WorldWideScience

Sample records for residual collisions due

  1. Macro-residual strains due to cyclic loading of composites

    CERN Document Server

    Hashin, Z

    1999-01-01

    Macro-residual strains produced by load cycles on elastic-brittle composites are analytically expressed in terms of the effective thermal expansion coefficients of the composite as affected by the damage states developing during the $9 cycling. Limiting values of residual strain are evaluated for unidirectional fiber composites and cross-ply laminates. Frictional losses due to internal sliding are not considered. (17 refs).

  2. Ion heating due to rotation and collision in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, F.; Stern, R.A.; Skiff, F.; Hammel, B.A.; Tran, M.Q.; Paris, P.J.; Kohler, P.

    1986-01-01

    The E x B rotation and associated collisional ion heating of noble-gas magnetized plasmas are investigated with high resolution by means of laser-induced fluorescence and electrical probes. Plasma rotation results from a radial potential gradient which can be controlled by biasing of the discharge electrodes. The time and space evolution of the potential, the rotation velocity v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/, and the ion perpendicular temperature indicate that heating is due to the randomization of v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/ by ion-neutral collisions, and leads to temperature increases as high as a factor of 50 over initial values

  3. An instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spherical particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L; Bao, N; Jiang, Y; Han, K; Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    It universally exists in moving particular systems that particles can be electrified, in which the particles are chemically identical, just as toner particles, coal dust, and pharmaceutical powders. However, owing to the limit of experimental instruments, so far, there are yet no experiments to illustrate whether a particle can be electrified due to a single collision between two spherical particles, and there are also no experiments to measure the charge carried by a single particle due to a single collision between two particles. So we have developed an instrument for charge measurement due to a single collision between two spheres. The instrument consists of two-sphere collision device, collision charge measurement apparatus, and particles' trajectory tracking system. By using this instrument, we can investigate the collision contact electrification due to a single collision between two spheres and simultaneously record the moving trajectories of spheres after the collision to calculate the rebound angles to identify the contribution of the triboelectrification due to the rubbing between the contact surfaces and the collision contact electrification due to the normal pressure between the contact surfaces.

  4. Super-Penrose process due to collisions inside ergosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    If two particles collide inside the ergosphere, the energy in the center of mass frame can be made unbound provided at least one of particles has a large negative angular momentum [A. A. Grib and Yu. V. Pavlov, Europhys. Lett. 101 (2013) 20004]. We show that the same condition can give rise to unbounded Killing energy of debris at infinity, i.e. super-Penrose process. Proximity of the point of collision to the black hole horizon is not required.

  5. Heavy residue properties in intermediate energy nuclear collisions with gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1990-10-01

    We have measured the target fragment production cross sections and angular distributions for the interaction of 32, 44 and 93 MeV/nucleon argon, 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon krypton with gold. The fragment isobaric yield distributions, moving frame angular distributions and velocities have been deduced from these data. This fission cross section decreases with increasing projectile energy and the heavy residue cross section increases. The ratio v parallel /v cn increases approximately linearly with mass removed from the target. 21 refs., 8 figs

  6. Formation of large target residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.; Xu, Z.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1987-04-01

    We have used radiochemical techniques to measure the yields, angular distributions and velocity spectra of the large (A/sub frag/ ≥ 2/3 A/sub tgt/) target residues from the fragmentation of 197 Au by intermediate energy 12 C, 20 Ne, 32 S, 40 Ar, 84 Kr, and 139 La projectiles. The fragment moving frame angular distributions are asymmetric for the lighter projectiles (C-Ar). The fragment velocity spectra are Maxwellian for the Kr induced reactions and non-Maxwellian for the reactions induced by the lighter ions. We interpret these results in terms of a change in the dominant fragment production mechanism(s) from one(s) involving a fast non-equilibrium process for the lighter ions to a slow, equilibrium process for Kr. Comparison of the measured yields and angular distributions with calculations made using a Boltzmann transport equation with appropriate modifications for Pauli blocking, etc., show excellent agreement between data and theory. 12 refs., 12 figs

  7. Prediction of residual stress distributions due to surface machining and welding and crack growth simulation under residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Katsuyama, JInya; Onizawa, Kunio; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual stress distributions due to welding and machining are evaluated by XRD and FEM. → Residual stress due to machining shows higher tensile stress than welding near the surface. → Crack growth analysis is performed using calculated residual stress. → Crack growth result is affected machining rather than welding. → Machining is an important factor for crack growth. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the weld zone of the core shroud and primary loop recirculation (PLR) pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel Type 316L. The joining process of pipes usually includes surface machining and welding. Both processes induce residual stresses, and residual stresses are thus important factors in the occurrence and propagation of SCC. In this study, the finite element method (FEM) was used to estimate residual stress distributions generated by butt welding and surface machining. The thermoelastic-plastic analysis was performed for the welding simulation, and the thermo-mechanical coupled analysis based on the Johnson-Cook material model was performed for the surface machining simulation. In addition, a crack growth analysis based on the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculation was performed using the calculated residual stress distributions that are generated by welding and surface machining. The surface machining analysis showed that tensile residual stress due to surface machining only exists approximately 0.2 mm from the machined surface, and the surface residual stress increases with cutting speed. The crack growth analysis showed that the crack depth is affected by both surface machining and welding, and the crack length is more affected by surface machining than by welding.

  8. Broadening of Plasmonic Resonance Due to Electron Collisions with Nanoparticle Boundary: а Quantum Mechanical Consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    wavelength in the metal. The approach can be used in studies of plasmonic properties of both single nanoparticles and arrays of nanoparticles. Energy conservation is insured by a self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations and our model for the photon absorption at the metal boundaries. Consequences......We present a quantum mechanical approach to calculate broadening of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures due to collisions of electrons with the surface of the structure. The approach is applicable if the characteristic size of the structure is much larger than the de Broglie electron...... of the model are illustrated for the case of spheroid nanoparticles, and results are in good agreement with earlier theories. In particular, we show that the boundary-collision broadening of the plasmonic resonance in spheroid nanoparticles can depend strongly on the polarization of the impinging light....

  9. Evaluation of stress intensity factors due to welding residual stresses for circumferential cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang-Young; Kim, Yun-Jae; Oh, Young-Jin; Kim, Jong-Sung; Song, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Yong-Beum

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of existing methods to estimate stress intensity factors due to welding residual stresses, comparisons with finite element (FE) solutions are made for two types of generic welding residual stress profiles, generated by simulating repair welds. It is found that fitting residual stresses over the crack depth using third-order polynomials gives good estimates of stress intensity factors but fitting over the entire thickness can result in inaccurate estimates even with fourth-order polynomials. Noting that welding residual stresses are often determined from FE analyses, linearization of residual stresses to estimate stress intensity factors is proposed. Comparison with FE solutions shows good agreements. -- Highlights: ► Applicability of K estimation methods is investigated for welding residual stresses. ► Two types of generic residual stress profiles with repair welds are considered. ► Fitting residual stresses over the crack depth gives good estimates of K. ► A method to estimate K by linearising residual stress profiles is proposed

  10. Residual stress distribution of wheel tread for freight car due to aging effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seok-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Seo, Jung-Won; Kwon, Sung-Tae

    2010-03-01

    Recently, several wheels for freight car in running had experienced the wheel failure due to fatigue crack, overheat braking and other factors. Severe heating of the wheel during tread braking was believed to be a contributing factor of derailment. It is necessary to evaluate the residual stress in wheel tread in order to manage the safety of wheel. In the present paper, the residual stress of wheel regarding to running distance using x-ray diffraction system is investigated. The result shows that the residual stress of wheel is depend on the running distance, wear rate of wheel and thermal gradient during brake application.

  11. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  12. Computational Investigations of Rovibrational Quenching of HD due to Collisions in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman Veazey, Clark; Wan, Yier; Yang, Benhui H.; Stancil, P.

    2017-06-01

    When conducting an examination of distant astronomical objects, scientists rely on measurements derived from astronomical observations of these objects, which are primarily collected using spectroscopy. In order to interpret spectroscopic data collected on astronomical objects, it is necessary to have a background of accurate dynamical information on interstellar molecules at one’s disposal. Seeing as most of the observable infrared radiation in the universe is emitted by molecules excited by collisional processes in the interstellar gas, generating accurate data on the rate of molecular collisions is of salient interest to astronomical endeavors.The collisional system we will be focusing on here is He-HD, an atom-diatom system in which He collides with HD. We are primarily interested in the cooling capabilities of this system, as these species are predicted to have played an important role in the formation of primordial stars, which emerged from a background composed solely of Hydrogen, Helium, and their compounds. HD is being investigated because it has a finite dipole moment and is hence a powerful radiator, and He due to its relative abundance in the early universe. Using a hybrid OpenMP/MPI adaption (vrrm) of a public-domain scattering package, cross sections for He-HD collisions are computed for a swathe of both rotational and vibrational states across a range of relevant kinetic energies, then integrated to produce rate coefficients. Due to the vast computational requirements for performing these operations, the use of high-powered computational resources is necessary.The work of CV was funded by a UGA Center for Undergraduate Research Opportunities award. We thank the University of Georgia GACRC and NERSC at Lawrence-Berkeley for computational resources and Brendan McLaughlin for assistance.

  13. Formation of the residual stress due to the thermal treatment in Alloy 690 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Joung Soo

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the steam generator tubes made of Alloy 600 have suffered primary coolant leakage accidents due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The one of main reasons for the susceptibility to SCC is understood to be chromium (Cr) depletion in the grain boundary. Therefore, the precipitation of carbide is controlled by heat treatment in the final manufacturing stage. In order to investigate the formation reason of residual stress in the steam generator tube systematically, the tube specimens were cooled both at inside and at outside tube after heat treatment and the residual stress formed during water quenching was measured by strain gage using sectioning method

  14. Residual Stresses Due to Circumferential Girth Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarak, Farzan

    Welding, as a joining method in fabrication of engineering products and structural elements, has a direct influence on thermo-mechanical behavior of components in numerous structural applications. Since these thermo-mechanical behaviors have a major role in the life of welding components, predicting thermo-mechanical effects of welding is a major factor in designing of welding components. One of the major of these effects is generation of residual stresses due to welding. These residual stresses are not the causes of failure in the components solely, but they will add to external loads and stresses in operating time. Since, experimental methods are time consuming and expensive, computational simulation of welding process is an effective method to calculate these residual stresses. This investigation focuses on the evaluation of residual stresses and distortions due to circumferential girth welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes using the commercial finite element software ESI Visual-Environment and SYSWELDRTM to simulate welding process. Of particular importance is the comparison of results from three different types of mechanics models: 1) Axisymmetric, 2) Shell, and 3) Full 3-D.

  15. Corrosion failure due to flux residues in an electronic add-on device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Minzari, Daniel; Rathinavelu, Umadevi

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion of components and sub-assemblies on an electronic Printed Circuit Board Assembly (PCBA) is a major reliability concern. Both process and user related contamination will influence the corrosion reliability of a PCBA and the electronic device as a whole. An important process related...... contamination is solder flux residues which can act as a corrosion promoter in humid atmosphere due to the presence of ionic substances and a resin component. The presence of ionic substances will increase the conductivity of a condensed water layer and influence corrosion processes, depending on the species...... of the electrochemical behavior metallic materials (alloys) used in the switch and risk of electrochemical migration (ECM) between the switch components in presence of flux residues was also carried out. Investigations included potentiodynamic polarization measurements on the switch electrodes using a micro...

  16. Rb-129Xe spin-exchange rates due to binary and three-body collisions at high Xe pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, G.D.; Fitzgerald, R.J.; Barton, A.S.; Bogorad, P.; Gatzke, M.; Newbury, N.R.; Saam, B.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the spin relaxation of 129 Xe nuclei due to collisions with Rb atoms at Xe pressures of 245--1817 Torr. Our results can be characterized by two parameters, the Rb- 129 Xe velocity-averaged binary spin-exchange cross section left-angle σv right-angle and a rate γ M that characterizes spin relaxation due to van der Waals molecules. Our results complement earlier studies performed at Xe pressures of about 1 Torr and N 2 pressures of 10--100 Torr. This work is useful for predicting spin-exchange rates between polarized Rb atoms and 129 Xe nuclei

  17. Continental collision slowing due to viscous mantle lithosphere rather than topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marin Kristen

    2012-02-29

    Because the inertia of tectonic plates is negligible, plate velocities result from the balance of forces acting at plate margins and along their base. Observations of past plate motion derived from marine magnetic anomalies provide evidence of how continental deformation may contribute to plate driving forces. A decrease in convergence rate at the inception of continental collision is expected because of the greater buoyancy of continental than oceanic lithosphere, but post-collisional rates are less well understood. Slowing of convergence has generally been attributed to the development of high topography that further resists convergent motion; however, the role of deforming continental mantle lithosphere on plate motions has not previously been considered. Here I show that the rate of India's penetration into Eurasia has decreased exponentially since their collision. The exponential decrease in convergence rate suggests that contractional strain across Tibet has been constant throughout the collision at a rate of 7.03 × 10(-16) s(-1), which matches the current rate. A constant bulk strain rate of the orogen suggests that convergent motion is resisted by constant average stress (constant force) applied to a relatively uniform layer or interface at depth. This finding follows new evidence that the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet is intact, which supports the interpretation that the long-term strain history of Tibet reflects deformation of the mantle lithosphere. Under conditions of constant stress and strength, the deforming continental lithosphere creates a type of viscous resistance that affects plate motion irrespective of how topography evolved.

  18. Chirped Auger electron emission due to field-assisted post-collision interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonitz M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the Auger decay in the temporal domain by applying a terahertz streaking light field. Xenon and krypton atoms were studied by implementing the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH as well as a source of high-order harmonic radiation combined with terahertz pulses from an optical rectification source. The observed linewidth asymmetries in the streaked spectra suggest a chirped Auger electron emission which is understood in terms of field-assisted post-collision interaction. The experimentally obtained results agree well with model calculations.

  19. Prediction of Collision Cross-Section Values for Small Molecules: Application to Pesticide Residue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Bade, Richard; Celma, Alberto; Mullin, Lauren; Cleland, Gareth; Stead, Sara; Hernandez, Felix; Sancho, Juan V

    2017-06-20

    The use of collision cross-section (CCS) values obtained by ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry has added a third dimension (alongside retention time and exact mass) to aid in the identification of compounds. However, its utility is limited by the number of experimental CCS values currently available. This work demonstrates the potential of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of CCS values of pesticides. The predictor, based on eight software-chosen molecular descriptors, was optimized using CCS values of 205 small molecules and validated using a set of 131 pesticides. The relative error was within 6% for 95% of all CCS values for protonated molecules, resulting in a median relative error less than 2%. In order to demonstrate the potential of CCS prediction, the strategy was applied to spinach samples. It notably improved the confidence in the tentative identification of suspect and nontarget pesticides.

  20. Canadian Estimate of Bird Mortality Due to Collisions and Direct Habitat Loss Associated with Wind Turbine Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan. Zimmerling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated impacts on birds from the development and operation of wind turbines in Canada considering both mortality due to collisions and loss of nesting habitat. We estimated collision mortality using data from carcass searches for 43 wind farms, incorporating correction factors for scavenger removal, searcher efficiency, and carcasses that fell beyond the area searched. On average, 8.2 ± 1.4 birds (95% C.I. were killed per turbine per year at these sites, although the numbers at individual wind farms varied from 0 - 26.9 birds per turbine per year. Based on 2955 installed turbines (the number installed in Canada by December 2011, an estimated 23,300 birds (95% C.I. 20,000 - 28,300 would be killed from collisions with turbines each year. We estimated direct habitat loss based on data from 32 wind farms in Canada. On average, total habitat loss per turbine was 1.23 ha, which corresponds to an estimated total habitat loss due to wind farms nationwide of 3635 ha. Based on published estimates of nest density, this could represent habitat for ~5700 nests of all species. Assuming nearby habitats are saturated, and 2 adults displaced per nest site, effects of direct habitat loss are less than that of direct mortality. Installed wind capacity is growing rapidly, and is predicted to increase more than 10-fold over the next 10-15 years, which could lead to direct mortality of approximately 233,000 birds / year, and displacement of 57,000 pairs. Despite concerns about the impacts of biased correction factors on the accuracy of mortality estimates, these values are likely much lower than those from collisions with some other anthropogenic sources such as windows, vehicles, or towers, or habitat loss due to many other forms of development. Species composition data suggest that < 0.2% of the population of any species is currently affected by mortality or displacement from wind turbine development. Therefore, population level impacts are unlikely

  1. Risk for the development of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) due to feeding of calves with milk containing residues of antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, A.; Allende, A.; Bolton, D.; Chemaly, M.; Davies, R.; Fernández Escámez, P.S.; Girones, R.; Koutsoumanis, K.; Lindqvist, R.; Nørrung, B.; Robertson, I.; Ru, G.; Sanaa, M.; Simmons, M.; Skandamis, P.; Snary, E.; Speybroeck, N.; ter Kuile, B.; Threlfall, J.; Wahlström, H.; Bengtsson, B.; Bouchard, D.; Randall, L.; Tenhagen, B.A.; Verdon, E.; Wallace, J.; Brozzi, R.; Guerra, B.; Liebana, E.; Stella, P.; Herman, L.

    2017-01-01

    EFSA was requested to: 1) assess the risk for the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) due to feeding on farm of calves with colostrum potentially containing residues of antibiotics; 2) assess the risk for the development of AMR due to feeding on farm of calves with milk of cows treated

  2. Interseismic Deformation due to Oblique India-Sunda Collision: Implications for the Arakan Sleeping Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, R.; Lindsey, E. O.; Feng, L.; Hubbard, J.; Hill, E.

    2017-12-01

    The northern extent of the collision of the Indian and Sunda plates occurs along the Arakan megathrust. This collision is oblique, and at least two large strike-slip faults, the Sagaing Fault and the Churachandpur-Mao Fault (CMF) accommodate part of this obliquity. The megathrust is conspicuous in its lack of notable interplate earthquakes in the instrumental catalogue; it has even been called aseismic by some authors and suggested not to accumulate any elastic strain. Nevertheless, geological evidence from the great 1762 Arakan earthquake suggests that the megathrust is capable of producing M 8 and possibly tsunamigenic events that can adversely affect the lives of many millions of people living in the region. We present for the first time a new dataset of GPS rates from the MIBB (Myanmar-India-Bangladesh-Bhutan) cGPS network (2011-present), which consists of region-wide east-west and north-south profiles. We use a Bayesian framework to explore the fault geometry (locking depth and fault dip) and relative plate motion that can reproduce the pattern of east-west convergence in both previously published and our own GPS data. We explore the individual contributions of the megathrust, CMF, Sagaing Fault, and block rotation to dextral shearing across the Indo-Burman ranges and further east. Our results suggest that the total convergence rate across the foldbelt is 14-18 mm/yr, while the total dextral shearing rate is 40 mm/yr. Rotation of the crustal sliver between the two major plates may explain some of this dextral motion, while reducing the strike-slip rates on the intervening faults. We show that given the current network geometry we are most sensitive to the location of maximum strain, i.e., the depth and distance from the trench below which the megathrust slides freely. Our results show that the megathrust is stably sliding below a depth of 30 km, but the seismogenic potential of the shallow megathrust and splay faults that possibly sole into the same system

  3. Measurement methodology of vegetable samples from an area affected by residual contamination due to uranium mining sterile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, N.; Suarez, J. A.; Yague, L.; Ortiz Gandia, M. I.; Marijuan, M. J.; Garcia, E.; Ortiz, T.; Alvarez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology established for radiological characterization of plant material generated during the first stage of the realization of a movement of land in an area of land affected by residual contamination due to the burial of sterile of uranium mining. (Author)

  4. [Residues of tetracycline in poultry meat and eggs due to the use of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkova, N V

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on broiler chicks and laying hens have indicated that increased drug loads (the prolonged oral use of oxytetracycline hydrochloride in a dose of 50 mg/kg or the single administration of its long-acting formulation--nitox in a dose of 200 mg/kg) lead to the accumulation of residues in the poultry flesh, by-products, and eggs even provided that the poultry exposure schedule before slaughtering is kept. The highest levels of the antibiotic are detectable at the site of injection and in the eggs after injection of nitox, a long-acting formulation of tetracycline. The detection of the residues of the antibiotic in the poultry flesh, by-products, and eggs may be associated with the development of cytotoxic effects and with the reduced functional capacities of the organs that are responsible for the detoxification and excretion of medicinal xenobiotics.

  5. Environmental Impacts to Residual Stand Damage due to Logging Operations in Hyrcanian Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Meghdad JOURGHOLAMI

    2012-01-01

    The development of harvesting systems aims to provide physically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally sound solutions. Residual stand-damage data have been collected from a mixed broadleaved stand in Kheyrud area in Hyrcanian forest in the northern of Iran. After the harvesting operations, for all trees, damage to the bole, roots, extent of the damage, wounding patterns, size and distribution was assessed using stratified systematic sampling with a random start and fixed area pl...

  6. Vibrational excitation in molecule--surface collisions due to temporary negative molecular ion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadzuk, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from gaseous and physisorbed diatomic molecules results in greatly enhanced vibrational overtone excitation if the incident electron has the appropriate energy to form a shape-resonance-induced temporary negative molecular ion. It is proposed here that due to the image potential lowering of the electron affinity level of a diatomic molecule in interaction with a metal surface, somewhere outside the surface an incident molecule would find its affinity level degenerate with or lower than the substrate Fermi level at which point a substrate electron could hop onto the molecule, in analogy with gas phase harpooning processes. A negative molecular ion is thus formed which remains until the molecular ion reflects from the surface and the affinity level rises above the Fermi level, thus permitting reverse electron hopping back into the metal. The lifetime of the molecular ion can be controlled by varying both the kinetic energy of the incident molecule and also the substrate work function. In analogy with the electron scattering events, greatly enhanced vibrational excitation of overtones is expected in the molecules of the scattered beam. Induced fluorescence probing of the vibrational state distribution should then yield fundamental information pertaining to the dynamics of charge transfer reactions and nonadiabatic effects in molecule--surface interactions. A theory of this phenomenon is here presented together with the numerical consequences for a model system designed to simulate N 2 or NO scattering from standard surface science metal surfaces

  7. Proper preparation to reduce endoscopic reexamination due to food residue after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Bae, Sue Eun; Jung, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Mi-Young; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho; Han, Seungbong

    2013-03-01

    Reducing food residue by proper preparation methods before endoscopy after distal gastrectomy can increase the quality of examination and decrease patient discomfort. We evaluated the risk factors for food residue and proper methods of preparation for endoscopy after distal gastrectomy. Follow-up endoscopy with questionnaires was performed on 1,001 patients who underwent distal gastrectomy at Asan Medical Center between December 2010 and July 2011. Endoscopic examination failed in 94 patients (9.4 %) as a result of large amounts of food residue. Rates of failure were significantly higher in patients who ate a regular diet rather than a soft diet at last dinner before examination (13.9 vs. 6.1 %, p = 0.050), and in those who ate lunch rather than not eating lunch on the day before examination (14.6 vs. 7.7 %, p = 0.020). Multivariate analysis showed that the rate of failed examination was lower in patients who had a history of abdominal surgery (p = 0.011), those who ate a soft (p fasting time (p = 0.009), and those with a longer gastrectomy-to-endoscopy time interval (p fast more than 18 h and ingest a soft or liquid diet on the day before examination.

  8. Structural transformations in Mn2NiGa due to residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sanjay; Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.; Ranjan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Powder x-ray diffraction study of Mn 2 NiGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy shows the existence of a 7M monoclinic modulated structure at room temperature (RT). The structure of Mn 2 NiGa is found to be highly dependent on residual stress. For higher stress, the structure is tetragonal at RT, and for intermediate stress it is 7M monoclinic. However, only when the stress is considerably relaxed, the structure is cubic, as is expected at RT since the martensitic transition temperature is 230 K.

  9. Environmental Impacts to Residual Stand Damage due to Logging Operations in Hyrcanian Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghdad JOURGHOLAMI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of harvesting systems aims to provide physically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally sound solutions. Residual stand-damage data have been collected from a mixed broadleaved stand in Kheyrud area in Hyrcanian forest in the northern of Iran. After the harvesting operations, for all trees, damage to the bole, roots, extent of the damage, wounding patterns, size and distribution was assessed using stratified systematic sampling with a random start and fixed area plots. Results show that wounding occurred on 16.4% of the remaining trees, but the severity of wounding varied significantly by species. Forty-six percent of wounding for all species combined was considered as small size. The greatest average amount of damage, to a bole, occurred along the first 1m up from the ground and also within 3m of the skid trail centerline (86.4%. Gouges were present on 79% of all scars. The stratification of the study unit would effectively improve accuracy of stand damage surveys. Selection of the appropriate method for damage reduction to trees adjacent skid trails was crucial. According to the results, skidding damage cannot be completely avoided in practice. We suggest that the education and the entertainment of the foresters and workers in forest would be enhanced and the injuries could be explained before the harvesting to the workers. In such a way the damages would be less in the future.

  10. Avian mortalities due to transmission line collisions: a review of current estimates and field methods with an emphasis on applications to the Canadian electric network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rioux

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Birds are vulnerable to collisions with human-made fixed structures. Despite ongoing development and increases in infrastructure, we have few estimates of the magnitude of collision mortality. We reviewed the existing literature on avian mortality associated with transmission lines and derived an initial estimate for Canada. Estimating mortality from collisions with power lines is challenging due to the lack of studies, especially from sites within Canada, and due to uncertainty about the magnitude of detection biases. Detection of bird collisions with transmission lines varies due to habitat type, species size, and scavenging rates. In addition, birds can be crippled by the impact and subsequently die, although crippling rates are poorly known and rarely incorporated into estimates. We used existing data to derive a range of estimates of avian mortality associated with collisions with transmission lines in Canada by incorporating detection, scavenging, and crippling biases. There are 231,966 km of transmission lines across Canada, mostly in the boreal forest. Mortality estimates ranged from 1 million to 229.5 million birds per year, depending on the bias corrections applied. We consider our most realistic estimate, taking into account variation in risk across Canada, to range from 2.5 million to 25.6 million birds killed per year. Data from multiple studies across Canada and the northern U.S. indicate that the most vulnerable bird groups are (1 waterfowl, (2 grebes, (3 shorebirds, and (4 cranes, which is consistent with other studies. Populations of several groups that are vulnerable to collisions are increasing across Canada (e.g., waterfowl, raptors, which suggests that collision mortality, at current levels, is not limiting population growth. However, there may be impacts on other declining species, such as shorebirds and some species at risk, including Alberta's Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator and western Canada's endangered Whooping

  11. A finite element elastic-plastic analysis of residual stresses due to clad welding in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalet, C.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    Residual stresses due to weld deposited cladding on the inside of a typical Westinghouse pressurized water reactor vessel are investigated using an axisymmetric finite element elastic-plastic analysis. At the beginning of the analysis, one head of the weld cladding is assumed to lie on the reactor vessel wall at melting temperature (2600degF), but in the solid phase, while the vessel remains at 300degF (preheat temperature). All material properties used in the calculations are taken as temperature-dependent. Temperature profiles are obtained in the cladding and base metal at several discrete time intervals. These temperatures profiles are used to obtain the stress distribution for the same time intervals. Residual hoop tensile stresses of approximately 25 ksi were found to exist in the cladding. Peak tensile stresses in the hoop direction occur in the base metal near the cladding interface and reach a value of 60 ksi at the end of the transient. The tensile stress decreases very rapidly through the thickness of the base metal and becomes insignificant at about two inches from the inside surface. In order to lower residual stresses, a post-weld heat treatment is performed by uniformly heating the vessel to 1100degF, holding at that temperature for a specified period of time and then cooling slowly. The analysis shows that after this treatment, the peak stresses in the base metal decrease from 60 ksi to 32 ksi, while the stress in the cladding does not change significantly. (author)

  12. Erythema Multiforme-like Secondary to Paraphenylenediamine Due to Henna Tattoo Plus Residual Hypopigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levancini, Cristian Fischer; Sancho, Maribel Iglesias; Serrano, Vicente Exposito; Torres, Eulalia Baselga

    2015-01-01

    Temporary henna tattoos or pseudotattoos have become increasingly widespread among children and adolescent. A generalized skin reaction, type erythema multiforme-like reaction is unusual, and rarely reported. We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy who reported erythematous papular bull's-eye shaped lesions and consolidated edema primarily in the upper and lower extremities. These lesions were compatibles with erythema multiforme-like reaction. He also showed an erythematous-eczematous lesion on his leg, shaped like a dolphin. In this area, a temporary henna tattoo was painted 1-month earlier. Patch test was positive for paraphenylenediamine (PPD). Skin reactions due to henna are rare. Most of the reactions are due to additives, especially PPD, an aniline derivative, which is added to speed up the process of skin dyeing and to give a darker brown to black color ("black" henna). As henna tattoos are becoming increasingly popular, prevention requires the annual provision of information to consumers, especially young people and their parents.

  13. Catalyst deactivation due to deposition of reaction products in macropores during hydroprocessing of petroleum residuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, S.J.; Mosby, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    A pore-filling model is proposed to describe deactivation of hydroprocessing catalysts of a wide-pore structure in well-mixed and plug-flow reactors where the catalyst pellets are deactivated due to slow and uniform deposition of reaction products (mostly metal compounds) in their macropores. The model based on no mass-transfer restriction in the main channels of the pores incorporates additional active sites created by metal compounds in the deposited layers and has been shown to have two parameters of the similar type of the Thiele modulus. The model along with lumped reaction kinetics is applied for hydroprocessing reactions in trickle-bed reactors and provides reasonable deactivation curves for desulfurization and demetallation reaction when less than 50% of the original pore volume is filled with metal compounds.

  14. Evaluation of dose due to the liberation of the radioactive content present in systems of final disposal of radioactive residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, V.; Lopez, F.

    2006-01-01

    The disposal systems of radioactive residuals well-known as repositories near to the surface, are used to dispose residuals that can contain high concentrations of radionuclides of period of short semi disintegration, which they would decay at levels radiologically insignificant in some few decades or in some centuries: and acceptably low concentrations of radionuclides of period of long semi disintegration. The dose that would receive the critic group due to these systems it could be increased by cause of discreet events that affect the foreseen retard time, or by the gradual degradation of the barriers. To this last case it contributes the presence of water, because it implies leaching and dissolution that can give place to radionuclide concentrations in the underground water greater to the prospective ones. The dosimetric evaluation is important because it offers useful objective information to decide if a given repository is adjusted to the purposes of its design and it fulfills the regulatory requirements. In this work a simplified evaluation of the dose that would receive the critic group due to the liberation of contained radionuclides in a hypothetical system of final disposition of radioactive residuals is presented. For it, they are considered representative values of the usually contained activities in this type of systems and they are carried out some approaches of the source term. The study is developed in two stages. In the first one, by means of the Radionuclide pollutant scattering pattern in phreatic aquifers (DRAF) it is considered the scattering of the pollutants in the phreatic aquifer, until the discharge point in the course of the nearest surface water. This model, developed originally in the regulatory branch of the National Commission of Argentine Atomic Energy (CNEA); it solves the transport equation of solutes in porous means in three dimensions, by the finite differences method having in account the soil retention and the radioactive

  15. Inelastic collision of two solitons for generalized BBM equation with cubic nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingdong Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the inelastic collision of two solitary waves of different velocities for the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM equation with cubic nonlinearity. It shows that one solitary wave is smaller than the other one in the H^1(R energy space. We explore the sharp estimates of the nonzero residue due to the collision, and prove the inelastic collision of two solitary waves and nonexistence of a pure 2-soliton solution.

  16. Isotopic production cross sections of fission residues in 197Au-on-proton collisions at 800 A MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlliure, J.; Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.

    2000-02-01

    Interactions of 197 Au projectiles at 800 A MeV with protons leading to fission are investigated. We measured the production cross sections and velocities of all fission residues which are fully identified in atomic and mass number by using the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The new data are compared with partial measurements of the characteristics of fission in similar reactions. Both the production cross sections and the recoil energies are relevant for a better understanding of spallation reactions. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of nuclide cross-sections of spallation residues in 1 A GeV 238U + proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taieb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Rejmund, F.; Stephan, C.; Schmidt, K.H.; Armbruster, P.; Benlliure, J.; Enqvist, T.; Boudard, A.; Legrain, R.; Leray, S.; Volant, C.; Wlazlo, W.; Casarejos, E.; Czajkowski, S.; Pravikoff, M.

    2003-02-01

    The production of heavy nuclides from the spallation-evaporation reaction of 238 U induced by 1 GeV protons was studied in inverse kinematics. The evaporation residues from tungsten to uranium were identified in-flight in mass and atomic number. Their production cross-sections and their momentum distributions were determined. The data are compared with empirical systematics. A comparison with previous results from the spallation of 208 Pb and 197 Au reveals the strong influence of fission in the spallation of 238 U. (orig.)

  18. Model parameter estimations from residual gravity anomalies due to simple-shaped sources using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Balkaya, Çağlayan; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Turan, Seçil

    2016-06-01

    An efficient approach to estimate model parameters from residual gravity data based on differential evolution (DE), a stochastic vector-based metaheuristic algorithm, has been presented. We have showed the applicability and effectiveness of this algorithm on both synthetic and field anomalies. According to our knowledge, this is a first attempt of applying DE for the parameter estimations of residual gravity anomalies due to isolated causative sources embedded in the subsurface. The model parameters dealt with here are the amplitude coefficient (A), the depth and exact origin of causative source (zo and xo, respectively) and the shape factors (q and ƞ). The error energy maps generated for some parameter pairs have successfully revealed the nature of the parameter estimation problem under consideration. Noise-free and noisy synthetic single gravity anomalies have been evaluated with success via DE/best/1/bin, which is a widely used strategy in DE. Additionally some complicated gravity anomalies caused by multiple source bodies have been considered, and the results obtained have showed the efficiency of the algorithm. Then using the strategy applied in synthetic examples some field anomalies observed for various mineral explorations such as a chromite deposit (Camaguey district, Cuba), a manganese deposit (Nagpur, India) and a base metal sulphide deposit (Quebec, Canada) have been considered to estimate the model parameters of the ore bodies. Applications have exhibited that the obtained results such as the depths and shapes of the ore bodies are quite consistent with those published in the literature. Uncertainty in the solutions obtained from DE algorithm has been also investigated by Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) sampling algorithm based on simulated annealing without cooling schedule. Based on the resulting histogram reconstructions of both synthetic and field data examples the algorithm has provided reliable parameter estimations being within the sampling limits of

  19. Residues of sulfadiazine and doxycycline in broiler liver and muscle tissue due to cross-contamination of feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberge, V; Delezie, E; Huyghebaert, G; Delahaut, P; Daeseleire, E; Croubels, S

    2012-01-01

    Veterinary drugs, such as antimicrobial compounds, are widely used in poultry and may lead to the presence of residues in matrices of animal origin, such as muscle and liver tissue. In this study, broilers received an experimental feed containing sulfadiazine or doxycycline at cross-contamination levels of 2.5, 5 and 10% of the therapeutic dose in feed. Breast and thigh muscle and liver samples were collected during treatment and depletion period and analysed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Concentrations reached a plateau phase 3-5 days after the start of experimental feeding. A rapid depletion of residues was noted after withdrawal of the experimental feed. No significant differences in measured concentrations were observed between the various muscle types. Residue concentrations for some experimental groups; the 10% group of sulfadiazine and the 5 and 10% group of doxycycline, however, exceeded their corresponding maximum residue limits (MRLs).

  20. Measurement methodology of vegetable samples from an area affected by residual contamination due to uranium mining sterile; Metodologia de medida de muestras vegetales procedentes de un terreno afectado por contaminacion residual debida a esteriles de mineria de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, N.; Suarez, J. A.; Yague, L.; Ortiz Gandia, M. I.; Marijuan, M. J.; Garcia, E.; Ortiz, T.; Alvarez, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology established for radiological characterization of plant material generated during the first stage of the realization of a movement of land in an area of land affected by residual contamination due to the burial of sterile of uranium mining. (Author)

  1. Numerical modeling of residual stresses generation due to 316L turning. A new experimental and numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiorgue, F.

    2008-12-01

    The main goal of this thesis proposed by AREVA NP is to predict the residual stresses induced by finishing turning of AISI 316L. The numerical model is simulating the residual stresses generation with a new approach by applying directly equivalent thermo-mechanical loadings onto the finished work piece surface without modeling the chip removal process. Thus, this study is divided in two complementary main subsections. On one hand, an experimental campaign is carried out to record data and to compute thermomechanical loadings. This task is made using the AREVA NP parameters. On the other hand numerical models are set up using previous measured values. They are made to reproduce the residual stresses generation by applying and moving the thermo mechanical loadings. The study leads to interesting results because the shapes of the residual stresses curves agree with previous works concerning this topic and with XRD measured residual stresses. The new approach seems to be pertinent because it is possible to simulate several tool passages like no other numerical model. (author)

  2. 3-D numerical evaluation of residual stress and deformation due welding process using simplified heat source models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslampanah, Amir Hossein [Islamic Azad University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aalami-aleagha, Mohammad Ebrahim; Feli, Saeid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaderi, Mohammad Reza [Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Thermal elastic-plastic finite element method has been employed to predict residual stress and deformation in a T-Fillet welded joint. An uncoupled thermal-mechanical three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed. A nonlinear-transient heat flow analysis was used to obtain the temperature distribution; then by applying thermal results in the three dimensional elastic-plastic model, residual stress and deformation distribution were obtained. Experiments were carried out to find fusion zone dimensions and displacement. Two heat source models with infinite speed are proposed and the mechanical result of the mentioned models and normal moving heat source are compared.

  3. Barotropic Eulerian residual circulation in the Gulf of California due to the M{sub 2} tide and wind stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argote, M. L.; Lavin, M. F.; Amador, A. [Departamento de Oceanografia Fisica, CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    A vertically integrated, non-linear numerical model in finite differences is used to analyze two forcing mechanisms of the mean barotropic circulation in the Gulf of California: topographic rectification due to tidal currents (M{sub 2}) and wind stress. Under tidal forcing the nonlinearities of the momentum equations induce unorganized strong tidal induced residual currents (u{sub e} > 5 cm s{sup -}1) in the channels between the islands, and along-isobath anticyclonic circulation in the Northern Gulf, with speeds u{sub 3} < 2.5 cm s{sup -}1 over the edge of Delfin Basin. These numerical results are in agreement with analytical results, which indicate that the tidal-induced currents are mostly due to the advective terms, and that continuity and the Coriolis term (but regulated by bottom friction) are responsible for the along-isobath flow. The quadratic bottom friction plays a role in generating mean currents only in the very shallow area off the Colorado River Delta. The effect of wind stress was modeled by imposing upon the running M{sub 2} model a constant surface stress ( r = 0.016 Pa), from the NW for winter conditions and from the SE for summer conditions. The wind-induced circulation was obtained by averaging over a tidal cycle and then subtracting the tidal residuals. The two wind directions produce almost identical circulation patterns, but with opposite directions. For the NW wind stress, the main features of the predicted circulation are: (a) In the Northern Gulf an anticyclonic circulation pattern, with the strongest currents (up to {approx} 10 cm s-1) following the bathymetry of the rim of Delfin Basin, Wagner Basin and the mainland coast off Bahia Adair and Bahia San Jorge. There is also a southward flow along the peninsula coast, from the Colorado River to Bahia San Luis Gonzaga. (b) In the Southern Gulf, there is a strong flow ({approx} 10 to 15 cm s{sup -}1) to the SE over the continental shelf along the mainland coast. A somewhat less well

  4. Seebeck Changes Due to Residual Cold-Work and Reversible Effects in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most commonly used thermocouple for industrial measurements because of their low cost, wide temperature range, and durability. As with all base-metal thermocouples, Type K is made to match a mathematical temperature-to-emf relationship and not a prescribed alloy formulation. Because different manufacturers use varying alloy formulations and manufacturing techniques, different Type K thermocouples exhibit a range of drift and hysteresis characteristics, largely due to ordering effects in the positive (K+) thermoelement. In this study, these effects are assessed in detail for temperatures below 700°C in the Type K wires from nine manufacturers. A linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner combined with the judicious use of annealing processes allow measurements that separately identify the effects of cold-work, ordering, and oxidation to be made. The results show most K+ alloys develop significant errors, but the magnitudes of the contributions of each process vary substantially between the different K+ wires. In practical applications, the measurement uncertainties achievable with Type K therefore depend not only on the wire formulation but also on the temperature, period of exposure, and, most importantly, the thermal treatments prior to use.

  5. Effect of collective response on the X-ray emission due to electron capture in high energy bare ion collisions with fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Singh, Y.P.; Misra, D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C. E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.in

    2003-05-01

    Electron capture by bare S ions was studied in collision with C{sub 60} and gas targets. The Lyman X-rays from the projectile were detected. It is observed that the intensity ratios of different Lyman X-ray lines in collisions with C{sub 60} are substantially lower than that for the gas targets. An attempt is made to explain this observation as a 'solid-like' effect, namely, wake field induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture.

  6. Comparative analysis among deterministic and stochastic collision damage models for oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Campanile

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of collision damage models on oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability is investigated considering the IACS deterministic model against GOALDS/IMO database statistics for collision events, substantiating the probabilistic model. Statistical properties of hull girder residual strength are determined by Monte Carlo simulation, based on random generation of damage dimensions and a modified form of incremental-iterative method, to account for neutral axis rotation and equilibrium of horizontal bending moment, due to cross-section asymmetry after collision events. Reliability analysis is performed, to investigate the incidence of collision penetration depth and height statistical properties on hull girder sagging/hogging failure probabilities. Besides, the incidence of corrosion on hull girder residual strength and reliability is also discussed, focussing on gross, hull girder net and local net scantlings, respectively. The ISSC double hull oil tanker and single side bulk carrier, assumed as test cases in the ISSC 2012 report, are taken as reference ships.

  7. INTERVENTIONS TO MANAGE RESIDUAL LIMB ULCERATION DUE TO PROSTHETIC USE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH LOWER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION:A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Kahle, Jason T; Klenow, Tyler D; Andrews, Casey R; Lewis, Katherine L; Bradley, Rachel C; Ward, Jessica M; Orriola, John J; Highsmith, James T

    2016-09-01

    Patients with lower extremity amputation (LEA) experience 65% more dermatologic issues than non-amputees, and skin problems are experienced by ≈75% of LEA patients who use prostheses. Continuously referring LEA patients to a dermatologist for every stump related skin condition may be impractical. Thus, physical rehabilitation professionals should be prepared to recognize and manage common non-emergent skin conditions in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine the quantity, quality, and strength of available evidence supporting treatment methods for prosthesis-related residual limb (RL) ulcers. Systematic literature review with evidence grading and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES) was employed. Three EESs were formulated describing ulcer etiology, conditions in which prosthetic continuance is practical, circumstances likely requiring prosthetic discontinuance, and the consideration of additional medical or surgical interventions. Continued prosthetic use is a viable option to manage minor or early-stage ulcerated residual limbs in compliant patients lacking multiple comorbidities. Prosthetic discontinuance is also a viable method of residual limb ulcer healing and may be favored in the presence of severe acute ulcerations, chronic heavy smoking, intractable pain, rapid volume and weight change, history of chronic ulceration, systemic infections, or advanced dysvascular etiology. Surgery or other interventions may also be necessary in such cases to achieve restored prosthetic ambulation. A short bout of prosthetic discontinuance with a staged re-introduction plan is another viable option that may be warranted in patients with ulceration due to poor RL volume management. High-quality prospective research with larger samples is needed to determine the most appropriate course of treatment when a person with LEA develops an RL ulcer that is associated with prosthetic use.

  8. Collision thrills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2016-01-01

    . The working hypothesis is that the aesthetics of action and the affinities between medias centre on collision. It will be suggested that collisions produce thrills ranging from the pleasure of destruction to the experience of spatial disorientation. Following will the aesthetics of action be coined ‘collision...

  9. Collision tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  10. Fast calculator for X-ray emission due to Radiative Recombination and Radiative Electron Capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, M. O.; Weber, G.; Gumberidze, A.; Wu, Z. W.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments with highly charged, fast heavy ions the Radiative Recombination (RR) and Radiative Electron Capture (REC) processes have significant cross sections in an energy range of up to a few GeV / u . They are some of the most important charge changing processes in collisions of heavy ions with atoms and electrons, leading to the emission of a photon along with the formation of the ground and excited atomic states. Hence, for the understanding and planning of experiments, in particular for X-ray spectroscopy studies, at accelerator ring facilities, such as FAIR, it is crucial to have a good knowledge of these cross sections and the associated radiation characteristics. In the frame of this work a fast calculator, named RECAL, for the RR and REC process is presented and its capabilities are demonstrated with the analysis of a recently conducted experiment at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. A method is presented to determine unknown X-ray emission cross sections via normalization of the recorded spectra to REC cross sections calculated by RECAL.

  11. Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission due to Highly Charged Ion Collisions with H, He, and H2: Line Ratios for Heliospheric and Interstellar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Mullen, P. D.; Lyons, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Fogle, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere, planetary exospheres, and supernova remnants. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly excited, high-charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays. To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, molecular-orbital close-coupling, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics. X-ray spectra were computed for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 with results compared to available experimental data. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant and the heliosphere are shown as examples with ion velocity dependence.

  12. Collision Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Servis, D.P.; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    The first section of the present report describes the procedures that are being programmed at DTU for evaluation of the external collision dynamics. Then follows a detailed description of a comprehensive finite element analysis of one collision scenario for MS Dextra carried out at NTUA. The last...

  13. Numerical and experimental evaluation of the residual stress relaxation and the influence zone due to application of the crack compliance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval-Pineda, J M; Garcia-Lira, J; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Hernandez-Gomez, L H; Beltran-Fernandez, J A; RodrIguez-Martinez, R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results concerning an evaluation of the crack compliance method. The research was focused on the relaxation caused by a cut induced to obtain the data required to calculate the residual stress field. The main objective in this research is to establish the optimum place to cut in a specimen that has suffered a failure and how extended is the zone of relaxed stresses. It has been recognized that a crack vanishes the beneficial or detrimental effects of the residual stress fields. This research has been performed in a numerical and experimental way, so results can be compared and FEM on this topic can be assessed.

  14. Improvement in accuracy of the measurements of residual stresses due to circumferential welds in thin-walled pipe using Rayleigh wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhshik, Siamak; Moharrami, Rasool

    2009-01-01

    To achieve an acceptable safety in many industrial applications such as nuclear power plants and power generation, it is extremely important to gain an understanding of the magnitudes and distributions of the residual stresses in a pipe formed by joining two sections with a girth butt weld. Most of the methods for high-accuracy measurement of residual stress are destructive. These destructive measurement methods cannot be applied to engineering systems and structures during actual operation. In this paper, we present a method based on the measurement of ultrasonic Rayleigh wave velocity variations versus the stress state for nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in dissimilar pipe welded joint. We show some residual stress profile obtained by this method. These are then compared with other profiles determined using a semi-destructive technique (hole-drilling) that makes it possible to check our results. According to the results, we also present a new method for adjusting the ultrasonic measurements to improve the agreement with the results obtained from other techniques.

  15. Non-collision backgrounds in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, S M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The proton-proton collision events recorded by the ATLAS experiment are on top of a background that is due to both collision debris and non-collision components. The latter comprises of three types: beam-induced backgrounds, cosmic particles and detector noise. We present studies that focus on the first two of these. We give a detailed description of beam-related and cosmic backgrounds based on the full 2011 ATLAS data set, and present their rates throughout the whole data-taking period. Studies of correlations between tertiary proton halo and muon backgrounds, as well as, residual pressure and resulting beam-gas events seen in beam-condition monitors will be presented. Results of simulations based on the LHC geometry and its parameters will be presented. They help to better understand the features of beam-induced backgrounds in each ATLAS sub-detector. The studies of beam-induced backgrounds in ATLAS reveal their characteristics and serve as a basis for designing rejection tools that can be applied in physic...

  16. Survival of the Lhasa Terrane during its collision with Asia due to crust-mantle coupling revealed by ca. 114 Ma intrusive rocks in western Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Liu, An-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Xia, Ying; Chen, Yue; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Zhao, Zhi-Dan

    2018-04-01

    Survival of the Lhasa Terrane during its drift across the Tethyan Ocean and subsequent collision with Asia was likely maintained by mechanical coupling between its ancient lithospheric mantle and the overlying crust. Evidence for this coupling is provided by geochronological and geochemical data from high-Mg dioritic porphyrite dikes that intruded into granodiorites with dioritic enclaves within the Nixiong Batholith in the western segment of the central Lhasa subterrane, southern Tibet. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating indicates synchronous emplacement of dioritic porphyrite dikes (113.9 ± 2 Ma), dioritic enclaves (113.9 ± 1 Ma), and host granodiorites (113.1 ± 2 Ma). The hornblende-bearing granodiorites are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 0.95-1.05) and belong to high-K calc-alkaline I-type granite. These rocks are characterized by low Mg# (37-43), negative zircon εHf(t) values (-6.8 to -1.2), and negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (-8.1 to -5.4), suggestive of derivation through anatexis of ancient lower crust. The two least-mixed or contaminated dioritic porphyrite dike samples have high MgO (8.46-8.74 wt%), high Mg# (69-70), and high abundances of compatible elements (e.g., Cr = 673-646 ppm, Ni = 177-189 ppm), which are close to those of primitive magma. They are high-K calc-alkaline and show negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (-1.9 to -1.2), indicating that these samples are most likely derived from the partial melting of ancient lithospheric mantle that was metasomatized by slab-derived fluids. The dioritic enclave samples are metaluminous high-K calc-alkaline and have varying negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (-7.8 to -3.7), which are interpreted as the result of magma mixing between the ancient lower crust-derived melts and asthenospheric mantle- (rather than lithospheric mantle-) derived melts. The Nd isotope mantle model ages of the least-mixed or contaminated high-Mg dioritic porphyrite dike samples (1.1-1.4 Ga) are close to the Nd isotope

  17. Protons in collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, M.

    1983-01-01

    The article is concerned with the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), sited at CERN, which produces the world's highest energy collisions between protons, but is due to be dismantled soon. The ISR has contributed to major advances in physics, during the past 13 years, particularly in quantum chromodynamics. (U.K.)

  18. Increased risks of malaria due to limited residual life of insecticide and outdoor biting versus protection by combined use of nets and indoor residual spraying on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley John

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is endemic on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, with year-round transmission. In 2004 an intensive malaria control strategy primarily based on indoor residual spraying (IRS was launched. The limited residual life of IRS poses particular challenges in a setting with year-round transmission, such as Bioko. Recent reports of outdoor biting by Anopheles gambiae are an additional cause for concern. In this study, the effect of the short residual life of bendiocarb insecticide and of children spending time outdoors at night, on malaria infection prevalence was examined. Methods Data from the 2011 annual malaria indicator survey and from standard WHO cone bioassays were used to examine the relationship between time since IRS, mosquito mortality and prevalence of infection in children. How often children spend time outside at night and the association of this behaviour with malaria infection were also examined. Results Prevalence of malaria infection in two to 14 year-olds in 2011 was 18.4%, 21.0% and 28.1% in communities with median time since IRS of three, four and five months respectively. After adjusting for confounders, each extra month since IRS corresponded to an odds ratio (OR of 1.44 (95% CI 1.15–1.81 for infection prevalence in two to 14 year-olds. Mosquito mortality was 100%, 96%, 81% and 78%, at month 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively after spraying. Only 4.1% of children spent time outside the night before the survey between the hours of 22.00 and 06.00 and those who did were not at a higher risk of infection (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.50–1.54. Sleeping under a mosquito net provided additive protection (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.54–0.86. Conclusions The results demonstrate the epidemiological impact of reduced mosquito mortality with time since IRS. The study underscores that in settings of year-round transmission there is a compelling need for longer-lasting IRS insecticides, but that in the interim, high coverage of long

  19. The complex clinical issues involved in an athlete's decision to retire from collision sport due to multiple concussions: a case study of a professional athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eGardner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The issue of retirement from athletic participation due to repetitive concussive injuries remains controversial. The complexity of providing recommendations to elite athletes is highlighted by the prospect that offering inappropriate advice may foreseeably lead to engagement in a medico-legal challenge. Currently no evidenced-based, scientifically validated guidelines for forming the basis of such a decision exist. The current paper discusses the complexities of this challenge in addition to presenting a case study of a professional athlete. A number of central issues to consider when discussing athlete retirement revolve around the player’s medical and concussion histories, the current clinical profile, the athlete’s long-term life goals and understanding of the potential long-terms risks. Ensuring that thorough investigations of all possible differential diagnosis, that may explain the presenting symptoms, are conducted is also essential. Discussion pertaining to recommendations for guiding the clinical approach to the retirement issue for athletes with a history of multiple concussions is presented.

  20. Residual deposits (residual soil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Residual soil deposits is accumulation of new formate ore minerals on the earth surface, arise as a result of chemical decomposition of rocks. As is well known, at the hyper genes zone under the influence of different factors (water, carbonic acid, organic acids, oxygen, microorganism activity) passes chemical weathering of rocks. Residual soil deposits forming depends from complex of geologic and climatic factors and also from composition and physical and chemical properties of initial rocks

  1. The STARK-B database VAMDC node: a repository for spectral line broadening and shifts due to collisions with charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Moreau, N.; Ben Nessib, N.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling require the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. Access to such data via an online database has become indispensable. The STARK-B database is aimed at meeting these needs for widths and shifts of isolated lines of neutral and ionized elements due to electron and ion impacts. This database of the Paris Observatory is a result of scientific cooperation between S Sahal-Bréchot (LERMA) and M S Dimitrijević (AOB). Access to it is free, and it was opened online at the end of 2008. STARK-B is a node of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) and thus complies with VAMDC and Virtual Observatory standards. VAMDC is a European Union-funded collaboration among groups involved in the generation and use of interoperable atomic and molecular data. STARK-B now contains all our semiclassical-perturbation (SCP) calculated data for more than 123 neutral or ionized elements as published in international refereed journals. It is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes, laboratory plasmas, laser equipment, and technological plasmas. Hence, the range of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is broad and depends on the ionization degree of the radiating atom. The modified semiempirical (MSE) results of calculations have begun to be implemented. In this paper, we highlight the key points of the method and the assumptions used in the calculations, which have lately been revisited. Then we present the database and its recent developments, as well as our ongoing work and our plans for the future.

  2. The STARK-B database VAMDC node: a repository for spectral line broadening and shifts due to collisions with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahal-Bréchot, S; Moreau, N; Dimitrijević, M S; Nessib, N Ben

    2015-01-01

    Accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling require the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. Access to such data via an online database has become indispensable. The STARK-B database is aimed at meeting these needs for widths and shifts of isolated lines of neutral and ionized elements due to electron and ion impacts. This database of the Paris Observatory is a result of scientific cooperation between S Sahal-Bréchot (LERMA) and M S Dimitrijević (AOB). Access to it is free, and it was opened online at the end of 2008. STARK-B is a node of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) and thus complies with VAMDC and Virtual Observatory standards. VAMDC is a European Union-funded collaboration among groups involved in the generation and use of interoperable atomic and molecular data. STARK-B now contains all our semiclassical-perturbation (SCP) calculated data for more than 123 neutral or ionized elements as published in international refereed journals. It is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes, laboratory plasmas, laser equipment, and technological plasmas. Hence, the range of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is broad and depends on the ionization degree of the radiating atom. The modified semiempirical (MSE) results of calculations have begun to be implemented. In this paper, we highlight the key points of the method and the assumptions used in the calculations, which have lately been revisited. Then we present the database and its recent developments, as well as our ongoing work and our plans for the future. (paper)

  3. Ship collision with iceberg database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, B.T. [National Research Council of Canada, St. John' s, NL (Canada). Inst. for Ocean Technology

    2006-11-15

    Approximately 20 per cent of collisions between icebergs, steam ships and motor vessels since 1850 have resulted in sinkings. The available data indicates that most sinkings were due to some kind of indirect impact rather than a head on collision. This paper presented the newly augmented Microsoft Access Database of Ship Collisions with Icebergs that includes more than 670 events over 200 years, most of which occurred on the Grand Banks. Other collisions occurred further afield in the Arctic, off Greenland and in the fjords of Alaska. The operation, search categories and data fields of the database were described along with various trends of collisions, scope of damage and environmental factors involved. Based on an estimate of the number of voyages over the Grand Banks, a probability of collision was derived from the number of cargo ship collisions over the past several years. The Microsoft Access template was provided by the Canadian Hydraulic Centre which had been developed by them for their Ice Regime Database to describe sea ice and ship interactions. This template was adapted and modified for iceberg collisions. Where possible, the data base was augmented to include information about the nature of the damage, the weather and sea state, the ice conditions, iceberg size, the vessel route and location at the time of collision, and vessel characteristics. The purpose of the database is to provide operators and regulators with an assessment of the frequency of collisions and environmental factors that played a role at the time of the collision. The database provides a basis to undertake risk analysis for vessels entering a given area and provides a better understanding of conditions under which collisions are likely to occur. It was concluded that although the trend of collisions has improved over the years with better observation and detection techniques, collisions still occur. Reduced visibility by fog, precipitation or low light conditions were found to be

  4. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  5. Collision Risk and Damage after Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a new and complete procedure for calculation of ship-ship collision rates on specific routes and the hull damage caused by such collisions.The procedure is applied to analysis of collision risks for Ro-Ro pasenger vessels. Given a collision the spatial probability distribution...

  6. Residual magnetic stray field in ITER building and field perturbation on the plasma due to ferromagnetic iron components outside the vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Marin, A.; Lucca, F.; Pizzuto, A.; Ramogida, G.

    2009-01-01

    The present work evaluates, using 3D finite element (FE) electromagnetic (EM) analyses, the poloidal field coil (PFC) stray field reduction inside and outside the main ITER building due to the presence of ferromagnetic content in the concrete and other iron components outside the vessel (mainly the huge iron boxes of the NBI - neutral beam injector - and the iron doors at the end of the port corridors). To perform these analyses a 360 deg. 3D EM model of the ITER building has been developed, named electromagnetic model of the building complex (EMMOBC), which includes the poloidal field coils, the plasma, a coarse model of the two heating and current drive (H and CD) NBIs, the coils of the NBI active magnetic field reduction system, and all the main building components that could include ferromagnetic materials. The plasma scenarios at the start of flat-top (SOF) and at the end of burning (EOB) have been considered. The effect on the stray field on the NBI due to the presence of the active (AMFRS) and passive (PMFRS) magnetic field reduction system of the near NBI and of the others iron component in the building has been evaluated, using EMMOBC that include the coarse model of the two NBIs. The coil currents of the AMFRS in the H and CD NBI have been optimized for the stray field coming from the SOF and EOB plasma scenarios at plasma current of 15 MA. The stray field at SOF and EOB, including the effects of the ferromagnetic iron content (outside the vessel), has been evaluated inside and outside the main ITER building using the EMMOBC. Finally the field perturbation produced on the plasma q = 2 surface has been evaluated.

  7. Puck collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  8. On Impact Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship-ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived...... mathematical models include friction at the contact point so that situation where the collision results in a sliding motion is included. Results obtained by application of the present procedure are compared with results obtained by time simulations and good agreement has been achieved. In addition, a number...... of illustrative examples are presented. The procedure presented in the paper is well suited for inclusion in a probabilistic calculation model for damage of ship structures due to collisions....

  9. On impact mechanics in ship collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship–ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived...... mathematical models include friction at the contact point so that situation where the collision results in a sliding motion is included. Results obtained by application of the present procedure are compared with results obtained by time simulations and good agreement has been achieved. In addition, a number...... of illustrative examples are presented. The procedure presented in the paper is well suited for inclusion in a probabilistic calculation model for damage of ship structures due to collisions....

  10. Evaluation of dose due to the liberation of the radioactive content present in systems of final disposal of radioactive residues; Evaluacion de la dosis debida a la liberacion del contenido radiactivo presente en sistemas de disposicion final de residuos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, V.; Lopez, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (C1429BNP) (Argentina)]. e-mail: vamado@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The disposal systems of radioactive residuals well-known as repositories near to the surface, are used to dispose residuals that can contain high concentrations of radionuclides of period of short semi disintegration, which they would decay at levels radiologically insignificant in some few decades or in some centuries: and acceptably low concentrations of radionuclides of period of long semi disintegration. The dose that would receive the critic group due to these systems it could be increased by cause of discreet events that affect the foreseen retard time, or by the gradual degradation of the barriers. To this last case it contributes the presence of water, because it implies leaching and dissolution that can give place to radionuclide concentrations in the underground water greater to the prospective ones. The dosimetric evaluation is important because it offers useful objective information to decide if a given repository is adjusted to the purposes of its design and it fulfills the regulatory requirements. In this work a simplified evaluation of the dose that would receive the critic group due to the liberation of contained radionuclides in a hypothetical system of final disposition of radioactive residuals is presented. For it, they are considered representative values of the usually contained activities in this type of systems and they are carried out some approaches of the source term. The study is developed in two stages. In the first one, by means of the Radionuclide pollutant scattering pattern in phreatic aquifers (DRAF) it is considered the scattering of the pollutants in the phreatic aquifer, until the discharge point in the course of the nearest surface water. This model, developed originally in the regulatory branch of the National Commission of Argentine Atomic Energy (CNEA); it solves the transport equation of solutes in porous means in three dimensions, by the finite differences method having in account the soil retention and the radioactive

  11. Collision avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glynn, P.

    2008-04-01

    A suite of new collision avoidance systems (CAS 1,2,3, and 4) for heavy vehicles particularly mine haul trucks, is presented for vehicles whose structure and size necessarily impeded driver visibility. The systems use probe radar systems, continuous wave Doppler radar, ultrasonic Doppler, radio frequency tagging and laser scanning technology. The main goal of the ACARP/CSIRO funded projects is to determine the appropriate use and adaptation of commercially available technologies, and where possible, produce a low cost variant suitable for use in proximity detection on large mining industry haul trucks. CAS variants produced were subjected to a field demonstration and linked to the output from the earlier CAS 1 project. The research concentrated on large mine haul trucks operating in open cut coal mines. While the results are especially applicable to the Queensland and New South Wales coal industries, they are also applicable worldwide. 1 tab.

  12. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  13. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  14. Neuromorphic UAS Collision Avoidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Collision avoidance for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) traveling at high relative speeds is a challenging task. It requires both the detection of a possible collision...

  15. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  16. Modelling of the Internal Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of the structural damage due to ship collisions is developed. The method is based on the idealized structural unit method (ISUM). Longitudinal/transverse webs which connect the outer and the inner hulls are modelled by rectangular plate units. The responses are determined......-skin plated structures in collision/grounding situations with the present solutions. As an illustrative example the procedure has been used for analyses of a side collision of a double-hull tanker. Several factors affecting ship collision response, namely the collision speed and the scantlings/ arrangements...

  17. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  18. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  19. Collisions between Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, D. T.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    The study of globular clusters (GC) plays an important role in our understanding of the Universe since these systems are true laboratories for theories of stellar dynamics and evolution. We are interested in studying a globular cluster formed by a collision between two different GC with NBODY6 (Aarseth, 2003). Firstly, in order to understand this code, we analyse how tidal streams form from a globular cluster in a circular orbit (on the disk) around the center of the Milky Way. In the next stage of this work we will study that collision. The stellar escape or capture from globular cluster can be understood with the Restricted Three Body Problem. These stars escape in a chaotic orbit, and in some cases may return (again in a chaotic orbit) to the cluster due to the Galactic potential. In most cases, such stars quickly alter their escape chaotic orbits to orbits that are similar to the parent cluster's orbit. Our results show an agglomeration of stars in a normal direction related to the direction towards the center of the Milky Way, forming thus a stream. We can explain this considering that a circular orbit around the dominant potential is the most likely orbit, since it requires minimum energy. In this coordinate systems, the tidal tails (or streams) rotates around the cluster center with the same mean motion associated to cluster around the Milky Way center.

  20. Chiral magnetic effect in isobaric collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Deng, Wei-Tian; Ma, Guo-Liang; Wang, Gang

    2017-11-01

    We give a numerical simulation of the generation of the magnetic field and the charge-separation signal due to the chiral magnetic effect (CME) - the induction of an electric current by the magnetic field in a parity-odd matter - in the collisions of isobaric nuclei, 9644Ru + 9644Ru and 9640Zr + 9640Zr, at √{sNN} = 200 GeV. We show that such collisions provide an ideal tool to disentangle the CME signal from the possible elliptic-flow driven background effects. We also discuss some other effects that can be tested by using the isobaric collisions.

  1. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  2. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  4. Decay of long-lived autoionization atomic states in atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakov, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiationless decay of long-lived autoionization states of helium atoms in atom collisions is investigated. It is shown that the states may decay in atom collisions due to softening of the selection rules

  5. Hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative picture of high energy hadron-nucleus collision process, emerging from the analysis of experimental data, is presented. Appropriate description procedure giving a possibility of reproducing various characteristics of this process in terms of the data on elementary hadron-nucleon interaction is proposed. Formula reproducing hadron-nucleus collision cross sections is derived. Inelastic collision cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus reactions at wide energy interval are calculated for Pb, Ag, and Al targets. A-dependence of cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions at nearly 50 GeV/c momentum were calculated and compared with existing experimental data. Energy dependence of cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions is determined simply by energy dependence of corresponding cross sections for hadron-nucleon collisions; A-dependence is determined simply by nuclear sizes and nucleon density distributions in nuclei

  6. LEXUS heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Yong Jeon

    1997-01-01

    We use a Glauber-like approach to describe very energetic nucleus- nucleus collisions as a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. No free parameters are needed: all the information comes from simple parametrizations of nucleon-nucleon collision data. Produced mesons are assumed not to interact with each other or with the original baryons. Comparisons are made to published experimental measurements of baryon rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, negative hadron rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, average multiplicities of pions, kaons, hyperons, and antihyperons, and zero degree energy distributions for sulfur-sulfur collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon and for lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. Good agreement is found except that the number of strange particles produced, especially antihyperons, is too small compared with experiment. We call this model LEXUS: Linear EXtrapolation of Ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon Scattering to heavy ion collisions. (11 refs).

  7. Residual risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing the residual risk of transmission of HIV by blood transfusion. An epidemiological approach assumed that all HIV infections detected serologically in first-time donors were pre-existing or prevalent infections, and that all infections detected in repeat blood donors were new or incident infections. During 1986 - 1987,0,012%.

  8. Chirality in molecular collision dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Chirality is a phenomenon that permeates the natural world, with implications for atomic and molecular physics, for fundamental forces and for the mechanisms at the origin of the early evolution of life and biomolecular homochirality. The manifestations of chirality in chemistry and biochemistry are numerous, the striking ones being chiral recognition and asymmetric synthesis with important applications in molecular sciences and in industrial and pharmaceutical chemistry. Chiral discrimination phenomena, due to the existence of two enantiomeric forms, very well known in the case of interaction with light, but still nearly disregarded in molecular collision studies. Here we review some ideas and recent advances about the role of chirality in molecular collisions, designing and illustrating molecular beam experiments for the demonstration of chiral effects and suggesting a scenario for a stereo-directional origin of chiral selection.

  9. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  10. Ball Collision Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  11. ALICE results in p-Pb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Stocco, Diego

    2015-01-01

    ALICE studies the properties of the strongly interacting matter at the extreme energy densities reached in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. In this context, the measurements in proton-proton and proton-nucleon collisions are mandatory: the former sets the reference, while the latter pro- vides further insight into the effects due to cold nuclear matter, which is crucial in the understand- ing of heavy-ion collisions. In this paper, a selection of the recent results in p–Pb collisions at the LHC will be presented.

  12. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  13. The relationship between vacuum and atomic collisions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    Atomic collision events in solids are frequently stimulated by external irradiation with energetic heavy ions. This requires production, acceleration and manipulation of ion beams in vacuum system with ensuing problems arising in perturbations to ion beam quality from gas phase collisions. In addition the dynamic interaction between the gas phase and any surfaces at which atomic collisions are under investigation can lead to perturbation to the collision events by adsorbed contaminant. This review discusses both gas phase requirements for ion accelerators to minimize deleterious effects and outlines some of the processes which occur in atomic collisions due to the presence of adsorbed impurities. Finally it is shown how certain atomic collision processes involving elastic scattering may be employed to investigate surface adsorption and related effects. (author)

  14. Nuclear pressure and energy loss in deep inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, M.

    1979-01-01

    The energy loss due to flux exchange between colliding nuclei is calculated using the concept of nuclear pressure. The energy loss due to friction, viscosity and shape deformations when added to the energy loss due to flux exchange is found to account for almost the net loss of energy in the collision. The characteristic features observed in heavy ion deep inelastic collisions are enumerated. (A.K.)

  15. Molecular dynamics and binary collision modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fracti...... that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase is demonstrated at low energy.......Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects...

  16. Elements of Risk Analysis for Collision and Grounding of a RoRo Passenger Ferry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, S.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Samuelidis, M.

    2002-01-01

    Newly developed software was applied to study the effects of damages due to collision and grounding. The annual risk of collision and grounding was computed for an example RoRo passenger ferry. Collision frequency was evaluated for a specified route taking into account traffic data. Grounding fre...

  17. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Laura [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Pearson, Erik A. [Techna Institute and the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pelizzari, Charles A., E-mail: c-pelizzari@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    1.2°). The accuracy study for the Kinect-Skanect surface showed an average discrepancy between the CT external contour and the surface scan of 2.2 mm. Conclusions: This methodology provides fast and reliable collision predictions using surface imaging. The use of the Kinect-Skanect system allows for a comprehensive modeling of the patient topography including all the relevant anatomy and immobilization devices that may lead to collisions. The use of this tool at the treatment simulation stage may allow therapists to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and optimize it before the planning CT scan is performed. This can allow for safer treatments for the patients due to better collision predictions and improved clinical workflow by minimizing replanning and resimulations due to unforeseen clearance issues.

  18. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  19. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    weeks of decomposition, due to high rates of residue N net mineralization and subsequent leaching and denitrification losses of N. Lysimeter experiments showed that pea residues may reduce leaching losses of N, probably due to their effect on the mineralization-immobilizalion turnover of N...... and denitrification. Winter barley succeeding field pea recovered 13% of the incorporated pea residue N by early December; the recovery was found to be 15% at maturity in July. A spring-sown crop of barley recovered less than half the amount of pea residue N recovered by winter barley. The residue N-use efficiencies...

  20. Vector boson production in hadron nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.D. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Whitmore, J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Lab. for Elementary Particle Science); Toothacker, W.S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Mont Alto (USA)); Hill, J.C.; Neale, W.W. (Cambridge Univ. (UK)); Lucas, P.; Voyvodic, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Ammar, R.; Gress, J. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence (USA)); Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Cason, N.M.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Ruchti, R.C.; Shephard, W.D. (Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA))

    1991-01-31

    We report a search for the production of light quark vector bosons in hadron-nucleus collisions at 100 GeV bombarding energy. We find surprisingly few of these resonances produced. The lack of these particles is though to be due to the absorption by the many modestly energetic nucleons and the few anti-nucleons in the final state. (orig.).

  1. Novel energy sharing collisions of multicomponent solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (say S2) experiences an opposite kind of energy switching due to the conservation law. ∫ ∞. −∞ |qj |2dt = constant,j = 1, 2. For the standard elastic collision property ascribed to the scalar solitons to occur here we need the magnitudes of the transition intensities to be unity which is possible for the specific choice (α. (1). 1 /α.

  2. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  3. Mechanics of train collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-30

    A simple and a more detailed mathematical model for the simulation of train collisions are presented. The study presents considerable insight as to the causes and consequences of train motions on impact. Comparison of model predictions with two full ...

  4. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  6. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  7. DEVISING STRATEGIES FOR RECLAMATION OF DERELICT SITES DUE TO MINING OF RESIDUAL SOIL (“SAIBRO” AT UBATUBA, NORTH COAST OF SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL: THE VIEWS AND ROLES OF THE STAKEHOLDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio José Ferreira

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Between the late 60's and early 90's intensive exploitation of residual soil for civil construction took place in the municipality of Ubatuba, North Coast of São Paulo State. Tropical climatic conditions associated with a hilly landscape bordered by the Atlantic Ocean gave rise to thick (10-30m weathering profiles derived from Precambrian granitic-gneissic rocks. Exploitation of large volumes of this material required only very simple technology, which on the other hand has caused highly adverse environmental impacts, such asdeforestation, soil erosion, land instability hazards, scenic eterioration, pollution and disturbance of local water flow regime. This paper deals with the devising of strategies thus identifying stakeholders and describing their roles both on the dereliction and reclamation processes related with residual soil exploitation. The evaluation approach focused on the analysis of the regulatory framework and its practical implications and issues in terms of licensing for mining operations, commercialization of construction materials, and the relations of such mining activities with regional and urban planning. A survey of stakeholderviewpoints was successfully achieved through a two-day workshop. The attendance included decision-makers, officials and representatives of governmental and regulatory bodies (Federal, State and Municipal, environmental research institutions, private miners (entrepreneurs and consultants, public attorney, and NGOs. The outcomes have ndicated that State and local authorities properly managed to stop illegal exploitation of residual soil in the early 90´s. However no land reclamation was undertaken until present. One of the main problems would be related with the procedures for mining and environmental licensing that were considered to be too complex and long (usually involving up to seven decisional instances and 2,5 years in average. Other key issues and needs identified included: aorganization of a

  8. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-01-01

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  9. Collision risk analysis based train collision early warning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Hui; Cai, Bai-Gen; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    A Train Collision Early Warning System (TCEWS) has been developed for collision avoidance. However, there are few studies regarding how to evaluate the collision risk and provide an early warning concerning a preceding train on the railway. In this paper, we have found that the time for collision avoidance is constrained by the timing of events, such as wireless communication latency, driver reaction, safety protection distance and deceleration rate. Considering these timing components, the time to avoid a collision is calculated accurately. To evaluate the potential collision severity when the following train approaches, the collision risk is defined based on the time to avoid a collision. The train collision early warning signal is divided into a four-tier color-coded system based on the collision risk, with red representing the most severe collision risk, followed by orange, yellow and blue. A field test of the train collision early warning strategy on the Hankou-Yichang Railway is analysed. It is demonstrated that the strategy has sufficient capability to indicate a potential collision and warn the following train. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Due diligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghera, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  11. Section of Atomic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.; Biri, S.; Gulyas, L.; Juhasz, Z.; Kover, A.; Orban, A.; Palinkas, J.; Papp, T.; Racz, R.; Ricz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Section of Atomic Collisions is a research unit with extended activity in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Starting from the study of atomic processes at the beamlines of nuclear physics accelerators in the seventies, our research community became one of the centers of fundamental research in Atomki. We also have a strong connection to materials sciences especially along the line of electron and ion spectroscopy methods. Our present activity covers a wide range of topics from atomic collision mechanisms of fundamental interest, to the complex interactions of electrons, ions, photons and antiparticles with atoms, molecules, surfaces, and specific nanostructures. In the last few years, an increasing fraction of our present topics has become relevant for applications, e.g., molecular collision studies for the radiation therapy methods of tumors, or ion-nanostructure interactions for the future construction of small ion-focusing elements. Our section belongs to the Division of Atomic Physics. The other unit of the Division is the Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Sciences. There are traditionally good connections and a strong collaboration between the groups of the two sections in many fields. From the very beginning of our research work in atomic collisions, external collaborations were of vital importance for us. We regularly organize international workshops in the field of fast ion-atom collisions and related small conferences in Debrecen from 1981. Recently, we organized the Conference on Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM 2008, Debrecen), and coorganized the Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS 2008, Cluj). We have access to several large scale facilities in Europe within the framework of formal and informal collaborations. The next themes are in this article: Forward electron emission from energetic atomic collisions; Positron-atom collisions; Photon-atom interactions; Interference effects in electron

  12. Collision dynamics of two 238U atomic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Cédric; Simenel, Cédric

    2009-07-24

    Collisions of actinide nuclei form, during very short times of few 10;{-21} s, the heaviest ensembles of interacting nucleons available on Earth. Such collisions have been proposed as an alternative way to produce heavy and superheavy elements. They are also used to produce superstrong electric fields by the huge number of interacting protons to test spontaneous positron-electron (e;{+}e;{-}) pair emission predicted by the quantum electrodynamics theory. The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory is used to study collision dynamics of two 238U atomic nuclei. In particular, the role of nuclear deformation on collision time and on reaction mechanisms such as nucleon transfer is emphasized. The highest collision times (approximately 4 x 10;{-21} s at 1200 MeV) should allow experimental signature of spontaneous e;{+}e;{-} emission in case of bare uranium ions. Surprisingly, we also observe ternary fission due to purely dynamical effects.

  13. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  14. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  15. Consumers’ Collision Insurance Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Laurel; Fischhoff, Baruch

    Using interviews with 74 drivers, we elicit and analyse how people think about collision coverage and, more generally, about insurance decisions. We compare the judgments and behaviours of these decision makers to the predictions of a range of theoretical models: (a) A model developed by Lee (2007...... a cognitive model based on budgeting. Our findings emphasize the importance of budget constraints, which lead consumers to budget their income across consumption categories. We find also that a simple heuristic accounts for many collision coverage decisions: purchase coverage for cars worth more than some...

  16. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model...... of the vocal fold collision is proposed, which incorporates different procedures used in contact mechanics and mathematical optimization theories. The penalty approach and the Lagrange multiplier method are investigated. The contact force solution obtained by the penalty formulation is highly dependent...

  17. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  18. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Collision Probability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Friis; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1998-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to apply a rational model for prediction of ship-ship collision probabilities as function of the ship and the crew characteristics and the navigational environment for MS Dextra sailing on a route between Cadiz and the Canary Islands.The most important ship and crew...

  20. High energy nuclear collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  1. CMS SEES FIRST COLLISIONS

    CERN Multimedia

      A very special moment.  On 23rd November, 19:40 we recorded our first collisions with 450GeV beams well centred in CMS.   If you have any comments / suggestions please contact Karl Aaron GILL (Editor)

  2. Collisions in soccer kicking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Bull; Dörge, Henrik C.; Thomsen, Franz Ib

    1999-01-01

    An equation to describe the velocity of the soccer ball after the collision with a foot was derived. On the basis of experimental results it was possible to exclude certain factors and only describe the angular momentum of the system, consisting of the shank, the foot and the ball, leading...

  3. Ultrarelativistic oscillon collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, M.A.; Banik, I.; Negreanu, C.; Yang, I.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this short paper we investigate the ultrarelativistic collisions of small amplitude oscillons in 1+1 dimensions. Using the amplitude of the oscillons and the inverse relativistic boost factor γ−1 as the perturbation variables, we analytically calculate the leading order spatial and temporal phase

  4. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-01-01

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  5. A Hybrid Collision Resolution Protocol for Passive RFID Tag Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Xin-qing, Yan; Zhou-ping, Yin; You-lun, Xiong

    2009-01-01

    Wireless communication channel collision of RFID system is a key issue that affects the pervasive application of the system, especially for passive RFID system due to the constrained communication ability and energy supply of tags. The collision resolution protocols suggested can be categorized into deterministic tree based protocols and probabilistic frame slot ALOHA based protocols. A hybrid protocol, which combines the query tree protocol and dynamic framed slotted ALOHA protocol, is prese...

  6. Charged particle multiplicity and correlations in heavy ion collisions in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    "Zabinski, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Since the start of LHC the ATLAS experiment has collected data from pp, PbPb and recently pPb collisions. In this talk two topics from the heavy ion programme are presented. The first of them is the multiplicity of charged particles in PbPb collisions studied as a function centrality. In such collisions very high pseudorapidity particle density is obtained, reaching 1738 $pm$ 76 at $eta sim 0$. For the pPb collisions the latest analysis of two-particle correlations is presented. The "ridge" observed in pp events with large multiplicities is present also in central pPb collisions selected by large $Sigma E_{T}$ at the Pb fragmentation side. In the azimuthal correlation for $2 < Deltaeta < 5$ two components can be extracted. Assuming that in the peripheral collisions only the correlation due to momentum conservation effects are present, in the central collisions additional quadruple modulation component can be identified.

  7. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  8. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  9. Beyond time-dependent Hartree-Fock: The collision terms in a mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generalised, time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations are shown to solve a well-defined part of the Hamiltonian problem. The complementary residual interaction is treated approximately, rather than by ensemble averages, and gives rise to the appearance of collision terms. The final set of equations is self-consistent. For colliding heavy ions the collision terms lead to a diffusion of the collective variables, which possibly can improve the agreement between mean-field calculations and experiment. (author)

  10. Collision physics going west

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The centroid of proton-antiproton physics is moving west across the Atlantic concluded Luigi Di Leila of CERN in his summary talk at the Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics, held at Fermilab in June. Previous meetings in this series had been dominated by results from CERN's big proton-antiproton collider, dating back to 1981. However last year saw the first physics run at Fermilab's collider, and although the number of collisions in the big CDF detector was only about one thirtieth of the score so far at CERN, the increased collision energy at Fermilab of 1.8 TeV (1800 GeV, compared to the routine 630 GeV at CERN) is already paying dividends

  11. Electrodialytic remediation of air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    Air pollution control (APC) residue from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) consists of the fly ash, and, in dry and semi-dry systems, also the reaction products from the flue gas cleaning process. APC residue is considered a hazardous waste due to its high alkalinity, high content of salts...

  12. Crashworthiness Simulation of Front Bumper Model of MOROLIPI V2 During Head-on Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugraha Aditya Sukma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to conduct an impact test for bumper collision. The use of bumper as a protective components of a vehicle during collision. On this Paper, a crashworthiness simulation of front bumper model with correspond to the size of MOROLIPI V2 is conducted. The purpose of this study was to obtain simulation result used as a reference to predict mechanical behaviour of bumper due to collision. The Simulation result can be predicted deformation after collision, von misses stress criteria after collision with static dummy load. To simulate impact on bumper, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics is used. Simulations were run at three values of mobile robot speeds (5, 10 and 20 m/s. The simulation results also show contact force due to the collision, deformation, stress and internal energy of the bumper beam. It was known that the speed of the vehicle is the dominant parameter determine the results of the crashworthiness simulation.

  13. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of measured and calculated collision efficiencies at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH). Freely falling 80 μm diameter water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 and 400 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500 to 5000 and 500 to 2000 cm-3, respectively, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The experimental data used to derive collision efficiency are in a temperature range of 238-245 K, where each collision of silver iodide particles with droplets can be assumed to result in the freezing of the droplet. An upper and lower limit of collision efficiency is also estimated for 800 nm diameter kaolinite particles. The chamber is kept at ice saturation at a temperature range of 236 to 261 K, leading to the slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency values of 0.13, 0.07 and 0.047-0.11 for 200, 400 and 800 nm particles are around 1 order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first data set of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and

  15. Implementation of collisions on GPU architecture in the Vorpal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Averkin, Sergey; Cowan, Ben; Sides, Scott; Werner, Greg; Cary, John

    2017-10-01

    The Vorpal code contains a variety of collision operators allowing for the simulation of plasmas containing multiple charge species interacting with neutrals, background gas, and EM fields. These existing algorithms have been improved and reimplemented to take advantage of the massive parallelization allowed by GPU architecture. The use of GPUs is most effective when algorithms are single-instruction multiple-data, so particle collisions are an ideal candidate for this parallelization technique due to their nature as a series of independent processes with the same underlying operation. This refactoring required data memory reorganization and careful consideration of device/host data allocation to minimize memory access and data communication per operation. Successful implementation has resulted in an order of magnitude increase in simulation speed for a test-case involving multiple binary collisions using the null collision method. Work supported by DARPA under contract W31P4Q-16-C-0009.

  16. Formation flight and collision avoidance for multiple UAVs based on modified tentacle algorithm in unstructured environments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Minghuan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for formation flight and collision avoidance of multiple UAVs. Due to the shortcomings such as collision avoidance caused by UAV's high-speed and unstructured environments, this paper proposes a modified tentacle algorithm to ensure the high performance of collision avoidance. Different from the conventional tentacle algorithm which uses inverse derivation, the modified tentacle algorithm rapidly matches the radius of each tentacle and the steering command, ensuri...

  17. Ship Collision and Grounding Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2010-01-01

    It is the purpose of the paper to present a review of prediction and analysis tools for collision and grounding analyses and to outline a probabilistic procedure whereby these tools can be used by the maritime industry to develop performance based rules to reduce the risk associated with human......, environmental and economic costs of collision and grounding events. The main goal of collision and grounding research should be to identify the most economic risk control options associated with prevention and mitigation of collision and grounding events...

  18. Road rage and collision involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert E; Zhao, Jinhui; Stoduto, Gina; Adlaf, Edward M; Smart, Reginald G; Donovan, John E

    2007-01-01

    To assess the contribution of road rage victimization and perpetration to collision involvement. The relationship between self-reported collision involvement and road rage victimization and perpetration was examined, based on telephone interviews with a representative sample of 4897 Ontario adult drivers interviewed between 2002 and 2004. Perpetrators and victims of both any road rage and serious road rage had a significantly higher risk of collision involvement than did those without road rage experience. This study provides epidemiological evidence that both victims and perpetrators of road rage experience increased collision risk. More detailed studies of the contribution of road rage to traffic crashes are needed.

  19. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  20. Metriplectic integrators for the Landau collision operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael; Hirvijoki, Eero

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel framework for addressing the nonlinear Landau collision integral in terms of finite element and other subspace projection methods. We employ the underlying metriplectic structure of the Landau collision integral and, using a Galerkin discretization for the velocity space, we transform the infinite-dimensional system into a finite-dimensional, time-continuous metriplectic system. Temporal discretization is accomplished using the concept of discrete gradients. The conservation of energy, momentum, and particle densities, as well as the production of entropy is demonstrated algebraically for the fully discrete system. Due to the generality of our approach, the conservation properties and the monotonic behavior of entropy are guaranteed for finite element discretizations, in general, independently of the mesh configuration.

  1. Two Improved Multiple-Differential Collision Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In CHES 2008, Bogdanov proposed multiple-differential collision attacks which could be applied to the power analysis attacks on practical cryptographic systems. However, due to the effect of countermeasures on FPGA, there are some difficulties during the collision detection, such as local high noise and the lack of sampling points. In this paper, keypoints voting test is proposed for solving these problems, which can increase the success ratio from 35% to 95% on the example of one implementation. Furthermore, we improve the ternary voting test of Bogdanov, which can improve the experiment efficiency markedly. Our experiments show that the number of power traces required in our attack is only a quarter of the requirement of traditional attack. Finally, some alternative countermeasures against our attacks are discussed.

  2. Electron collisions with biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoy, V; Winstead, C

    2008-01-01

    We report on results of recent studies of collisions of low-energy electrons with nucleobases and other DNA constituents. A particular focus of these studies has been the identification and characterization of resonances that play a role in electron attachment leading to strand breaks in DNA. Comparison of the calculated resonance positions with results of electron transmission measurements is quite encouraging. However, the higher-lying π* resonances of the nucleobases appear to be of mixed elastic and core-excited character. Such resonant channel coupling raises the interesting possibility that the higher π*resonances in the nucleobases may promote dissociation of DNA by providing doorway states to triplet excited states.

  3. Molecular collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Child, M S

    2010-01-01

    This high-level monograph offers an excellent introduction to the theory required for interpretation of an increasingly sophisticated range of molecular scattering experiments. There are five helpful appendixes dealing with continuum wavefunctions, Green's functions, semi-classical connection formulae, curve-crossing in the momentum representation, and elements of classical mechanics.The contents of this volume have been chosen to emphasize the quantum mechanical and semi-classical nature of collision events, with little attention given to purely classical behavior. The treatment is essentiall

  4. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  5. Outer Dynamics of Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose is to present analysis procedures for the motion of ships during ship-ship collisions and for ship collisions with offshore structures. The aim is to estimate that part of the lost kinetic energy which will have to be absorbed by rupture and plastic damage of the colliding structures....

  6. Correlation effects in electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, W. van de.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis deals with correlation effects occurring in the outer region of configuration space after an ionising collision. The motion of both escaping electrons in the external region is then fully determined by the long-range Coulomb forces. Firstly the threshold ionisation of hydrogen-like targets is studied. In that case two slow electrons attempt to escape from the Coulomb attraction of the residual ion. Secondly ionising collisions, with the formation of an autoionising state as an intermediate step, are considered. Such an autoionising state is in fact a quasi bound state of the neutral atom which lies imbedded in the ionisation continuum. The state decays after a certain lifetime by emission of an electron. Of all states to be formed in the reaction region only the autoionising state(s) under consideration is then relevant for this type of ionisation process. The energy positions of autoionising states usually are such that the electron to be ionised is ejected with a rather large velocity. The correlation in the outer region of configuration space then consists of the interaction of a fast ejected electron and, in case of threshold excitation of the autoionising state, a slow scattered electron. (Auth.)

  7. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  8. Collision in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  9. A Changing Wind Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, Yaël; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Pittard, Julian M.; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Rauw, Gregor; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hillier, D. John

    2018-02-01

    We report on the first detection of a global change in the X-ray emitting properties of a wind–wind collision, thanks to XMM-Newton observations of the massive Small Magellenic Cloud (SMC) system HD 5980. While its light curve had remained unchanged between 2000 and 2005, the X-ray flux has now increased by a factor of ∼2.5, and slightly hardened. The new observations also extend the observational coverage over the entire orbit, pinpointing the light-curve shape. It has not varied much despite the large overall brightening, and a tight correlation of fluxes with orbital separation is found without any hysteresis effect. Moreover, the absence of eclipses and of absorption effects related to orientation suggests a large size for the X-ray emitting region. Simple analytical models of the wind–wind collision, considering the varying wind properties of the eruptive component in HD 5980, are able to reproduce the recent hardening and the flux-separation relationship, at least qualitatively, but they predict a hardening at apastron and little change in mean flux, contrary to observations. The brightness change could then possibly be related to a recently theorized phenomenon linked to the varying strength of thin-shell instabilities in shocked wind regions. Based on XMM-Newton and Chandra data.

  10. Why Blue stragglers formed via collisions may not be rapid rotators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Clement, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    We propose that the blue stragglers formed via collisions may not be rapid rotators due to magnetic braking during a Hayashi phase as they approach the main sequence. It is conceivable that just the envelopes of the blue stragglers are spun down, while their cores remain rapidly rotating. This would greatly extend the main-sequence lifetimes of the blue stragglers produced by collisions

  11. Rate adaptation using acknowledgement feedback in finite-state markov channels with collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, C.K.; Oostveen, J.C.; Linnartz, J.-P.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate packet-by-packet rate adaptation so as to maximize the throughput.We consider a finite-state Markov channel (FSMC) with collisions, which models channel fading as well as collisions due to multi-user interference. To limit the amount of feedback data, we only use past packet

  12. Inclusive Jet Spectra in p-Pb Collisions at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00255007

    2014-01-01

    Jet suppression has been observed in central heavy ion collisions. This suppression is attributed to partonic energy loss in the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) formed in such collisions. However, this measurement is influenced by all stages of the collision. It is expected that in p-Pb collisions similar initial conditions occur as in Pb-Pb collisions without creating a QGP, allowing modification to the jet spectra due to cold nuclear matter effects to be quantified. Inclusive jet spectra in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV measured by ALICE are presented. Jets are reconstructed via the anti-k$_{\\rm T}$ algorithm with different resolution parameters by combining charged tracks measured in the ALICE tracking system with the neutral energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The jet spectra can be used to determine a nuclear modification factor $R_{\\rm pPb}$ while the jet profile in p-Pb is studied by dividing spectra measured with different resolution parameters and comparing to the same r...

  13. Summary of Reported Whale-Vessel Collisions in Alaskan Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Neilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we summarize 108 reported whale-vessel collisions in Alaska from 1978–2011, of which 25 are known to have resulted in the whale's death. We found 89 definite and 19 possible/probable strikes based on standard criteria we created for this study. Most strikes involved humpback whales (86% with six other species documented. Small vessel strikes were most common (<15 m, 60%, but medium (15–79 m, 27% and large (≥80 m, 13% vessels also struck whales. Among the 25 mortalities, vessel length was known in seven cases (190–294 m and vessel speed was known in three cases (12–19 kn. In 36 cases, human injury or property damage resulted from the collision, and at least 15 people were thrown into the water. In 15 cases humpback whales struck anchored or drifting vessels, suggesting the whales did not detect the vessels. Documenting collisions in Alaska will remain challenging due to remoteness and resource limitations. For a better understanding of the factors contributing to lethal collisions, we recommend (1 systematic documentation of collisions, including vessel size and speed; (2 greater efforts to necropsy stranded whales; (3 using experienced teams focused on determining cause of death; (4 using standard criteria for validating collision reports, such as those presented in this paper.

  14. Automatic Tool Selection in V-bending Processes by Using an Intelligent Collision Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    V-bending is widely used to produce the sheet metal components. There are global Changes in the shape of the sheet metal component during progressive bending processes. Accordingly, collisions may be occurred between part and tool during bending. Collision-free is considered one of the feasibility conditions of V-bending process planning which the tool selection is verified by the absence of the collisions. This paper proposes an intelligent collision detection algorithm which has the ability to distinguish between 2D bent parts and the other bent parts. Due to this ability, 2D and 3D collision detection subroutines have been developed in the proposed algorithm. This division of algorithm’s subroutines could reduce the computational operations during collisions detecting.

  15. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  16. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter

  17. Residual stresses in steel and zirconium weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, J.H.; Coleman, C.E.; Bowden, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional scans of residual stress within intact weldments provide insight into the consequences of various welding techniques and stress-relieving procedures. The neutron diffraction method for nondestructive evaluation of residual stresses has been applied to a circumferential weld in a ferritic steel pipe of outer diameter 114 mm and thickness 8.6 mm. The maximum tensile stresses, 250 MPa in the hoop direction, are found at mid-thickness of the fusion zone. The residual stresses approach zero within 20 mm from the weld center. The residual stresses caused by welding zirconium alloy components are partially to blame for failures due to delayed-hydride cracking. Neutron diffraction measurements in a GTA-welded Zr-2.5 Nb plate have shown that heat treatment at 530 C for 1 h reduces the longitudinal residual strain by 60%. Neutron diffraction has also been used to scan the residual stresses near circumferential electron beam welds in irradiated and unirradiated Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes. The residual stresses due to electron beam welding appear to be lower than 130 MPa, even in the as-welded state. No significant changes occur in the residual stress pattern of the electron-beam welded tube, during a prolonged exposure to thermal neutrons and the temperatures typical of an operating nuclear reactor

  18. Environmental Impacts of Diverting Crop Residues to Fuel Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy S.

    1997-01-01

    Shortage of fuel wood has lead many rural people to switch to using agricultural residues as an alternative energy source. However this has not always been met with universal acclaim due to the role of residues as fertilisers. Although crop residues and animal manure as a nutrient source has been

  19. TU-FG-201-07: Development of SRS Conical Collimator Collision Prediction Software for Radiation Treatment Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutti, V; Morrow, A; Kim, S; Patel, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments using conical collimators can potentially result in gantry collision with treatment table due to limited collision-clear spaces. An in-house software was developed to help the SRS treatment planner mitigate potential SRS conical collimator (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) collisions with the treatment table. This software was designed to remove treatment re-planning secondary to unexpected collisions. Methods: A BrainLAB SRS ICT Frameless Extension used for SRS treatments in our clinic was mathematically modelled using surface points registered to the 3D co-ordinate space of the couch extension. The surface points are transformed based on the treatment isocenter point and potential collisions are determined in 3D space for couch and gantry angle combinations. The distance between the SRS conical collimators and LINAC isocenter is known. The collision detection model was programmed in MATLAB (Mathwork, Natick, MA) to display graphical plots of the calculations, and the plotted data is used to avoid the gantry and couch angle combinations that would likely result in a collision. We have utilized the cone collision tool for 23 SRS cone treatment plans (8 retrospective and 15 prospective for 10 patients). Results: Twenty one plans strongly agreed with the software tool prediction for collision. However, in two plans, a collision was observed with a 0.5 cm margin when the software predicted no collision. Therefore, additional margins were added to the clearance criteria in the program to achieve a lower risk of actual collisions. Conclusion: Our in-house developed collision check software successfully avoided SRS cone re-planning by 91.3% due to a reduction in cone collisions with the treatment table. Future developments to our software will include a CT image data set based collision prediction model as well as a beam angle optimization tool to avoid normal critical tissues as well as previously treated lesions.

  20. Conservative bin-to-bin fractional collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Particle methods such as direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) are commonly used to model rarefied kinetic flows for engineering applications because of their ability to efficiently capture non-equilibrium behavior. The primary drawback to these methods relates to the poor convergence properties due to the stochastic nature of the methods which typically rely heavily on high degrees of non-equilibrium and time averaging to compensate for poor signal to noise ratios. For standard implementations, each computational particle represents many physical particles which further exacerbate statistical noise problems for flow with large species density variation such as encountered in flow expansions and chemical reactions. The stochastic weighted particle method (SWPM) introduced by Rjasanow and Wagner overcome this difficulty by allowing the ratio of real to computational particles to vary on a per particle basis throughout the flow. The DSMC procedure must also be slightly modified to properly sample the Boltzmann collision integral accounting for the variable particle weights and to avoid the creation of additional particles with negative weight. In this work, the SWPM with necessary modification to incorporate the variable hard sphere (VHS) collision cross section model commonly used in engineering applications is first incorporated into an existing engineering code, the Thermophysics Universal Research Framework. The results and computational efficiency are compared to a few simple test cases using a standard validated implementation of the DSMC method along with the adapted SWPM/VHS collision using an octree based conservative phase space reconstruction. The SWPM method is then further extended to combine the collision and phase space reconstruction into a single step which avoids the need to create additional computational particles only to destroy them again during the particle merge. This is particularly helpful when oversampling the

  1. Gyrokinetic linearized Landau collision operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    , which is important in multiple ion-species plasmas. Second, the equilibrium operator describes drag and diffusion of the magnetic field aligned component of the vorticity associated with the E×B drift. Therefore, a correct description of collisional effects in turbulent plasmas requires the equilibrium......The full gyrokinetic electrostatic linearized Landau collision operator is calculated including the equilibrium operator, which represents the effect of collisions between gyrokinetic Maxwellian particles. First, the equilibrium operator describes energy exchange between different plasma species...... operator, even for like-particle collisions....

  2. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... instantaneous intensities be achieved with in-beam accumulation, but more importantly many orders of magnitude improvement in energy and spatial resolution can be achieved using positron cooling. Atomic collisions can be studied on a new energy scale with unprecedented precion and control. The use...

  3. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  4. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Toneev, V.D.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    1994-01-01

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e + e - pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed

  5. Collision attack against Tav-128 hash function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyanto, Fajar; Hayat Susanti, Bety

    2017-10-01

    Tav-128 is a hash function which is designed for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) authentication protocol. Tav-128 is expected to be a cryptographically secure hash function which meets collision resistance properties. In this research, a collision attack is done to prove whether Tav-128 is a collision resistant hash function. The results show that collisions can be obtained in Tav-128 hash function which means in other word, Tav-128 is not a collision resistant hash function.

  6. Collision and recombination driven instabilities in variable charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neglected in comparison to the effect due to the recombination for estimating the dust-acoustic instability; later the other report shows that the recombination effect is negligible in the presence of dust-neutral collisions. In line of this present situation our investigation revealed that the recom- bination is more important than ...

  7. Risk assessment for ship collisions against offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2014-01-01

    is to ensure that the risk for major accidents and service disruptions is low enough to be acceptable to users, the public and those responsible for public safety. The collision risk hazards must also be re-evaluated at proper time intervals during the operational phase in order to update the risk estimate due...

  8. Collision and recombination driven instabilities in variable charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In an earlier research work, the dust-neutral collision was neglected in comparison to the effect due to the recombination for estimating the dust-acoustic instability; later the other report ... Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, India; Department of AEIE, Dream Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India ...

  9. Collision Technologies for Circular Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levichev, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    For several decades already, particle colliders have been essential tools for particle physics. From the very beginning, such accelerators have been among the most complicated scientific instruments ever built, including a number of innovative technological developments. Examples are ultrahigh vacuum systems, magnets with a very high magnetic field, and equipment for sub-ns synchronization and sub-mm precision alignment of equipment inside multi-km underground tunnels. Some key technologies are related to the focusing of the beam down to a scale of sub-μm at the collision point to obtain high luminosity. This review provides an overview of collision concepts and technologies for circular particle colliders, starting from the first ideas. In particular, it discusses such novel schemes and related technologies as crab waist collision and round beam collision.

  10. Collision Risk Analysis for HSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, Jesper; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1999-01-01

    conventional ships. To reach a documented level of safety, it is therefore not possible directly to transfer experience with conventional ships. The purpose of this paper is to present new rational scientific tools to assess and quantify the collision risk associated with HSC transportation. The paper...... analysis tools to quantify the effect of the high speed have been available. Instead nearly all research on ship accidents has been devoted to analysis of the consequences of given accident scenarios. The proposed collision analysis includes an analysis which determines the probability of a collision...... for a HSC on a given route, an analysis of the released energy during a collision, analytical closed form solutions for the absorbed energy in the structure and finally an assessment of the overall structural crushing behaviour of the vessel, including the level of acceleration and the size of the crushing...

  11. Collision region of the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    This is a collision region from the world’s first proton collider, the Intersecting Storage Rings. The ISR was used at CERN from 1971-84 to study proton-proton collisions at the highest energy then available (60GeV). When operational, ISR collision regions were surrounded by detectors as shown in the photo. In 1972, the surprising discovery of fragments flying out sideways from head-on proton-proton collisions was the first evidence of quark-quark scattering inside the colliding protons . This was similar to Rutherford’s observation in 1911 of alpha particles scattering off the tiny nucleus inside atoms of gold. The ISR beamtubes had to be as empty as outer space, a vacuum 100 000 times better than other CERN machines at the time.

  12. collision zone of an ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a collision region from the world’s first proton collider, the Intersecting Storage Rings. The ISR was used at CERN from 1971-84 to study proton-proton collisions at the highest energy then available (60GeV). When operational, ISR collision regions were surrounded by detectors as shown in the photo. In 1972, the surprising discovery of fragments flying out sideways from head-on proton-proton collisions was the first evidence of quark-quark scattering inside the colliding protons . This was similar to Rutherford’s observation in 1911 of alpha particles scattering off the tiny nucleus inside atoms of gold. The ISR beamtubes had to be as empty as outer space, a vacuum 100 000 times better than other CERN machines at the time.

  13. Agricultural pesticide residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuehr, F.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of tracer techniques in the study of agricultural pesticide residues is reviewed under the following headings: lysimeter experiments, micro-ecosystems, translocation in soil, degradation of pesticides in soil, biological availability of soil-applied substances, bound residues in the soil, use of macro- and microautography, double and triple labelling, use of tracer labelling in animal experiments. (U.K.)

  14. Radiations from atomic collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernyi, D.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of atomic collision phenomena in which only the Coulomb forces have a role is an actual field or the research of the present days. The impact energy range in these collisions is very broad,it extends from the eV or even lower region to the GeV region or higher,i.e. it spans the region of three branches of physics,namely that of the atomic,the nuclear and the particle physics.To describe and explain the collision processes themselves, different models (collision mechanisms) are used and they are surveyed in the presentation. Different electromagnetic radiations and particles are emitted from the collision processes.Their features are shown in details together with the most important methods in their detection and study.Examples are given based on the literature and on the investigations of the author and his coworkers. The applications of the radiation from atomic collisions in other scientific fields and in the solution of different practical problems are also surveyed shortly. 16 figs., 2 tabs., 76 refs. (author)

  15. A metastable helium trap for atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colla, M.; Gulley, R.; Uhlmann, L.; Hoogerland, M.D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Metastable helium in the 2 3 S state is an important species for atom optics and atomic collision physics. Because of its large internal energy (20eV), long lifetime (∼8000s) and large collision cross section for a range of processes, metastable helium plays an important role in atmospheric physics, plasma discharges and gas laser physics. We have embarked on a program of studies on atom-atom and electron-atom collision processes involving cold metastable helium. We confine metastable helium atoms in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), which is loaded by a transversely collimated, slowed and 2-D focussed atomic beam. We employ diode laser tuned to the 1083 nm (2 3 S 1 - 2 3 P2 1 ) transition to generate laser cooling forces in both the loading beam and the trap. Approximately 10 million helium atoms are trapped at temperatures of ∼ 1mK. We use phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the trapped atomic density. The cold, trapped atoms can collide to produce either atomic He + or molecular He 2 + ions by Penning Ionisation (PI) or Associative Ionisation (AI). The rate of formation of these ions is dependant upon the detuning of the trapping laser from resonance. A further laser can be used to connect the 2 3 S 1 state to another higher lying excited state, and variation of the probe laser detuning used to measure interatomic collision potential. Electron-atom collision processes are studied using a monochromatic electron beam with a well defined spatial current distribution. The total trap loss due to electron collisions is measured as a function of electron energy. Results will be presented for these atomic collision physics measurements involving cold, trapped metastable helium atoms. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  16. Mathematical Model for Collision-Coalescence Among Inclusions in the Bloom Continuous Caster with M-EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Jiang, Jimin; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Weixian; Dong, Guiwen

    2018-02-01

    Mathematical simulation is an effective tool to analyze the fluid flow and the inclusion behavior in the bloom continuous caster with mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS). The mathematical model is applied to the modeling of magnetic field, flow field, and inclusion field. Due to the introduction of Archimedes force, the collision mechanism and inclusion's slipping velocity should be modified in the inclusion mass and population conservation model. Numerically predicted magnetic field, flow field, and the inclusion spatial distribution conform to the experimental results in the existing literature. Lorentz force plays an important role in the fluid flow, and Archimedes force plays an important role in the inclusion distribution in the continuous caster. Due to Brownian collision, Stokes collision, Archimedes collision, and turbulent collision, the coalescence among inclusions occurs in the bloom continuous caster with M-EMS. Among the four types of collisions, turbulent collision occurs most frequently, followed by Archimedes collision and Stokes collision. The frequency of Brownian collision is several orders of magnitudes smaller and is therefore negligible. The inclusion volume concentration, number density, and characteristic radius exhibit a U-shape in the continuous caster without M-EMS. However, with M-EMS, they exhibit an inverted U-shape.

  17. Mathematical Model for Collision-Coalescence Among Inclusions in the Bloom Continuous Caster with M-EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Jiang, Jimin; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Weixian; Dong, Guiwen

    2018-04-01

    Mathematical simulation is an effective tool to analyze the fluid flow and the inclusion behavior in the bloom continuous caster with mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS). The mathematical model is applied to the modeling of magnetic field, flow field, and inclusion field. Due to the introduction of Archimedes force, the collision mechanism and inclusion's slipping velocity should be modified in the inclusion mass and population conservation model. Numerically predicted magnetic field, flow field, and the inclusion spatial distribution conform to the experimental results in the existing literature. Lorentz force plays an important role in the fluid flow, and Archimedes force plays an important role in the inclusion distribution in the continuous caster. Due to Brownian collision, Stokes collision, Archimedes collision, and turbulent collision, the coalescence among inclusions occurs in the bloom continuous caster with M-EMS. Among the four types of collisions, turbulent collision occurs most frequently, followed by Archimedes collision and Stokes collision. The frequency of Brownian collision is several orders of magnitudes smaller and is therefore negligible. The inclusion volume concentration, number density, and characteristic radius exhibit a U-shape in the continuous caster without M-EMS. However, with M-EMS, they exhibit an inverted U-shape.

  18. Passive inference of collision frequency in magnetized capacitive argon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binwal, S.; Joshi, J. K.; Karkari, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Nair, L.

    2018-03-01

    A non-invasive method of determining the collision frequency νm by measuring the net plasma impendence in a magnetized, capacitive-coupled, radio-frequency (rf) discharge circuit is developed. The collision frequency has been analytically expressed in terms of bulk plasma reactance, wherein standard sheath models have been used to estimate the reactance offered due to the capacitive rf sheaths at the discharge plates. The experimental observations suggest that in the un-magnetized case, νm remains constant over a range of rf current but steadily increases as the background pressure reduces. In the magnetized case, the collision frequency has been observed to decay with the increase in rf current while it remains unaffected by the background pressure. A qualitative discussion has been presented to explain these characteristics.

  19. Bursty emission of whistler waves in association with plasmoid collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fujimoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new mechanism to generate whistler waves in the course of collisionless magnetic reconnection is proposed. It is found that intense whistler emissions occur in association with plasmoid collisions. The key processes are strong perpendicular heating of the electrons through a secondary magnetic reconnection during plasmoid collision and the subsequent compression of the ambient magnetic field, leading to whistler instability due to the electron temperature anisotropy. The emissions have a bursty nature, completing in a short time within the ion timescales, as has often been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. The whistler waves can accelerate the electrons in the parallel direction, contributing to the generation of high-energy electrons. The present study suggests that the bursty emission of whistler waves could be an indicator of plasmoid collisions and the associated particle energization during collisionless magnetic reconnection.

  20. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Roncero, Octavio; Sanz-Sanz, Cristina [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Departamento de Química Física, Unidad Asociada UAM-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias M-14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  1. Electroweak bosons in heavy ion collisions in CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsigmond, Anna Julia

    2014-06-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is fully equipped to measure leptonic decays of electroweak probes in the high multiplicity environment of nucleus–nucleus collisions. The inclusive and differential Z boson yields in the muon and electron decay channels are presented, together with measurements of the yield of W bosons decaying into a muon and an (anti)neutrino as a function of centrality, and the W charge asymmetry as a function of rapidity. The results confirm the binary scaling hypothesis, and show that possible modifications due to nuclear PDFs with respect to pp collisions, scaled by the number of elementary nucleon–nucleon collisions, are within the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the current measurements.

  2. Molecular dynamics and binary collisions modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the spectral dependence of defect production and microstructure evolution for the development of fission-fusion correlations. Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase demonstrated at low energy

  3. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  4. Comparing Fragmentation Functions in Pb-Pb Collisions using JEWEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harrison

    2016-09-01

    Collisions between lead nuclei at relativistic speeds create a hot, dense state of deconfined quark matter called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). Due to its extreme density, temperature, and abundance of color charge, the QGP gives us a unique opportunity to study strong interactions and test the limits of QCD. Collisions between nuclei produce jets, clusters of particles hadronized from an energetic parton. Jets produced in heavy ion collisions must travel through the energetic and dense QGP, which changes the structure and momenta of the jets, a phenomenon known as jet quenching. By analyzing the changes in hadron fragmentation and momenta, we probe the properties and structure of the QGP. To analyze the jet fragmentation, we simulated lead-lead collisions with JEWEL, a modification to the Monte-Carlo (MC) generator PYTHIA6, and compared the results with ATLAS data at 2.76 TeV and 5 TeV. These comparisons between the ATLAS data and the MC simulation are important for understanding jet quenching in heavy ion collisions. This poster gives an overview of the results of the simulation and how they compare with ATLAS data on fragmentation.

  5. Replacement collision sequences in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewitt, T.H.; Kirk, M.A.; Scott, T.L.

    1975-10-01

    The concept of radiation-induced defects traveling large distances by focussed collision sequences (focusons) without thermal activation has important consequences in radiation effect studies. The focussed collision sequences are of two types: (1) ''Silsbee focussing'' or momentum focussing which can cause defect pairs to form large distances from the primary knock-on and (2) focussed replacement collisions also called ''dynamic crowdions'' where mass transport causes a large separation between the vacancy and its interstitial. Direct experimental evidence for focussed collision sequences is in short supply and conflicting. The sputtering patterns associated with close packed crystalline directions from the backscattering of charged particles seemed to substantiate long-range focussed collisions until it was pointed out that collision chains need not be long to yield such patterns. More recently, transmission sputtering has been used with conflicting results. Ecker et al. found no evidence for focusons greater than 17 atom distances whereas preliminary results of Siedman et al. suggest several hundred atom distances. Keil and co-workers found evidence for replacement collision sequences of 100 atom distances by stereo electron microscopy of interstitial agglomerates interjected by low energy heavy ion bombardment. Experiments by Kirk et al. and Becker and co-workers on ordered alloys, are only sensitive to dynamic crowdions. Kirk and co-workers result on the changes in magnetic properties of Ni 3 Mn induced by thermal neutron bombardment strongly support long range focusons (greater than 30 atom distances) whereas Wollenberger found no evidence for focusons with 1 and 3 MeV electron irradiation. Theoretical treatments of Liebfried suggest a maximum length of 30 atom distances whereas Holmes' modified treatment suggests less than 10 atom distances. (10 fig, 23 references)

  6. [Residual neuromuscular blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Schmartz, D

    2017-06-01

    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.

  7. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain trace amounts of both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant and residuals.

  8. Residu Fungisida Tembaga (Cu pada Pucuk Teh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christanti Sumardiyono

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was done to know copper residue on tea due to blister blight control by copper fungicides. The experiment was done at Pagilaran Tea Plantation, Batang, Pekalongan. Tea plants were sprayed 8 times, with 8 days interval at the dosages of 0. 75, 150, and 300 g/ha respectively. Shoot sample was taken at 8 and 16 days after spraying. The copper residue war analyzed by Atomic Adsorbtion Spectrophotometer at 324 nm. The result showed that the higher dosage of spraying gives higher copper residue. At the dosage of 300 g/ha was detected 23,52 ppm of copper residue at 8 days after spraying. The residue was reduced to 12,96 ppm at 16 days after spraying. At that dosage the blister blight disease intensity reduced by 59,97%. The detected residue of copper fungicides due to blister blight control is not higher than MRL ( 150 ppm.

  9. Multiple production of mesons in Au+Au and Pb+Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P; Bhattacharya, D P; Bhattacharya, S

    2003-01-01

    The study presented here pertains to the model-based analyses for production of some important charged secondaries in lead-lead and gold-gold collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. We examine the role of a particular version of the Sequential Chain Model (SCM) in interpreting the data on the production of only the secondary mesons of the most abundant variety in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The initial results derived for basic pp collisions have been transformed into the corresponding cases for nucleus-nucleus collisions through the appropriate physical-mathematical formalisms. The agreement between the model of choice and the measured data for the most important varieties of mesons in the two above-stated nuclear collisions could so far be rated to be barely modest. This is presumably due to our neglect of the effects of rescattering and cascading, while we choose to obtain only the first-order results in the initial attempt. (47 refs).

  10. The activation of classical vibro-rotational resonances in diatom molecules through slow collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Antonia; Palao, Jose P.; Heller, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Classical atom-diatom collisions at low velocities can be considered as a transient perturbation to the (integrable) diatomic system. We present an analysis that makes explicit the contributions of the terms of the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential to the changes in the molecular actions due to the collision process. Each term is associated with a resonance condition between the vibrational and rotational molecular frequencies, and leads to a vibrational, rotational or vibrotational contribution to the total action changes. The analysis is applied to the system Li 2 * -Ne. -- Highlights: → Resonances determine vibrotational energy transfer in slow atom-diatom collisions. → We obtain the molecular action changes from the Fourier expansion of the interaction. → Vibrotational correlations depend on collision velocity and initial molecular state. → The application to classical Li 2 -Ne collisions explains experimental observations.

  11. Formation flight and collision avoidance for multiple UAVs based on modified tentacle algorithm in unstructured environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghuan Zhang

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for formation flight and collision avoidance of multiple UAVs. Due to the shortcomings such as collision avoidance caused by UAV's high-speed and unstructured environments, this paper proposes a modified tentacle algorithm to ensure the high performance of collision avoidance. Different from the conventional tentacle algorithm which uses inverse derivation, the modified tentacle algorithm rapidly matches the radius of each tentacle and the steering command, ensuring that the data calculation problem in the conventional tentacle algorithm is solved. Meanwhile, both the speed sets and tentacles in one speed set are reduced and reconstructed so as to be applied to multiple UAVs. Instead of path iterative optimization, the paper selects the best tentacle to obtain the UAV collision avoidance path quickly. The simulation results show that the method presented in the paper effectively enhances the performance of flight formation and collision avoidance for multiple high-speed UAVs in unstructured environments.

  12. Formation flight and collision avoidance for multiple UAVs based on modified tentacle algorithm in unstructured environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghuan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for formation flight and collision avoidance of multiple UAVs. Due to the shortcomings such as collision avoidance caused by UAV's high-speed and unstructured environments, this paper proposes a modified tentacle algorithm to ensure the high performance of collision avoidance. Different from the conventional tentacle algorithm which uses inverse derivation, the modified tentacle algorithm rapidly matches the radius of each tentacle and the steering command, ensuring that the data calculation problem in the conventional tentacle algorithm is solved. Meanwhile, both the speed sets and tentacles in one speed set are reduced and reconstructed so as to be applied to multiple UAVs. Instead of path iterative optimization, the paper selects the best tentacle to obtain the UAV collision avoidance path quickly. The simulation results show that the method presented in the paper effectively enhances the performance of flight formation and collision avoidance for multiple high-speed UAVs in unstructured environments.

  13. Residuation in orthomodular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajda Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that every idempotent weakly divisible residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law can be transformed into an orthomodular lattice. The converse holds if adjointness is replaced by conditional adjointness. Moreover, we show that every positive right residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law and two further simple identities can be converted into an orthomodular lattice. In this case, also the converse statement is true and the corresponence is nearly one-to-one.

  14. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  15. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  16. Nucleus behavior in violent collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, M.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.

    1985-01-01

    Thanks to new heavy ion beams (Argon, Krypton...) accelerated at Ganil and Sara to velocities of about 0.2 to 0.5 times the light one, very violent collisions, between complex nuclei can be made. During peripheral collisions, the projectile is strongly heated in '' wearing away'' the target and follows its way at high velocity in loosing nucleons. Resulting fragments can present themselves as nuclei very different from usual stable nuclei, often at existence limit. In more central collisions, the energy transferred is such that fusion of both leads to a new type of very hot nucleus near the immediate boiling. Another existence limit is reached by this way: where the bound nucleon system tend to become nucleon gas or a bulk of little fragments [fr

  17. Semiholography for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2017-01-01

    The formation of QGP in heavy ion collisions gives us a great opportunity for learning about nonperturbative dynamics of QCD. Semiholography provides a new consistent framework to combine perturbative and non-perturbative effects in a coherent way and can be applied to obtain an effective description for heavy ion collisions. In particular, it allows us to include nonperturbative effects in existing glasma effective theory and QCD kinetic theory for the weakly coupled saturated degrees of freedom liberated by the collisions in the initial stages in a consistent manner. We argue why the full framework should be able to confront experiments with only a few phenomenological parameters and present feasibility tests for the necessary numerical computations. Furthermore, we discuss that semiholography leads to a new description of collective flow in the form of a generalised non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss some open questions which we hope to answer in the near future.

  18. QCD in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Iancu, Edmond

    2014-04-10

    These lectures provide a modern introduction to selected topics in the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions which shed light on the fundamental theory of strong interactions, the Quantum Chromodynamics. The emphasis is on the partonic forms of QCD matter which exist in the early and intermediate stages of a collision -- the colour glass condensate, the glasma, and the quark-gluon plasma -- and on the effective theories that are used for their description. These theories provide qualitative and even quantitative insight into a wealth of remarkable phenomena observed in nucleus-nucleus or deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and/or the LHC, like the suppression of particle production and of azimuthal correlations at forward rapidities, the energy and centrality dependence of the multiplicities, the ridge effect, the limiting fragmentation, the jet quenching, or the dijet asymmetry.

  19. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  20. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  1. Characteristics of violent collisions in Ar-induced reactions at intermediaire energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivet, M.F.; Borderie, B.

    1984-01-01

    We report on two experiments performed with the Ganil facility using the 27 MeV/u Ar beam. The first one concerns an intermediate mass system, Ar + Ag. For the second one a heavier fissile system, Ar + U, was chosen. For Ar + Ag information about fusion requires the measurements of evaporation residues and fission. In the Ar + U reaction, most of the collisions lead to fission. The violence of the collision is therefore determined from the correlation angle of the coincidence fission fragments

  2. $J/\\psi$ Absorption in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano; Polosa, Antonio; Riquer, V

    2004-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the pi-J/psi dissociation cross sections within the Constituent Quark-Meson Model recently introduced. To discuss the absorption of J/psi in heavy-ion collisions, we assume the J/psi to be produced inside a thermalized pion gas, as discussed by Bjorken, and introduce the corrections due to absorption by nuclear matter as well. We fit the absorption length of the J/psi to the data obtained at the CERN SPS by the NA50 Collaboration for Pb-Pb collisions. Collisions of lower centrality allow us to determine the temperature and the energy density of the pion gas. For both these quantities we find values close to those indicated by lattice gauge calculations for the transition to a quark-gluon plasma. A simple extrapolation to more central collisions, which takes into account the increase of the energy deposited due to the increased nucleon flux, fails to reproduce the break in J/psi absorption indicated by NA50, thus lending support to the idea that an unconfined quark-gluon phase m...

  3. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F e =F g +1 and F g >0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity

  4. Spectroscopic studies of hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielkopf, J.

    1991-01-01

    Low energy collisions involving neutral excited states of hydrogen are being studied with vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen is generated by focusing an energetic pulse of ArF, KrF, or YAG laser light into a cell of molecular hydrogen, where a plasma is created near the focal point. The H 2 molecules in and near this region are dissociated, and the cooling atomic hydrogen gas is examined with laser and dispersive optical spectroscopy. In related experiments, we are also investigating neutral H + O and H + metal - atom collisions in these laser-generated plasmas

  5. High-energy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, Denes.

    1987-01-01

    The progress in energetic ion-atom collision studies is shown briefly on the basis of the Workshop in the field above held in Debrecen. The 'hot topics', namely 'two-center' and electron correlation phenomena, collisions with antiprotons, recent results on alignment and orientation in energetic heavy-ion collisions, autoionization electron studies in the meV region and the utilization of heavy-ion storage rings in ion-atom collision experiments are treated. (author) 4 figs

  6. How does the Quark-Gluon Plasma know the collision energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Heavy ion collisions at the LHC facility generate a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) which, for central collisions, has a higher energy density and temperature than the plasma generated in central collisions at the RHIC. But sufficiently peripheral LHC collisions give rise to plasmas which have the same energy density and temperature as the "central" RHIC plasmas. One might assume that the two versions of the QGP would have very similar properties (for example, with regard to jet quenching), but recent investigations have suggested that they do not: the plasma "knows" that the overall collision energy is different in the two cases. We argue, using a gauge-gravity analysis, that the strong magnetic fields arising in one case (peripheral collisions), but not the other, may be relevant here. If the residual magnetic field in peripheral LHC plasmas is of the order of at least eB ≈ 5mπ2, then the model predicts modifications of the relevant quenching parameter which approach those recently reported.

  7. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  8. Compression and expansion in central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of central collisions of heavy nuclei in the energy range from few tens of MeV/nucleon to a couple of GeV/nucleon is discussed. As the beam energy increases and/or the impact parameter decreases, the maximum compression increases. It is argued that the hydrodynamic behaviour of matter sets in the vicinity of balance energy. At higher energies shock fronts are observed to form within head-on reaction simulations, perpendicular to beam axis and separating hot compressed matter from cold. In the semi-central reactions a weak tangential discontinuity develops in-between these fronts. The hot compressed matter exposed to the vacuum in directions parallel to the shock front begin to expand collectively into these directions. The expansion affects particle angular distributions and mean energy components and further shapes of spectra and mean energies of particles emitted into any one direction. The variation of slopes and the relative yields measured within the FOPI collaboration are in a general agreement with the results of simulations. As to the FOPI data on stopping, they are consistent with the preference for transverse over the longitudinal motion in the head-on Au + Au collisions. Unfortunately, though, the data can not be used to decide directly on that preference due to acceptance cuts. Tied to the spatial and temporal changes in the reactions are changes in the entropy per nucleon. (authors)

  9. Distraction-related road traffic collisions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objectives: We aimed to prospectively study distraction-related road traffic collision injuries, their contributory factors, severity, and outcome. Methods: Data were prospectively collected on all hospitalized road traffic collision trauma patients in Al-Ain City who were drivers at the collision time over one and half years ...

  10. Photoinitiated collisions between cold Cs Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overstreet, K. Richard; Schwettmann, Arne; Tallant, Jonathan; Shaffer, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of a photoinitiated collision in an ultracold Cs Rydberg gas are presented. The process is characterized by measuring the laser intensity dependence of the absorption, the number of particles leaving each collision, and the recoil velocity of the collision fragments. The results of the experiment are compared to ab initio Rydberg pair interaction potentials

  11. NA49: lead-lead collision

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  12. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  13. Car Accident Due to Horse Crossing the Motorway: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbülent Kılıç

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic Commercial Court in Ankara wanted a report from our department of forensic medicine about two injury cases due to animal vehicle collision. The reports should include the disability rate and the duration of unfunctionality. After the examination we prepared the reports. Both vehicle collisions happened due to free ranging horse crossing the motorway. Both cases had different types of injury due to trauma. Vehicle collision due to horse crossing the motorway is rarely met in Turkey. Our first case is a man that had upper extremity and facial injury. He uses prothesis due to ear amputation. He has a scar tissue on the right side of his face and left forearm. The other case is three-years-old boy that had cranial bone fracture and cranial hematoma. He has also hemiparesis of the right side of body. Both cases have neurologic sequels but they have no psychiatric sequels.  In literature, animal vehicle collisions involve lots of animal species such as kangaroo, deer, camel and moose. Animal vehicle collision involving the horses is rarely met. Forensic medicine specialists should state the causal link between traumatic events and disabilities in order to help justice. Our aim to present the current two cases is investigation of injuries of animal related collision and makes forensic medicine specialists pay attention to the subject of preparing reports about such cases. Key words: Animal vehicle collision; death; disability; horse; injury; motorway.  

  14. Electroremediation of air pollution control residues in a continuous reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ferreira, Célia M. D.; Hansen, Henrik K.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residue from municipal solid waste incineration is considered hazardous waste due to its alkalinity and high content of salts and mobile heavy metals. Various solutions for the handling of APC-residue exist, however most commercial solutions involve landfilling. A demand...... for environmental sustainable alternatives exists and electrodialysis could be such an alternative. The potential of electrodialysis for treating APC-residue is explored in this work by designing and testing a continuous-flow bench-scale reactor that can work with a high solids content feed solution. Experiments...... were made with raw residue, water-washed residue, acid washed residue and acid-treated residue with emphasis on reduction of heavy metal mobility. Main results indicate that the reactor successfully removes toxic elements lead, copper, cadmium and zinc from the feed stream, suggesting...

  15. Electrodialytic remediation of air pollution control residues in bench scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ferreira, Celia; Hansen, Henrik K.

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residue from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is considered a hazardous waste due to its alkalinity and high content of salts and mobile heavy metals. Various solutions for the handling of APC-residue exist in different regions; however, most commercial...... solutions are concerned with deposition. A demand for more environmentally friendly alternatives exists. Electrodialysis could be such an alternative, and the potential is being explored. This work presents a bench scale study of the feasibility of treating APC-residue from a dry system by electrodialysis....... A system resembling conventional electrodialysis was designed and adjusted to fit the high solids content feed solution (10% APC residue, 90% water). Experiments were made in bench scale with raw residue (natural pH > 12), water pre-residue (natural pH > 12), acid pre-washed residue (pH 10), and acid...

  16. Collision Analysis for MS DEXTRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    and grounding events have to be analysed and assessed.The present paper outlines such a rational procedure for evaluation of the probabilistic distribution of damages caused by collisions against other ships for a specific ship on a specific route.The work described in the paper constitutes a step towards...

  17. Cern collisions light up Copenhagen

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Anyone passing by the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, might be startled by some strange moving lights on the facade of the institute's main building. In fact, the dancing beams show, almost in real time, collisions form the Atlas experiment at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)" (1 paragraph)

  18. Perspective on relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1979-05-01

    The importance of experiments detecting more than one particle is pointed out. The production of nuclei far from stability in peripheral collisions and the expectations for the explosive disassembly of dense nuclear matter (nuclear fireball) and some evidence for it are related. Pion interferometry concerns the measurement of correlations in the momentum and energy of two identical pions; the subject is discussed in relation to incoherent production, coherent production, partially coherent production, final-state interactions, impact parameter average, and outlook. Much of the paper deals with an assessment of the possibility of determining the form of the hadronic spectrum in the high-mass region through nuclear collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. The subject is developed under the following topics: perspective, the initial fireball, isoergic equilibrium expansion of the fireball, quasi-dynamical expansion, quark matter, and the mass degree of freedom. The quasi-dynamical model obtained indicates that certain parameters, such as the ..pi../N and K/N ratios at high kinetic energy, will survive the collision; therefore, a determination of the asymptotic form of the hadron spectrum probably can be made by studying nuclear collisions at very high energies (10 GeV/nucleon in the center of mass). 16 figures. (RWR)

  19. in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... the 'Big Bang', and has now been (re-)created as the hottest matter ever in laboratory by heavy-ion collisions ('Little Bang') at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as well as at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). To experimentally measure and theoretically understand the various properties of the QGP ...

  20. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  1. Outer Dynamics of Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to present analysis procedures for the motion of ships during ship-ship collisions and for ship collisons with offshore structures. The aim is to estimate that part of the lost kinetic energy which will have to be absorbed by rupture and plastic damage of the colliding...

  2. Corn residue removal and CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4) are the primary greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted from the soil due to agricultural activities. In the short-term, increases in CO2 emissions indicate increased soil microbial activity. Soil micro-organisms decompose crop residues and release...

  3. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents methodologies for residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components using linear elastic and nonlinear fracture mechanics principles. The effect of cohesive forces due to aggregate bridging has been represented mathematically by employing tension softening models. Various tension ...

  4. The upper bound of radiation energy in the Myers-Perry black hole collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the upper bound of the radiation energy in the head-on collision of two Myers-Perry black holes. Initially, the two black holes are far away from each other, and they become one black hole after the collision. We have obtained the upper bound of the radiation energy thermodynamically allowed in the process. The upper bound of the radiation energy is obtained in general dimensions. The radiation bound depends on the alignments of rotating axes for a given initial condition due to spin-spin interaction. We have found that the collision may not be occurred for a initially ultra-spinning black hole.

  5. Overview on collision processes of highly charged ions with atoms present status and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.

    1983-05-01

    This paper provides a brief discussion on the present status of the collision physics of highly charged ions with atoms. The emphasis is on the main achievements in understanding and describing the most important collision processes, and as charge transfer, ionization and Auger-type processes, and even more on those open problems which, due either to their scientific or practical importance, represent challenges to current research in this field. The paper concentrates on general ideas and problems whose development and solutions have advanced or will advance our basic understanding of the collision dynamics of multiply charged ions with atoms

  6. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  7. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  8. Environmental Impacts of Diverting Crop Residues to Fuel Use

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, Joy S.

    1997-01-01

    Shortage of fuel wood has lead many rural people to switch to using agricultural residues as an alternative energy source. However this has not always been met with universal acclaim due to the role of residues as fertilisers. Although crop residues and animal manure as a nutrient source has been superseded by inorganic fertilizers in most intensive farming systems, they continue to be the main source of crop nutrient replacement in most developing countries. There has developed wide spread a...

  9. The importance of antibiotic residues presence detection in milk

    OpenAIRE

    Dubravka Samaržija; Neven Antunac

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic residues are the most present inhibitory substances in milkhaving undesirable effect on human health, technological characteristics and the quality of milk and dairy products. In order to protect consumer's health and to ensure high quality milk production, European Union (EU) regulation 2377/90 sets a maximum permitted levels for antibiotic residues in milk. Although the presence of antibiotic residues in milk can be due to animal diseases treatment, and in the case of milking ani...

  10. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecke, Holger; Svensson, Malin

    2008-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2 6-1 experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO 2 until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon

  11. Collision prediction models using multivariate Poisson-lognormal regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Sayed, Tarek

    2009-07-01

    This paper advocates the use of multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) regression to develop models for collision count data. The MVPLN approach presents an opportunity to incorporate the correlations across collision severity levels and their influence on safety analyses. The paper introduces a new multivariate hazardous location identification technique, which generalizes the univariate posterior probability of excess that has been commonly proposed and applied in the literature. In addition, the paper presents an alternative approach for quantifying the effect of the multivariate structure on the precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN approach is compared with the independent (separate) univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN) models with respect to model inference, goodness-of-fit, identification of hot spots and precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN is modeled using the WinBUGS platform which facilitates computation of posterior distributions as well as providing a goodness-of-fit measure for model comparisons. The results indicate that the estimates of the extra Poisson variation parameters were considerably smaller under MVPLN leading to higher precision. The improvement in precision is due mainly to the fact that MVPLN accounts for the correlation between the latent variables representing property damage only (PDO) and injuries plus fatalities (I+F). This correlation was estimated at 0.758, which is highly significant, suggesting that higher PDO rates are associated with higher I+F rates, as the collision likelihood for both types is likely to rise due to similar deficiencies in roadway design and/or other unobserved factors. In terms of goodness-of-fit, the MVPLN model provided a superior fit than the independent univariate models. The multivariate hazardous location identification results demonstrated that some hazardous locations could be overlooked if the analysis was restricted to the univariate models.

  12. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. Results We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. Conclusions We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific

  13. Coalescence and Collisions of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Tijerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the assembling of small gold clusters subject to collisions and close contact coalescence by using molecular dynamics simulations to simulate events that occur typically in the sputtering process of synthesis. Our results support the notion that the kinetics of coalescence processes strongly determine the geometry and structure of the final particle. While impact velocities, relative orientations, and the initial shape of the interacting particles are unlikely to strictly determine the structural details of the newly formed particle, we found that high initial temperatures and/or impact velocities increase the probability of appearance of icosahedral-like structures, Wulff polyhedra are likely to be formed as a product of the interactions between nanospheres, while the appearance of fcc particles of approximately cuboctahedral shape is mainly due to the interaction between icosahedra.

  14. Theory of and effects from elastoplasticity in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1985-02-01

    Elastoplasticity of finite Fermi systems results from a coherent coupling between collective and intrinsic degrees of freedom and subsequent equilibration essentially due to two-body collisions. Within a non-markovian transport-theoretical approach referred to as dissipative diabatic dynamics (DDD), elastoplastical forms the link between giant vibrations and overdamped motion of nuclear. Obersvable effects resulting from this non-markovian behaviour in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Isospin effects in central heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivet M.-F.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available N/Z effects were observed on variables measured in central Xe on Sn collisions around the Fermi energy. Comparisons were made with dynamical simulations of collisions in which the symmetry term of the EOS was varied. In this framework it appeared that the observed effects were due to the dynamics of the reaction and not to the deexcitation of the hot primary fragments.

  16. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  17. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  18. Atomic collisions related to atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    Atomic collisions are important in various places in atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). At a vaporization zone, many atomic collisions due to high density have influence on the atomic beam characteristics such as velocity distribution and metastable states' populations at a separation zone. In the separation zone, a symmetric charge transfer between the produced ions and the neutral atoms may degrade selectivity. We have measured atomic excitation temperatures of atomic beams and symmetric charge transfer cross sections for gadolinium and neodymium. Gadolinium and neodymium are both lanthanides. Nevertheless, results for gadolinium and neodymium are very different. The gadolinium atom has one 5d electron and neodymium atom has no 5d electron. It is considered that the differences are due to existence of 5d electron. (author)

  19. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  20. Paths to equilibrium in non-conformal collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attems Maximilian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since fast hydrodynamization has been observed in heavy ion collisions the understanding of the hot early out-of-equilibrium stage of such collisions has been a topic of intense research. We use the gauge/gravity duality to model the creation of a strongly coupled Quark-Gluon plasma in a non-conformal gauge theory. This numerical relativity study is the first non-conformal holographic simulation of a heavy ion collision and reveals the existence of new relaxation channels due to the presence of non-vanishing bulk viscosity. We study shock wave collisions at different energies in gauge theories with different degrees of non-conformality and compare three relaxation times which can occur in different orderings: the hydrodynamization time (when hydrodynamics becomes applicable, the EoSization time (when the average pressure approaches its equilibrium value and the condensate relaxation time (when the expectation value of a scalar operator approaches its equilibrium value. We find that these processes can occur in several different orderings. In particular, the condensate can remain far from equilibrium even long after the plasma has hydrodynamized and EoSized.

  1. Pedestrian fatalities resulting from train-person collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sérgio; Santos, Liliana; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa; Santos, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Train-person collisions have a significant impact in our society, due to their negative economic and psychological effects. This work aims to study fatalities resulting from train-person collisions in Portugal. A retrospective study was conducted based on the analysis of autopsy reports related to train-person fatalities performed in the North Branch of the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences. Suicide was responsible for most of the cases, and males were more often involved in train-person collisions than females. Victims, between 40 and 59 years old, were found to be involved in a high percentage (39%) of the cases, and people older than 65 accounted for a significant percentage (40%) of the accidents. No seasonality was observed in suicide cases, but a decrease in accident numbers was registered in summer. Regarding weekday and time of day, afternoon and non-rush hour were the times when most suicides were observed, whereas accidents did not showed a specific weekday or time of day, except for rush hour, during which they were more frequent. Alcohol-positive blood analysis accounting for 25% of the cases. Differences from other European studies were found, which may be related to the different cultures of the countries/regions, as well as to the differences in the railway systems. More extensive studies must be performed in order to develop strategies to prevent train-person collisions.

  2. Chlorinated pesticide residues in sediments from the Arabian Sea along the Central West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; SenGupta, R.

    Environmental contamination by persistent chlorinated pesticides has evoked major concern due to the presence of their residues in the environment. The quantitative distribution of chlorinated pesticides residues in the marine sediments from...

  3. Diabatic interaction potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Lukasiak, A.

    1984-01-01

    Within a refined method for the construction of diabatic states allowing for the treatment of the full spin-orbit coupling, characteristic features of the diabatic potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions are investigated. Approximately 90% of the strong repulsion results from diabatic particle-hole excitations, while only 10% is due to compression. The diabatic interaction potential describes a physical situation intermediate between adiabatic and sudden approximations. (orig.)

  4. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  6. Hard probes in heavy ion collisions at the LHC: PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, Alberto; Botje, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cole, B.; Eskola, K.J.; Fai, George I.; Frankfurt, L.; Fries, R.J.; Geist, Walter M.; Guzey, V.; Honkanen, H.; Kolhinen, V.J.; Kovchegov, Yu.V.; McDermott, M.; Morsch, A.; Qiu, Jian-wei; Salgado, C.A.; Strikman, M.; Takai, H.; Tapprogge, S.; Vogt, R.; Zhang, X.f.

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript is the outcome of the subgroup ``PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions'' from the CERN workshop ``Hard Probes in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC''. In addition to the experimental parameters for $pA$ collisions at the LHC, the issues discussed are factorization in nuclear collisions, nuclear parton distributions (nPDFs), hard probes as the benchmark tests of factorization in $pA$ collisions at the LHC, and semi-hard probes as observables with potentially large nuclear effects. Also, novel QCD phenomena in $pA$ collisions at the LHC are considered. The importance of the $pA$ program at the LHC is emphasized.

  7. Collision geometry dependence of the thermal excitation-energy deposition in 8-15 GeV/c hadron-Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltz, R; Newby, R J; Klay, J; Heffner, M; Beaulieu, L; Lefort, T; Kwiatkowski, K; Viola, V E

    2008-05-08

    The mean number of primary hadron-nucleon scatterings (<{nu}>) and mean impact parameter () are extracted from the distribution of fast protons in 14.6 GeV p-Au and 8.0 GeV {pi}-Au and {bar p}-Au collisions. The mean excitation energy per residue nucleon (E*/A) and fast and thermal light particle multiplicities are studied as a function of collision geometry.

  8. Collisions engineering theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Frémond, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates collisions occurring in the motion of solids, in the motion of fluids but also in the motion of pedestrians in crowds. The duration of these presented collisions is short compared to the whole duration of the motion: they are assumed instantaneous. The innovative concept demonstrated in this book is that a system made of two solids, is deformable because their relative position changes. The definition of the velocities of deformation of the system introduced in the classical developments of mechanics, the principle of the virtual work and the laws of thermodynamics, allows a large range of applications such as crowd motions, debris flow motions, and shape memory alloys motions. The set of the applications is even larger: social sciences and mechanics are unified to predict the motion of crowds with application to transport management and to evacuation of theaters management.

  9. Collisions engineering. Theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremond, Michel; Univ.

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates collisions occurring in the motion of solids, in the motion of fluids but also in the motion of pedestrians in crowds. The duration of these presented collisions is short compared to the whole duration of the motion: they are assumed instantaneous. The innovative concept demonstrated in this book is that a system made of two solids, is deformable because their relative position changes. The definition of the velocities of deformation of the system introduced in the classical developments of mechanics, the principle of the virtual work and the laws of thermodynamics, allows a large range of applications such as crowd motions, debris flow motions, and shape memory alloys motions. The set of the applications is even larger: social sciences and mechanics are unified to predict the motion of crowds with application to transport management and to evacuation of theaters management.

  10. Collisions engineering. Theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fremond, Michel [Rome ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Computer Science

    2017-02-01

    This book investigates collisions occurring in the motion of solids, in the motion of fluids but also in the motion of pedestrians in crowds. The duration of these presented collisions is short compared to the whole duration of the motion: they are assumed instantaneous. The innovative concept demonstrated in this book is that a system made of two solids, is deformable because their relative position changes. The definition of the velocities of deformation of the system introduced in the classical developments of mechanics, the principle of the virtual work and the laws of thermodynamics, allows a large range of applications such as crowd motions, debris flow motions, and shape memory alloys motions. The set of the applications is even larger: social sciences and mechanics are unified to predict the motion of crowds with application to transport management and to evacuation of theaters management.

  11. Electron collisions in gas switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    Many technologies rely on the conduction/insulation properties of gaseous matter for their successful operation. Many others (e.g., pulsed power technologies) rely on the rapid change (switching or modulation) of the properties of gaseous matter from an insulator to a conductor and vice versa. Studies of electron collision processes in gases aided the development of pulsed power gas switches, and in this paper we shall briefly illustrate the kind of knowledge on electron collision processes which is needed to optimize the performance of such switching devices. To this end, we shall refer to three types of gas switches: spark gap closing, self-sustained diffuse discharge closing, and externally-sustained diffuse discharge opening. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Charged particle multiplicity and correlations in heavy ion collisions in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zabinski, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Since the start of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the ATLAS experiment has collected data from $p+p$, Pb+Pb and recently $p$+Pb collisions. In this paper two topics from the heavy ion programme are presented. The first of them is the multiplicity of charged particles in Pb+Pb collisions studied as a function of centrality. In such collisions very high pseudorapidity particle density is obtained, reaching 1738 $\\pm 76$ at $\\eta \\approx0$. For the $p$+Pb collisions the latest analysis of two-particle correlations is presented. The "ridge" observed in pp events with large multiplicities is present also in central $p$+Pb collisions selected by large $\\Sigma E_{T}$ measured at the Pb fragmentation side. In the azimuthal correlation for $2<|\\Delta \\eta|< 5$ two components can be extracted. Assuming that in the peripheral collisions only the correlation due to momentum conservation effects are present, in the central collisions additional quadruple modulation component can be identified.

  13. Tag Anti-collision Algorithm for RFID Systems with Minimum Overhead Information in the Identification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama S. Mohammed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new tree based anti-collision algorithm for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID systems. The proposed technique is based on fast parallel binary splitting (FPBS technique. It follows a new identification path through the binary tree. The main advantage of the proposed protocol is the simple dialog between the reader and tags. It needs only one bit tag response followed by one bit reader reply (one-to-one bit dialog. The one bit reader response represents the collision report (0: collision; 1: no collision of the tags' one bit message. The tag achieves self transmission control by dynamically updating its relative replying order due to the received collision report. The proposed algorithm minimizes the overhead transmitted bits per one tag identification. In the collision state, tags do modify their next replying order in the next bit level. Performed computer simulations have shown that the collision recovery scheme is very fast and simple even with the successive reading process. Moreover, the proposed algorithm outperforms most of the recent techniques in most cases.

  14. Residual stresses in material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaczek, K. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Hubbard, C. R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then addresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  15. Electron collisions with ethylene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, T C; Bettega, M H F

    2009-01-01

    We present elastic cross sections for electron collisions with ethylene oxide. Our results compare well in shape with the experimental total cross section obtained by Szmytkowski et al.. We found a shape resonance at around 5 eV, which is in agreement with the observations of Allan and Andric and Szmytkowski et al.. Allan and Andric reported another low energy shape resonance which is not present in our results.

  16. Electron collisions with ethylene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, T C; Bettega, M H F, E-mail: tcf03@fisica.ufpr.b, E-mail: bettega@fisica.ufpr.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    We present elastic cross sections for electron collisions with ethylene oxide. Our results compare well in shape with the experimental total cross section obtained by Szmytkowski et al.. We found a shape resonance at around 5 eV, which is in agreement with the observations of Allan and Andric and Szmytkowski et al.. Allan and Andric reported another low energy shape resonance which is not present in our results.

  17. Collision entropy and optimal uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Bosyk, G. M.; Portesi, M.; Plastino, A.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an alternative measure of quantum uncertainty for pairs of arbitrary observables in the 2-dimensional case, in terms of collision entropies. We derive the optimal lower bound for this entropic uncertainty relation, which results in an analytic function of the overlap of the corresponding eigenbases. Besides, we obtain the minimum uncertainty states. We compare our relation with other formulations of the uncertainty principle.

  18. NASA Lewis Launch Collision Probability Model Developed and Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D

    1999-01-01

    There are nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the earth. These objects encompass manned objects, active and decommissioned satellites, spent rocket bodies, and debris. They range from a few centimeters across to the size of the MIR space station. Anytime a new satellite is launched, the launch vehicle with its payload attached passes through an area of space in which these objects orbit. Although the population density of these objects is low, there always is a small but finite probability of collision between the launch vehicle and one or more of these space objects. Even though the probability of collision is very low, for some payloads even this small risk is unacceptable. To mitigate the small risk of collision associated with launching at an arbitrary time within the daily launch window, NASA performs a prelaunch mission assurance Collision Avoidance Analysis (or COLA). For the COLA of the Cassini spacecraft, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted an in-house development and analysis of a model for launch collision probability. The model allows a minimum clearance criteria to be used with the COLA analysis to ensure an acceptably low probability of collision. If, for any given liftoff time, the nominal launch vehicle trajectory would pass a space object with less than the minimum required clearance, launch would not be attempted at that time. The model assumes that the nominal positions of the orbiting objects and of the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time, and therefore, that any tracked object that comes within close proximity of the launch vehicle can be identified. For any such pair, these nominal positions can be used to calculate a nominal miss distance. The actual miss distances may differ substantially from the nominal miss distance, due, in part, to the statistical uncertainty of the knowledge of the objects positions. The model further assumes that these position uncertainties can be described with position covariance matrices

  19. General approach to the computation of local transport coefficients with finite Larmor effects in the collision contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, P.

    1986-10-01

    We expand the distribution functions on a basis of Hermite functions and obtain a general scheme to compute the local transport coefficients. The magnetic field dependence due to finite Larmor radius effects during the collision process is taken into account

  20. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  1. QCD studies in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F 2 , which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q 2 regimes are discussed. The low Q 2 transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure α s , and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs

  2. Head-on collision of internal waves with trapped cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderich, Vladimir; Jung, Kyung Tae; Terletska, Kateryna; Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics and energetics of a head-on collision of internal solitary waves (ISWs) with trapped cores propagating in a thin pycnocline were studied numerically within the framework of the Navier-Stokes equations for a stratified fluid. The peculiarity of this collision is that it involves trapped masses of a fluid. The interaction of ISWs differs for three classes of ISWs: (i) weakly non-linear waves without trapped cores, (ii) stable strongly non-linear waves with trapped cores, and (iii) shear unstable strongly non-linear waves. The wave phase shift of the colliding waves with equal amplitude grows as the amplitudes increase for colliding waves of classes (i) and (ii) and remains almost constant for those of class (iii). The excess of the maximum run-up amplitude, normalized by the amplitude of the waves, over the sum of the amplitudes of the equal colliding waves increases almost linearly with increasing amplitude of the interacting waves belonging to classes (i) and (ii); however, it decreases somewhat for those of class (iii). The colliding waves of class (ii) lose fluid trapped by the wave cores when amplitudes normalized by the thickness of the pycnocline are in the range of approximately between 1 and 1.75. The interacting stable waves of higher amplitude capture cores and carry trapped fluid in opposite directions with little mass loss. The collision of locally shear unstable waves of class (iii) is accompanied by the development of instability. The dependence of loss of energy on the wave amplitude is not monotonic. Initially, the energy loss due to the interaction increases as the wave amplitude increases. Then, the energy losses reach a maximum due to the loss of potential energy of the cores upon collision and then start to decrease. With further amplitude growth, collision is accompanied by the development of instability and an increase in the loss of energy. The collision process is modified for waves of different amplitudes because of the exchange

  3. SRC Residual fuel oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  4. Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs

  5. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-30

    This report gave a record of the composition of several samples of residues from carbonization of various hydrogenation residue from processing some type of coal or tar in the Bergius process. These included Silesian bituminous coal processed at 600 atm. with iron catalyst, in one case to produce gasoline and middle oil and in another case to produce heavy oil excess, Scholven coal processed at 250 atm. with tin oxalate and chlorine catalyst, Bruex tar processed in a 10-liter oven using iron catalyst, and a pitch mixture from Welheim processed in a 10-liter over using iron catalyst. The values gathered were compared with a few corresponding values estimated for Boehlen tar and Gelsenberg coal based on several assumptions outlined in the report. The data recorded included percentage of ash in the dry residue and percentage of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, total sulfur, and volatile sulfur. The percentage of ash varied from 21.43% in the case of Bruex tar to 53.15% in the case of one of the Silesian coals. Percentage of carbon varied from 44.0% in the case of Scholven coal to 78.03% in the case of Bruex tar. Percentage of total sulfur varied from 2.28% for Bruex tar to a recorded 5.65% for one of the Silesian coals and an estimated 6% for Boehlen tar. 1 table.

  6. Electron-impact collision strengths for neutral fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliyan, K.S.; Bhatia, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Configuration-interaction wave functions are constructed for the lowest 11 atomic target states of neutral fluorine. These wave functions are used to calculate target-state energies and absorption oscillator strengths for the dipole-allowed transitions. In general, a good agreement is found between the length and velocity forms of f values. However, f values for some transitions show significant discrepancies between these two forms. All these target states are retained in the R-matrix basis function and the (N+1)-electron collision wave functions are expanded in terms of these basis functions. The calculations are performed for the electron-impact excitation collision strengths for all transitions between these states using the R-matrix method. In the low-partial-wave region (total angular momentum L≤12) the full exchange R-matrix method is employed while a no-exchange R-matrix method is used for the calculations in the partial-wave region with 13≤L≤40. The effect of this procedure is most evident in the case of dipole-forbidden transitions for which collision strengths increase by about 10--60 % due to the contribution from higher partial waves. Beyond this value of the total angular momentum, the Burgess sum rule is applied to determine the higher partial-wave contribution to the total collision strengths for dipole-allowed transitions. The collision strengths are obtained for a wide range of incident electron energy from the first excitation threshold to 3.0 Ry. The calculations are performed in the LS-coupling scheme

  7. Naturally occuring radioactivity in residues of drinking water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornehm, C.; Mallick, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the course of a research project about 500 residues of drinking water treatment from approx. 400 water supply companies in Bavaria were investigated on naturally occurring radioactivity. For each residue the effective dose for workers was evaluated for each residue. The results show that increased activities, particularly of Radium-226, can be found in the material. The dose due to the exposure to the residues, which mostly result from the backwashing of filters, is below the reference value of 1 mSv/a, which can be used according to paragraph 97 of the German radiation protection standard. During the project the quantity of residues in Bavaria and the ways of their disposal were evaluated. In addition the relation between the amount of natural radioisotopes in the residues and the geological and hydrochemical conditions of the water catchment area was pointed out. (orig.)

  8. Efficient ALL vs. ALL collision risk analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, D.; Paskowitz, M.; Agueda, A.; Garcia, G.; Molina, M.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the space debris has gained a lot of attention due to the increasing amount of uncontrolled man-made objects orbiting the Earth. This population poses a significant and constantly growing thread to operational satellites. In order to face this thread in an independent manner, ESA has launched an initiative for the development of a European SSA System where GMV is participating via several activities. Apart from those activities financed by ESA, GMV has developed closeap, a tool for efficient conjunction assessment and collision probability prediction. ESÁs NAPEOS has been selected as computational engine and numerical propagator to be used in the tool, which can be considered as an add-on to the standard NAPEOS package. closeap makes use of the same orbit computation, conjunction assessment and collision risk algorithms implemented in CRASS, but at the same time both systems are completely independent. Moreover, the implementation in closeap has been validated against CRASS with excellent results. This paper describes the performance improvements implemented in closeap at algorithm level to ensure that the most time demanding scenarios (e.g., all catalogued objects are analysed against each other - all vs. all scenarios -) can be analysed in a reasonable amount of time with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. However, the amount of space debris increases steadily due to the human activities. Thus, the number of objects involved in a full collision assessment is expected to increase notably and, consequently, the computational cost, which scales as the square of the number of objects, will increase as well. Additionally, orbit propagation algorithms that are computationally expensive might be needed to predict more accurately the trajectories of the space debris. In order to cope with such computational needs, the next natural step in the development of collision assessment tools is the use of parallelization techniques. In this paper we investigate

  9. The epidemiology of bicyclist's collision accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L. B.

    1994-01-01

    The number of bicyclists injured in the road traffic in collision accidents and treated at the emergency room at Odense University Hospital has increased 66% from 1980 to 1989. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of bicyclist's collision accidents and identify risk groups...... of bicyclists and risk situations. The findings should make a basis for preventive programmes in order to decrease the number and severity of bicyclists collision accidents. Data from the emergency room in a 2 year period was combined with data from questionnaires. The study group consisted of 1021 bicyclists...... injured in collision accidents, and 1502 bicyclists injured in single accidents was used as a reference group. The young bicyclists 10-19 years of age had the highest incidence of injuries caused by collision accidents. The collision accidents had different characteristics according to counterpart. One...

  10. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases

  11. Crop Residue Biomass Effects on Agricultural Runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damodhara R. Mailapalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High residue loads associated with conservation tillage and cover cropping may impede water flow in furrow irrigation and thus decrease the efficiency of water delivery and runoff water quality. In this study, the biomass residue effects on infiltration, runoff, and export of total suspended solids (TSS, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, sediment-associated carbon (TSS-C, and other undesirable constituents such as phosphate (soluble P, nitrate (, and ammonium ( in runoff water from a furrow-irrigated field were studied. Furrow irrigation experiments were conducted in 91 and 274 m long fields, in which the amount of residue in the furrows varied among four treatments. The biomass residue in the furrows increased infiltration, and this affected total load of DOC, TSS, and TSS-C. Net storage of DOC took place in the long but not in the short field because most of the applied water ran off in the short field. Increasing field length decreased TSS and TSS-C losses. Total load of , , and soluble P decreased with increasing distance from the inflow due to infiltration. The concentration and load of P increased with increasing residue biomass in furrows, but no particular trend was observed for and . Overall, the constituents in the runoff decreased with increasing surface cover and field length.

  12. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents are developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences can be analysed and assessed. The presnt paper outlines a method for evaluation of the probability of ship......-ship collisions, ship-platform collisions, and ship groundings. The main benefit of the method is that it allows comparisons of various navigation routes....

  13. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo...... genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision....

  14. Soliton-like behavior in fast two-pulse collisions in weakly perturbed linear physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Avner; Nguyen, Quan M.; Huynh, Toan T.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate that pulses of linear physical systems, weakly perturbed by nonlinear dissipation, exhibit soliton-like behavior in fast collisions. The behavior is demonstrated for linear waveguides with weak cubic loss and for systems described by linear diffusion-advection models with weak quadratic loss. We show that in both systems, the expressions for the collision-induced amplitude shifts due to the nonlinear loss have the same form as the expression for the amplitude shift in a fast collision between two solitons of the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the presence of weak cubic loss. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by numerical simulations with the corresponding coupled linear evolution models with weak nonlinear loss. These results open the way for studying dynamics of fast collisions between pulses of weakly perturbed linear physical systems in an arbitrary spatial dimension.

  15. Neutral meson production in Cu+Au collisions at 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Ya.; Kotov, D.; Radzevich, P.; Riabov, V.; Zharko, Sergei

    2017-11-01

    Strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) was discovered in central heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. Jet quenching is one of the sQGP evidence observed in particle yields suppression related to yields measured in elementary nucleon-nucleon collisions. System of Cu+Au collisions is characterized by special nuclear overlap geometry different to other large systems (such as Au+Au). Study of such collision systems will help to estimate sQGP properties with higher accuracy. Neutral mesons such as π 0 give a good opportunity for studying sQGP effects especially jet quenching due to their large production rate. This paper presents results on neutral pion invariant differential spectra and nuclear modification factors measured with PHENIX experiment.

  16. Single particle momentum and angular distributions in hadron-hadron collisions at ultrahigh energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, T. T.; Chen, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The forward-backward charged multiplicity distribution (P n sub F, n sub B) of events in the 540 GeV antiproton-proton collider has been extensively studied by the UA5 Collaboration. It was pointed out that the distribution with respect to n = n sub F + n sub B satisfies approximate KNO scaling and that with respect to Z = n sub F - n sub B is binomial. The geometrical model of hadron-hadron collision interprets the large multiplicity fluctuation as due to the widely different nature of collisions at different impact parameters b. For a single impact parameter b, the collision in the geometrical model should exhibit stochastic behavior. This separation of the stochastic and nonstochastic (KNO) aspects of multiparticle production processes gives conceptually a lucid and attractive picture of such collisions, leading to the concept of partition temperature T sub p and the single particle momentum spectrum to be discussed in detail.

  17. Medium modification of averaged jet charge in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-Yong; Zhang, Ben-Wei; Wang, Enke

    2017-08-01

    Jet charge characterizes the electric charge distribution inside a jet. In this talk we make the first theoretical study of jet charge in high-energy nuclear collisions and calculate numerically the medium alternations of jet charge due to parton energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma. The parton multiple scattering in hot/dense QCD medium is simulated by a modified version of PYQUEN Monte Carlo model with 3+1D ideal hydrodynamical evolution of the fireball. Our preliminary results show that the averaged jet charge is significant modified in A+A collisions relative to that in p+p. The different features of quark jet charge and gluon jet charge in heavy-ion collisions, and the sensitivity of jet charge modifications to flavour dependence of energy loss are observed, which could then be used to discriminate quark and gluon jet as well as their energy loss patterns in heavy-ion collisions.

  18. Probability of Grounding and Collision Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the risks involved in ship traffic, rational criteria for collision and grounding accidents have to be developed. This implies that probabilities as well as inherent consequences have to be analyzed and assessed.The present notes outline a method for evaluation of the probability...... of ship-ship collisions, ship-platform collisions, and ship groundings. The main benefit of the method is that it allows comparisons of various navigation routes and procedures by assessing the relative frequencies of collisions and groundings....

  19. Telerobotics with whole-arm collision avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Strenn, Stephen

    1993-12-01

    The complexity of telerobotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection is desirable. With this goal in mind Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinetically similar master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  20. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  1. Cross sections for electron-C2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, S.E.; Oliveira, H.L.; Soares, L.S.S.; Veiteinheimer, E.; Luz, C.A.R.; Mazon, K.T.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Lee, M.-T.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical study on electron-C 2 collisions in the low and intermediate energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand total (elastic + inelastic) and absorption cross sections are reported in the 0.1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. Comparison of the present calculated results with the available experimental and theoretical data for electron-C 2 H 2 collisions has shown remarkable similarity for incident energies higher than 20 eV. In addition, a sharp shape resonance is located around 2.5 eV and is identified as due to the 1 Π g scattering channel

  2. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  3. Review of quantum collision dynamics in Debye plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Janev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot, dense plasmas exhibit screened Coulomb interactions, resulting from the collective effects of correlated many-particle interactions. In the lowest particle correlation order (pair-wise correlations, the interaction between charged plasma particles reduces to the Debye–Hückel (Yukawa-type potential, characterized by the Debye screening length. Due to the importance of Coulomb interaction screening in dense laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, hundreds of theoretical investigations have been carried out in the past few decades on the plasma screening effects on the electronic structure of atoms and their collision processes employing the Debye–Hückel screening model. The present article aims at providing a comprehensive review of the recent studies in atomic physics in Debye plasmas. Specifically, the work on atomic electronic structure, photon excitation and ionization, electron/positron impact excitation and ionization, and excitation, ionization and charge transfer of ion-atom/ion collisions will be reviewed.

  4. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... the virtues and limits of loss-sharing rules in generating optimal (second-best) incentives and allocations of risk. We find that loss sharing may be optimal in the presence of countervailing policy objectives, homogeneous risk avoiders, and subadditive risk, which potentially offers a valuable tool...

  5. Central collisions of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. During this period, our program focuses on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus central collisions. We participated in the preparation of letters of intent for two RHIC experiments -- the OASIS proposal and the Di-Muon proposal -- and worked on two RHIC R ampersand D efforts -- a silicon strip detector project and a muon-identifier project. A small fraction of time was also devoted to physics programs outside the realm of heavy ion reactions by several individuals

  6. Collisions in spherical stellar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Shukhman, I.G. (AN SSSR, Irkutsk. Sibirskij Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln)

    From the set of the equations for the stellar distribution function and for the two-particle correlation in the action- angle variables, by averaging over fast finite motions the general expression for the collisional term of a finite stellar system with ''rare'' Coulomb collisions is obtained. In the case of a spherically symmetrical system with the distribution function f/sub 0/=f/sub 0/(E, L) (E, L being the energy and the angular momentum of a star), the kinetic equation is reduced to the standard form of the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equations.

  7. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  8. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  9. Collision-Induced Melting in Collisions of Water Ice Nanograins: Strong Deformations and Prevention of Bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Umstätter, Philipp; Alabd Alhafez, Iyad; Rosandi, Yudi; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2017-11-01

    Collisions between ice grains are ubiquitous in the outer solar system. The mechanics of such collisions is traditionally described by the elastic contact theory of adhesive spheres. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to study collisions between nanometer-sized amorphous water ice grains. We demonstrate that the collision-induced heating leads to grain melting in the interface of the colliding grains. The large lateral deformations and grain sticking induced considerably modify available macroscopic collision models. We report on systematic increases of the contact radius, strong grain deformations, and the prevention of grain bouncing.

  10. Initial angular momentum and flow in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Chen, Guangyao; Somanathan, Sidharth

    2018-03-01

    We study the transfer of angular momentum in high energy nuclear collisions from the colliding nuclei to the region around midrapidity, using the classical approximation of the color glass condensate (CGC) picture. We find that the angular momentum shortly after the collision (up to times ˜1 /Qs , where Qs is the saturation scale) is carried by the "β -type" flow of the initial classical gluon field, introduced by some of us earlier. βi˜μ1∇iμ2-μ2∇iμ1 (i =1 ,2 ) describes the rapidity-odd transverse energy flow and emerges from Gauss's law for gluon fields. Here μ1 and μ2 are the averaged color charge fluctuation densities in the two nuclei, respectively. Interestingly, strong coupling calculations using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) techniques also find an energy flow term featuring this particular combination of nuclear densities. In classical CGC the order of magnitude of the initial angular momentum per rapidity in the reaction plane, at a time 1 /Qs , is |d L2/d η |≈ RAQs-3ɛ¯0/2 at midrapidity, where RA is the nuclear radius, and ɛ¯0 is the average initial energy density. This result emerges as a cancellation between a vortex of energy flow in the reaction plane aligned with the total angular momentum, and energy shear flow opposed to it. We discuss in detail the process of matching classical Yang-Mills results to fluid dynamics. We will argue that dissipative corrections should not be discarded to ensure that macroscopic conservation laws, e.g., for angular momentum, hold. Viscous fluid dynamics tends to dissipate the shear flow contribution that carries angular momentum in boost-invariant fluid systems. This leads to small residual angular momentum around midrapidity at late times for collisions at high energies.

  11. Pesticide residues in birds and mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; Edwards, C.A.

    1973-01-01

    exposure to an organochlorine pesticide, the concentrations of residues in the different tissues are ordinarily directly correlated with each other. When the dosage is at lethal levels, or when stored residues are mobilised to lethal levels, the balanced relationship is disrupted. The concentrations of residues in the brain provide the most rigorous criteria for diagnosis of death due to these chemicals, and levels are generally similar across a wide range of species of birds and mammals. Residues in liver are closely correlated with recent dose, either from direct intake or from mobilisation from storage, and so reflect hazardous exposure. Residues in the whole carcass show the storage reserve, and so indicate the potential for adverse effects from lethal mobilisation or from the continuous slow mobilisation that occurs during the normal processes of metabolism and excretion. A synchronous, rapid, and widespread decline in weight and thickness of shells of eggs laid by many species of wild birds occurred in the late 1940's and has persisted. Birds of prey were primarily affected; exceptions apparently are the result of lesser exposure because of different food habits. Many species of fish-eating birds are also affected. Others, however, appear to be more resistant and to accumulate much higher residues before shell-thinning occurs. Seed-eating birds do not appear to have been generally affected; their exposure is ordinarily lower, but physiological factors also seem to be involved. A relationship between shell-thinning and population decline has been established for many species. In exceptional cases, such as the herring gull, persistent re-nesting and other population reactions have overcome adverse effects at the population level. The discovery of shell-thinning among natural populations, and the hypothesis that this thinning was related to the occurrence of organochlorine pesticides, stimulated experimental studies to determine wheth

  12. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. GRACAT, Software for grounding and collision analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Hansen, Peter; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2002-01-01

    From 1998 to 2001 an integrated software package for grounding and collision analysis was developed at the Technical University of Denmark within the ISESO project at the cost of six man years (0.75M US$). The software provides a toolbox for a multitude of analyses related to collision...

  14. Theory and Validation for the Collision Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1999-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE....

  15. Results from proton–lead collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mischke, André

    2016-01-01

    This contribution summarises recent measurements in small collision systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presented at the 2016 edition of the Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics conference. Three main probes are discussed, namely light flavour (strangeness) production, az- imuthal angular correlations and jets, and open and hidden heavy-flavour production in proton- lead collisions.

  16. Phenomenology of photon-$e^{+-}$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Renard, F M

    1982-01-01

    The physical interest of gamma e/sup +or-/ collisions is examined. A basic formalism is established. Cross-sections are computed with general couplings and polarization states. Illustrations are given for QED tests, Z/sup 0/ and W/sup +or-/ production, various electro-weak processes including gamma gamma collisions and the search for new currents and particles.

  17. Successive combination jet algorithm for hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.; Soper, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Jet finding algorithms, as they are used in e + e- and hadron collisions, are reviewed and compared. It is suggested that a successive combination style algorithm, similar to that used in e + e- physics, might be useful also in hadron collisions, where cone style algorithms have been used previously

  18. Reducing deaths in single vehicle collisions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adminaite, D. Jost, G. Stipdonk, H. & Ward, H.

    2017-01-01

    A third of road deaths in the EU are caused by collisions that involve a single motorised vehicle where the driver, rider and/or passengers are killed but no other road users are involved. These single vehicle collisions (SVCs), and how to prevent them occurring, are the subject of this report.

  19. Electromagnetic processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1987-05-01

    A study of the processes generated by the electromagnetic interaction in relativistic nuclear, and atomic collisions is presented. Very strong electromagnetic fields for a very short time are present in distant collisions with no nuclear contact. Such fields can also lead to interesting effects, which are discussed here. (orig.)

  20. Cultural Collisions in L2 Academic Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on writing and culture, focusing on the collisions of cultures when discourse practices second language writers are expected to reproduce clash with what they know, believe, and value in their first language writing. Describes collisions of culture in writing regarding voice, organization, reader/writer responsibility, topic, and…

  1. Charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    Charge exchange reactions in which electrons are transferred from one ion (or atom) to another during a collision have been studied both as interesting examples of rearrangement collisions and because of important applications in plasma physics. This article reviews the modern theory developed for use at non-relativistic energies, but excluding the thermal and very low energy region. (author)

  2. Laser-assisted electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    New developments in our understanding of the electron-atom collision process have been made possible by combining the use of highly monochromatic electron beams and intense CO 2 lasers. This paper reviews such experiments and discusses possible future progress in what is a new field in atomic collision physics. (author)

  3. Collision integral for inhomogeneous plasma in a magnetic field effecting on particle collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trushin, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The collision integral of kinetic equation for the case when the Larmor radius of particles is less than the Debye radius is obtained. Though this problem has been considered in a number of studies main attention has been given usually to the effect of variation of Coulomb logarithm which is valid also for homogeneous plasma. In the present study a series of new components containing derived coordinate-distribution functions which under certain conditions can probably lead to variation of known coefficients of diffusion and thermal conductivity of plasma is obtained. The causes of difference of some results of other authors, for example, for electron flux due to transverse to the field ion motion are considered as well

  4. Baryon femtoscopy in heavy-ion collisions at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Szymański, Maciej Pawel

    2014-01-01

    In this report, femtoscopic measurements with proton-proton, antiproton-antiproton, proton-antiproton, proton-antilambda, antiproton-lambda and lambda-antilambda pairs in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV registered by ALICE at the LHC are presented. Emission source sizes extracted from the correlation analysis with (anti)protons grow with the event multiplicity, as expected. A method to extract the interaction potentials (e.g. for proton-antilambda and antiproton-lambda pairs) based on femtoscopy analysis is discussed. The importance of taking into account the so-called residual correlations induced by pairs contaminated by secondary particles is emphasized for all analyses mentioned above.

  5. Processes of hypernuclei formation in relativistic ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botvina Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of hypernuclei in relativistic ion collisions open new opportunities for nuclear and particle physics. The main processes leading to the production of hypernuclei in these reactions are the disintegration of large excited hyper-residues (target- and projectile-like, and the coalescence of hyperons with other baryons into light clusters. We use the transport, coalescence and statistical models to describe the whole reaction, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach: These reactions lead to the abundant production of multi-strange nuclei and new hypernuclear states. A broad distribution of predicted hypernuclei in masses and isospin allows for investigating properties of exotic hypernuclei, as well as the hypermatter both at high and low temperatures. There is a saturation of the hypernuclei production at high energies, therefore, the optimal way to pursue this experimental research is to use the accelerator facilities of intermediate energies, like FAIR (Darmstadt and NICA (Dubna.

  6. Peptides containing internal residues of pyroglutamic acid: proton NMR characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The proton NMR characteristics of internal pyroglutamic acid (Glp; 5-oxoproline) residues in seven tripeptides of the general structure Boc-Xxx-Glp-Yyy-NH 2 were studied. In general, the chemical shifts of several diagnostic protons moved downfield on going from the Glu-containing peptides (Boc-Xxx-Glu-Yyy-NH 2 ) to the corresponding Glp-containing peptides. The C-2 proton of the Xxx residue was shifted by about 1.1 ppm. The N-2 proton of the Yyy residue was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. The C-2 proton of the Glx residue itself was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. One of the Glx C-3 protons was also shifted by about 0.5 ppm, but the other remained essentially unchanged. Finally, the Glx C-4 protons were shifted by about 0.3 ppm. Internal Glu residues are readily converted chemically into internal Glp residues. This conversion also occurs as a side reaction during HP cleavage of the protecting group from Glu(OBzl) residues. The spontaneous fragmentation of serum proteins C3, C4 and λ 2 -macroglobulin under denaturing conditions is probably due to regioselective hydrolysis of an internal Glp residue formed in each of these proteins upon denaturation. These proton NMR characteristics may be useful in establishing the presence of internal Glp residues in synthetic and natural peptides

  7. Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Wallace P.; Johnson, Gregory D.; Strickland, Dale M.; Young, Jr., David P.; Sernka, Karyn J.; Good, Rhett E.

    2001-08-01

    It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.

  8. Relativistic ion collisions as the source of hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botvina, A.S. [J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bleicher, M.; Steinheimer, J. [J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Pochodzalla, J. [J. Gutenberg-Universitaet, Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); J. Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik and PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We shortly review the theory of hypernuclei production in relativistic ion collisions, that is adequate to future experiments at BM rate at N, NICA, and FAIR. Within a hybrid approach we use transport, coalescence and statistical models to describe the whole process. We demonstrate that the origin of hypernuclei can be explained by typical baryon interactions, that is similar to the production of conventional nuclei. In particular, heavy hypernuclei are coming mostly from projectile and target residues, whereas light hypernuclei can be produced at all rapidities. The yields of hypernuclei increase considerably above the energy threshold for Λ hyperon production, and there is a tendency to saturation of yields of hypernuclei with increasing the beam energy up to few TeV. There are unique opportunities in relativistic ion collisions which are difficult to realize in traditional hypernuclear experiments: The produced hypernuclei have a broad distribution in masses and isospin. They can even reach beyond the neutron and proton drip-lines and that opens a chance to investigate properties of exotic hypernuclei. One finds also the abundant production of multi-strange nuclei, of bound and unbound hypernuclear states with new decay modes. In addition, we can directly get an information on the hypermatter both at high and low temperatures. (orig.)

  9. Fixed Target Collisions at STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, Kathryn C.

    2016-12-15

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Previous results have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies of 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb potential analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions are presented and are found to be consistent with results from previous experiments. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared to published results from the AGS.

  10. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  11. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  12. Phenomenological approaches of dissipative heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1983-09-01

    These lectures describe the properties of dissipative heavy ion collisions observed in low bombarding energy heavy ion reactions. These dissipative collisions are of two different types: fusion and deep inelastic reactions. Their main experimental properties are described on selected examples. It is shown how it is possible to give a simple interpretation to the data. A large number of phenomenological models have been developped to understand dissipative heavy ion collisions. The most important are those describing the collision by classical mechanics and friction forces, the diffusion models, and transport theories which merge both preceding approaches. A special emphasis has been done on two phenomena observed in dissipative heavy ion collisions: charge equilibratium for which we can show the existence of quantum fluctuations, and fast fission which appears as an intermediate mechanism between deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation [fr

  13. Collision effects on the nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.

    1987-01-01

    The lectures on the collision effects on the nuclear dynamics are reported. A kinetic equation, describing the nuclear dynamics in a microscopical way, is deduced. The Vlasov equation and methods, allowing the obtention of approached solutions, are indicated. Concerning one dimensional and spherical symmetric systems, these solutions applied to the matter slab collisions and to the expansion of the excited spherical cores, are discussed. Moreover, the phenomenology of the collision terms and their application on the heavy ions collisions, are considered. The respective parts of the mean field and the collision term in different cases, are indicated. A link with the transport theories is given by the calculations of dispersions and by means of the Landau-Vlasov equation [fr

  14. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  15. Report on the Oak Ridge workshop on Monte Carlo codes for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    In order to make detailed predictions for the case of purely hadronic matter, several Monte Carlo codes have been developed to describe relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Although these various models build upon models of hadron-hadron interactions and have been fitted to reproduce hadron-hadron collision data, they have rather different pictures of the underlying hadron collision process and of subsequent particle production. Until now, the different Monte Carlo codes have, in general, been compared to different sets of experimental data, according to which results were readily available to the model builder or which Monte Carlo code was readily available to an experimental group. As a result, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about whether the observed deviations between experiments and calculations were due to deficiencies in the particular model, experimental discrepancies, or interesting effects beyond a simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. For this reason, it was decided that it would be productive to have a structured confrontation between the available experimental data and the many models of high-energy nuclear collisions in a manner in which it could be ensured that the computer codes were run correctly and the experimental acceptances were properly taken into account. With this purpose in mind, a Workshop on Monte Carlo Codes for Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions was organized at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from September 12--23, 1988. This paper reviews this workshop. 11 refs., 6 figs

  16. Decision Support from Genetic Algorithms for Ship Collision Avoidance Route Planning and Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Ming-Cheng; Kao, Sheng-Long; Su, Chien-Min

    When an officer of the watch (OOW) faces complicated marine traffic, a suitable decision support tool could be employed in support of collision avoidance decisions, to reduce the burden and greatly improve the safety of marine traffic. Decisions on routes to avoid collisions could also consider economy as well as safety. Through simulating the biological evolution model, this research adopts the genetic algorithm used in artificial intelligence to find a theoretically safety-critical recommendation for the shortest route of collision avoidance from an economic viewpoint, combining the international regulations for preventing collisions at sea (COLREGS) and the safety domain of a ship. Based on this recommendation, an optimal safe avoidance turning angle, navigation restoration time and navigational restoration angle will also be provided. A Geographic Information System (GIS) will be used as the platform for display and operation. In order to achieve advance notice of alerts and due preparation for collision avoidance, a Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) operator and the OOW can use this system as a reference to assess collision avoidance at present location.

  17. Multiplicity dependence of D{sup *+}-meson production in p-Pb collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The heavy-ion programme at ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) facilitates the study of the hot, high-density state of matter formed in high-energy nuclear collisions. A key probe of this system is the production of heavy quarks, namely charm and beauty. Charm and beauty quarks are produced in the earliest stages of the collision, and experience the full evolution of the system. As well as studying the production of leptons from heavy-flavour decays, ALICE's excellent tracking, vertexing, and particle identification capabilities also allow it to fully reconstruct the hadronic decays of open-charmed D mesons. Control measurements are made in p-Pb collisions in order to disentangle experimental outcomes arising in the hot and dense medium from those occurring due to initial-state effects. One interesting measurement that can be made in this system is the production of certain particle species as a function of the overall multiplicity of charged particles. Such measurements allow us to investigate the role of multi-parton interactions in particle collisions at LHC energies, in particular when compared with similar results in pp collisions. In this talk, the ALICE measurements of D{sup *+}-meson production as a function of charged-particle multiplicity in p-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=5.02 TeV are presented, along with comparisons with D{sup 0} and D{sup +} results in p-Pb and pp.

  18. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  19. Molecular-dynamics simulations with explicit hydrodynamics II: on the collision of polymers with molecular obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, M; Slater, G W

    2006-06-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of single polymers colliding with molecular obstacles using Molecular-dynamics simulations. In concert with these simulations we present a generalized polymer-obstacle collision model which is applicable to a number of collision scenarios. The work focusses on three specific problems: i) a polymer driven by an external force colliding with a fixed microscopic post; ii) a polymer driven by a (plug-like) fluid flow colliding with a fixed microscopic post; and iii) a polymer driven by an external force colliding with a free polymer. In all three cases, we present a study of the length-dependent dynamics of the polymers involved. The simulation results are compared with calculations based on our generalized collision model. The generalized model yields analytical results in the first two instances (cases i) and ii)), while in the polymer-polymer collision example (case iii)) we obtain a series solution for the system dynamics. For the case of a polymer-polymer collision we find that a distinct V-shaped state exists as seen in experimental systems, though normally associated with collisions with multiple polymers. We suggest that this V-shaped state occurs due to an effective hydrodynamic counter flow generated by a net translational motion of the two-chain system.

  20. Study of Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on Heavy Quarkonia in Proton-Lead Collisions at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Fanfan; Yang, Zhenwei; Schmidt, Burkhard

    Proton-nucleus ($p\\rm{A}$) collisions play an important role in high energy nuclear physics as they allow to study nuclear matter effects and the parton distribution functions in the nuclear environment (nPDF). The quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase transition from hadron gas to the the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is not expected to occur in a $p\\rm{A}$ collision due to its limited space-time size. Therefore, the $p\\rm{A}$ collisions provide an ideal platform to study cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which are also known as normal nuclear matter effects. The measurements of the productions and correlations of the final-state particles in $p\\rm{A}$ collisions serve the purpose to test various theoretical models for CNM effects, to constrain the benchmarking nPDFs, and thus provide a baseline to understand and interpret the QGP created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Heavy quarkonia (including charmonia and bottomonia), which are produced at the early stage of heavy-ion collisions, are considered goo...

  1. On-site treatment and landfilling of MSWI air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC-residue a......Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC...

  2. Hard Pomeron-odderon interference effects in the production of π+π- pairs in high energy γγ collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pire, B.; Schwennsen, F.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the production of two meson pairs in high energy photon-photon collisions produced in ultraperipheral collisions at LHC. We show that the study of charge asymmetries may reveal the existence of the perturbative Odderon and discuss the concrete event rates expected at the LHC. Sizable rates and asymmetries are expected in the case of proton-proton collisions and medium values of γγ energies √(s γγ )≅20 GeV. Proton-proton collisions will benefit from a high rate due to a large effective γγ luminosity and ion-ion collisions with a somewhat lower rate from the possibility to trigger on ultraperipheral collisions and a reduced background from strong interactions.

  3. Forest residues in cattle feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Elzeário Castelo Branco Iapichini

    2012-12-01

    amount of 1% over the live weight + 10% of intake. The results of the first phase of the research, for steers supplemented in pasture, showed good acceptability and consumption in the three levels of substitution, with an average of 3.0 kg of concentrate per head. No rejection was observed for consumption of the mixture, as well as any physiological negative / change and clinical levels tested The pine cone (strobilus without the pine nuts (seeds was obtained as a residue of genetically improved seed collection. Likely source of tannins and fiber, dried and triturated pine cones can contribute to lower production costs due to the substitution of an ingredient in feed formulation, as an aid in control of internal parasites and also in the possible mitigation of methane gas production, resulting from digestion of ruminants, one of the gases responsible for the greenhouse effect. The potential use of pine cone as an ingredient in replacement of roughage and concentrate in the diet of ruminants qualifies as a new source of revenue in pine forestry activity, since no such product currently has no commercial value timber and its accumulation along the dried leaves among the trees, increase the risk of forest fires. Finally, these technological and social innovations result in remarkable potential to leverage Regional Programs Sustainable Development.

  4. Recent advances in residual stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.; Edwards, L.; Bouchard, P.J.; Buttle, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently residual stresses have been included in structural integrity assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and piping in a very primitive manner due to the lack of reliable residual stress measurement or prediction tools. This situation is changing the capabilities of newly emerging destructive (i.e. the contour method) and non-destructive (i.e. magnetic and high-energy synchrotron X-ray strain mapping) residual stress measurement techniques for evaluating ferritic and austenitic pressure vessel components are contrasted against more well-established methods. These new approaches offer the potential for obtaining area maps of residual stress or strain in welded plants, mock-up components or generic test-pieces. The mapped field may be used directly in structural integrity calculations, or indirectly to validate finite element process/structural models on which safety cases for pressurised nuclear systems are founded. These measurement methods are complementary in terms of application to actual plant, cost effectiveness and measurements in thick sections. In each case an exemplar case study is used to illustrate the method and to highlight its particular capabilities

  5. Study of charged particle production in U-U collisions in the wounded quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, O. S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Singh, B. K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the study of deformed uranium-uranium (U-U) collisions in its various geometrical configurations due to their usefulness in understanding the different aspects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In this paper we have studied the particle production in deformed U-U collisions at √{s_{NN}} = 193 GeV using the modified wounded quark model (WQM). At first, we have shown the variation of quark-nucleus inelastic scattering cross-section ( σ_{qA}^{in} with respect to centralities for various geometrical orientations of U-U collisions in WQM. After that we have calculated the pseudorapidity density ( dn_{ch}/d η within WQM using a two-component prescription. Further we have calculated the transverse energy density distribution ( dET/d η along with the ratio of transverse energy to charged hadron multiplicity ( ET/N_{ch} for U-U collisions and compared them with the corresponding experimental data. We have shown the scaling behavior of dn_{ch}/d η and dET/d η for different initial geometry of U-U collision with respect to p - p data at √{s_{NN}}= 200 GeV. Furthermore we have shown the Bjorken energy density achieved in U-U collisions for various configurations and compared them with experimental data of Au-Au at 200GeV. We observe that the present model suitably describes the experimental data for minimum bias geometrical configuration of U-U collisions. An estimate for various observables in different initial geometries of U-U collisions is also presented which will be tested in future by experimental data.

  6. High energy heavy ion collisions from the view point of the 'strong field physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itakura, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    In the high energy heavy ion collisions at the facilities like RHIC and LHC, two strongest fields in the present universe are generated. First of all, a very strong electromagnetic field is generated, though its duration is very short due to the very high speed collisions of nuclei and the large electric charges. On the other hand, the nuclei are described as the high density saturation gluon state just before the moment of the collision and the high density gluon is released by the collision. A very strong color electromagnetic field is generated. The color glass condensate (CGC) is a reasonable picture. In this text, dynamics of the GLASMA (Glass + plasma), the new physics brought about by those 'strong fields', are introduced and are explained how the yet unsolved problems of the heavy ion collisions are going to be investigated on the new view point. The mechanism of the apparitions of the strong electromagnetic field and the strong color electromagnetic field are explained at first. The heavy ion collisions can be described as the process CGC to develop into QGP. As the phenomena under the strong electromagnetic field and the heavy ion collisions, their synchrotron radiations, the photon birefringence, the photon decay, the splitting of photons and the chiral phase transitions under high field are picked up. Concerning the strong color electromagnetic field dynamics and the heavy ion collisions, the plasma flux tube dynamics, the color magnetic flux tube, the color electric flux tube and the coexisting case of the color electric field and magnetic field are presented. (S. Funahashi)

  7. Impact of Increased Football Field Width on Player High-Speed Collision Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Khalsa, Siri S; Smith, Brandon W; Park, Paul

    2017-07-01

    High-acceleration head impact is a known risk for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on studies using helmet accelerometry. In football, offensive and defensive players are at higher risk of mTBI due to increased speed of play. Other collision sport studies suggest that increased playing surface size may contribute to reductions in high-speed collisions. We hypothesized that wider football fields lead to a decreased rate of high-speed collisions. Computer football game simulation was developed using MATLAB. Four wide receivers were matched against 7 defensive players. Each offensive player was randomized to one of 5 typical routes on each play. The ball was thrown 3 seconds into play; ball flight time was 2 seconds. Defensive players were delayed 0.5 second before reacting to ball release. A high-speed collision was defined as the receiver converging with a defensive player within 0.5 second of catching the ball. The simulation counted high-speed collisions for 1 team/season (65 plays/game for 16 games/season = 1040 plays/season) averaged during 10 seasons, and was validated against existing data using standard field width (53.3 yards). Field width was increased in 1-yard intervals up to 58.3 yards. Using standard field width, 188 ± 4 high-speed collisions were seen per team per season (18% of plays). When field width increased by 3 yards, high-speed collision rate decreased to 135 ± 3 per team per season (28% decrease; P football field width can lead to substantial decline in high-speed collisions, with potential for reducing instances of mTBI in football players. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Contemporary Presence of Dynamical and Statistical Intermediate Mass Fragment Production Mechanisms in Midperipheral NI+NI Collisions at 30 MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Sisto, M.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Rui, R.; Vannini, G.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Colonna, N.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Fabbietti, L.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Belkacem, M.

    2001-11-01

    The 58Ni+58Ni reaction at 30 MeV/nucleon has been experimentally investigated at the Superconducting Cyclotron of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud. In midperipheral collisions the production of massive fragments (4 ≤ Z ≤ 12), consistent with the statistical fragmentation of the projectile-like residue and the contemporary dynamical fragmentation of a neck, joining projectile-like and target-like residues, has been observed.

  9. How Tiny Collisions Shape Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    If space rocks are unpleasant to encounter, space dust isnt much better. Mercurys cratered surface tells of billions of years of meteoroid impacts but its thin atmosphere is what reveals its collisional history with smaller impactors. Now new research is providing a better understanding of what were seeing.Micrometeoroids Ho!The inner solar system is bombarded by micrometeoroids, tiny particles of dust (on the scale of a tenth of a millimeter) emitted by asteroids and comets as they make their closest approach to the Sun. This dust doesnt penetrateEarths layers of atmosphere, but the innermost planet of our solar system, Mercury, doesnt have this convenient cushioning.Just as Mercury is affected by the impacts of large meteoroids, its also shaped by the many smaller-scale impacts it experiences. These tiny collisions are thought to vaporize atoms and molecules from the planets surface, which quickly dissociate. This process adds metals to Mercurys exosphere, the planets extremely tenuous atmosphere.Modeling PopulationsDistribution of the directions from which meteoroids originate before impacting Mercurys surface, as averaged over its entire orbit. Local time of 12 hr corresponds to the Sun-facing side. A significant asymmetry is seen between the dawn (6 hrs) and dusk (18 hrs) rates. [Pokorn et al. 2017]The metal distribution in the exosphere provides a way for us to measure the effect of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury but this only works if we have accurate models of the process. A team of scientists led by Petr Pokorn (The Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard SFC) has now worked to improve our picture of micrometeoroid impact vaporization on Mercury.Pokorn and collaborators argue that two meteoroid populations Jupiter-family comets (short-period) and Halley-type comets (long-period) contribute the dust for the majority of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury. The authors model the dynamics and evolution of these two populations, reproducing the

  10. Light flavor results in p-Pb collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Particle ratios provide insight into the hadrochemistry of the event and the mechanisms for particle production. In Pb-Pb collisions the relative multi-strange baryon yields exhibit an enhancement with respect to pp collisions, whereas the short-lived K$^{*0}$ resonance is suppressed in the most central events due to re-scattering of its decay daughter particles. Measurements in p-Pb allow us to investigate the development of these effects as a function of the system size. We report comprehensive results on light-flavor hadron production measured with the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV, covering a wide range of particle species which includes long-lived hadrons, resonances and multi-strange baryons. The measurements include the transverse momentum spectra and the ratios of spectra among different species, and extend over a very large transverse momentum region, from $\\approx$100 MeV/$c$ to $\\approx$20 GeV/$c$, depending on the particle species.

  11. Orthopedic injury in electric bicycle-related collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Yun, Zhe; Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yucai; Yang, Tongtao; Zheng, Lianhe; Qian, Jixian

    2017-05-19

    Although electric bicycle-related injuries have become the most common reason for hospitalization due to a road crash in China, no study has comprehensively investigated electric bicycle collisions and their impact on orthopedic injuries; such a study may provide evidence to support a new road safety policy. A retrospective review of orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle collisions was performed in an urban trauma center. We collected variables including age, gender, location of fracture, presence of open or closed fractures, concomitant vascular, and neurologic injuries. A total of 2,044 cases were involved in electric bicycle collisions. The orthopedic injury victims were predominantly male and middle aged. The most common orthopedic injury was a femur fracture. Open fractures frequently involved the forearm and tibia/fibula. Male patients were more likely to suffer from multiple fractures and associated injuries than female patients. Fewer patients age 60 years old or older wore helmets at the time of the accident compared to those in other age groups. Orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle-related accidents cause patients substantial suffering that could lead to serious social consequences. Helmet use and protective clothing or similar safety gear, especially for electric bicycle users, should be required to provide greater protection.

  12. Marine Tar Residues: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Warnock, April M.; Hagen, Scott C.; Passeri, Davina L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in ...

  13. Agrochemical residues in rivers sediments, Poas, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masis, Federico; Valdez, Juan; Leon, Sandra; Coto, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    The organophosphorus and organochlorine agrochemical residues distribution in sediments of 3 rivers located in an ornamental plant production area were analyzed in Poas canton, Alajuela, Costa Rica. The study comprised 8 months in order to assure 3 seasonal episodes: dry, transitional, and rainy seasons. Sediments were taken in 10 sampling stations along the rivers and characterized by a determination of their organic matter and texture. In 7 out of 10 sampling stations pesticide residues were detected in at least 1 of 4 samplings, but quantified only in 4 stations. Agrochemical residues evaluated included 21 organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides; however, we found residues of only 3 organochlorine pesticides, due their high persistence in the sediment. Residues corresponded to PCNB (80-800 μg.kg -1 ), Endosulfan-β (40-50 μg.kg -1 ), and Endosulfan-α (90 μg.kg -1 ). Chlorothalonil was detected in only one sample. (author) [es

  14. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun You

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972 and collision avoidance rules (2001 are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  15. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Youngjun; Rhee, Key-Pyo; Ahn, Kyoungsoo

    2013-06-01

    In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA) and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA) information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972) and collision avoidance rules (2001) are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  16. Electron diffusion due to electromagnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Cross field electron diffusion induced by low frequency electromagnetic field fluctuations is investigated by the test particle approach based on the drift kinetic equation with the number conserving Krook collision term within the limit of quasilinear analysis in slab geometry. The diffusion coefficient is described in terms of a form factor which consists of three portions; the wave number and frequency spectra of density fluctuations, the effect of longitudinal wave-particle interaction, and the transverse dispersion function. The transverse dispersion gives the plasma skin depth as the characteristic scale length, which yields the Alcator-like scaling of the diffusion coefficient. The form factor shows a resonance-like behavior due to the magnetic part of fluctuations at the drift frequency, which indicates the importance of density fluctuations near the frequency in the electromagnetic plasma turbulence. This resonance is enhanced with increasing the plasma pressure, and finally the transition of the Alcator scaling is possible in the case of narrow band turbulence. The transitions of the Alcator scaling by the effect of collision is also derived in the single mode approximation. (author)

  17. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Francisco [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Rogan, José; Valdivia, J.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Varas, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Av. Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au{sub 12} cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au{sub 12}→Au{sub 13} is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au{sub 12}Ag and Au{sub 12}Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au{sub 12}Ag and 4483 Au{sub 12}Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously.

  18. Molecular treatment of He++H collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, A.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1981-01-01

    Total cross sections for the reactions 4 He + (1s)+H(1s)→ 4 He + (1s)+H(2p), 4 He + (1s) + H(1s)→ 4 He(1s2p /sup 1,3/P)+H + are calculated in an impact-parameter formalism, for collision energies 0.5--30 keV, using a molecular approach. The molecular energies are calculated at large internuclear distances by a configuration-interaction method, and at short distances by a block-diagonalization method. The radial couplings between the molecular wave functions are evaluated exactly, and turn out to depend strongly on the choice of origin of electronic coordinates; as a consequence, the cross sections also depend on this choice. The effect of the anomalous rotational couplings which decrease like R -1 is shown to be negligible, and a method to integrate them is proposed in the Appendix. Choosing the center of mass as origin of electronic coordinates, we obtain good agreement with experimental data, but we find no a priori reason to favor this choice. As an important conclusion, the main effect of the so-called momentum-transfer problem, which is the origin dependence of the cross sections, is due to the form of the molecular wave functions at short internuclear distances

  19. Balance Function in High-Energy Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, A.; Shalaby, Asmaa G.

    2015-01-01

    Aspects and implications of the balance functions (BF) in high-energy physics are reviewed. The various calculations and measurements depending on different quantities, for example, system size, collisions centrality, and beam energy, are discussed. First, the different definitions including advantages and even short-comings are highlighted. It is found that BF, which are mainly presented in terms of relative rapidity, and relative azimuthal and invariant relative momentum, are sensitive to the interaction centrality but not to the beam energy and can be used in estimating the hadronization time and the hadron-quark phase transition. Furthermore, the quark chemistry can be determined. The chemical evolution of the new-state-of-matter, the quark-gluon plasma, and its temporal-spatial evolution, femtoscopy of two-particle correlations, are accessible. The production time of positive-negative pair of charges can be determined from the widths of BF. Due to the reduction in the diffusion time, narrowed widths refer to delayed hadronization. It is concluded that BF are powerful tools characterizing hadron-quark phase transition and estimating some essential properties

  20. Relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, Rajeev S.

    The field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is introduced to the high-energy physics students with no prior knowledge in this area. The emphasis is on the two most important observables, namely the azimuthal collective flow and jet quenching, and on the role fluid dynamics plays in the interpretation of the data. Other important observables described briefly are constituent quark number scaling, ratios of particle abundances, strangeness enhancement, and sequential melting of heavy quarkonia. Comparison is made of some of the basic heavy-ion results obtained at LHC with those obtained at RHIC. Initial findings at LHC which seem to be in apparent conflict with the accumulated RHIC data are highlighted.

  1. Theory of low energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparenberg, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The basic notions of low-energy quantum scattering theory are introduced (cross sections, phase shifts, resonances,... ), in particular for positively-charged particles, in view of nuclear physics applications. An introduction to the reaction-matrix (or R-matrix) method is then proposed, as a tool to both solve the Schroedinger equation describing collisions and fit experimental data phenomenologically. Most results are established without proof but with a particular emphasis on their intuitive understanding and their possible analogs in classical mechanics. Several choices are made consequently: (i) the text starts with a detailed reminder of classical scattering theory, (ii) the concepts are first introduced in ideal theoretical cases before going to the more complicated formalism allowing the description of realistic experimental situations, (iii) a single example is used throughout nearly the whole text, (iv) all concepts are established for the elastic scattering of spinless particles, with only a brief mention of their multichannel generalization at the end of the text. (author)

  2. Diplopia due to Dacryops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Duman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dacryops is a lacrimal ductal cyst. It is known that it can cause globe displacement, motility restriction, and proptosis because of the mass effect. Diplopia due to dacryops has not been reported previously. Here, we present a 57-year-old man with binocular horizontal diplopia that occurred during left direction gaze due to dacryops.

  3. Lesser prairie-chicken fence collision risk across its northern distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Samantha G.; Haukos, David A.; Plumb, Reid T.; Hagen, Christian A.; Pitman, James C.; Lautenbach, Joseph M.; Sullins, Daniel S.; Kraft, John D.; Lautenbach, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Livestock fences have been hypothesized to significantly contribute to mortality of lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus); however, quantification of mortality due to fence collisions is lacking across their current distribution. Variation in fence density, landscape composition and configuration, and land use could influence collision risk of lesser prairie-chickens. We monitored fences within 3 km of known leks during spring and fall and surveyed for signs of collision occurrence within 20 m of fences in 6 study sites in Kansas and Colorado, USA during 2013 and 2014. We assessed mortality locations of radio-tagged birds (n = 286) for evidence of fence collisions and compared distance to fence relative to random points. Additionally, we quantified locations, propensity, and frequency of fences crossed by lesser prairie-chickens. We tested for landscape and vegetative characteristics that influenced fence-cross propensity and frequency of global positioning system (GPS)-marked birds. A minimum of 12,706 fence crossings occurred by GPS-marked lesser prairie-chickens. We found 3 carcasses and 12 additional possible instances of evidence of collision during >2,800 km of surveyed fences. We found evidence for a single suspected collision based on carcass evidence for 148 mortalities of transmittered birds. Mortality locations of transmittered birds were located at distances from fences 15% farther than expected at random. Our data suggested minimal biological significance and indicated that propensity and frequency of fence crossings were random processes. Lesser prairie-chickens do not appear to be experiencing significant mortality risk due to fence collisions in Kansas and Colorado. Focusing resources on other limiting factors (i.e., habitat quality) has greater potential for impact on population demography than fence marking and removal.

  4. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  5. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Verena Taudte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR- like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR, although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX. This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis.

  6. The importance of antibiotic residues presence detection in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Samaržija

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic residues are the most present inhibitory substances in milkhaving undesirable effect on human health, technological characteristics and the quality of milk and dairy products. In order to protect consumer's health and to ensure high quality milk production, European Union (EU regulation 2377/90 sets a maximum permitted levels for antibiotic residues in milk. Although the presence of antibiotic residues in milk can be due to animal diseases treatment, and in the case of milking animals, they are mostly present after mastitis treatment. The aim of this work is to stress the importance of the continuous control on antibiotic residues presence in milk, due to the role that milk and dairy products have in human nutrition. In this paper, different groups of antibiotics, mechanisms of theirs action, mistakes occurring in dairy products manufacture as well as the methods for theirs detection are described.

  7. Contributory fault and level of personal injury to drivers involved in head-on collisions: Application of copula-based bivariate ordinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Behram; Khattak, Asad J; Xu, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to simultaneously investigate the degree of injury severity sustained by drivers involved in head-on collisions with respect to fault status designation. This is complicated to answer due to many issues, one of which is the potential presence of correlation between injury outcomes of drivers involved in the same head-on collision. To address this concern, we present seemingly unrelated bivariate ordered response models by analyzing the joint injury severity probability distribution of at-fault and not-at-fault drivers. Moreover, the assumption of bivariate normality of residuals and the linear form of stochastic dependence implied by such models may be unduly restrictive. To test this, Archimedean copula structures and normal mixture marginals are integrated into the joint estimation framework, which can characterize complex forms of stochastic dependencies and non-normality in residual terms. The models are estimated using 2013 Virginia police reported two-vehicle head-on collision data, where exactly one driver is at-fault. The results suggest that both at-fault and not-at-fault drivers sustained serious/fatal injuries in 8% of crashes, whereas, in 4% of the cases, the not-at-fault driver sustained a serious/fatal injury with no injury to the at-fault driver at all. Furthermore, if the at-fault driver is fatigued, apparently asleep, or has been drinking the not-at-fault driver is more likely to sustain a severe/fatal injury, controlling for other factors and potential correlations between the injury outcomes. While not-at-fault vehicle speed affects injury severity of at-fault driver, the effect is smaller than the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on at-fault injury outcome. Contrarily, and importantly, the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on injury severity of not-at-fault driver is almost equal to the effect of not-at-fault vehicle speed on injury outcome of not-at-fault driver. Compared to traditional ordered probability

  8. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  9. The theory of relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This program began in January 1993. Its primary goals are studies of highly excited matter and its production in nuclear collisions at very high energies. After a general orientation on the project, abstracts describing the contents of completed papers and providing some details of current projects are given. Principal topics of interest are the following: the dynamics of nuclear collisions at very high energies (RHIC and LHC), the dynamics of nuclear collisions at AGS energies, high-temperature QCD and the physics of the quark-gluon plasma, and the production of strangelets and other rare objects

  10. Wireless vehicular networks for car collision avoidance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Vehicular Networks for Car Collision Avoidance focuses on the development of the ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) in order to minimize vehicular accidents. The book presents and analyses a range of concrete accident scenarios while examining the causes of vehicular collision and proposing countermeasures based on wireless vehicular networks. The book also describes the vehicular network standards and quality of service mechanisms focusing on improving critical dissemination of safety information. With recommendations on techniques and protocols to consider when improving road safety policies in order to minimize crashes and collision risks.

  11. Relativistic collisions of structured atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2008-01-01

    The book reviews the progress achieved over the last decade in the study of collisions between an ion and an atom in which both the atomic particles carry electrons and can undergo transitions between their internal states - including continua. It presents the detailed considerations of different theoretical approaches, that can be used to describe collisions of structured atomic particles for the very broad interval of impact energies ranging from 0.5-1 MeV/u till extreme relativistic energies where the collision velocity very closely approaches the speed of light. (orig.)

  12. Thermal equilibrium in strongly damped collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, S.K.; De, J.N.; Krishan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Energy division between colliding nuclei in damped collisions is studied in the statistical nucleon exchange model. The reactions 56 Fe+ 165 Ho and 56 Fe+ 238 U at incident energy of 465 MeV are considered for this purpose. It is found that the excitation energy is approximately equally shared between the nuclei for the peripheral collisions and the systems slowly approach equilibrium for more central collisions. This is in conformity with the recent experimental observations. The calculated variances of the charge distributions are found to depend appreciably on the temperature and are in very good agreement with the experimental data

  13. Kinematic and dynamic pair collision statistics of sedimenting inertial particles relevant to warm rain initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Bogdan; Parishani, Hossein; Ayala, Orlando; Wang, Lian-Ping; Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach has become a reliable tool for studying turbulent collision-coalescence of cloud droplets relevant to warm rain development. It has been shown that small-scale turbulent motion can enhance the collision rate of droplets by either enhancing the relative velocity and collision efficiency or by inertia-induced droplet clustering. A hybrid DNS approach incorporating DNS of air turbulence, disturbance flows due to droplets, and droplet equation of motion has been developed to quantify these effects of air turbulence. Due to the computational complexity of the approach, a major challenge is to increase the range of scales or size of the computation domain so that all scales affecting droplet pair statistics are simulated. Here we discuss our on-going work in this direction by improving the parallel scalability of the code, and by studying the effect of large-scale forcing on pair statistics relevant to turbulent collision. New results at higher grid resolutions show a saturation of pair and collision statistics with increasing flow Reynolds number, for given Kolmogorov scales and small droplet sizes. Furthermore, we examine the orientation dependence of pair statistics which reflects an interesting coupling of gravity and droplet clustering.

  14. The Effect of Fiber Collisions on the Galaxy Power Spectrum Multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Scoccimarro, Roman; Blanton, Michael R.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.

    2017-05-01

    Fibre-fed multi-object spectroscopic surveys, with their ability to collect an unprecedented number of redshifts, currently dominate large-scale structure studies. However, physical constraints limit these surveys from successfully collecting redshifts from galaxies too close to each other on the focal plane. This ultimately leads to significant systematic effects on galaxy clustering measurements. Using simulated mock catalogues, we demonstrate that fibre collisions have a significant impact on the power spectrum, P(k), monopole and quadrupole that exceeds sample variance at scales smaller than k ˜ 0.1 h Mpc-1. We present two methods to account for fibre collisions in the power spectrum. The first, statistically reconstructs the clustering of fibre-collided galaxy pairs by modelling the distribution of the line-of-sight displacements between them. It also properly accounts for fibre collisions in the shot-noise correction term of the P(k) estimator. Using this method, we recover the true P(k) monopole of the mock catalogues with residuals of nuisance parameters. Using this method, we reliably model the effect of fibre collisions on the monopole and quadrupole down to the scale limits of theoretical predictions. The methods we present in this paper will allow us to robustly analyse galaxy power spectrum multipole measurements to much smaller scales than previously possible.

  15. Neutron diffractometer RSND for residual stress analysis at CAEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Hong; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Chen, Yanzhou; Pang, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Changsheng; Gong, Jian; Liu, Yaoguang

    2015-05-01

    Residual Stress Neutron Diffractometer (RSND) has been built at China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) in Mianyang. Due to its excellent flexibility, the residual stress measurement on different samples, as well as in-situ study for materials science, can be carried out through RSND. The basic tests on its intensity and resolution and some preliminary experimental results under mechanical load, demonstrate the high quality of RSND.

  16. Tokamak residual zonal flow level in near-separatrix region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing-Ren, Shi

    2010-01-01

    Residual zonal flow level is calculated for tokamak plasmas in the near-separatrix region of a diverted tokamak. A recently developed method is used to construct an analytic divertor tokamak configuration. It is shown that the residual zonal flow level becomes smaller but still keeps finite near the separatrix because the neoclassical polarisation mostly due to the trapped particles goes larger in this region. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  17. Determination of specificity influencing residues for key transcription factor families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Garde, Christian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major modulators of transcription and subsequent cellular processes. The binding of TFs to specific regulatory elements is governed by their specificity. Considering the gap between known TFs sequence and specificity, specificity prediction frameworks are highly...... desired. Key inputs to such frameworks are protein residues that modulate the specificity of TF under consideration. Simple measures like mutual information (MI) to delineate specificity influencing residues (SIRs) from alignment fail due to structural constraints imposed by the three...

  18. Production, composition, and application of coffee and its industrial residues

    OpenAIRE

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Machado, Ercília M. S.; Martins, Silvia; Teixeira, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world and is the second largest traded commodity after petroleum. Due to the great demand of this product, large amounts of residues are generated in the coffee industry, which are toxic and represent serious environmental problems. Coffee silverskin and spent coffee grounds are the main coffee industry residues, obtained during the beans roasting, and the process to prepare “instant coffee”, respectively. Recently, some attempts have been m...

  19. Alkali activation processes for incinerator residues management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Ponzoni, Chiara; Barbieri, Luisa; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-08-01

    Incinerator bottom ash (BA) is produced in large amount worldwide and in Italy, where 5.1 millionstons of municipal solid residues have been incinerated in 2010, corresponding to 1.2-1.5 millionstons of produced bottom ash. This residue has been used in the present study for producing dense geopolymers containing high percentage (50-70 wt%) of ash. The amount of potentially reactive aluminosilicate fraction in the ash has been determined by means of test in NaOH. The final properties of geopolymers prepared with or without taking into account this reactive fraction have been compared. The results showed that due to the presence of both amorphous and crystalline fractions with a different degree of reactivity, the incinerator BA geopolymers exhibit significant differences in terms of Si/Al ratio and microstructure when reactive fraction is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expectations and realities in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, R.C.

    1988-06-01

    Interpretations of some recent results from experiments done at the CERN-SPS on relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. A cautionary note is given for the observed J//Psi/ suppression due to the hadronic interaction of J//Psi/ in the final state. The multiplicity dependence of average transverse momentum has many complications, and is unsuitable as an indicator of phase transition. Multiplicity fluctuation may be a better diagnostic tool. No indication of any collective behavior has been seen in the recent experiments. 30 refs., 3 figs

  1. Large multiplicity fluctuations and saturation effects in onium collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper studies two related questions in high energy onium-onium scattering: the probability of producing an unusually large number of particles in a collision, where it is found that the cross section for producing a central multiplicity proportional to k should decrease exponentially in √(k). Secondly, the nature of gluon (dipole) evolution when dipole densities become so high that saturation effects due to dipole-dipole interactions become important: measures of saturation are developed to help understand when saturation becomes important, and further information is obtained by exploiting changes of frame, which interchange unitarity and saturation corrections. (orig.)

  2. Towards an understanding of staggering effects in dissipative binary collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Morelli, L.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Barlini, S.; Cannata, F.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Raduta, Ad.R.

    2012-01-01

    The reactions 32 S+ 58,64 Ni are studied at 14.5 A MeV. Evidence is found for important odd–even effects in isotopic observables of selected peripheral collisions corresponding to the decay of a projectile-like source. The influence of secondary decays on the staggering is studied with a correlation function technique. It is shown that this method is a powerful tool to get experimental information on the evaporation chain, in order to constrain model calculations. Specifically, we show that odd–even effects are due to interplay between pairing effects in the nuclear masses and in the level densities.

  3. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  4. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  5. Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks during continental collision: Evidence, time, mechanism, and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Kun; Gao, Xiao-Ying

    2017-09-01

    Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks during continental collision has been increasingly found in nature. More and more studies have devoted to the evidence, time, mechanism and effect of crustal anataxis at mantle to lower crust depths. This is particularly so for UHP rocks from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, whereas similar studies on these issues are relatively minor for other UHP terranes. The petrological evidence, especially microstructural observations and multiphase solid inclusion analyses, have been accumulated for the partial melting of UHP metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. The results indicate that this is a kind of low-degree crustal anataxis at convergent plate margins due to decompressional dehydration of the UHP rocks themselves. Thus it has great bearing on intracrustal differentiation and crust-mantle interaction in continental subduction channels. Zircon may grow through peritectic reactions due to the breakdown of hydrous minerals. By dating of the peritectic zircons that contain coesite or diamond inclusions, the time of crustal anatexis under UHP conditions can be directly determined. In general, the partial melting of UHP rocks mainly took place at the stage of their early exhumation, partly still in the UHP regime and partly in the subsequent high-pressure (HP) regime. The crustal anatexis still at mantle depths is common in many UHP terranes, possibly facilitating exhumation of deeply subducted continental slices toward shallower levels. Petrological and geochemical studies indicate that phengite dehydration-driven melting during exhumation is the common mechanism for the anatexis of UHP rocks, though the other hydrous minerals were also involved in this process. The resulted HP to UHP melts may occur at different spatial scales and show significant fractionation in melt-mobile incompatible trace elements such as LILE and LREE. These melts are enriched in LILE to large extent and LREE and Th to small extent

  6. Novel efficient hybrid‐DEM collision integration scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Buist, Kay A.; Seelen, Luuk J.H.; Deen, Niels G.; Padding, Johan T.; Kuipers, Hans J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid collision integration scheme is introduced, benefiting from the efficient handling of binary collisions in the hard sphere scheme and the robust time scaling of the soft sphere scheme. In typical dynamic dense granular flow, simulated with the soft sphere scheme, the amount of collisions involving more than two particles are limited, and necessarily so because of loss of energy decay otherwise. Because most collisions are binary, these collisions can be handled within one time step w...

  7. Dilepton production in nucleon–nucleon collisions around 1 GeV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (T < 100 MeV) and baryonic densities up to three times the normal nuclear matter density. Due to negligible final-state interactions with the surrounding medium, dileptons (e+e−) provide a very clean and powerful probe for this purpose. A recurring feature of the dilepton spectra measured in nucleus–nucleus (AA) collisions ...

  8. Variation in bird-window collision mortality and scavenging rates within an urban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual avian mortality from collisions with windows and buildings is estimated to range from a million to a billion birds in the United States alone. However, estimates of mortality based on carcass counts suffer from bias due to imperfect detection and carcass scavenging. We stu...

  9. Close collisions in the two-dimensional Raman response of liquid carbon disulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, TLC; Duppen, K; Snijders, Jaap

    2003-01-01

    The fifth-order 2D Raman response of a liquid is calculated taking all possible interaction induced effects into account. Next to dipole-induced dipole interactions, close collision effects due to induced multipoles and electron overlap are found to give a significant contribution to the response of

  10. Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation of Non-Derivatized and Derivatized Desmosine and Isodesmosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongay, Sara; Hermans, Jos; Bruins, Andries P.; Nieuwendijk, Adrianus M. C. H.; Overkleeft, Hermen; Bischoff, Rainer

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has attracted increasing interest due to its complementarity to collision-induced dissociation (CID). ETD allows the direct localization of labile post-translational modifications, which is of main interest in proteomics where differences and similarities between

  11. ''Atomic'' Bremsstrahlung or polarizational radiation in collision of many-electron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the so-called ''Atomic'' bremsstrahlung (AB) or polarizational radiation, created in collisions of atoms or ions, is discussed. This kind of radiation arises due to the polarization of the electron shell of colliding particles. It is created by the structured projectiles and targets if the constituents are electrically charged. 6 refs, 2 figs

  12. Collisions Between Single Stars in Dense Clusters: Runaway Formation of a Massive Object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitag, M.; Gürkan, M.A.; Rasio, F.A.

    2007-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo codes, we follow the collisional evolution of clusters in a variety of scenarios. We consider the conditions under which a cluster of main-sequence stars may undergo rapid core collapse due to mass segregation, thus entering a phase of runaway collisions, forming a very massive

  13. Heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.; Amsden, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of measurement are proposed for the analysis of heavy ion collisions in the range of energy of 20--200 MeV/A. First, measurement of the longitudinal component of the kinetic energy of the collision products characterizes the impact parameter of the collision. The distribution in this quantity allows the dissipation in the theoretical models to be determined. A second kind of measurement is that of the coefficients of a spherical harmonic expansion of the angular distribution of the products. Besides giving independent information on the impact parameter and reaction dynamics, measurement of these coefficients offers the possibility of measuring the stiffness of the equation of state of nuclear matter. These ideas are explored in the context of a hydrodynamic model for the collision. In the purely hydrodynamic model there is a large measurable asymmetry in the angular distribution, but the dependence on the equation of state is small

  14. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references

  15. VT Vehicle-Animal Collisions - 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data (ROADKILL06) describes the locations of vehicle-animal collisions. This shapefile is a collection of collsion information collected by...

  16. Particle production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of multiple scattering theory we present and contrast both the conventional limiting case of independent multiple collisions of nucleons and the multiple scattering of collective degrees of freedom. Dramatically different predictions may be obtained for particle production in relativistic nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. We first study the pion multiplicity distributions to uncover evidence for a coherent-collective mechanism. Attention is then focused on potentially more conclusive tests - subthreshold (in the nucleon-nucleon kinematics) production of massive particles anti p, K - , PSI/J and W, as examples. Evidence for a collective mechanism is found by examining subthreshold anti p production data in particle-nucleus collisions and contrasting with results from the IMC model including realistic Fermi motion. As perhaps the leading candidate for a coherent-collective mechanism we specifically adopt the Coherent Tube Model to explain these data since it has been successful in high energy particle-nucleus collisions. (orig.) [de

  17. LHC: Collisions on course for 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In the LHC tunnel and caverns, a particle accelerator and detectors are rapidly taking shape. At last week's Council meeting, delegates took stock of the year's progress towards first collisions in 2007.

  18. Collision Detection for Underwater ROV Manipulator Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivčev, Satja; Rossi, Matija; Coleman, Joseph; Omerdić, Edin; Dooly, Gerard; Toal, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    Work-class ROVs equipped with robotic manipulators are extensively used for subsea intervention operations. Manipulators are teleoperated by human pilots relying on visual feedback from the worksite. Operating in a remote environment, with limited pilot perception and poor visibility, manipulator collisions which may cause significant damage are likely to happen. This paper presents a real-time collision detection algorithm for marine robotic manipulation. The proposed collision detection mechanism is developed, integrated into a commercial ROV manipulator control system, and successfully evaluated in simulations and experimental setup using a real industry standard underwater manipulator. The presented collision sensing solution has a potential to be a useful pilot assisting tool that can reduce the task load, operational time, and costs of subsea inspection, repair, and maintenance operations.

  19. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Directional Collision Avoidance in Ad Hoc Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yu; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J. J

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of directional collision avoidance schemes, in which antenna systems are used to direct the transmission and reception of control and data packets in channel access...

  1. Evidence for collective phenomena in pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Observation of long-range ridge-like correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions opened up new opportunities for exploring novel QCD dynamics in small collision systems. Based on data collected in 2015 and 2016 with the CMS detector at the LHC, the second-order ($v_{2}$) and third-order ($v_{3}$) azimuthal anisotropy harmonics of $K_{s}^{0}$, $\\Lambda$ and inclusive charged particles are extracted from long-range two-particle correlations as functions of particle multiplicity and transverse momentum. For the first time in pp collisions, the $v_{2}$ signals are also extracted from multi-particle correlations, providing direct evidence of the collective nature of observed particle correlations. These results provide new insights on the origin of observed long-range correlations in pp collisions, and may shed light on how quantum fluctuations affect the proton structure at a very short time scale.

  2. Novel energy sharing collisions of multicomponent solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... Abstract. In this paper, we discuss the fascinating energy sharing collisions of multicomponent solitons in certain incoherently coupled and coherently coupled nonlinear Schrödinger-type equations arising in the context of nonlinear optics.

  3. Identification of residue pairing in interacting β-strands from a predicted residue contact map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Wenxuan; Gong, Haipeng

    2018-04-19

    Despite the rapid progress of protein residue contact prediction, predicted residue contact maps frequently contain many errors. However, information of residue pairing in β strands could be extracted from a noisy contact map, due to the presence of characteristic contact patterns in β-β interactions. This information may benefit the tertiary structure prediction of mainly β proteins. In this work, we propose a novel ridge-detection-based β-β contact predictor to identify residue pairing in β strands from any predicted residue contact map. Our algorithm RDb 2 C adopts ridge detection, a well-developed technique in computer image processing, to capture consecutive residue contacts, and then utilizes a novel multi-stage random forest framework to integrate the ridge information and additional features for prediction. Starting from the predicted contact map of CCMpred, RDb 2 C remarkably outperforms all state-of-the-art methods on two conventional test sets of β proteins (BetaSheet916 and BetaSheet1452), and achieves F1-scores of ~ 62% and ~ 76% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. Taking the prediction of the more advanced RaptorX-Contact as input, RDb 2 C achieves impressively higher performance, with F1-scores reaching ~ 76% and ~ 86% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. In a test of structural modeling using the top 1 L predicted contacts as constraints, for 61 mainly β proteins, the average TM-score achieves 0.442 when using the raw RaptorX-Contact prediction, but increases to 0.506 when using the improved prediction by RDb 2 C. Our method can significantly improve the prediction of β-β contacts from any predicted residue contact maps. Prediction results of our algorithm could be directly applied to effectively facilitate the practical structure prediction of mainly β proteins. All source data and codes are available at http://166.111.152.91/Downloads.html or the GitHub address of https://github.com/wzmao/RDb2C .

  4. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  5. Updated Vertical Extent of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagg, R.; Bartzis, P.; Papanikolaou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The probabilistic distribution of the vertical extent of collision damage is an important and somewhat controversial component of the proposed IMO harmonized damage stability regulations for cargo and passenger ships. The only pre-existing vertical distribution, currently used in the international...... cargo ship regulations, was based on a very simplified presumption of bow heights. This paper investigates the development of this damage extent distribution based on three independent methodologies; actual casualty measurements, world fleet bow height statistics, and collision simulation modeling...

  6. Perspectives in high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, J.

    1983-08-01

    This report gives an overview of some aspects of hadronic physics relevant for the conception of a research facility devoted to the study of high energy nuclear collisions. Several concepts to be studied in nuclear collisions are selected, with emphasis placed on the properties and nature of the quark-gluon plasma, the formation of the plasma state in the central region and its anticipated lifetime, and the observability, through strangeness content of this new form of nuclear matter. (orig.)

  7. Global Λ hyperon polarization in nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; de La Barca Sánchez, M. Calderón; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-08-01

    The extreme energy densities generated by ultra-relativistic collisions between heavy atomic nuclei produce a state of matter that behaves surprisingly like a fluid, with exceptionally high temperature and low viscosity. Non-central collisions have angular momenta of the order of 1,000ћ, and the resulting fluid may have a strong vortical structure that must be understood to describe the fluid properly. The vortical structure is also of particular interest because the restoration of fundamental symmetries of quantum chromodynamics is expected to produce novel physical effects in the presence of strong vorticity. However, no experimental indications of fluid vorticity in heavy ion collisions have yet been found. Since vorticity represents a local rotational structure of the fluid, spin-orbit coupling can lead to preferential orientation of particle spins along the direction of rotation. Here we present measurements of an alignment between the global angular momentum of a non-central collision and the spin of emitted particles (in this case the collision occurs between gold nuclei and produces Λ baryons), revealing that the fluid produced in heavy ion collisions is the most vortical system so far observed. (At high energies, this fluid is a quark-gluon plasma.) We find that Λ and hyperons show a positive polarization of the order of a few per cent, consistent with some hydrodynamic predictions. (A hyperon is a particle composed of three quarks, at least one of which is a strange quark; the remainder are up and down quarks, found in protons and neutrons.) A previous measurement that reported a null result, that is, zero polarization, at higher collision energies is seen to be consistent with the trend of our observations, though with larger statistical uncertainties. These data provide experimental access to the vortical structure of the nearly ideal liquid created in a heavy ion collision and should prove valuable in the development of hydrodynamic models that

  8. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  9. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC DEUTERON - GOLD COLLISIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.AHRENS,L.BAI,M.BEEBE-WANG,J.

    2003-05-12

    Deuteron and gold beams have been accelerated to a collision energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/u in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), providing the first asymmetric-species collisions of this complex. Necessary changes for this mode of operation include new ramping software and asymmetric crossing angle geometries. This paper reviews machine performance, problem encountered and their solutions, and accomplishments during the 16 weeks of ramp-up and operations.

  10. Jet production in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Calucci, G

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the production of jets in heavy ion collisions at LHC. The process allows one to determine to a good accuracy the value of the impact parameter of the nuclear collision in each single inelastic event. The knowledge of the geometry is a powerful tool for a detailed analysis of the process, making it possible to test the various different elements which, in accordance with present theoretical ideas, take part to the production mechanism. (8 refs).

  11. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N., E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Dainese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  12. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C.A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  13. High energy nuclear collisions: Theory overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1012 K, were deconfined and existed as a quark gluon plasma (QGP). These ideas can be tested in collisions of nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies. At the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC), nuclei as heavy as gold are accelerated to an energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. A total energy of 40 TeV is available in the collision of.

  14. Due process traditionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2008-06-01

    In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and they might have joined a cascade. An alternative defense sees due process traditionalism as a second-best substitute for two preferable alternatives: a purely procedural approach to the Due Process Clause, and an approach that gives legislatures the benefit of every reasonable doubt. But it is not clear that in these domains, the first-best approaches are especially attractive; and even if they are, the second-best may be an unacceptably crude substitute. The most plausible defense of due process traditionalism operates on rule-consequentialist grounds, with the suggestion that even if traditions are not great, they are often good, and judges do best if they defer to traditions rather than attempting to specify the content of "liberty" on their own. But the rule-consequentialist defense depends on controversial and probably false assumptions about the likely goodness of traditions and the institutional incapacities of judges.

  15. Instability of compensated beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Autin, B.; Chen, Pisin.

    1989-01-01

    The beam-beam disruption phenomena in linear colliders are increasingly seen as a source of serious problems for these machines. A plasma compensation scheme, in which the motion of the plasma electrons in the presence of the colliding beams provides neutralizing charge and current densities, has been proposed and studied. But natural alternative to this scheme is to consider the overlapping of nearly identical high energy e + and e/sup /minus// bunches, and the collision of two such pairs - in other words, collision of two opposing relativistic positronium plasmas. It should be noticed that while the luminosity for all collisions is increased by a factor of four in this scheme, the event rate for e + e/sup /minus// collisions is only increased by a factor of two. The other factor of two corresponds to the addition of e + e + and e/sup /minus//e/sup /minus// collisions to the interaction point. This beam compensation scheme, which has been examined through computer simulation by Balakin and Solyak in the Soviet Union, promises full neutralization of beam charges and currents. These numerical investigations have shown that plasma instabilities exist in this nominally neutral system. Although the implementation of this idea seems technically daunting, the potential benefits (beamstrahlung and disruption suppression, relaxation of final focus system constraints) are such that we should consider the physics of these collisions further. In the remainder of this paper, we theoretically analyze the issues of stability and bunch parameter tolerances in this scheme. 11 refs

  16. Distraction-related road traffic collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Hani O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively study distraction-related road traffic collision injuries, their contributory factors, severity, and outcome. Data were prospectively collected on all hospitalized road traffic collision trauma patients in Al-Ain City who were drivers at the collision time over one and half years. Driver's inattentive behaviors preceding the collision were collected by interviewing the admitted drivers. There were 444 drivers, 330 of them were fully oriented patients, out of them only 44 (13%) were distracted. Nineteen (5.8%) drivers were distracted by using mobile phones, 12 (3.6%) were pre-occupied with deep thinking, six (1.8%) were talking with other passengers, four (1.2%) were picking things in the vehicle, and three (0.9%) were using entertainment systems. The maximum distraction occurred during the time of 6 am - 12 noon when the traffic was crowded. There were no significant differences between distracted and non-distracted drivers in demographical and physiological factors, injured regions, and outcomes. Distraction of alert drivers causes 13% of road traffic collisions in Al-Ain city. About 40 percent of the distracted drivers involved in road traffic collisions (RTC) were using mobile phones. Our study supports the ban of use of cell phones while driving.

  17. An improved accelerated frame slotted aloha (afsa) algorithm for tag collision in rfid

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Tanveer; feng, Yan tian

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of tag identification in an RFID system can be low down due to the tag collision problems. the tag collision problem occurs when a reader try to read multiple tags in an interrogation zone. as a result the reader does not identify the tag correctly. that causes a loss of information or data interference. to solve such kind of issues a series of aloha based algorithm and binary search algorithm have beed proposed. the most simple popular and good giving performance algorithm are...

  18. Fast Heavy Ion Collisions with H2 Molecules And Young Type Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated the Young type interference effect in electron emission spectrum from molecular H2 in Coulomb ionization induced by fast heavy ions. The details of the derivation of the oscillations due to this process from the electron double differential distributions are discussed. In addition, we have explored the effect of Compton profile, on such interference oscillations, which gives rise a double-peak structure in case of low energy collisions for which the binary encounter peak starts overlapping with soft collision electrons. The measured DDCS as well as the interference patterns are compared with molecular CDW-EIS models.

  19. Suppression of angular forces in collisions of non-S-state transition metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krems, R.V.; Klos, J.; Rode, M.F.; Szczesniak, M.M.; Chalasinski, G.; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    Angular momentum transfer is expected to occur rapidly in collisions of atoms in states of nonzero angular momenta due to the large torque of angular forces. We show that despite the presence of internal angular momenta transition metal atoms interact in collisions with helium effectively as spherical atoms and angular momentum transfer is slow. Thus, magnetic trapping and sympathetic cooling of transition metal atoms to ultracold temperatures should be readily achievable. Our results open up new avenues of research with a broad class of ultracold atoms

  20. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  1. LHC Report: First collisions soon

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On the evening of Friday 16 March beams were accelerated in the LHC at 4 TeV for the first time: a new world record! According to the schedule for the machine restart it will take another three weeks before the stable beams mode – the requirement for the detectors to start taking data – is achieved.   During the beam commissioning period the equipment teams make sure that their systems – beam instrumentation, radio frequency, beam interlock, feedback on orbit and tune, etc. – are working flawlessly with beam. Confidence in the correct functioning of all the magnets, their settings and their alignment is obtained by detailed measurements of the optics and the physical aperture. The optics measurements include the beta* of the squeezed beam at the centre of the experiments where the collisions will soon take place. This year the aim is to have a smaller beta* of 60 cm for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. As a reminder, smaller values of beta* mean thinner and m...

  2. Constitutional collisions of criminal law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M. Inshakov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify and resolve conflicts between the norms of constitutional and criminal law which regulate the issue of legal liability of senior officials of the state. Methods formallogical systematic comparativelegal. Results the article analyzes the embodiment of the principle of citizensrsquo equality under the law regarding the criminal responsibility of the President of the Russian Federation as one of the segments of the elite right other criminal and legal conflicts are considered associated with the creation of conditions for derogation from the principle of equality. Basing on this analysis the means of overcoming collisions between the norms of constitutional and criminal law are formulated. Scientific novelty in the article for the first time it has been shown that in the Russian criminal law there are exceptions to the principle of citizensrsquo equality under the law relating to the President of the Russian Federation the conflicts are identified between the norms of constitutional and criminal law regulating the issue of legal liability of senior officials of the state ways of overcoming conflicts are suggested. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in research and teaching in the consideration of issues of senior state officialsrsquo criminal liability.

  3. Residual stresses in zircaloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R.; Fernandez, L; Vizcaino, P.; Banchik, A.D.; Samper, R; Martinez, R. L; Almer, J; Motta, A.T.; Colas, K.B; Kerr, M.; Daymond, M.R

    2009-01-01

    Welds in Zirconium-based alloys are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, as H enters the material due to dissociation of water. The yield strain for hydride cracking has a complex dependence on H concentration, stress state and texture. The large thermal gradients produced by the applied heat; drastically changes the texture of the material in the heat affected zone, enhancing the susceptibility to delayed hydride cracking. Normally hydrides tend to form as platelets that are parallel to the normal direction, but when welding plates, hydride platelets may form on cooling with their planes parallel to the weld and through the thickness of the plates. If, in addition to this there are significant tensile stresses, the susceptibility of the heat affected zone to delayed hydride cracking will be increased. Here we have measured the macroscopic and microscopic residual stressed that appear after PLASMA welding of two 6mm thick Zircaloy-4 plates. The measurements were based on neutron and synchrotron diffraction experiments performed at the Isis Facility, UK, and at Advanced Photon Source, USA, respectively. The experiments allowed assessing the effect of a post-weld heat treatment consisting of a steady increase in temperature from room temperature to 450oC over a period of 4.5 hours; followed by cooling with an equivalent cooling rate. Peak tensile stresses of (175± 10) MPa along the longitudinal direction were found in the as-welded specimen, which were moderately reduced to (150±10) MPa after the heat-treatment. The parent material showed intergranular stresses of (56±4) MPa, which disappeared on entering the heat-affected zone. In-situ experiments during themal cyclong of the material showed that these intergranular stresses result from the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient of the hexagonal crystal lattice. [es

  4. Measurement of 2 characteristics of metastable helium important for laser cooling: loss rates due to collisions in presence of quasi-resonant laser radiation and transition rates for 2 forbidden transitions: 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}; Mesure de deux caracteristiques de l'helium metastable importantes pour le refroidissement radiatif: taux de pertes par collisions en presence de lumiere quasi-resonante et taux de transition des raies interdites 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} et 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poupard, J

    2000-11-15

    This thesis presents the study of 2 characteristics of metastable helium that are important for laser cooling. First, we measure two-body losses in a magneto-optical trap. The losses, enhanced by nearly resonant laser radiation, are mainly due to ionizing collisions. We measure the loss rate by observing the decay of the number of trapped atoms using either atomic fluorescence or ion production. We study the loss rate as a function of the trapping laser parameters. The second part of the thesis concerns experiments to measure the transition rates of the intercombination lines: 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} to 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} to 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}. The first of these rates is measured by exciting a small fraction of the atoms in a magneto-optical trap to the 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} state and observing the decrease in the trap lifetime. We then measure the ratio of the transition rates for 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} towards the 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} ground state by monitoring the flux of UV photons associated with the transition. (author)

  5. Denoising traffic collision data using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and its application for constructing continuous risk profile (CRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Seog; Chung, Koohong; Ahn, Seongchae; Yu, Jeong Whon; Choi, Keechoo

    2014-10-01

    Filtering out the noise in traffic collision data is essential in reducing false positive rates (i.e., requiring safety investigation of sites where it is not needed) and can assist government agencies in better allocating limited resources. Previous studies have demonstrated that denoising traffic collision data is possible when there exists a true known high collision concentration location (HCCL) list to calibrate the parameters of a denoising method. However, such a list is often not readily available in practice. To this end, the present study introduces an innovative approach for denoising traffic collision data using the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method which is widely used for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data. The present study describes how to transform the traffic collision data before the data can be decomposed using the EEMD method to obtain set of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) and residue. The attributes of the IMFs were then carefully examined to denoise the data and to construct Continuous Risk Profiles (CRPs). The findings from comparing the resulting CRP profiles with CRPs in which the noise was filtered out with two different empirically calibrated weighted moving window lengths are also documented, and the results and recommendations for future research are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Performance of the ALICE secondary vertex b-tagging algorithm in p-Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kramárik, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    The hot and dense nuclear matter, that is produced in heavy-ion collisions, could be studied by jets originating from beauty quarks. In-medium energy loss of these quarks provides information on several properties of the quark-gluon plasma, produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Reconstructed jets are powerful tools, since they offer access to kinematics of these hard-scattered partons. Beauty hadrons are specific for their long lifetime, large mass and large-multiplicity decays. Due to the long lifetime beauty hadrons decay at displaced secondary vertices. In the ALICE experiment, secondary vertex properties are used to tag b-jets. The study of Monte Carlo based performance of the b-tagging algorithm for charged jets in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV is discussed in proceedings.

  7. LOCAL COLLISION SIMULATION OF AN SC WALL USING ENERGY ABSORBING STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUL-HUN CHUNG

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the local damage of a turbine in an auxiliary building of a nuclear power plant due to an external impact by using the LS-DYNA finite element program. The wall of the auxiliary building is SC structure and the material of the SC wall plate is high manganese steel, which has superior ductility and energy absorbance compared to the ordinary steel used for other SC wall plates. The effects of the material of the wall, collision speed, and angle on the magnitude of the local damage were evaluated by local collision analysis. The analysis revealed that the SC wall made of manganese steel had significantly less damage than the SC wall made of ordinary steel. In conclusion, an SC wall made of manganese steel can have higher effective resistance than an SC wall made of ordinary steel against the local collision of an airplane engine or against a turbine impact.

  8. Micro pit formation by mercury-sphere collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Syuichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro

    2004-01-01

    The development of a MW-class spallation neutron source facility is being carried out under the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Project promoted by JAERI and KEK. A mercury target working as the spallation neutron source will be subjected to pressure waves generated by rapid thermal expansion of mercury due to a pulsed proton beam injection. The pressure wave will impose dynamic stress on the vessel and deform the vessel, which would cause cavitation in mercury. To evaluate the effect of mercury micro jets, driven by cavitation bubble collapse, on the micro-pit formation, analyses on mercury sphere collision were carried out: single bubble dynamics and collision behavior on interface between liquid and solid, which take the nonlinearity due to shock wave in mercury and the strain rate dependency of yield stress in solid metal into account. Analytical results give a good explanation to understand relationship between the micro-pit formation and material properties: the pit size could decrease with increasing the yield strength of materials. (author)

  9. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  10. Residual stress analysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques which are or could be employed to measure residual stresses are outlined. They include X-ray and neutron diffraction. Comments are made on the reliability and accuracy to be expected from particular techniques

  11. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  12. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  13. (Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/A), intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/A) and relativistic (> 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of best'' semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon {sup 129}Xe with {sup 197}Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C with {sup 197}Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated.

  14. [Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy ( 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of ''best'' semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon 129 Xe with 197 Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon 12 C with 197 Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated

  15. Vesícula residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. U. Coelho

    Full Text Available Our objective is to report three patients with recurrent severe upper abdominal pain secondary to residual gallbladder. All patients had been subjected to cholecystectomy from 1 to 20 years before. The diagnosis was established after several episodes of severe upper abdominal pain by imaging exams: ultrasonography, tomography, or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Removal of the residual gallbladder led to complete resolution of symptoms. Partial removal of the gallbladder is a very rare cause of postcholecystectomy symptoms.

  16. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  17. Marine Tar Residues: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, April M; Hagen, Scott C; Passeri, Davina L

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in the sea floor. However, in many cases, they are transported ashore via currents and waves where they pose a concern to coastal recreation activities, the seafood industry and may have negative effects on wildlife. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on marine tar residue formation, transport, degradation, and distribution. Methods of detection and removal of marine tar residues and their possible ecological effects are discussed, in addition to topics of marine tar research that warrant further investigation. Emphasis is placed on benthic tar residues, with a focus on the remnants of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in particular, which are still affecting the northern Gulf of Mexico shores years after the leaking submarine well was capped.

  18. Perioperative functional residual capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, R W

    1991-04-01

    The literature dealing with the magnitude, mechanism and effects of reduced FRC in the perioperative period is reviewed. During general anaesthesia FRC is reduced by approximately 20%. The reduction is greater in the obese and in patients with COPD. The most likely mechanism is the loss of inspiratory muscle tone of the muscles acting on the rib cage. Gas trapping is an additional mechanism. Lung compliance decreases and airways resistance increases, in large part, due to decreased FRC. The larynx is displaced anteriorly and elongated, making laryngoscopy and intubation more difficult. The change in FRC creates or increases intrapulmonary shunt and areas of low ventilation to perfusion. This is due to the occurrence of compression atelectasis, and to regional changes in mechanics and airway closure which tend to reduce ventilation to dependent lung zones which are still well perfused. Abdominal and thoracic operations tend to increase shunting further. Large tidal volume but not PEEP will improve oxygenation, although both increase FRC. Both FRC and vital capacity are reduced following abdominal and thoracic surgery in a predictable pattern. The mechanism is the combined effect of incisional pain and reflex dysfunction of the diaphragm. Additional effects of thoracic surgery include pleural effusion, cooling of the phrenic nerve and mediastinal widening. Postoperative hypoxaemia is a function of reduced FRC and airway closure. There is no real difference among the various methods of active lung expansion in terms of the speed of restoration of lung function, or in preventing postoperative atelectasis/pneumonia. Epidural analgesia does not influence the rate of recovery of lung function, nor does it prevent atelectasis/pneumonia.

  19. Investigating Resulting Residual Stresses during Mechanical Forming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, Stephen A.; Fatoba, Olawale S.; Mashinini, Peter M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2018-03-01

    Most manufacturing processes such as machining, welding, heat treatment, laser forming, laser cladding and, laser metal deposition, etc. are subjected to a form of heat or energy to change the geometrical shape thus changing the inherent engineering and structural properties of the material. These changes often cause the development of locked up stresses referred to as residual stresses as a result of these activities. This study reports on the residual stresses developed due to the mechanical forming process to maintain a suitable structural integrity for the formed components. The result of the analysis through the X-ray diffraction confirmed that residual stresses were induced in the manufactured parts and further revealed that residual stresses were compressive in nature as found in the parent material but with values less than the parent material.

  20. Human due diligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly.

  1. Classical description of the electron capture to the continuum cusp formation in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illescas, Clara; Pons, B.; Riera, A.

    2002-01-01

    Classical calculations are used to describe the dynamics of the electron capture to the continuum (ECC) cusp formation in H + +He collisions. We illustrate the frontier character of the ECC electrons between capture and ionization, and confirm that it is a temporary capture, through projectile focusing, that is responsible for the ECC cusp. Furthermore, the cusp is not a divergence smoothed by the experiment, and is slightly shifted from the impact-velocity value because of the residual pull from the target after ionization. This shift is larger the smaller the nuclear velocity

  2. Calculation of high power relativistic beams with consideration of collision effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the numerical calculation of relativistic charged particle beams moving in axisymmetric systems in which the presence of a residual neutral gas is possible. It is essential to consider phenomena related to collisions between charged particles and neutrals. Algorithms are constructed for numerical modeling of ionization processes within the framework of the ERA program complex. Solutions of model and practical problems are presented as examples. Such problems were studied where ionization processes were considered by a more complex method requiring a greater volume of calculations but valid at lower pressures

  3. Effects of Galaxy collisions on the structure and evolution of Galaxy clusters. I. Mass and luminosity functions and background light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.; Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin)

    1983-01-01

    The role of galaxy collisions in controlling the form of the galaxy mass and luminosity functions and in creating a diffuse background light is investigated by means of a direct computer simulation. Galaxy collisions are treated in a realistic manner, including both galaxy mergers and tidal encounters. A large number of theoretical studies of a galaxy collisions were consulted to formulate the basic input physics of collision cross sections. Despite this large number of studies, there remains considerable uncertainty in the effects of a collision on a galaxy due mainly to our lack of knowledge of the orbital distribution of matter in galaxies. To improve this situation, some methods of semiempirical calibration are suggested: for example, a survey of background light in clusters of different richness and morphological classes. If real galaxies are represented by galaxy models where the bulk of the matter is on radial, rather than circular, orbits, then tidal collisions are more damaging and there are a number of interesting effects: Repeated tidal encounters lead to galaxy mass and luminosity functions which are largely independent of model parameters and the initial galaxy mass function. It appears unlikely that the form of the average present-day luminosity function characteristic of both field and cluster galaxies is due to collisions, but certain observed deviations from the average found by Heiligman and Turner and by Dressler may be a signature of collisions, in particular a flat faint-end slope. The amount of luminous matter stripped from the galaxies in the simulations agrees with the amount of diffuse background light seen in the Coma Cluster

  4. Effective collision frequency due to ion-acoustic instability: Theory and simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Menietti, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2004), L10806 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 500; GA AV ČR IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA PRODEX(XE) 14529/00/NL/SFe; NASA (US) NAG5-11942 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : Magnetospheric Physics: Plasma waves and instabilities * Space Plasma Physics: Kinetic and MHD theory * Space Plasma Physics: Magnetic reconnection Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.378, year: 2004

  5. Dephasing times in quantum dots due to elastic LO phonon-carrier collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, A. V.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of experiments on quantum dot (QD) lasers presents a challenge: the phonon bottleneck, which should strongly suppress relaxation and dephasing of the discrete energy states, often seems to be inoperative. We suggest and develop a theory for an intrinsic mechanism for dephasing in Q......: second-order elastic interaction between quantum dot charge carriers and LO phonons. The calculated dephasing times are of the order of 200 fs at room temperature, consistent with experiments. The phonon bottleneck thus does not prevent significant room temperature dephasing....

  6. Microclimate effects of crop residues on biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Prueger, J. H.

    1996-03-01

    Residues from crops left on the soil surface have an impact on the microclimate, primarily temperature, within the soil and the atmosphere; but, the impact on the biological system is largely unknown. Residue is assumed to have a positive impact on the biological system in the soil and a negative impact on crop growth. This report investigates the effect of standing residue on the microclimate surrounding a cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) crop in a semi-arid environment and the effect of flat residue on the seasonal soil temperature and soil water regimes in a humid climate with a corn ( Zea mays L.) and soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production system. A study was conducted during 1987 and 1988 in a semi-arid climate at Lubbock, Texas using standing wheat stubble to shelter cotton from wind. In this study soil water, microclimatic variables, and plant growth were measured within standing stubble and bare soil during the early vegetative growth period. Air temperatures were warmer at night within the standing residue and the air more humid throughout the day. This led to a reduction in the soil water evaporation rate and an increase in the water use efficiency of the cotton plant within the stubble. Studies on corn residue with continuous corn and corn-soybean rotations with no-till, chiselplow, and moldboard plow tillage practices in central Iowa showed that the average soil temperatures in the upper soil profile were not affected by the presence of flat residue after tillage. Diurnal temperature ranges were most affected by the residue throughout the year. The largest effect of the residue on soil temperature was in the fall after harvest when no-till fields cooled more slowly than tilled fields. In the spring, surface residue decreased the soil water evaporation rate and increased the soil water storage within the soil profile covered with residue. In years with below normal rainfall, the additional stored soil water due to the surface residue was used by the

  7. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  8. On tide-induced Lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 2. Residual transport with application in south San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    The transports of solutes and other tracers are fundamental to estuarine processes. The apparent transport mechanisms are convection by tidal current and current-induced shear effect dispersion for processes which take place in a time period of the order of a tidal cycle. However, as emphasis is shifted toward the effects of intertidal processes, the net transport is mainly determined by tide-induced residual circulation and by residual circulation due to other processes. The commonly used intertidal conservation equation takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation in which the convective velocity is the Eulerian residual current, and the dispersion terms are often referred to as the phase effect dispersion or, sometimes, as the “tidal dispersion.” The presence of these dispersion terms is merely the result of a Fickian type hypothesis. Since the actual processes are not Fickian, thus a Fickian hypothesis obscures the physical significance of this equation. Recent research results on residual circulation have suggested that long-term transport phenomena are closely related to the Lagrangian residual current or the Lagrangian residual transport. In this paper a new formulation of an intertidal conservation equation is presented and examined in detail. In a weakly nonlinear tidal estuary the resultant intertidal transport equation also takes the form of a convection-dispersion equation without the ad hoc introduction of phase effect dispersion in a form of dispersion tensor. The convective velocity in the resultant equation is the first-order Lagrangian residual current (the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift). The remaining dispersion terms are important only in higher-order solutions; they are due to shear effect dispersion and turbulent mixing. There exists a dispersion boundary layer adjacent to shoreline boundaries. An order of magnitude estimate of the properties in the dispersion boundary layer is given. The present treatment

  9. Ship Collision Avoidance by Distributed Tabu Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gyun Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 90% of world trade is transported by sea. The size and speed of ships is rapidly increasing in order to boost economic efficiency. If ships collide, the damage and cost can be astronomical. It is very difficult for officers to ascertain routes that will avoid collisions, especially when multiple ships travel the same waters. There are several ways to prevent ship collisions, such as lookouts, radar, and VHF radio. More advanced methodologies, such as ship domain, fuzzy theory, and genetic algorithm, have been proposed. These methods work well in one-on-one situations, but are more difficult to apply in multiple-ship situations. Therefore, we proposed the Distributed Local Search Algorithm (DLSA to avoid ship collisions as a precedent study. DLSA is a distributed algorithm in which multiple ships communicate with each other within a certain area. DLSA computes collision risk based on the information received from neighboring ships. However, DLSA suffers from Quasi-Local Minimum (QLM, which prevents a ship from changing course even when a collision risk arises. In our study, we developed the Distributed Tabu Search Algorithm (DTSA. DTSA uses a tabu list to escape from QLM that also exploits a modified cost function and enlarged domain of next-intended courses to increase its efficiency. We conducted experiments to compare the performance of DLSA and DTSA. The results showed that DTSA outperformed DLSA.

  10. Collision detection and avoidance during treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, John L.; Pizzuto, Domenico; Fleischman, Eric; Mohan, Radhe

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To develop computer software that assists the planner avoid potential gantry collisions with the patient or patient support assembly during the treatment planning process. Methods and Materials: The approach uses a simulation of the therapy room with a scale model of the treatment machine. Because the dimensions of the machine and patient are known, one can calculate a priori whether any desired therapy field is possible or will result in a collision. To assist the planner, we have developed a graphical interface enabling the accurate visualization of each treatment field configuration with a 'room's eye view' treatment planning window. This enables the planner to be aware of, and alleviate any potential collision hazards. To circumvent blind spots in the graphic representation, an analytical software module precomputes whether each update of the gantry or turntable position is safe. Results: If a collision is detected, the module alerts the planner and suggests collision evasive actions such as either an extended distance treatment or the gantry angle of closest approach. Conclusions: The model enables the planner to experiment with unconventional noncoplanar treatment fields, and immediately test their feasibility

  11. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  12. Bipolar H II regions produced by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Anthony; Lomax, Oliver; Balfour, Scott; Mège, Pierre; Zavagno, Annie; Deharveng, Lise

    2018-01-01

    We suggest that bipolar H II regions may be the aftermath of collisions between clouds. Such a collision will produce a shock-compressed layer, and a star cluster can then condense out of the dense gas near the center of the layer. If the clouds are sufficiently massive, the star cluster is likely to contain at least one massive star, which emits ionizing radiation, and excites an H II region, which then expands, sweeping up the surrounding neutral gas. Once most of the matter in the clouds has accreted onto the layer, expansion of the H II region meets little resistance in directions perpendicular to the midplane of the layer, and so it expands rapidly to produce two lobes of ionized gas, one on each side of the layer. Conversely, in directions parallel to the midplane of the layer, expansion of the H II region stalls due to the ram pressure of the gas that continues to fall towards the star cluster from the outer parts of the layer; a ring of dense neutral gas builds up around the waist of the bipolar H II region, and may spawn a second generation of star formation. We present a dimensionless model for the flow of ionized gas in a bipolar H II region created according to the above scenario, and predict the characteristics of the resulting free-free continuum and recombination-line emission. This dimensionless model can be scaled to the physical parameters of any particular system. Our intention is that these predictions will be useful in testing the scenario outlined above, and thereby providing indirect support for the role of cloud-cloud collisions in triggering star formation.

  13. Effective-range function methods for charged particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, David; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2018-04-01

    Different versions of the effective-range function method for charged particle collisions are studied and compared. In addition, a novel derivation of the standard effective-range function is presented from the analysis of Coulomb wave functions in the complex plane of the energy. The recently proposed effective-range function denoted as Δℓ [Ramírez Suárez and Sparenberg, Phys. Rev. C 96, 034601 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevC.96.034601] and an earlier variant [Hamilton et al., Nucl. Phys. B 60, 443 (1973), 10.1016/0550-3213(73)90193-4] are related to the standard function. The potential interest of Δℓ for the study of low-energy cross sections and weakly bound states is discussed in the framework of the proton-proton S10 collision. The resonant state of the proton-proton collision is successfully computed from the extrapolation of Δℓ instead of the standard function. It is shown that interpolating Δℓ can lead to useful extrapolation to negative energies, provided scattering data are known below one nuclear Rydberg energy (12.5 keV for the proton-proton system). This property is due to the connection between Δℓ and the effective-range function by Hamilton et al. that is discussed in detail. Nevertheless, such extrapolations to negative energies should be used with caution because Δℓ is not analytic at zero energy. The expected analytic properties of the main functions are verified in the complex energy plane by graphical color-based representations.

  14. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kameno, Seiji [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Crdova 3107 Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Momose, Munetake [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Nakajima, Taku, E-mail: fumitaka.nakamura@nao.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  15. Stereodynamics in NO(X) + Ar inelastic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouard, M., E-mail: mark.brouard@chem.ox.ac.uk; Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B. [The Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, The Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Aoiz, F. J., E-mail: aoiz@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Stolte, S., E-mail: s.stolte@vu.nl [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-06-14

    The effect of orientation of the NO(X) bond axis prior to rotationally inelastic collisions with Ar has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. A modification to conventional velocity-map imaging ion optics is described, which allows the orientation of hexapole state-selected NO(X) using a static electric field, followed by velocity map imaging of the resonantly ionized scattered products. Bond orientation resolved differential cross sections are measured experimentally for a series of spin-orbit conserving transitions and compared with quantum mechanical calculations. The agreement between experimental results and those from quantum mechanical calculations is generally good. Parity pairs, which have previously been observed in collisions of unpolarized NO with various rare gases, are not observed due to the coherent superposition of the two j = 1/2, Ω = 1/2 Λ-doublet levels in the orienting field. The normalized difference differential cross sections are found to depend predominantly on the final rotational state, and are not very sensitive to the final Λ-doublet level. The differential steric effect has also been investigated theoretically, by means of quantum mechanical and classical calculations. Classically, the differential steric effect can be understood by considering the steric requirement for different types of trajectories that contribute to different regions of the differential cross section. However, classical effects cannot account quantitatively for the differential steric asymmetry observed in NO(X) + Ar collisions, which reflects quantum interference from scattering at either end of the molecule. This quantum interference effect is dominated by the repulsive region of the potential.

  16. Heating oil, distillates and residuals outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervin, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    M.J. Ervin and Associates offers strategic planning support to the downstream petroleum industry in terms of price market monitoring, market analysis, media commentary and benchmarking of marketing operations. This presentation included graphs depicting supply and demand for heating oil distillates and residuals from the mid 1990s to 2004. It was noted that the long-term decline in residuals demand in the United States and Canada are due to environmental issues, the use of natural gas as an alternative, and the increasing complexity of refineries. Graphs depicting market impacts of refinery utilization and inventory trends showed that middle distillate production will increase at the expense of gasoline production. Middle distillates and gasoline markets will be more sensitive to supply disruptions, resulting in more frequent price spikes. Inventory trends indicate a greater reliance on product imports. The demand for heating fuel has stabilized due to the continued penetration of natural gas in eastern states and provinces. The demand for diesel fuel has growth 1.5 to 2 per cent while the demand for jet fuel has remained relatively flat and depends greatly on the growth of the gross national product (GNP). tabs., figs

  17. Application of hydrodynamics to heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felsberger, Lukas

    2014-12-02

    The Bjorken model is a simple tool for making rough predictions of the hydrodynamic evolution of the thermalized matter created in a heavy ion collision. The advantage of the model clearly lies in its simplicity, rather than accuracy. As it is still used for making rough estimations 'by hand', in this thesis, I investigate in which cases the Bjorken model gives useful results and in which it is not recommended. For central collisions, I show which critical size the nuclei should have so that the Bjorken model can be applied. For non-central collisions, I demonstrate that using Glauber initial conditions combined with the Bjorken evolution, leads to reasonable results up to large impact parameters. Finally, I study the case of a non-ideal (viscous) description of the thermalized matter which leads to strongly differing results if first- or second-order hydrodynamics is applied.

  18. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  19. The binary collision approximation: Background and introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1992-08-01

    The binary collision approximation (BCA) has long been used in computer simulations of the interactions of energetic atoms with solid targets, as well as being the basis of most analytical theory in this area. While mainly a high-energy approximation, the BCA retains qualitative significance at low energies and, with proper formulation, gives useful quantitative information as well. Moreover, computer simulations based on the BCA can achieve good statistics in many situations where those based on full classical dynamical models require the most advanced computer hardware or are even impracticable. The foundations of the BCA in classical scattering are reviewed, including methods of evaluating the scattering integrals, interaction potentials, and electron excitation effects. The explicit evaluation of time at significant points on particle trajectories is discussed, as are scheduling algorithms for ordering the collisions in a developing cascade. An approximate treatment of nearly simultaneous collisions is outlined and the searching algorithms used in MARLOWE are presented

  20. The asteroids as outcomes of catastrophic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinella, P. (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate, Italy); Paolicchi, P.

    1982-12-01

    The role of catastrophic collisions in the evoloution of the asteroids is discussed in detail, employing extrapolations of experimental results on the outcome of high velocity-impacts. The probability of impacts with a given projectile-to-target mass ratio for asteroids of different sizes is derived, taking into account different mass distributions of the asteroid population at the beginning of the collision process. The extrapolations show that collisional breakup against solid-state cohesions must be a widespread process for asteroids. The influence of self-gravitation and transfer of angular momentum during collision is shown to depend strongly on the traget size, resulting in a variety of possible outcomes in the intermediate size range. Comparason of the theoretical results with observations of asteroid rotations and shapes yields favorable results.

  1. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...... method are applied in order to describe the target molecule and the collision process. It is shown that three perpendicular orientations of the molecular axis with respect to the trajectory are sufficient to accurately reproduce the ionization cross section calculated by Sakimoto [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062704...... (2005)] reducing the numerical effort drastically. The independent-event model is employed to approximate the cross section for double ionization and H+ production in antiproton collisions with H2....

  2. Atomic collisions in fusion plasmas involving multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzborn, E.

    1980-01-01

    A short survey is given on atomic collisions involving multiply charged ions. The basic features of charge transfer processes in ion-ion and ion-atom collisions relevant to fusion plasmas are discussed. (author)

  3. Impact parameter dependence of linear momentum transfer and the role of two-body dissipation mechanisms in heavy ion collisions around the Fermi energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Suomijärvi, T.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gillibert, A.; Le Faou, J. H.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Roynette, J. C.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    1998-12-01

    High energy -rays ( MeV) have been measured in coincidence with heavy residues emitted in reactions induced by a 37 MeV/u Ar beam on a Mo target.The -ray yield increases strongly with increasing linear momentum transfer indicating the importance of two-body collisions in the transfer mechanism. The high energy -ray multiplicity has been used to correlate the linear momentum transfer to the impact parameter. This correlation is compared to dynamical BNV simulations to show the essential role of two body nucleon-nucleon collisions at these bombarding energies.

  4. Measurement of D$^{+}$ meson production in p-Pb collisions with the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Russo, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the experimental programs on ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the LHC is the production and characterization of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), a phase of nuclear matter in which strongly interacting constituents (quarks and gluons) are deconfined. Heavy quarks are considered effective probes of the properties of the QGP as they are created on a short time scale, with respect to that of the QGP, and subsequently interact with it. Moreover, for a proper assessment of the characteristics of the matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is important to disentangle the final state effects due to the formation of a QGP from the initial state effects due to the fact that nuclei are present in the colliding system. Both initial and final state effects may lead to qualitatively similar phenomena in the observables of interest. The measurement of charmed meson production in proton-nucleus collisions allows to assess initial state effects present in nuclear collisions, under the assumption th...

  5. Numerical prediction effects of particle-particle collisions on gas-particle flows in swirl chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Liu Xue; Li Guohui; Jiang Lixiang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a unified-second-order-moment two-phase turbulent model incorporating into the kinetic theory of granular flows for considering particle-particle collision (USM-θ) is proposed to study the turbulent gas-particle flows in swirl chamber. Anisotropy of gas-solid two-phase stress and the interaction between two-phase stresses are fully considered by constructing a two-phase Reynolds stress model and a transport equation of two-phase stress correlation. Sommerfeld et al. (1991) experimental data is used to quantitatively validate USM-θ and USM model for analysis the effects of particle-particle collision. Numerical predicted results show that time-averaged velocity and fluctuation velocity of gas and particle using particle temperature model are better than those of without particle temperature model. Maximum particle concentration and temperature located at thin shear layer adjacent to wall surface due to particle inertia. Small-scale particle fluctuation due to particle-particle collision is smaller than large-scale gas-particle turbulence fluctuation. Particle-particle collision leads to the redistribution dissipation of Reynolds stress and particle turbulence kinetic energy.

  6. Constraining the Stellar Mass Function in the Galactic Center via Mass Loss from Stellar Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dense concentration of stars and high-velocity dispersions in the Galactic center imply that stellar collisions frequently occur. Stellar collisions could therefore result in significant mass loss rates. We calculate the amount of stellar mass lost due to indirect and direct stellar collisions and find its dependence on the present-day mass function of stars. We find that the total mass loss rate in the Galactic center due to stellar collisions is sensitive to the present-day mass function adopted. We use the observed diffuse X-ray luminosity in the Galactic center to preclude any present-day mass functions that result in mass loss rates >10-5M⨀yr−1 in the vicinity of ~1″. For present-day mass functions of the form, dN/dM∝M-α, we constrain the present-day mass function to have a minimum stellar mass ≲7M⨀ and a power-law slope ≳1.25. We also use this result to constrain the initial mass function in the Galactic center by considering different star formation scenarios.

  7. Physics with relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dönigus Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given on the experimental study of physics with relativistic heavy-ion collisions, with emphasis on recent measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC. The focus here is laid on p–Pb collisions at the LHC and the corresponding d–Au measurements at RHIC. The topics touched are “collectivity and approach to equilibrium”, “high pT and jets”, “heavy flavour and electroweak bosons” and “search for exotic objects”.

  8. Guide to the collision avoidance rules

    CERN Document Server

    Cockcroft, A N

    2004-01-01

    A Guide to the Collision Avoidance Rules is the essential reference to the safe operation of all vessels at sea. Published continuously since 1965, this respected and expert guide is the classic text for all who need to, practically and legally, understand and comply with the Rules. This sixth edition incorporates all of the amendments to the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea which came into force in November 2003.The books sets out all of the Rules with clear explanation of their meaning, and gives detailed examples of how the rules have been used in practice

  9. Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Becky P. Y.; Anderson, Tessa Kate

    outlines the key issues in identifying hazardous road locations (HRLs), considers current approaches used for reducing and preventing road traffic collisions, and outlines a strategy for improved road safety. The book covers spatial accuracy, validation, and other statistical issues, as well as link......Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions centers on the geographical nature of road crashes, and uses spatial methods to provide a greater understanding of the patterns and processes that cause them. Written by internationally known experts in the field of transport geography, the book...

  10. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures

  11. Applied atomic and collision physics special topics

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, H S W; Bederson, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 5: Special Topics deals with topics on applications of atomic collisions that were not covered in the first four volumes of the treatise. The book opens with a chapter on ultrasensitive chemical detectors. This is followed by separate chapters on lighting, magnetohydrodynamic electrical power generation, gas breakdown and high voltage insulating gases, thermionic energy converters, and charged particle detectors. Subsequent chapters deal with the operation of multiwire drift and proportional chambers and streamer chambers and their use in high energy p

  12. Conservative Bin-to-Bin Fractional Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Combustion Chemistry Common Features in Spacecraft Collisions: Relevant Densities Spanning Many Orders of Magnitude — 6+ Transitions from Collisional to...Radiative Cooling/Ionization Combustion Chemistry Common Features in Spacecraft Collisions: Relevant Densities Spanning Many Orders of Magnitude — 6...Error’ Unknown without Analytical Solution or High Fidelity Simulation −0.5 0 0.5 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Original−NTC Position, (m) T

  13. Fluctuations in high-energy particle collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronqvist, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    We study fluctuations that are omnipresent in high-energy particle collisions. These fluctuations can be either of either classical or quantum origin and we will study both. Firstly, we consider the type of quantum fluctuations that arise in proton-proton collisions. These are computable perturbatively in quantum field theory and we will focus on a specific class of diagrams in this set-up. Secondly, we will consider the fluctuations that are present in collisions between nuclei that can be heavier than protons. These are the quantum laws of nature that describe the positions of nucleons within a nucleus, but also the hydrodynamic fluctuations of classical, thermal origin that affect the evolution of the medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. The fluctuations arising in proton-proton collisions can be computed analytically up to a certain order in perturbative quantum field theory. We will focus on one-loop diagrams of a fixed topology. Loop diagrams give rise to integrals that typically are hard to evaluate. We show how modern mathematical methods can be used to ease their computation. We will study the relations among unitarity cuts of a diagram, the discontinuity across the corresponding branch cut and the coproduct. We show how the original integral corresponding to a given diagram can be reconstructed from the information contained in the coproduct. We expect that these methods can be applied to solve more complicated topologies and help in the computation of new amplitudes in the future. Finally, we study the two types of fluctuations arising in heavy-ion collisions. These are related either to the initial state or the intermediate state of matter produced in such collisions. The initial state fluctuations are experimentally observed to give rise to non-Gaussianities in the final-state spectra. We show how these non-Gaussianities can be explained by the random position and interaction energy of 'sources' in the colliding nuclei. Furthermore, we

  14. Cold collisions in dissipative optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piilo, J; Suominen, K-A

    2005-01-01

    The invention of laser cooling methods for neutral atoms allows optical and magnetic trapping of cold atomic clouds in the temperature regime below 1 mK. In the past, light-assisted cold collisions between laser cooled atoms have been widely studied in magneto-optical atom traps (MOTs). We describe here theoretical studies of dynamical interactions, specifically cold collisions, between atoms trapped in near-resonant, dissipative optical lattices. The extension of collision studies to the regime of optical lattices introduces several complicating factors. For the lattice studies, one has to account for the internal substates of atoms, position-dependent matter-light coupling, and position-dependent couplings between the atoms, in addition to the spontaneous decay of electronically excited atomic states. The developed one-dimensional quantum-mechanical model combines atomic cooling and collision dynamics in a single framework. The model is based on Monte Carlo wavefunction simulations and is applied when the lattice-creating lasers have frequencies both below (red-detuned lattice) and above (blue-detuned lattice) the atomic resonance frequency. It turns out that the radiative heating mechanism affects the dynamics of atomic cloud in a red-detuned lattice in a way that is not directly expected from the MOT studies. The optical lattice and position-dependent light-matter coupling introduces selectivity of collision partners. The atoms which are most mobile and energetic are strongly favoured to participate in collisions, and are more often ejected from the lattice, than the slow ones in the laser parameter region selected for study. Consequently, the atoms remaining in the lattice have a smaller average kinetic energy per atom than in the case of non-interacting atoms. For blue-detuned lattices, we study how optical shielding emerges as a natural part of the lattice and look for ways to optimize the effect. We find that the cooling and shielding dynamics do not mix

  15. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  16. A numerical 4D Collision Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Pal; Culloch, Ross; Lieber, Lilian; Kregting, Louise

    2017-04-01

    With the growing number of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices being installed across the world, some concern has been raised about the possibility of harming mobile, marine fauna by collision. Although physical contact between a MRE device and an organism has not been reported to date, these novel sub-sea structures pose a challenge for accurately estimating collision risks as part of environmental impact assessments. Even if the animal motion is simplified to linear translation, ignoring likely evasive behaviour, the mathematical problem of establishing an impact probability is not trivial. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, four-dimensional simulations of a novel marine renewable device concept, Deep Green, Minesto's power plant and hereafter referred to as the 'kite' that flies in a figure-of-eight configuration. Simulations were carried out altering several configurations including kite depth, kite speed and kite trajectory while keeping the speed of the moving object constant. Since the kite assembly is defined as two parts in the model, a tether (attached to the seabed) and the kite, collision risk of each part is reported independently. By comparing the number of collisions with the number of collision-free simulations, a probability of impact for each simulated position in the cross- section of the area is considered. Results suggest that close to the bottom, where the tether amplitude is small, the path is always blocked and the impact probability is 100% as expected. However, higher up in the water column, the collision probability is twice as high in the mid line, where the tether passes twice per period than at the extremes of its trajectory. The collision probability distribution is much more complex in the upper end of the water column, where the kite and tether can simultaneously collide with the object. Results demonstrate the viability of such models, which can also incorporate empirical

  17. High energy particle collisions near black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-10-01

    If two geodesic particles collide near a rotating black hole, their energy in the centre of mass frame Ec.m. can become unbound under certain conditions (the so-called BSW effect). The special role is played here by so-called critical geodesics when one of particles has fine-tuned energy and angular momentum. The nature of geodesics reveals itself also in fate of the debris after collisions. One of particles moving to a remote observer is necessarily near-critical. We discuss, when such a collision can give rise not only unboud Ec.m. but also unbound Killing energy E (so-called super-Penrose process).

  18. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-07-17

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures.

  19. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  20. Estimation of a collision impact parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmatov, S.V.; Zarubin, P.I.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that the nuclear collision geometry (i.e. impact parameter) can be determined in an event-by-event analysis by measuring the transverse energy flow in the pseudorapidity region 3≤|η|≤5 with a minimal dependence on collision dynamics details at the LHC energy scale. Using the HIJING model we have illustrated our calculation by a simulation of events of nucleus-nucleus interactions at the c.m.s. energy from 1 up to 5.5 TeV per nucleon and various types of nuclei

  1. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  2. Absorbed Energy in Ship Collisions and Grounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    Minorsky's well-known empirical formula, which relates the absorbed energy to the destroyed material volume, has been widely used in analyses of high energy collision and grounding accidents for nearly 40 years. The advantage of the method is its apparent simplcity. Obviously, its drawback...... collisions and grounding. The developed expressions reflect the structural arrangement, the material properties and different damage patterns.The present method is validated against a large number of existing experimental results and detailed numerical simulation results. Applications to full-sale ship...

  3. Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Becky P. Y.; Anderson, Tessa Kate

    Spatial Analysis Methods of Road Traffic Collisions centers on the geographical nature of road crashes, and uses spatial methods to provide a greater understanding of the patterns and processes that cause them. Written by internationally known experts in the field of transport geography, the book...... outlines the key issues in identifying hazardous road locations (HRLs), considers current approaches used for reducing and preventing road traffic collisions, and outlines a strategy for improved road safety. The book covers spatial accuracy, validation, and other statistical issues, as well as link...

  4. Influence of Residual Stress on Fatigue Design of AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steel cannot be hardened by any form of heat treatment, in fact, quenching from 10000C merely softens them. They are usually cold worked to increase the hardness. Shot peening is a cold working process that changes micro-structure as well as residual stress in the surface layer. In the present work, the compressive residual stress and fatigue strength of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel have been evaluated at various shot peening conditions. The improvement in various mechanical properties such as hardness, damping factors and fatigue strength was noticed. Compressive residual stress induced by shot peening varies with cyclic loading due to relaxation of compressive residual stress field. The consideration of relaxed compressive residual stress field instead of original compressive residual stress field provides reliable fatigue design of components. In this paper, the exact reductions in weight and control of mechanical properties due to shot peening process are discussed.

  5. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  6. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  7. PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE WATER AND FISH (LAGOON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    technique was employed to extract pesticide residues in water and fish samples, respectively, using 1:1 (v/v) ethyl acetate/dichloromethane .... species in the Chemu and Korle lagoons due to excessive pollution. The fish samples were ... reagents were of analytical (HPLC) grade supplied by BDH, London, UK. Extraction of ...

  8. Alternatives to crop residues for soil amendment

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J.M.; Unger, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Metadata only record In semiarid agroecosystems, crop residues can provide important benefits of soil and water conservation, nutrient cycling, and improved subsequent crop yields. However, there are frequently multiple competing uses for residues, including animal forage, fuel, and construction material. This chapter discusses the various uses of crop residues and examines alternative soil amendments when crop residues cannot be left on the soil.

  9. Clearing Residual Planetesimals by Sweeping Secular Resonances in Transitional Disks: A Lone-planet Scenario for the Wide Gaps in Debris Disks around Vega and Fomalhaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaochen; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Mao, Shude; Zhang, Xiaojia

    2017-11-01

    Extended gaps in the debris disks of both Vega and Fomalhaut have been observed. These structures have been attributed to tidal perturbations by multiple super-Jupiter gas giant planets. Within the current observational limits, however, no such massive planets have been detected. Here we propose a less stringent “lone-planet” scenario to account for the observed structure with a single eccentric gas giant and suggest that clearing of these wide gaps is induced by its sweeping secular resonance. With a series of numerical simulations, we show that the gravitational potential of the natal disk induces the planet to precess. At the locations where its precession frequency matches the precession frequency the planet imposes on the residual planetesimals, their eccentricity is excited by its resonant perturbation. Due to the hydrodynamic drag by the residual disk gas, the planetesimals undergo orbital decay as their excited eccentricities are effectively damped. During the depletion of the disk gas, the planet’s secular resonance propagates inward and clears a wide gap over an extended region of the disk. Although some residual intermediate-size planetesimals may remain in the gap, their surface density is too low to either produce super-Earths or lead to sufficiently frequent disruptive collisions to generate any observable dusty signatures. The main advantage of this lone-planet sweeping-secular-resonance model over the previous multiple gas giant tidal truncation scenario is the relaxed requirement on the number of gas giants. The observationally inferred upper mass limit can also be satisfied provided the hypothetical planet has a significant eccentricity. A significant fraction of solar or more massive stars bear gas giant planets with significant eccentricities. If these planets acquired their present-day kinematic properties prior to the depletion of their natal disks, their sweeping secular resonance would effectively impede the retention of neighboring

  10. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  11. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  12. Combinatorial construction of toric residues

    OpenAIRE

    Khetan, Amit; Soprounov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The toric residue is a map depending on n+1 semi-ample divisors on a complete toric variety of dimension n. It appears in a variety of contexts such as sparse polynomial systems, mirror symmetry, and GKZ hypergeometric functions. In this paper we investigate the problem of finding an explicit element whose toric residue is equal to one. Such an element is shown to exist if and only if the associated polytopes are essential. We reduce the problem to finding a collection of partitions of the la...

  13. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrienko, Daniil A., E-mail: daniila@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 1320 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Investigation of O{sub 2}–N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound–bound and bound–free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO{sub 2} complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N{sub 2}–O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  14. A Strangelet and Particle Search in Pb-Pb Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Lohmann, K-D; Linden, T

    2002-01-01

    %NA52 %title\\\\ \\\\The NA52 experiment aims to detect strangelets, \\textit{i.e.} small drops of strange quark matter, which might result from the extreme energy and baryon densities attained in Pb+Pb collisions at a beam momentum of 158~A GeV/c. The experiment uses the H6 beam line as a spectrometer equipped with wire chambers, time of flight measurements over a path of 524~m and a hadronic calorimeter which is placed at the end of the setup.\\\\ \\\\During the 17 day run in fall of 1994 we accumulated data of 1.8~\\cdot~10$^{12}$~Pb ions on our Pb targets. The average beam intensity was 2~\\cdot~10$^{7}$~ions per spill for the NA52 experiment. We were running mainly with a 40~mm target at spectrometer rigidities of $\\pm$100 and $-$200~GeV/c and with a 16~mm target at $+$200~GeV/c. Per setting 10$^{11}$ Pb+Pb collisions were recorded. During the Pb-ion run in 1995 the statistics for the strangelet search at a rigidity of $-$200~GeV/c has been improved by about one order of magnitude. This was mainly due to a factor o...

  15. Subthreshold Production of Neutral Pions in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The pion production below the threshold at 290 MeV/u (corresponding to the minimum beam velocity at which pions can be produced in nucleon-nucleon collisions) is sensitive to coherent effects in the momentum distribution of the nucleons in the internuclear collision region. Such collective or coherent effects would manifest themselves in an enhancement of the observed cross section with respect to a prediction on the basis of model momentum distributions, e.g. from the Fermi gas model. \\\\ \\\\ With neutral pions such experiments can be extended to rather low energies and rather small cross sections (in the sub-@mb range) due to the fact that the @p|0's leave the composite nuclear system undisturbed by the Coulomb forces and that their decay $\\gamma$ rays can be detected with high efficiency also at very low pion momentum. In our experiments using |1|2C~ions of 60, 74 and 84~MeV/u and |1|80 of 84~MeV/u we were able to clearly sep from background from different sources. The large efficiency of the annular lead gl...

  16. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, Daniil A; Boyd, Iain D

    2016-07-07

    Investigation of O2-N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound-bound and bound-free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO2 complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N2-O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  17. A cloud collision model for water maser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, J C; Welch, W J

    1986-06-01

    High-velocity collisions between small, dense, neutral clouds or between a dense cloud and a dense shell can provide the energy source required to excite H2O maser emission. The radiative precursor from the surface of the collisional shock front rapidly diffuses through the cloud, heating the dust grains but leaving the H2 molecules cool. Transient maser emission occurs as the conditions for the Goldreich and Kwan "hot-dust cold-gas" maser pump scheme are realized locally within the cloud. In time the local maser action quenches due to the heating of the H2 molecules by collisions against the grains. Although this model cannot explain the very long-lived steady maser features, it is quite successful in explaining a number of the observed properties of the high-velocity features in such sources as Orion, W51, and W49. In particular, it provides a natural explanation for the rapid time variations, the narrow line widths, juxtaposition of high- and low-velocity features, and the short lifetimes which are frequently observed for the so-called high-velocity maser "bullets" thought to be accelerated by strong stellar winds.

  18. Collisions with ice-volatile objects: Geological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, P.; Quinby-Hunt, M.S.; Berry, W.B.N.

    1988-01-01

    The collision of the Earth with extra-terrestrial ice-volatile bodies is proposed as a mechanism to produce rapid changes in the geologic record. These bodies would be analogs of the ice satellites found for the Jovian planets and suspected for comets and certain low density bodies in the Asteroid belt. Five generic end-members are postulated: (1) water ice; (2) dry ice: carbon-carbon dioxide rich, (3) oceanic (chloride) ice; (4) sulfur-rich ice; (5) ammonia hydrate-rich ice; and (6) clathrate: methane-rich ice. Due to the volatile nature of these bodies, evidence for their impact with the Earth would be subtle and probably best reflected geochemically or in the fossil record. Actual boloids impacting the Earth may have a variable composition, generally some admixture with water ice. However for discussion purposes, only the effects of a dominant component will be treated. The general geological effects of such collisions, as a function of the dominant component would be: (1) rapid sea level rise unrelated to deglaciation, (2) decreased oceanic pH and rapid climatic warming or deglaciation; (3) increased paleosalinities; (4) increased acid rain; (5) increased oceanic pH and rapid carbonate deposition; and (6) rapid climatic warming or deglaciation

  19. Distraction-related road traffic collisions | Eid | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: We aimed to prospectively study distraction-related road traffic collision injuries, their contributory factors, severity, and outcome. Methods: Data were prospectively collected on all hospitalized road traffic collision trauma patients in Al-Ain City who were drivers at the collision time over one and half years. Driver's ...

  20. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis. (a) For a permitted flight with a planned maximum altitude greater than 150 kilometers, a permittee must obtain a collision avoidance analysis from United States Strategic Command. (b) The collision... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65...

  1. Radionuclides in Bayer process residues: previous analysis for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Rocha, Zildete; Oliveira, Arno H. de

    2011-01-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in the main residues of Bayer process for alumina production: red mud and sand samples. Usually, the residues of Bayer process are named red mud, in their totality. However, in the industry where the samples were collected, there is an additional residues separation: sand and red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of radionuclides are higher in the red mud than in the sand. These solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. Further uses for the residues as building material must be more evaluated from the radiological point of view, due to its potential of radiological exposure enhancement, specially caused by radon emission. (author)

  2. Radionuclides in Bayer process residues: previous analysis for radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Rocha, Zildete, E-mail: vc@cdtn.b, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Arno H. de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in the main residues of Bayer process for alumina production: red mud and sand samples. Usually, the residues of Bayer process are named red mud, in their totality. However, in the industry where the samples were collected, there is an additional residues separation: sand and red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of radionuclides are higher in the red mud than in the sand. These solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. Further uses for the residues as building material must be more evaluated from the radiological point of view, due to its potential of radiological exposure enhancement, specially caused by radon emission. (author)

  3. Determination of residual stress within complex-shaped coarse-grained cobalt-chrome biomedical castings

    OpenAIRE

    Conroy, Brian P; Tanner, David A

    2016-01-01

    peer-reviewed ASTM F75 femoral knee implant casting components distort during manufacture due to residual stress re-distribution or inducement. These castings pose a number of challenges for residual stress determination methods; they have a complex geometry, their micro-structure is inhomogeneous, they work-harden rapidly and they have a coarse, elastically-anisotropic grain structure. The contour method is anticipated to be the most promising residual stress determination technique. X-ra...

  4. Greenhouse and laboratory study for the land application of water treatment residual

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Jay B.

    1991-01-01

    The disposal of water treatment residual has received little attention due to a lack of regulation, funding, and concern about their environmental impacts. Many treatment plants discharge alum residual directly into nearby water courses or dewater them for landfilling. If suitable land is available, land application of residual is cost effective and has the potential for negligible effects on the environment and may prove to be a long-term solution to the disposal problem. This...

  5. Probing transverse momentum broadening via dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Qin, Guang-You; Wei, Shu-Yi; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Han-Zhong

    2017-10-01

    Dijet, dihadron, hadron-jet angular correlations have been reckoned as important probes of the transverse momentum broadening effects in relativistic nuclear collisions. When a pair of high-energy jets created in hard collisions traverse the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions, they become de-correlated due to the vacuum soft gluon radiation associated with the Sudakov logarithms and the medium-induced transverse momentum broadening. For the first time, we employ the systematical resummation formalism and establish a baseline calculation to describe the dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlation data in pp and peripheral AA collisions where the medium effect is negligible. We demonstrate that the medium-induced broadening 〈 p⊥2 〉 and the so-called jet quenching parameter q ˆ can be extracted from the angular de-correlations observed in AA collisions. A global χ2 analysis of dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlation data renders 〈p⊥ 2 〉 ∼13-4+5 GeV2 for a quark jet at RHIC top energy. Further experimental and theoretical efforts along the direction of this work shall significantly advance the quantitative understanding of transverse momentum broadening and help us acquire unprecedented knowledge of jet quenching parameter in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  6. [Keratitis due to Acanthamoeba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Irezábal, Julio; Martínez, Inés; Isasa, Patricia; Barrón, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    Free-living amebae appertaining to the genus Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Balamuthia are the most prevalent protozoa found in the environment. These amebae have a cosmopolitan distribution in soil, air and water, providing multiple opportunities for contacts with humans and animals, although they only occasionally cause disease. Acanthamoeba spp. are the causative agent of granulomatous amebic encephalitis, a rare and often fatal disease of the central nervous system, and amebic keratitis, a painful disease of the eyes. Keratitis usually follows a chronic course due to the delay in diagnosis and subsequent treatment. The clear increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis in the last 20 years is related to the use and deficient maintenance of contact lenses, and to swimming while wearing them. The expected incidence is one case per 30,000 contact lens wearers per year, with 88% of cases occurring in persons wearing hydrogel lenses. This review presents information on the morphology, life-cycle and epidemiology of Acanthamoeba, as well as on diagnostic procedures (culture), appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and prevention measures.

  7. [MRI evaluation of residual breast carcinoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, A; de Korvin, B; Bouriel, C; Carsin, A; Tas, P; Bendavid, C; Dupré, P F; Kerbrat, P; Mesbah, H; Poree, P; Levêque, J

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the sensibility and specificity of MRI in the detection and size measuring of residual breast cancer in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. This is a retrospective study of 32 women, who underwent breast MRI before and after neoadjuvant treatment. MRI has been confronted to surgical pathology results. The sensibility of MRI to assess pathologic Complete Response (no invasive residual tumor) was excellent (100%) but the specificity was low (55,5%). There was no false negative case and four false positive cases (Two ductal carcinomas in situ and two scars-like fibrosis). When MRI outcomes were compared with the presence or absence of invasive or in situ residual carcinoma, only one false negative case was noticed (one "in situ" residual tumor). The correlation between tumor size measured by MRI and histopathology was low (r=0,32). Underestimations of tumor size were due to non-continuous tumor regression or invasive lobular carcinoma or association of invasive carcinoma and intra ductal breast cancer. Over estimations of tumor size were due to chemotherapy-induced changes. MRI is a sensitive but poorly specific method to assess the pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Estimation of tumor size and detection of isolated residual in situ carcinoma are fare. Therefore, surgical intervention remains necessary whatever the MRI outcomes.

  8. Year-round monitoring reveals prevalence of fatal bird-window collisions at the Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Schneider

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Collisions with glass are a serious threat to avian life and are estimated to kill hundreds of millions of birds per year in the United States. We monitored 22 buildings at the Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC in Blacksburg, Virginia, for collision fatalities from October 2013 through May 2015 and explored possible effects exerted by glass area and surrounding land cover on avian mortality. We documented 240 individuals representing 55 identifiable species that died due to collisions with windows at the VTCRC. The relative risk of fatal collisions at all buildings over the study period were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical zero-inflated Poisson model adjusting for percentage of tree and lawn cover within 50 m of buildings, as well as for glass area. We found significant relationships between fatalities and surrounding lawn area (relative risk: 0.96, 95% credible interval: 0.93, 0.98 as well as glass area on buildings (RR: 1.30, 95% CI [1.05–1.65]. The model also found a moderately significant relationship between fatal collisions and the percent land cover of ornamental trees surrounding buildings (RR = 1.02, 95% CI [1.00–1.05]. Every building surveyed had at least one recorded collision death. Our findings indicate that birds collide with VTCRC windows during the summer breeding season in addition to spring and fall migration. The Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris was the most common window collision species and accounted for 10% of deaths. Though research has identified various correlates with fatal bird-window collisions, such studies rarely culminate in mitigation. We hope our study brings attention, and ultimately action, to address this significant threat to birds at the VTCRC and elsewhere.

  9. Weld Residual Stress in Corner Boxing Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuyoshi, Matsuoka; Tokuharu, Yoshii; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue damage often occurs in corner boxing welded joints because of stress concentration and residual stress. The hot spot stress approach is applicable to stress concentration. However, the number of suitable methods for estimating residual stress in welded joints is limited. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the residual stress in corner boxing joints. The method of estimating residual stresses based on the inherent stress technique is presented. Residual stress measurements are per...

  10. Charged jets in p--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 5.02$ TeV measured with the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haake, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are collimated sprays of charged and neutral particles, which are produced in the fragmentation of hard scattered partons in the early stage of the collision. The measurement of nuclear modification of charged jet spectra in p-Pb collisions provides an important way of quantifying the effects of cold nuclear matter in the initial state on jet production, fragmentation, and hadronization. Unlike in Pb-Pb collisions, modifications of jet production due to hot nuclear matter effects are not expected to occur in p-Pb collisions. Therefore, measurements of nuclear modifications in charged jet spectra in p-Pb collisions (commonly known as $R_\\mathrm{pPb}$) can be used to isolate and quantify cold nuclear matter effects. Potential nuclear effects are expected to be more pronounced in more central p-Pb collisions due to a higher probability of an interaction between the proton and the lead-nucleus. To measure th...

  11. Electronic stopping in ion-fullerene collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlathölter, T.A.; Hadjar, O.; Hoekstra, R.A.; Morgenstern, R.W.H.

    The electronic friction experienced by a multiply charged ion interacting with the valence electrons of a single fullerene is an important aspect of the collision dynamics. It manifests itself in a considerable loss of projectile kinetic energy transferred to the target, resulting in excitation. The

  12. Probabilistic calculation for angular dependence collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This collision probabilistic method is broadly used in cylindrical geometry (in one- or two-dimensions). It constitutes a powerful tool for the heterogeneous Response Method where, the coupling current is of the cosine type, that is, without angular dependence at azimuthal angle θ and proportional to μ (cosine of the θ polar angle). (Author) [es

  13. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  14. Collision vulnerability of vultures at established windfarms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Campbell Murn

    Vulture News 65. November 2013. Collision vulnerability of vultures at established windfarms. Warren Goodwin. 177 Fraser Road North, Canning vale, WA 6155, Australia. shikra_g@yahoo.com. Established wind farms are commonly situated on mountain ridges or hillsides, in order to make optimal use of prevailing winds,.

  15. Collision strengths for transitions in Ni XIX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atomic data (namely energy levels, radiative rates, collision strengths, excitation rates, etc.) are required in order to estimate the power loss from the walls of the reactors. Furthermore, Ni XIX, a neon-like ion, is also very useful in lasing plas- mas. Similarly many transitions, particularly within the n = 3 configurations, have.

  16. Rear end collision: Causes and avoidance techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nekovee, Maziar; Bie, Jing; Naja, Rola

    2013-01-01

    Rear-end collision is one of the most frequent accidents occurring on roadways. This chapter investigates how vehicle’s local parameters in a platoon of cars (i.e., perception and information collection, vehicle speed, safe distance, braking parameters) affect the global behavior of the traffic

  17. Collision between two ortho-positronium (Ps)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The elastic collision between two ortho-positronium (e.g. S = 1 ) atoms is studied using an {\\it ab-initio} static exchange model (SEM) in the centre of mass (CM) frame by considering the system as a four-body Coulomb problem where all the Coulomb interaction terms in the direct and exchange channels are treated exactly.

  18. Efficient Collision Detection in a Simulated Hydrocyclone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, D.F.; Krebs, T.; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocyclones enhance oil–water separation efficiency compared to conventional separation methods. An efficient collision detection scheme with Np ln Np dependency on the number of particles is proposed. The scheme is developed to investigate the importance of particle–particle interaction for flow

  19. Multifragmentation and dynamics in heavy ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The investigation of heavy-ion collision mechanisms at intermediate energies, around the nucleon Fermi energy, have set major understanding objectives to reach. For several years, such studies have been focusing on intermediate-mass fragment (IMF) production. More specifically, the probing of nuclear liquid-gas phase ...

  20. Perspective of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the lectures given at the International School of nuclear physics, Erice, 1985, which survey the expectations for the field of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The primary motivation for the field, the organization of the lectures, and a description of the NA 34 experiment, are all briefly given. (U.K.)