decreased over time and were continuously incorporated into the non-living SOM pool. The {sup 13}C-FA in the non-living SOM remained stable from day 59 whereas the contents of {sup 13}C-AA slightly increased until the end. After 90 days, nearly all NER were biogenic as they were made up almost completely by natural biomass compounds. The presented data demonstrated that the potential environmental risks related to the ibuprofen-derived NER are overestimated. - Highlights: ► Biogenic residue formation during microbial degradation of ibuprofen was studied. ► Nearly all non-extractable residues derived from ibuprofen were biogenic. ► Fatty acids and amino acids formed biogenic non-extractable residues and were stabilised in soil. ► Environmental risks of ibuprofen-derived non-extractable residues are overestimated.

  20. Reactive control processes contributing to residual switch cost and mixing cost in young and old adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Rebecca Whitson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In task-switching paradigms, performance is better when repeating the same task than when alternating between tasks (switch cost and when repeating a task alone rather than intermixed with another task (mixing cost. These costs remain even after extensive practice and when task cues enable advanced preparation (residual costs. Moreover, residual RT mixing cost has been consistently shown to increase with age. Residual switch and mixing costs modulate the amplitude of the stimulus-locked P3b. This mixing effect is disproportionately larger in older adults who also prepare more for and respond more cautiously on these ‘mixed’ repeat trials (Karayanidis et al., 2011. In this study, we examine stimulus-locked and response-locked P3 and lateralized readiness potentials to identify whether residual switch and mixing cost arise from the need to control interference at the level of stimulus processing or response processing. Residual mixing cost was associated with control of stimulus-level interference, whereas residual switch cost was also associated with a delay in response selection. In older adults, the disproportionate increase in mixing cost was associated with greater interference at the level of decision-response mapping and response programming for repeat trials in mixed-task blocks. We argue that, together with evidence of greater proactive control and more cautious responding for these trials, these findings suggest that older adults strategically recruit greater proactive and reactive control to overcome increased susceptibility to post-stimulus interference. This interpretation is consistent with recruitment of compensatory strategies to compensate for reduced repetition benefit rather than an overall decline on cognitive flexibility.

  1. Contribution of microorganisms to non-extractable residue formation during biodegradation of ibuprofen in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Karolina M.; Girardi, Cristobal; Miltner, Anja; Gehre, Matthias; Schäffer, Andreas; Kästner, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Non-extractable residues (NER) formed during biodegradation of organic contaminants in soil are considered to be mainly composed of parent compounds or their primary metabolites with hazardous potential. However, in the case of biodegradable organic compounds, the soil NER may also contain microbial biomass components, for example fatty acids (FA) and amino acids (AA). After cell death, these biomolecules are subsequently incorporated into non-living soil organic matter (SOM) and are stabilised ultimately forming hardly extractable residues of biogenic origin. We investigated biodegradation of 13 C 6 -ibuprofen, in particular the metabolic incorporation of the 13 C-label into FA and AA and their fate in soil over 90 days. 13 C-FA and 13 C-AA amounts in the living microbial biomass fraction initially increased, then decreased over time and were continuously incorporated into the non-living SOM pool. The 13 C-FA in the non-living SOM remained stable from day 59 whereas the contents of 13 C-AA slightly increased until the end. After 90 days, nearly all NER were biogenic as they were made up almost completely by natural biomass compounds. The presented data demonstrated that the potential environmental risks related to the ibuprofen-derived NER are overestimated. - Highlights: ► Biogenic residue formation during microbial degradation of ibuprofen was studied. ► Nearly all non-extractable residues derived from ibuprofen were biogenic. ► Fatty acids and amino acids formed biogenic non-extractable residues and were stabilised in soil. ► Environmental risks of ibuprofen-derived non-extractable residues are overestimated

  2. Mast cell-neural interactions contribute to pain and itch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpna; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2018-03-01

    Mast cells are best recognized for their role in allergy and anaphylaxis, but increasing evidence supports their role in neurogenic inflammation leading to pain and itch. Mast cells act as a "power house" by releasing algogenic and pruritogenic mediators, which initiate a reciprocal communication with specific nociceptors on sensory nerve fibers. Consequently, nerve fibers release inflammatory and vasoactive neuropeptides, which in turn activate mast cells in a feedback mechanism, thus promoting a vicious cycle of mast cell and nociceptor activation leading to neurogenic inflammation and pain/pruritus. Mechanisms underlying mast cell differentiation, activation, and intercellular interactions with inflammatory, vascular, and neural systems are deeply influenced by their microenvironment, imparting enormous heterogeneity and complexity in understanding their contribution to pain and pruritus. Neurogenic inflammation is central to both pain and pruritus, but specific mediators released by mast cells to promote this process may vary depending upon their location, stimuli, underlying pathology, gender, and species. Therefore, in this review, we present the contribution of mast cells in pathological conditions, including distressing pruritus exacerbated by psychologic stress and experienced by the majority of patients with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis and in different pain syndromes due to mastocytosis, sickle cell disease, and cancer. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. International symposium on restoration of environments with radioactive residues. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    After the use of radioactive materials or the utilization of nuclear energy, some radioactive residues may remain in the environment and give rise to the exposure of persons living or working in that environment. Most commonly, these residues are the result of human activities that have been carried out in the past without proper regard to the internationally accepted radiation protection requirements for practices, or at that time when those requirements were less stringent than today. Of course unforeseen events such as accidents of concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material can also lead to higher levels of radioactive residues in theenvironment. The purpose of this Symposium is to foster an information exchange on the restoration of environments with radioactive residues. This includes the principles and criteria for guiding decision making and the methodologies for assessing the radiological situation and developing remediation plans for the human habitats affected. The overall aim is to promote an international consensus on the relevant issues in these areas. This document contains 51 presentations delivered during oral and poster sessions. Each of the presentations was separately indexed and provided with an abstract.

  4. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-01

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy (α+β) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  5. International symposium on restoration of environments with radioactive residues. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    After the use of radioactive materials or the utilization of nuclear energy, some radioactive residues may remain in the environment and give rise to the exposure of persons living or working in that environment. Most commonly, these residues are the result of human activities that have been carried out in the past without proper regard to the internationally accepted radiation protection requirements for practices, or at that time when those requirements were less stringent than today. Of course unforeseen events such as accidents of concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material can also lead to higher levels of radioactive residues in the environment. The purpose of this Symposium is to foster an information exchange on the restoration of environments with radioactive residues. This includes the principles and criteria for guiding decision making and the methodologies for assessing the radiological situation and developing remediation plans for the human habitats affected. The overall aim is to promote an international consensus on the relevant issues in these areas. This document contains 51 presentations delivered during oral and poster sessions. Each of the presentations was separately indexed and provided with an abstract

  6. MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SIDE AMINO ACID RESIDUES OF POLYMYXIN B3 TO ITS BINDING WITH E.COLI OUTER MEMBRANE LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Last decades, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are the subject of intense investigations aimed to develop effective drugs against extremely resistant nosocomial bacterial pathogens (especially Gram-negative bacteria. In particular, there has been greatly renewed interest to polymyxins, the representatives of AMPs which are specific and highly potent against Gram-negative bacteria, but have potential nephrotoxic side effect. A prerequisite of purposeful enhancement of therapeutic properties of polymyxins is a detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with cell targets. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main component of the outer leaflet of outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, is a primary cell target of polymyxins. The aim of the paper was to study the peculiarities of molecular interactions of polymyxin В3 with lipopolysaccharide of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacterium. Materials and methods The complexes of polymyxin В3 (PmВ3 and its alaninederivatives with E. coli outer membrane lipopolysaccharide were built and studied by molecular modeling methods (minimization, simulated annealing, docking. Atom coordinates of polymyxin В3 and LPS structures were taken from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography experiments, respectively. The AMBER03 force field was used with a 1.05 nm force cutoff. Longrange electrostatic interactions were treated by the Particle Mesh Ewald method. Results and discussion Alanine scanning of PmВ3 molecule has been carried out and the role of its side amino acid residues in the formation of complex with lipopolysaccharide has been investigated. It has been shown that substitutions of polymyxin’s Dab residues in positions 1, 3, 5, 8 and 9 for alanine markedly reduce the binding energy of PmB3-LPS complex, where as the similar substitutions of residues in positions 2, 6, 7 and 10 leave the binding energy virtually unchanged. Structural aspects of antimicrobial action of

  7. Extended Lipkin-type models with residual proton-neutron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, S.

    1999-01-01

    Extended Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) models for testing the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation (pnRPA) methods are developed taking into account explicitly the proton and neutron degrees of freedom. First, an extended LMG model for testing RPA is developed. The proton and neutron Hamiltonians are taken to be of the LMG form and, in addition, a residual proton-neutron interaction is included. Exact solutions in a SU(2) x SU(2) basis as well as the RPA solutions for the energy spectrum of the model Hamiltonian are obtained. Then, the behaviour of the first collective excited state is studied as a function of the interaction parameters of the model using the exact and RPA methods. Secondly, an extended LMG model for testing pnRPA method is developed. Besides the proton and neutron single particle terms two types of residual proton-neutron interactions, one simulating a particle-particle and the other a particle-hole interaction, are included in the model Hamiltonian, so that the model is exactly solvable in an isospin SU(2) x SU(2) basis. The exact and pnRPA spectra of the model Hamiltonian are calculated as a function of the model parameters and compared to each other. Furthermore, charge-changing operators simulating a nuclear beta decay and their action on eigenfunctions of the model Hamiltonian are defined, and transition amplitude of them are calculated using exact and pnRPA wave functions. The best agreement between the exact RPA-type calculations for spectra and transitions, was obtained when the correlated RPA ground state, instead of the uncorrelated HF ground state was employed and when both kinds of residual interactions (i.e. like- and unlike-particle two-body interactions) are included in the model Hamiltonians. (author)

  8. Interactive Contributions of Attribution Biases and Emotional Intensity to Child-Friend Interaction Quality During Preadolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; McElwain, Nancy L; Lansford, Jennifer E

    2017-12-20

    Using data from a subsample of 913 study children and their friends who participated in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the interactive contributions of child-reported attribution biases and teacher-reported child emotional intensity (EI) at Grade 4 (M = 9.9 years) to observed child-friend interaction at Grade 6 (M = 11.9 years) were examined. Study children's hostile attribution bias, combined with high EI, predicted more negative child-friend interaction. In contrast, benign attribution bias, combined with high EI, predicted more positive child-friend interaction. The findings are discussed in light of the "fuel" interpretation of EI, in which high-intensity emotions may motivate children to act on their cognitive biases for better or for worse. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  9. The RING 2.0 web server for high quality residue interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Minervini, Giovanni; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-07-08

    Residue interaction networks (RINs) are an alternative way of representing protein structures where nodes are residues and arcs physico-chemical interactions. RINs have been extensively and successfully used for analysing mutation effects, protein folding, domain-domain communication and catalytic activity. Here we present RING 2.0, a new version of the RING software for the identification of covalent and non-covalent bonds in protein structures, including π-π stacking and π-cation interactions. RING 2.0 is extremely fast and generates both intra and inter-chain interactions including solvent and ligand atoms. The generated networks are very accurate and reliable thanks to a complex empirical re-parameterization of distance thresholds performed on the entire Protein Data Bank. By default, RING output is generated with optimal parameters but the web server provides an exhaustive interface to customize the calculation. The network can be visualized directly in the browser or in Cytoscape. Alternatively, the RING-Viz script for Pymol allows visualizing the interactions at atomic level in the structure. The web server and RING-Viz, together with an extensive help and tutorial, are available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/ring. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. gRINN: a tool for calculation of residue interaction energies and protein energy network analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serçinoglu, Onur; Ozbek, Pemra

    2018-05-25

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generate a wealth of information related to the dynamics of proteins. If properly analyzed, this information can lead to new insights regarding protein function and assist wet-lab experiments. Aiming to identify interactions between individual amino acid residues and the role played by each in the context of MD simulations, we present a stand-alone software called gRINN (get Residue Interaction eNergies and Networks). gRINN features graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and a command-line interface for generating and analyzing pairwise residue interaction energies and energy correlations from protein MD simulation trajectories. gRINN utilizes the features of NAMD or GROMACS MD simulation packages and automatizes the steps necessary to extract residue-residue interaction energies from user-supplied simulation trajectories, greatly simplifying the analysis for the end-user. A GUI, including an embedded molecular viewer, is provided for visualization of interaction energy time-series, distributions, an interaction energy matrix, interaction energy correlations and a residue correlation matrix. gRINN additionally offers construction and analysis of Protein Energy Networks, providing residue-based metrics such as degrees, betweenness-centralities, closeness centralities as well as shortest path analysis. gRINN is free and open to all users without login requirement at http://grinn.readthedocs.io.

  11. Contribution of microorganisms to non-extractable residue formation during biodegradation of ibuprofen in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Karolina M; Girardi, Cristobal; Miltner, Anja; Gehre, Matthias; Schäffer, Andreas; Kästner, Matthias

    2013-02-15

    Non-extractable residues (NER) formed during biodegradation of organic contaminants in soil are considered to be mainly composed of parent compounds or their primary metabolites with hazardous potential. However, in the case of biodegradable organic compounds, the soil NER may also contain microbial biomass components, for example fatty acids (FA) and amino acids (AA). After cell death, these biomolecules are subsequently incorporated into non-living soil organic matter (SOM) and are stabilised ultimately forming hardly extractable residues of biogenic origin. We investigated biodegradation of (13)C(6)-ibuprofen, in particular the metabolic incorporation of the (13)C-label into FA and AA and their fate in soil over 90 days. (13)C-FA and (13)C-AA amounts in the living microbial biomass fraction initially increased, then decreased over time and were continuously incorporated into the non-living SOM pool. The (13)C-FA in the non-living SOM remained stable from day 59 whereas the contents of (13)C-AA slightly increased until the end. After 90 days, nearly all NER were biogenic as they were made up almost completely by natural biomass compounds. The presented data demonstrated that the potential environmental risks related to the ibuprofen-derived NER are overestimated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term contributions of cover crop surface residue return to soil carbon and nitrogen contents in temperate Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Wu, Hanwen; Li, Guangdi; Chen, Chengrong

    2016-11-01

    Cover crop species are usually grown to control weeds. After cover crop harvest, crop residue is applied on the ground to improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little information is available about quantifying the contributions of cover crop application to soil total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) contents in temperate Australia. Here, we selected eight cover crop treatments, including two legume crops (vetch and field pea), four non-legume crops (rye, wheat, Saia oat, and Indian mustard), a mixture of rye and vetch, and a nil-crop control in temperate Australia to calculate the contributions of cover crops (crop growth + residue decomposition) to soil C and N contents. Cover crops were sown in May 2009 (autumn). After harvest, the crop residue was placed on the soil surface in October 2009. Soil and crop samples were collected in October 2009 after harvest and in May 2010 after 8 months of residue decomposition. We examined cover crop residue biomass, soil and crop total C and N contents, and soil microbial biomass C and N contents. The results showed that cover crop application increased the mean soil total C by 187-253 kg ha -1 and the mean soil total N by 16.3-19.1 kg ha -1 relative to the nil-crop treatment, except for the mixture treatment, which had similar total C and N contents to the nil-crop control. Cover crop application increased the mean soil microbial biomass C by 15.5-20.9 kg ha -1 and the mean soil microbial biomass N by 4.5-10.2 kg ha -1 . We calculated the apparent percentage of soil total C derived from cover crop residue C losses and found that legume crops accounted for 10.6-13.9 %, whereas non-legume crops accounted for 16.4-18.4 % except for the mixture treatment (0.2 %). Overall, short-term cover crop application increased soil total C and N contents and microbial biomass C and N contents, which might help reduce N fertilizer use and improve sustainable agricultural development.

  13. Biomass Residues from Agriculture and Potential Contribution towards Modern Energy Supply in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackom, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Access to modern energy services especially in developing countries is an urgent issue. Globally, 1.3 billion people do not have access to modern energy and the services associated with it. Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the regions have profound lack of modern energy access. The objective of this ......Access to modern energy services especially in developing countries is an urgent issue. Globally, 1.3 billion people do not have access to modern energy and the services associated with it. Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the regions have profound lack of modern energy access. The objective...... of this paper is to understand the role that residues obtained from agricultural practices could be utilised in providing electricity for use in West African countries. Selected countries include: Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Togo. The study utilized methods developed by Mendu et. al. 2012, Mabeeet. al. 2010...

  14. CONTRIBUTION OF QUADRATIC RESIDUE DIFFUSERS TO EFFICIENCY OF TILTED PROFILE PARALLEL HIGHWAY NOISE BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Monazzam ، P. Nassiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation on the acoustic performance of tilted profile parallel barriers with quadratic residue diffuser (QRD tops and faces. A 2D boundary element method (BEM is used to predict the barrier insertion loss. The results of rigid and with absorptive coverage are also calculated for comparisons. Using QRD on the top surface and faces of all tilted profile parallel barrier models introduced here is found to improve the efficiency of barriers compared with rigid equivalent parallel barrier at the examined receiver positions. Applying a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz on 5 degrees tilted parallel barrier improves the overall performance of its equivalent rigid barrier by 1.8 dB(A. Increase in the treated surfaces with reactive elements shifts the effective performance toward lower frequencies. It is found that by tilting the barriers from 0 to 10 degrees in parallel set up, the degradation effects in parallel barriers is reduced but the absorption effect of fibrous materials and also diffusivity of the quadratic residue diffuser is reduced significantly. In this case all the designed barriers have better performance with 10 degrees tilting in parallel set up. The most economic traffic noise parallel barrier which produces significantly high performance, is achieved by covering the top surface of the barrier closed to the receiver by just a QRD with frequency design of 400 Hz and tilting angle of 10 degrees. The average A-weighted insertion loss in this barrier is predicted to be 16.3 dB (A.

  15. Near target residues from the peripheral interaction of relativistic heavy ions with bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleklett, K.; Morrissey, D.J.; Loveland, W.; Moody, K.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic distributions for the near target residues Au and Tl were measured radioanalytically for the reaction of 8.0-GeV 20 Ne ions with 209 Bi. The isotopic production cross section for Au and Tl isotopes were calculated by using a macroscopic abrasion-ablation model and a microscopic intranuclear cascade-evaporation model. The importance of the neutron skin in determining the yield of these products from the peripheral interactions was also explored in the framework of the macroscopic model. 3 figures

  16. Reconsidering Schumpeterian opportunities: The contribution of interaction ritual chain theory

    OpenAIRE

    Goss, David

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to develop a conceptual framework that recognises the significance of emotional and interactional factors in shaping the development and enactment of entrepreneurial opportunities. Design/methodology/approach Provides a theory development illustrated through a case study based on secondary sources. Findings Demonstrates how emotion and interaction ritual chains can extend the scope of entrepreneurial theorising. Research limitations/...

  17. Modulating Transmembrane α-Helix Interactions through pH-Sensitive Boundary Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2016-08-09

    Changes in pH can alter the structure and activity of proteins and may be used by the cell to control molecular function. This coupling can also be used in non-native applications through the design of pH-sensitive biomolecules. For example, the pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) can spontaneously insert into a lipid bilayer when the pH decreases. We have previously shown that the α-helicity and helix-helix interactions of the TM2 α-helix of the proteolipid protein (PLP) are sensitive to the local hydrophobicity at its C-terminus. Given that there is an ionizable residue (Glu-88) at the C-terminus of this transmembrane (TM) segment, we hypothesized that changing the ionization state of this residue through pH may alter the local hydrophobicity of the peptide enough to affect both its secondary structure and helix-helix interactions. To examine this phenomenon, we synthesized peptide analogues of the PLP TM2 α-helix (wild-type sequence (66)AFQYVIYGTASFFFLYGALLLAEGF(90)). Using circular dichroism and Förster resonance energy transfer in the membrane-mimetic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate, we found that a decrease in pH increases both peptide α-helicity and the extent of self-association. This pH-dependent effect is due specifically to the presence of Glu-88 at the C-terminus. Additional experiments in which Phe-90 was mutated to residues of varying hydrophobicities indicated that the strength of this effect is dependent on the local hydrophobicity near Glu-88. Our results have implications for the design of TM peptide switches and improve our understanding of how membrane protein structure and activity can be regulated through local molecular environmental changes.

  18. Intragenic suppressor of Osiaa23 revealed a conserved tryptophan residue crucial for protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ni

    Full Text Available The Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA and Auxin Response Factor (ARF are two important families that play key roles in auxin signal transduction. Both of the families contain a similar carboxyl-terminal domain (Domain III/IV that facilitates interactions between these two families. In spite of the importance of protein-protein interactions among these transcription factors, the mechanisms involved in these interactions are largely unknown. In this study, we isolated six intragenic suppressors of an auxin insensitive mutant, Osiaa23. Among these suppressors, Osiaa23-R5 successfully rescued all the defects of the mutant. Sequence analysis revealed that an amino acid substitution occurred in the Tryptophan (W residue in Domain IV of Osiaa23. Yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that the mutation in Domain IV prevents the protein-protein interactions between Osiaa23 and OsARFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the W residue is conserved in both OsIAAs and OsARFs. Next, we performed site-specific amino acid substitutions within Domain IV of OsARFs, and the conserved W in Domain IV was exchanged by Serine (S. The mutated OsARF(WSs can be released from the inhibition of Osiaa23 and maintain the transcriptional activities. Expression of OsARF(WSs in Osiaa23 mutant rescued different defects of the mutant. Our results suggest a previously unknown importance of Domain IV in both families and provide an indirect way to investigate functions of OsARFs.

  19. Weak interaction contribution to the energy spectrum of two-lepton system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of neutral currents to the weak interaction quasi-potential of two leptons is investigated. The exact expression for the weak interaction operator of the system for arbitrary biding energies in one-boson approximation is obtained. The weak interaction contribution to the S-levels displacement of hydrogen-like atom. 14 refs

  20. Contributions of conserved residues at the gating interface of glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Leung, Ada W Y; Galpin, Jason D

    2011-01-01

    and the in vivo nonsense suppression method to incorporate unnatural amino acids to probe the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions of five highly conserved side chains near the interface, Glu-53, Phe-145, Asp-148, Phe-187, and Arg-218. Our results suggest a salt bridge between Asp-148 in loop 7 and Arg-218......Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are chloride channels that mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) family. The interface between the ligand binding domain and the transmembrane domain of pLGICs has been proposed to be crucial...

  1. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Urano-Tashiro

    Full Text Available Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2 of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N or Arg365 to Asn (R365N substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins.

  2. Gnotobiotic mouse model's contribution to understanding host-pathogen interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubelková, K.; Benuchová, M.; Kozáková, Hana; Šinkora, Marek; Kročová, Z.; Pejchal, J.; Macela, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 20 (2016), s. 3961-3969 ISSN 1420-682X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Germ- free model * Gnotobiology * Host-pathogen interaction Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 5.788, year: 2016

  3. Effects of the residual proton-neutron interaction in the development of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The widespread effects of the residual T=0 proton-neutron (p-n) interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure are discussed. Although these effects in inducing single nucleon configuration mixing, and hence in the development of non-spherical nuclear shapes, collectivity, and the associated shape and phase transitions have been known for four decades, it is only in recent years that their deep ramifications have become more fully appreciated. This had led to a unified phenomenological understanding of the role of the p-n interaction in nuclear collectivity and to, for example, the proposal of the N p N n scheme and the associated concept of the P factor, which is a normalized value of N p N n reflecting the average number of p-n interactions per valence nucleon. Simultaneously, experimentally-determined p-n matrix elements for many nuclei have been extracted: they disclose striking anomalies for N=Z nuclei, and intriguing microstructure. These developments and empirical results will be discussed along with microscopic calculations that can be used to interpret them. 18 refs., 13 figs

  4. Three- and five-quasiparticle isomers, rotational bands and residual interactions in 175Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracoulis, G.D.; Walker, P.M.

    1980-03-01

    Two 3-quasiparticle isomers with spins, parities and half lives of 19/2 + , 1.1 μ and 23/2 - , 1.2 ns have been identified at 1433 and 1766 keV in 175 Hf. A third isomer possibly 35/2 - with a 1.2 μs half-life is found at 3015 keV. The first two are characterised as a 7/2 + (633) neutron coupled to the known 6 + and 8 - 2-proton isomers of the core nuclei. Rotational bands based on the 3-qp isomers are highly perturbed, due to Coriolis mixing, and their structure is reproduced in a band mixing calculation. The energy depression of the 3-quasiparticle states relative to the 2-quasiproton core states is attributed mainly to the residual proton-neutron interaction, and possibly also to blocking effects through neutron admixtures

  5. Baryon femtoscopy considering residual correlations as a tool to extract strong interaction potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of baryon-antibaryon femtoscopic correlations is presented. In particular, it is shown that taking into account residual correlations is crucial for the description of pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and p̄Λ correlation functions measured by the STAR experiment in Au–Au collisions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 200 GeV. This approach enables to obtain pΛ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ (p̄Λ source size consistent with the sizes extracted from correlations in pΛ (p̄Λ¯$\\bar \\Lambda $ and lighter pair systems as well as with model predictions. Moreover, with this analysis it is possible to derive the unknown parameters of the strong interaction potential for baryon-antibaryon pairs under several assumptions.

  6. Subnanomolar Inhibitor of Cytochrome bc1 Complex Designed via Optimizing Interaction with Conformationally Flexible Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei-Liang; Wang, Le; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Wu, Jia-Wei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome bc1 complex (EC 1.10.2.2, bc1), an essential component of the cellular respiratory chain and the photosynthetic apparatus in photosynthetic bacteria, has been identified as a promising target for new drugs and agricultural fungicides. X-ray diffraction structures of the free bc1 complex and its complexes with various inhibitors revealed that the phenyl group of Phe274 in the binding pocket exhibited significant conformational flexibility upon different inhibitors binding to optimize respective π-π interactions, whereas the side chains of other hydrophobic residues showed conformational stability. Therefore, in the present study, a strategy of optimizing the π-π interaction with conformationally flexible residues was proposed to design and discover new bc1 inhibitors with a higher potency. Eight new compounds were designed and synthesized, among which compound 5c with a Ki value of 570 pM was identified as the most promising drug or fungicide candidate, significantly more potent than the commercially available bc1 inhibitors including azoxystrobin (AZ), kresoxim-methyl (KM), and pyraclostrobin (PY). To our knowledge, this is the first bc1 inhibitor discovered from structure-based design with a potency of subnanomolar Ki value. For all of the compounds synthesized and assayed, the calculated binding free energies correlated reasonably well with the binding free energies derived from the experimental Ki values with a correlation coefficient of r2 = 0.89. The further inhibitory kinetics studies revealed that compound 5c is a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to substrate cytochrome c, but is a competitive inhibitor with respect to substrate ubiquinol. Due to its subnanomolar Ki potency and slow dissociation rate constant (k−0 = 0.00358 s−1), compound 5c could be used as a specific probe for further elucidation of the mechanism of bc1 function and as a new lead compound for future drug discovery. PMID:19928849

  7. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzilhav Shem-Ad

    Full Text Available The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  8. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  9. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darriulai, P.

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the α-α elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6 + and 8 + , at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 α-particle 0 + states in C 12 is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be 8 level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2 + , but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [fr

  10. Calcium Contributes to the Cytotoxic Interaction Between Diclofenac and Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Ashley R; Breier, Anna B; Turkus, Jonathan D; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Diclofenac (DCLF) is a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is associated with idiosyncratic, drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) in humans. The mechanisms of DCLF-induced liver injury are unknown; however, patients with certain inflammatory diseases have an increased risk of developing IDILI, which raises the possibility that immune mediators play a role in the pathogenesis. DCLF synergizes with the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN) to cause hepatocellular apoptosis in vitro by a mechanism that involves activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response pathway and of the mitogen-activated protein kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). DCLF also causes an increase in intracellular calcium (Ca(++)) in hepatocytes, but the role of this in the cytotoxic synergy between DCLF and cytokines is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that Ca(++) contributes to DCLF/cytokine-induced cytotoxic synergy. Treatment of HepG2 cells with DCLF led to an increase in intracellular Ca(++) at 6 and 12 h, and this response was augmented in the presence of TNF and IFN at 12 h. The intracellular Ca(++) chelator BAPTA/AM reduced cytotoxicity and caspase-3 activation caused by DCLF/cytokine cotreatment. BAPTA/AM also significantly reduced DCLF-induced activation of the ER stress sensor, protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), as well as activation of JNK and ERK. Treatment of cells with an inositol trisphosphate receptor antagonist almost completely eliminated DCLF/cytokine-induced cytotoxicity and decreased DCLF-induced activation of PERK, JNK, and ERK. These findings indicate that Ca(++) contributes to DCLF/cytokine-induced cytotoxic synergy by promoting activation of the ER stress-response pathway and JNK and ERK. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A method for predicting individual residue contributions to enzyme specificity and binding-site energies, and its application to MTH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James J P

    2016-11-01

    A new method for predicting the energy contributions to substrate binding and to specificity has been developed. Conventional global optimization methods do not permit the subtle effects responsible for these properties to be modeled with sufficient precision to allow confidence to be placed in the results, but by making simple alterations to the model, the precisions of the various energies involved can be improved from about ±2 kcal mol -1 to ±0.1 kcal mol -1 . This technique was applied to the oxidized nucleotide pyrophosphohydrolase enzyme MTH1. MTH1 is unusual in that the binding and reaction sites are well separated-an advantage from a computational chemistry perspective, as it allows the energetics involved in docking to be modeled without the need to consider any issues relating to reaction mechanisms. In this study, two types of energy terms were investigated: the noncovalent interactions between the binding site and the substrate, and those responsible for discriminating between the oxidized nucleotide 8-oxo-dGTP and the normal dGTP. Both of these were investigated using the semiempirical method PM7 in the program MOPAC. The contributions of the individual residues to both the binding energy and the specificity of MTH1 were calculated by simulating the effect of mutations. Where comparisons were possible, all calculated results were in agreement with experimental observations. This technique provides fresh insight into the binding mechanism that enzymes use for discriminating between possible substrates.

  12. Radio reduction of the vitamin K in ethanolic solution: Contribution to radical oxidation study of a glutamic residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fackir, L.

    1995-01-01

    The biological action of vitamin K may involve mono electronic exchanges. Therefore, in this work we achieved a radiolytical study on one land, of mono electronic reduction of vitamin K hydroquinone symbolized by KHsubn pp. We also studied the vitamin K2 model of glutamic residue( B - Glu ) by radiolytic mean. The study of radical mechanisms of vitamin K1 reduction in ethanolic solution showed that vitamin K1 is a good sensor of free radicals alpha - hydroxyethyles ( R sup . ) issued from the radiolysis of vitamin K1 ethanolic solutions, saturated with N sub2 O. The final product is hydroquinone K sub 1 H sub 2. It has been demonstrated that mono electronic reduction can be also initiated by solvated electrons. The mono electronic oxidation of K H sub p has been studied in ethanolic solution.The results showed that K H sub p is a good sensor of peroxyl radicals model (RO sub2) sup . issues from ethanol. The oxidation leads to the formation a dimeric from of the quinone K. All these results showed that the free radicals R sup . centred on carbon are efficient reducing agents of vitamin K1, and that the peroxyl radicals R Osub2 centred on oxygen are possible oxidants of KH sub p. At the end and for modeling the eventual interaction of semi quinonic radical with glutamic acid. We have irradiated mixture of vitamin K1 and a compound having a glutamic residue, the concentration ratio (B-Glu) sub 0/ (K sub 1) sub 0 varying for 0,03 to 1. The obtained results showed that the yield of vitamin K sub 1 disappearance is superior to G (R sup .)/R for low concentration of B-Glu. 80 figs., 5 tabs., 105 refs. (F. M.)

  13. The differences in hadronic cross-sections and the residues of secondary reggeons in the quark-gluon model for strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.; Volkovitsky, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    In the framework of the quark-gluon picture for strong interactions based on the topological expansion and the string model, the relations between t differences of hadronic cross- section are obtained. The system of equations for the contribution of secondary reggeons (rho, ω, f, A 2 and phi and f' poles) to the elastic scattering amplitudes for arbitrary hadrons is derived. It is shown that this system has a factorized solution and the secondary reggeon residues for all hadrons are expressed in terms of the universal function g(t). The model predictions are in a good agreement with experimental data [ru

  14. Similarity of multi-fragmentation of residual nucleus created in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hafiez, A.; Chernyavski, M.M.; Orlova, G.I.; Gulamov, K.G.; Navotny, V.SH.; Uzhinskii, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on multi-fragmentation of residual krypton nuclei created in the interactions of the krypton nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei ut energy of 0.9 GeV per nucleon are presented in a comparison with the analogous data on fragmentation of gold residual nuclei at the energy of 10.7 GeV/nucleon. It is shown for the first time that there are two regimes of nuclear multifragmentation: the former is when less than one-half of nucleons of projectile nucleus are knocked out, the later is when more than one-half of nucleons are knocked out. Residual nuclei with closed masses created at different reactions are fragmenting practically simultaneously when more than one-half of nucleons of original nuclei are knocked out. The evidence of existence of a radial flow of the spectator fragment at the decay of residual krypton nuclei is found

  15. Aging/Systems Interaction Study, Component Residual Lifetime Evaluation and Feasibility of Relicensing. Progress report, FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, J.A.; Jacobs, P.T.; Korth, G.E.; Mudlin, J.M.; Server, W.L.; Spaletta, H.W.

    1985-10-01

    This report documents the work performed on four research tasks in Fiscal Year 1985 (FY-1985) which were part of the Aging/Systems Interaction Study, Component Residual Lifetime Evaluation and Feasibility of Relicensing Project. The technical and management/institutional objectives for the project are described, followed by a description of the results of each task. The work on Task 1 involved identifying and prioritizing new research activities for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. A proposed methodology and plan for aging-system interaction studies was developed in Task 2. The description of Task 3 work comprises a summary of nuclear plant life extension activities in the US, the technical basis associated with the residual life of metallic materials and a proposed plan for research on residual life assessment. Task 4 describes the initial evaluation of selected Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800) sections to investigate the feasibility of relicensing. 14 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs

  16. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m ± 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s ± 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m ± 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s ± 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree

  17. Computational design, construction, and characterization of a set of specificity determining residues in protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Chioko; Izako, Nozomi; Soga, Shinji; Khan, Samia Haseeb; Kawabata, Shigeki; Shirai, Hiroki; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Proteins interact with different partners to perform different functions and it is important to elucidate the determinants of partner specificity in protein complex formation. Although methods for detecting specificity determining positions have been developed previously, direct experimental evidence for these amino acid residues is scarce, and the lack of information has prevented further computational studies. In this article, we constructed a dataset that is likely to exhibit specificity in protein complex formation, based on available crystal structures and several intuitive ideas about interaction profiles and functional subclasses. We then defined a "structure-based specificity determining position (sbSDP)" as a set of equivalent residues in a protein family showing a large variation in their interaction energy with different partners. We investigated sequence and structural features of sbSDPs and demonstrated that their amino acid propensities significantly differed from those of other interacting residues and that the importance of many of these residues for determining specificity had been verified experimentally. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Contribution to the study of alpha-alpha interaction; Contribution a l'etude de l'interaction alpha - alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darriulai, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-03-01

    Two sets of measurements of the {alpha}-{alpha} elastic scattering differential cross section are presented. The first set - angular distributions from 50 up to 120 MeV - shows two new resonances, 6{sup +} and 8{sup +}, at 25 and 57 MeV. Complex phase shifts are extracted from the data and a phenomenological potential is given. A description of the 3 {alpha}-particle 0{sup +} states in C{sup 12} is made with this interaction potential. The second set - excitation curves between 20 and 50 MeV - allows investigation of the Be{sup 8} level structure within this energy range - It identifies the 16.6 and 16.9 MeV states as 2{sup +}, but the rise of inelastic processes at higher energies makes further identification of spins and parities more and more difficult. (author) [French] Deux series de mesures de la section efficace differentielle de diffusion {alpha}-{alpha} sont presentees. La premiere - distributions angulaires entre 50 et 120 MeV - fait apparaitre deux nouvelles resonances, 6{sup +} et 8{sup +}, a 25 et 57 MeV d'excitation. Des dephasages complexes en sont extraits et un potentiel phenomenologique est presente. Une etude des etats 0{sup +} a parentage (3{alpha}) de {sup 12}C est faite a partir de ce potentiel. La seconde - courbes d'excitation s'etendant de 20 a 50 MeV - met en evidence la structure de {sup 8}Be dans cette region. Elle montre que les niveaux a 16,6 et 16,9 MeV sont des 2{sup +} mais l'importance des processus inelastiques rend difficile l'identification des niveaux d'excitation plus elevee. (auteur)

  19. Constraints on Non-Standard Contributions to the Charged-Current Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K; Hagiwara, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Seiji

    1998-01-01

    The success of the quantum level predictions of the Standard Model on the $Z$ boson properties, on $\\mw$ and on $\\mt$, which makes use of the muon lifetime as an input, implies a stringent constraint on new physics contributions to the $V-A$ charged-current interactions among leptons. Observed unitarity of the CKM matrix elements then implies constraints on non-standard contributions to the lepton-quark charged-current interactions. By using the recent electroweak data as inputs, we find the 95% CL limits for the corresponding contact interactions: $\\Lambda_{CC,+}^{\\ell\\ell}>7.5$ TeV and the lepton-quark contact interactions.

  20. Consumption-based approach for assessing the contribution of hospitals towards the load of pharmaceutical residues in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Kristell S; Ort, Christoph; Kateley, Diana; Allen, Belinda; Escher, Beate I; Keller, Jurg

    2012-09-15

    Hospitals are considered as major sources of pharmaceutical residues discharged to municipal wastewater, but recent experimental studies showed that the contribution of hospitals to the loads of selected, quantifiable pharmaceuticals in sewage treatment plant (STP) influents was limited. However such conclusions are made based on the experimental analysis of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater which is hindered by a number of factors such as access to suitable sampling sites, difficulties in obtaining representative samples and availability of analytical methods. Therefore, this study explores a refined and extended consumption-based approach to predict the contribution of six selected Australian hospitals to the loads of 589 pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater. In addition, the possibility that hospital-specific substances are present at levels that may pose a risk for human health was evaluated. For 63 to 84% of the pharmaceuticals investigated, the selected hospitals are not a major point source with individual contributions likely to be less than 15% which is in line with previous experimental studies. In contrast, between 10 and 20% of the pharmaceuticals consumed in the selected hospitals are exclusively used in these hospitals. For these hospital-specific substances, 57 distinct pharmaceuticals may cause concerns for human health as concentrations predicted in hospital effluents are less than 100-fold lower than effect thresholds. However, when concentrations were predicted in the influent of the corresponding STP, only 12 compounds (including the antineoplastic vincristine, the antibiotics tazobactam and piperacillin) remain in concentration close to effect thresholds, but further decrease is expected after removal in STP, dilution in the receiving stream and drinking water treatment. The results of this study suggest that risks of human exposure to the pharmaceuticals exclusively administered in the investigated hospitals are limited and

  1. Interactive Contributions of Cumulative Peer Stress and Executive Function Deficits to Depression in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to peer stress contributes to adolescent depression, yet not all youth experience these effects. Thus, it is important to identify individual differences that shape the consequences of peer stress. This research investigated the interactive contribution of cumulative peer stress during childhood (second-fifth grades) and executive…

  2. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A.; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping – a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene – by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  3. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  4. Interactive effects of rice residue and water stress on growth and metabolism of wheat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimisha Amist

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study effects of rice residue with and without water stress were studied on Triticum aestivum L. cv. Shatabadi. The mixture of residue and garden soil in 1:1 ratio was considered as 50% (R1 and only decomposed residue as 100% (R2. Garden soil was taken as control. Twenty five seeds were sown in each experimental trays filled with soil mixture according to the treatments. Trays were arranged in two groups. After 15 days one set was subjected to water stress (WS by withholding water supply for 3 days. Morphological and biochemical parameters of 18 days old seedlings were recorded. Seedling height decreased in all treatments. A gradual decrease in relative water content, pigment and protein contents of wheat seedlings were observed. Sugar and proline contents increased in treatments. An increase in malondialdehyde (MDA content and antioxidative enzyme activities was recorded. Elevation in catalase activity was observed in all treatments except in plants with water deficit. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX activities increased when residue mixed with soil but decreased in seedlings under the combined influence of the residue and water stress. Higher amount of MDA and lower activities of APX and GPX reflected the oxidative damage in seedlings under combined treatments. Rice residue inhibited growth of wheat seedlings. Water stress intensified the effects of residue.

  5. A single arginine residue is required for the interaction of the electron transferring flavoprotein (ETF) with three of its dehydrogenase partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony R

    2003-12-01

    The interaction of several dehydrogenases with the electron transferring flavoprotein (ETF) is a crucial step required for the successful transfer of electrons into the electron transport chain. The exact determinants regarding the interaction of ETF with its dehydrogenase partners are still unknown. Chemical modification of ETF with arginine-specific reagents resulted in the loss, to varying degrees, of activity with medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD). The kinetic profiles showed the inactivations followed pseudo-first-order kinetics for all reagents used. For activity with MCAD, maximum inactivation of ETF was accomplished by 2,3-butanedione (4% residual activity after 120 min) and it was shown that modification of one arginine residue was responsible for the inactivation. Almost 100% restoration of this ETF activity was achieved upon incubation with free arginine. However, the same 2,3-butanedione modified ETF only possessed decreased activity with dimethylglycine-(DMGDH, 44%) and sarcosine- (SDH, 27%) dehydrogenases unlike the abolition with MCAD. Full protection of ETF from arginine modification by 2,3-butanedione was achieved using substrate-protected DMGDH, MCAD and SDH respectively. Cross-protection studies of ETF with the three dehydrogenases implied use of the same single arginine residue in the binding of all three dehydrogenases. These results lead us to conclude that this single arginine residue is essential in the binding of the ETF to MCAD, but only contributes partially to the binding of ETF to SDH and DMGDH and thus, the determinants of the dehydrogenase binding sites overlap but are not identical.

  6. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  7. Distinct Residues Contribute to Motility Repression and Autoregulation in the Proteus mirabilis Fimbria-Associated Transcriptional Regulator AtfJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nadine J; Chan, Kun-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis contributes to a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, where coordinated regulation of adherence and motility is critical for ascending disease progression. Previously, the mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator MrpJ has been shown to both repress motility and directly induce the transcription of its own operon; in addition, it affects the expression of a wide range of cellular processes. Interestingly, 14 additional mrpJ paralogs are included in the P. mirabilis genome. Looking at a selection of MrpJ paralogs, we discovered that these proteins, which consistently repress motility, also have nonidentical functions that include cross-regulation of fimbrial operons. A subset of paralogs, including AtfJ (encoded by the ambient temperature fimbrial operon), Fim8J, and MrpJ, are capable of autoinduction. We identified an element of the atf promoter extending from 487 to 655 nucleotides upstream of the transcriptional start site that is responsive to AtfJ, and we found that AtfJ directly binds this fragment. Mutational analysis of AtfJ revealed that its two identified functions, autoregulation and motility repression, are not invariably linked. Residues within the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix domain are required for motility repression but not necessarily autoregulation. Likewise, the C-terminal domain is dispensable for motility repression but is essential for autoregulation. Supported by a three-dimensional (3D) structural model, we hypothesize that the C-terminal domain confers unique regulatory capacities on the AtfJ family of regulators. Balancing adherence with motility is essential for uropathogens to successfully establish a foothold in their host. Proteus mirabilis uses a fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator to switch between these antagonistic processes by increasing fimbrial adherence while simultaneously downregulating flagella. The discovery of multiple

  8. Substantial conformational change mediated by charge-triad residues of the death effector domain in protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C Twomey

    Full Text Available Protein conformational changes are commonly associated with the formation of protein complexes. The non-catalytic death effector domains (DEDs mediate protein-protein interactions in a variety of cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation and migration, and glucose metabolism. Here, using NMR residual dipolar coupling (RDC data, we report a conformational change in the DED of the phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes, 15 kDa (PEA-15 protein in the complex with a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase, extracellular regulated kinase 2 (ERK2, which is essential in regulating ERK2 cellular distribution and function in cell proliferation and migration. The most significant conformational change in PEA-15 happens at helices α2, α3, and α4, which also possess the highest flexibility among the six-helix bundle of the DED. This crucial conformational change is modulated by the D/E-RxDL charge-triad motif, one of the prominent structural features of DEDs, together with a number of other electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions on the protein surface. Charge-triad motif promotes the optimal orientation of key residues and expands the binding interface to accommodate protein-protein interactions. However, the charge-triad residues are not directly involved in the binding interface between PEA-15 and ERK2.

  9. Computational prediction of protein hot spot residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes involve multiple proteins interacting with each other. It has been recently discovered that certain residues in these protein-protein interactions, which are called hot spots, contribute more significantly to binding affinity than others. Hot spot residues have unique and diverse energetic properties that make them challenging yet important targets in the modulation of protein-protein complexes. Design of therapeutic agents that interact with hot spot residues has proven to be a valid methodology in disrupting unwanted protein-protein interactions. Using biological methods to determine which residues are hot spots can be costly and time consuming. Recent advances in computational approaches to predict hot spots have incorporated a myriad of features, and have shown increasing predictive successes. Here we review the state of knowledge around protein-protein interactions, hot spots, and give an overview of multiple in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues.

  10. Computational Prediction of Hot Spot Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2013-01-01

    Most biological processes involve multiple proteins interacting with each other. It has been recently discovered that certain residues in these protein-protein interactions, which are called hot spots, contribute more significantly to binding affinity than others. Hot spot residues have unique and diverse energetic properties that make them challenging yet important targets in the modulation of protein-protein complexes. Design of therapeutic agents that interact with hot spot residues has proven to be a valid methodology in disrupting unwanted protein-protein interactions. Using biological methods to determine which residues are hot spots can be costly and time consuming. Recent advances in computational approaches to predict hot spots have incorporated a myriad of features, and have shown increasing predictive successes. Here we review the state of knowledge around protein-protein interactions, hot spots, and give an overview of multiple in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues. PMID:22316154

  11. A computational tool to predict the evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction hot-spot residues from the structure of the unbound protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neeraj J; Helk, Bernhard; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2014-01-21

    Identifying hot-spot residues - residues that are critical to protein-protein binding - can help to elucidate a protein's function and assist in designing therapeutic molecules to target those residues. We present a novel computational tool, termed spatial-interaction-map (SIM), to predict the hot-spot residues of an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction from the structure of an unbound protein alone. SIM can predict the protein hot-spot residues with an accuracy of 36-57%. Thus, the SIM tool can be used to predict the yet unknown hot-spot residues for many proteins for which the structure of the protein-protein complexes are not available, thereby providing a clue to their functions and an opportunity to design therapeutic molecules to target these proteins. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diversity-interaction modeling: estimating contributions of species identities and interactions to ecosystem function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, L; Connolly, J; Finn, J A

    2009-01-01

    to the roles of evenness, functional groups, and functional redundancy. These more parsimonious descriptions can be especially useful in identifying general diversity-function relationships in communities with large numbers of species. We provide an example of the application of the modeling framework......We develop a modeling framework that estimates the effects of species identity and diversity on ecosystem function and permits prediction of the diversity-function relationship across different types of community composition. Rather than just measure an overall effect of diversity, we separately....... These models describe community-level performance and thus do not require separate measurement of the performance of individual species. This flexible modeling approach can be tailored to test many hypotheses in biodiversity research and can suggest the interaction mechanisms that may be acting....

  13. Activities Contributing a Great Deal to the Students' Interactive Skills in Foreign Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    While teaching speaking it is desired to provide a rich environment in class for meaningful communication to take place. With this aim, various speaking activities can contribute a great deal to students in developing their interactive skills necessary for life. These activities make students active in the learning process and at the same time…

  14. Comment on contact contributions to the magnetic hyperfine interaction of rare-earth impurities in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, H.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the strong d character of the Fe conduction band on the hyperfine interaction of dilute rare earth impurities is emphasized, and the contact contributions are estimated. Apparent inconsistencies between hyperfine field measurements for Eu and Gd in Fe are noted

  15. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  16. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  17. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  18. Re-docking scheme for generating near-native protein complexes by assembling residue interaction fingerprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Uchikoga

    Full Text Available Interaction profile method is a useful method for processing rigid-body docking. After the docking process, the resulting set of docking poses could be classified by calculating similarities among them using these interaction profiles to search for near-native poses. However, there are some cases where the near-native poses are not included in this set of docking poses even when the bound-state structures are used. Therefore, we have developed a method for generating near-native docking poses by introducing a re-docking process. We devised a method for calculating the profile of interaction fingerprints by assembling protein complexes after determining certain core-protein complexes. For our analysis, we used 44 bound-state protein complexes selected from the ZDOCK benchmark dataset ver. 2.0, including some protein pairs none of which generated near-native poses in the docking process. Consequently, after the re-docking process we obtained profiles of interaction fingerprints, some of which yielded near-native poses. The re-docking process involved searching for possible docking poses in a restricted area using the profile of interaction fingerprints. If the profile includes interactions identical to those in the native complex, we obtained near-native docking poses. Accordingly, near-native poses were obtained for all bound-state protein complexes examined here. Application of interaction fingerprints to the re-docking process yielded structures with more native interactions, even when a docking pose, obtained following the initial docking process, contained only a small number of native amino acid interactions. Thus, utilization of the profile of interaction fingerprints in the re-docking process yielded more near-native poses.

  19. Re-docking scheme for generating near-native protein complexes by assembling residue interaction fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoga, Nobuyuki; Matsuzaki, Yuri; Ohue, Masahito; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Interaction profile method is a useful method for processing rigid-body docking. After the docking process, the resulting set of docking poses could be classified by calculating similarities among them using these interaction profiles to search for near-native poses. However, there are some cases where the near-native poses are not included in this set of docking poses even when the bound-state structures are used. Therefore, we have developed a method for generating near-native docking poses by introducing a re-docking process. We devised a method for calculating the profile of interaction fingerprints by assembling protein complexes after determining certain core-protein complexes. For our analysis, we used 44 bound-state protein complexes selected from the ZDOCK benchmark dataset ver. 2.0, including some protein pairs none of which generated near-native poses in the docking process. Consequently, after the re-docking process we obtained profiles of interaction fingerprints, some of which yielded near-native poses. The re-docking process involved searching for possible docking poses in a restricted area using the profile of interaction fingerprints. If the profile includes interactions identical to those in the native complex, we obtained near-native docking poses. Accordingly, near-native poses were obtained for all bound-state protein complexes examined here. Application of interaction fingerprints to the re-docking process yielded structures with more native interactions, even when a docking pose, obtained following the initial docking process, contained only a small number of native amino acid interactions. Thus, utilization of the profile of interaction fingerprints in the re-docking process yielded more near-native poses.

  20. Interaction of elementary damage processes and their contribution to neutron damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki

    1989-01-01

    Specific features of radiation damage of ceramics as compared with those of metals are discussed. It is pointed out that the electronic excitation gives considerable contribution to radiation damage of ceramics not only by itself but also through interaction with knock-on processes. In the talk first I mention briefly the elementary damage processes; the knock-on process and the processes induced by electronic excitation; the latter is of particularly importance in ceramics because of large energy quantums. Then I discuss possible interactions between these elementary processes; why they may contribute to radiation damage and in what situation they are induced. The types of interactions discussed include those between knock-on processes, between electronic excitation and knock-on processes and between processes induced by electronic excitation. Experimental results which prove directly the significance of such interactions are also described. Importance of such interactions in radiation damage of ceramics and their relevance to other phenomena, such as laser damage, is emphasized. Possible experimental techniques, including those which uses high energy neutron sources, are described. (author)

  1. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Conditioned place preference for social interaction in rats: contribution of sensory components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Kai; Klement, Sabine; Eggart, Vincent; Mayr, Michael J; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A main challenge in the therapy of drug dependent individuals is to help them reactivate interest in non-drug-associated activities. We previously developed a rat experimental model based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in which only four 15-min episodes of social interaction with a gender- and weight-matched male Sprague Dawley rat (1) reversed CPP from cocaine to social interaction despite continuing cocaine training and (2) prevented the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. In the present study, we investigated which of the sensory modalities of the composite stimulus "social interaction" contributes most to the rats' preference for it. If touch was limited by steel bars spaced at a distance of 2 cm and running across the whole length of a partitioning, CPP was still acquired, albeit to a lesser degree. If both rats were placed on the same side of a partitioning, rats did not develop CPP for social interaction. Thus, decreasing the available area for social interaction from 750 to 375 cm(2) prevented the acquisition of CPP to social interaction despite the fact that animals could touch each other more intensely than through the bars of the partitioning. When touch was fully restricted by a glass screen dividing the conditioning chambers, and the only sensory modalities left were visual and olfactory cues, place preference shifted to place aversion. Overall, our findings indicate that the major rewarding sensory component of the composite stimulus "social interaction" is touch (taction).

  3. Calculation of contribution of multiple interactions and efficiency of neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Kazakov, L.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Poletaev, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Results of calculation of multiple neutron interactions contribution to efficiency of detectors with 6 Li glass and 10 B plate in the energy range of 0.01-1 MeV are given. The calculation was performed by the Monte-Carlo method using BRAND program complex. It is shown that a correction value for multiple neutron interaction in 6 Li glass of 1 mm thickness constitutes 4.5 % at energy of up to 100 keV and at higher energies has a complex energy dependence reaching 25 % at 440 keV

  4. Accurate characterization of weak macromolecular interactions by titration of NMR residual dipolar couplings: application to the CD2AP SH3-C:ubiquitin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Brutscher, Bernhard; Azuaga, Ana I; Blackledge, Martin; van Nuland, Nico A J

    2009-05-01

    The description of the interactome represents one of key challenges remaining for structural biology. Physiologically important weak interactions, with dissociation constants above 100 muM, are remarkably common, but remain beyond the reach of most of structural biology. NMR spectroscopy, and in particular, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) provide crucial conformational constraints on intermolecular orientation in molecular complexes, but the combination of free and bound contributions to the measured RDC seriously complicates their exploitation for weakly interacting partners. We develop a robust approach for the determination of weak complexes based on: (i) differential isotopic labeling of the partner proteins facilitating RDC measurement in both partners; (ii) measurement of RDC changes upon titration into different equilibrium mixtures of partially aligned free and complex forms of the proteins; (iii) novel analytical approaches to determine the effective alignment in all equilibrium mixtures; and (iv) extraction of precise RDCs for bound forms of both partner proteins. The approach is demonstrated for the determination of the three-dimensional structure of the weakly interacting CD2AP SH3-C:Ubiquitin complex (K(d) = 132 +/- 13 muM) and is shown, using cross-validation, to be highly precise. We expect this methodology to extend the remarkable and unique ability of NMR to study weak protein-protein complexes.

  5. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-01-01

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A

  6. Contribution of tryptophan residues to the combining site of a monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl spin-label antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglister, J.; Bond, M.W.; Frey, T.; Leahy, D.; Levitt, M.; McConnell, H.M.; Rule, G.S.; Tomasello, J.; Whittaker, M.

    1987-09-22

    Two Fab fragments of the monoclonal anti dinitrophenyl (DNP) spin-label antibody AN02 were prepared by recombination of specifically deuterated heavy and light chains. In the recombinant H(I)L(II) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the heavy chain. In the recombinant H(II)L(I) all the tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated as were the tryptophan residues of the light chain. Saturation of three resonances of H(I)L(II), assigned to tryptophan protons of the light chain, resulted in magnetization transfer to the aromatic proton at position 6 of the DNP ring and to the CH2 protons of the glycines linked to the DNP in a diamagnetic hapten (DNP-DG). Saturation of three resonances of H(II)L(I) assigned to tryptophan protons of the heavy chain resulted in magnetization transfer to the CH2 protons of the glycines in DNP-DG. From the dependence of the magnetization transfer on the irradiation time, the cross relaxation rates between the involved protons were estimated. The inferred distances between these protons of the hapten and certain tryptophan protons are 3-4 A. It is concluded that in the combining site of AN02 there is one tryptophan from the light chain and one tryptophan from the heavy chain that are very near the hapten. When all tyrosines and phenylalanines were perdeuterated and all tryptophan aromatic protons were deuterated except for the protons at positions 2 and 5, titration of the Fab fragments with variable amounts of paramagnetic hapten showed that one proton from the light chain tryptophan is near (less than 7 A) the unpaired electron and that three other protons are significantly closer than 15 A.

  7. Multi-level learning: improving the prediction of protein, domain and residue interactions by allowing information flow between levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Drew

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins interact through specific binding interfaces that contain many residues in domains. Protein interactions thus occur on three different levels of a concept hierarchy: whole-proteins, domains, and residues. Each level offers a distinct and complementary set of features for computationally predicting interactions, including functional genomic features of whole proteins, evolutionary features of domain families and physical-chemical features of individual residues. The predictions at each level could benefit from using the features at all three levels. However, it is not trivial as the features are provided at different granularity. Results To link up the predictions at the three levels, we propose a multi-level machine-learning framework that allows for explicit information flow between the levels. We demonstrate, using representative yeast interaction networks, that our algorithm is able to utilize complementary feature sets to make more accurate predictions at the three levels than when the three problems are approached independently. To facilitate application of our multi-level learning framework, we discuss three key aspects of multi-level learning and the corresponding design choices that we have made in the implementation of a concrete learning algorithm. 1 Architecture of information flow: we show the greater flexibility of bidirectional flow over independent levels and unidirectional flow; 2 Coupling mechanism of the different levels: We show how this can be accomplished via augmenting the training sets at each level, and discuss the prevention of error propagation between different levels by means of soft coupling; 3 Sparseness of data: We show that the multi-level framework compounds data sparsity issues, and discuss how this can be dealt with by building local models in information-rich parts of the data. Our proof-of-concept learning algorithm demonstrates the advantage of combining levels, and opens up

  8. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  9. The ovens of the industry of the cement and their contribution to the handling of solid residuals and dangerous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riveros Rojas, Marcelo

    1995-01-01

    The substitution of certain row matters in the process of elaboration of the cement, as flying ashes, polluted soils with petroleum, muds of the industry of the petroleum, oxides of the industry of the steel, foundry sand and tires, they can replace until 40% of the necessities of energy of a cement oven contributing to improve the conservation of the environment. This new technology is using with success in United States and some countries of Europe

  10. Robust cross-links in molluscan adhesive gels: testing for contributions from hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M; Robinson, T M; Salt, M D; Hamilton, K S; Silvia, B E; Blasiak, R

    2009-02-01

    The cross-linking interactions that provide cohesive strength to molluscan adhesive gels were investigated. Metal-based interactions have been shown to play an important role in the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud), but other types of interactions may also contribute to the glue's strength and their role has not been investigated. This study shows that treatments that normally disrupt hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions have little to no effect on the slug glue. High salt concentrations and non-ionic detergent do not affect the solubility of the proteins in the glue or the ability of the glue proteins to stiffen gels. In contrast, metal chelation markedly disrupts the gel. Experiments with gel filtration chromatography identify a 40 kDa protein that is a central component of the cross-links in the glue. This 40 kDa protein forms robust macromolecular aggregations that are stable even in the presence of high concentrations of salt, non-ionic detergent, urea or metal chelators. Metal chelation during glue secretion, however, may block some of these cross-links. Such robust, non-specific interactions in an aqueous environment are highly unusual for hydrogels and reflect an intriguing cross-linking mechanism.

  11. Three C-terminal residues from the sulphonylurea receptor contribute to the functional coupling between the KATP channel subunits SUR2A and Kir6.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Julien P; Revilloud, Jean; Moreau, Christophe J; Vivaudou, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are metabolic sensors formed by the association of the inward rectifier potassium channel Kir6.2 and the sulphonylurea receptor SUR2A. SUR2A adjusts channel gating as a function of intracellular ATP and ADP and is the target of pharmaceutical openers and blockers which, respectively, up- and down-regulate Kir6.2. In an effort to understand how effector binding to SUR2A translates into Kir6.2 gating modulation, we examined the role of a 65-residue SUR2A fragment linking transmembrane domain TMD2 and nucleotide-binding domain NBD2 that has been shown to interact with Kir6.2. This fragment of SUR2A was replaced by the equivalent residues of its close homologue, the multidrug resistance protein MRP1. The chimeric construct was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using the patch-clamp technique. We found that activation by MgADP and synthetic openers was greatly attenuated although apparent affinities were unchanged. Further chimeragenetic and mutagenetic studies showed that mutation of three residues, E1305, I1310 and L1313 (rat numbering), was sufficient to confer this defective phenotype. The same mutations had no effects on channel block by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide or by ATP, suggesting a role for these residues in activatory – but not inhibitory – transduction processes. These results indicate that, within the KATP channel complex, the proximal C-terminal of SUR2A is a critical link between ligand binding to SUR2A and Kir6.2 up-regulation. PMID:18450778

  12. Relative contribution of residual renal function and different measures of adequacy to survival in hemodialysis patients: an analysis of the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD)-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen, Fabian; Dekker, Friedo W.; van Manen, Jeannette G.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2004-01-01

    A high delivered Kt/V(urea) (dKt/V(urea)) is advocated in the U.S. National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines on hemodialysis (HD) adequacy, irrespective of the presence of residual renal function. The contribution of treatment adequacy and residual renal function to

  13. Optimal definition of inter-residual contact in globular proteins based on pairwise interaction energy calculations, its robustness, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fačkovec, Boris; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2012-10-25

    Although a contact is an essential measurement for the topology as well as strength of non-covalent interactions in biomolecules and their complexes, there is no general agreement in the definition of this feature. Most of the definitions work with simple geometric criteria which do not fully reflect the energy content or ability of the biomolecular building blocks to arrange their environment. We offer a reasonable solution to this problem by distinguishing between "productive" and "non-productive" contacts based on their interaction energy strength and properties. We have proposed a method which converts the protein topology into a contact map that represents interactions with statistically significant high interaction energies. We do not prove that these contacts are exclusively stabilizing, but they represent a gateway to thermodynamically important rather than geometry-based contacts. The process is based on protein fragmentation and calculation of interaction energies using the OPLS force field and relies on pairwise additivity of amino acid interactions. Our approach integrates the treatment of different types of interactions, avoiding the problems resulting from different contributions to the overall stability and the different effect of the environment. The first applications on a set of homologous proteins have shown the usefulness of this classification for a sound estimate of protein stability.

  14. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  15. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  16. Analysis of copy number variations in Holstein cows identify potential mechanisms contributing to differences in residual feed intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yali; Bickhart, Derek M; Chung, Hoyoung; Hutchison, Jana L; Norman, H Duane; Connor, Erin E; Liu, George E

    2012-11-01

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. In this study, we performed an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) using BovineHD SNP genotyping data from 147 Holstein cows identified as having high or low feed efficiency as estimated by residual feed intake (RFI). We detected 443 candidate CNV regions (CNVRs) that represent 18.4 Mb (0.6 %) of the genome. To investigate the functional impacts of CNVs, we created two groups of 30 individual animals with extremely low or high estimated breeding values (EBVs) for RFI, and referred to these groups as low intake (LI; more efficient) or high intake (HI; less efficient), respectively. We identified 240 (~9.0 Mb) and 274 (~10.2 Mb) CNVRs from LI and HI groups, respectively. Approximately 30-40 % of the CNVRs were specific to the LI group or HI group of animals. The 240 LI CNVRs overlapped with 137 Ensembl genes. Network analyses indicated that the LI-specific genes were predominantly enriched for those functioning in the inflammatory response and immunity. By contrast, the 274 HI CNVRs contained 177 Ensembl genes. Network analyses indicated that the HI-specific genes were particularly involved in the cell cycle, and organ and bone development. These results relate CNVs to two key variables, namely immune response and organ and bone development. The data indicate that greater feed efficiency relates more closely to immune response, whereas cattle with reduced feed efficiency may have a greater capacity for organ and bone development.

  17. Differential contributions of ubiquitin-modified APOBEC3G lysine residues to HIV-1 Vif-induced degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Tiffany; Shao, Qiujia; Wang, Weiran; Wang, Yudi; Wang, Chenliang; Kinlock, Ballington; Liu, Bindong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a host restriction factor that impedes HIV-1 replication. Viral integrity is salvaged by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), which mediates A3G polyubiquitination and subsequent cellular depletion. Previous studies have implied that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for Vif-induced degradation. However, the contribution of polyubiquitination to the rate of A3G degradation remains unclear. Here we show that A3G po...

  18. Identification of key amino acid residues in the hTGR5-nomilin interaction and construction of its binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takashi; Mita, Moeko; Ikari, Naho; Kuboyama, Ayane; Hashimoto, Shuzo; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ishiguro, Masaji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-01-01

    TGR5, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is activated by bile acids. Because TGR5 promotes energy expenditure and improves glucose homeostasis, it is recognized as a key target in treating metabolic diseases. We previously showed that nomilin, a citrus limonoid, activates TGR5 and confers anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemic effects in mice. Information on the TGR5-nomilin interaction regarding molecular structure, however, has not been reported. In the present study, we found that human TGR5 (hTGR5) shows higher nomilin responsiveness than does mouse TGR5 (mTGR5). Using mouse-human chimeric TGR5, we also found that three amino acid residues (Q77ECL1, R80ECL1, and Y893.29) are important in the hTGR5-nomilin interaction. Based on these results, an hTGR5-nomilin binding model was constructed using in silico docking simulation, demonstrating that four hydrophilic hydrogen-bonding interactions occur between nomilin and hTGR5. The binding mode of hTGR5-nomilin is vastly different from those of other TGR5 agonists previously reported, suggesting that TGR5 forms various binding patterns depending on the type of agonist. Our study promotes a better understanding of the structure of TGR5, and it may be useful in developing and screening new TGR5 agonists.

  19. Asymmetric dark matter: residual annihilations and self-interactions arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Baldes, Iason; Panci, Paolo; Petraki, Kalliopi; Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco

    Dark matter (DM) coupled to light mediators has been invoked to resolve the putative discrepancies between collisionless cold DM and galactic structure observations. However, $\\gamma$-ray searches and the CMB strongly constrain such scenarios. To ease the tension, we consider asymmetric DM. We show that, contrary to the common lore, detectable annihilations occur even for large asymmetries, and derive bounds from the CMB, $\\gamma$-ray, neutrino and antiproton searches. We then identify the viable space for self-interacting DM. Direct detection does not exclude this scenario, but provides a way to test it.

  20. Identifying stabilizing key residues in proteins using interresidue interaction energy matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biedermannová, Lada; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2008), s. 402-413 ISSN 0887-3585 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR GA203/06/1727; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : protein stabilisation * an-initio calculation * interaction energy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.419, year: 2008

  1. Interaction of acid mine drainage with Ordinary Portland Cement blended solid residues generated from active treatment of acid mine drainage with coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitari, Wilson M; Petrik, Leslie F; Key, David L; Okujeni, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash (FA) has been investigated as a possible treatment agent for Acid mine drainage (AMD) and established to be an alternative, cheap and economically viable agent compared to the conventional alkaline agents. However, this treatment option also leads to generation of solid residues (SR) that require disposal and one of the proposed disposal method is a backfill in coal mine voids. In this study, the interaction of the SR with AMD that is likely to be present in such backfill scenario was simulated by draining columns packed with SR and SR + 6% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) unsaturated with simulated AMD over a 6 month period. The evolving geochemistry of the liquid/solid (L/S) system was evaluated in-terms of the mineral phases likely or controlling contaminants attenuation at the different pH regimes generated. Stepwise acidification of the percolates was observed as the drainage progressed. Two pH buffer zones were observed (7.5-9 and 3-4) for SR and (11.2-11.3 and 3.5-4) for SR + 6% OPC. The solid residue cores (SR) appeared to have a significant buffering capacity, maintaining a neutral to slightly alkaline pH in the leachates for an extended period of time (97 days: L/S 4.3) while SR + 6% OPC reduced this neutralization capacity to 22 days (L/S 1.9). Interaction of AMD with SR or SR + 6% OPC generated alkaline conditions that favored precipitation of Fe, Al, Mn-(oxy) hydroxides, Fe and Ca-Al hydroxysulphates that greatly contributed to the contaminants removal. However, precipitation of these phases was restricted to the pH of the leachates remaining at neutral to circum-neutral levels. Backfill of mine voids with SR promises to be a feasible technology for the disposal of the SR but its success will greatly depend on the disposal scenario, AMD generated and the alkalinity generating potential of the SR. A disadvantage would be the possible re-dissolution of the precipitated phases at pH water column. However extrapolation of this concept to a field

  2. Identification of the gamma subunit-interacting residues on photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase, PDE6alpha '.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, A E; Artemyev, N O

    2000-12-29

    Photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE6) is the effector enzyme in the G protein-mediated visual transduction cascade. In the dark, the activity of PDE6 is shut off by the inhibitory gamma subunit (Pgamma). Chimeric proteins between cone PDE6alpha' and cGMP-binding and cGMP-specific PDE (PDE5) have been constructed and expressed in Sf9 cells to study the mechanism of inhibition of PDE6 catalytic activity by Pgamma. Substitution of the segment PDE5-(773-820) by the corresponding PDE6alpha'-(737-784) sequence in the wild-type PDE5 or in a PDE5/PDE6alpha' chimera containing the catalytic domain of PDE5 results in chimeric enzymes capable of inhibitory interaction with Pgamma. The catalytic properties of the chimeric PDEs remained similar to those of PDE5. Ala-scanning mutational analysis of the Pgamma-binding region, PDE6alpha'-(750-760), revealed PDE6alpha' residues essential for the interaction. The M758A mutation markedly impaired and the Q752A mutation moderately impaired the inhibition of chimeric PDE by Pgamma. The analysis of the catalytic properties of mutant PDEs and a model of the PDE6 catalytic domain suggest that residues Met(758) and Gln(752) directly bind Pgamma. A model of the PDE6 catalytic site shows that PDE6alpha'-(750-760) forms a loop at the entrance to the cGMP-binding pocket. Binding of Pgamma to Met(758) would effectively block access of cGMP to the catalytic cavity, providing a structural basis for the mechanism of PDE6 inhibition.

  3. Geometrical contributions to the exchange constants: Free electrons with spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2017-05-01

    Using thermal quantum field theory, we derive an expression for the exchange constant that resembles Fukuyama's formula for orbital magnetic susceptibility (OMS). Guided by this formal analogy between the exchange constant and OMS, we identify a contribution to the exchange constant that arises from the geometrical properties of the band structure in mixed phase space. We compute the exchange constants for free electrons and show that the geometrical contribution is generally important. Our formalism allows us to study the exchange constants in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. Thereby, we find sizable differences between the exchange constants of helical and cycloidal spin spirals. Furthermore, we discuss how to calculate the exchange constants based on a gauge-field approach in the case of the Rashba model with an additional exchange splitting, and we show that the exchange constants obtained from this gauge-field approach are in perfect agreement with those obtained from the quantum field theoretical method.

  4. The disordered C-terminal domain of human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 contributes to its stability via intramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hegde, Pavana M; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F; Li, Jing; Oezguen, Numan; Hilser, Vincent J; Tainer, John A; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-07-10

    NEIL1 [Nei (endonuclease VIII)-like protein 1], one of the five mammalian DNA glycosylases that excise oxidized DNA base lesions in the human genome to initiate base excision repair, contains an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD; ~100 residues), not conserved in its Escherichia coli prototype Nei. Although dispensable for NEIL1's lesion excision and AP lyase activities, this segment is required for efficient in vivo enzymatic activity and may provide an interaction interface for many of NEIL1's interactions with other base excision repair proteins. Here, we show that the CTD interacts with the folded domain in native NEIL1 containing 389 residues. The CTD is poised for local folding in an ordered structure that is induced in the purified fragment by osmolytes. Furthermore, deletion of the disordered tail lacking both Tyr and Trp residues causes a red shift in NEIL1's intrinsic Trp-specific fluorescence, indicating a more solvent-exposed environment for the Trp residues in the truncated protein, which also exhibits reduced stability compared to the native enzyme. These observations are consistent with stabilization of the native NEIL1 structure via intramolecular, mostly electrostatic, interactions that were disrupted by mutating a positively charged (Lys-rich) cluster of residues (amino acids 355-360) near the C-terminus. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis confirms the flexibility and dynamic nature of NEIL1's CTD, a feature that may be critical to providing specificity for NEIL1's multiple, functional interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PHILOSOPHY OF MIND; THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE EMERGING VISION OF MIND-BRAIN INTERACTION.

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    Paul Ruiz Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to contribute to the discussion of mind-brain interactions from an emergentism point of view of the Philosophy of Mind, using some of the naturalized theories. Some proposed bridges between mind and brain based on experimental naturalization are neuro-psychoanalysis, mirror neurons, and psychosomatics, among others. Naturalization can be achieved by earching for the link between psychological and biological processes. This biological-based approach can be developed avoiding mplification and reductionism of psychological processes. We discuss the access to new insights about the mind-brain relationship and its implications through neurophenomenology, from an emerging and interactionist point of view.

  6. Social inequalities in health: measuring the contribution of housing deprivation and social interactions for Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanos-Garrido, Rosa M

    2012-12-14

    Social factors have been proved to be main determinants of individuals' health. Recent studies have also analyzed the contribution of some of those factors, such as education and job status, to socioeconomic inequalities in health. The aim of this paper is to provide new evidence about the factors driving socioeconomic inequalities in health for the Spanish population by including housing deprivation and social interactions as health determinants. Cross-sectional study based on the Spanish sample of European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 2006. The concentration index measuring income-related inequality in health is decomposed into the contribution of each determinant. Several models are estimated to test the influence of different regressors for three proxies of ill-health. Health inequality favouring the better-off is observed in the distribution of self-assessed health, presence of chronic diseases and presence of limiting conditions. Inequality is mainly explained, besides age, by social factors such as labour status and financial deprivation. Housing deprivation contributes to pro-rich inequality in a percentage ranging from 7.17% to 13.85%, and social interactions from 6.16% to 10.19%. The contribution of some groups of determinants significantly differs depending on the ill-health variable used. Health inequalities can be mostly reduced or shaped by policy, as they are mainly explained by social determinants such as labour status, education and other socioeconomic conditions. The major role played on health inequality by variables taking part in social exclusion points to the need to focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  7. A charged residue at the subunit interface of PCNA promotes trimer formation by destabilizing alternate subunit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Ramaswamy, S.; Washington, M. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential accessory factor in DNA replication and repair, is a ring-shaped homotrimer. A novel nontrimeric structure of E113G-mutant PCNA protein is reported, which shows that this protein forms alternate subunit interactions. It is concluded that the charged side chain of Glu113 promotes normal trimer formation by destabilizing these alternate subunit interactions. Eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential replication accessory factor that interacts with a variety of proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. Each monomer of PCNA has an N-terminal domain A and a C-terminal domain B. In the structure of the wild-type PCNA protein, domain A of one monomer interacts with domain B of a neighboring monomer to form a ring-shaped trimer. Glu113 is a conserved residue at the subunit interface in domain A. Two distinct X-ray crystal structures have been determined of a mutant form of PCNA with a substitution at this position (E113G) that has previously been studied because of its effect on translesion synthesis. The first structure was the expected ring-shaped trimer. The second structure was an unanticipated nontrimeric form of the protein. In this nontrimeric form, domain A of one PCNA monomer interacts with domain A of a neighboring monomer, while domain B of this monomer interacts with domain B of a different neighboring monomer. The B–B interface is stabilized by an antiparallel β-sheet and appears to be structurally similar to the A–B interface observed in the trimeric form of PCNA. The A–A interface, in contrast, is primarily stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Because the E113G substitution is located on this hydrophobic surface, the A–A interface should be less favorable in the case of the wild-type protein. This suggests that the side chain of Glu113 promotes trimer formation by destabilizing these possible alternate subunit interactions

  8. Inverse gene-for-gene interactions contribute additively to tan spot susceptibility in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Zurn, Jason D; Kariyawasam, Gayan; Faris, Justin D; Shi, Gongjun; Hansen, Jana; Rasmussen, Jack B; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2017-06-01

    Tan spot susceptibility is conferred by multiple interactions of necrotrophic effector and host sensitivity genes. Tan spot of wheat, caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is an important disease in almost all wheat-growing areas of the world. The disease system is known to involve at least three fungal-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) that interact with the corresponding host sensitivity (S) genes in an inverse gene-for-gene manner to induce disease. However, it is unknown if the effects of these NE-S gene interactions contribute additively to the development of tan spot. In this work, we conducted disease evaluations using different races and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in a wheat recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two susceptible genotypes, LMPG-6 and PI 626573. The two parental lines each harbored a single known NE sensitivity gene with LMPG-6 having the Ptr ToxC sensitivity gene Tsc1 and PI 626573 having the Ptr ToxA sensitivity gene Tsn1. Transgressive segregation was observed in the population for all races. QTL mapping revealed that both loci (Tsn1 and Tsc1) were significantly associated with susceptibility to race 1 isolates, which produce both Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, and the two genes contributed additively to tan spot susceptibility. For isolates of races 2 and 3, which produce only Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, only Tsn1 and Tsc1 were associated with tan spot susceptibility, respectively. This work clearly demonstrates that tan spot susceptibility in this population is due primarily to two NE-S interactions. Breeders should remove both sensitivity genes from wheat lines to obtain high levels of tan spot resistance.

  9. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Stetz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allosteric interactions in the Hsp70 proteins are linked with their regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions. Despite significant progress in structural and functional characterization of the Hsp70 proteins fundamental questions concerning modularity of the allosteric interaction networks and hierarchy of signaling pathways in the Hsp70 chaperones remained largely unexplored and poorly understood. In this work, we proposed an integrated computational strategy that combined atomistic and coarse-grained simulations with coevolutionary analysis and network modeling of the residue interactions. A novel aspect of this work is the incorporation of dynamic residue correlations and coevolutionary residue dependencies in the construction of allosteric interaction networks and signaling pathways. We found that functional sites involved in allosteric regulation of Hsp70 may be characterized by structural stability, proximity to global hinge centers and local structural environment that is enriched by highly coevolving flexible residues. These specific characteristics may be necessary for regulation of allosteric structural transitions and could distinguish regulatory sites from nonfunctional conserved residues. The observed confluence of dynamics correlations and coevolutionary residue couplings with global networking features may determine modular organization of allosteric interactions and dictate localization of key mediating sites. Community analysis of the residue interaction networks revealed that concerted rearrangements of local interacting modules at the inter-domain interface may be responsible for global structural changes and a population shift in the DnaK chaperone. The inter-domain communities in the Hsp70 structures harbor the majority of regulatory residues involved in allosteric signaling, suggesting that these sites could be integral to the network organization and coordination of structural changes. Using a network-based formalism of

  10. Electrostatic contribution of surface charge residues to the stability of a thermophilic protein: benchmarking experimental and predicted pKa values.

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    Chi-Ho Chan

    Full Text Available Optimization of the surface charges is a promising strategy for increasing thermostability of proteins. Electrostatic contribution of ionizable groups to the protein stability can be estimated from the differences between the pKa values in the folded and unfolded states of a protein. Using this pKa-shift approach, we experimentally measured the electrostatic contribution of all aspartate and glutamate residues to the stability of a thermophilic ribosomal protein L30e from Thermococcus celer. The pKa values in the unfolded state were found to be similar to model compound pKas. The pKa values in both the folded and unfolded states obtained at 298 and 333 K were similar, suggesting that electrostatic contribution of ionizable groups to the protein stability were insensitive to temperature changes. The experimental pKa values for the L30e protein in the folded state were used as a benchmark to test the robustness of pKa prediction by various computational methods such as H++, MCCE, MEAD, pKD, PropKa, and UHBD. Although the predicted pKa values were affected by crystal contacts that may alter the side-chain conformation of surface charged residues, most computational methods performed well, with correlation coefficients between experimental and calculated pKa values ranging from 0.49 to 0.91 (p<0.01. The changes in protein stability derived from the experimental pKa-shift approach correlate well (r = 0.81 with those obtained from stability measurements of charge-to-alanine substituted variants of the L30e protein. Our results demonstrate that the knowledge of the pKa values in the folded state provides sufficient rationale for the redesign of protein surface charges leading to improved protein stability.

  11. Contribution of long-range interactions to the secondary structure of an unfolded globin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyukina, Daria V; Rajagopalan, Senapathy; Sekhar, Ashok; Fulmer, Eric C; Eun, Ye-Jin; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2010-09-08

    This work explores the effect of long-range tertiary contacts on the distribution of residual secondary structure in the unfolded state of an alpha-helical protein. N-terminal fragments of increasing length, in conjunction with multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, were employed. A protein representative of the ubiquitous globin fold was chosen as the model system. We found that, while most of the detectable alpha-helical population in the unfolded ensemble does not depend on the presence of the C-terminal region (corresponding to the native G and H helices), specific N-to-C long-range contacts between the H and A-B-C regions enhance the helical secondary structure content of the N terminus (A-B-C regions). The simple approach introduced here, based on the evaluation of N-terminal polypeptide fragments of increasing length, is of general applicability to identify the influence of long-range interactions in unfolded proteins. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anionic Sites, Fucose Residues and Class I Human Leukocyte Antigen Fate During Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Endothelial Cells

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    Stumbo Ana Carolina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii invades and proliferates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells where it resides in a parasitophorous vacuole. In order to analyze which components of the endothelial cell plasma membrane are internalized and become part of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, the culture of endothelial cells was labeled with cationized ferritin or UEA I lectin or anti Class I human leukocytte antigen (HLA before or after infection with T. gondii. The results showed no cationized ferritin and UEA I lectin in any parasitophorous vacuole membrane, however, the Class I HLA molecule labeling was observed in some endocytic vacuoles containing parasite until 1 h of interaction with T. gondii. After 24 h parasite-host cell interaction, the labeling was absent on the vacuolar membrane, but presents only in small vesicles near parasitophorous vacuole. These results suggest the anionic site and fucose residues are excluded at the time of parasitophorous vacuole formation while Class I HLA molecules are present only on a minority of Toxoplasma-containig vacuoles.

  13. Interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain in the hERG channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Liu, J; Jiang, M; Wu, D-M; Sonawane, K; Guy, H R; Tseng, G-N

    2005-10-01

    Studies on voltage-gated K channels such as Shaker have shown that positive charges in the voltage-sensor (S4) can form salt bridges with negative charges in the surrounding transmembrane segments in a state-dependent manner, and different charge pairings can stabilize the channels in closed or open states. The goal of this study is to identify such charge interactions in the hERG channel. This knowledge can provide constraints on the spatial relationship among transmembrane segments in the channel's voltage-sensing domain, which are necessary for modeling its structure. We first study the effects of reversing S4's positive charges on channel activation. Reversing positive charges at the outer (K525D) and inner (K538D) ends of S4 markedly accelerates hERG activation, whereas reversing the 4 positive charges in between either has no effect or slows activation. We then use the 'mutant cycle analysis' to test whether D456 (outer end of S2) and D411 (inner end of S1) can pair with K525 and K538, respectively. Other positive charges predicted to be able, or unable, to interact with D456 or D411 are also included in the analysis. The results are consistent with predictions based on the distribution of these charged residues, and confirm that there is functional coupling between D456 and K525 and between D411 and K538.

  14. Estimating the spatial scale of herbicide and soil interactions by nested sampling, hierarchical analysis of variance and residual maximum likelihood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Oliver R., E-mail: oliver.price@unilever.co [Warwick-HRI, University of Warwick, Wellesbourne, Warwick, CV32 6EF (United Kingdom); University of Reading, Soil Science Department, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6UR (United Kingdom); Oliver, Margaret A. [University of Reading, Soil Science Department, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6UR (United Kingdom); Walker, Allan [Warwick-HRI, University of Warwick, Wellesbourne, Warwick, CV32 6EF (United Kingdom); Wood, Martin [University of Reading, Soil Science Department, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6UR (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    An unbalanced nested sampling design was used to investigate the spatial scale of soil and herbicide interactions at the field scale. A hierarchical analysis of variance based on residual maximum likelihood (REML) was used to analyse the data and provide a first estimate of the variogram. Soil samples were taken at 108 locations at a range of separating distances in a 9 ha field to explore small and medium scale spatial variation. Soil organic matter content, pH, particle size distribution, microbial biomass and the degradation and sorption of the herbicide, isoproturon, were determined for each soil sample. A large proportion of the spatial variation in isoproturon degradation and sorption occurred at sampling intervals less than 60 m, however, the sampling design did not resolve the variation present at scales greater than this. A sampling interval of 20-25 m should ensure that the main spatial structures are identified for isoproturon degradation rate and sorption without too great a loss of information in this field. - Estimating the spatial scale of herbicide and soil interactions by nested sampling.

  15. Estimating the spatial scale of herbicide and soil interactions by nested sampling, hierarchical analysis of variance and residual maximum likelihood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Oliver R.; Oliver, Margaret A.; Walker, Allan; Wood, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An unbalanced nested sampling design was used to investigate the spatial scale of soil and herbicide interactions at the field scale. A hierarchical analysis of variance based on residual maximum likelihood (REML) was used to analyse the data and provide a first estimate of the variogram. Soil samples were taken at 108 locations at a range of separating distances in a 9 ha field to explore small and medium scale spatial variation. Soil organic matter content, pH, particle size distribution, microbial biomass and the degradation and sorption of the herbicide, isoproturon, were determined for each soil sample. A large proportion of the spatial variation in isoproturon degradation and sorption occurred at sampling intervals less than 60 m, however, the sampling design did not resolve the variation present at scales greater than this. A sampling interval of 20-25 m should ensure that the main spatial structures are identified for isoproturon degradation rate and sorption without too great a loss of information in this field. - Estimating the spatial scale of herbicide and soil interactions by nested sampling.

  16. Assessing the underlying breast cancer risk of Chinese females contributed by dietary intake of residual DDT from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengling; Zhao, Meirong; Zhou, Shanshan; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    The greatest concern over DDT exposure in China arose since the early 1990s for the rising breast cancer incidence, and the cause still remains to be elucidated. An extensive survey of DDT background in agricultural soils, covered the entire region of China, was conducted. DDT at concentrations greater than 100 ng/g (the China's Farmland Environmental Quality Evaluation Standards for Edible Agricultural Products) was found to impact 42.3 million Chinese population. Considering the geographical differences with diverse DDT contributions and different diet products and habits, the average daily dietary intake was modeled and estimated to be 0.34 μg/kg p,p'-DDE (the main bioactive constituent in DDT). Population attributable fraction derived from a case-control study from 78 women with breast cancer and 72 controls was used to assess the DDT exposure risk to breast cancer. Based on the estimated population attributable fraction with a median value of 0.6% (IQR 0.23-2.11%), the excess annual breast cancer incidence rate attributable to p,p'-DDE exposure averaged 0.06×10(-5) with significant spatial variations varying from 0.00021×10(-5) to 11.05×10(-5) in Chinese females. Exposure to DDT is a contributor to breast cancer, but the overall limited relative risk and population attributable fraction imply confounding factors for breast cancer in Chinese females. Exposure risk in a regional scale helps understand the cause and prevention of breast cancer. Our mapping and modeling method could be used to assess other environmental carcinogens and related cancer diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The relative contribution of waves, tides, and nontidal residuals to extreme total water levels on U.S. West Coast sandy beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Katherine A.; Ruggiero, Peter; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    To better understand how individual processes combine to cause flooding and erosion events, we investigate the relative contribution of tides, waves, and nontidal residuals to extreme total water levels (TWLs) at the shoreline of U.S. West Coast sandy beaches. Extreme TWLs, defined as the observed annual maximum event and the simulated 100 year return level event, peak in Washington, and are on average larger in Washington and Oregon than in California. The relative contribution of wave-induced and still water levels (SWL) to the 100 year TWL event is similar to that of the annual maximum event; however, the contribution of storm surge to the SWL doubles across events. Understanding the regional variability of TWLs will lead to a better understanding of how sea level rise, changes in storminess, and possible changes in the frequency of major El Niños may impact future coastal flooding and erosion along the U.S. West Coast and elsewhere.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Barnase: Contribution of Noncovalent Intramolecular Interaction to Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ribonuclease Barnase (RNase Ba is a 12 kD (kilodalton small extracellular ribonuclease. It has broad application prospects in agriculture, clinical medicine, pharmaceutical, and so forth. In this work, the thermal stability of Barnase has been studied using molecular dynamics simulation at different temperatures. The present study focuses on the contribution of noncovalent intramolecular interaction to protein stability and how they affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. Profiles of root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation identify thermostable and thermosensitive regions of Barnase. Analyses of trajectories in terms of secondary structure content, intramolecular hydrogen bonds and salt bridge interactions indicate distinct differences in different temperature simulations. In the simulations, Four three-member salt bridge networks (Asp8-Arg110-Asp12, Arg83-Asp75-Arg87, Lys66-Asp93-Arg69, and Asp54-Lys27-Glu73 have been identified as critical salt bridges for thermostability which are maintained stably at higher temperature enhancing stability of three hydrophobic cores. The study may help enlighten our knowledge of protein structural properties, noncovalent interactions which can stabilize secondary peptide structures or promote folding, and also help understand their actions better. Such an understanding is required for designing efficient enzymes with characteristics for particular applications at desired working temperatures.

  19. A novel interaction fingerprint derived from per atom score contributions: exhaustive evaluation of interaction fingerprint performance in docking based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Julia B; Humbeck, Lina; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2018-03-16

    Protein ligand interaction fingerprints are a powerful approach for the analysis and assessment of docking poses to improve docking performance in virtual screening. In this study, a novel interaction fingerprint approach (PADIF, protein per atom score contributions derived interaction fingerprint) is presented which was specifically designed for utilising the GOLD scoring functions' atom contributions together with a specific scoring scheme. This allows the incorporation of known protein-ligand complex structures for a target-specific scoring. Unlike many other methods, this approach uses weighting factors reflecting the relative frequency of a specific interaction in the references and penalizes destabilizing interactions. In addition, and for the first time, an exhaustive validation study was performed that assesses the performance of PADIF and two other interaction fingerprints in virtual screening. Here, PADIF shows superior results, and some rules of thumb for a successful use of interaction fingerprints could be identified.

  20. Characterization of conserved arginine residues on Cdt1 that affect licensing activity and interaction with Geminin or Mcm complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhiying; Ode, Koji L; Shindo, Mayumi; Takisawa, Haruhiko; Masai, Hisao

    2016-05-02

    All organisms ensure once and only once replication during S phase through a process called replication licensing. Cdt1 is a key component and crucial loading factor of Mcm complex, which is a central component for the eukaryotic replicative helicase. In higher eukaryotes, timely inhibition of Cdt1 by Geminin is essential to prevent rereplication. Here, we address the mechanism of DNA licensing using purified Cdt1, Mcm and Geminin proteins in combination with replication in Xenopus egg extracts. We mutagenized the 223th arginine of mouse Cdt1 (mCdt1) to cysteine or serine (R-S or R-C, respectively) and 342nd and 346th arginines constituting an arginine finger-like structure to alanine (RR-AA). The RR-AA mutant of Cdt1 could not only rescue the DNA replication activity in Cdt1-depleted extracts but also its specific activity for DNA replication and licensing was significantly increased compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the R223 mutants were partially defective in rescue of DNA replication and licensing. Biochemical analyses of these mutant Cdt1 proteins indicated that the RR-AA mutation disabled its functional interaction with Geminin, while R223 mutations resulted in ablation in interaction with the Mcm2∼7 complex. Intriguingly, the R223 mutants are more susceptible to the phosphorylation-induced inactivation or chromatin dissociation. Our results show that conserved arginine residues play critical roles in interaction with Geminin and Mcm that are crucial for proper conformation of the complexes and its licensing activity.

  1. THE CONTRIBUTION OF SOCIOCULTURAL THEORY TO THE PROBLEM OF INSTRUCTIONAL INTERACTIONS IN THE SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernova, N.A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the concept of a continuum of regulation being also important to understanding Vygotsky’s view of cognitive development which clearly suggests that communicative collaboration with adults or more skilled peers contributes to the development of self-regulation, that is, the capacity for independent problem solving and self-directed activity. Attention is drawn to the fact that in the language classroom, using sociocultural theory and its tenets as a framework, we would see a highly interactive classroom, where the students’ zone of proximal development is identified through strategies such as portfolios, and dialogue journals. Necessity of compiling a textbook based on the above-mentioned principles is stressed.

  2. Contribution of the study of a nuclear reactor accident: residual power aspects and thermodynamic of U-UO_2 and UO_2-ZrO_2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baichi, Mehdi

    2001-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of early delocalization and fission product releases during the formation of corium coming from a nuclear reactor accident. The first part deals with an analysis of corium cooling. The contribution to the power of each corium element has been calculated with time. The main elements are represented but the addition of Pu, Mo and Nb has been proposed. The last release experimental data taken into account result in a loss of residual power of 25% exclusive of corium between the emergency stop and ten days. The second part deals with the early delocalization observed during Vercors experiments. A critical selection on the U-UO_2 and UO_2-ZrO_2 systems has been carried out. In order to complete the small and inconsistent data, thermodynamic activity measurements have been performed by mass spectrometry. The UO_2 activity on UO_2-ZrO_2 presents a positive deviation from ideality at 2200 K and approximates ideality at 2400 K. All the data have been used for optimizing the systems with Thermo-Calc. This work has allowed to calculate the ternary systems and to define the required approach to analyze the metallic phase and corium oxides densities. (author) [fr

  3. Conserved residues in the coiled-coil pocket of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 are essential for viral replication and interhelical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Hongmei; Konstantinidis, Alex K.; Stewart, Kent D.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Ng, Teresa; Swift, Kerry; Matayoshi, Edmund D.; Kati, Warren; Kohlbrenner, William; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 plays an important role in mediating the fusion of HIV with host cells. During the fusion process, three N-terminal helices and three C-terminal helices pack in an anti-parallel direction to form a six-helix bundle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the gp41 core demonstrated that within each coiled-coil interface, there is a deep and large pocket, formed by a cluster of residues in the N-helix coiled-coil. In this report, we systematically analyzed the role of seven conserved residues that are either lining or packing this pocket on the infectivity and interhelical interaction using novel approaches. Our results show that residues L568, V570, W571, and K574 of the N-helix that are lining the side chain and right wall of the pocket are important for establishing a productive infection. Mutations V570A and W571A completely abolished replication, while replication of the L568A and K574A mutants was significantly attenuated relative to wild type. Similarly, residues W628, W631, and I635 of the C-helix that insert into the pocket are essential for infectivity. The impaired infectivity of these seven mutants is in part attributed to the loss in binding affinity of the interhelical interaction. Molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the coiled-coil further shows that alanine substitution of those residues disrupts the hydrophobic interaction between the N- and C-helix. These results suggest that the conserved residues in the coiled-coil domain play a key role in HIV infection and this coiled-coil pocket is a good target for development of inhibitors against HIV. In addition, our data indicate that the novel fluorescence polarization assay described in this study could be valuable in screening for inhibitors that block the interhelical interaction and HIV entry

  4. Maternal Dispositional Empathy and Electrodermal Reactivity: Interactive Contributions to Maternal Sensitivity with Toddler-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix’s (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent’s empathic tendencies and his/her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry versus laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child’s distress versus non-distress). PMID:24955589

  5. Interactions of the gasotransmitters contribute to microvascular tone (dysregulation in the preterm neonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Dyson

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulphide (H2S, nitric oxide (NO, and carbon monoxide (CO are involved in transitional microvascular tone dysregulation in the preterm infant; however there is conflicting evidence on the interaction of these gasotransmitters, and their overall contribution to the microcirculation in newborns is not known. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of all 3 gasotransmitters, characterise their interrelationships and elucidate their combined effects on microvascular blood flow.90 preterm neonates were studied at 24h postnatal age. Microvascular studies were performed by laser Doppler. Arterial COHb levels (a measure of CO were determined through co-oximetry. NO was measured as nitrate and nitrite in urine. H2S was measured as thiosulphate by liquid chromatography. Relationships between levels of the gasotransmitters and microvascular blood flow were assessed through partial correlation controlling for the influence of gestational age. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow and derive a theoretical model of their interactions.No relationship was observed between NO and CO (p = 0.18, r = 0.18. A positive relationship between NO and H2S (p = 0.008, r = 0.28 and an inverse relationship between CO and H2S (p = 0.01, r = -0.33 exists. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow. The model with the best fit is presented.The relationships between NO and H2S, and CO and H2S may be of importance in the preterm newborn, particularly as NO levels in males are associated with higher H2S levels and higher microvascular blood flow and CO in females appears to convey protection against vascular dysregulation. Here we present a theoretical model of these interactions and their overall effects on microvascular flow in the preterm newborn, upon which future mechanistic studies may be based.

  6. Repaglinide-gemfibrozil drug interaction: inhibition of repaglinide glucuronidation as a potential additional contributing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Chen, Weiqi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Ling; Hong, Yang; Tian, Yuan; Li, Wenying; Zhang, Yueping; Tang, Yuwei; Zhang, Hongjian; Humphreys, William Griffith; Rodrigues, A David

    2010-12-01

    To further explore the mechanism underlying the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil, alone or in combination with itraconazole. Repaglinide metabolism was assessed in vitro (human liver subcellular fractions, fresh human hepatocytes, and recombinant enzymes) and the resulting incubates were analyzed, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and radioactivity counting, to identify and quantify the different metabolites therein. Chemical inhibitors, in addition to a trapping agent, were also employed to elucidate the importance of each metabolic pathway. Finally, a panel of human liver microsomes (genotyped for UGT1A1*28 allele status) was used to determine the importance of UGT1A1 in the direct glucuronidation of repaglinide. The results of the present study demonstrate that repaglinide can undergo direct glucuronidation, a pathway that can possibly contribute to the interaction with gemfibrozil. For example, [³H]-repaglinide formed glucuronide and oxidative metabolites (M2 and M4) when incubated with primary human hepatocytes. Gemfibrozil effectively inhibited (∼78%) both glucuronide and M4 formation, but had a minor effect on M2 formation. Concomitantly, the overall turnover of repaglinide was also inhibited (∼80%), and was completely abolished when gemfibrozil was co-incubated with itraconazole. These observations are in qualitative agreement with the in vivo findings. UGT1A1 plays a significant role in the glucuronidation of repaglinide. In addition, gemfibrozil and its glucuronide inhibit repaglinide glucuronidation and the inhibition by gemfibrozil glucuronide is time-dependent. Inhibition of UGT enzymes, especially UGT1A1, by gemfibrozil and its glucuronide is an additional mechanism to consider when rationalizing the interaction between repaglinide and gemfibrozil. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Low-energy structure studies of odd-odd deformed nuclei and the coriolis and residual interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    The nuclear level structure of /sup 176/Lu, /sup 170/Tm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 160/Tb have been studied by means of the /sup 177/Hf(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 176/Lu, /sup 171/Yb(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 170/Tm, /sup 167/Er(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 166/Ho, and /sup 161/Dy(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 160/Tb reactions and with the use of previously published (d,p) spectroscopy and gamma transitions from the (n,..gamma..) reactions. The (t,..cap alpha..) reactions have been performed and analyzed with 17 MeV tritons and the Los Alamos Q3D spectrometer. Eighty-one new rotational states in excited proton configurations or vibrational excited states are proposed. An independent parameterization of the Coriolis interaction is presented, which leads to satisfactory results in reproducing experimental single-particle transfer reaction cross-sections by theoretical calculations. The anomalous population of the excited neutron configurations (404 reduces to -624 up arrow) in /sup 176/Lu and (411 reduces to +- 512 up arrow) in /sup 170/Tm, and the anomalously low (t,..cap alpha..) cross-sections of the (411 up arrow +- 633 up arrow) configuration in /sup 166/Ho are observed. Qualitative explanation of the anomalies is presented in terms of the mixing of states which satisfy the requirement delta/sub I'/,/sub I/delta/sub K'/,/sub K/. Off-diagonal H/sub INT/ matrix elements are calculated, which show that the residual interaction cannot be used to account for the magnitude of the cross-sections observed.

  8. Inhibition by etomoxir of rat liver carnitine octanoyltransferase is produced through the co-ordinate interaction with two histidine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, M; Clotet, J; Rubí, B; Serra, D; Ariño, J; Hegardt, F G; Asins, G

    2000-10-15

    Rat peroxisomal carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT), which facilitates the transport of medium-chain fatty acids through the peroxisomal membrane, is irreversibly inhibited by the hypoglycaemia-inducing drug etomoxir. To identify the molecular basis of this inhibition, cDNAs encoding full-length wild-type COT, two different variant point mutants and one variant double mutant from rat peroxisomal COT were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism devoid of endogenous COT activity. The recombinant mutated enzymes showed activity towards both carnitine and decanoyl-CoA in the same range as the wild type. Whereas the wild-type version expressed in yeast was inhibited by etomoxir in an identical manner to COT from rat liver peroxisomes, the activity of the enzyme containing the double mutation H131A/H340A was completely insensitive to etomoxir. Individual point mutations H131A and H340A also drastically reduced sensitivity to etomoxir. Taken together, these results indicate that the two histidine residues, H131 and H340, are the sites responsible for inhibition by etomoxir and that the full inhibitory properties of the drug will be shown only if both histidines are intact at the same time. Our data demonstrate that both etomoxir and malonyl-CoA inhibit COT by interacting with the same sites.

  9. The importance of residues 195-206 of human blood clotting factor VII in the interaction of factor VII with tissue factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W.; Kazim, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that human and bovine factor VII exhibit 71% amino acid sequence identity. In the present study, competition binding experiments revealed that the interaction of human factor VII with cell-surface human tissue factor was not inhibited by 100-fold molar excess of bovine factor VII. This finding indicated that bovine and human factor VII are not structurally homologous in the region(s) where human factor VII interacts with human tissue factor. On this premise, the authors synthesized three peptides corresponding to regions of human factor VII that exhibited marked structural dissimilarity to bovine factor VII; these regions of dissimilarity included residues 195-206, 263-274, and 314-326. Peptide 195-206 inhibited the interaction of factor VII with cell-surface tissue factor and the activation of factor X by a complex of factor VIIa and tissue factor half-maximally at concentrations of 1-2 mM. A structurally rearranged form of peptide 195-206 containing an aspartimide residue inhibited these reactions half-maximally at concentrations of 250-300 μM. In contrast, neither peptide 263-274 nor peptide 314-326, at 2 mM concentration, significantly affected either factor VIIa interaction with tissue factor or factor VIIa-mediated activation of factor X. The data provide presumptive evidence that residues 195-206 of human factor VII are involved in the interaction of human factor VII with the extracellular domain of human tissue factor apoprotein

  10. Complex T Cell Interactions Contribute to Helicobacter pylori Gastritis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Brian M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Poe, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  11. Contribution of post-harvest agricultural paddy residue fires in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain to ambient carcinogenic benzenoids, toxic isocyanic acid and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praphulla Chandra, Boggarapu; Sinha, Vinayak

    2016-04-01

    benzene and ensure compliance with the NAAQS. Calculations of excessive lifetime cancer risk due to benzene amount to 25 and 10 per million inhabitants for children and adults, respectively, exceeding the USEPA threshold of 1 per million inhabitants. Annual exposure to isocyanic acid was close to 1 ppb, the concentration considered to be sufficient to enhance risks for cardiovascular diseases and cataracts. This study makes a case for urgent mitigation of post-harvest paddy residue fires as the unknown synergistic effect of multi-pollutant exposure due to emissions from this anthropogenic source may be posing grave health risks to the population of the N.W. IGP. This work has been published very recently and the citation to the complete work is: B.P. Chandra, Vinayak Sinha, Contribution of post-harvest agricultural paddy residue fires in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain to ambient carcinogenic benzenoids, toxic isocyanic acid and carbon monoxide, Environment International, Volume 88, March 2016, Pages 187-197, ISSN 0160-4120, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2015.12.025.

  12. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Cooper, C.A.; Šimůnek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil–plant–atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001–December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments.

  13. Separate and interactive contributions of weak inhibitory control and threat sensitivity to prediction of suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Noah C; Sellbom, Martin; Sourander, Andre; Kendler, Kenneth S; Joiner, Thomas E; Drislane, Laura E; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Elonheimo, Henrik; Parkkola, Kai; Multimaki, Petteri; Patrick, Christopher J

    2015-04-30

    Biobehavioral dispositions can serve as valuable referents for biologically oriented research on core processes with relevance to many psychiatric conditions. The present study examined two such dispositional variables-weak response inhibition (or disinhibition; INH-) and threat sensitivity (or fearfulness; THT+)-as predictors of the serious transdiagnostic problem of suicide risk in two samples: male and female outpatients from a U.S. clinic (N=1078), and a population-based male military cohort from Finland (N=3855). INH- and THT+ were operationalized through scores on scale measures of disinhibition and fear/fearlessness, known to be related to DSM-defined clinical conditions and brain biomarkers. Suicide risk was assessed by clinician ratings (clinic sample) and questionnaires (both samples). Across samples and alternative suicide indices, INH- and THT+ each contributed uniquely to prediction of suicide risk-beyond internalizing and externalizing problems in the case of the clinic sample where diagnostic data were available. Further, in both samples, INH- and THT+ interactively predicted suicide risk, with individuals scoring concurrently high on both dispositions exhibiting markedly augmented risk. Findings demonstrate that dispositional constructs of INH- and THT+ are predictive of suicide risk, and hold potential as referents for biological research on suicidal behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Personalized Social Network Activity Feeds for Increased Interaction and Content Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo eBerkovsky

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks were originally conceived as means of sharing information and activities with friends, and their success has been one of the primary contributors of the tremendous growth of the Web. Social network activity feeds were devised as a means to aggregate recent actions of friends into a convenient list. But the volume of actions and content generated by social network users is overwhelming, such that keeping users up-to-date with friend activities is an ongoing challenge for social network providers. Personalization has been proposed as a solution to combat social network information overload and help users to identify the nuggets of relevant information in the incoming flood of network activities. In this paper, we propose and thoroughly evaluate a personalized model for predicting the relevance of the activity feed items, which informs the ranking of the feeds and facilitates personalization. Results of a live study show that the proposed feed personalization approach successfully identifies and promotes relevant feed items and boosts the uptake of the feeds. In addition, it increases the contribution of user-generated content to the social network and spurs interaction between users.

  15. Interactive contribution of grain size and grain orientation to coercivity of melt spun ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, N.; Li, G.; Yao, W.J.; Wen, X.X.

    2010-01-01

    During melt spinning process, the improvement of certain grain orientation and the refinement of grain size with surface velocity have interactive and contradictory effects on the magnetic properties. The contributions of these effects have seldom been taken into account and they were discussed in this paper via Fe-2, 4, 6.5 wt% Si alloys. Heat treatment at 1173 K for 1 h was performed to show the annealing impact. The X-ray diffraction patterns show that the high surface velocity and heat treatment increase the intensity ratio of line (2 0 0) to (1 1 0) of A2 phase. The (2 0 0) line corresponds to (2 0 0) plane in direction, easy magnetization direction of α-Fe phase in Fe-Si alloy. The improvement of this grain orientation with the surface velocity decreases the coercivity, which should increase due to the grain refinement. It is revealed that the texture promoted by the anisotropic heat release during melt spinning process is one factor to improve the magnetic properties and should be considered when preparing soft magnetic materials.

  16. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  17. Elicitin-induced distal systemic resistance in plants is mediated through the protein-protein interactions influenced by selected lysine residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana eUhlíková

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Elicitins are a family of small proteins with sterol-binding activity that are secreted by Phytophthora and Pythium spp. classified as oomycete PAMPs. Although alfa- and beta-elicitins bind with the same affinity to one high affinity binding site on the plasma membrane, beta-elicitins (possessing 6-7 lysine residues are generally 50- to 100-fold more active at inducing distal HR and systemic resistance than the alfa-isoforms (with only 1-3 lysine residues.To examine the role of lysine residues in elicitin biological activity, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to prepare a series of beta-elicitin cryptogein variants with mutations on specific lysine residues. In contrast to direct infiltration of protein into leaves, application to the stem revealed a rough correlation between protein’s charge and biological activity, resulting in protection against Phytophthora parasitica. A detailed analysis of proteins’ movement in plants showed no substantial differences in distribution through phloem indicating differences in consequent apoplastic or symplastic transport. In this process, an important role of homodimer formation together with the ability to form a heterodimer with potential partner represented by endogenous plants LTPs is suggested. Our work demonstrates a key role of selected lysine residues in these interactions and stresses the importance of processes preceding elicitin recognition responsible for induction of distal systemic resistance.

  18. The presence of modifiable residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin is not crucial for precursor nisin interactions with NisB- and NisC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem Khusainov

    Full Text Available Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin-nisin modification enzymes interactions, since it has previously been shown that the construct containing only the nisin leader sequence is not sufficient to pull-down the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. Serines and threonines in the core peptide part are the residues that NisB specifically dehydrates, and cysteines are the residues that NisC stereospecifically couples to the dehydrated amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that increasing the number of negatively charged residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin, which are absent in wild-type nisin, does not abolish binding of precursor nisin to the modification enzymes NisB and NisC, but dramatically decreases the antimicrobial potency of these nisin mutants. An unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all serines and threonines in the core peptide part and an unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all cysteines in the core peptide part still bind the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC, suggesting that these residues are not essential for direct interactions with the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. These results are important for lantibiotic engineering studies.

  19. Ion-ion interactions in the denatured state contribute to the stabilization of CutA1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutani, Katsuhide; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Naitow, Hisashi; Joti, Yasumasa

    2018-05-16

    In order to elucidate features of the denatured state ensembles that exist in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions, we performed 1.4-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at 400 K and 450 K using the monomer subunits of three CutA1 mutants from Escherichia coli: an SH-free mutant (Ec0SH) with denaturation temperature (T d ) = 85.6 °C, a hydrophobic mutant (Ec0VV) with T d  = 113.3 °C, and an ionic mutant (Ec0VV_6) with T d  = 136.8 °C. The occupancy of salt bridges by the six substituted charged residues in Ec0VV_6 was 140.1% at 300 K and 89.5% at 450 K, indicating that even in the denatured state, salt bridge occupancy was high, approximately 60% of that at 300 K. From these results, we can infer that proteins from hyperthermophiles with a high ratio of charged residues are stabilized by a decrease in conformational entropy due to ion-ion interactions in the denatured state. The mechanism must be comparable to the stabilization conferred by disulfide bonds within a protein. This suggests that introduction of charged residues, to promote formation of salt bridges in the denatured state, would be a simple way to rationally design stability-enhanced mutants.

  20. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  1. Residues essential for Panton-Valentine leukocidin S component binding to its cell receptor suggest both plasticity and adaptability in its interaction surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit-Joseph Laventie

    Full Text Available Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a bicomponent staphylococcal leukotoxin, is involved in the poor prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia. The present study aimed to elucidate the binding mechanism of PVL and in particular its cell-binding domain. The class S component of PVL, LukS-PV, is known to ensure cell targeting and exhibits the highest affinity for the neutrophil membrane (Kd∼10(-10 M compared to the class F component of PVL, LukF-PV (Kd∼10(-9 M. Alanine scanning mutagenesis was used to identify the residues involved in LukS-PV binding to the neutrophil surface. Nineteen single alanine mutations were performed in the rim domain previously described as implicated in cell membrane interactions. Positions were chosen in order to replace polar or exposed charged residues and according to conservation between leukotoxin class S components. Characterization studies enabled to identify a cluster of residues essential for LukS-PV binding, localized on two loops of the rim domain. The mutations R73A, Y184A, T244A, H245A and Y250A led to dramatically reduced binding affinities for both human leukocytes and undifferentiated U937 cells expressing the C5a receptor. The three-dimensional structure of five of the mutants was determined using X-ray crystallography. Structure analysis identified residues Y184 and Y250 as crucial in providing structural flexibility in the receptor-binding domain of LukS-PV.

  2. Interactions between residue placement and earthworm ecological strategy affect aggregate turnover and N2O dynamics in agricultural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannopoulos, G.; Pulleman, M.M.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies using epigeic and anecic earthworms have shown that earthworm activity can considerably increase nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from crop residues in soils. However, the universality of this effect across earthworm functional groups and its underlying mechanisms remain

  3. Derivative interactions and perturbative UV contributions in N Higgs doublet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuta, Yohei [KEK Theory Center, KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasuhiro [Universidad de Granada, Deportamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Facultad de Ciencias and CAFPE, Granada (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    We study the Higgs derivative interactions on models including arbitrary number of the Higgs doublets. These interactions are generated by two ways. One is higher order corrections of composite Higgs models, and the other is integration of heavy scalars and vectors. In the latter case, three point couplings between the Higgs doublets and these heavy states are the sources of the derivative interactions. Their representations are constrained to couple with the doublets. We explicitly calculate all derivative interactions generated by integrating out. Their degrees of freedom and conditions to impose the custodial symmetry are discussed. We also study the vector boson scattering processes with a couple of two Higgs doublet models to see experimental signals of the derivative interactions. They are differently affected by each heavy field. (orig.)

  4. Contributions to the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report contains three papers presented in the 7th International Conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices held in Princeton (USA) 5-9 May 1986, all referred to the FT Tokamak

  5. Interactions between the FTO and GNB3 genes contribute to varied clinical phenotypes in hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    Full Text Available The genes FTO and GNB3 are implicated in essential hypertension but their interaction remains to be explored. This study investigates the role of interaction between the two genes in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension.In a case-control study comprising 750 controls and 550 patients, interaction between the polymorphisms of FTO and GNB3 was examined using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR. The influence of interaction on clinical phenotypes like systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and body mass index was also investigated. The 3-locus MDR model comprising FTO rs8050136C/A and GNB3 rs1129649T/C and rs5443C/T emerged as the best disease conferring model. Moreover, the interacted-genotypes having either 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 risk alleles correlated with linearly increasing odds ratios of 1.91 (P = 0.027; 3.93 (P = 2.08E-06; 4.51 (P = 7.63E-07; 7.44 (P = 3.66E-08 and 11.57 (P = 1.18E-05, respectively, when compared with interacted-genotypes devoid of risk alleles. Furthermore, interactions among haplotypes of FTO (H1-9 and GNB3 (Ha-d differed by >1.5-fold for protective-haplotypes, CTGGC+TC [H2+Ha] and CTGAC+TC [H4+Ha] (OR = 0.39, P = 0.003; OR = 0.22, P = 6.86E-05, respectively and risk-haplotypes, AAAGC+CT [H3+Hc] and AAAGC+TT [H3+Hd] (OR = 2.91, P = 9.98E-06; OR = 2.50, P = 0.004, respectively compared to individual haplotypes. Moreover, the effectiveness of gene-gene interaction was further corroborated with a 1.29-, 1.25- and 1.38-fold higher SBP, MAP and BMI, respectively, in patients having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hc and 2.48-fold higher SBP having risk interacted-haplotype H3+Hd compared to individual haplotypes.Interactions between genetic variants of FTO and GNB3 influence clinical parameters to augment hypertension.

  6. Role of rho exchange in isobar contributions to the NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnoud, X.; Holinde, K.; Machleidt, R.

    1984-01-01

    The fourth-order noniterative diagrams of πrho exchange involving nucleon-isobar intermediate states are evaluated in momentum space in the framework of noncovariant perturbation theory. It is shown that the sum of all time orderings (iterative plus noniterative) can be reasonably well approximated by twice the isoscalar piece of the iterative ones (which are much simpler to evaluate). The same approximation is used in order to describe the sum of all time orderings for the corresponding diagrams involving double-isobar intermediate states. The role of these contributions is studied in NN scattering. Especially, it is investigated whether such contributions can quantitatively replace part of the ω-exchange contribution used in one-boson-exchange models

  7. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  8. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Sitek, Anna [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Abdullah, Nzar Rauf [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Science Education, School of Science, University of Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region (Iraq); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, Miaoli (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University (Iceland)

    2016-05-15

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar; Sitek, Anna; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field.

  10. Contribution to the study of the thermal interaction between uranium oxide and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the experimental results of the fuel-coolant interactions carried out in the CORECT II device at the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre. A description is then given of a theoretical model of interaction which comprises three points: first a study of the coolant, that is to say of its hydrodynamic and thermodynamic behaviour, then the study of the fuel, namely the phenomena of fragmentation and heat transfer between the fuel and the coolant, and last the treatment of heat leaks to the structures. A study follows on the effect of the various parameters on the theoretical model as well as the effects of the assumptions on the fragmentation, transfer and losses of heat. Last, the interpretations of a few experiments carried out with two models of fragmentation are described. A discussion of these interpretations enables some generalizations to be made on the nature of the thermal interaction [fr

  11. Quantum oscillation signatures of spin-orbit interactions controlling the residual nodal bilayer-splitting in underdoped high-Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil; Shekhter, Arkady

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the origin of the small residual nodal bilayer-splitting in the underdoped high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x using the results of recently published angle-resolved quantum oscillation data [Sebastian et al., Nature 511, 61 (2014)]. A crucial clue to the origin of the residual bilayer-splitting is found to be provided by the anomalously small Zeeman-splitting of some of the observed cyclotron orbits. We show that such an anomalously Zeeman-splitting (or small effective g-factor) for a subset of orbits can be explained by spin-orbit interactions, which become significant in the nodal regions as a result of the vanishing bilayer coupling. The primary effect of spin-orbit interactions is to cause quasiparticles traversing the nodal region of the Brillouin zone to undergo a spin flip. We suggest that the Rashba-like spin-orbit interactions, naturally present in bilayer systems, have the right symmetry and magnitude to give rise to a network of coupled orbits consistent with experimental observations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x. This work is supported by the DOEm BES proposal LANLF100, while the magnet lab is supported by the NSF and Florida State.

  12. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida-López, Sergio; Extremera, Natalio; Rey, Lourdes

    2017-09-29

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional intelligence boosted engagement when the levels of role ambiguity were higher. Our findings suggest the need for future research examining the impact of job hindrances on the links between emotional intelligence and teachers' occupational well-being indicators. Finally, the implications for emotional intelligence training in education are discussed.

  13. Continuum contribution to excitonic four-wave mixing due to interaction-induced nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1996-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of ultrafast transient four-wave mixing of GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells for coherent excitation of exciton and continuum states. The signal appears at the exciton resonance and is shown to consist of two contributions: an intense spectrall...

  14. Causal functional contributions and interactions in the attention network of the brain: an objective multi-perturbation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2016-06-01

    Spatial attention is a prime example for the distributed network functions of the brain. Lesion studies in animal models have been used to investigate intact attentional mechanisms as well as perspectives for rehabilitation in the injured brain. Here, we systematically analyzed behavioral data from cooling deactivation and permanent lesion experiments in the cat, where unilateral deactivation of the posterior parietal cortex (in the vicinity of the posterior middle suprasylvian cortex, pMS) or the superior colliculus (SC) cause a severe neglect in the contralateral hemifield. Counterintuitively, additional deactivation of structures in the opposite hemisphere reverses the deficit. Using such lesion data, we employed a game-theoretical approach, multi-perturbation Shapley value analysis (MSA), for inferring functional contributions and network interactions of bilateral pMS and SC from behavioral performance in visual attention studies. The approach provides an objective theoretical strategy for lesion inferences and allows a unique quantitative characterization of regional functional contributions and interactions on the basis of multi-perturbations. The quantitative analysis demonstrated that right posterior parietal cortex and superior colliculus made the strongest positive contributions to left-field orienting, while left brain regions had negative contributions, implying that their perturbation may reverse the effects of contralateral lesions or improve normal function. An analysis of functional modulations and interactions among the regions revealed redundant interactions (implying functional overlap) between regions within each hemisphere, and synergistic interactions between bilateral regions. To assess the reliability of the MSA method in the face of variable and incomplete input data, we performed a sensitivity analysis, investigating how much the contribution values of the four regions depended on the performance of specific configurations and on the

  15. Contribution of charge symmetry breaking interactions in binding energy difference of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghari, M.

    2006-01-01

    Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly in mirror nuclei due to the NN interactions with isospin mixing between T=0 and T=1 mesons of the same spin and parity are investigated. With the computation of coulomb energy along with the charge symmetry breaking effects provide a reasonably accurate description of binding energy differences between 39 Ca- 39 K , 41 Sc- 41 Ca mirror nuclei

  16. Nuclear interaction contribution to SEUs in heavy ion energy deposition in the ESA monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Bahamonde, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nuclear interactions inducing Single Event Upsets in ESA SEU monitor are explored for heavy ion beams of different energies. The experimental and simulated results are compared, the possible causes of disagreement are suggested as well as the future steps to take.

  17. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  18. Functional contributions and interactions between the human hippocampus and subregions of the striatum during arbitrary associative learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeld, Aaron T.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus and striatum are thought to have different functional roles in learning and memory. It is unknown under what experimental conditions their contributions are dissimilar or converge, and the extent to which they interact over the course of learning. In order to evaluate both the functional contributions of as well as the interactions between the human hippocampus and striatum, the present study used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and variations of a conditional visuomotor associative learning task that either taxed arbitrary associative learning (Experiment 1) or stimulus-response learning (Experiment 2). In the first experiment we observed changes in activity in the hippocampus and anterior caudate that reflect differences between the two regions consistent with distinct computational principles. In the second experiment we observed activity in the putamen that reflected content specific representations during the learning of arbitrary conditional visuomotor associations. In both experiments the hippocampus and ventral striatum demonstrated dynamic functional coupling during the learning of new arbitrary associations, but not during retrieval of well-learned arbitrary associations using control variants of the tasks that did not preferentially tax one system versus the other. These findings suggest that both the hippocampus and subregions of the dorsal striatum contribute uniquely to the learning of arbitrary associations while the hippocampus and ventral striatum interact over the course of learning. PMID:25560298

  19. Dispersion Interactions between Urea and Nucleobases Contribute to the Destabilization of RNA by Urea in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasavajhala, Koushik; Bikkina, Swetha; Patil, Indrajit; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Priyakumar, U. Deva

    2015-01-01

    Urea has long been used to investigate protein folding and, more recently, RNA folding. Studies have proposed that urea denatures RNA by participating in stacking interactions and hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases. In this study, the ability of urea to form unconventional stacking interactions with RNA bases is investigated using ab initio calculations (RI-MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set). A total of 29 stable nucleobase-urea stacked complexes are identified in which the intermolecular interaction energies (up to −14 kcal/mol) are dominated by dispersion effects. Natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations further confirm strong interactions between urea and nucleobases. Calculations on model systems with multiple urea and water molecules interacting with a guanine base lead to a hypothesis that urea molecules along with water are able to form cage-like structures capable of trapping nucleic acid bases in extrahelical states by forming both hydrogen bonded and dispersion interactions, thereby contributing to the unfolding of RNA in the presence of urea in aqueous solution. PMID:25668757

  20. Contribution of the study of thermal interaction: modelling of a thermal blast in a multi-phase medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Edouard

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the safety of nuclear facilities by reporting the study of the interaction between nuclear fuel and coolant in simplified conditions. It focuses on the thermal aspect of this interaction between a very hot body and an easily vaporized cold body, which could produce a blast. Thus, this author addresses the field of existence of a thermal blast, and reports the development of a hydrodynamic model which takes the heterogeneous nature of the interacting medium into account, in order to precisely describe the conditions of fuel fragmentation. This model includes the propagation of a shock in a mixture, and the calculation of a multi-phase flow in the reaction zone, and proposes criteria for a self-sustained shock wave propagation in the reactive medium. Results are compared with those obtained with the Bankoff model [fr

  1. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mérida-López

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional intelligence boosted engagement when the levels of role ambiguity were higher. Our findings suggest the need for future research examining the impact of job hindrances on the links between emotional intelligence and teachers’ occupational well-being indicators. Finally, the implications for emotional intelligence training in education are discussed.

  2. Modelling engagement in dementia through behaviour. Contribution for socially interactive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugia, Giulia; Diaz Doladeras, Marta; Mallofre, Andreu Catala; Rauterberg, Matthias; Barakova, Emilia

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present a novel tool to measure engagement in people with dementia playing board games and interacting with a social robot, Pleo. We carried out two studies to reach a comprehensive inventory of behaviours accounting for engagement in dementia. The first one is an exploratory study aimed at modelling engagement in cognitive board games. The second one is a longitudinal study to investigate how people with dementia express engagement in cognitive games and in interactions with social robots. We adopted a technique coming from Ethology to mould behaviour, the ethogram. Ethogram is founded on low level behaviours, and allows hierarchical structuring. Herein, we present preliminary results consisting in the description of two ethograms and in their structuring obtained through thematic analysis. Such results show that an underlying structure of engagement exists across activities, and that different activities trigger different behavioural displays of engagement that adhere to such a structure.

  3. Contributions of Work-Related Stress and Emotional Intelligence to Teacher Engagement: Additive and Interactive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of role stress and emotional intelligence for predicting engagement among 288 teachers. Emotional intelligence and engagement were positively associated. Role ambiguity and role conflict showed negative associations with vigor and dedication scores. The interaction of role ambiguity and emotional intelligence was significant in explaining engagement dimensions. Similar results were found considering overall teacher engagement. Emotional intelligence boosted engagement when the levels of role ambiguity were higher. Our findings suggest the need for future research examining the impact of job hindrances on the links between emotional intelligence and teachers’ occupational well-being indicators. Finally, the implications for emotional intelligence training in education are discussed. PMID:28961218

  4. Contribution to the theoretical study of metallic systems containing rare earths: hyperfine interactions and exchange coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troper, A.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study involving rare earth impurities, which were embedded in transition metals (s-p or noble), from the point of view of the hyperfine interactions is presented. A model was created to describe a d-resonance (Anderson-Moriya) acting on a s-p conduction band which was strongly perturbed by a slater-koster potential, used to describe the rare earths which were diluted in matrices of transition elements. (author)

  5. A cation-π interaction at a phenylalanine residue in the glycine receptor binding site is conserved for different agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Hanek, Ariele P; Price, Kerry L

    2011-01-01

    . In the current study, we investigated whether the lower efficacy agonists of the human GlyR β-alanine and taurine also form cation-π interactions with Phe159. By incorporating a series of unnatural amino acids, we found cation-π interactions between Phe159 and the amino groups of β-alanine and taurine....... The strengths of these interactions were significantly weaker than for glycine. Modeling studies suggest that β-alanine and taurine are orientated subtly differently in the binding pocket, with their amino groups further from Phe159 than that of glycine. These data therefore show that similar agonists can have...... similar but not identical orientations and interactions in the binding pocket and provide a possible explanation for the lower potencies of β-alanine and taurine....

  6. Dopamine and oxytocin interactions underlying behaviors: potential contributions to behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Douglas, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator that exerts widespread effects on the central nervous system (CNS) function. Disruption in dopaminergic neurotransmission can have profound effects on mood and behavior and as such is known to be implicated in various neuropsychiatric behavioral disorders including autism and depression. The subsequent effects on other neurocircuitries due to dysregulated dopamine function have yet to be fully explored. Due to the marked social deficits observed in psychiatric patients, the neuropeptide, oxytocin is emerging as one particular neural substrate that may be influenced by the altered dopamine levels subserving neuropathologic-related behavioral diseases. Oxytocin has a substantial role in social attachment, affiliation and sexual behavior. More recently, it has emerged that disturbances in peripheral and central oxytocin levels have been detected in some patients with dopamine-dependent disorders. Thus, oxytocin is proposed to be a key neural substrate that interacts with central dopamine systems. In addition to psychosocial improvement, oxytocin has recently been implicated in mediating mesolimbic dopamine pathways during drug addiction and withdrawal. This bi-directional role of dopamine has also been implicated during some components of sexual behavior. This review will discuss evidence for the existence dopamine/oxytocin positive interaction in social behavioral paradigms and associated disorders such as sexual dysfunction, autism, addiction, anorexia/bulimia, and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that whilst further rigorous testing has to be conducted to establish a dopamine/oxytocin link in human disorders, animal models seem to indicate the existence of broad and integrated brain circuits where dopamine and oxytocin interactions at least in part mediate socio-affiliative behaviors. A profound disruption to these pathways is likely to underpin associated behavioral disorders. Central oxytocin pathways may serve as a

  7. Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling Linder, Cecilia; Enander, Karin; Magnusson, Per

    2016-03-01

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein-protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

  8. Catching up with the Past: A Small Contribution to a Long History of Interactive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fox

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the evolution of my thinking in the area of interactive architecture over the past 15 years with students and my office. The work is framed within an overview of a long history of work in the area by others. My personal development has taken a number of clear steps in a relatively logical progression.In summary, the work began with kinetics as a means to facilitate adaptation. Work in this area led to integrating computation as a means of controlling the kinetics. The combination of these two areas led to the use of discrete mechanical assemblies as a systems approach to interaction design, which led to the thinking of control as bottom-up and emergent. Consequently I became fascinated with modular autonomous robotics and the notion that actual architectural space could be made of such systems. This in turn led to the exploration of biomimetics in terms of the processes, which eventually led to the idea that the parts in a system should get smaller to the point that they make up the matter itself.The paper concludes with an explanation of how technical advancements in manufacturing, fabrication and computational control will continue to expand the parameters of what is possible in robotics, and consequently influence the scale by which we understand and construct our environments. The future of interactive environments will most certainly involve re-examining the scale by which things operate to the extent that much of the operations happen within the materials themselves. This scaling down is beginning to force a reinterpretation of the mechanical paradigm of adaptation.

  9. The AMPTE program's contribution to studies of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeck, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) program provided important information on the behavior of clouds of plasma artificially injected into the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere. Now that the releases are over, data from the satellites are being analyzed to investigate the processes by which the ambient solar wind mass, momentum, and energy are transferred to the magnetosphere. Work in progress at APL indicates that the solar wind is much more inhomogeneous than previously believed, that the solar wind constantly buffets the magnetosphere, and that ground observers may remotely sense these interactions as geomagnetic pulsations. 8 refs

  10. Contributed Review: The novel gas puff targets for laser-matter interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Ul. Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Various types of targetry are used nowadays in laser matter interaction experiments. Such targets are characterized using different methods capable of acquiring information about the targets such as density, spatial distribution, and temporal behavior. In this mini-review paper, a particular type of target will be presented. The targets under consideration are gas puff targets of various and novel geometries. Those targets were investigated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) imaging techniques, such as shadowgraphy, tomography, and pinhole camera imaging. Details about characterization of those targets in the EUV and SXR spectral regions will be presented.

  11. Chemical Control of Black Flies in Large Rivers as an Impact in Agrochemical Residue-Biota Interactions in Water Ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haufe, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    Livestock losses have been an obstacle to economic development of the farming and livestock industry in more northerly areas of Canada until two species of black fly, Simulium arcticum and S. luggeri, outbreaks are controlled effectively. The problem is complicated by its association with an abundance of large rivers and streams. Since effective control of black flies is presently limited to reduction of their breeding sources in flowing water, the managers of Canadian inland waters have been concerned about any major practice of using pesticides as black fly larvicides. Consequently, Canadian inland waters have been subject to continuous monitoring of major drainage systems with special attention to the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides. The latest status of residues was published from a Canadian Survey of 333 sampling locations between 1972 and 1975

  12. Thyroid Hormone in the CNS: Contribution of Neuron-Glia Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Mami

    2018-01-01

    The endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS) are intimately linked. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the regulation of development and differentiation of neurons and neuroglia and hence for development and function of the CNS. T3 (3,3',5-triiodothyronine), an active form of TH, is important not only for neuronal development but also for differentiation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and for microglial development. In adult brain, T3 affects glial morphology with sex- and age-dependent manner and therefore may affect their function, leading to influence on neuron-glia interaction. T3 is an important signaling factor that affects microglial functions such as migration and phagocytosis via complex mechanisms. Therefore, dysfunction of THs may impair glial function as well as neuronal function and thus disturb the brain, which may cause mental disorders. Investigations on molecular and cellular basis of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism will help us to understand changes in neuron-glia interaction and therefore consequent psychiatric symptoms. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Species distribution models contribute to determine the effect of climate and interspecific interactions in moving hybrid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, J O; Rödder, D; Elle, O; Hochkirch, A; Secondi, J

    2013-11-01

    Climate is a major factor delimiting species' distributions. However, biotic interactions may also be prominent in shaping geographical ranges, especially for parapatric species forming hybrid zones. Determining the relative effect of each factor and their interaction of the contact zone location has been difficult due to the lack of broad scale environmental data. Recent developments in species distribution modelling (SDM) now allow disentangling the relative contributions of climate and species' interactions in hybrid zones and their responses to future climate change. We investigated the moving hybrid zone between the breeding ranges of two parapatric passerines in Europe. We conducted SDMs representing the climatic conditions during the breeding season. Our results show a large mismatch between the realized and potential distributions of the two species, suggesting that interspecific interactions, not climate, account for the present location of the contact zone. The SDM scenarios show that the southerly distributed species, Hippolais polyglotta, might lose large parts of its southern distribution under climate change, but a similar gain of novel habitat along the hybrid zone seems unlikely, because interactions with the other species (H. icterina) constrain its range expansion. Thus, whenever biotic interactions limit range expansion, species may become 'trapped' if range loss due to climate change is faster than the movement of the contact zone. An increasing number of moving hybrid zones are being reported, but the proximate causes of movement often remain unclear. In a global context of climate change, we call for more interest in their interactions with climate change. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. On contribution of three-body forces to Nd interaction at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzikov, Yu.N.

    2001-01-01

    Available data on large-angle nucleon-deuteron elastic scattering Nd → dN below the pion threshold give a signal for three-body forces. There is a problem of separation of possible subtle aspects of these forces from off-shell effects in two-nucleon potentials. By considering the main mechanisms of the process Nd → dN, we show qualitatively that in the quasi-binary reaction N + d → (NN) + N with the final spin singlet NN-pair in the S-state the relative contribution of the 3N forces differs substantially from the elastic channel. It gives a new testing ground for the problem in question

  15. Water absorption in PEEK and PEI matrices. Contribution to the understanding of water-polar group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, E.; Bicaba, Y.; Colin, X.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in two aromatic linear polymers (PEEK and PEI) was studied between 10% and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. It was found that these polymers display classical Henry and Fick's behaviors. Moreover, they have very close values of equilibrium water concentration C∞ and water diffusivity D presumably because their respective polar groups establish molecular interactions of the same nature with water. This assumption was checked from a literature compilation of values of C∞ and D for a large variety of linear and tridimensional polymers containing a single type of polar group. It was then evidenced that almost all types of carbonyl group (in particular, those belonging to imides, amides and ketones) have the same molar contribution to water absorption, except those belonging to esters which are much less hydrophilic. Furthermore, hydroxyl and sulfone groups are much more hydrophilic than carbonyl groups so that their molar contribution is located on another master curve. On this basis, semi-empirical structure/water transport property relationships were proposed. It was found that C∞ increases exponentially with the concentration of polar groups (presumably because water is doubly bonded), but also with the intensity of their molecular interactions with water. In contrast, D is inversely proportional to C∞, which means that polar group-water interactions slow down the rate of water diffusion.

  16. Pericytes and endothelial precursor cells: cellular interactions and contributions to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Weber, William; Rouleau, Cecile; Teicher, Beverly A

    2005-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is irregular, abnormal, and essential for tumor growth. Pericytes and endothelial precursor cells (EPC) contribute to the formation of blood vessels under angiogenic conditions. As primary cells in culture, pericytes and EPC share many properties such as tube/network formation and response to kinase inhibitors selective for angiogenic pathways. Expression of cell surface proteins including platelet-derived growth factor receptor, vascular cell adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule, CD105, desmin, and neural growth proteoglycan 2 was similar between pericytes and EPC, whereas expression of P1H12 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 clearly differentiates the cell types. Further distinction was observed in the molecular profiles for expression of angiogenic genes. Pericytes or EPC enhanced the invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in a coculture assay system. The s.c. coinjection of live pericytes or EPC along with MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in an increased rate of tumor growth compared with coinjection of irradiated pericytes or EPC. Microvessel density analysis indicated there was no difference in MDA-MB-231 tumors with or without EPC or pericytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of vasculature suggested that EPC and pericytes may stabilize or normalize vasculature rather than initiate vasculogenesis. In addition, tumors arising from the coinjection of EPC and cancer cells were more likely to develop lymphatic vessels. These results support the notion that pericytes and EPC contribute to malignancy and that these cell types can be useful as cell-based models for tumor vascular development and selection of agents that may provide therapeutic benefit.

  17. Independence and interaction of luminance and chromatic contributions to spatial hyperacuity performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie; Lee, Barry B

    2014-04-01

    Here we test interactions of luminance and chromatic input to spatial hyperacuity mechanisms. First, we tested alignment of luminance and chromatic gratings matched or mismatched in contrast polarity or grating type. Thresholds with matched gratings were low while all mismatched pairs were elevated. Second, we determined alignment acuity as a function of luminance or chromatic contrast alone or in the presence of constant contrast components of the other type. For in-phase components, performance followed the envelope of the more sensitive mechanism. However, polarity reversals revealed an asymmetric effect for luminance and chromatic conditions, which suggested that luminance can override chromatic mechanisms in hyperacuity; we interpret these findings in the context of spatial mechanisms.

  18. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  19. Importance of a Conserved Lys/Arg Residue for Ligand/PDZ Domain Interactions as Examined by Protein Semisynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Moran, Griffin E; Sereikaité, Vita

    2016-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous small protein domains that are mediators of numerous protein-protein interactions, and play a pivotal role in protein trafficking, synaptic transmission, and the assembly of signaling-transduction complexes. In recent years, PDZ domains have emerged as novel and exciting...... drug targets for diseases (in the brain in particular), so understanding the molecular details of PDZ domain interactions is of fundamental importance. PDZ domains bind to a protein partner at either a C-terminal peptide or internal peptide motifs. Here, we examined the importance of a conserved Lys...

  20. The role of a second-shell residue in modifying substrate and inhibitor interactions in the SHV beta-lactamase: a study of ambler position Asn276.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Sarah M; Bethel, Christopher R; Hujer, Kristine M; Hurless, Kelly N; Distler, Anne M; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A

    2009-06-02

    Inhibitor-resistant class A beta-lactamases of the TEM and SHV families that arise by single amino acid substitutions are a significant threat to the efficacy of beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. To better understand the basis of the inhibitor-resistant phenotype in SHV, we performed mutagenesis to examine the role of a second-shell residue, Asn276. Of the 19 variants expressed in Escherichia coli, only the Asn276Asp enzyme demonstrated reduced susceptibility to ampicillin/clavulanate (MIC increased from 50/2 --> 50/8 microg/mL) while maintaining high-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC = 8192 microg/mL). Steady-state kinetic analyses of Asn276Asp revealed slightly diminished k(cat)/K(m) for all substrates tested. In contrast, we observed a 5-fold increase in K(i) for clavulanate (7.4 +/- 0.9 microM for Asn276Asp vs 1.4 +/- 0.2 microM for SHV-1) and a 40% reduction in k(inact)/K(I) (0.013 +/- 0.002 microM(-1 )s(-1) for Asn276Asp vs 0.021 +/- 0.004 microM(-1) s(-1) for SHV-1). Timed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of clavulanate-inhibited SHV-1 and SHV Asn276Asp showed nearly identical mass adducts, arguing for a similar pathway of inactivation. Molecular modeling shows that novel electrostatic interactions are formed between Arg244Neta2 and both 276AspOdelta1 and Odelta2; these new forces restrict the spatial position of Arg244, a residue important in the recognition of the C(3)/C(4) carboxylate of beta-lactam substrates and inhibitors. Testing the functional consequences of this interaction, we noted considerable free energy costs (+DeltaDeltaG) for substrates and inhibitors. A rigid carbapenem (meropenem) was most affected by the Asn276Asp substitution (46-fold increase in K(i) vs SHV-1). We conclude that residue 276 is an important second-shell residue in class A beta-lactamase-mediated resistance to substrates and inhibitors, and only Asn is able to precisely modulate the conformational flexibility of Arg244 required for successful

  1. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Paul R., E-mail: prhorn@berkeley.edu; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na{sup +}, water-Cl{sup −}, and the naphthalene dimer.

  2. Residues R199H200 of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R 199 H 200 and R 221 R 222 R 223 that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 , but not R 199 H 200 , relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R 221 R 222 R 223 in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R 199 H 200 residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 . Collectively, our findings suggest that R 199 H 200 directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R 221 R 222 R 223 residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R 199 H 200 residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223

  3. A PM7 dynamic residue-ligand interactions energy landscape of the BACE1 inhibitory pathway by hydroxyethylamine compounds. Part I: The flap closure process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Martinez-Consuegra, Alejandro; Zuchniarz, Joshua; Gueto-Tettay, Luis Roberto; Drosos-Ramírez, Juan Carlos

    2017-09-01

    BACE1 is an enzyme of scientific interest because it participates in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Hydroxyethylamines (HEAs) are a family of compounds which exhibit inhibitory activity toward BACE1 at a nanomolar level, favorable pharmacokinetic properties and oral bioavailability. The first step in the inhibition of BACE1 by HEAs consists of their entrance into the protease active site and the resultant conformational change in the protein, from Apo to closed form. These two conformations differ in the position of an antiparallel loop (called the flap) which covers the entrance to the catalytic site. For BACE1, closure of this flap is vital to its catalytic activity and to inhibition of the enzyme due to the new interactions thereby formed with the ligand. In the present study a dynamic energy landscape of residue-ligand interaction energies (ReLIE) measured for 112 amino acids in the BACE1 active site and its immediate vicinity during the closure of the flap induced by 8 HEAs of different inhibitory power is presented. A total of 6.272 million ReLIE calculations, based on the PM7 semiempirical method, provided a deep and quantitative view of the first step in the inhibition of the aspartyl protease. The information suggests that residues Asp93, Asp289, Thr292, Thr293, Asn294 and Arg296 are anchor points for the ligand, accounting for approximately 45% of the total protein-ligand interaction. Additionally, flap closure improved the BACE1-HEA interaction by around 25%. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of HEAs could be related to the capacity of these ligands to form said anchor point interactions and maintain them over time: the lack of some of these anchor interactions delayed flap closure or impeded it completely, or even caused the flap to reopen. The methodology employed here could be used as a tool to evaluate future structural modifications which lead to improvements in the favorability and stability of BACE1-HEA ReLIEs, aiding in the design of

  4. Three-particle one-hole multiple scattering contribution to the nuclear effective interaction in mass-18 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, H.; Krenciglowa, E.M.; Ando, K.

    1979-01-01

    Within the systematic framework of the double partition approach, the three-particle one-hole multiple scattering and Q-box formalisms are combined to give the valence-linked and connected energy-independent effective interaction. All low-lying [2p+3p1h] contributions to the mass-18 effective interaction are evaluated using an essentially exact energy-dependent reaction matrix based on the Reid SC potential. The low-lying one-body field of the core nucleus is treated consistently with the underlying reaction matrix G through particle- and hole-line self-energy insertions. Center-of-mass motion, folded diagrams and starting energy dependence are properly taken into account throughout. The low-lying [2p+3p1h] correlations are strongly damped by self-energy insertions. By incorporating only the folded diagram contributions with origins in the low-lying space, the net effect of all low-lying [2p+3p1h] correlations is to give back the bare-G plus second-order core-polarization spectra which are found to be in respectable agreement with the experimental spectra. However, including the full folded diagram contribution, which has additional contributions from the high-lying space through the energy dependence of G, leads to final spectra which deviate sizably from experiment. The present results are conclusive in the sense that the treatment is essentially exact for low-lying [2p+3p1h] correlations which originate from the high-lying two-particle correlations through the reaction matrix G. (Auth.)

  5. Contribution to the study of the molecular interactions of gaseous hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostorero, Jean

    1972-01-01

    The experimental study is based on measurements of gaseous viscosity coefficients and on the pure rotational spectrum of HF perturbed by F 2 at pressures up to 200 Bar. The study of viscosity is made with two apparatuses: a capillary viscometer (data on monomeric HF) and a rotating cylinder viscometer (data on mono and polymeric HF, and seven binary gaseous mixtures HF-X (X = He, Ar, N 2 , F 2 , CO 2 , ClF 3 , HCl). The experimental results are used as a criterion of validity for the different interaction models for polar gases found in the literature. The two remaining models are: 1) DANON and AMDUR; 2) MONCHICK and MASON. The viscosity data of mixtures give the values of the intermolecular parameters (ε 0 , σ 0 ) of the potential isotropic part. A semi quantum calculus improves slightly the correlation in the case of the model proposed by MONCHICK and MASON. The interpretation of the pressure viscosity data of HF gives the parameters values (e, o) for the dimer and the cyclic hexamer in the vapor phase. The vanishing of the R 0 rotation line of the HF spectrum perturbed by F 2 is qualitatively interpreted as the influence of the anisotropic part of the intermolecular potential. (author) [fr

  6. Contribution to numerical and mechanical modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retel, V.

    2002-12-01

    Pressurised water reactor fuel rods (PWR) are the place of nuclear fission, resulting in unstable and radioactive elements. Today, the mechanical loading on the cladding is harder and harder and is partly due to the fuel pellet movement. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the cladding needs to be simulated with models allowing to assess realistic stress and strain fields for all the running conditions. Besides, the mechanical treatment of the fuel pellet needs to be improved. The study is part of a global way of improving the treatment of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in the 1D finite elements EDF code named CYRANO3. Non-axisymmetrical multidirectional effects have to be accounted for in a context of unidirectional axisymmetrical finite elements. The aim of this work is double. Firstly a model simulating the effect of stress concentration on the cladding, due to the opening of the radial cracks of fuel, had been added in the code. Then, the fragmented state of fuel material has been taken into account in the thermomechanical calculation, through a model which led the strain and stress relaxation in the pellet due to the fragmentation, be simulated. This model has been implemented in the code for two types of fuel behaviour: elastic and viscoplastic. (author)

  7. Importance of the correlation contribution for local hybrid functionals: range separation and self-interaction corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Kaupp, Martin

    2012-01-07

    Local hybrid functionals with their position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a conceptually simple and promising extension of the concept of a hybrid functional. Local hybrids based on a simple mixing of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) with exact exchange have been shown to be successful for thermochemistry, reaction barriers, and a range of other properties. So far, the combination of this generation of local hybrids with an LSDA correlation functional has been found to give the most favorable results for atomization energies, for a range of local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the exact-exchange admixture. Here, we show that the choice of correlation functional to be used with local hybrid exchange crucially influences the parameterization also of the exchange part as well as the overall performance. A novel ansatz for the correlation part of local hybrids is suggested based on (i) range-separation of LSDA correlation into short-range (SR) and long-range (LR) parts, and (ii) partial or full elimination of the one-electron self-correlation from the SR part. It is shown that such modified correlation functionals allow overall larger exact exchange admixture in thermochemically competitive local hybrids than before. This results in improvements for reaction barriers and for other properties crucially influenced by self-interaction errors, as demonstrated by a number of examples. Based on the range-separation approach, a fresh view on the breakdown of the correlation energy into dynamical and non-dynamical parts is suggested.

  8. Maize root lectins mediate the interaction with Herbaspirillum seropedicae via N-acetyl glucosamine residues of lipopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Balsanelli

    Full Text Available Herbaspirillum seropedicae is a plant growth-promoting diazotrophic betaproteobacterium which associates with important crops, such as maize, wheat, rice and sugar-cane. We have previously reported that intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS is required for H. seropedicae attachment and endophytic colonization of maize roots. In this study, we present evidence that the LPS biosynthesis gene waaL (codes for the O-antigen ligase is induced during rhizosphere colonization by H. seropedicae. Furthermore a waaL mutant strain lacking the O-antigen portion of the LPS is severely impaired in colonization. Since N-acetyl glucosamine inhibits H. seropedicae attachment to maize roots, lectin-like proteins from maize roots (MRLs were isolated and mass spectrometry (MS analysis showed that MRL-1 and MRL-2 correspond to maize proteins with a jacalin-like lectin domain, while MRL-3 contains a B-chain lectin domain. These proteins showed agglutination activity against wild type H. seropedicae, but failed to agglutinate the waaL mutant strain. The agglutination reaction was severely diminished in the presence of N-acetyl glucosamine. Moreover addition of the MRL proteins as competitors in H. seropedicae attachment assays decreased 80-fold the adhesion of the wild type to maize roots. The results suggest that N-acetyl glucosamine residues of the LPS O-antigen bind to maize root lectins, an essential step for efficient bacterial attachment and colonization.

  9. Maize root lectins mediate the interaction with Herbaspirillum seropedicae via N-acetyl glucosamine residues of lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; Tuleski, Thalita Regina; de Baura, Valter Antonio; Yates, Marshall Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda Satie; Pedrosa, Fabio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2013-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is a plant growth-promoting diazotrophic betaproteobacterium which associates with important crops, such as maize, wheat, rice and sugar-cane. We have previously reported that intact lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is required for H. seropedicae attachment and endophytic colonization of maize roots. In this study, we present evidence that the LPS biosynthesis gene waaL (codes for the O-antigen ligase) is induced during rhizosphere colonization by H. seropedicae. Furthermore a waaL mutant strain lacking the O-antigen portion of the LPS is severely impaired in colonization. Since N-acetyl glucosamine inhibits H. seropedicae attachment to maize roots, lectin-like proteins from maize roots (MRLs) were isolated and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis showed that MRL-1 and MRL-2 correspond to maize proteins with a jacalin-like lectin domain, while MRL-3 contains a B-chain lectin domain. These proteins showed agglutination activity against wild type H. seropedicae, but failed to agglutinate the waaL mutant strain. The agglutination reaction was severely diminished in the presence of N-acetyl glucosamine. Moreover addition of the MRL proteins as competitors in H. seropedicae attachment assays decreased 80-fold the adhesion of the wild type to maize roots. The results suggest that N-acetyl glucosamine residues of the LPS O-antigen bind to maize root lectins, an essential step for efficient bacterial attachment and colonization.

  10. Audio-visual interactions uniquely contribute to resolution of visual conflict in people possessing absolute pitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Kim

    Full Text Available Individuals possessing absolute pitch (AP are able to identify a given musical tone or to reproduce it without reference to another tone. The present study sought to learn whether this exceptional auditory ability impacts visual perception under stimulus conditions that provoke visual competition in the form of binocular rivalry. Nineteen adult participants with 3-19 years of musical training were divided into two groups according to their performance on a task involving identification of the specific note associated with hearing a given musical pitch. During test trials lasting just over half a minute, participants dichoptically viewed a scrolling musical score presented to one eye and a drifting sinusoidal grating presented to the other eye; throughout the trial they pressed buttons to track the alternations in visual awareness produced by these dissimilar monocular stimuli. On "pitch-congruent" trials, participants heard an auditory melody that was congruent in pitch with the visual score, on "pitch-incongruent" trials they heard a transposed auditory melody that was congruent with the score in melody but not in pitch, and on "melody-incongruent" trials they heard an auditory melody completely different from the visual score. For both groups, the visual musical scores predominated over the gratings when the auditory melody was congruent compared to when it was incongruent. Moreover, the AP participants experienced greater predominance of the visual score when it was accompanied by the pitch-congruent melody compared to the same melody transposed in pitch; for non-AP musicians, pitch-congruent and pitch-incongruent trials yielded equivalent predominance. Analysis of individual durations of dominance revealed differential effects on dominance and suppression durations for AP and non-AP participants. These results reveal that AP is accompanied by a robust form of bisensory interaction between tonal frequencies and musical notation that boosts

  11. Arterial extracellular matrix: a mechanobiological study of the contributions and interactions of elastin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Lin, Charles P; Zhang, Yanhang

    2014-06-17

    The complex network structure of elastin and collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) forms the primary load bearing components in the arterial wall. The structural and mechanobiological interactions between elastin and collagen are important for properly functioning arteries. Here, we examined the elastin and collagen organization, realignment, and recruitment by coupling mechanical loading and multiphoton imaging. Two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation methods were performed with a multiphoton video-rate microscope to capture real time changes to the elastin and collagen structure during biaxial deformation. Enzymatic removal of elastin was performed to assess the structural changes of the remaining collagen structure. Quantitative analysis of the structural changes to elastin and collagen was made using a combination of two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and fractal analysis, which allows for a more complete understanding of structural changes. Our study provides new quantitative evidence, to our knowledge on the sequential engagement of different arterial ECM components in response to mechanical loading. The adventitial collagen exists as large wavy bundles of fibers that exhibit fiber engagement after 20% strain. The medial collagen is engaged throughout the stretching process, and prominent elastic fiber engagement is observed up to 20% strain after which the engagement plateaus. The fiber orientation distribution functions show remarkably different changes in the ECM structure in response to mechanical loading. The medial collagen shows an evident preferred circumferential distribution, however the fiber families of adventitial collagen are obscured by their waviness at no or low mechanical strains. Collagen fibers in both layers exhibit significant realignment in response to unequal biaxial loading. The elastic fibers are much more uniformly distributed and remained relatively unchanged due to loading. Removal of elastin produces

  12. Possible contribution of ice-sheet/lithosphere interactions to past glaciological changes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, R. B.; Parizek, B. R.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Pollard, D.; Stevens, N. T.; Pourpoint, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ice-lithosphere interactions may have influenced the history of ice-sheet sensitivity to climate change. The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) is sensitive to warming, and is likely to be largely removed if subjected to relatively small additional temperature increases. The recent report (Schaefer et al., 2016, Nature) of near-complete GIS removal under modest Pleistocene forcing suggests that GIS sensitivity may be even greater than generally modeled, but lack of major Holocene retreat is more consistent with existing models. As shown by Stevens et al. (2016, JGR), peak lithospheric flexural stresses associated with ice-age GIS cycling are of the same order as dike-driving stresses in plutonic systems, and migrate over ice-age cycles. The full analysis by Stevens et al. suggests the possibility that the onset of cyclic ice-sheet loading allowed deep melt associated with the passage of the Icelandic hot spot beneath Greenland to work up though the crust to or near the base of the ice sheet, helping explain the anomalous geothermal heat fluxes observed at the head of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream and elsewhere in the northern part of GIS. If ice-age cycling aided extraction of an existing reservoir of melted rock, then geothermal heat flux would have risen with the onset of extraction and migration, but with a subsequent fall associated with reservoir depletion. Simple parameterized flow-model simulations confirm intuition that a higher geothermal flux makes deglaciation easier, with the northern part of the ice sheet especially important. Large uncertainties remain in quantification, but we suggest the hypothesis that, following the onset of ice-age cycling, deglaciation of the GIS first became easier and then more difficult in response to feedbacks involving the ice sheet and the geological system beneath. In turn, this suggests that evidence of past deglaciation under moderate forcing is consistent with existing ice-sheet models.

  13. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al

  14. Uncovering the local inelastic interactions during manufacture of ductile cast iron: How the substructure of the graphite particles can induce residual stress concentrations in the matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriollo, Tito; Hellström, Kristina; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels; Hattel, Jesper

    2018-02-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements have revealed that plastic deformation and a residual elastic strain field can be present around the graphite particles in ductile cast iron after manufacturing, probably due to some local mismatch in thermal contraction. However, as only one component of the elastic strain tensor could be obtained from the XRD data, the shape and magnitude of the associated residual stress field have remained unknown. To compensate for this and to provide theoretical insight into this unexplored topic, a combined experimental-numerical approach is presented in this paper. First, a material equivalent to the ductile cast iron matrix is manufactured and subjected to dilatometric and high-temperature tensile tests. Subsequently, a two-scale hierarchical top-down model is devised, calibrated on the basis of the collected data and used to simulate the interaction between the graphite particles and the matrix during manufacturing of the industrial part considered in the XRD study. The model indicates that, besides the viscoplastic deformation of the matrix, the effect of the inelastic deformation of the graphite has to be considered to explain the magnitude of the XRD strain. Moreover, the model shows that the large elastic strain perturbations recorded with XRD close to the graphite-matrix interface are not artifacts due to e.g. sharp gradients in chemical composition, but correspond to residual stress concentrations induced by the conical sectors forming the internal structure of the graphite particles. In contrast to common belief, these results thus suggest that ductile cast iron parts cannot be considered, in general, as stress-free at the microstructural scale.

  15. Ionic interaction of myosin loop 2 with residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin probed by chemical cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliszka, Barbara; Martin, Brian M; Karczewska, Emilia

    2008-02-01

    To probe ionic contacts of skeletal muscle myosin with negatively charged residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin, myosin subfragment 1 (S1) and actin split by ECP32 protease (ECP-actin) were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC). We have found that unmodified S1 can be cross-linked not only to the N-terminal part, but also to the C-terminal 36 kDa fragment of ECP-actin. Subsequent experiments performed on S1 cleaved by elastase or trypsin indicate that the cross-linking site in S1 is located within loop 2. This site is composed of Lys-636 and Lys-637 and can interact with negatively charged residues of the 36 kDa actin fragment, most probably with Glu-99 and Glu-100. Cross-links are formed both in the absence and presence of MgATP.P(i) analog, although the addition of nucleotide decreases the efficiency of the cross-linking reaction.

  16. The Shigella flexneri OmpA amino acid residues 188EVQ190 are essential for the interaction with the virulence factor PhoN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Daniela; Damico, Rosanna; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Superti, Fabiana; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Maria Pia; Longhi, Catia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Zagaglia, Carlo; Nicoletti, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Shigella flexneri is an intracellular pathogen that deploys an arsenal of virulence factors promoting host cell invasion, intracellular multiplication and intra- and inter-cellular dissemination. We have previously reported that the interaction between apyrase (PhoN2), a periplasmic ATP-diphosphohydrolase, and the C-terminal domain of the outer membrane (OM) protein OmpA is likely required for proper IcsA exposition at the old bacterial pole and thus for full virulence expression of Shigella flexneri (Scribano et al., 2014). OmpA, that is the major OM protein of Gram-negative bacteria, is a multifaceted protein that plays many different roles both in the OM structural integrity and in the virulence of several pathogens. Here, by using yeast two-hybrid technology and by constructing an in silico 3D model of OmpA from S. flexneri 5a strain M90T, we observed that the OmpA residues 188 EVQ 190 are likely essential for PhoN2-OmpA interaction. The 188 EVQ 190 amino acids are located within a flexible region of the OmpA protein that could represent a scaffold for protein-protein interaction.

  17. Unexpected alignment patterns in high-j intruder bands evidence for a strong residual neutron proton interaction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyss, R.; Johnson, A.; Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm

    1990-01-01

    The alignment of h 11/12 protons in νi 13/2 intruder bands in mass A = 130 region is investigated. The lack of a clear h 11/12 band crossing is compared with the alignment pattern of i 13/2 neutrons in πi 13/2 intruder bands in mass A = 180 region. The very smooth rise in angular momentum in the intruder bands is related to a possible neutron proton interaction between the single intruder orbital and the aligned two-quasiparticle configuration. 36 refs., 3 figs

  18. Two-quasineutron states in 98248Cf and 98250Cf and the neutron-neutron residual interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katori, K.; Ahmad, I.; Friedman, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-quasineutron states in 248 Cf and 250 Cf were investigated by single-neutron transfer reactions, 249 Cf(d,t) 248 Cf and 249 Cf(d,p) 250 Cf. The majority of levels observed were assigned to 12 bands in 248 Cf and six bands in 250 Cf, constructed from the single-particle states in neighboring Cf nuclei. The effective two-body interactions between two odd neutrons coupled outside a deformed core were deduced from the differences in the energies of the bandheads formed by the parallel and antiparallel coupling of the intrinsic spins of the two single-particle states

  19. Investigation of interaction between alkoxy substituted phthalocyanines with different lengths of alkyl residue and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, Natalya Sh., E-mail: nsl@isc-ras.ru [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya, 1, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Gubarev, Yury A.; Vyugin, Anatoly I. [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya, 1, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Koifman, Oscar I. [Research Institute of Macroheterocycles of Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, 153000 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Interaction between bovine serum albumin and alkoxy substituted phthalocyanines was studied by means of electron absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosimetry. The binding constants and binding distance were calculated. It was found that ZnPc(4-NH-CO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OC{sub 10}H{sub 21}){sub 4} prevents twisting of BSA molecule and localizes between subdomains IB and IIA in protein globule. ZnPc(4-NH-CO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OC{sub 6}H{sub 13}){sub 4} and ZnPc(4-NH-CO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OC{sub 8}H{sub 17}){sub 4} are located on the outer surface of the protein globule. In the case of ZnPc(4-NH-CO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} it can be assumed that the phthalocyanine molecule is in the immediate vicinity of the subdomains IB and IIA. - Highlights: • Interaction between bovine serum albumin and alkoxy substituted phthalocyanines was studied by means of electron absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosimetry. • The binding constants and binding distance were calculated by using the Scatchard method. • Photochemical characteristics of phthalocyanines of studied phthalocyanines are defined. • Localization of phthalocyanines on the protein globule is defined.

  20. Single molecule TPM analysis of the catalytic pentad mutants of Cre and Flp site-specific recombinases: contributions of the pentad residues to the pre-chemical steps of recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Cheng, Yong-Song; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    Cre and Flp site-specific recombinase variants harboring point mutations at their conserved catalytic pentad positions were characterized using single molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) analysis. The findings reveal contributions of these amino acids to the pre-chemical steps of recombination. They suggest functional differences between positionally conserved residues in how they influence recombinase-target site association and formation of ‘non-productive’, ‘pre-synaptic’ and ‘synaptic’ complexes. The most striking difference between the two systems is noted for the single conserved lysine. The pentad residues in Cre enhance commitment to recombination by kinetically favoring the formation of pre-synaptic complexes. These residues in Flp serve a similar function by promoting Flp binding to target sites, reducing non-productive binding and/or enhancing the rate of assembly of synaptic complexes. Kinetic comparisons between Cre and Flp, and between their derivatives lacking the tyrosine nucleophile, are consistent with a stronger commitment to recombination in the Flp system. The effect of target site orientation (head-to-head or head-to-tail) on the TPM behavior of synapsed DNA molecules supports the selection of anti-parallel target site alignment prior to the chemical steps. The integrity of the synapse, whose establishment/stability is fostered by strand cleavage in the case of Flp but not Cre, appears to be compromised by the pentad mutations. PMID:25765648

  1. Contribution of post-harvest agricultural paddy residue fires in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain to ambient carcinogenic benzenoids, toxic isocyanic acid and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, B P; Sinha, Vinayak

    2016-03-01

    In the north west Indo-Gangetic Plain (N.W.IGP), large scale post-harvest paddy residue fires occur every year during the months of October-November. This anthropogenic perturbation causes contamination of the atmospheric environment with adverse impacts on regional air quality posing health risks for the population exposed to high concentrations of carcinogens such as benzene and toxic VOCs such as isocyanic acid. These gases and carbon monoxide are known to be emitted from biomass fires along with acetonitrile. Yet no long-term in-situ measurements quantifying the impact of this activity have been carried out in the N.W. IGP. Using high quality continuous online in-situ measurements of these gases at a strategic downwind site over a three year period from 2012 to 2014, we demonstrate the strong impact of this anthropogenic emission activity on ambient concentrations of these gases. In contrast to the pre-paddy harvest period, excellent correlation of benzenoids, isocyanic acid and CO with acetonitrile (a biomass burning chemical tracer); (r≥0.82) and distinct VOC/acetonitrile emission ratios were observed for the post-paddy harvest period which was also characterized by high ambient concentrations of these species. The average concentrations of acetonitrile (1.62±0.18ppb), benzene (2.51±0.28ppb), toluene (3.72±0.41ppb), C8-aromatics (2.88±0.30ppb), C9-aromatics (1.55±0.19ppb) and CO (552±113ppb) in the post-paddy harvest periods were about 1.5 times higher than the annual average concentrations. For isocyanic acid, a compound with both primary and secondary sources, the concentration in the post-paddy harvest period was 0.97±0.17ppb. The annual average concentrations of benzene, a class A carcinogen, exceeded the annual exposure limit of 1.6ppb at NTP mandated by the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of India (NAAQS). We show that mitigating the post-harvest paddy residue fires can lower the annual average concentration of benzene and ensure

  2. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  3. Unique contributions of dynamic versus global measures of parent-child interaction quality in predicting school adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardack, Sarah; Herbers, Janette E; Obradović, Jelena

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the unique contribution of microsocial and global measures of parent-child positive coregulation (PCR) in predicting children's behavioral and social adjustment in school. Using a community sample of 102 children, ages 4-6, and their parents, we conducted nested path analytic models to identify the unique effects of 2 measures of PCR on school outcomes. Microsocial PCR independently predicted fewer externalizing and inattention/impulsive behaviors in school. Global PCR did not uniquely relate to children's behavioral and social adjustment outcomes. Household socioeconomic status was related to both microsocial and global measures of PCR, but not directly associated with school outcomes. Findings illustrate the importance of using dynamic measures of PCR based on microsocial coding to further understand how the quality of parent-child interaction is related to children's self-regulatory and social development during school transition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A cluster of aspartic residues in the extracellular loop II of PAR 4 is important for thrombin interaction and activation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Centellas, Daniel; Gudlur, Sushanth; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2017-06-01

    Thrombin activates platelets via proteolytic cleavage of protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. The two PARs have distinct but complementary roles. The mechanisms responsible for PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied. However, much less is known regarding thrombin activation of PAR4, especially the potential involvement of regions of PAR4 other than the N-terminal, which is bound to the catalytic site of thrombin. We have studied PAR4 in S. cerevisiae strain MMY12, an expression system in which the GPCR receptors are connected to a Lac Z reporter gene resulting in increased β-galactosidase activity. This approach was used to assess PAR4 mutants to evaluate the contribution of different aspartic residues in facilitating PAR4 activation. Furthermore, peptides mimicking parts of the PAR4 N-terminal and the second extracellular loop (ECLII) were tested for their ability to inhibit platelet activation by thrombin. Binding of these peptides to γ-thrombin was studied by monitoring the decrease in tryptophan fluorescence intensity of thrombin. We conclude that not only the N-terminal but also the electronegative aspartic residues D224, D230 and D235 (located in ECLII) are be important for PAR4 binding to thrombin. We further suggest that they play a role for the tethered ligand binding to the receptor, as mutations also affected activation in response to a PAR4-activating peptide mimicking the new N-terminal formed after cleavage. This agrees with previous results on PAR1 and thrombin binding. We suggest that the ECLII of PAR4 could be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The heparin/heparan sulfate sequence that interacts with cyclophilin B contains a 3-O-sulfated N-unsubstituted glucosamine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Deligny, Audrey; Delehedde, Maryse; Denys, Agnès; Melchior, Aurélie; Liénard, Xavier; Lyon, Malcolm; Mazurier, Joël; Fernig, David G; Allain, Fabrice

    2007-08-17

    Many of the biological functions of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans can be attributed to specialized structures within HS moieties, which are thought to modulate binding and function of various effector proteins. Cyclophilin B (CyPB), which was initially identified as a cyclosporin A-binding protein, triggers migration and integrin-mediated adhesion of peripheral blood T lymphocytes by a mechanism dependent on interaction with cell surface HS. Here we determined the structural features of HS that are responsible for the specific binding of CyPB. In addition to the involvement of 2-O,6-O, and N-sulfate groups, we also demonstrated that binding of CyPB was dependent on the presence of N-unsubstituted glucosamine residues (GlcNH2), which have been reported to be precursors for sulfation by 3-O-sulfotransferases-3 (3-OST-3). Interestingly, 3-OST-3B isoform was found to be the main 3-OST isoenzyme expressed in peripheral blood T lymphocytes and Jurkat T cells. Moreover, down-regulation of the expression of 3-OST-3 by RNA interference potently reduced CyPB binding and consequent activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Altogether, our results strongly support the hypothesis that 3-O-sulfation of GlcNH2 residues could be a key modification that provides specialized HS structures for CyPB binding to responsive cells. Given that 3-O-sulfation of GlcNH2-containing HS by 3-OST-3 also provides binding sites for glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex virus type I, these findings suggest an intriguing structural linkage between the HS sequences involved in CyPB binding and viral infection.

  6. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  7. Resolving the infection process reveals striking differences in the contribution of environment, genetics and phylogeny to host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duneau, David; Luijckx, Pepijn; Ben-Ami, Frida; Laforsch, Christian; Ebert, Dieter

    2011-02-22

    Infection processes consist of a sequence of steps, each critical for the interaction between host and parasite. Studies of host-parasite interactions rarely take into account the fact that different steps might be influenced by different factors and might, therefore, make different contributions to shaping coevolution. We designed a new method using the Daphnia magna - Pasteuria ramosa system, one of the rare examples where coevolution has been documented, in order to resolve the steps of the infection and analyse the factors that influence each of them. Using the transparent Daphnia hosts and fluorescently-labelled spores of the bacterium P. ramosa, we identified a sequence of infection steps: encounter between parasite and host; activation of parasite dormant spores; attachment of spores to the host; and parasite proliferation inside the host. The chances of encounter had been shown to depend on host genotype and environment. We tested the role of genetic and environmental factors in the newly described activation and attachment steps. Hosts of different genotypes, gender and species were all able to activate endospores of all parasite clones tested in different environments; suggesting that the activation cue is phylogenetically conserved. We next established that parasite attachment occurs onto the host oesophagus independently of host species, gender and environmental conditions. In contrast to spore activation, attachment depended strongly on the combination of host and parasite genotypes. Our results show that different steps are influenced by different factors. Host-type-independent spore activation suggests that this step can be ruled out as a major factor in Daphnia-Pasteuria coevolution. On the other hand, we show that the attachment step is crucial for the pronounced genetic specificities of this system. We suggest that this one step can explain host population structure and could be a key force behind coevolutionary cycles. We discuss how different

  8. Resolving the infection process reveals striking differences in the contribution of environment, genetics and phylogeny to host-parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laforsch Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection processes consist of a sequence of steps, each critical for the interaction between host and parasite. Studies of host-parasite interactions rarely take into account the fact that different steps might be influenced by different factors and might, therefore, make different contributions to shaping coevolution. We designed a new method using the Daphnia magna - Pasteuria ramosa system, one of the rare examples where coevolution has been documented, in order to resolve the steps of the infection and analyse the factors that influence each of them. Results Using the transparent Daphnia hosts and fluorescently-labelled spores of the bacterium P. ramosa, we identified a sequence of infection steps: encounter between parasite and host; activation of parasite dormant spores; attachment of spores to the host; and parasite proliferation inside the host. The chances of encounter had been shown to depend on host genotype and environment. We tested the role of genetic and environmental factors in the newly described activation and attachment steps. Hosts of different genotypes, gender and species were all able to activate endospores of all parasite clones tested in different environments; suggesting that the activation cue is phylogenetically conserved. We next established that parasite attachment occurs onto the host oesophagus independently of host species, gender and environmental conditions. In contrast to spore activation, attachment depended strongly on the combination of host and parasite genotypes. Conclusions Our results show that different steps are influenced by different factors. Host-type-independent spore activation suggests that this step can be ruled out as a major factor in Daphnia-Pasteuria coevolution. On the other hand, we show that the attachment step is crucial for the pronounced genetic specificities of this system. We suggest that this one step can explain host population structure and could be a key

  9. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Structure-based network analysis of activation mechanisms in the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases: the regulatory spine residues are global mediators of structural stability and allosteric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A James

    Full Text Available The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced "superacceptor" activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not

  11. The interaction of fatigue cracks with a residual stress field using thermoelastic stress analysis and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Khurram; Asquith, David; Sebastian, Christopher M.; Wang, Wei-Chung

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the fatigue behaviour of cracks emanating from cold-expanded holes utilizing thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) techniques with the aim of resolving the long-standing ambiguity in the literature regarding potential relaxation, or modification, of beneficial compressive residual stresses as a result of fatigue crack propagation. The crack growth rates are found to be substantially lower as the crack tip moved through the residual stress zone induced by cold expansion. The TSA results demonstrated that the crack tip plastic zones were reduced in size by the presence of the residual compressive stresses induced by cold expansion. The crack tip plastic zones were found to be insignificant in size in comparison to the residual stress zone resulting from cold expansion, which implied that they were unlikely to have had a notable impact on the surrounding residual stresses induced by cold expansion. The residual stress distributions measured along the direction of crack growth, using SXRD, showed no signs of any significant stress relaxation or redistribution, which validates the conclusions drawn from the TSA data. Fractographic analysis qualitatively confirmed the influence on crack initiation of the residual stresses induced by the cold expansion. It was found that the application of single compressive overload caused a relaxation, or reduction in the residual stresses, which has wider implications for improving the fatigue life. PMID:29291095

  12. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  13. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa-Eva Huettl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1 in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  14. Positively charged residues at the five-fold symmetry axis of cell culture-adapted foot-and-mouth disease virus permit novel receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Stephen; Clark, Stuart; Kakker, Naresh K; Silk, Rhiannon; Seago, Julian; Wadsworth, Jemma; Chamberlain, Kyle; Knowles, Nick J; Jackson, Terry

    2013-08-01

    Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have a restricted cell tropism which is limited by the need for certain RGD-dependent integrin receptors. In contrast, cell culture-adapted viruses use heparan sulfate (HS) or other unidentified molecules as receptors to initiate infection. Here, we report several novel findings resulting from cell culture adaptation of FMDV. In cell culture, a virus with the capsid of the A/Turkey/2/2006 field isolate gained the ability to infect CHO and HS-deficient CHO cells as a result of a single glutamine (Q)-to-lysine (K) substitution at VP1-110 (VP1-(Q)110(K)). Using site-directed mutagenesis, the introduction of lysine at this same site also resulted in an acquired ability to infect CHO cells by type O and Asia-1 FMDV. However, this ability appeared to require a second positively charged residue at VP1-109. CHO cells express two RGD-binding integrins (α5β1 and αvβ5) that, although not used by FMDV, have the potential to be used as receptors; however, viruses with the VP1-(Q)110(K) substitution did not use these integrins. In contrast, the VP1-(Q)110(K) substitution appeared to result in enhanced interactions with αvβ6, which allowed a virus with KGE in place of the normal RGD integrin-binding motif to use αvβ6 as a receptor. Thus, our results confirmed the existence of nonintegrin, non-HS receptors for FMDV on CHO cells and revealed a novel, non-RGD-dependent use of αvβ6 as a receptor. The introduction of lysine at VP1-110 may allow for cell culture adaptation of FMDV by design, which may prove useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves intractable.

  15. Positively Charged Residues at the Five-Fold Symmetry Axis of Cell Culture-Adapted Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Permit Novel Receptor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Stephen; Clark, Stuart; Kakker, Naresh K.; Silk, Rhiannon; Seago, Julian; Wadsworth, Jemma; Chamberlain, Kyle; Knowles, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have a restricted cell tropism which is limited by the need for certain RGD-dependent integrin receptors. In contrast, cell culture-adapted viruses use heparan sulfate (HS) or other unidentified molecules as receptors to initiate infection. Here, we report several novel findings resulting from cell culture adaptation of FMDV. In cell culture, a virus with the capsid of the A/Turkey/2/2006 field isolate gained the ability to infect CHO and HS-deficient CHO cells as a result of a single glutamine (Q)-to-lysine (K) substitution at VP1-110 (VP1-Q110K). Using site-directed mutagenesis, the introduction of lysine at this same site also resulted in an acquired ability to infect CHO cells by type O and Asia-1 FMDV. However, this ability appeared to require a second positively charged residue at VP1-109. CHO cells express two RGD-binding integrins (α5β1 and αvβ5) that, although not used by FMDV, have the potential to be used as receptors; however, viruses with the VP1-Q110K substitution did not use these integrins. In contrast, the VP1-Q110K substitution appeared to result in enhanced interactions with αvβ6, which allowed a virus with KGE in place of the normal RGD integrin-binding motif to use αvβ6 as a receptor. Thus, our results confirmed the existence of nonintegrin, non-HS receptors for FMDV on CHO cells and revealed a novel, non-RGD-dependent use of αvβ6 as a receptor. The introduction of lysine at VP1-110 may allow for cell culture adaptation of FMDV by design, which may prove useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves intractable. PMID:23740982

  16. Interaction between CK2α and CK2β, the Subunits of Protein Kinase CK2: Thermodynamic Contributions of Key Residues on the CK2α Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, J; Bischoff, N; Kloppfleisch, K

    2011-01-01

    that Leu41 or Phe54 single mutations were most disruptive to binding of CK2β. Additionally, these CK2α mutants retained their kinase activity. Furthermore, the substitution of Leu41 in combination with Phe54 showed that the individual mutations were not additive, suggesting that the cooperative action...

  17. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  18. Integrated modeling of groundwater-surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field: The importance of directly measured flow route contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemeijer, J.C.; Velde, Y. van der; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, F.C. van; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely

  19. The Contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) Warm-Up Segments in Assessing Parent-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Jenelle R.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred…

  20. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Tseng, Andrew; He, Hongxuan; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Wang, Xuannian; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB), a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human tropoelastin (HTE), the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N). Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38) by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  1. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB, a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human tropoelastin (HTE, the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N. Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  2. To What Extent Do Teacher-Student Interaction Quality and Student Gender Contribute to Fifth Graders' Engagement in Mathematics Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Baroody, Alison E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Curby, Timothy W.; Abry, Tashia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines concurrent teacher-student interaction quality and 5th graders' (n = 387) engagement in mathematics classrooms (n = 63) and considers how teacher-student interaction quality relates to engagement differently for boys and girls. Three approaches were used to measure student engagement in mathematics: Research assistants observed…

  3. Multiple Taf subunits of TFIID interact with Ino2 activation domains and contribute to expression of genes required for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Stefan; Engelhardt, Maike; van Diepen, Laura; Witt, Eric; Schüller, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-01

    Expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes in yeast requires activator protein Ino2 which can bind to the UAS element inositol/choline-responsive element (ICRE) and trigger activation of target genes, using two separate transcriptional activation domains, TAD1 and TAD2. However, it is still unknown which cofactors mediate activation by TADs of Ino2. Here, we show that multiple subunits of basal transcription factor TFIID (TBP-associated factors Taf1, Taf4, Taf6, Taf10 and Taf12) are able to interact in vitro with activation domains of Ino2. Interaction was no longer observed with activation-defective variants of TAD1. We were able to identify two nonoverlapping regions in the N-terminus of Taf1 (aa 1-100 and aa 182-250) each of which could interact with TAD1 of Ino2 as well as with TAD4 of activator Adr1. Specific missense mutations within Taf1 domain aa 182-250 affecting basic and hydrophobic residues prevented interaction with wild-type TAD1 and caused reduced expression of INO1. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated Ino2-dependent recruitment of Taf1 and Taf6 to ICRE-containing promoters INO1 and CHO2. Transcriptional derepression of INO1 was no longer possible with temperature-sensitive taf1 and taf6 mutants cultivated under nonpermissive conditions. This result supports the hypothesis of Taf-dependent expression of structural genes activated by Ino2. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase PER-2 and Insights into the Role of Specific Residues in the Interaction with β-Lactams and β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric; Herman, Raphaël; Sapunaric, Frédéric; Galleni, Moreno; Gutkind, Gabriel; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric

    2014-01-01

    PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum β-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most β-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 Å and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward β-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Ω loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A β-lactamases. PER β-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A (“A” indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER β-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different β-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior. PMID:25070104

  5. Interaction between a fluid at high temperature and a concrete: contribution to the modeling of heat and mass transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introini, C.

    2010-01-01

    In the late phases of some scenario of hypothetical severe accident in Pressurized Water Reactors, a molten mixture of core and vessel structures, called corium, comes to interact with the concrete basemat. The safety numerical tools are lumped parameter codes. They are based on a large averaged description of heat and mass transfers which raises some uncertainties about the multi-scale description of the exchanges but also about the adopted boundary layer structure in the vicinity of the ablation front. In this context, the aim of this work is to tackle the problem of the boundary layer structure by means of direct numerical simulation. This work joins within the more general framework of a multi-scale description and a multi-scale modeling, namely from the local scale associated with the vicinity of the ablation front to the scale associated with the lumped parameter codes. Such a multi-scale description raises not only the problem of the local description of the multiphase multicomponent flow but also the problem of the up-scaling between the local- and the macro-scale which is associated with the convective structures within the pool of corium. Here, we are particularly interested in the building of effective boundary conditions or wall laws for macro-scale models. The difficulty of the multiphase multicomponent problem at the local scale leads us to consider a relatively simplified problem. Effective boundary conditions are built in the frame of a domain decomposition method and numerical experiments are performed for a natural convection problem in a stamp shaped cavity to assess the validity of the proposed wall laws. Even if the treated problem is still far from the target applications, this contribution can be viewed as a first step of a multi-scale modeling of the exchanges for the molten core concrete issue. In the more complicated case of multiphase multicomponent flows, it is necessary to have a direct numerical simulation tool of the flow at the local

  6. Novel essential residues of Hda for interaction with DnaA in the regulatory inactivation of DnaA: unique roles for Hda AAA Box VI and VII motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenta; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli ATP-DnaA initiates chromosomal replication. For preventing extra-initiations, a complex of ADP-Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp promotes DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, yielding inactive ADP-DnaA. However, the Hda-DnaA interaction mode remains unclear except that the Hda Box VII Arg finger (Arg-153) and DnaA sensor II Arg-334 within each AAA(+) domain are crucial for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Here, we demonstrate that direct and functional interaction of ADP-Hda with DnaA requires the Hda residues Ser-152, Phe-118 and Asn-122 as well as Hda Arg-153 and DnaA Arg-334. Structural analyses suggest intermolecular interactions between Hda Ser-152 and DnaA Arg-334 and between Hda Phe-118 and the DnaA Walker B motif region, in addition to an intramolecular interaction between Hda Asn-122 and Arg-153. These interactions likely sustain a specific association of ADP-Hda and DnaA, promoting DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Consistently, ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA interact with the ADP-Hda-DNA-clamp complex with similar affinities. Hda Phe-118 and Asn-122 are contained in the Box VI region, and their hydrophobic and electrostatic features are basically conserved in the corresponding residues of other AAA(+) proteins, suggesting a conserved role for Box VI. These findings indicate novel interaction mechanisms for Hda-DnaA as well as a potentially fundamental mechanism in AAA(+) protein interactions.

  7. The Contribution of Different Patterns of Teachers' Interactions to Young Children's Experiences of Democratic Values during Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisen, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Developing a sense of belonging and experiences about the value of community are important democratic values that children may learn during play in preschool. Through the different ways that teachers' interact with children during play, children can learn about democratic values. This study is part of a Nordic project on values education in early…

  8. Protein Charge and Mass Contribute to the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Minimal Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Hong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2013-01-01

    We constructed and simulated a ‘minimal proteome’ model using Langevin dynamics. It contains 206 essential protein types which were compiled from the literature. For comparison, we generated six proteomes with randomized concentrations. We found that the net charges and molecular weights of the proteins in the minimal genome are not random. The net charge of a protein decreases linearly with molecular weight, with small proteins being mostly positively charged and large proteins negatively charged. The protein copy numbers in the minimal genome have the tendency to maximize the number of protein-protein interactions in the network. Negatively charged proteins which tend to have larger sizes can provide large collision cross-section allowing them to interact with other proteins; on the other hand, the smaller positively charged proteins could have higher diffusion speed and are more likely to collide with other proteins. Proteomes with random charge/mass populations form less stable clusters than those with experimental protein copy numbers. Our study suggests that ‘proper’ populations of negatively and positively charged proteins are important for maintaining a protein-protein interaction network in a proteome. It is interesting to note that the minimal genome model based on the charge and mass of E. Coli may have a larger protein-protein interaction network than that based on the lower organism M. pneumoniae. PMID:23420643

  9. An Examination of the Contributions of Interactive Peer Play to Salient Classroom Competencies for Urban Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzo, John; Sekino, Yumiko; Cohen, Heather L.

    2004-01-01

    Relations between children's peer play competence and other relevant competencies were investigated using two samples of urban Head Start children. Dimensions of peer play were examined concurrently with emotion regulation, autonomy, and language. Children exhibiting high levels of peer play interaction were found to demonstrate more competent…

  10. Continuum contribution to excitonic four-wave mixing due to interaction-induced nonlinearities: A numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, Karim El; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1997-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of ultrafast transient four-wave mixing (FWM) of GaAs quantum wells for coherent excitation of excitons and a large number of continuum states. It is shown that in this case the line shape of the FWM signal is drastically altered due to an interaction-induce...

  11. Residual analysis for spatial point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, A.; Turner, R.; Møller, Jesper

    We define residuals for point process models fitted to spatial point pattern data, and propose diagnostic plots based on these residuals. The techniques apply to any Gibbs point process model, which may exhibit spatial heterogeneity, interpoint interaction and dependence on spatial covariates. Ou...... or covariate effects. Q-Q plots of the residuals are effective in diagnosing interpoint interaction. Some existing ad hoc statistics of point patterns (quadrat counts, scan statistic, kernel smoothed intensity, Berman's diagnostic) are recovered as special cases....

  12. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  13. Humic acids and their interactions with metallic elements: Cu II, Eu III, Th IV, U VI: contribution of size exclusion chromatography method and research of complexation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourd-Moulin, V.

    1986-04-01

    The interest given to natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) as complexing agents of metallic ions in soils and natural waters becomes more and more important in environmental area. Cation - humic matter interactions have a great importance, a better understanding of the contribution of these substances in natural media specially towards radioactive elements with long life time. Interactions are studied by a chromatographic technique of gel filtration: the dynamic equilibrium method is based on the separation of the formed complex humic macromolecule - metallic ion and the free metallic ion, which due to its size penetrates totally in the pores of the gel. Separation mechanisms of the chromatographic support and the contribution of each parameter, are studied as a function of the buffer nature, its concentration, the PH, the gel porosity and the valence of the metallic cation. This study led to the determination of the appropriate experimental conditions for each cation. A study of metallic binding with humic acid has been undertaken with Cu 2+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , Uo 2 2+ . These elements, except copper, have been chosen for their properties similar to the transuranic elements. Different samples of humic acids (commercial, podzolic soil, rendzine soil) are also studied. A deeper research of europium - humic acid interactions by means of different treatment models (discrete or gaussian models) has been undertaken in order to determine the number, the binding site strength and the global interaction constants [fr

  14. Brca2 C-terminus interacts with Rad51 and contributes to nuclear forcus formation in double-strand break repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Syuto, Bunei; Hashizume, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    In humans and mice, the interaction between the breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2, and Rad51 recombinase is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination, the failure of this process can predispose to cancer. Cells with mutated Brca2 are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and exhibit defective DNA repair. Using yeast and mammalian two-hybrid assays, we demonstrate that canine Rad51 protein interacts specifically with the C-terminus of canine Brca2. In support of the biological significance of this interaction, we found that radiation-induced focus formation of Rad51 in COS-7 cells was compromised by forced expression of the C-terminus of canine Brca2. A similar result was obtained for the murine C-terminus. These data suggest that the C-terminal domain of canine Brca2 functions to bind Rad51 and that this domain contributes to the IR-induced assembly of the Rad51 complex in vivo. (author)

  15. Uncovering the local inelastic interactions during manufacture of ductile cast iron: How the substructure of the graphite particles can induce residual stress concentrations in the matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Hellström, Kristina; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2018-01-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements have revealed that plastic deformation and a residual elastic strain field can be present around the graphite particles in ductile cast iron after manufacturing, probably due to some local mismatch in thermal contraction. However, as only one component...... of the elastic strain tensor could be obtained from the XRD data, the shape and magnitude of the associated residual stress field have remained unknown. To compensate for this and to provide theoretical insight into this unexplored topic, a combined experimental-numerical approach is presented in this paper...... the graphite particles and the matrix during manufacturing of the industrial part considered in the XRD study. The model indicates that, besides the vis- coplastic deformation of the matrix, the effect of the inelastic deformation of the graphite has to be considered to explain the magnitude of the XRD strain...

  16. Identification of hormone-interacting amino acid residues within the steroid-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other steroid hormone receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Stroemstedt, P.E.; Persson, B.; Cederlund, E.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Joernvall, H.

    1988-01-01

    Purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was covalently charged with [ 3 H]glucocorticoid by photoaffinity labeling (UV irradiation of [ 3 H]triamcinolone acetonide-glucocorticoid receptor) or affinity labeling (incubation with [ 3 H]dexamethasone mesylate). After labeling, separate samples of the denatured receptor were cleaved with trypsin (directly or after prior succinylation), chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. Labeled residues in the peptides obtained were identified by radiosequence analysis. The peaks of radioactivity corresponded to Met-622 and Cys-754 after photoaffinity labeling with [ 3 H]triamcinolone acetonide and Cys-656 after affinity labeling with [ 3 H]dexamethasone mesylate. The labeled residues are all positioned within hydrophobic segments of the steroid-binding domain. The patterns of hydropathy and secondary structure for the glucocorticoid receptor are highly similar to those for the progestin receptor and similar but less so to those for the estrogen receptor and to those for c-erb A

  17. How Design-based Research, Action Research and Interaction Design Contributes to the Development of Designs for Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Gunver; Misfeldt, Morten; Nielsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how action research, design based research and interaction design can be combined and used in the development of educational robotic tools. Our case study is the development of Number Blocks and it combines physical interaction, learning, and immediate feedback. Number Blocks...... supports the children's understanding of place value in the sense that it allows them to experiment with creating large numbers. The development was done in collaboration with a class of 7-8 year old children and their mathematics teacher. The article argues that elements from different research methods...... allowed a structured approach to projects that combines educational research and innovation of new learning technologies. Key elements of this approach is acknowledging the users input, developing a theoretical pre-analysis and using an iterative approach....

  18. Unique contributions of emotion regulation and executive functions in predicting the quality of parent-child interaction behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Anne; Obradović, Jelena

    2017-03-01

    Parenting is a cognitive, emotional, and behavioral endeavor, yet limited research investigates parents' executive functions and emotion regulation as predictors of how parents interact with their children. The current study is a multimethod investigation of parental self-regulation in relation to the quality of parenting behavior and parent-child interactions in a diverse sample of parents and kindergarten-age children. Using path analyses, we tested how parent executive functions (inhibitory control) and lack of emotion regulation strategies uniquely relate to both sensitive/responsive behaviors and positive/collaborative behaviors during observed interaction tasks. In our analyses, we accounted for parent education, financial stress, and social support as socioeconomic factors that likely relate to parent executive function and emotion regulation skills. In a diverse sample of primary caregivers (N = 102), we found that direct assessment of parent inhibitory control was positively associated with sensitive/responsive behaviors, whereas parent self-reported difficulties in using emotion regulation strategies were associated with lower levels of positive and collaborative dyadic behaviors. Parent education and financial stress predicted inhibitory control, and social support predicted emotion regulation difficulties; parent education was also a significant predictor of sensitive/responsive behaviors. Greater inhibitory control skills and fewer difficulties identifying effective emotion regulation strategies were not significantly related in our final path model. We discuss our findings in the context of current and emerging parenting interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Comparative modeling and docking studies of p16ink4/Cyclin D1/Rb pathway genes in lung cancer revealed functionally interactive residue of RB1 and its functional partner E2F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    e Zahra Syeda Naqsh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the major cause of mortality worldwide. Major signalling pathways that could play significant role in lung cancer therapy include (1 Growth promoting pathways (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Ras/ PhosphatidylInositol 3-Kinase (2 Growth inhibitory pathways (p53/Rb/P14ARF, STK11 (3 Apoptotic pathways (Bcl-2/Bax/Fas/FasL. Insilico strategy was implemented to solve the mystery behind selected lung cancer pathway by applying comparative modeling and molecular docking studies. Results YASARA [v 12.4.1] was utilized to predict structural models of P16-INK4 and RB1 genes using template 4ELJ-A and 1MX6-B respectively. WHAT CHECK evaluation tool demonstrated overall quality of predicted P16-INK4 and RB1 with Z-score of −0.132 and −0.007 respectively which showed a strong indication of reliable structure prediction. Protein-protein interactions were explored by utilizing STRING server, illustrated that CDK4 and E2F1 showed strong interaction with P16-INK4 and RB1 based on confidence score of 0.999 and 0.999 respectively. In order to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the complex interactions between candidate genes with their functional interactors, GRAMM-X server was used. Protein-protein docking investigation of P16-INK4 revealed four ionic bonds illustrating Arg47, Arg80,Cys72 and Met1 residues as actively participating in interactions with CDK4 while docking results of RB1 showed four hydrogen bonds involving Glu864, Ser567, Asp36 and Arg861 residues which interact strongly with its respective functional interactor E2F1. Conclusion This research may provide a basis for understanding biological insights of P16-INK4 and RB1 proteins which will be helpful in future to design a suitable drug to inhibit the disease pathogenesis as we have determined the interacting amino acids which can be targeted in order to design a ligand in-vitro to propose a drug for clinical trials. Protein -protein docking of

  20. Study of the interactions between a proline-rich protein and a flavan-3-ol by NMR: residual structures in the natively unfolded protein provides anchorage points for the ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christine; Paté, Franck; Cheynier, Véronique; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2009-09-01

    Astringency is one of the major organoleptic properties of food and beverages that are made from plants, such as tea, chocolate, beer, or red wine. This sensation is thought to be due to interactions between tannins and salivary proline-rich proteins, which are natively unfolded proteins. A human salivary proline-rich protein, namely IB-5, was produced by the recombinant method. Its interactions with a model tannin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major flavan-3-ol in green tea, were studied here. Circular dichroism experiments showed that IB-5 presents residual structures (PPII helices) when the ionic strength is close to that in saliva. In the presence of these residual structures, IB-5 undergoes an increase in structural content upon binding to EGCG. NMR data corroborated the presence of preformed structural elements within the protein prior to binding and a partial assignment was proposed, showing partial structuration. TOCSY experiments showed that amino acids that are involved in PPII helices are more likely to interact with EGCG than those in random coil regions, as if they were anchorage points for the ligand. The signal from IB-5 in the DOSY NMR spectrum revealed an increase in polydispersity upon addition of EGCG while the mean hydrodynamic radius remained unchanged. This strongly suggests the formation of IB-5/EGCG aggregates.

  1. Quantitative modeling assesses the contribution of bond strengthening, rebinding and force sharing to the avidity of biomolecule interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Schiavo

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell's empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond

  2. Quantitative Modeling Assesses the Contribution of Bond Strengthening, Rebinding and Force Sharing to the Avidity of Biomolecule Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Schiavo, Valentina; Robert, Philippe; Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell’s empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond maturation, rebinding and

  3. Contributions at the Tripoli Monte Carlo code qualifying on critical experiences and at neutronic interaction study of fissile units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Criticality studies in nuclear fuel cycle are based on Monte Carlo method. These codes use multigroup cross sections which can verify by experimental configurations or by use of reference codes such Tripoli 2. In this Tripoli 2 code nuclear data are errors attached and asked for experimental studies with critical experiences. This is one of the aim of this thesis. To calculate the keff of interacted fissile units we have used the multigroup Monte Carlo code Moret with convergence problems. A new estimator of reactions rates permit to better approximate the neutrons exchange between units and a new importance function has been tested. 2 annexes

  4. Continuum contribution to excitonic four-wave mixing due to interaction-induced nonlinearities: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, K.; Birkedal, D.; Lyssenko, V. G.; Hvam, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of ultrafast transient four-wave mixing (FWM) of GaAs quantum wells for coherent excitation of excitons and a large number of continuum states. It is shown that in this case the line shape of the FWM signal is drastically altered due to an interaction-induced coupling of the exciton to all the excited continuum states. The signal is dominantly emitted at the spectral position of the exciton and decays, as a function of delay, on a time scale set by the duration of the laser pulse rather than by the intrinsic dephasing time. Nevertheless, the spectral width of the exciton line in the FWM spectrum and in the decay of the time-resolved FWM signal in real time are governed by the intrinsic excitonic dephasing rate. It is shown that for pulse durations of ~ 100 fs (for GaAs quantum wells) this behavior can be explained as the influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction, while for even shorter pulses this behavior is dominantly caused by nonlinear polarization decay.

  5. Measurement of the yields of residual nuclei in interactions 17.9 GeV/c α-particles with sup(159)Tb, sup(181)Ta and sup(207,2)Pb nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butsev, V.S.; Butseva, G.L.; Kostin, V.Ya.; Migalenya, V.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The results of investigations of 17.9 GeV/c α-particle interactions with Tb, Ta and Ph nuclei are presented. Measurements have been carried out of the relative yields of residual nuclei for the (α+Tb), (α+Ta) and (α+Pb) reactions in the 24 93 Tc, 133 Ce and 198 Tl the isomeric ratios are determined, that are compared with the isomeric ratios measured in reactions induced by 500 MeV protons and by 25.2 GeV 12 C ions

  6. A Mutational Analysis of Residues in Cholera Toxin A1 Necessary for Interaction with Its Substrate, the Stimulatory G Protein Gsα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Jobling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea requires cholera toxin (CT-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribosylation of stimulatory G protein (Gsα in enterocytes. CT is an AB5 toxin with an inactive CTA1 domain linked via CTA2 to a pentameric receptor-binding B subunit. Allosterically activated CTA1 fragment in complex with NAD+ and GTP-bound ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6-GTP differs conformationally from the CTA1 domain in holotoxin. A surface-exposed knob and a short α-helix (formed, respectively, by rearranging “active-site” and “activation” loops in inactive CTA1 and an ADP ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT motif, all located near the CTA1 catalytic site, were evaluated for possible roles in recognizing Gsα. CT variants with one, two or three alanine substitutions at surface-exposed residues within these CTA1 motifs were tested for assembly into holotoxin and ADP-ribosylating activity against Gsα and diethylamino-(benzylidineamino-guanidine (DEABAG, a small substrate predicted to fit into the CTA1 active site. Variants with single alanine substitutions at H55, R67, L71, S78, or D109 had nearly wild-type activity with DEABAG but significantly decreased activity with Gsα, suggesting that the corresponding residues in native CTA1 participate in recognizing Gsα. As several variants with multiple substitutions at these positions retained partial activity against Gsα, other residues in CTA1 likely also participate in recognizing Gsα.

  7. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  8. Contribution to concrete modelling towards aging and durability: interactions between creep deformations and non-linear behaviour of the material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthollet, A.

    2003-10-01

    Concrete structures are examined during their lifetime and often present important cracking states, which can progress with time and lead to change the structural behavior. The civil engineering works that the main function corresponds to protection's wall are very sensitive to this damage and its evolution. The growth of the time - dependent cracks represents an aging pathology linked with interaction between creep mechanism and the non-linear behavior of the material. In this thesis, a modeling for these mechanisms and their coupling are proposed. It based on creep strains analysis under different load levels, on the influence of the rate effect to the mechanical behavior. A stress limit is put on prominent manner, where beyond it, the creep - cracking interaction becomes important with the introduction of the ultimate tertiary creep kinetic. This level of strength is identified for infinitely slow loading rates and is also called intrinsic strength. It defines the limit on this side the viscous behavior of the cement paste limits the irreversibility processes as cracking. Thus, a constitutive law of viscoelastic - viscoplastic behavior with a high coupling between the cracking mechanism and the creep strains is proposed. The developments of the model are built on DUVAUT - LIONS approach integrated a generalized MAXWELL chain model. For one part, the viscoelastic behavior translates the creep mechanism under low stresses. For a second part, it associated with the viscoplastic behavior, which allows introducing both creep effect under high stresses and rate effect acting on micro-cracked zones. The cracking mechanism is described throughout a plasticity theory with multi-criteria, which induce a property of anisotropy for hardening. Qualitatively, ails of the creep kinetics are reproduced. An additional validation is based on experimental tests in compression, traction and flexion where the main parameters of the modeling are detailed. Thus, we can conclude on the

  9. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution to the evaluation of impact on ecosystems of the valorization of thermal process residues in road engineering; Contribution a l'evaluation de l'impact sur les ecosystemes de la valorisation de residus de procedes thermiques en BTP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthet, L.

    2003-07-01

    For several years, Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and coal fly ash have been reused in civil engineering. Although their physical-chemical characteristics are very studied, the toxicity of these materials is the issue of few works. This study aims at contributing to the evaluation of the impact on the ecosystems of the valorization of these residues of thermal processes (RTP) in road engineering. We have compared the potential toxicity of MSWI bottom ash resulting from traditional collection and MSWI bottom ash resulting from selective collection. Since physicochemical parameters of MSWI bottom ash weathering is quite important, we will see the effect of artificial carbonation on the potential toxicity. We have chosen to work with whole-cell microorganisms from the compartment of the producers (algae: Chlorella vulgaris) and from the compartment of the decomposers (yeasts: Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The use of tests using global metabolism (algae growth) and more specific tests (enzymatic activities) have allowed to compare the potential toxicity of MSWI bottom ash resulting from traditional collection and MSWI bottom ash resulting from selective collection. These bioassays have shown that artificial carbonation may decrease the potential toxicity of these MSWI bottom ash. The behavior of coal fly ash used in various scenarios of pilots of road has also been revealed. The development of an optical bio-sensor with immobilized whole cells will enable on line and in-situ monitoring of pollutants salting out MSWI bottom ash and coal fly-ash from pilots of roads. (author)

  11. Contributions of pocket depth and electrostatic interactions to affinity and selectivity of receptors for methylated lysine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Joshua E; Peacor, Brendan C; Bain, Julianne V; James, Lindsey I; Waters, Marcey L

    2015-03-21

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry was used to generate a set of receptors for peptides containing methylated lysine (KMen, n = 0-3) and study the contribution of electrostatic effects and pocket depth to binding affinity and selectivity. We found that changing the location of a carboxylate resulted in an increase in preference for KMe2, presumably based on ability to form a salt bridge with KMe2. The number of charged groups on either the receptor or peptide guest systematically varied the binding affinities to all guests by approximately 1-1.5 kcal mol(-1), with little influence on selectivity. Lastly, formation of a deeper pocket led to both increased affinity and selectivity for KMe3 over the lower methylation states. From these studies, we identified that the tightest binder was a receptor with greater net charge, with a Kd of 0.2 μM, and the receptor with the highest selectivity was the one with the deepest pocket, providing 14-fold selectivity between KMe3 and KMe2 and a Kd for KMe3 of 0.3 μM. This work provides key insights into approaches to improve binding affinity and selectivity in water, while also demonstrating the versatility of dynamic combinatorial chemistry for rapidly exploring the impact of subtle changes in receptor functionality on molecular recognition in water.

  12. Experiments on the reaction π-p → π0π0n and their contributions to the knowledge of ππ-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1977-12-01

    The status of our experimental knowledge of ππ-interaction is presented. Special attention is given to the contributions from experiments which measured the reaction π - p → π 0 π 0 n. The publication contains also an introduction to the basic theoretical aspects of ππ-scattering and describes the extraction of ππ-scattering from the reaction πN → ππN. The origin of the ambiguities in the phase shifts is discussed. In the last part a description of the experimental set ups and techniques is given. (orig.) [de

  13. Contribution of MS-based proteomics to the understanding of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eSantamaría

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other DNA viruses, Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 replicates and proliferates in host cells continuously modulating the host molecular environment. Following a sophisticated temporal expression pattern, HSV-1 encodes at least 89 multifunctional proteins that interplay with and modify the host cell proteome. During the last decade, advances in mass spectrometry applications coupled to the development of proteomic separation methods have allowed to partially monitor the impact of HSV-1 infection in human cells. In this review, we discuss the current use of different proteome fractionation strategies to define HSV-1 targets on two major application areas: i viral protein interactomics to decipher viral protein interactions in host cells and ii differential quantitative proteomics to analyse the virally induced changes in the cellular proteome. Moreover, we will also discuss the potential application of high throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and also post-translational modifications in HSV-1-infected cells, what will greatly improved our molecular knowledge of HSV-1 infection.

  14. Multiphonon contribution to the polaron formation in cuprates with strong electron correlations and strong electron-phonon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey G.; Makarov, Ilya A.; Kozlov, Peter A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work dependences of the electron band structure and spectral function in the HTSC cuprates on magnitude of electron-phonon interaction (EPI) and temperature are investigated. We use three-band p-d model with diagonal and offdiagonal EPI with breathing and buckling phonon mode in the frameworks of polaronic version of the generalized tight binding (GTB) method. The polaronic quasiparticle excitation in the system with EPI within this approach is formed by a hybridization of the local multiphonon Franck-Condon excitations with lower and upper Hubbard bands. Increasing EPI leads to transfer of spectral weight to high-energy multiphonon excitations and broadening of the spectral function. Temperature effects are taken into account by occupation numbers of local excited polaronic states and variations in the magnitude of spin-spin correlation functions. Increasing the temperature results in band structure reconstruction, spectral weight redistribution, broadening of the spectral function peak at the top of the valence band and the decreasing of the peak intensity. The effect of EPI with two phonon modes on the polaron spectral function is discussed.

  15. Plasminogen Binding Proteins and Plasmin Generation on the Surface of Leptospira spp.: The Contribution to the Bacteria-Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica L. Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is considered a neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern. Although extensive investigations on host-pathogen interactions have been pursued by several research groups, mechanisms of infection, invasion and persistence of pathogenic Leptospira spp. remain to be elucidated. We have reported the ability of leptospires to bind human plasminogen (PLG and to generate enzimatically active plasmin (PLA on the bacteria surface. PLA-coated Leptospira can degrade immobilized ECM molecules, an activity with implications in host tissue penetration. Moreover, we have identified and characterized several proteins that may act as PLG-binding receptors, each of them competent to generate active plasmin. The PLA activity associated to the outer surface of Leptospira could hamper the host immune attack by conferring the bacteria some benefit during infection. The PLA-coated leptospires obstruct complement C3b and IgG depositions on the bacterial surface, most probably through degradation. The decrease of leptospiral opsonization might be an important aspect of the immune evasion strategy. We believe that the presence of PLA on the leptospiral surface may (i facilitate host tissue penetration, (ii help the bacteria to evade the immune system and, as a consequence, (iii permit Leptospira to reach secondary sites of infection.

  16. Centromere Protein (CENP)-W Interacts with Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) U and May Contribute to Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment in Mitotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Younghwa; Kim, Raehyung; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U), a component of the hnRNP complex, contributes to stabilize the kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis. CENP-W was identified as an inner centromere component that plays crucial roles in the formation of a functional kinetochore complex. Results We report that hnRNP U interacts with CENP-W, and the interaction between hnRNP U and CENP-W mutually increased each other’s protein stability by inhibiting the proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, their co-localization was observed chiefly in the nuclear matrix region and at the microtubule-kinetochore interface during interphase and mitosis, respectively. Both microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing agents significantly decreased the protein stability of CENP-W. Furthermore, loss of microtubules and defects in microtubule organization were observed in CENP-W-depleted cells. Conclusion Our data imply that CENP-W plays an important role in the attachment and interaction between microtubules and kinetochore during mitosis. PMID:26881882

  17. Persistence of organophosphorus pesticides in aquatic environments. Coordinated programme on isotope-tracer-aided research and monitoring on agricultural residue - biological interactions in aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, L.

    1982-08-01

    A radiometric enzymic assay method was developed for quick measuring of organophosphorous insecticides in water samples. All steps of the assay procedure were carried out in scintillation vials. 50 μl enzyme solution (acetylcholinesterase of electric eel) and 50 μl buffer pH 7 were pipetted into the vial followed by 100 μl of water sample or aqueous solution of the insecticide and the mixture was incubated for 60 minutes. 50 μl 3 H-acetylcholine were added to the vial and the enzymic reaction stopped after 10 minutes by adding 200 μl buffer solution pH 2.5. 10 ml scintillation cocktail were then added and after shaking and 30 minutes standing the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation spectrometer. Acetylcholine remained in the water phase while 3 H-acetic acid released in enzymic hydrolysis may be extracted by an organic solvent. By this method, not only the parent compound but also some of its degradation products, which possess some anticholinesteratic activity can be measured. The method is suitable for combination with thin-layer chromatography for identification purposes. Using this method, we studied the degradation of the organophosphorous insecticides malathion, parathion, DDVP and imidan. The degradation in distilled water and natural water was compared. For example, the half-time of malathion in distilled water at room temperature was 6 days while in natural water (Danube river) it was 4 hours. The degradation processes were also studied in model systems containing sediment and water. Degradation was faster in models containing solid particles than in filtered water. The radiometric enzymic method was tested as analytical procedure for residue monitoring. Since 1978 a residue monitoring programme was in progress in the Danube river near Budapest. Occasionally high residue levels were detected in spring and early summer. The radiometric enzymic method has proved to be a useful analytical method for anticholinesterase pesticides in

  18. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers

  19. Accounting for Genotype-by-Environment Interactions and Residual Genetic Variation in Genomic Selection for Water-Soluble Carbohydrate Concentration in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovenden, Ben; Milgate, Andrew; Wade, Len J; Rebetzke, Greg J; Holland, James B

    2018-05-31

    Abiotic stress tolerance traits are often complex and recalcitrant targets for conventional breeding improvement in many crop species. This study evaluated the potential of genomic selection to predict water-soluble carbohydrate concentration (WSCC), an important drought tolerance trait, in wheat under field conditions. A panel of 358 varieties and breeding lines constrained for maturity was evaluated under rainfed and irrigated treatments across two locations and two years. Whole-genome marker profiles and factor analytic mixed models were used to generate genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) for specific environments and environment groups. Additive genetic variance was smaller than residual genetic variance for WSCC, such that genotypic values were dominated by residual genetic effects rather than additive breeding values. As a result, GEBVs were not accurate predictors of genotypic values of the extant lines, but GEBVs should be reliable selection criteria to choose parents for intermating to produce new populations. The accuracy of GEBVs for untested lines was sufficient to increase predicted genetic gain from genomic selection per unit time compared to phenotypic selection if the breeding cycle is reduced by half by the use of GEBVs in off-season generations. Further, genomic prediction accuracy depended on having phenotypic data from environments with strong correlations with target production environments to build prediction models. By combining high-density marker genotypes, stress-managed field evaluations, and mixed models that model simultaneously covariances among genotypes and covariances of complex trait performance between pairs of environments, we were able to train models with good accuracy to facilitate genetic gain from genomic selection. Copyright © 2018 Ovenden et al.

  20. Thioredoxin A Is Essential for Motility and Contributes to Host Infection of Listeria monocytogenes via Redox Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Cheng

    2017-06-01

    favorable condition for protein folding and activation, and therefore contributes to bacterial virulence and motility.

  1. Thioredoxin A Is Essential for Motility and Contributes to Host Infection of Listeria monocytogenes via Redox Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Changyong; Dong, Zhimei; Han, Xiao; Wang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Sun, Jing; Yang, Yongchun; Ma, Tiantian; Shao, Chunyan; Wang, Xiaodu; Chen, Zhongwei; Fang, Weihuan; Freitag, Nancy E; Huang, Huarong; Song, Houhui

    2017-01-01

    protein folding and activation, and therefore contributes to bacterial virulence and motility.

  2. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  3. Do student self-efficacy and teacher-student interaction quality contribute to emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel P; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined (a) the contribution of math self-efficacy to students' perception of their emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math classes, and (b) the extent to which high quality teacher-student interactions compensated for students' low math self-efficacy in contributing to engagement. Teachers (n = 73) were observed three times during the year during math to measure the quality of teacher-student interactions (emotional, organizational, and instructional support). Fifth graders (n = 387) reported on their math self-efficacy at the beginning of the school year and then were surveyed about their feelings of engagement in math class three times during the year immediately after the lessons during which teachers were observed. Results of multi-level models indicated that students initially lower in math self-efficacy reported lower emotional and social engagement during math class than students with higher self-efficacy. However, in classrooms with high levels of teacher emotional support, students reported similar levels of both emotional and social engagement, regardless of their self-efficacy. No comparable findings emerged for organizational and instructional support. The discussion considers the significance of students' own feelings about math in relation to their engagement, as well as the ways in which teacher and classroom supports can compensate for students lack of agency. The work has implications for school psychologists and teachers eager to boost students' engagement in math class. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contributions to advances in blend pellet products (BPP) research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction by advanced synchrotron and globar molecular (Micro)spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Oquendo, Víctor H; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-04-13

    To date, advanced synchrotron-based and globar-sourced techniques are almost unknown to food and feed scientists. There has been little application of these advanced techniques to study blend pellet products at a molecular level. This article aims to provide recent research on advanced synchrotron and globar vibrational molecular spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction. How processing induced molecular structure changes in relation to nutrient availability and utilization of the blend pellet products. The study reviews Utilization of co-product components for blend pellet product in North America; Utilization and benefits of inclusion of pulse screenings; Utilization of additives in blend pellet products; Application of pellet processing in blend pellet products; Conventional evaluation techniques and methods for blend pellet products. The study focus on recent applications of cutting-edge vibrational molecular spectroscopy for molecular structure and molecular structure association with nutrient utilization in blend pellet products. The information described in this article gives better insight on how advanced molecular (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction.

  5. PprA contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid, genome maintenance after DNA damage and interacts with deinococcal topoisomerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kota

    Full Text Available PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB as well as other proteins. Here, we show that PprA is a key contributor to D. radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid (Nal, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Growth of wild type D. radiodurans and a pprA mutant were similar in the absence of exogenous genotoxic insults; however, the pprA mutant exhibited marked growth delay and a higher frequency of anucleate cells following treatment with DNA-damaging agents. We show that PprA interacts with both DraTopoIB and the Gyrase A subunit (DraGyrA in vivo and that purified PprA enhances DraTopoIB catalysed relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Thus, besides promoting DNA repair, our findings suggest that PprA also contributes to preserving the integrity of the D. radiodurans genome following DNA damage by interacting with DNA topoisomerases and by facilitating the actions of DraTopoIB.

  6. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  7. Tet38 Efflux Pump Affects Staphylococcus aureus Internalization by Epithelial Cells through Interaction with CD36 and Contributes to Bacterial Escape from Acidic and Nonacidic Phagolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Bolduc, Q C; Khan, N S; Vyas, J M; Hooper, D C

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the Tet38 efflux pump is involved in internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by A549 lung epithelial cells. A lack of tet38 reduced bacterial uptake by A549 cells to 36% of that of the parental strain RN6390. Using invasion assays coupled with confocal microscopy imaging, we studied the host cell receptor(s) responsible for bacterial uptake via interaction with Tet38. We also assessed the ability of S. aureus to survive following alkalinization of the phagolysosomes by chloroquine. Antibody to the scavenger receptor CD36 reduced the internalization of S. aureus RN6390 by A549 cells, but the dependence on CD36 was reduced in QT7 tet38, suggesting that an interaction between Tet38 and CD36 contributed to S. aureus internalization. Following fusion of the S. aureus-associated endosomes with lysosomes, alkalinization of the acidic environment with chloroquine led to a rapid increase in the number of S. aureus RN6390 bacteria in the cytosol, followed by a decrease shortly thereafter. This effect of chloroquine was not seen in the absence of intact Tet38 in mutant QT7. These data taken together suggest that Tet38 plays a role both in bacterial internalization via interaction with CD36 and in bacterial escape from the phagolysosomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Many-body study of van der Waals interaction involving lithium and rare-gas atoms and its contribution to hyperfine shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.K.; Das, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Using linked cluster many-body perturbation theory, the frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities a(ω) has been calculated for the lithium atom. The value of a(ω) at the static limit (169.04 a 0 3 ) matches well with other available theoretical values and experimental results. These values have been used to calculate the van der Waals constants for interactions of lithium, helium and neon atoms. The values of the van der Waals constants for dipole-dipole interaction in atomic units are -22.9, -44.8, -1465.8, 184950.0, 2011.8, 3896.5, 30.3, 59.0 and 115.1 for Li-He, Li-Ne, Li-Li, Li-Li-Li, Li-Li-He, Li-Li-Ne, Li-He-He, Li-He-Ne and Li-Ne-Ne interactions respectively. Obtaining the suitable response functions for lithium and helium atoms, the long range contribution to Δa(r)/a 0 in the study of fractional frequency shift in hyperfine pressure and temperature shift measurements is obtained as -541 atomic units. (author)

  9. A Virtual Reality avatar interaction (VRai) platform to assess residual executive dysfunction in active military personnel with previous mild traumatic brain injury: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Jackson, Philip L; Hébert, Luc J; Mercier, Catherine; Bouyer, Laurent J; Fecteau, Shirley; Richards, Carol L; McFadyen, Bradford J

    2017-10-01

    This proof of concept study tested the ability of a dual task walking protocol using a recently developed avatar-based virtual reality (VR) platform to detect differences between military personnel post mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and healthy controls. The VR platform coordinated motion capture, an interaction and rendering system, and a projection system to present first (participant-controlled) and third person avatars within the context of a specific military patrol scene. A divided attention task was also added. A healthy control group was compared to a group with previous mTBI (both groups comprised of six military personnel) and a repeated measures ANOVA tested for differences between conditions and groups based on recognition errors, walking speed and fluidity and obstacle clearance. The VR platform was well tolerated by both groups. Walking fluidity was degraded for the control group within the more complex navigational dual tasking involving avatars, and appeared greatest in the dual tasking with the interacting avatar. This navigational behaviour was not seen in the mTBI group. The present findings show proof of concept for using avatars, particularly more interactive avatars, to expose differences in executive functioning when applying context-specific protocols (here for the military). Implications for rehabilitation Virtual reality provides a means to control context-specific factors for assessment and intervention. Adding human interaction and agency through avatars increases the ecologic nature of the virtual environment. Avatars in the present application of the Virtual Reality avatar interaction platform appear to provide a better ability to reveal differences between trained, military personal with and without mTBI.

  10. Fate and persistence of 14C pesticide residues in different soils: effects of 14C pesticide contaminated run-off soil water on biological systems. Part of a coordinated programme on isotopic-tracer-aided studies of agrochemical residue - soil biota interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenstein, E.

    1982-09-01

    The interaction of selected fungicides, herbicides and N-fertilizers with microorganisms in cranberry soils and their effects on the degradation of 14 C-phenyl-parathion were investigated. Incubation of soils with parathion of p-nitrophenol for 4 days, followed by the addition of 14 C-parathion resulted after 24 h in an enhanced degradation of the insecticide to 14 CO 2 (34-39% of the applied radiocarbon as opposed to 2% in controls) and also in an increased binding of 14 C to the soil. The fungicide captafol inhibited the degradation of soil-applied 14 C-parathion as evidenced by a reduction of both 14 CO 2 evolution and 14 C-bound residues. Maneb and benomyl suppressed the degradation of 14 C-parathion to 14 CO 2 but not the formation of bound residues. Addition of 2,4-D to 14 C-parathion treated soil also resulted in an increased persistence of the insecticide. Studies conducted with the insecticide and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , NH 4 NO 3 , KNO 3 or urea showed that under all experimental conditions the total amounts of 14 C recovered were similar, yet the distribution of 14 C-compounds into benzene-soluble, water-soluble and bound residues was not. This possibly indicated a change in the pathway of 14 C-parathion degradation. The insecticide was most persistent in soils containing (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , as demonstrated by a recovery of 29% of the applied radiocarbon in benzene-soluble form. Analyses by TIC of this benzene extraction phase revealed the presence of 14 C-parathion, 14 C-p-aminophenol and 14 C-aminoparathion

  11. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation

  12. Contributions of primary and secondary biogenic VOC tototal OH reactivity during the CABINEX (Community Atmosphere-Biosphere INteractions Experiments-09 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present OH reactivity measurements using the comparative reactivity method with a branch enclosure technique for four different tree species (red oak, white pine, beech and red maple in the UMBS PROPHET tower footprint during the Community Atmosphere Biosphere INteraction EXperiment (CABINEX field campaign in July of 2009. Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS was sequentially used as a detector for OH reactivity and BVOC concentrations including isoprene and monoterpenes (MT for enclosure air. Therefore, the measurement dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from well-known BVOC. The results indicate that isoprene and MT, and in one case a sesquiterpene, can account for the measured OH reactivity. Significant discrepancy between measured OH reactivity and calculated OH reactivity from isoprene and MT is found for the red maple enclosure dataset but it can be reconciled by adding reactivity from emission of a sesquiterpene, α-farnesene, detected by GC-MS. This leads us to conclude that no significant unknown BVOC emission contributed to ambient OH reactivity from these trees at least during the study period. However, this conclusion should be followed up by more comprehensive side-by-side intercomparison between measured and calculated OH reactivity and laboratory experiments with controlled temperature and light environments to verify effects of those essential parameters towards unknown/unmeasured reactive BVOC emissions. This conclusion leads us to explore the contribution towards ambient OH reactivity (the dominant OH sink in this ecosystem oxidation products such as hydroxyacetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and C4 and C5-hydroxycarbonyl using recently published isoprene oxidation mechanisms (Mainz Isoprene Mechanism II and Leuven Isoprene Mechanism. Evaluation of conventionally unmeasured first generation oxidation products of isoprene and their possible contribution to ambient missing OH reactivity

  13. Phactr3/scapinin, a member of protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family, interacts with the plasma membrane via basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Itoh

    Full Text Available Proteins that belong to the protein phosphatase 1 and actin regulator (phactr family are involved in cell motility and morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms that regulate the actin cytoskeleton are poorly understood. We have previously shown that phactr3, also known as scapinin, localizes to the plasma membrane, including lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. In the present study, experiments using deletion and point mutants showed that the basic and hydrophobic residues in the N-terminus play crucial roles in the localization to the plasma membrane. A BH analysis (http://helixweb.nih.gov/bhsearch is a program developed to identify membrane-binding domains that comprise basic and hydrophobic residues in membrane proteins. We applied this program to phactr3. The results of the BH plot analysis agreed with the experimentally determined region that is responsible for the localization of phactr3 to the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the N-terminal itself binds to liposomes and acidic phospholipids. In addition, we showed that the interaction with the plasma membrane via the N-terminal membrane-binding sequence is required for phactr3-induced morphological changes in Cos7 cells. The membrane-binding sequence in the N-terminus is highly conserved in all members of the phactr family. Our findings may provide a molecular basis for understanding the mechanisms that allow phactr proteins to regulate cell morphogenesis.

  14. Interaction of NANOS2 and NANOS3 with different components of the CNOT complex may contribute to the functional differences in mouse male germ cells

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    Atsushi Suzuki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available NANOS2 and NANOS3 belong to the Nanos family of proteins that contain a conserved zinc finger domain, which consists of two consecutive CCHC-type zinc finger motifs, and contribute to germ cell development in mice. Previous studies indicate that there are redundant and distinct functions of these two proteins. NANOS2 rescues NANOS3 functions in the maintenance of primordial germ cells, whereas NANOS3 fails to replace NANOS2 functions in the male germ cell pathway. However, the lack of a conditional allele of Nanos3 has hampered delineation of each contribution of NANOS2 and NANOS3 to the male germ cell pathway. In addition, the molecular mechanism underlying the distinct functions of these proteins remains unexplored. Here, we report an unexpected observation of a transgenic mouse line expressing a NANOS2 variant harboring mutations in the zinc finger domain. Transcription of Nanos2 and Nanos3 was strongly compromised in the presence of this transgene, which resulted in the mimicking of the Nanos2/Nanos3 double-null condition in the male gonad. In these transgenic mice, P-bodies involved in RNA metabolism had disappeared and germ cell differentiation was more severely affected than that in Nanos2-null mice, indicating that NANOS3 partially substitutes for NANOS2 functions. In addition, similar to NANOS2, we found that NANOS3 associated with the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex but via a direct interaction with CNOT8, unlike CNOT1 in the case of NANOS2. This alternate interaction might account for the molecular basis of the functional redundancy and differences in NANOS2 and NANOS3 functions.

  15. Residues and duality for projective algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Ernst; Dickenstein, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    This book, which grew out of lectures by E. Kunz for students with a background in algebra and algebraic geometry, develops local and global duality theory in the special case of (possibly singular) algebraic varieties over algebraically closed base fields. It describes duality and residue theorems in terms of K�hler differential forms and their residues. The properties of residues are introduced via local cohomology. Special emphasis is given to the relation between residues to classical results of algebraic geometry and their generalizations. The contribution by A. Dickenstein gives applications of residues and duality to polynomial solutions of constant coefficient partial differential equations and to problems in interpolation and ideal membership. D. A. Cox explains toric residues and relates them to the earlier text. The book is intended as an introduction to more advanced treatments and further applications of the subject, to which numerous bibliographical hints are given.

  16. Protein-protein docking with dynamic residue protonation states.

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    Krishna Praneeth Kilambi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions depend on a host of environmental factors. Local pH conditions influence the interactions through the protonation states of the ionizable residues that can change upon binding. In this work, we present a pH-sensitive docking approach, pHDock, that can sample side-chain protonation states of five ionizable residues (Asp, Glu, His, Tyr, Lys on-the-fly during the docking simulation. pHDock produces successful local docking funnels in approximately half (79/161 the protein complexes, including 19 cases where standard RosettaDock fails. pHDock also performs better than the two control cases comprising docking at pH 7.0 or using fixed, predetermined protonation states. On average, the top-ranked pHDock structures have lower interface RMSDs and recover more native interface residue-residue contacts and hydrogen bonds compared to RosettaDock. Addition of backbone flexibility using a computationally-generated conformational ensemble further improves native contact and hydrogen bond recovery in the top-ranked structures. Although pHDock is designed to improve docking, it also successfully predicts a large pH-dependent binding affinity change in the Fc-FcRn complex, suggesting that it can be exploited to improve affinity predictions. The approaches in the study contribute to the goal of structural simulations of whole-cell protein-protein interactions including all the environmental factors, and they can be further expanded for pH-sensitive protein design.

  17. An interaction of renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems contributes to vascular hypertrophy in angiotensin II-induced hypertension: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela S Ceravolo

    Full Text Available The kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems interact at multiple levels. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the B1 kinin receptor (B1R contributes to vascular hypertrophy in angiotensin II (ANG II-induced hypertension, through a mechanism involving reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 activation. Male Wistar rats were infused with vehicle (control rats, 400 ng/Kg/min ANG II (ANG II rats or 400 ng/Kg/min ANG II plus B1 receptor antagonist, 350 ng/Kg/min des-Arg(9-Leu(8-bradykinin (ANGII+DAL rats, via osmotic mini-pumps (14 days or received ANG II plus losartan (10 mg/Kg, 14 days, gavage - ANG II+LOS rats. After 14 days, ANG II rats exhibited increased systolic arterial pressure [(mmHg 184 ± 5.9 vs 115 ± 2.3], aortic hypertrophy; increased ROS generation [2-hydroxyethidium/dihydroethidium (EOH/DHE: 21.8 ± 2.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.8] and ERK1/2 phosphorylation (% of control: 218.3 ± 29.4 vs 100 ± 0.25]. B1R expression was increased in aortas from ANG II and ANG II+DAL rats than in aortas from the ANG II+LOS and control groups. B1R antagonism reduced aorta hypertrophy, prevented ROS generation (EOH/DHE: 9.17 ± 3.1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation (137 ± 20.7% in ANG II rats. Cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC stimulated with low concentrations (0.1 nM of ANG II plus B1R agonist exhibited increased ROS generation, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, proliferating-cell nuclear antigen expression and [H3]leucine incorporation. At this concentration, neither ANG II nor the B1R agonist produced any effects when tested individually. The ANG II/B1R agonist synergism was inhibited by losartan (AT1 blocker, 10 µM, B1R antagonist (10 µM and Tiron (superoxide anion scavenger, 10 mM. These data suggest that B1R activation contributes to ANG II-induced aortic hypertrophy. This is associated with activation of redox-regulated ERK1/2 pathway that controls aortic smooth muscle cells growth

  18. Contribution of the PET-CT with {sup 18}F.D.G. in the non metastatic thyroid cancers with suspicion of residual or recurrent disease; Apport de la TEP-TDM au {sup 18}FDG dans les cancers de la thyroide non metastatiques avec suspicion de maladie residuelle ou recidivante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghander, C.; Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [CHU Timone, Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Sebag, F.; Henry, J.F. [CHU Timone, service central de chirurgie generale et endocrinienne, 13 - Marseille (France); De Micco, C. [Inserm U555, service d' anatomopathologie, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Recurrent thyroid carcinomas usually involve the cervical lymph nodes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET in the investigation of thyroid cancer compared with non-metastatic cervical echography. Conclusions: Due to the low overall sensitivity of PET / CT in thyroid carcinoma, its use should be reserved for cases of aggressive carcinoma and when the residual thyroglobulin under stimulation is high. In these cases it is a complementary information with neck echography. (N.C.)

  19. Biogas from landfills embankments: the Brazilian contribution for the management of urban solid residues and the greenhouse effect mitigation through the mechanisms for clean development; Biogas de aterros: a contribuicao do Brasil na gestao de residuos solidos urbanos e na mitigacao do efeito estufa atraves dos mecanismos de desenvolvimento limpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Gleide B.M.; Guimaraes, Hoji Y' a Henda da R.; Andrade, Euridice S. Mamede de; Teixeira, Gisele Pereira; Freitas, Marcos A.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2008-07-01

    This paper studies the clean development mechanism (CDM) for sanitary sewage in Brazil, as instruments for flexibilization and mitigation of the effects of climate changes coming from the global heating. This research presents the assessments of the CDM projects for sanitary sewage in Brazil, considering the Project Conception Documents (PCD) approved until November 2007. The paper presents some methodologies for studying of energy generation potential from the biogas originated in sanitary sewage. The paper also contributes to projects of carbon credit commercialization, and relevance of the CDM instrument for the adequate management expansion of the residence solid residues as well, and advances in the implantation of sanitary embankments in Brazil.

  20. An Interaction between RRP6 and SU(VAR)3-9 Targets RRP6 to Heterochromatin and Contributes to Heterochromatin Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Andrea B.; Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gañez-Zapater, Antoni; Hessle, Viktoria; Silberberg, Gilad; von Euler, Anne; Silverstein, Rebecca A.; Visa, Neus

    2015-01-01

    RNA surveillance factors are involved in heterochromatin regulation in yeast and plants, but less is known about the possible roles of ribonucleases in the heterochromatin of animal cells. Here we show that RRP6, one of the catalytic subunits of the exosome, is necessary for silencing heterochromatic repeats in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a fraction of RRP6 is associated with heterochromatin, and the analysis of the RRP6 interaction network revealed physical links between RRP6 and the heterochromatin factors HP1a, SU(VAR)3-9 and RPD3. Moreover, genome-wide studies of RRP6 occupancy in cells depleted of SU(VAR)3-9 demonstrated that SU(VAR)3-9 contributes to the tethering of RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci. Depletion of the exosome ribonucleases RRP6 and DIS3 stabilizes heterochromatic transcripts derived from transposons and repetitive sequences, and renders the heterochromatin less compact, as shown by micrococcal nuclease and proximity-ligation assays. Such depletion also increases the amount of HP1a bound to heterochromatic transcripts. Taken together, our results suggest that SU(VAR)3-9 targets RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci where RRP6 degrades chromatin-associated non-coding RNAs in a process that is necessary to maintain the packaging of the heterochromatin. PMID:26389589

  1. Probing the Unique Contributions of Self-Concept, Task Values, and Their Interactions Using Multiple Value Facets and Multiple Academic Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiesi Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on expectancy-value theory, the present study examined the unique contributions of the four major value beliefs and self-concept on achievement, self-reported effort, and teacher-rated behavioral engagement in mathematics. In particular, we examined the multiplicative effects of self-concept and task values on educational outcomes using the latent moderated structural equation approach. Participants were 1,868 German ninth-grade students. The data analyses relied on a higher-order structure of value beliefs, which is suited to parsing the differential patterns of predictive relations for different value beliefs. The findings revealed that (a self-concept was more predictive of achievement, whereas value beliefs were more predictive of self-rated effort; (b self-concept and value beliefs emerged as equally important predictors of teacher-reported engagement; (c among the four value beliefs, achievement was more associated with low cost, whereas effort was more associated with attainment value; and (d latent interactions between self-concept and value beliefs predicted the three outcomes synergistically.

  2. Long-term stable, long-term safe storage of residues and radioactive waste. Contribution to discussion to the storage (final storage); Langzeitstabile, langzeitsichere Verwahrung von Rueckstaenden und radioaktiven Abfaellen. Beitrag zur Diskussion um Lagerung (Endlagerung)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lersow, Michael [DGGT e.V., Breitenbrunn/Erzgeb. (Germany). Ak 5.5 Tailings; Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper it is presented, where radioactive waste and residues occur, how these materials can be classified, which rules and regulations have to be complied with regarding the disposal and which geotechnical environmental constructions (final repositories) are suitable to guarantee a safe long-term disposal of these materials. Primary protection objective is ''to permanently prevent the transfer of toxic, radioactive contaminations into the biosphere by air, water or rock path or to keep the amount of contamination within a commonly accepted range''. Radionuclide inventories and the given time period considered for long-term safety are compared with. It is shown, that the site-specific disposal solutions cannot be justified by the radioactive inventory deposited there. The given period of 10{sup 6} years is critically evaluated. Based on this it is suggested to subdivide this period into two time periods with different prognosis reliabilities. Results of a specially designed long-term monitoring as part of the site-specific waste disposal solution should be considered for the long-term safety proof. A modular concept for the final storage of High Active Waste (HAW) is derived based on the critical evaluation of the long-term safety, including transmutation, provisional storage and monitoring module. A foundation model is proposed to guarantee the financial resources required for the disposal of HAW.

  3. Ensemble Architecture for Prediction of Enzyme-ligand Binding Residues Using Evolutionary Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Priyadarshini P; Dattatreya, Rohit Kadam; Mondal, Sukanta

    2017-11-01

    Enzyme interactions with ligands are crucial for various biochemical reactions governing life. Over many years attempts to identify these residues for biotechnological manipulations have been made using experimental and computational techniques. The computational approaches have gathered impetus with the accruing availability of sequence and structure information, broadly classified into template-based and de novo methods. One of the predominant de novo methods using sequence information involves application of biological properties for supervised machine learning. Here, we propose a support vector machines-based ensemble for prediction of protein-ligand interacting residues using one of the most important discriminative contributing properties in the interacting residue neighbourhood, i. e., evolutionary information in the form of position-specific- scoring matrix (PSSM). The study has been performed on a non-redundant dataset comprising of 9269 interacting and 91773 non-interacting residues for prediction model generation and further evaluation. Of the various PSSM-based models explored, the proposed method named ROBBY (pRediction Of Biologically relevant small molecule Binding residues on enzYmes) shows an accuracy of 84.0 %, Matthews Correlation Coefficient of 0.343 and F-measure of 39.0 % on 78 test enzymes. Further, scope of adding domain knowledge such as pocket information has also been investigated; results showed significant enhancement in method precision. Findings are hoped to boost the reliability of small-molecule ligand interaction prediction for enzyme applications and drug design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Interaction between Galectin-9/TIM-3 pathway and follicular helper CD4+ T cells contributes to viral persistence in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Ya; Zhang, Yi-Fu; Wu, Hong-Jie; Qin, Lei; Wang, Yan-Ping; Liu, A-Min; Wang, Xin-Hong

    2017-10-01

    Both Galectin 9 (Gal-9)/T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (TIM-3) pathway and follicular helper CD4 + T (Tfh) cells play important roles in persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Thus, we aimed to investigate the regulatory role of interaction between Gal-9/TIM-3 pathway and Tfh cells in chronic hepatitis C. A total of 44 chronic hepatitis C patients and 19 normal controls (NCs) were enrolled in this study. Purified CD4 + T cells were cultured by TIM-3 Fc protein, recombinant Gal-9, or IL-21 for 48h. TIM-3 expression, Tfh proportion, and IL-21 production was measured, respectively. The immunomodulatory role of Gal-9/TIM-3 and IL-21 was also investigated in HCV cell culture system in vitro. We found that the percentage corresponding to both TIM-3-positive and CXCR5 + ICOS + Tfh cells within CD4 + T cells, which correlated with HCV RNA replication, was significantly elevated in patients with chronic hepatitis C in comparison with those in NCs. Moreover, blockade of Gal-9/TIM-3 pathway by TIM-3 Fc protein increased Tfh cells proportion, IL-21 mRNA and protein expression within purified CD4 + T cells, while activation of Gal-9/TIM-3 signaling by Gal-9 stimulation decreased IL-21 production in both patients with chronic HCV infection and healthy individuals. Meanwhile, high concentrations (100 and 200ng/mL) of IL-21 stimulation also elevated TIM-3 expression on CD4 + T cells in chronic hepatitis C. Furthermore, TIM-3 blockage and IL-21 stimulation suppressed mRNA expressions of HCV-induced antiviral proteins (myxovirus resistance A and oligoadenylate synthetase) in Huh7.5 cells without affecting viral replication in HCV cell culture system. The interaction between Gal-9/TIM-3 pathway and Tfh cells contributed to viral persistent in chronic HCV infection, which might be pivotal for development of new therapeutic approaches for chronic hepatitis C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ chemical composition measurement of individual cloud residue particles at a mountain site, southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how atmospheric aerosol particles interact with chemical composition of cloud droplets, a ground-based counterflow virtual impactor (GCVI coupled with a real-time single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS was used to assess the chemical composition and mixing state of individual cloud residue particles in the Nanling Mountains (1690 m a. s. l. , southern China, in January 2016. The cloud residues were classified into nine particle types: aged elemental carbon (EC, potassium-rich (K-rich, amine, dust, Pb, Fe, organic carbon (OC, sodium-rich (Na-rich and Other. The largest fraction of the total cloud residues was the aged EC type (49.3 %, followed by the K-rich type (33.9 %. Abundant aged EC cloud residues that mixed internally with inorganic salts were found in air masses from northerly polluted areas. The number fraction (NF of the K-rich cloud residues increased within southwesterly air masses from fire activities in Southeast Asia. When air masses changed from northerly polluted areas to southwesterly ocean and livestock areas, the amine particles increased from 0.2 to 15.1 % of the total cloud residues. The dust, Fe, Pb, Na-rich and OC particle types had a low contribution (0.5–4.1 % to the total cloud residues. Higher fraction of nitrate (88–89 % was found in the dust and Na-rich cloud residues relative to sulfate (41–42 % and ammonium (15–23 %. Higher intensity of nitrate was found in the cloud residues relative to the ambient particles. Compared with nonactivated particles, nitrate intensity decreased in all cloud residues except for dust type. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on in situ observation of the chemical composition and mixing state of individual cloud residue particles in China.

  6. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kalescky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2 in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  7. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  8. Relative contributions of the major human CYP450 to the metabolism of icotinib and its implication in prediction of drug-drug interaction between icotinib and CYP3A4 inhibitors/inducers using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Liu, Dongyang; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Ji; Hu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Icotinib is an anticancer drug, but relative contributions of CYP450 have not been identified. This study was carried out to identify the contribution percentage of CYP450 to icotinib and use the results to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which can help to predict drug-drug interaction (DDI). Human liver microsome (HLM) and supersome using relative activity factor (RAF) were employed to determine the relative contributions of the major human P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib. These values were introduced to develop a PBPK model using SimCYP. The model was validated by the observed data in a Phase I clinical trial in Chinese healthy subjects. Finally, the model was used to simulate the DDI with ketoconazole or rifampin. Final contribution of CYP450 isoforms determined by HLM showed that CYP3A4 provided major contributions to the metabolism of icotinib. The percentage contributions of the P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib were determined by HLM inhibition assay and RAF. The AUC ratio under concomitant use of ketoconazole and rifampin was 3.22 and 0.55, respectively. Percentage of contribution of CYP450 to icotinib metabolism was calculated by RAF. The model has been proven to fit the observed data and is used in predicting icotinib-ketoconazole/rifampin interaction.

  9. Some problems of residual activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katrik, P.; Mustafin, E.; Strasik, I.; Pavlovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    As a preparatory work for constructing the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Darmstadt, samples of copper were irradiated by 500 MeV/u 238 U ion beam and investigated by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The nuclides that contribute dominantly to the residual activity have been identified and their contributions have been quantified by two different methods: from the whole-target gamma spectra and by integration of depth-profiles of residual activity of individual nuclides. Results obtained by these two methods are compared and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  10. Relationship between hot spot residues and ligand binding hot spots in protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Brandon S; Hall, David R; Vajda, Sandor; Whitty, Adrian; Kozakov, Dima

    2012-08-27

    In the context of protein-protein interactions, the term "hot spot" refers to a residue or cluster of residues that makes a major contribution to the binding free energy, as determined by alanine scanning mutagenesis. In contrast, in pharmaceutical research, a hot spot is a site on a target protein that has high propensity for ligand binding and hence is potentially important for drug discovery. Here we examine the relationship between these two hot spot concepts by comparing alanine scanning data for a set of 15 proteins with results from mapping the protein surfaces for sites that can bind fragment-sized small molecules. We find the two types of hot spots are largely complementary; the residues protruding into hot spot regions identified by computational mapping or experimental fragment screening are almost always themselves hot spot residues as defined by alanine scanning experiments. Conversely, a residue that is found by alanine scanning to contribute little to binding rarely interacts with hot spot regions on the partner protein identified by fragment mapping. In spite of the strong correlation between the two hot spot concepts, they fundamentally differ, however. In particular, while identification of a hot spot by alanine scanning establishes the potential to generate substantial interaction energy with a binding partner, there are additional topological requirements to be a hot spot for small molecule binding. Hence, only a minority of hot spots identified by alanine scanning represent sites that are potentially useful for small inhibitor binding, and it is this subset that is identified by experimental or computational fragment screening.

  11. Lectures on weak interactions: from Fermi-Majorana-Perrin to Glasgow-Weinberg-Salam and some contributions from Latin American physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Historical aspects on the development of the physics of weak interactions which, after about forty years, converged with quantum electrodynamics to give birth ot the first model of unification of interactions, the so-called electroweak standard model, are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  12. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  13. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  14. Contributo para a melhoria de solos marginais destinados a pastagens pela aplicação de lama residual urbana, sem riscos ambientais Contribution to the improvement of degraded soils under pastures through sewage sludge application, without environmental risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Serrão

    2009-01-01

    ções de biomassa, por melhoria do teor de fósforo “assimilável” no solo, a LRU não provocou poluição do solo, um ano após a sua aplicação, quanto aos compostos orgânicos pesquisados, nem aumentou a flora microbiana patogénica, nos dois ciclos culturais. Contudo, a maior dose de LRU aumentou a concentração de Cu extraível por água régia no solo (0-10 cm para níveis superiores ao máximo legislado em Portugal (100 mg kg-1 e reduziu apreciavelmente a população de rizóbio, no 1º ciclo cultural e a proporção de leguminosas, no 2º ciclo. Os teores foliares de Cu foram muito inferiores ao nível máximo tolerável para a dieta de pequenos ruminantes (25 mg kg-1, o que sugere, nitidamente, que da aplicação da LRU não deverão ocorrer efeitos nocivos para a nutrição animal. Face aos efeitos indesejáveis do nível mais elevado de LRU, a dose L1 (12 t/ha seria a recomendável.Sewage sludge (SS application to soils reserved for pastures, still scarcely used in the country, often contributes to improve organic matter (O.M. and some plant nutrient contents and to reduce the erosion risk, by increasing the soil vegetation cover. However, the occasional occurrence in SS of high levels of heavy metals, organic pollutant compounds, and pathogenic organisms restrict the SS rate to apply and makes indispensable their control in the soils to which they were applied. Also, the high nitrogen concentration often present in SS can inhibit the symbiotic rhizobium activity, with sequent damage in the leguminous species survival in grassland. In this work, dry matter yield, floristic composition, and copper (Cu concentration in the plant biomass were evaluated, in two successive years of a field experiment with a sown pasture mixture, established in a poor Haplic Luvisol in the Mértola region. A biologically treated SS from Évora, rich in Cu, was applied. The evolution in the topsoil of the O.M., some plant nutrients, and aqua regia extractable Cu concentrations

  15. Amino Acid Interaction (INTAA) web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgonek, Jakub; Vymetal, Jirí; Jakubec, David; Vondrášek, Jirí

    2017-07-03

    Large biomolecules-proteins and nucleic acids-are composed of building blocks which define their identity, properties and binding capabilities. In order to shed light on the energetic side of interactions of amino acids between themselves and with deoxyribonucleotides, we present the Amino Acid Interaction web server (http://bioinfo.uochb.cas.cz/INTAA/). INTAA offers the calculation of the residue Interaction Energy Matrix for any protein structure (deposited in Protein Data Bank or submitted by the user) and a comprehensive analysis of the interfaces in protein-DNA complexes. The Interaction Energy Matrix web application aims to identify key residues within protein structures which contribute significantly to the stability of the protein. The application provides an interactive user interface enhanced by 3D structure viewer for efficient visualization of pairwise and net interaction energies of individual amino acids, side chains and backbones. The protein-DNA interaction analysis part of the web server allows the user to view the relative abundance of various configurations of amino acid-deoxyribonucleotide pairs found at the protein-DNA interface and the interaction energies corresponding to these configurations calculated using a molecular mechanical force field. The effects of the sugar-phosphate moiety and of the dielectric properties of the solvent on the interaction energies can be studied for the various configurations. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Identification of a direct interaction between residue 19 in the helical portion of calcitonin and the amino-terminal domain of the calcitonin receptor from photoaffinity cross-linking and mutational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, V.; Wade, J.; McDowall, S.G.; Quiza, M.; Sexton, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Calcitonins (CTs) are 32 amino acid hormones with both peripheral and central actions mediated via specific cell surface receptors, which belong to the superfamily of class II G-protein coupled receptors. Chimeric receptor and mutational data suggested that the helical portion (residues 8-22) of salmon CT (sCT) is important for high affinity binding to the amino-terminal extracellular domain of the human CT receptor (hCTR). In this study, we have developed photoactive sCT analogues [Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and [Arg 11 , 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32) that incorporate a photolabile Bpa (p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine) into position 19 of the helical domain of the ligand and used this to determine a specific receptor fragment proximate to it. These analogues saturably bound to the CTR with high affinity (IC 50 = 3 nM) which was similar to that of the natural sCT and its antagonist (IC 50 = 2 nM and 20 nM, respectively). Upon photolysis, radioiodinated 125 I-[Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and 125 I-[Arg 11,18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32) efficiently and specifically cross-linked to hCTR stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells (Hollexl cells, ∼ 800,000 receptors per cell), generating a single radiolabeled band of ∼ 72-kDa on SDS/PAGE autoradiography. To identify the 'contact domain' within CTR involved in binding of 125 I-[Arg1 1 , 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and 125 I-[Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32), the radiolabeled band containing the ligand-receptor conjugate was subjected to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native receptor yielded a radiolabeled fragment of apparent Mr ∼ 31-kDa that shifted to Mr ∼ 14 kDa after deglycosylation. This receptor domain corresponded to amino acids 59-134 of the hCTR, located at the amino-terminal extracellular region of the receptor. These results provide the first direct demonstration of a contact domain between calcitonin and its receptor, and will contribute towards the modelling of CT-CTR interface. Copyright

  17. Correction: β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryousuke; Nakada, Chika; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2017-01-18

    Correction for 'β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade' by Ryousuke Ito et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2017, 15, 177-188.

  18. A non-catalytic histidine residue influences the function of the metalloprotease of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Brian M; Bitar, Alan Pavinski; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Mpl, a thermolysin-like metalloprotease, and PC-PLC, a phospholipase C, are synthesized as proenzymes by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. During intracellular growth, L. monocytogenes is temporarily confined in a membrane-bound vacuole whose acidification leads to Mpl autolysis and Mpl-mediated cleavage of the PC-PLC N-terminal propeptide. Mpl maturation also leads to the secretion of both Mpl and PC-PLC across the bacterial cell wall. Previously, we identified negatively charged and uncharged amino acid residues within the N terminus of the PC-PLC propeptide that influence the ability of Mpl to mediate the maturation of PC-PLC, suggesting that these residues promote the interaction of the PC-PLC propeptide with Mpl. In the present study, we identified a non-catalytic histidine residue (H226) that influences Mpl secretion across the cell wall and its ability to process PC-PLC. Our results suggest that a positive charge at position 226 is required for Mpl functions other than autolysis. Based on the charge requirement at this position, we hypothesize that this residue contributes to the interaction of Mpl with the PC-PLC propeptide.

  19. Heavy metals speciation in solid household waste incineration residues and contribution to the interpretation of volatilization processes; Speciation des metaux lourds dans les residus solides d'usines d'incineration d'ordures menageres et contribution a l'interpretation des processus de vaporisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnepain, B.

    1998-07-01

    Different types of solid residues of incineration plants have at first been analyzed by complementary techniques. Relative tendencies to the heavy metals speciation have been established. On the one hand, the chemical trapping of heavy metals by ashes as well as their respective mobilities have been characterized by the sequential extraction method. On the other hand, morphology of ashes, localization, repartition and chemical environment of heavy metals have been studied by X-ray microanalysis. It has been shown that Cd and Zn are highly leachable, Cr, Ni and Cu are trapped in ashes and Pb, As have intermediary behaviours with a slow mobility. Concentration gradients of heavy metals in terms of the ashes granulometry have been deduced. An experimental device for studying the vaporization of heavy metals in a fluidized bed (simulation of the heavy metals release during the incineration of household wastes) has been perfected. Experiments have been carried out in conditions (temperature, gaseous atmosphere, residence time) near those of the real processes. A model, coupling the mass and heat transfers with a thermodynamic anticipation of the heavy metals behaviour has been developed and has allowed to exploit these obtained results. (O.M.)

  20. The Fragmentation of Heavy Nuclei by 13.8 GeV/c Protons as a Contribution to the Study of the Interaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Perez, D.

    1967-01-01

    We present he re an global study of the interaction between high- energy particles and heavy nuclei, an interaction which holds obvious interest in relation to the problems of nuclear fragmentation and which, up lo now has only been studied piecemeal. We have used three stacks of photographic emulsions which were irradiated by 13.8 GeV/c protons, 17 GeV/c negative pions and 24 GeV/c protons. All three irradiations took place in a 180 K.G. magnetic field using CERN beams. (Author) 20 refs

  1. Contribution to the simulation of hadron-nucleon inelastic interaction between 1 GeV to 20 GeV by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquemal, Alain

    1982-01-01

    This work settles up a simulation model of inelastic hadron-nucleon interaction, using a Monte Carlo method. The creation of excited or stable particles and the decay of excited particles are simulated on the basis of the statistical thermodynamic model of HAGEDORN and of a relativistic kinematical treatment. The quantum identity of stable secondary particles is determined with the help of the statistical model of Fermi. In all cases of interactions the multiplicities and kinematical correlations are correctly reproduced by the simulation. Longitudinal and transversal momentum of secondary particles are also in good agreement with experimental results, in the case of non-diffractive collisions. [fr

  2. E2-EPF UCP Possesses E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity via Its Cysteine 118 Residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Hwa; Shin, Hee Won; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Ju Hee; Jung, Hong-Ryul; Im, Dong-Soo; Jung, Cho-Rok

    Here, we show that E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP) elongated E3-independent polyubiquitin chains on the lysine residues of von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and its own lysine residues both in vitro and in vivo. The initiation of the ubiquitin reaction depended on not only Lys11 linkage but also the Lys6, Lys48 and Lys63 residues of ubiquitin, which were involved in polyubiquitin chain formation on UCP itself. UCP self-association occurred through the UBC domain, which also contributed to the interaction with pVHL. The polyubiquitin chains appeared on the N-terminus of UCP in vivo, which indicated that the N-terminus of UCP contains target lysines for polyubiquitination. The Lys76 residue of UCP was the most critical site for auto-ubiquitination, whereas the polyubiquitin chain formation on pVHL occurred on all three of its lysines (Lys159, Lys171 and Lys196). A UCP mutant in which Cys118 was changed to alanine (UCPC118A) did not form a polyubiquitin chain but did strongly accumulate mono- and di-ubiquitin via auto-ubiquitination. Polyubiquitin chain formation required the coordination of Cys95 and Cys118 between two interacting molecules. The mechanism of the polyubiquitin chain reaction of UCP may involve the transfer of ubiquitin from Cys95 to Cys118 by trans-thiolation, with polyubiquitin chains forming at Cys118 by reversible thioester bonding. The polyubiquitin chains are then moved to the lysine residues of the substrate by irreversible isopeptide bonding. During the elongation of the ubiquitin chain, an active Cys118 residue is required in both parts of UCP, namely, the catalytic enzyme and the substrate. In conclusion, UCP possesses not only E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme activity but also E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and Cys118 is critical for polyubiquitin chain formation.

  3. E2-EPF UCP Possesses E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity via Its Cysteine 118 Residue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Lim

    Full Text Available Here, we show that E2-EPF ubiquitin carrier protein (UCP elongated E3-independent polyubiquitin chains on the lysine residues of von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL and its own lysine residues both in vitro and in vivo. The initiation of the ubiquitin reaction depended on not only Lys11 linkage but also the Lys6, Lys48 and Lys63 residues of ubiquitin, which were involved in polyubiquitin chain formation on UCP itself. UCP self-association occurred through the UBC domain, which also contributed to the interaction with pVHL. The polyubiquitin chains appeared on the N-terminus of UCP in vivo, which indicated that the N-terminus of UCP contains target lysines for polyubiquitination. The Lys76 residue of UCP was the most critical site for auto-ubiquitination, whereas the polyubiquitin chain formation on pVHL occurred on all three of its lysines (Lys159, Lys171 and Lys196. A UCP mutant in which Cys118 was changed to alanine (UCPC118A did not form a polyubiquitin chain but did strongly accumulate mono- and di-ubiquitin via auto-ubiquitination. Polyubiquitin chain formation required the coordination of Cys95 and Cys118 between two interacting molecules. The mechanism of the polyubiquitin chain reaction of UCP may involve the transfer of ubiquitin from Cys95 to Cys118 by trans-thiolation, with polyubiquitin chains forming at Cys118 by reversible thioester bonding. The polyubiquitin chains are then moved to the lysine residues of the substrate by irreversible isopeptide bonding. During the elongation of the ubiquitin chain, an active Cys118 residue is required in both parts of UCP, namely, the catalytic enzyme and the substrate. In conclusion, UCP possesses not only E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme activity but also E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and Cys118 is critical for polyubiquitin chain formation.

  4. Probing the Unique Contributions of Self-Concept, Task Values, and Their Interactions Using Multiple Value Facets and Multiple Academic Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Jiesi; Nagengast, Benjamin; Marsh, Herbert W.; Kelava, Augustin; Gaspard, Hanna; Brandt, Holger; Cambria, Jenna; Flunger, B.; Dicke, Anna Lena; Häfner, Isabelle; Brisson, Brigitte Maria; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on expectancy-value theory, the present study examined the unique contributions of the four major value beliefs and self-concept on achievement, self-reported effort, and teacher-rated behavioral engagement in mathematics. In particular, we examined the multiplicative effects of self-concept

  5. Eviromental Economic and Technological Residues Management Demands: An Optimization Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Soares Borges

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial residues management is a very demanding task since many different goals must be achieved. The combination of different approaches used by people from different stuff is very challenging activity that can misuse the residues potential value and applicability. An interactive WEB base tool, to integrate different sectors and overcome residues management difficulties will be presented. The system must be loaded with all data concerning the residue life cycle, and through data integration and modeling routine will give the best alternative as output. As wider and complete the system data becomes, by information loading from differen t segment, more efficient the residues management becomes. The user friendly tool will encourage the participation of industries, labs and research institutions to obtain qualified information about industrial residues inventory, raw materials recovery, characteristics, treatment and alternative uses, to achieve residues management sustainability.

  6. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  7. In vitro interaction of a novel neutrophil growth factor with human liver microsomal cytochromes P450 and the contribution of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to its metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siller, M.; Anzenbacher, P.; Anzenbacherová, E.; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 11 (2011), s. 934-944 ISSN 0049-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION S * SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY * R-ROSCOVITINE * GLUCURONIDATION * CELLS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.791, year: 2011

  8. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTERACTIVE BINARY STARS TO DOUBLE MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS AND DUAL RED CLUMP OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Li Tanda; Liu Kang; Meng Xiangcun

    2011-01-01

    Double or extended main-sequence turnoffs (DMSTOs) and dual red clump (RC) were observed in intermediate-age clusters, such as in NGC 1846 and 419. The DMSTOs are interpreted as that the cluster has two distinct stellar populations with differences in age of about 200-300 Myr but with the same metallicity. The dual RC is interpreted as a result of a prolonged star formation. Using a stellar population-synthesis method, we calculated the evolution of a binary-star stellar population. We found that binary interactions and merging can reproduce the dual RC in the color-magnitude diagrams of an intermediate-age cluster, whereas in actuality only a single population exists. Moreover, the binary interactions can lead to an extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) rather than DMSTOs. However, the rest of the main sequence, subgiant branch, and first giant branch are hardly spread by the binary interactions. Part of the observed dual RC and extended MSTO may be the results of binary interactions and mergers.

  9. Parental Depressive Symptoms and Marital Intimacy at 4.5 Years: Joint Contributions to Mother-Child and Father-Child Interaction at 6.5 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jennifer M.; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from a subset of 606 families who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we assessed emotional intimacy in the marriage as a buffer of the negative effects of parental depression on the quality of parent-child interaction. Maternal and paternal…

  10. Hydrogen bond strengths in phosphorylated and sulfated amino acid residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaya Rapp

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the addition of an oxoanion functional group, usually a phosphate group and less commonly a sulfate group, leads to diverse structural and functional consequences in protein systems. Building upon previous studies of the phosphoserine residue (pSer, we address the distinct nature of hydrogen bonding interactions in phosphotyrosine (pTyr and sulfotyrosine (sTyr residues. We derive partial charges for these modified residues and then study them in the context of molecular dynamics simulation of model tripeptides and sulfated protein complexes, potentials of mean force for interacting residue pairs, and a survey of the interactions of modified residues among experimental protein structures. Overall, our findings show that for pTyr, bidentate interactions with Arg are particularly dominant, as has been previously demonstrated for pSer. sTyr interactions with Arg are significantly weaker, even as compared to the same interactions made by the Glu residue. Our work sheds light on the distinct nature of these modified tyrosine residues, and provides a physical-chemical foundation for future studies with the goal of understanding their roles in systems of biological interest.

  11. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, S. Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT F o − F c and 2F o − F c neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α 1 β 1 heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpK a between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure

  12. Electron-electron interaction in strong electromagnetic fields The two-electron contribution to the ground-state energy in He-like uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Gumberidze, A; Barnás, D; Beckert, Karl; Beller, Peter; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Cai, X; Stöhlker, T; Hagmann, S; Kozhuharov, C; Liesen, D; Nolden, F; Ma, X; Mokler, P H; Orsic-Muthig, A; Steck, Markus; Sierpowski, D; Tashenov, S; Warczak, A; Zou, Y

    2004-01-01

    Radiative recombination transitions into the ground state of cooled bare and hydrogen-like uranium ions were measured at the storage ring ESR. By comparing the corresponding x-ray centroid energies, this technique allows for a direct measurement of the electron-electron contribution to the ionization potential in the heaviest He-like ions. For the two-electron contribution to the ionization potential of He-like uranium we obtain a value of 2248 ± 9 eV. This represents the most accurate determination of two-electron effects in the domain of high-Z He-like ions and the accuracy reaches already the size of the specific two-electron radiative QED corrections.

  13. Contribution to the study of remedy solutions to uranium(molybdenum)/aluminium interactions: role of silicon addition to aluminium, study of coupled effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allenou, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the project development and qualification program of a nuclear fuel with Low Enriched Uranium for Materials Testing Reactors, the dispersed U(Mo)/Al fuel is being developed due to its excellent stability during irradiation. However, in pile experiments showed that depending on the irradiation conditions (e.g. high burnup or high heat flux), an extensive interaction occurs between the fissile element U(Mo) and the Al based matrix resulting in swelling, which could eventually lead to a fuel plate failure. Among the ways to improve the behavior of the dispersed U(Mo) fuel, the solution now seen as the reference remedy by the entire scientific community is the addition of silicon into the aluminum matrix. In order to provide some understanding and optimizing the solution 'Si additions into Al matrix' under neutron irradiation, an out of pile study is performed on (i) the interaction mechanisms involved in the U(Mo)/Al (Si) system and (ii) the impact of the Si additions into the Al matrix on alternative solutions to the U(Mo)/Al interactions, namely the modification of the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound by adding a third element and/or modifying the interface between the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound and the matrix. This document provides a mechanistic description of the U(7Mo)/Al(Si) interaction for a range of Si content in Al between 2 and 10 wt.%, based on the multi-scale characterization of diffusion couples. The location of the Mo and its role in the reaction mechanisms are demonstrated. The influence of elements X = Y, Cu, Zr, Ti, Cr, on the U (Mo)/Al and U (Mo)/Al (Si) interactions mechanisms was then studied. It is shown that adding a third element to the U(Mo) alloy acts on the second order on diffusion kinetics and (micro)structure of the interaction layer compared to the addition of Si into Al. Finally, an alumina coating which shows a potential interest to improve the performance of the fuel has been developed. (author) [fr

  14. Modulating weak interactions for molecular recognition: a dynamic combinatorial analysis for assessing the contribution of electrostatics to the stability of CH-π bonds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ester; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Oses, Gonzalo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2015-03-27

    Electrostatic and charge-transfer contributions to CH-π complexes can be modulated by attaching electron-withdrawing substituents to the carbon atom. While clearly stabilizing in the gas phase, the outcome of this chemical modification in water is more difficult to predict. Herein we provide a definitive and quantitative answer to this question employing a simple strategy based on dynamic combinatorial chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Environmental dredging residual generation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patmont, Clay; LaRosa, Paul; Narayanan, Raghav; Forrest, Casey

    2018-05-01

    The presence and magnitude of sediment contamination remaining in a completed dredge area can often dictate the success of an environmental dredging project. The need to better understand and manage this remaining contamination, referred to as "postdredging residuals," has increasingly been recognized by practitioners and investigators. Based on recent dredging projects with robust characterization programs, it is now understood that the residual contamination layer in the postdredging sediment comprises a mixture of contaminated sediments that originate from throughout the dredge cut. This mixture of contaminated sediments initially exhibits fluid mud properties that can contribute to sediment transport and contamination risk outside of the dredge area. This article reviews robust dredging residual evaluations recently performed in the United States and Canada, including the Hudson River, Lower Fox River, Ashtabula River, and Esquimalt Harbour, along with other projects. These data better inform the understanding of residuals generation, leading to improved models of dredging residual formation to inform remedy evaluation, selection, design, and implementation. Data from these projects confirm that the magnitude of dredging residuals is largely determined by site conditions, primarily in situ sediment fluidity or liquidity as measured by dry bulk density. While the generation of dredging residuals cannot be avoided, residuals can be successfully and efficiently managed through careful development and implementation of site-specific management plans. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:335-343. © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2018 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  16. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A N; Webster, G A [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P J [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  17. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  18. Contribution of the LIM domain and nebulin-repeats to the interaction of Lasp-2 with actin filaments and focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lasp-2 binds to actin filaments and concentrates in the actin bundles of filopodia and lamellipodia in neural cells and focal adhesions in fibroblastic cells. Lasp-2 has three structural regions: a LIM domain, a nebulin-repeat region, and an SH3 domain; however, the region(s responsible for its interactions with actin filaments and focal adhesions are still unclear. In this study, we revealed that the N-terminal fragment from the LIM domain to the first nebulin-repeat module (LIM-n1 retained actin-binding activity and showed a similar subcellular localization to full-length lasp-2 in neural cells. The LIM domain fragment did not interact with actin filaments or localize to actin filament bundles. In contrast, LIM-n1 showed a clear subcellular localization to filopodial actin bundles. Although truncation of the LIM domain caused the loss of F-actin binding activity and the accumulation of filopodial actin bundles, these truncated fragments localized to focal adhesions. These results suggest that lasp-2 interactions with actin filaments are mediated through the cooperation of the LIM domain and the first nebulin-repeat module in vitro and in vivo. Actin filament binding activity may be a major contributor to the subcellular localization of lasp-2 to filopodia but is not crucial for lasp-2 recruitment to focal adhesions.

  19. Interaction of NANOS2 and NANOS3 with different components of the CNOT complex may contribute to the functional differences in mouse male germ cells

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Suzuki; Yuki Niimi; Yumiko Saga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT NANOS2 and NANOS3 belong to the Nanos family of proteins that contain a conserved zinc finger domain, which consists of two consecutive CCHC-type zinc finger motifs, and contribute to germ cell development in mice. Previous studies indicate that there are redundant and distinct functions of these two proteins. NANOS2 rescues NANOS3 functions in the maintenance of primordial germ cells, whereas NANOS3 fails to replace NANOS2 functions in the male germ cell pathway. However, the lack o...

  20. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  1. Course workshop for teachers Nuclear energy in education: A didactic focus, an interactive approach with contributions from the new communications and information technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Matzen, Claudio; Herrera Carmona, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A teacher education activity is describes, a course-workshop with a mixed interactive approach, N uclear Energy in Education: A Didactic Focus , which was undertaken from July to October 2000 from Region III to X in Chile, in university rooms with video-conferencing and with Internet communications support. It is a course-workshop that uses the new information and communications (NTIC) technologies to present and discuss the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, as crossover curricular content that exemplifies the relationships between science, technology and society, while presenting methodological proposals for transferring the contents and activities to the Educational System's primary and secondary levels

  2. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  3. Interaction between β-hexachlorocyclohexane and ADIPOQ genotypes contributes to the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in East Chinese adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shushu; Wang, Xichen; Yang, Lu; Yao, Shen; Zhang, Ruyang; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Zhan; Wang, Li; Xu, Qiujin; Wang, Shou-Lin

    2016-11-01

    Growing evidence links environmental exposure to hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) to the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and ADIPOQ that encodes adiponectin is considered as an important gene for T2DM. However, the role of ADIPOQ-HCH interaction on T2DM risk remains unclear. Thus, a paired case-control study was conducted in an East Chinese community. A total of 1446 subjects, including 723 cases and 723 controls matched on age, gender and residence, were enrolled, and 4 types of HCH isomers were measured in serum samples using GC-MS/MS. Additionally, 4 candidate ADIPOQ SNPs (rs182052, rs266729, rs6810075, and rs16861194) were genotyped by TaqMan assay, and plasma adiponectin was measured using ELISA. No associations between 4 SNPs and T2DM risk were found, but T2DM risk significantly increased with serum levels of β-HCH (P 2052 significantly increased T2DM risk (OR I-additive model = 2.20, OR I-recessive model = 2.13). Additionally, individuals carrying only rs182052 (A allele) with high levels of β-HCH had significant reduction in adiponectin levels (P = 0.016). These results indicate that the interaction between rs182052 and β-HCH might increase the risk of T2DM by jointly decreasing the adiponectin level and potentially trigger T2DM development.

  4. Useful lower limits to polarization contributions to intermolecular interactions using a minimal basis of localized orthogonal orbitals: theory and analysis of the water dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, R Julian; Horn, Paul Richard; Sundstrom, Eric Jon; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2013-02-28

    The problem of describing the energy-lowering associated with polarization of interacting molecules is considered in the overlapping regime for self-consistent field wavefunctions. The existing approach of solving for absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO) coefficients that are block-diagonal in the fragments is shown based on formal grounds and practical calculations to often overestimate the strength of polarization effects. A new approach using a minimal basis of polarized orthogonal local MOs (polMOs) is developed as an alternative. The polMO basis is minimal in the sense that one polarization function is provided for each unpolarized orbital that is occupied; such an approach is exact in second-order perturbation theory. Based on formal grounds and practical calculations, the polMO approach is shown to underestimate the strength of polarization effects. In contrast to the ALMO method, however, the polMO approach yields results that are very stable to improvements in the underlying AO basis expansion. Combining the ALMO and polMO approaches allows an estimate of the range of energy-lowering due to polarization. Extensive numerical calculations on the water dimer using a large range of basis sets with Hartree-Fock theory and a variety of different density functionals illustrate the key considerations. Results are also presented for the polarization-dominated Na(+)CH4 complex. Implications for energy decomposition analysis of intermolecular interactions are discussed.

  5. The interaction between axes of inequality in studies on discrimination, stigma and HIV/AIDS: contributions to the recent international literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Simone S; Villela, Wilza V; Soares, Priscilla S

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to conduct a systematic literature review in order to identify how recent studies have addressed the interaction between social inequality and the processes of exclusion and marginalisation related to HIV/AIDS stigma and discrimination. The review was conducted using PubMed and Scopus databases and included publications from 2008 to 2011. Of 497 summaries found in the review, 42 were selected and classified based on topic, population, axes of inequality employed, conceptualisation of stigma and relationship between stigma and vulnerability. Results demonstrated that there is a predominance of research on stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV/AIDS, sexual and racial/ethnic minorities and migrants. The axes of inequality examined in the literature were linked to specific cultural and socio-economic dimensions and analysed as factors that behave synergistically to increase social groups' vulnerability to HIV. Half of the 42 articles viewed expression of stigma/discrimination to be the result of power dynamics that reinforce the processes of social exclusion. The other half of the articles tended to describe stigma as intrinsic to social interaction. Some researchers are making a visible effort to devise consistent theoretical and methodological approaches in order to understand stigma as a complex social process produced at the intersection of different axes of inequality. These efforts provide vital information that can inform how best to address HIV/AIDS stigma.

  6. Complexity in modeling of residual stresses and strains during polymerization of bone cement: effects of conversion, constraint, heat transfer, and viscoelastic property changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2006-12-15

    Aseptic loosening of cemented joint prostheses remains a significant concern in orthopedic biomaterials. One possible contributor to cement loosening is the development of porosity, residual stresses, and local fracture of the cement that may arise from the in-situ polymerization of the cement. In-situ polymerization of acrylic bone cement is a complex set of interacting processes that involve polymerization reactions, heat generation and transfer, full or partial mechanical constraint, evolution of conversion- and temperature-dependent viscoelastic material properties, and thermal and conversion-driven changes in the density of the cement. Interactions between heat transfer and polymerization can lead to polymerization fronts moving through the material. Density changes during polymerization can, in the presence of mechanical constraint, lead to the development of locally high residual strain energy and residual stresses. This study models the interactions during bone cement polymerization and determines how residual stresses develop in cement and incorporates temperature and conversion-dependent viscoelastic behavior. The results show that the presence of polymerization fronts in bone cement result in locally high residual strain energies. A novel heredity integral approach is presented to track residual stresses incorporating conversion and temperature dependent material property changes. Finally, the relative contribution of thermal- and conversion-dependent strains to residual stresses is evaluated and it is found that the conversion-based strains are the major contributor to the overall behavior. This framework provides the basis for understanding the complex development of residual stresses and can be used as the basis for developing more complex models of cement behavior.

  7. A Numerical Study on Phonon Spectral Contributions to Thermal Conduction in Silicon-on-Insulator Transistor Using Electron-Phonon Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyung-sun; Koh, Young Ha; Jin, Jae Sik [Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study is to understand the phonon transfer characteristics of a silicon thin film transistor. For this purpose, the Joule heating mechanism was considered through the electron-phonon interaction model whose validation has been done. The phonon transport characteristics were investigated in terms of phonon mean free path for the variations in the device power and silicon layer thickness from 41 nm to 177 nm. The results may be used for developing the thermal design strategy for achieving reliability and efficiency of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) transistor, further, they will increase the understanding of heat conduction in SOI systems, which are very important in the semiconductor industry and the nano-fabrication technology.

  8. Study of magnetic interactions in some ferri- and antiferromagnetic normal spinels studied by neutron diffraction; Contribution a l'etude des interactions magnetiques dans quelques spinelles ferri-et antiferromagnetiques normaux etudies par diffraction des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumier, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Magnetic structure determination of a few ferri- and antiferromagnets normal spinels has led us to study what are, besides nearest neighbour magnetic interactions, the magnetic terms which have to be considered in the establishment of such or such magnetic structure. Tetragonal distortion which is frequently observed in such compounds is of the order of magnetic exchange striction (10{sup -3}). Such a distortion leads to two effects. First it decreases the total energy of the system. Secondly it introduces term of axial magnetic anisotropy. Besides this term of axial anisotropy, the possibility of basal anisotropy in the case of coplanar magnetic structure has to be considered. This last term explained why the magnetic structures of such antiferromagnetic spinels frequently have one or more cell parameters which are twice that of the chemical cell. Finally the comparison between various magnetic structures of antiferromagnetic spinels in which the leading term is the magnetic energy between first nearest neighbours, shows that the part played by magnetic interactions between non nearest neighbours is not negligible. Such indirect superexchange interactions through two anions or two anions and a cation on tetrahedral site, although of the order of a few percent of the preceding one, join a given ion to its twelve second nearest neighbours, six third nearest neighbours and twelve fourth nearest neighbours. (author) [French] La determination des structures magnetiques de quelques spinelles ferri- et antiferromagnetiques normaux nous a conduit a preciser quels sont, en dehors du terme dominant d'interaction magnetique entre ions premiers voiins, les termes d'energie magnetique a considerer dans l'apparition de telle ou telle structure magnetique. La distorsion quadratique que l'on observe frequemment dans ces composes est de l'ordre de grandeur de celle attribuable a la striction d'echange (10{sup -3}). L'effet d'une telle distorsion est double. Non seulement elle

  9. Drug and chemical residues in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussman, H C

    1975-02-01

    Given the large number of chemical substances that may find their way into the food supply, a system is needed to monitor their presence. The U. S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Inspection Program routinely tests for chemical residues in animals coming to slaughter. Pesticides, heavy metals, growth promotants (hormones and hormonelike agents), and antibiotics are included. Samples are taken statistically so that inferences as to national incidence of residues can be drawn. When a problem is identified, a more selective sampling is designed to help follow up on the initial regulatory action. In testing for pesticides, only DDT and dieldrin are found with any frequency and their levels are decreasing; violative residues of any chlorinated hydrocarbon are generally a result of an industrial accident rather than agricultural usage. Analyses for heavy metals have revealed detectable levels of mercury, lead, and others, but none at levels that are considered a health hazard. Of the hormone or hormonelike substances, only diethylstilbestrol has been a residue problem and its future is uncertain. The most extensive monitoring for veterinary drugs is on the antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, streptomycin, and the tetracycline group of antibiotics that constitute the bulk of the violations; their simultaneous use prophylactically and therapeutically has contributed to the problem in certain cases. A strong, well-designed user education program on proper application of pesticides, chemicals, and veterinary drugs appears to be one method of reducing the incidence of unwanted residues.

  10. Conserved Aromatic Residue Confers Cation Selectivity in Claudin-2 and Claudin-10b*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2013-01-01

    In tight junctions, both claudin-2 and claudin-10b form paracellular cation-selective pores by the interaction of the first ECL 1 with permeating ions. We hypothesized that a highly conserved aromatic residue near the pore selectivity filter of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by cation-π interaction with the permeating cation. To test this, we generated MDCK I Tet-off cells stably transfected with claudin-2 Tyr67 mutants. The Y67L mutant showed reduced cation selectivity compared with wild-type claudin-2 due to a decrease in Na+ permeability, without affecting the Cl− permeability. The Y67A mutant enlarged the pore size and further decreased the charge selectivity due to an increase in Cl− permeability. The Y67F mutant restored the Na+ permeability, Cl− permeability, and pore size back to wild-type. The accessibility of Y67C to methanethiosulfonate modification indicated that its side chain faces the lumen of the pore. In claudin-10b, the F66L mutant reduced cation selectivity, and the F66A mutant lost pore conductance. We conclude that the conserved aromatic residue near the cation pore domain of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by a dual role of cation-π interaction and a luminal steric effect. Our findings provide new insight into how ion selectivity is achieved in the paracellular pore. PMID:23760508

  11. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures

  12. Tyrosine residues modification studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santrucek, Jiri; Strohalm, Martin; Kadlcik, Vojtech; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific reactivity in proteins is of great current interest in structural biology as it provides information about solvent accessibility and reactivity of the residue and, consequently, about protein structure and possible interactions. In the work presented tyrosine residues of three model proteins with known spatial structure are modified with two tyrosine-specific reagents: tetranitromethane and iodine. Modified proteins were specifically digested by proteases and the mass of resulting peptide fragments was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that there are only small differences in the extent of tyrosine residues modification by tetranitromethane and iodine. However, data dealing with accessibility of reactive residues obtained by chemical modifications are not completely identical with those obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. These interesting discrepancies can be caused by local molecular dynamics and/or by specific chemical structure of the residues surrounding

  13. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... for policy makers and courts in awarding damages in a large number of real-world accident cases....

  14. Interactions of a didomain fragment of the Drosophila Sex-lethal protein with single-stranded uridine-rich oligoribonucleotides derived from the transformer and Sex-lethal messenger RNA precursors: NMR with residue-selective [5-2H]uridine substitutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Insil; Muto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Kitamura, Aya; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hosono, Kazumi; Kawai, Gota; Takaku, Hiroshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Shimura, Yoshiro

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that contain two or more copies of the RNA-binding domain [ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain or RNA recognition motif (RRM)] are considered to be involved in the recognition of single-stranded RNA, but the mechanisms of this recognition are poorly understood at the molecular level. For an NMR analysis of a single-stranded RNA complexed with a multi-RBD protein, residue-selective stable-isotope labeling techniques are necessary, rather than common assignment methods based on the secondary structure of RNA. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of a Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein fragment, consisting of two RBDs (RBD1-RBD2), with two distinct target RNAs derived from the tra and Sxl mRNA precursors with guanosine and adenosine, respectively, in a position near the 5'-terminus of a uridine stretch. First, we prepared a [5- 2 H]uridine phosphoramidite, and synthesized a series of 2 H-labeled RNAs, in which all of the uridine residues except one were replaced by [5- 2 H]uridine in the target sequence, GU 8 C. By observing the H5-H6 TOCSY cross peaks of the series of 2 H-labeled RNAs complexed with the Sxl RBD1-RBD2, all of the base H5-H6 proton resonances of the target RNA were unambiguously assigned. Then, the H5-H6 cross peaks of other target RNAs, GU 2 GU 8 , AU 8 , and UAU 8 , were assigned by comparison with those of GU 8 C. We found that the uridine residue prior to the G or A residue is essential for proper interaction with the protein, and that the interaction is tighter for A than for G. Moreover, the H1' resonance assignments were achieved from the H5-H6 assignments. The results revealed that all of the protein-bound nucleotide residues, except for only two, are in the unusual C2'-endo ribose conformation in the complex

  15. Interactions of a didomain fragment of the Drosophila Sex-lethal protein with single-stranded uridine-rich oligoribonucleotides derived from the transformer and Sex-lethal messenger RNA precursors: NMR with residue-selective [5-2H]uridine substitutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Insil; Muto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Kitamura, Aya; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki [University of Tokyo, Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Hosono, Kazumi; Kawai, Gota; Takaku, Hiroshi [Chiba Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Chemistry (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) (Japan); Sakamoto, Hiroshi [Kobe University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science (Japan); Shimura, Yoshiro [Biomolecular Engineering Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-06-15

    Proteins that contain two or more copies of the RNA-binding domain [ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain or RNA recognition motif (RRM)] are considered to be involved in the recognition of single-stranded RNA, but the mechanisms of this recognition are poorly understood at the molecular level. For an NMR analysis of a single-stranded RNA complexed with a multi-RBD protein, residue-selective stable-isotope labeling techniques are necessary, rather than common assignment methods based on the secondary structure of RNA. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of a Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein fragment, consisting of two RBDs (RBD1-RBD2), with two distinct target RNAs derived from the tra and Sxl mRNA precursors with guanosine and adenosine, respectively, in a position near the 5'-terminus of a uridine stretch. First, we prepared a [5-{sup 2}H]uridine phosphoramidite, and synthesized a series of {sup 2}H-labeled RNAs, in which all of the uridine residues except one were replaced by [5-{sup 2}H]uridine in the target sequence, GU{sub 8}C. By observing the H5-H6 TOCSY cross peaks of the series of {sup 2}H-labeled RNAs complexed with the Sxl RBD1-RBD2, all of the base H5-H6 proton resonances of the target RNA were unambiguously assigned. Then, the H5-H6 cross peaks of other target RNAs, GU{sub 2}GU{sub 8}, AU{sub 8}, and UAU{sub 8}, were assigned by comparison with those of GU{sub 8}C. We found that the uridine residue prior to the G or A residue is essential for proper interaction with the protein, and that the interaction is tighter for A than for G. Moreover, the H1' resonance assignments were achieved from the H5-H6 assignments. The results revealed that all of the protein-bound nucleotide residues, except for only two, are in the unusual C2'-endo ribose conformation in the complex.

  16. On the interactions between carbon monoxide and transition metals; Contribution a l'etude des interractions de l'oxyde de carbone et des metaux de transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degras, D E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-12-01

    The sticking of carbon monoxide on surface atoms of transition metals is a collective phenomenon: according to the adsorption process period which is considered, this phenomenon may be formally described either by the Elovich equation or essentially from a steric point of view. The process rate depends upon the nature of the metal, the carbon monoxide pressure the temperature and the population densities of the induced and fundamental energy levels of the gas-solid bond. At least one of these induced levels tends to disappear with increasing time. For a localised adsorption and taking into account the surface Rayleigh waves, the analysis of the surface entropy yields the so-called iso-kinetic temperature for thermal desorption. This temperature is correlated with the cohesive energy of the metal surface atoms. Finally, it is shown that the interactions of a low energy electron bean with adsorbed molecules - reflection and energy exchange, desorption, ionization or dissociative ionization are strongly dependent on the energy levels of the gas-solid bond and the relative populations of these levels. (author) [French] La capture des molecules d'oxyde de carbone par les atomes de surface des metaux de transition est un phenomene collectif: il peut etre decrit formellernent soit par l'equation d'Elovich, soit a partir de considerations purement steriques suivant la periode envisagee dans l'evolution du processus d'adsorption. Cette evolution est determinee par la nature du metal, la pression d'oxyde de carbone, la temperature et la densite des populations des niveaux fondamental et induits de la liaison. L'un au moins de ceux-ci tend a disparaitre avec le temps. L' etude de l'entropie du complexe de surface a partir des ondes de Rayleigh en adsorption localisee permet de retrouver theoriquernent la temperature dite isocinetique dans la dissociation thermique de ce complexe. Cette temperature depend de la cohesion des atomes rnetalliques de surface. Enfin l'interaction d

  17. Combined Role of Two Tryptophane Residues of α-Factor Pheromone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Young [Yeungnam Univ., Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Nam Joo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Amide analogs of tridecapeptide α-factor (WHWLQLKPGQPMYCONH{sub 2}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which Trp at position 1 and 3 were replaced with other residues, were synthesized to ascertain whether cooperative interactions between two Trp residues occurred upon binding with its receptor. Analogs containing Ala or Aib at position 3 of the peptide [Ala{sup 3}]α-factor amide (2) and [Aib{sup 3}]α-factor amide (5) exhibited greater decreases in bioactivity than analogs with same residue at position one [Ala{sup 1}]α-factor amide (1) and [Aib{sup 1}]α-factor amide (4), reflecting that Trp{sup 3} may plays more important role than Trp{sup 1} for agonist activity. Analogs containing Ala or Aib in both position one and three 3, 6 exhibited complete loss of bioactivity, emphasizing both the essential role and the combined role of two indole rings for triggering cell signaling. In contrast, double substituted analog with D-Trp in both positions 9 exhibited greater activity than single substituted analog with D-Trp 8 or deleted analog 7, reflecting the combined contribution of two tryptophane residues of α-factor ligand to activation of Ste2p through interaction with residue Tyr{sup 266} and importance of the proper parallel orientation of two indole rings for efficient triggering of signal G protein coupled activation. Among ten amide analogs, [Ala{sup 1,3}]α-factor amide (3), [Aib{sup 1,3}]α-factor amide (6), [D-Trp{sup 3}]α-factor amide (8) and [des-Trp{sup 1},Phe{sup 3}]α-factor amide (10) were found to have antagonistic activity. Analogs 3 and 6 showed greater antagonistic activity than analogs 8 and 10.

  18. Combined Role of Two Tryptophane Residues of α-Factor Pheromone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Eun Young; Hong, Nam Joo

    2013-01-01

    Amide analogs of tridecapeptide α-factor (WHWLQLKPGQPMYCONH 2 ) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which Trp at position 1 and 3 were replaced with other residues, were synthesized to ascertain whether cooperative interactions between two Trp residues occurred upon binding with its receptor. Analogs containing Ala or Aib at position 3 of the peptide [Ala 3 ]α-factor amide (2) and [Aib 3 ]α-factor amide (5) exhibited greater decreases in bioactivity than analogs with same residue at position one [Ala 1 ]α-factor amide (1) and [Aib 1 ]α-factor amide (4), reflecting that Trp 3 may plays more important role than Trp 1 for agonist activity. Analogs containing Ala or Aib in both position one and three 3, 6 exhibited complete loss of bioactivity, emphasizing both the essential role and the combined role of two indole rings for triggering cell signaling. In contrast, double substituted analog with D-Trp in both positions 9 exhibited greater activity than single substituted analog with D-Trp 8 or deleted analog 7, reflecting the combined contribution of two tryptophane residues of α-factor ligand to activation of Ste2p through interaction with residue Tyr 266 and importance of the proper parallel orientation of two indole rings for efficient triggering of signal G protein coupled activation. Among ten amide analogs, [Ala 1,3 ]α-factor amide (3), [Aib 1,3 ]α-factor amide (6), [D-Trp 3 ]α-factor amide (8) and [des-Trp 1 ,Phe 3 ]α-factor amide (10) were found to have antagonistic activity. Analogs 3 and 6 showed greater antagonistic activity than analogs 8 and 10

  19. Contributions: SAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Contributions: SAGE. Space Alternating Generalized Expectation (SAGE) Maximization algorithm provides an iterative approach to parameter estimation when direct maximization of the likelihood function may be infeasible. Complexity is less in those applications ...

  20. Various Contributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Various Contributions. Developed an Off –Diagonal MIMO Canceller to mitigate Upstream Crosstalk in VDSL. Developed a low complexity, Expectation Maximization based iterative Crosstalk cancellation. Developed an optimal way of computational complexity ...

  1. Original contributions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hefere

    Original contributions ... Results suggest that there is a significant positive ... psychological abuse, including economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, stalking, damage ... or maintaining the structure and function of the African home (Alio et al., 2011; Jewkes,. Levin ... Revictimisation occurs due to emotional violence and.

  2. US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat. part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo)

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01 : September 2000 - Mr Bill Richardson, Secretary of Energy, United States of America (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat, part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo); with l. to r. Dr Mildred Dresselhaus, Dr Carlo Wyss, CERN Director General, Profesor Luciano Maiani, Professor Roger Cashmore, Ambassador George Moose, Dr Peter Rosen, Dr John Ellis. Photo 02 : Mr. Bill Richardson (right), Secretary of Energy United States of America with Prof. Luciano Maiani leaning over one of the LHC magnets produced at Fermilab during his visit to CERN on 16th September 2000.

  3. How much can a large population study on genes, environments, their interactions and common diseases contribute to the health of the American people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaufan, Claudia

    2007-10-01

    I offer a critical perspective on a large-scale population study on gene-environment interactions and common diseases proposed by the US Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS). I argue that for scientific and policy reasons this and similar studies have little to add to current knowledge about how to prevent, treat, or decrease inequalities in common diseases, all of which are major claims of the proposal. I use diabetes as an exemplar of the diseases that the study purports to illuminate. I conclude that the question is not whether the study will meet expectations or whether the current emphasis on a genetic paradigm is real or imagined, desirable or not. Rather, the question is why, given the flaws of the science underwriting the study, its assumptions remain unchallenged. Future research should investigate the reasons for this immunity from criticism and for the popularity of this and similar projects among laypersons as well as among intellectuals.

  4. The Contribution of the Future SWOT Mission to Improve Simulations of River Stages and Stream-Aquifer Interactions at Regional Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Filipo, Nicolas; Biancamaria, Sylvain; Habets, Florence; Rodriguez, Enersto; Mognard, Nelly

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide a realistic simulation of river stage in regional river networks in order to improve the quantification of stream-aquifer exchanges and better assess the associated aquifer responses that are often impacted by the magnitude and the frequency of the river stage fluctuations. This study extends the earlier work to improve the modeling of the Seine basin with a focus on simulating the hydrodynamics behavior of the Bassée alluvial wetland, a 120 km reach of the Seine River valley located south- east of Paris. The Bassée is of major importance for the drinking-water supply of Paris and surroundings, in addition to its particular hydrodynamic behavior due to the presence of a number of gravels. In this context, the understanding of stream-aquifer interactions is required for water quantity and quality preservation. A regional distributed process-based hydro(geo)logical model, Eau-Dyssée, is used. It aims at the integrated modeling of the hydrosystem to manage the various elements involved in the quantitative and qualitative aspects of water resources. Eau-Dyssée simulates pseudo 3D flow in aquifer systems solving the diffusivity equation with a finite difference numerical scheme. River flow is simulated with a Muskingum model. In addition to the in-stream discharge, a river stage estimate is needed to calculate the water exchange at the stream-aquifer interface using a conductance model. In this context, the future SWOT mission and its high-spatial resolution imagery can provide surface water level measurements at the regional scale that will permit to better characterize the Bassée complex hydro(geo)logical system and better assess soil water content. Moreover, the Bassée is considered as a potential target for the framework of the AirSWOT airborne campaign in France, 2013.

  5. The transcriptional regulatory network of Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 and its interaction with metabolic routes contributing to human body odor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzantny, Helena; Schröder, Jasmin; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Fredrich, Eugenie; Brune, Iris; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-15

    Lipophilic corynebacteria are involved in the generation of volatile odorous products in the process of human body odor formation by degrading skin lipids and specific odor precursors. Therefore, these bacteria represent appropriate model systems for the cosmetic industry to examine axillary malodor formation on the molecular level. To understand the transcriptional control of metabolic pathways involved in this process, the transcriptional regulatory network of the lipophilic axilla isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 was reconstructed from the complete genome sequence. This bioinformatic approach detected a gene-regulatory repertoire of 83 candidate proteins, including 56 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators, nine two-component systems, nine sigma factors, and nine regulators with diverse physiological functions. Furthermore, a cross-genome comparison among selected corynebacterial species of the taxonomic cluster 3 revealed a common gene-regulatory repertoire of 44 transcriptional regulators, including the MarR-like regulator Jk0257, which is exclusively encoded in the genomes of this taxonomical subline. The current network reconstruction comprises 48 transcriptional regulators and 674 gene-regulatory interactions that were assigned to five interconnected functional modules. Most genes involved in lipid degradation are under the combined control of the global cAMP-sensing transcriptional regulator GlxR and the LuxR-family regulator RamA, probably reflecting the essential role of lipid degradation in C. jeikeium. This study provides the first genome-scale in silico analysis of the transcriptional regulation of metabolism in a lipophilic bacterium involved in the formation of human body odor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  7. Antidepressant activity: contribution of brain microdialysis in knock-out mice to the understanding of BDNF/5-HT transporter/5-HT autoreceptor interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain M Gardier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Why antidepressants vary in terms of efficacy is currently unclear. Despite the leadership of Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of depression, the precise neurobiological mechanisms involved in their therapeutic action are poorly understood. A better knowledge of molecular interactions between monoaminergic system, pre- and post-synaptic partners, brain neuronal circuits and regions involved may help to overcome limitations of current treatments and to identify new therapeutic targets. Intracerebral in vivo microdialysis (ICM already provided important information about the brain mechanism of action of antidepressants first in anesthetized rats in the early 90s, and since then in conscious wild-type or knockout mice. The principle of ICM is based on the balance between release of neurotransmitters (e.g., monoamines, and re-uptake by selective transporters (e.g., SERT for serotonin 5-HT. Complementary to electrophysiology, this technique reflects presynaptic monoamines release and intrasynaptic events corresponding to ≈ 80% of whole brain tissue content. The inhibitory role of serotonergic autoreceptors infers that they limit somatodendritic and nerve terminal 5-HT release. It has been proposed that activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor sub-types limit the antidepressant-like activity of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI. This hypothesis is based partially on results obtained in ICM experiments performed in naïve, non-stressed Rodents. The present review will first remind the principle and methodology of ICM performed in mice. The crucial need of developing animal models that display anxiety and depression-like behaviors, neurochemical and brain morphological phenotypes reminiscent of these mood disorders in Human, will be underlined. Recently developed genetic mouse models have been generated to independently manipulate 5-HT1A auto and hetero-receptors and ICM helped to clarify the role of the

  8. Unique contributions of an arginine side chain to ligand recognition in a glutamate-gated chloride channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Komnatnyy, Vitaly V; Pless, Stephan A

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate recognition by neurotransmitter receptors often relies on arginine (Arg) residues in the binding site, leading to the assumption that charge-charge interactions underlie ligand recognition. However, assessing the precise chemical contribution of Arg side chains to protein function......-gated chloride channel from the nematode Haemonchus contortus. Our data unveil a surprisingly small contribution of charge at a conserved arginine side chain previously suggested to form a salt bridge with the ligand, glutamate. Instead, our data show that Arg contributes crucially to ligand sensitivity via...

  9. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  10. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  11. Lignin biochemistry and soil N determine crop residue decomposition and soil priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropping history can affect soil properties, including available N, but little is known about the interactive effects of residue biochemistry, temperature and cropping history on residue decomposition. A laboratory incubation examined the role of residue biochemistry and temperature on the decomposi...

  12. Isobaric yields and radiochemistry of near-target residues in the interaction of 12C and 16O with 103Rh at an incident energy of 400 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buthelezi, E.Z.; Steyn, G.F.; Walt, T.N. Van der; Aardaneh, K.; Gadioli, E.; Albertini, F.; Cerutti, F.; Connell, S.H.; Cowley, A.A.; Nortier, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Production cross sections of residues with mass near to that of the target were measured in 12 C and 16 O induced reactions on Rh at an incident energy of 400 MeV. An ion-exchange method has been developed for the separation of Rh, Pd and Ag nuclides from all other produced activities. Rh and Ag nuclides were separated from elements such as Pd, Ru, and Tc, amongst others, on an AG1-X8 anion exchange resin in 6M HCl. The Ag nuclides were then removed from the effluent using a precipitation technique so that only Rh remained in the final solution. The Pd was afterwards separated from Ru and Tc by eluting it from the resin with 5% ammonia solution. This procedure made it possible to accurately measure production cross sections for 103m Rh and 103 Pd. Cross sections for the production of various other observed residues are also presented. The results are consistent with an enhanced isobaric yield in the near-target mass region. The radiochemical separation technique is also suitable for the routine production of Pd and Rh nuclides, e.g., 103 Pd and 101m Rh, in proton-induced reactions on Rh targets. (author)

  13. Role of long- and short-range hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues contact network in protein’s structural organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Dhriti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be described as a graph where nodes represent residues and the strength of non-covalent interactions between them are edges. These protein contact networks can be separated into long and short-range interactions networks depending on the positions of amino acids in primary structure. Long-range interactions play a distinct role in determining the tertiary structure of a protein while short-range interactions could largely contribute to the secondary structure formations. In addition, physico chemical properties and the linear arrangement of amino acids of the primary structure of a protein determines its three dimensional structure. Here, we present an extensive analysis of protein contact subnetworks based on the London van der Waals interactions of amino acids at different length scales. We further subdivided those networks in hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues networks and have tried to correlate their influence in the overall topology and organization of a protein. Results The largest connected component (LCC of long (LRN-, short (SRN- and all-range (ARN networks within proteins exhibit a transition behaviour when plotted against different interaction strengths of edges among amino acid nodes. While short-range networks having chain like structures exhibit highly cooperative transition; long- and all-range networks, which are more similar to each other, have non-chain like structures and show less cooperativity. Further, the hydrophobic residues subnetworks in long- and all-range networks have similar transition behaviours with all residues all-range networks, but the hydrophilic and charged residues networks don’t. While the nature of transitions of LCC’s sizes is same in SRNs for thermophiles and mesophiles, there exists a clear difference in LRNs. The presence of larger size of interconnected long-range interactions in thermophiles than mesophiles, even at

  14. Residual stresses in weld-clad reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.

    1975-01-01

    Cladding of low alloy nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel with austenitic stainless steel introduces in heavy section components high residual stresses which may cause microcrack formation in stress relief heat treatment. In this investigation an attempt is made to contribute to the solution of the stress relief cracking problem by determining quantitatively the magnitude and distribution of the residual stresses after cladding and after subsequent stress relief heat treatment. The distribution of residual stresses was determined on the basis of a combined experimental-mathematical procedure. Heavy section plate specimens of low alloy steel as base material were given an austenitic monolayer-cladding using the techniques of strip electrode and plasma hot wire cladding, respectively. A number of plates was stress relief heat treated. Starting from the cladded surface the thickness of the plates was reduced by subsequent removal of layers of material. The elastic strain reaction to the removal of each layer was measured by strain gauges. From the data obtained the biaxial residual stress distribution was computed as a function of thickness using relations which are derived for this particular case. In summary, lower residual stresses are caused by reduced thickness of the components. As the heat input, is decreased at identical base material thickness, the residual stresses are lowered also. The height of the tensile residual stress peak, however, remains approximataly constant. In stress relief annealed condition the residual stresses in the cladding are in tension; in the base material the residual stresses are negligibly small

  15. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  16. On the importance of polar interactions for complexes containing intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T C Wong

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition for the importance of proteins with large intrinsically disordered (ID segments in cell signaling and regulation. ID segments in these proteins often harbor regions that mediate molecular recognition. Coupled folding and binding of the recognition regions has been proposed to confer high specificity to interactions involving ID segments. However, researchers recently questioned the origin of the interaction specificity of ID proteins because of the overrepresentation of hydrophobic residues in their interaction interfaces. Here, we focused on the role of polar and charged residues in interactions mediated by ID segments. Making use of the extended nature of most ID segments when in complex with globular proteins, we first identified large numbers of complexes between globular proteins and ID segments by using radius-of-gyration-based selection criteria. Consistent with previous studies, we found the interfaces of these complexes to be enriched in hydrophobic residues, and that these residues contribute significantly to the stability of the interaction interface. However, our analyses also show that polar interactions play a larger role in these complexes than in structured protein complexes. Computational alanine scanning and salt-bridge analysis indicate that interfaces in ID complexes are highly complementary with respect to electrostatics, more so than interfaces of globular proteins. Follow-up calculations of the electrostatic contributions to the free energy of binding uncovered significantly stronger Coulombic interactions in complexes harbouring ID segments than in structured protein complexes. However, they are counter-balanced by even higher polar-desolvation penalties. We propose that polar interactions are a key contributing factor to the observed high specificity of ID segment-mediated interactions.

  17. Measurement of residual stress in a cylinder by x-ray under the consideration of its penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Osamu; Ukai, Takayoshi

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose an exact theory of residual stress measurement by successive thin layer removal in a hollow cylinder under the consideration of the contribution of residual stress within a definite subsurface, and show an example of its application. (author)

  18. Forest residues in cattle feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Elzeário Castelo Branco Iapichini

    2012-12-01

    amount of 1% over the live weight + 10% of intake. The results of the first phase of the research, for steers supplemented in pasture, showed good acceptability and consumption in the three levels of substitution, with an average of 3.0 kg of concentrate per head. No rejection was observed for consumption of the mixture, as well as any physiological negative / change and clinical levels tested The pine cone (strobilus without the pine nuts (seeds was obtained as a residue of genetically improved seed collection. Likely source of tannins and fiber, dried and triturated pine cones can contribute to lower production costs due to the substitution of an ingredient in feed formulation, as an aid in control of internal parasites and also in the possible mitigation of methane gas production, resulting from digestion of ruminants, one of the gases responsible for the greenhouse effect. The potential use of pine cone as an ingredient in replacement of roughage and concentrate in the diet of ruminants qualifies as a new source of revenue in pine forestry activity, since no such product currently has no commercial value timber and its accumulation along the dried leaves among the trees, increase the risk of forest fires. Finally, these technological and social innovations result in remarkable potential to leverage Regional Programs Sustainable Development.

  19. Radioactivity of combustion residues from coal-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vom Berg, W.; Puch, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    Each year in Germany, about 18 mill. t of combustion residues are produced from the combustion of bituminous coal and lignite. They are utilized to a great extent in the construction industry and in mining. During the combustion of coal, the radio-nuclides remain predominantly in the ash. The radionuclide concentration in lignite ash is within the range of that in natural soil. The combustion residues of bituminous coal contain radio-nuclides of a similar order of magnitude as also can occur in natural rock. The utilization of combustion residues in construction materials makes a negligible contribution to radiation exposure through retention in buildings. (orig.) [de

  20. Isobar contributions to the NN interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnoud, X.; Holinde, K.; Machleidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The fourth-order noniterative 2π-exchange diagrams involving double-isobar intermediate states are evaluated in momentum space, in the framework of noncovariant perturbation theory. The role of these diagrams is studied by making a detailed comparison with (i) the corresponding iterative diagrams and (ii) diagrams involving NN or NΔ intermediate states. Current prescriptions for replacing all time-orderings of those diagrams by (simple) pion-range transition potentials are tested

  1. Structure-wise discrimination of cytosine, thymine, and uracil by proteins in terms of their nonbonded interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, S; Selvaraj, S

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition and discrimination of very similar ligand moieties by proteins are important subjects in protein-ligand interaction studies. Specificity in the recognition of molecules is determined by the arrangement of protein and ligand atoms in space. The three pyrimidine bases, viz. cytosine, thymine, and uracil, are structurally similar, but the proteins that bind to them are able to discriminate them and form interactions. Since nonbonded interactions are responsible for molecular recognition processes in biological systems, our work attempts to understand some of the underlying principles of such recognition of pyrimidine molecular structures by proteins. The preferences of the amino acid residues to contact the pyrimidine bases in terms of nonbonded interactions; amino acid residue-ligand atom preferences; main chain and side chain atom contributions of amino acid residues; and solvent-accessible surface area of ligand atoms when forming complexes are analyzed. Our analysis shows that the amino acid residues, tyrosine and phenyl alanine, are highly involved in the pyrimidine interactions. Arginine prefers contacts with the cytosine base. The similarities and differences that exist between the interactions of the amino acid residues with each of the three pyrimidine base atoms in our analysis provide insights that can be exploited in designing specific inhibitors competitive to the ligands.

  2. Characterization of the interdependency between residues that bind the substrate in a β-glycosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Tomassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The manner by which effects of simultaneous mutations combine to change enzymatic activity is not easily predictable because these effects are not always additive in a linear manner. Hence, the characterization of the effects of simultaneous mutations of amino acid residues that bind the substrate can make a significant contribution to the understanding of the substrate specificity of enzymes. In the β-glycosidase from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sfβgly, both residues Q39 and E451 interact with the substrate and this is essential for defining substrate specificity. Double mutants of Sfβgly (A451E39, S451E39 and S451N39 were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in bacteria and purified using affinity chromatography. These enzymes were characterized using p-nitrophenyl β-galactoside and p-nitrophenyl β-fucoside as substrates. The k cat/Km ratio for single and double mutants of Sfβgly containing site-directed mutations at positions Q39 and E451 was used to demonstrate that the effect on the free energy of ES‡ (enzyme-transition state complex of the double mutations (∆∆G‡xy is not the sum of the effects resulting from the single mutations (∆∆G‡x and ∆∆G‡y. This difference in ∆∆G‡ indicates that the effects of the single mutations partially overlap. Hence, this common effect counts only once in ∆∆G‡xy. Crystallographic data on β-glycosidases reveal the presence of a bidentate hydrogen bond involving residues Q39 and E451 and the same hydroxyl group of the substrate. Therefore, both thermodynamic and crystallographic data suggest that residues Q39 and E451 exert a mutual influence on their respective interactions with the substrate.

  3. Characterization of the interdependency between residues that bind the substrate in a beta-glycosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassi, M H; Rozenfeld, J H K; Gonçalves, L M; Marana, S R

    2010-01-01

    The manner by which effects of simultaneous mutations combine to change enzymatic activity is not easily predictable because these effects are not always additive in a linear manner. Hence, the characterization of the effects of simultaneous mutations of amino acid residues that bind the substrate can make a significant contribution to the understanding of the substrate specificity of enzymes. In the beta-glycosidase from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sfbetagly), both residues Q39 and E451 interact with the substrate and this is essential for defining substrate specificity. Double mutants of Sfbetagly (A451E39, S451E39 and S451N39) were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in bacteria and purified using affinity chromatography. These enzymes were characterized using p-nitrophenyl beta-galactoside and p-nitrophenyl beta-fucoside as substrates. The k cat/Km ratio for single and double mutants of Sfbetagly containing site-directed mutations at positions Q39 and E451 was used to demonstrate that the effect on the free energy of ESdouble dagger (enzyme-transition state complex) of the double mutations (Gdouble daggerxy) is not the sum of the effects resulting from the single mutations (Gdouble daggerx and Gdouble daggery). This difference in Gdouble dagger indicates that the effects of the single mutations partially overlap. Hence, this common effect counts only once in Gdouble daggerxy. Crystallographic data on beta-glycosidases reveal the presence of a bidentate hydrogen bond involving residues Q39 and E451 and the same hydroxyl group of the substrate. Therefore, both thermodynamic and crystallographic data suggest that residues Q39 and E451 exert a mutual influence on their respective interactions with the substrate.

  4. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  5. Residue preference mapping of ligand fragments in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lirong; Xie, Zhaojun; Wipf, Peter; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2011-04-25

    The interaction between small molecules and proteins is one of the major concerns for structure-based drug design because the principles of protein-ligand interactions and molecular recognition are not thoroughly understood. Fortunately, the analysis of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) enables unprecedented possibilities for new insights. Herein, we applied molecule-fragmentation algorithms to split the ligands extracted from PDB crystal structures into small fragments. Subsequently, we have developed a ligand fragment and residue preference mapping (LigFrag-RPM) algorithm to map the profiles of the interactions between these fragments and the 20 proteinogenic amino acid residues. A total of 4032 fragments were generated from 71 798 PDB ligands by a ring cleavage (RC) algorithm. Among these ligand fragments, 315 unique fragments were characterized with the corresponding fragment-residue interaction profiles by counting residues close to these fragments. The interaction profiles revealed that these fragments have specific preferences for certain types of residues. The applications of these interaction profiles were also explored and evaluated in case studies, showing great potential for the study of protein-ligand interactions and drug design. Our studies demonstrated that the fragment-residue interaction profiles generated from the PDB ligand fragments can be used to detect whether these fragments are in their favorable or unfavorable environments. The algorithm for a ligand fragment and residue preference mapping (LigFrag-RPM) developed here also has the potential to guide lead chemistry modifications as well as binding residues predictions.

  6. [E75, R78 and D82 of Escherichia coli FtsZ are key residues for FtsZ cellular self-assembly and FtsZ-MreB interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yujia; Lu, Qiaonan; Zheng, Xiaowei; Ma, Yuanfang; Lu, Feng

    2016-02-04

    To explore effects of FtsZ mutants FtsZ(E75A), FtsZ(R78G) and FtsZ(D82A) on FtsZ self-assembly and interaction of FtsZ with MreB in Escherichia coli strains. METHODS) We constructed FtsZ and its mutant's plasmids by molecular clone and site-directed mutagenesis methods, and purified targeted proteins by affinity chromatography. QN6(ftsZ::yfp-cat), QN7(tsZ::yfp-cat), QN8(ftsZ(R78G)::yfp-cat) and QN9 (ftsZ(D82A):.:yfp-cat) strains were constructed by linear DNA homologous recombination. We observed cellular localization pattern of FtsZ and its mutants in E. coli by living cell imaging experiments, examined interaction of FtsZ/FtsZ*-FtsZ* and FtsZ/FtsZ*-MreB by Coimmunoprecipitation and bacteria two hybrid, and analyzed assembly characteristics of FtsZ mutants by Light scattering. RESULTS) The Yfp-labeled FtsZ(E75A), FtsZ(R78G) and FtsZ(D82A) mutant proteins failed to assemble into functional Z-ring structure and localize correctly in E. coli strains. Interaction of FtsZ with its mutants, or FtsZ*-FtsZ* and FtsZ*-MreB interaction were weakened or completely disappeared. In addition, in vitro experiments show that E75A, R78G and D82A mutations decreased the polymerization efficiency of FtsZ monomer. FtsZ E75, R78 and D82 are critical amino acids in the assembly, function of FtsZ protein and FtsZ-MreB interaction in E. coli strains.

  7. Study of rock-drilling fluid interactions that contribute for the borehole instability; Estudo das interacoes rocha-fluido de perfuracao que contribuem para a instabilidade dos pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Cleysson C.; Nascimento, Regina S.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos H. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it was developed a new three points flexural mechanical test submersed for the simultaneous evaluation of the mechanical and chemical nature processes involved in the rock/drilling fluid interactions, which contribute for the borehole instability. The utilized fluids were air, mineral oil, distilled water and water solutions of non hydrolized polyacrylamide, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) with different molecular weights, and the copolymer with acrylamide. Cuttings rolling tests were utilized to help in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the shale's inhibition process. The results suggest that shale/polymer interactions are responsible for the shale's mechanical resistance, since the quantity of water and total carbon content of the shales were the same, after the test, independently of the inhibitor used. The results also suggest that the shale instability depends on the amount of adsorbed water, since independently of the inhibitor utilized, the quantity of adsorbed water was the same as that obtained with the shale/water system. (author)

  8. Contribution to the experimental study of wave particle interactions in a plasma having a two-population electronic distribution function; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de l'interaction ondes-particules dans un plasma presentant une fonction de distribution electronique a deux populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The aim of this work is the experimental study of the interaction between electrostatic waves and electrons in a plasma characterized by a so called 'bump in tail' distribution function. To study experimentally the mechanism of this interaction it is necessary to measure precisely the electron distribution and its evolution in space or in time. This was performed with an electrostatic separation probe which was designed especially. We measured also the evolution in space and time of the noise spectrum. We studied this mechanism in two different regimes of our discharge: - In the first case the distribution function is very close to that describing the interaction of a semi-infinite plasma with a cold beam injected at its edge. We showed that the instability resulting from this interaction is convective and that the growth of the waves results in a very important modification of the distribution function. The ionization due to the electric field related to the waves is also important. This modification is similar to that described by the quasi linear theory. The mechanism described by this theory remains then qualitatively valid in a strongly non linear case. - In the second case the conditions necessary for the quasi linear theory to be valid are satisfactorily fulfilled. It is then possible to measure, simultaneously, and precisely, the evolution of the distribution function and of the noise spectrum. From these measurements one can deduce the mechanism of the energy exchange between waves and particles and show that it is in good agreement with that described by the quasi linear theory. (author) [French] On presente ici l'etude experimentale detaillee du mecanisme de l'echange d'energie entre les oscillations e la frequence plasma des electrons et des electrons energetiques dans un plasma presentant une fonction de distribution du type a 'double bosse'. Pour realiser cette etude on a mis au point, une 'sonde a separation electrostatique' qui permet de mesurer

  9. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  10. Interaction between chitosan and its related enzymes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Shoko; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2017-11-01

    Chitosan-related enzymes including chitosanases, exo-β-glucosaminidases, and enzymes having chitosan-binding modules recognize ligands through electrostatic interactions between the acidic amino acids in proteins and amino groups of chitosan polysaccharides. However, in GH8 chitosanases, several aromatic residues are also involved in substrate recognition through stacking interactions, and these enzymes consequently hydrolyze β-1,4-glucan as well as chitosan. The binding grooves of these chitosanases are extended and opened at both ends of the grooves, so that the enzymes can clamp a long chitosan polysaccharide. The association/dissociation of positively charged glucosamine residues to/from the binding pocket of a GH2 exo-β-glucosaminidase controls the p K a of the catalytic acid, thereby maintaining the high catalytic potency of the enzyme. In contrast to chitosanases, chitosan-binding modules only accommodate a couple of glucosamine residues, predominantly recognizing the non-reducing end glucosamine residue of chitosan by electrostatic interactions and a hydrogen-bonding network. These structural findings on chitosan-related enzymes may contribute to future applications for the efficient conversion of the chitin/chitosan biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Critical contribution of aromatic rings to specific recognition of polyether rings. The case of ciguatoxin CTX3C-ABC and its specific antibody 1C49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumoto, Kouhei; Yokota, Akiko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ui, Mihoko; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Kumagai, Izumi; Nagumo, Yoko; Oguri, Hiroki; Inoue, Masayuki; Hirama, Masahiro

    2008-05-02

    To address how proteins recognize polyether toxin compounds, we focused on the interaction between the ABC ring compound of ciguatoxin 3C and its specific antibody, 1C49. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated that Escherichia coli-expressed variable domain fragments (Fv) of 1C49 had the high affinity constants and slow dissociation constants typical of antigen-antibody interactions. Linear van't Hoff analyses suggested that the interaction is enthalpy-driven. We resolved the crystal structure of 1C49 Fv bound to ABC ring compound of ciguatoxin 3C at a resolution of 1.7A. The binding pocket of the antibody had many aromatic rings and bound the antigen by shape complementarity typical of hapten-antibody interactions. Three hydrogen bonds and many van der Waals interactions were present. We mutated several residues of the antibody to Ala, and we used surface plasmon resonance to analyze the interactions between the mutated antibodies and the antigen. This analysis identified Tyr-91 and Trp-96 in the light chain as hot spots for the interaction, and other residues made incremental contributions by conferring enthalpic advantages and reducing the dissociation rate constant. Systematic mutation of Tyr-91 indicated that CH-pi and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic ring at this site and the antigen made substantial contributions to the association, and van der Waals interactions inhibited dissociation, suggesting that aromaticity and bulkiness are critical for the specific recognition of polyether compounds by proteins.

  12. Contribution of buried aspartic acid to the stability of the PDZ2 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasimha, Pruthvi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Suladze, Saba; Makhatadze, George I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Buried Asp residues on average form 2.5 to 3 hydrogen bonds and/or 0.8 salt bridges. ► Contribution of buried Asp to stability was estimated using model protein PDZ2. ► The energetic contribution of Asp56 to PDZ2 stability estimated to be 18 kJ · mol −1 . ► Findings are discussed in terms of contribution of Asp residues to protein stability. - Abstract: Statistical analysis of protein structures shows that buried aspartic acid residues on average form 2.5 to 3 hydrogen bonds and/or 0.8 potential ionic interactions with other protein groups. To estimate the energetic contribution of such buried groups to the Gibbs free energy of proteins, we measured the effects of amino acid substitutions of D56 in a model protein PDZ2 on its stability. We used temperature-induced unfolding monitored by DSC and denaturant-induced unfolding monitored by the changes in fluorescence intensity. We find that all substitutions of D56 lead to protein unfolding, thus suggesting that this buried hydrogen bonded aspartic acid has a significant contribution to the stability. To quantify the changes in the Gibbs free energy, one of the variants, D56N was stabilized by addition of the protective osmolyte TMAO. Comparison of the stability of the D56N variant with the wild-type PDZ2 in the presence and absence of TMAO allowed us to estimate the contribution of D56 to the protein stability to be 18 kJ · mol −1 . These findings are discussed in terms of contribution of buried ionizable groups to protein stability.

  13. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  14. Tidal residual current and its role in the mean flow on the Changjiang Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Jiliang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Huang, Daji; Wang, Taiping; Zhou, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The tidal residual current may play an important role in the mean flow in the Changjiang Bank region, in addition to other residual currents, such as the Taiwan Warm Current, the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, and the Yellow Sea Warm Current. In this paper, a detailed structure of the tidal residual current, in particular the meso-scale eddies, in the Changjiang Bank region is observed from model simulations, and its role in the mean flow is quantified using the well-validated Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The tidal residual current in the Changjiang Bank region consists of two components: an anticyclonic regional-scale tidal residual circulation around the edge of the Changjiang Bank and some cyclonic meso-scale tidal residual eddies across the Changjiang Bank. The meso-scale tidal residual eddies occur across the Changjiang Bank and contribute to the regional-scale tidal residual circulation offshore at the northwest boundary and on the northeast edge of the Changjiang Bank, southeastward along the 50 m isobath. Tidal rectification is the major mechanism causing the tidal residual current to flow along the isobaths. Both components of the tidal residual current have significant effects on the mean flow. A comparison between the tidal residual current and the mean flow indicates that the contribution of the tidal residual current to the mean flow is greater than 50%.

  15. Tidal residual current and its role in the mean flow on the Changjiang Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuan, Jiliang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Huang, Daji; Wang, Taiping; Zhou, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Tidal residual current may play an important role in the mean flow in the Changjiang Bank region, in addition to other residual currents, such as the Taiwan Warm Current, the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, and the Yellow Sea Warm Current. In this paper, a detailed structure of the tidal residual current, in particular the meso-scale eddies, in the Changjiang Bank region is observed from model simulations, and its role in the mean flow is quantified using the well-validated Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model). The tidal residual current in the Changjiang Bank region consists of two components: an anticyclonic regional-scale tidal residual circulation around the edge of the Changjiang Bank and some cyclonic meso-scale tidal residual eddies across the Changjiang Bank. The meso-scale tidal residual eddies occur across the Changjiang Bank and contribute to the regional-scale tidal residual circulation offshore at the northwest boundary and at the northeast edge of the Changjiang Bank, southeastward along the 50 m isobath. Tidal rectification is the major mechanism causing the tidal residual current to flow along the isobaths. Both components of the tidal residual current have significant effects on the mean flow. A comparison between the tidal residual current and the mean flow indicates that the contribution of the tidal residual current to the mean flow is greater than 50%.

  16. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  17. Residues of 14C-prochloraz in irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Maria A.; Tornisielo, Valdemar L.

    2000-01-01

    The Brazilian crops mangoes has expanding in the last years. However, tropical fruits crops are susceptible to infection that harms the crop yield. The control of these diseases is made through fungicides such as Prochloraz which possesses protecting eradicating action by controlling antracnose in mangoes. Agrochemicals are of great importance in the agriculture considering the of relationship cost/benefit. However they may cause a series of problems in the ecosystem, being the levels of agrochemicals residues in fruits one of these factors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the Prochloraz levels in mangoes treated in the post harvest. In the treatment of the mangoes, the interaction, fungicide with the gamma radiation with of 1,0 kGy dose, was used to induce Prochloraz degradation. Treated post-harvest mangoes were stored, at 12 deg C during 21 days. The results showed that the Prochloraz did not present reduction in the residual levels of the mangoes after 21 days storage, that is the safe period established by the Brazilian legislation on agrochemicals, in treated mangoes. The refrigerated storage (12 deg C) and the gamma radiation also did not contribute to the degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In average the concentration of the fungicide Prochloraz in the peels (mean = 1,64 μg/g) was higher than in the mangoes pulp (mean = 0,06 μg/g), which allows the consumption of this fruit, since the peel is always discarded. The degradation product, formed in peels of mangoes in fruits treated in the post-harvest was the metabolite BTS 44596. The metabolite was found in very low levels, confirming that occurs degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. (author)

  18. Contribution to the study of the interaction of slow neutrons with {sup 235}U using the time-of-flight method; Contribution a l'etude par la methode du temps de vol de l'interaction de neutrons lents avec l'U{sup 235}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    This study concerns the properties of the excited levels of uranium 236 obtained by interaction of slow neutron with uranium 235. The experiments have been carried out at the Saclay linear electron accelerator by use of the time of flight method. In the first part of this paper, we examine the technical and physical conditions which rule the experiments: compromise between resolution and counting rate, time dispersion due to the slowing down of the neutrons and crystalline binding effects. In a second part the experimental results i.e. total, fission and ternary fission cross sections are given. The third part deals with the analysis of these results: the resonance parameters determination ({tau}{sub n}, {tau}{sub {gamma}}, {tau}{sub f}), the study of their statistical distribution and of their correlations. We tried some classifications of the resonances according to their parameters and compared these classifications to each other and to other results. At least the evidence of a cross section correlation with a range smaller than 100 eV seems to be confirmed. (author) [French] Cette etude porte sur les proprietes des niveaux excites de l'Uranium-236 obtenus par l'interaction de neutrons lents avec le {sup 235}U. La technique experimentale est celle de la spectrometrie par temps de vol, les experiences ayant ete realisees aupres de l'accelerateur lineaire d'electrons de Saclay, Dans une premiere partie nous examinons les donnees techniques et physiques conditionnant les experiences: compromis entre resolution et taux de comptage, dispersion en temps due au ralentissement des neutrons, effet des liaisons cristallines. Dans une deuxieme partie sont exposes les resultats experimentaux: sections efficaces totales, de fission et de fission ternaire du {sup 235}U. Une troisieme partie porte sur l'analyse de ces resultats: determination des parametres ({tau}{sub n}, {tau}{sub {gamma}}, {tau}{sub f}), etude de leurs distributions statistiques et des correlations entre ces

  19. Contribution to the study of the interaction of slow neutrons with {sup 235}U using the time-of-flight method; Contribution a l'etude par la methode du temps de vol de l'interaction de neutrons lents avec l'U{sup 235}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-05-15

    This study concerns the properties of the excited levels of uranium 236 obtained by interaction of slow neutron with uranium 235. The experiments have been carried out at the Saclay linear electron accelerator by use of the time of flight method. In the first part of this paper, we examine the technical and physical conditions which rule the experiments: compromise between resolution and counting rate, time dispersion due to the slowing down of the neutrons and crystalline binding effects. In a second part the experimental results i.e. total, fission and ternary fission cross sections are given. The third part deals with the analysis of these results: the resonance parameters determination ({tau}{sub n}, {tau}{sub {gamma}}, {tau}{sub f}), the study of their statistical distribution and of their correlations. We tried some classifications of the resonances according to their parameters and compared these classifications to each other and to other results. At least the evidence of a cross section correlation with a range smaller than 100 eV seems to be confirmed. (author) [French] Cette etude porte sur les proprietes des niveaux excites de l'Uranium-236 obtenus par l'interaction de neutrons lents avec le {sup 235}U. La technique experimentale est celle de la spectrometrie par temps de vol, les experiences ayant ete realisees aupres de l'accelerateur lineaire d'electrons de Saclay, Dans une premiere partie nous examinons les donnees techniques et physiques conditionnant les experiences: compromis entre resolution et taux de comptage, dispersion en temps due au ralentissement des neutrons, effet des liaisons cristallines. Dans une deuxieme partie sont exposes les resultats experimentaux: sections efficaces totales, de fission et de fission ternaire du {sup 235}U. Une troisieme partie porte sur l'analyse de ces resultats: determination des parametres ({tau}{sub n}, {tau}{sub {gamma}}, {tau}{sub f}), etude de leurs distributions statistiques et

  20. Impact of Corn Residue Removal on Crop and Soil Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. M.; Wilhelm, W. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Voorhees, W. B.; Linden, D.

    2003-12-01

    Over-reliance on imported fuels, increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouses and sustaining food production for a growing population are three of the most important problems facing society in the mid-term. The US Department of Energy and private enterprise are developing technology necessary to use high cellulose feedstock, such as crop residues, for ethanol production. Based on production levels, corn (Zea mays L.) residue has potential as a biofuel feedstock. Crop residues are a renewable and domestic fuel source, which can reduce the rate of fossil fuel use (both imported and domestic) and provide an additional farm commodity. Crop residues protect the soil from wind and water erosion, provide inputs to form soil organic matter (a critical component determining soil quality) and play a role in nutrient cycling. Crop residues impact radiation balance and energy fluxes and reduce evaporation. Therefore, the benefits of using crop residues as fuel, which removes crop residues from the field, must be balanced against negative environmental impacts (e.g. soil erosion), maintaining soil organic matter levels, and preserving or enhancing productivity. All ramifications of new management practices and crop uses must be explored and evaluated fully before an industry is established. There are limited numbers of long-term studies with soil and crop responses to residue removal that range from negative to negligible. The range of crop and soil responses to crop residue removal was attributed to interactions with climate, management and soil type. Within limits, corn residue can be harvested for ethanol production to provide a renewable, domestic source of energy feedstock that reduces greenhouse gases. Removal rates must vary based on regional yield, climatic conditions and cultural practices. Agronomists are challenged to develop a protocol (tool) for recommending maximum permissible removal rates that ensure sustained soil productivity.

  1. The N- and C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains of Haemonchus contortus galectin bind to distinct receptors of goat PBMC and contribute differently to its immunomodulatory functions in host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, MingMin; Tian, XiaoWei; Yang, XinChao; Yuan, Cheng; Ehsan, Muhammad; Liu, XinChao; Yan, RuoFeng; Xu, LiXin; Song, XiaoKai; Li, XiangRui

    2017-09-05

    Hco-gal-m is a tandem-repeat galectin isolated from the adult worm of Haemonchus contortus. A growing body of studies have demonstrated that Hco-gal-m could exert its immunomodulatory effects on host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to facilitate the immune evasion. Our previous work revealed that C-terminal and N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) of Hco-gal-m had different sugar binding abilities. However, whether different domains of Hco-gal-m account differently for its multiple immunomodulatory functions in the host-parasite interaction remains to be elucidated. We found that the N-terminal CRD of Hco-gal-m (MNh) and the C-terminal CRD (MCh) could bind to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells by distinct receptors: transmembrane protein 63A (TMEM63A) was a binding receptor of MNh, while transmembrane protein 147 (TMEM147) was a binding receptor of MCh. In addition, MCh was much more potent than MNh in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis, while MNh was much more effective in inhibiting NO production. Moreover, MNh could suppress the transcription of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), but MCh not. Our data suggested that these two CRDs of Hco-gal-m bind to distinct receptors and contributed differently to its ability to downregulate host immune response. These results will improve our understanding of galectins from parasitic nematodes contributing to the mechanism of parasitic immune evasion and continue to illustrate the diverse range of biological activities attributable to the galectin family.

  2. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  3. Aprendizaje Colaborativo Presencial, Aprendizaje Colaborativo Mediado por Computador e Interacción: aclaraciones, aportes y evidencias Collaborative Learning, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Interaction: Explanations, contributions and evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Londoño Monroy Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo intenta responder las siguientes inquietudes: ¿Aprender colaborativamente es lo mismo que aprender trabajando en grupo?, ¿Hay diferencias sustanciales entre el aprendizaje logrado colaborativamente en la presencialidad y el conseguido con la mediación de herramientas informáticas?, ¿Qué papel juega la interacción en este último caso, qué aporta y cómo se lo facilita el software educativo? Para ello se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con dos propósitos. El primero, esclarecer los conceptos Aprendizaje Colaborativo y Aprendizaje Colaborativo Mediado por Computador para encontrar diferencias y similitudes entre ellos, reconocer sus orígenes y hacer una síntesis de las referencias teóricas constructivistas y socioculturales que los sustentan. Y el segundo, para intentar comprender el concepto interacción y vislumbrar de qué manera incide en el ACMC en el diseño de software educativo y en el aprendizaje. This article tries to respond the following questions: is collaborative learning the same that learning in a workgroup?, is there any substantial differences between presential collaborative learning and learning in an informatics tools mediated educative process?, In this last case, what is the interaction role, what it contributes to, and how it is facilitated by educative software? Looking for answers, a bibliographical revision with two intentions was made. First, to clarify the concepts Collaborative Learning and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL in order to find the differences and similarities among them, to recognize its origins and to make a synthesis of the Constructivist and Sociocultural theoretical references that sustain them. And second, to try to understand the concept Interaction and to glimpse how it affects the CSCL in educative software desing and in learning.

  4. Residual stress analysis in reactor pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Pont, D.

    1991-08-01

    Residual stresses in cladding and welded attachments could contribute to the problem of stress-corrosion cracking in boiling-water reactors (BWR). As part of a larger program aimed at quantifying residual stress in BWR components, models that would be applicable for predicting residual stress in BWR components are reviewed and documented. The review includes simple methods of estimating residual stresses as well as advanced finite-element software. In general, simple methods are capable of predicting peak magnitudes of residual stresses but are incapable of adequately characterizing the distribution of residual stresses. Ten groups of researchers using finite-element software are reviewed in detail. For each group, the assumptions of the model, possible simplifications, material property data, and specific applications are discussed. The most accurate results are obtained when a metallurgical simulation is performed, transformation plasticity effects are included, and the heating and cooling parts of the welding thermal cycle are simulated. Two models are identified which can provide these features. The present state of these models and the material property data available in the literature are adequate to quantify residual stress in BWR components

  5. Residual Resistance Data from Cavity Production Projects at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Geng, Rongli; Mammosser, John; Saunders, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental limitation towards achieving high quality factors in superconducting radio-frequency cavities is the so-called residual resistance. Understanding and controlling the residual resistance has important implications towards improving the efficiency and reduce the operating cost of continuous wave superconducting linear accelerators. In this contribution we will report on the residual resistance values obtained from measurements of the quality factor of a large set of cavities, with resonant frequency between 805 MHz and 1.5 GHz, all of them processed and tested at Jefferson Lab. Surface treatments included both buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing. The results indicate an approximate value of the residual resistance of about 7-10 n Omega.

  6. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  7. Contribution to the study of mesons and their interactions with nuclei, by threshold production in low nucleon number systems; Contribution a l`etude des mesons et de leur interaction avec les noyaux, par production au seuil dans les systemes a petit nombre de nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudot, F

    1995-01-01

    The threshold excitation function of the pd {yields} {sup 3}HeX reaction and the total {eta}-meson production cross section near threshold in the dd {yields} {alpha}{eta} reaction have been measured using the SPES4 beam line of the Laboratoire National Saturne. In the pd {yields} {sup 3}HeX threshold function, clear signals are observed at {omega}, {eta}` and {phi}6 mesons threshold; some structures appear at central masses of the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0}-mesons, as just above the two kaons production threshold. These structures could be the signature of new hadronic exotic states. The two-pion and two-kaon physical background has been estimated in a one-pion exchange model allowing the calculation of the differential cross section for the {pi}{sup -}p {yields} nX elementary process. The results of this calculation of the physical background of the threshold excitation function. The the dd {yields} {alpha}{eta} study, the {eta}-meson was clearly observed in the spectrometer`s final focal plane spectra, in good agreement with a Monte Carlo simulation. A total cross section of the order of the nano-barn has been measured. The results are compared to some other {eta}-meson production processes with lighter nuclei than helium-4. Using different nuclei a comparative study of the {eta}-nucleus interaction has shown that the latter is more binding in the helium-4 case. Based on these data, the charge symmetry breaking in the dd {yields} {alpha}{pi}{sup 0} reaction is studied. Using a {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing model, the extracted cross sections are compatible with the only measurement of this reaction cross section. (author). 59 refs.

  8. Residual symptoms and functioning in depression, does the type of residual symptom matter? A post-hoc analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romera Irene

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The degrees to which residual symptoms in major depressive disorder (MDD adversely affect patient functioning is not known. This post-hoc analysis explored the association between different residual symptoms and patient functioning. Methods Patients with MDD who responded (≥50% on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; HAMD-17 after 3 months of treatment (624/930 were included. Residual core mood-symptoms (HAMD-17 core symptom subscale ≥1, residual insomnia-symptoms (HAMD-17 sleep subscale ≥1, residual anxiety-symptoms (HAMD-17-anxiety subscale ≥1, residual somatic-symptoms (HAMD-17 Item 13 ≥1, pain (Visual Analogue Scale ≥30, and functioning were assessed after 3 months treatment. A stepwise logistic regression model with normal functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale ≥80 as the dependent variable was used. Results After 3 months, 59.5% of patients (371/624 achieved normal functioning and 66.0% (412/624 were in remission. Residual symptom prevalence was: core mood symptoms 72%; insomnia 63%; anxiety 78%; and somatic symptoms 41%. Pain reported in 18%. Factors associated with normal functioning were absence of core mood symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 8.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6–16.7, absence of insomnia symptoms (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2–2.7, episode length (4–24 weeks vs. ≥24 weeks [OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.6] and better baseline functioning (OR 1.0; 95% CI, 1.0–1.1. A significant interaction between residual anxiety symptoms and pain was found (p = 0.0080. Conclusions Different residual symptoms are associated to different degrees with patient functioning. To achieve normal functioning, specific residual symptoms domains might be targeted for treatment.

  9. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, F. J.; Huijsmans, J. F. M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-09-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues may contribute to ammonia volatilization, but sufficient information on their contribution to the national ammonia volatilization is lacking. Experiments were carried out with the aim to assess the ammonia volatilization of crop residues left on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil under the conditions met in practice in the Netherlands during late autumn and winter. Ammonia emission from residues of broccoli, leek, sugar beet, cut grass, fodder radish (fresh and frozen) and yellow mustard (frozen) was studied during two winter seasons using volatilization chambers. Residues were either placed on top of soil or mixed with soil. Mixing residues with soil gave insignificant ammonia volatilization, whereas volatilization was 5-16 percent of the N content of residues when placed on top of soil. Ammonia volatilization started after at least 4 days. Total ammonia volatilization was related to C/N-ratio and N concentration of the plant material. After 37 days, cumulative ammonia volatilization was negligible from plant material with N concentration below 2 percent, and was 10 percent of the N content of plant material with 4 percent N. These observations can be explained by decomposition of plant material by micro-organisms. After an initial built up of the microbial population, NH 4+ that is not needed for their own growth is released and can easily emit as NH 3 at the soil surface. The results of the experiments were used to estimate the contribution of crop residues to ammonia volatilization in the Netherlands. Crop residues of arable crops and residues of pasture topping may contribute more than 3 million kg NH 3-N to the national ammonia volatilization of the

  10. SRTC Contribution to EMSP 81898 Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Poh-Sang

    2004-01-01

    The following describes the SRTC contributions to EMSP 81898 with emphasis on the specific applications to the SRS high level radioactive waste tanks. In particular, the crack growth criteria, constraint effects, and the weld residual stress effects are covered. The write-up consists of two parts: (1) Crack Growth Simulation, and (2) Stress Corrosion Cracking in Weld Residual Stress

  11. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  12. Remote Sensing of Residue Management in Farms using Landsat 8 Sensor Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A Rostami

    2017-10-01

    study were NDVI, BAI, NBR and NBRT. Classification accuracy was evaluated and expressed by confusion matrix and Kappa coefficient. Natural surfaces are rarely composed of a single uniform material. Spectral mixing occurs when materials with different spectral properties are represented by a single image pixel. The condition where scale of the mixing is large (macroscopic, mixing would occur in a linear fashion. However for microscopic situations, the mixing is generally nonlinear. The linear model ahich wasadopted in this study, assumes that there is no interaction between materials. Assumption of LSUA is that each pixel on the surface is a physical mixture of several constituents weighted by surface abundance, and the spectrum of the mixture is a linear combination of the endmember reflectance spectra. Within the context of this study, LSUA is a classification method that can determine contribution of each material (or endmember such as soil or residue for each image pixel. Results and Discussion The spectral response curve extracted from Landsat 8 image used as input into the LSUA model in ENVI software. As expected, crop burned residue (Ash spectra had lower reflectance when compared to the soil, residue and green plant spectra. The contrast between residue, green plant, soil and residue ash spectra was particularly evident in the NIR and SWIR bands. It is suggested that these bands are essential for residue discrimination. Differences of reflectance in the visible bands were minimal, providing little discrimination between residue, green plant, soil and residue ash. Burned area estimated by LSUA method from Landsat 8 image was correlated against the ground data (measured coincident to the ground data. The overall accuracy of classification with BAI index and LSUA method was 91.7 and 88.3 and Kappa coefficient was 0.89 and 0.84 respectively. Results indicated that burned field area can be located and its area can be estimated using Landsat 8 images. The Index BAI was

  13. Vesícula residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. U. Coelho

    Full Text Available Our objective is to report three patients with recurrent severe upper abdominal pain secondary to residual gallbladder. All patients had been subjected to cholecystectomy from 1 to 20 years before. The diagnosis was established after several episodes of severe upper abdominal pain by imaging exams: ultrasonography, tomography, or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Removal of the residual gallbladder led to complete resolution of symptoms. Partial removal of the gallbladder is a very rare cause of postcholecystectomy symptoms.

  14. Residual number processing in dyscalculia ?

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and ca...

  15. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  16. Investigating the properties of residues. Characterization of pellets from fermentation residues; Den Eigenschaften der Reststoffe auf der Spur. Untersuchung widmet sich der Charakterisierung von Pellets aus Gaerresten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzeisen, Martin; Mueller, Joachim [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik; Starcevic, Nikica [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik; Strabag Umweltanlagen GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Projekt Produktentwicklung/Schlammbehandlung

    2009-09-15

    Fermentation residues are by-products of the biogas process. Farmers use them as fertilizers, but as the size of biogas plants grows, so does the residues volume. It is now too much for local use, and transport to other sites is expensive. Fuel pellets production may be an alternative. Pellets from fermentation residues are not accepted as yet because too little is known about their characteristics. The contribution describes an investigation that intends to identify the fuel characteristics of pellets from fermentation residues. (orig.)

  17. A study on the production of agricultural residues in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Blasi, C.; Tanzi, V.; Lanzetta, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dip di Ingegneria Chimica, Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-01

    The Italian production of agricultural residues has been evaluated with a view to energy recovery through gasification. Two main categories of residues have been identified: the first, (A) is associated with the growing and collection of products with a nutritional value, whereas the second (B) includes the residues associated with the subsequent processing in order to obtain final products for commercialization. Category A, which comprises three further sub-categories: straw (A1); woody residues (A2); and stems and leaves (residues from vegetables, tobacco, sugar beet, (A3)), results in about 16.5 mt yr. The average amount of straw (A1) is 11 mt/yr, of which about 60% is waste to be eliminated. Woody residues (A2) (mainly pruning off-cuts from vineyards and olive groves) are about 3.5 mt/yr (85% unused). Category A3 amounts to about 2 mt/yr (90% unused). Straw is available mainly in the northern part of the country, whereas the other two sub-categories are widely distributed in central and southern regions. The yields of category B are estimated at 4 mt/yr, of which more than 3 mt/yr are waste products from grape and olive processing. Other residues, such as rice, sunflower and soya-bean husks (about 0.65 mt/yr), almond and nut shells and fruit stones (about 0.2 mt/yr), although not widely available on a national scale, can be significant on a local basis. The total amount of unused agricultural residues is about 14.5 mt/yr, which, if completely exploited through gasification, can contribute as much as 7-10% to the current national electricity needs. The regions of Veneto, Puglia, Friuli, Lombardia and Emilia Romagna appear to be good candidates for electricity production, given the significant surface concentration of unused residues (105-55 t km{sup 2}). (author)

  18. Identification of Key Residues for Enzymatic Carboxylate Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Stolterfoht

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylate reductases (CARs, E.C. 1.2.1.30 generate aldehydes from their corresponding carboxylic acid with high selectivity. Little is known about the structure of CARs and their catalytically important amino acid residues. The identification of key residues for carboxylate reduction provides a starting point to gain deeper understanding of enzymatic carboxylate reduction. A multiple sequence alignment of CARs with confirmed activity recently identified in our lab and from the literature revealed a fingerprint of conserved amino acids. We studied the function of conserved residues by multiple sequence alignments and mutational replacements of these residues. In this study, single-site alanine variants of Neurospora crassa CAR were investigated to determine the contribution of conserved residues to the function, expressability or stability of the enzyme. The effect of amino acid replacements was investigated by analyzing enzymatic activity of the variants in vivo and in vitro. Supported by molecular modeling, we interpreted that five of these residues are essential for catalytic activity, or substrate and co-substrate binding. We identified amino acid residues having significant impact on CAR activity. Replacement of His 237, Glu 433, Ser 595, Tyr 844, and Lys 848 by Ala abolish CAR activity, indicating their key role in acid reduction. These results may assist in the functional annotation of CAR coding genes in genomic databases. While some other conserved residues decreased activity or had no significant impact, four residues increased the specific activity of NcCAR variants when replaced by alanine. Finally, we showed that NcCAR wild-type and mutants efficiently reduce aliphatic acids.

  19. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  20. Mineralization of nitrogen from nitrogen-15 labeled crop residues and utilization by rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, R.J.; Gilmour, J.T.; Wells, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of N from the residues of the previous crop to the subsequent rice (Oryza sativa L.) crop is largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure the mineralization of N from 15 N-labeled rice, soybean (Glycine max L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) residues and the uptake by a subsequent rice crop; and (2) compare the 15 N tracer method with the standard fertilizer-N response method used in field studies to quantify the N contribution from the crop residue to the next crop. Nitrogen mineralization from decomposing crop residues was measured by soil sampling prior to seeding the rice crop and after seeding by plant sampling the rice at maturity. The minimum estimate of the amount of residue N mineralized from the time of residue incorporation until rice harvest was 9, 52, and 38% of the rice, soybean, and wheat residue N, respectively. The amount of residue N recovered in the rice crop was 3, 11, and 37% of the rice, soybean, and wheat residue N, respectively. The lower the C/N ratio and the higher the amount of N in the residue, the lower was the amount of residue N recovered in the soil organic fraction at harvest and the higher was the amount of residue N mineralized. The 15 N tracer method compared favorably with the fertilizer N response method when the uptake efficiency of the fertilizer N was taken into account

  1. Stacking interactions between carbohydrate and protein quantified by combination of theoretical and experimental methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Wimmerová

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate-protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL lectin complexes with α-L-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were -8.5, -7.1 and -4.1 kcal x mol(-1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values -8.8, -7.9 kcal x mol(-1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was -0.9 kcal x mol(-1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-L-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction.

  2. The n→π* Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Robert W; Raines, Ronald T

    2017-08-15

    groups, demonstrating unequivocally that a dipolar mechanism is insufficient to describe these interactions. Rather, these interactions have important quantum-mechanical character that can be evaluated through careful experimental analysis and judicious use of computation. Although individual n→π* interactions are relatively weak (∼0.3-0.7 kcal/mol), the ubiquity of carbonyl groups across chemistry and biology gives the n→π* interaction broad impact. In particular, the n→π* interaction is likely to play an important role in dictating protein structure. Indeed, bioinformatics analysis suggests that approximately one-third of residues in folded proteins satisfy the geometric requirements to engage in an n→π* interaction, which is likely to be of particular importance for the α-helix. Other carbonyl-dense polymeric materials like polyesters and peptoids are also influenced by n→π* interactions, as are a variety of small molecules, some with particular medicinal importance. Research will continue to identify molecules whose conformation and activity are affected by the n→π* interaction and will clarify their specific contributions to the structures of biomacromolecules.

  3. Finding coevolving amino acid residues using row and column weighting of mutual information and multi-dimensional amino acid representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Gouveia; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Some amino acid residues functionally interact with each other. This interaction will result in an evolutionary co-variation between these residues - coevolution. Our goal is to find these coevolving residues. RESULTS: We present six new methods for detecting coevolving...... residues. Among other things, we suggest measures that are variants of Mutual Information, and measures that use a multidimensional representation of each residue in order to capture the physico-chemical similarities between amino acids. We created a benchmarking system, in silico, able to evaluate...

  4. Roles of the β 146 histidyl residue in the molecular basis of the Bohr Effect of hemoglobin: A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, M.R.; Mace, J.E.; Ho, N.T.; Ho, Chien

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of the roles of the carboxyl-terminal β146 histidyl residues in the alkaline Bohr effect in human and normal adult hemoglobin by high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy requires assignment of the resonances corresponding to these residues. By a careful spectroscopic study of human normal adult hemoglobin, enzymatically prepared des(His146β)-hemoglobin, and the mutant hemoglobins Cowtown (β146His → Leu) and York (β146His → Pro), the authors have resolved some of these conflicting results. By a close incremental variation of pH over a wide range in chloride-free 0.1 M N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid buffer, a single resonance has been found to be consistently missing in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these hemoglobin variants. The results indicate that the contribution of the β146 histidyl residues is 0.52 H + /hemoglobin tetramer at pH 7.6, markedly less than 0.8 H + /hemoglobin tetramer estimated by study of the mutant hemoglobin Cowtown (β146His → Leu) by Shih and Perutz. They have found that at least two histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of this mutant have pK values that are perturbed, and they suggest that these pK differences may in part account for this discrepancy. The results show that the pK values of β146 histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of hemoglobin are substantially affected by the presence of chloride and other anions in the solvent, and thus, the contribution of this amino acid residue to the alkaline Bohr effect can be shown to vary widely in magnitude, depending on the solvent composition. These results demonstrate that the detailed molecular mechanisms of the alkaline Bohr effect are not unique but are affected both by the hemoglobin structure and by the interactions with the solvent components in which the hemoglobin molecule resides

  5. The H2A-H2B dimeric kinetic intermediate is stabilized by widespread hydrophobic burial with few fully native interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyett, Paul J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2012-01-20

    The H2A-H2B histone heterodimer folds via monomeric and dimeric kinetic intermediates. Within ∼5 ms, the H2A and H2B polypeptides associate in a nearly diffusion limited reaction to form a dimeric ensemble, denoted I₂ and I₂*, the latter being a subpopulation characterized by a higher content of nonnative structure (NNS). The I₂ ensemble folds to the native heterodimer, N₂, through an observable, first-order kinetic phase. To determine the regions of structure in the I₂ ensemble, we characterized 26 Ala mutants of buried hydrophobic residues, spanning the three helices of the canonical histone folds of H2A and H2B and the H2B C-terminal helix. All but one targeted residue contributed significantly to the stability of I₂, the transition state and N₂; however, only residues in the hydrophobic core of the dimer interface perturbed the I₂* population. Destabilization of I₂* correlated with slower folding rates, implying that NNS is not a kinetic trap but rather accelerates folding. The pattern of Φ values indicated that residues forming intramolecular interactions in the peripheral helices contributed similar stability to I₂ and N₂, but residues involved in intermolecular interactions in the hydrophobic core are only partially folded in I₂. These findings suggest a dimerize-then-rearrange model. Residues throughout the histone fold contribute to the stability of I₂, but after the rapid dimerization reaction, the hydrophobic core of the dimer interface has few fully native interactions. In the transition state leading to N₂, more native-like interactions are developed and nonnative interactions are rearranged. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CD205-TLR9-IL-12 axis contributes to CpG-induced oversensitive liver injury in HBsAg transgenic mice by promoting the interaction of NKT cells with Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xin; Hao, Xiaolei; Zheng, Meijuan; Xu, Congfei; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Rongbin; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-08-01

    Gut-derived bacterial products contribute to liver inflammation and injury during chronic hepatitis B virus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic (HBs-Tg) mice and their wild-type (WT) control C57BL/6 mice were injected with CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to mimic the translocation of gut microbial products into the systemic circulation. We found that, compared with the WT mice, the HBs-Tg mice were oversensitive to CpG-ODN-induced liver injury, which was dependent on natural killer T (NKT) cells. CpG-ODN injection enhanced the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) on NKT cells. In addition, hepatocytes from the HBs-Tg mice expressed higher levels of Fas than did those from the WT mice, which was further augmented by CpG-ODN. Interaction of Fas and FasL was involved in the cytotoxicity of NKT cells against hepatocytes in the HBs-Tg mice. Moreover, Kupffer cells in the HBs-Tg mice expressed higher levels of CD205 and produced greater amounts of interleukin (IL)-12 than did those in the WT mice. Finally, the depletion of Kupffer cells, neutralization of IL-12 or specific silencing of CD205 on Kupffer cells significantly inhibited CpG-ODN-induced liver injury and NKT activation in the HBs-Tg mice. Our data suggest that CD205-expressing Kupffer cells respond to CpG-ODNs and subsequently release IL-12 to promote NKT cell activation. Activated NKT cells induce liver damage through the Fas signaling pathway in HBs-Tg mice.

  7. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  8. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  9. Anaerobia Treatments of the domestic residual waters. Limitations potentialities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo Gomez, Eugenio

    1993-01-01

    The quick growth of the Latin American cities has prevented that an appropriate covering of public services is achieved for the whole population, One of the undesirable consequences of this situation is the indiscriminate discharge from the domestic and industrial residual waters to the nearest bodies of water with its consequent deterioration and with disastrous consequences about the ecology and the public health. The developed countries have controlled this situation using systems of purification of the residual waters previously to their discharge in the receptor source. The same as the technology of the evacuation of the served waters, they have become numerous efforts for the application of the purification systems used in the countries developed to the socioeconomic, climatic and cultural conditions of our means. One of the results obtained in these efforts is the economic inability of the municipalities to pay the high investment costs and of operation of the traditional systems for the treatment of the residual waters. Contrary to another type of public services, the treatment of the residual waters needs of appropriate technological solutions for the Climatic and socioeconomic means of the developing countries, One of the technological alternatives for the purification of the residual waters that has had a great development in the last decades has been that of the biological treatments in t anaerobia ambient. The objective of this contribution is to present, to author's trial, the limitations and potentialities of this technology type with special emphasis in the case of the domestic residual waters

  10. Identification of chemical signatures of gunshot residues in different fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Joao Carlos Dias de

    2010-01-01

    The modern forensic science goes hand in hand with scientific research. The forensic scientists are faced every day with many cases requiring the analysis of residues from firing gun (gunshot residues). This works describes the development of a methodology to determine chemical signatures of shots from a firearm, by measuring the concentrations of Pb, Ba e Sb in the residues from these shots deposited near the entrance hole of bullets, based on the technique with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). Shots were performed on five types of target-fabrics and collected testimonies from regions close to the entrance hole of projectiles. The results showed that the method enabled us to identify and distinguish the residues of the .38 caliber revolver and pistols .40 and 9mm caliber. The use of ternary graphs as a tool for data analysis helped to identify specific patterns of distribution of blank samples and gunshot residues deposited after firing revolvers and pistols. The methodology enabled the assignment of the origin of the shot through the confirmation of the residues collected also from the hands of shooters. As a result the methodology in police procedures and aims to add a valuable contribution to forensic investigations. (author)

  11. Decomposition of sugar cane crop residues under different nitrogen rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Costa Potrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of organic residues through mechanical harvesting of cane sugar is a growing practice in sugarcane production system. The maintenance of these residues on the soil surface depends mainly on environmental conditions. Nitrogen fertilization on dry residues tend to retard decomposition of these, providing benefits such as increased SOM. Thus, the object of this research was to evaluate the effect of different doses of nitrogen on sugar cane crop residues, as its decomposition and contribution to carbon sequestration in soil. The experiment was conducted in Dourados-MS and consisted of a randomized complete block design. Dried residues were placed in litter bags and the treatments were arranged in a split plot, being the four nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg ha-1 N the plots, and the seven sampling times (0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 the spit plots. Decomposition rates of residues, total organic carbon and labile carbon on soil were analysed. The application of increasing N doses resulted in an increase in their decomposition rates. Despite this, note also the mineral N application as a strategy to get higher levels of labile carbon in soil.

  12. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  13. Prediction of Active Site and Distal Residues in E. coli DNA Polymerase III alpha Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuram, Ramya; Coulther, Timothy A; Hollander, Judith M; Keston-Smith, Elise; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2018-02-20

    The process of DNA replication is carried out with high efficiency and accuracy by DNA polymerases. The replicative polymerase in E. coli is DNA Pol III, which is a complex of 10 different subunits that coordinates simultaneous replication on the leading and lagging strands. The 1160-residue Pol III alpha subunit is responsible for the polymerase activity and copies DNA accurately, making one error per 10 5 nucleotide incorporations. The goal of this research is to determine the residues that contribute to the activity of the polymerase subunit. Homology modeling and the computational methods of THEMATICS and POOL were used to predict functionally important amino acid residues through their computed chemical properties. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical assays were used to validate these predictions. Primer extension, steady-state single-nucleotide incorporation kinetics, and thermal denaturation assays were performed to understand the contribution of these residues to the function of the polymerase. This work shows that the top 15 residues predicted by POOL, a set that includes the three previously known catalytic aspartate residues, seven remote residues, plus five previously unexplored first-layer residues, are important for function. Six previously unidentified residues, R362, D405, K553, Y686, E688, and H760, are each essential to Pol III activity; three additional residues, Y340, R390, and K758, play important roles in activity.

  14. Tyrosine Residues Regulate Multiple Nuclear Functions of P54nrb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahn R; Hung, Wayne; Xie, Ning; Liu, Liangliang; He, Leye; Dong, Xuesen

    2017-04-01

    The non-POU-domain-containing octamer binding protein (NONO; also known as p54nrb) has various nuclear functions ranging from transcription, RNA splicing, DNA synthesis and repair. Although tyrosine phosphorylation has been proposed to account for the multi-functional properties of p54nrb, direct evidence on p54nrb as a phosphotyrosine protein remains unclear. To investigate the tyrosine phosphorylation status of p54nrb, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on the five tyrosine residues of p54nrb, replacing the tyrosine residues with phenylalanine or alanine, and immunoblotted for tyrosine phosphorylation. We then preceded with luciferase reporter assays, RNA splicing minigene assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and confocal microscopy to study the function of p54nrb tyrosine residues on transcription, RNA splicing, protein-protein interaction, and cellular localization. We found that p54nrb was not phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Rather, it has non-specific binding affinity to anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. However, replacement of tyrosine with phenylalanine altered p54nrb activities in transcription co-repression and RNA splicing in gene context-dependent fashions by means of differential regulation of p54nrb protein association with its interacting partners and co-regulators of transcription and splicing. These results demonstrate that tyrosine residues, regardless of phosphorylation status, are important for p54nrb function. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 852-861, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  16. Nonsensing residues in S3-S4 linker's C terminus affect the voltage sensor set point in K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-de-Souza, Joao L; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2018-02-05

    Voltage sensitivity in ion channels is a function of highly conserved arginine residues in their voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), but this conservation does not explain the diversity in voltage dependence among different K + channels. Here we study the non-voltage-sensing residues 353 to 361 in Shaker K + channels and find that residues 358 and 361 strongly modulate the voltage dependence of the channel. We mutate these two residues into all possible remaining amino acids (AAs) and obtain Q-V and G-V curves. We introduced the nonconducting W434F mutation to record sensing currents in all mutants except L361R, which requires K + depletion because it is affected by W434F. By fitting Q-Vs with a sequential three-state model for two voltage dependence-related parameters ( V 0 , the voltage-dependent transition from the resting to intermediate state and V 1 , from the latter to the active state) and G-Vs with a two-state model for the voltage dependence of the pore domain parameter ( V 1/2 ), Spearman's coefficients denoting variable relationships with hydrophobicity, available area, length, width, and volume of the AAs in 358 and 361 positions could be calculated. We find that mutations in residue 358 shift Q-Vs and G-Vs along the voltage axis by affecting V 0 , V 1 , and V 1/2 according to the hydrophobicity of the AA. Mutations in residue 361 also shift both curves, but V 0 is affected by the hydrophobicity of the AA in position 361, whereas V 1 and V 1/2 are affected by size-related AA indices. Small-to-tiny AAs have opposite effects on V 1 and V 1/2 in position 358 compared with 361. We hypothesize possible coordination points in the protein that residues 358 and 361 would temporarily and differently interact with in an intermediate state of VSD activation. Our data contribute to the accumulating knowledge of voltage-dependent ion channel activation by adding functional information about the effects of so-called non-voltage-sensing residues on VSD dynamics. © 2018

  17. Cycling of fertilizer and cotton crop residue nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, I.J.; Constable, G.A.; MacLeod, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Mineral nitrogen (N), nitrate and ammonium contents were monitored in N-fertilized soils supporting cotton crops to provide information on the nitrification, mineralization and immobilization processes operating in the soil. The relative contributions of fertilizer N, previous cotton crop residue N and indigenous soil N to the mineral N pools and to the current crop's N uptake were calculated. After N fertilizer (urea) application, the soil's mineral N content rose rapidly and subsequently declined at a slower rate. The recovery of 15 N-labelled urea as mineral N declined exponentially with time. Biological immobilization (and possibly denitrification to some extent) were believed to be the major processes reducing post-application soil mineral N content. Progressively less N was mineralized upon incubation of soil sampled through the growing season. Little soil N (either from urea or crop residue) was mineralized at crop maturity. Cycling of N was evident between the soil mineral and organic N pools throughout the cotton growing season. Considerable quantities of fertilizer N were immobilized by the soil micro biomass; immobilized N was remineralized and subsequently taken up by the cotton crop. A large proportion of the crop N was taken up in the latter part of the season when the soil mineral N content was low. It is suggested that much of the N taken up by cotton was derived from microbial sources, rather than crop residues. The application of cotton crop residue (stubble) slightly reduced the mineral N content in the soil by encouraging biological immobilization. 15 N was mineralized very slowly from the labelled crop residue and did not contribute significantly to the supply of N to the current crop. Recovery of labelled fertilizer N and labelled crop residue N by the cotton crop was 28% and 1%, respectively. In comparison, the apparent recovery of fertilizer N was 48%. Indigenous soil N contributed 68% of the N taken up by the cotton crop. 33 refs., 1 tab

  18. Slow and pressurized co-pyrolysis of coal and agricultural residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboyade, Akinwale O.; Carrier, Marion; Meyer, Edson L.; Knoetze, Hansie; Görgens, Johann F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Evaluation of co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass in pressurized packed bed reactor. ► Relative influence of coal–biomass mix ratio, temperature and pressure also investigated. ► Results show significant synergy or chemical interactions in the vapor phase. ► Synergistic interactions did not influence distribution of lumped solid liquid and gas products. - Abstract: The distribution of products from the slow heating rate pyrolysis of coal, corn residues (cobs and stover), sugarcane bagasse and their blends were investigated by slow pressurized pyrolysis in a packed bed reactor. A factorial experimental design was implemented to establish the relative significance of coal–biomass mix ratio, temperature and pressure on product distribution. Results showed that the yield and composition of tar and other volatile products were mostly influenced by mix ratio, while temperature and pressure had a low to negligible significance under the range of conditions investigated. Analysis of the composition of condensates and gas products obtained showed that there was significant synergy or chemical interactions in the vapor phase during co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass. However, the interactions did not significantly affect the relative distribution of the lumped solid, liquid and gas products obtained from the blends, beyond what would be expected assuming additive behavior from the contributing fuels.

  19. Scale-free behaviour of amino acid pair interactions in folded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Mortensen, Rasmus J.

    2012-01-01

    The protein structure is a cumulative result of interactions between amino acid residues interacting with each other through space and/or chemical bonds. Despite the large number of high resolution protein structures, the ‘‘protein structure code’’ has not been fully identified. Our manuscript...... presents a novel approach to protein structure analysis in order to identify rules for spatial packing of amino acid pairs in proteins. We have investigated 8706 high resolution non-redundant protein chains and quantified amino acid pair interactions in terms of solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence...... which amino acid paired residues contributed to the cells with a population above 50, pairs of Ala, Ile, Leu and Val dominate the results. This result is statistically highly significant. We postulate that such pairs form ‘‘structural stability points’’ in the protein structure. Our data shows...

  20. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  1. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  2. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  3. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  4. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  5. Combinatorial construction of toric residues

    OpenAIRE

    Khetan, Amit; Soprounov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The toric residue is a map depending on n+1 semi-ample divisors on a complete toric variety of dimension n. It appears in a variety of contexts such as sparse polynomial systems, mirror symmetry, and GKZ hypergeometric functions. In this paper we investigate the problem of finding an explicit element whose toric residue is equal to one. Such an element is shown to exist if and only if the associated polytopes are essential. We reduce the problem to finding a collection of partitions of the la...

  6. Alternatives to crop residues for soil amendment

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J.M.; Unger, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Metadata only record In semiarid agroecosystems, crop residues can provide important benefits of soil and water conservation, nutrient cycling, and improved subsequent crop yields. However, there are frequently multiple competing uses for residues, including animal forage, fuel, and construction material. This chapter discusses the various uses of crop residues and examines alternative soil amendments when crop residues cannot be left on the soil.

  7. Residual Structures in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2010-01-01

    Several alternatives are available for specifying the residual structure in latent growth curve modeling. Two specifications involve uncorrelated residuals and represent the most commonly used residual structures. The first, building on repeated measures analysis of variance and common specifications in multilevel models, forces residual variances…

  8. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    a pair of residuals generated by Compact Disc Player. However, these residuals depend on the performance of position servos in the Compact Disc Player. In other publications of the same authors a pair of decoupled residuals is derived. However, the computation of these alternative residuals has been...

  9. Impact of sugarcane field residue and mill bagasse on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  10. Allelopathic impact of HoCP 96-540 field residue on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  11. Generic GPCR residue numbers - aligning topology maps while minding the gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isberg, Vignir; de Graaf, Chris; Bortolato, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Generic residue numbers facilitate comparisons of, for example, mutational effects, ligand interactions, and structural motifs. The numbering scheme by Ballesteros and Weinstein for residues within the class A GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors) has more than 1100 citations, and the recent crysta...

  12. Liquefaction behaviors of bamboo residues in a glycerol-based solvent using microwave energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiulong Xie; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Jinqiu Qi; Hui Pan

    2014-01-01

    Liquefaction of bamboo was performed in glycerol–methanol as co-solvent using microwave energy and was evaluated by characterizing the liquefied residues. High efficiency conversion of bamboo was achieved under mild reaction conditions. Liquefaction temperature and time interacted to affect the liquefaction reaction. Fourier transform infrared analyzes of the residues...

  13. Research items regarding seismic residual risk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    After learning the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP severe accidents in 2011, the government investigation committee proposed the effective use of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and now it is required to establish new safety rules reflecting the results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and proposed severe accident measures. Since the Seismic Design Guide has been revised on September 19, 2006, JNES has been discussing seismic PRA (Levels 1-3) methods to review licensees' residual risk assessment while preparing seismic PRA models. Meanwhile, new safety standards for light water reactors are to be issued and enforced on July 2013, which require the residual risk of tsunami, in addition to earthquakes, should be lowered as much as possible. The Fukushima accidents raised the problems related to risk assessment, e.g. approaches based on multi-hazard (earthquake and tsunami), multi-unit, multi-site, and equipment's common cause failure. This fiscal year, while performing seismic and/or tsunami PRA to work on these problems, JNES picked up the equipment whose failure greatly contribute to core damage, surveyed accident management measures on those equipment as well as effectiveness to reduce core damage probability. (author)

  14. Residues and world-sheet instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, Chris; Witten, Edward

    2003-01-01

    We reconsider the question of which Calabi-Yau compactifications of the heterotic string are stable under world-sheet instanton corrections to the effective space-time superpotential. For instance, compactifications described by (0; 2) linear sigma models are believed to be stable, suggesting a remarkable cancellation among the instanton effects in these theories. Here, we show that this cancellation follows directly from a residue theorem, whose proof relies only upon the right-moving world-sheet supersymmetries and suitable compactness properties of the (0; 2) linear sigma model. Our residue theorem also extends to a new class of 'half-linear' sigma models. Using these half-linear models, we show that heterotic compactifications on the quintic hypersurface in CP 4 for which the gauge bundle pulls back from a bundle on CP 4 are stable. Finally, we apply similar ideas to compute the superpotential contributions from families of membrane instantons in M-theory compactifications on manifolds of G 2 holonomy. (author)

  15. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-02

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  16. Managing woodwaste: Yield from residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, E. [LNS Services, Inc., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Rayner, S. [Pacific Waste Energy Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Historically, the majority of sawmill waste has been burned or buried for the sole purpose of disposal. In most jurisdictions, environmental legislation will prohibit, or render uneconomic, these practices. Many reports have been prepared to describe the forest industry`s residue and its environmental effect; although these help those looking for industry-wide or regional solutions, such as electricity generation, they have limited value for the mill manager, who has the on-hands responsibility for generation and disposal of the waste. If the mill manager can evaluate waste streams and break them down into their usable components, he can find niche market solutions for portions of the plant residue and redirect waste to poor/no-return, rather than disposal-cost, end uses. In the modern mill, residue is collected at the individual machine centre by waste conveyors that combine and mix sawdust, shavings, bark, etc. and send the result to the hog-fuel pile. The mill waste system should be analyzed to determine the measures that can improve the quality of residues and determine the volumes of any particular category before the mixing, mentioned above, occurs. After this analysis, the mill may find a niche market for a portion of its woodwaste.

  17. Residual stress in polyethylene pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poduška, Jan; Hutař, Pavel; Kučera, J.; Frank, A.; Sadílek, J.; Pinter, G.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, SEP (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polyethylene pipe * residual stress * ring slitting method * lifetime estimation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  18. Solow Residuals Without Capital Stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burda, Michael C.; Severgnini, Battista

    2014-01-01

    We use synthetic data generated by a prototypical stochastic growth model to assess the accuracy of the Solow residual (Solow, 1957) as a measure of total factor productivity (TFP) growth when the capital stock in use is measured with error. We propose two alternative measurements based on curren...

  19. Solidification process for sludge residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria

  20. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  1. Statistical deconvolution of enthalpic energetic contributions to MHC-peptide binding affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Michael GB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC Class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which forms an integral part of the adaptive immune response. Peptides are bound within a groove formed by the MHC heavy chain. Previous approaches to MHC Class I-peptide binding prediction have largely concentrated on the peptide anchor residues located at the P2 and C-terminus positions. Results A large dataset comprising MHC-peptide structural complexes was created by re-modelling pre-determined x-ray crystallographic structures. Static energetic analysis, following energy minimisation, was performed on the dataset in order to characterise interactions between bound peptides and the MHC Class I molecule, partitioning the interactions within the groove into van der Waals, electrostatic and total non-bonded energy contributions. Conclusion The QSAR techniques of Genetic Function Approximation (GFA and Genetic Partial Least Squares (G/PLS algorithms were used to identify key interactions between the two molecules by comparing the calculated energy values with experimentally-determined BL50 data. Although the peptide termini binding interactions help ensure the stability of the MHC Class I-peptide complex, the central region of the peptide is also important in defining the specificity of the interaction. As thermodynamic studies indicate that peptide association and dissociation may be driven entropically, it may be necessary to incorporate entropic contributions into future calculations.

  2. Radiation doses from residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Shunzo; Fujita, Shoichiro; Harley, John H.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter available data and calculations for assessing the exposure of survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs and persons who entered the cities after the bombings have been presented. It appears that it is possible to produce firm estimates only for external radiation and, while the internal contribution for long-lived fission products appears small, there is no way to evaluate potential exposures to the short-lived fission products. The radiation exposure in the most highly contaminated fallout area of a few hectares at Nishiyama, Nagasaki, is estimated as 20 to 40 R when integrated from one hour to infinity using a decay exponent of -1.2. For the Hiroshima Koi-Takasu area, the corresponding exposure is estimated as 1 to 3 R. The falloff with distance for Nagasaki is not steep and an exposure of one-fifth of the maximum is spread over an area of perhaps 1000 ha. With the assumption stated above, the potential maximum exposures to external radiation from induced radioactivity at the hypocenter is estimated to be about 80 R fir Hiroshima and 30 to 40 R for Nagasaki with the assumptions stated above. These exposures fall off with both time and distance. The cumulative exposure would be about one-third as large after a day and only a few percent after a week. The falloff with distance is less striking, but can be estimated from the areas listed or from the curves shown in Gritzner and Woolson. Unlike the fallout, which exposed individuals in their living areas, exposures to induced activity came from reentry of individuals into the area around the hypocenter. As an example, an individual entering the Hiroshima hypocenter area after one day and working 10 or 20 hours a day for a week would have been exposed to about 10 R. If the person had been working at a distance of 500 m, the exposure would have been about 1 R and, at 1000 m, about 20 mR. The exposure described apply to the specified areas in the two cities. Application of these values to individuals

  3. Residual heat removal system diagnostic advisor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) Diagnostic Advisor which is an expert system designed to alert the operators to abnormal conditions that exits in the RHRS and offer advice about the cause of the abnormal conditions. The Advisor uses a combination of rule-based and model-based diagnostic techniques to perform its functions. This diagnostic approach leads to a deeper understanding of the RHRS by the Advisor and consequently makes it more robust to unexpected conditions. The main window of the interactive graphic display is a schematic diagram of the RHRS piping system. When a conclusion about a failed component can be reached, the operator can bring up windows that describe the failure mode of the component and a brief explanation about how the Advisor arrived at its conclusion

  4. Radioactive material in residues of health services residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa R, A. Jr.; Recio, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The work presents the operational actions developed by the one organ responsible regulator for the control of the material use radioactive in Brazil. Starting from the appearance of coming radioactive material of hospitals and clinical with services of nuclear medicine, material that that is picked up and transported in specific trucks for the gathering of residuals of hospital origin, and guided one it manufactures of treatment of residuals of services of health, where they suffer radiological monitoring before to guide them for final deposition in sanitary embankment, in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The appearance of this radioactive material exposes a possible one violation of the norms that govern the procedures and practices in that sector in the country. (Author)

  5. Multiquark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk'yanov, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    To study multiquark interactions (MQI) the data of experiments confirming the presence of 3q, 6q, 12q states in interacting nuclear nucleons, in hadron- and lepton-nuclear processes at high energies and high momentum transfers are considered. Experimental data on cumulative processes pointing to the existence of MQI are analyzed. Two-channel model of a nucleus (the model of interacting nucleons) in the theory of coupled channels is discussed. The behaviour of form factor of deuteron and NQI (6q) contributions to ed scattering as well as deep inelastic scattering on nuclei are studied. The data known as EMC effect are discussed. It is pointed out that introduction of the notion MQI and consideration of a nucleus as a system of nucleons with a low MQI addition will help to explain such processes as cumulative reactions, form factors of a deuteron and light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering on nuclei

  6. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of 14 C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of ∼ 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA

  7. Influence of pH on pesticide sorption by soil containing wheat residue-derived char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Guangyao; Yang Yaning; Huang Minsheng; Yang Kai

    2005-01-01

    Field burning of crop residues incorporates resulting chars into soil and may thus influence the environmental fate of pesticides in the soil. This study evaluated the influence of pH on the sorption of diuron, bromoxynil, and ametryne by a soil in the presence and absence of a wheat residue-derived char. The sorption was measured at pHs ∼3.0 and ∼7.0. Wheat char was found to be a highly effective sorbent for the pesticides, and its presence (1% by weight) in soil contributed >70% to the pesticide sorption (with one exception). The sorption of diuron was not influenced by pH, due to its electroneutrality. Bromoxynil becomes dissociated at high pHs to form anionic species. Its sorption by soil and wheat char was lower at pH ∼7.0 than at pH ∼3.0, probably due to reduced partition of the anionic species of bromoxynil into soil organic matter and its weak interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Ametryne in its molecular form at pH ∼7.0 was sorbed by char-amended soil via partitioning into soil organic matter and interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Protonated ametryne at pH ∼3.0 was substantially sorbed by soil primarily via electrostatic forces. Sorption of protonated ametryne by wheat char was also significant, likely due not only to the interaction with the carbon surface but also to interactions with hydrated silica and surface functional groups of the char. Sorption of ametryne by char-amended soil at pH ∼3.0 was thus influenced by both the soil and the char. Environmental conditions may thus significantly influence the sorption and behavior of pesticides in agricultural soils containing crop residue-derived chars. - Wheat char was effective for adsorption of pesticides in soil, with efficacy varying with pH and particular pesticides

  8. Influence of pH on pesticide sorption by soil containing wheat residue-derived char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Guangyao [Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)]. E-mail: gsheng@uark.edu; Yang Yaning [Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Huang Minsheng [Department of Environmental Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang Kai [Department of Environmental Science and Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2005-04-01

    Field burning of crop residues incorporates resulting chars into soil and may thus influence the environmental fate of pesticides in the soil. This study evaluated the influence of pH on the sorption of diuron, bromoxynil, and ametryne by a soil in the presence and absence of a wheat residue-derived char. The sorption was measured at pHs {approx}3.0 and {approx}7.0. Wheat char was found to be a highly effective sorbent for the pesticides, and its presence (1% by weight) in soil contributed >70% to the pesticide sorption (with one exception). The sorption of diuron was not influenced by pH, due to its electroneutrality. Bromoxynil becomes dissociated at high pHs to form anionic species. Its sorption by soil and wheat char was lower at pH {approx}7.0 than at pH {approx}3.0, probably due to reduced partition of the anionic species of bromoxynil into soil organic matter and its weak interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Ametryne in its molecular form at pH {approx}7.0 was sorbed by char-amended soil via partitioning into soil organic matter and interaction with the carbon surface of the char. Protonated ametryne at pH {approx}3.0 was substantially sorbed by soil primarily via electrostatic forces. Sorption of protonated ametryne by wheat char was also significant, likely due not only to the interaction with the carbon surface but also to interactions with hydrated silica and surface functional groups of the char. Sorption of ametryne by char-amended soil at pH {approx}3.0 was thus influenced by both the soil and the char. Environmental conditions may thus significantly influence the sorption and behavior of pesticides in agricultural soils containing crop residue-derived chars. - Wheat char was effective for adsorption of pesticides in soil, with efficacy varying with pH and particular pesticides.

  9. The Energetics of Streptococcal Enolase Octamer Formation: The Quantitative Contributions of the Last Eight Amino Acids at the Carboxy-Terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A Kornblatt

    Full Text Available The enolase produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is a homo-octamer whose overall shape resembles that of a donut. The octamer is best described as a tetramer of dimers. As such, it contains two types of interfaces. The first is common to almost all enolases as most enolases that have been studied are dimers. The second is unique to the octamers and includes residues near the carboxy-terminus. The primary sequence of the enolase contains 435 residues with an added 19 as an N-terminal hexahistine tag. We have systematically truncated the carboxy-terminus, individually removing the first 8 residues. This gave rise to a series of eight structures containing respectively, 435, 434, 433, 432, 431, 430, 429 and 427 residues. The truncations cause the protein to gradually dissociate from octamers to enzymatically inactive monomers with very small amounts of intermediate tetramers and dimers. We have evaluated the contributions of the missing residues to the monomer/octamer equilibrium using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation and activity assays. For the dissociation reaction, octamer 8 monomer truncation of all eight C-terminal residues resulted in a diminution in the standard Gibbs energy of dissociation of about 59 kJ/mole of octamer relative to the full length protein. Considering that this change is spread over eight subunits, this translates to a change in standard Gibbs interaction energy of less than 8 kJ/mole of monomer distributed over the eight monomers. The resulting proteins, containing 434, 433, 432, 431, 430, 429 and 427 residues per monomer, showed intermediate free energies of dissociation. Finally, three other mutations were introduced into our reference protein to establish how they influenced the equilibrium. The main importance of this work is it shows that for homo-multimeric proteins a small change in the standard Gibbs interaction energy between subunits can have major physiological effects.

  10. Treatment and processing of residues of fermentation; Behandlung und Verwertung von Gaerrueckstaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doehler, H.; Schliebner, P. [Kuratorium fuer Technik und Bauwesen in der Landwirtschaft (KTBL), Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    With the transformation of the EEG (Renewable Energy Resources Act), the number of biogas plants increased rapidly. Additionally, an enlargement of the performance of the plants and a regional concentration process take place. Recently, processing routes for liquid manure will be considered in order to reduce problems of the surplus of nutrients as well as the costs of the transport of the water-rich residues of fermentation. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on procedures for the processing of residues of fermentation as well as costs and utilization of these procedures. By the example of an agrarian society, four procedures for the output and processing of residues of fermentation are compared with one another regarding to expenditure of work time, investments and economy: Output of residues of fermentation, treatment of residues of fermentation by separation, processing of residues of fermentation by means of diaphragm technology, processing of residues of fermentation by means of evaporation technology. The processing routes reduce the residues of fermentation by 60 %. Thus, the costs of output and the necessary storage capacities for residues of fermentation are reduced. Presently, no savings regarding to work completion by the processing of the residues of fermentation can be obtained. The specific total costs of the investigated procedures are between 2.64 Euro/m{sup 3} according to the procedure with separation and to 8.64 Euro/m{sup 3} according to the diaphragm processing route. An enhanced demand of investment does not cause compellingly the highest specific total costs of the procedures. In comparison to the output of residues of fermentation, the examined procedures for the processing of residues of fermentation do not result in economical and ergonomic advantages. The high costs of investment and operating cost of the processing of residues of fermentation cannot be compensated by the reduced costs of output

  11. The Yin and Yang of SagS: Distinct Residues in the HmsP Domain of SagS Independently Regulate Biofilm Formation and Biofilm Drug Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Jozef; Poudyal, Bandita

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of inherently drug-tolerant biofilms by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires the sensor-regulator hybrid SagS, with ΔsagS biofilms being unstructured and exhibiting increased antimicrobial susceptibility. Recent findings indicated SagS to function as a switch to control biofilm formation and drug tolerance independently. Moreover, findings suggested the periplasmic sensory HmsP domain of SagS is likely to be the control point in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm cells transitioning to a drug-tolerant state. We thus asked whether specific amino acid residues present in the HmsP domain contribute to the switch function of SagS. HmsP domain residues were therefore subjected to alanine replacement mutagenesis to identify substitutions that block the sensory function(s) of SagS, which is apparent by attached cells being unable to develop mature biofilms and/or prevent transition to an antimicrobial-resistant state. Mutant analyses revealed 32 residues that only contribute to blocking one sensory function. Moreover, amino acid residues affecting attachment and subsequent biofilm formation but not biofilm tolerance also impaired histidine kinase signaling via BfiS. In contrast, residues affecting biofilm drug tolerance but not attachment and subsequent biofilm formation negatively impacted BrlR transcription factor levels. Structure prediction suggested the two sets of residues affecting sensory functions are located in distinct areas that were previously described as being involved in ligand binding interactions. Taken together, these studies identify the molecular basis for the dual regulatory function of SagS. IMPORTANCE The membrane-bound sensory protein SagS plays a pivotal role in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and biofilm cells gaining their heightened resistance to antimicrobial agents, with SagS being the control point at which both pathways diverge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the two

  12. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, E.; Multigner, M.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  13. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frutos, E. [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L., E-mail: jlg@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  14. On machine surface to the unit event causing residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalama, R.M.; Mannanb, M.A.; Spowageca, A.

    2005-01-01

    Integrity and reduce overall costs. Within the framework of surface integrity investigations, special emphasis is given to the measurement of residual stresses because they contribute directly to premature failure of components. Since the highest residual stresses are to be found in surface layers, these deserve special attention when dealing with dynamically, heavily loaded machine parts such as gas turbine components used in aero engines. Of the many techniques available for the measurement of residual stresses, the most highly developed and widely used non-destructive method is based on X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, it is not possible to use this technique for inspection of all the components, since it is time consuming, complicated as well as expensive. In this paper, a method is being proposed that augments the XRD method but at the same time capable of inspecting all the components. A non-destructive, visual inspection technique has been developed that can correlate the characteristic features on the surface to the unit event causing the residual stress and the type of residual stress generated on the machined surface. Pictures of the machined surfaces have been taken using a digital video microscope at a magnification of 500 and the surface feature correlated to the unit event causing the residual stress. Sharp and well defined long grooves indicate that the plastic deformation is dominated by a mechanical unit event while appearance of streaks and small areas of smeared material indicate that the plastic deformation is dominated by a thermal unit event. These trends have been confirmed by measuring the residual stresses using XRD. The proposed technique is an attempt at establishing a simple methodology that would be useful to industries manufacturing aerospace and other components that require good surface integrity. (Author)

  15. Thermogravimetric investigation of the co-combustion between the pyrolysis oil distillation residue and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2016-10-01

    Co-combustion of lignite with distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The addition of distillation residue improved the reactivity and combustion efficiency of lignite, such as increasing the weight loss rate at peak temperature and decreasing the burnout temperature and the total burnout. With increasing distillation residue content in the blended fuels, the synergistic interactions between distillation residue and lignite firstly increased and then decreased during co-combustion stage. Results of XRF, FTIR, (13)C NMR and SEM analysis indicated that chemical structure, mineral components and morphology of samples have great influence on the synergistic interactions. The combustion mechanisms and kinetic parameters were calculated by the Coats Redfern model, suggesting that the lowest apparent activation energy (120.19kJ/mol) for the blended fuels was obtained by blending 60wt.% distillation residue during main co-combustion stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Cauchy method of residues

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrinović, Dragoslav S

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1, i. e. the monograph The Cauchy Method of Residues - Theory and Applications published by D. Reidel Publishing Company in 1984 is the only book that covers all known applications of the calculus of residues. They range from the theory of equations, theory of numbers, matrix analysis, evaluation of real definite integrals, summation of finite and infinite series, expansions of functions into infinite series and products, ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical and theoretical physics, to the calculus of finite differences and difference equations. The appearance of Volume 1 was acknowledged by the mathematical community. Favourable reviews and many private communications encouraged the authors to continue their work, the result being the present book, Volume 2, a sequel to Volume 1. We mention that Volume 1 is a revised, extended and updated translation of the book Cauchyjev raeun ostataka sa primenama published in Serbian by Nau~na knjiga, Belgrade in 1978, whereas the greater part ...

  17. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  18. Calcin