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Sample records for residual collision model

  1. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model...... of the vocal fold collision is proposed, which incorporates different procedures used in contact mechanics and mathematical optimization theories. The penalty approach and the Lagrange multiplier method are investigated. The contact force solution obtained by the penalty formulation is highly dependent...

  2. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  3. Molecular dynamics and binary collision modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fracti...... that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase is demonstrated at low energy.......Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects...

  4. Heavy residue properties in intermediate energy nuclear collisions with gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1990-10-01

    We have measured the target fragment production cross sections and angular distributions for the interaction of 32, 44 and 93 MeV/nucleon argon, 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon krypton with gold. The fragment isobaric yield distributions, moving frame angular distributions and velocities have been deduced from these data. This fission cross section decreases with increasing projectile energy and the heavy residue cross section increases. The ratio v parallel /v cn increases approximately linearly with mass removed from the target. 21 refs., 8 figs

  5. Formation of large target residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L.; Xu, Z.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1987-04-01

    We have used radiochemical techniques to measure the yields, angular distributions and velocity spectra of the large (A/sub frag/ ≥ 2/3 A/sub tgt/) target residues from the fragmentation of 197 Au by intermediate energy 12 C, 20 Ne, 32 S, 40 Ar, 84 Kr, and 139 La projectiles. The fragment moving frame angular distributions are asymmetric for the lighter projectiles (C-Ar). The fragment velocity spectra are Maxwellian for the Kr induced reactions and non-Maxwellian for the reactions induced by the lighter ions. We interpret these results in terms of a change in the dominant fragment production mechanism(s) from one(s) involving a fast non-equilibrium process for the lighter ions to a slow, equilibrium process for Kr. Comparison of the measured yields and angular distributions with calculations made using a Boltzmann transport equation with appropriate modifications for Pauli blocking, etc., show excellent agreement between data and theory. 12 refs., 12 figs

  6. Comparative analysis among deterministic and stochastic collision damage models for oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Campanile

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of collision damage models on oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability is investigated considering the IACS deterministic model against GOALDS/IMO database statistics for collision events, substantiating the probabilistic model. Statistical properties of hull girder residual strength are determined by Monte Carlo simulation, based on random generation of damage dimensions and a modified form of incremental-iterative method, to account for neutral axis rotation and equilibrium of horizontal bending moment, due to cross-section asymmetry after collision events. Reliability analysis is performed, to investigate the incidence of collision penetration depth and height statistical properties on hull girder sagging/hogging failure probabilities. Besides, the incidence of corrosion on hull girder residual strength and reliability is also discussed, focussing on gross, hull girder net and local net scantlings, respectively. The ISSC double hull oil tanker and single side bulk carrier, assumed as test cases in the ISSC 2012 report, are taken as reference ships.

  7. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  8. A numerical 4D Collision Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Pal; Culloch, Ross; Lieber, Lilian; Kregting, Louise

    2017-04-01

    With the growing number of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices being installed across the world, some concern has been raised about the possibility of harming mobile, marine fauna by collision. Although physical contact between a MRE device and an organism has not been reported to date, these novel sub-sea structures pose a challenge for accurately estimating collision risks as part of environmental impact assessments. Even if the animal motion is simplified to linear translation, ignoring likely evasive behaviour, the mathematical problem of establishing an impact probability is not trivial. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, four-dimensional simulations of a novel marine renewable device concept, Deep Green, Minesto's power plant and hereafter referred to as the 'kite' that flies in a figure-of-eight configuration. Simulations were carried out altering several configurations including kite depth, kite speed and kite trajectory while keeping the speed of the moving object constant. Since the kite assembly is defined as two parts in the model, a tether (attached to the seabed) and the kite, collision risk of each part is reported independently. By comparing the number of collisions with the number of collision-free simulations, a probability of impact for each simulated position in the cross- section of the area is considered. Results suggest that close to the bottom, where the tether amplitude is small, the path is always blocked and the impact probability is 100% as expected. However, higher up in the water column, the collision probability is twice as high in the mid line, where the tether passes twice per period than at the extremes of its trajectory. The collision probability distribution is much more complex in the upper end of the water column, where the kite and tether can simultaneously collide with the object. Results demonstrate the viability of such models, which can also incorporate empirical

  9. Molecular dynamics and binary collisions modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the spectral dependence of defect production and microstructure evolution for the development of fission-fusion correlations. Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase demonstrated at low energy

  10. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  11. Firetube model and hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareth, R.A.M.S.; Kodama, T.; Portes Junior, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    A new version of the fire tube model is developed to describe hadron-hadron collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. Several improvements are introduced in order to include the longitudinal expansion of intermediate fireballs, which remedies the overestimates of the transverse momenta in the previous version. It is found that, within a wide range of incident energies, the model describes well the experimental data for the single particle rapidity distribution, two-body correlations in the pseudo-rapidity, transverse momentum spectra of pions and kaons, the leading particle spectra and the K/π ratio. (author)

  12. Modelling of the Internal Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of the structural damage due to ship collisions is developed. The method is based on the idealized structural unit method (ISUM). Longitudinal/transverse webs which connect the outer and the inner hulls are modelled by rectangular plate units. The responses are determined......-skin plated structures in collision/grounding situations with the present solutions. As an illustrative example the procedure has been used for analyses of a side collision of a double-hull tanker. Several factors affecting ship collision response, namely the collision speed and the scantlings/ arrangements...

  13. Solitary waves in dimer binary collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Zaid; Jayaprakash, K. R.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary wave propagation in nonlinear diatomic (dimer) chains is a very interesting topic of research in the study of nonlinear lattices. Such waves were recently found to be supported by the essentially nonlinear granular lattice and Toda lattice. An interesting aspect of this discovery is attributed to the realization of a spectrum of the mass ratio (the only system parameter governing the dynamics) that supports the propagation of such waves corresponding to the considered interaction potential. The objective of this exposition is to explore solitary wave propagation in the dimer binary collision (BC) model. Interestingly, the dimer BC model supports solitary wave propagation at a discrete spectrum of mass ratios similar to those observed in granular and Toda dimers. Further, we report a qualitative and one-to-one correspondence between the spectrum of the mass ratio corresponding to the dimer BC model and those corresponding to granular and Toda dimer chains.

  14. Improved intra-species collision models for PIC simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, the authors have investigated methods to improve the effectiveness of modeling collisional processes in particle-in-cell codes. Through the use of generalized collision models, plasma dynamics can be followed both in the regime of nearly collisionless plasmas as well as in the hydrodynamic limit of collisional plasmas. They have developed a collision-field method to treat both the case of collisions between unlike plasma species (inter-species collisions), through the use of a deterministic, grid-based force, and between particles of the same species (intra-species collisions), through the use of a Langevin equation. While the approach used for inter-species collisions is noise-free in that the collision experienced by a particle does not require any random numbers, such random numbers are used for intra-species collisions. This gives rise to a stochastic cooling effect inherent in the Langevin approach. In this paper, the authors concentrate on intra-species collisions and describe how the accuracy of the model can be improved by appropriate corrections to velocity and spatial moments

  15. Geostatistical methods applied to field model residuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Fox; Mosegaard, K.; Olsen, Nils

    consists of measurement errors and unmodelled signal), and is typically assumed to be uncorrelated and Gaussian distributed. We have applied geostatistical methods to analyse the residuals of the Oersted(09d/04) field model [http://www.dsri.dk/Oersted/Field_models/IGRF_2005_candidates/], which is based......The geomagnetic field varies on a variety of time- and length scales, which are only rudimentary considered in most present field models. The part of the observed field that can not be explained by a given model, the model residuals, is often considered as an estimate of the data uncertainty (which...... on 5 years of Ørsted and CHAMP data, and includes secular variation and acceleration, as well as low-degree external (magnetospheric) and induced fields. The analysis is done in order to find the statistical behaviour of the space-time structure of the residuals, as a proxy for the data covariances...

  16. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  17. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  18. Modeling and simulation of cars in frontal collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deac, S. C.; Perescu, A.; Simoiu, D.; Nyaguly, E.; Crâştiu, I.; Bereteu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Protection of cars, mainly drivers and passengers in a collision are very important issues worldwide. Statistics given by “World Health Organization” are alarming rate of increase in the number of road accidents, most claiming with serious injury, human and material loss. For these reasons has been a continuous development of protection systems, especially car causing three quarters of all accidents. Mathematical modeling and simulation of a car behavior during a frontal collision leads to new solutions in the development of protective systems. This paper presents several structural models of a vehicle during a frontal collision and its behavior is analyzed by numerical simulation using Simulink.

  19. Collision Detection Modelling for Store Release Testing at AMRL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leung, Sunny

    2000-01-01

    ... of stores from aircraft. A computer program called CDM, written in Java and Java 3D programming language has been developed to visualise, model, and provide collision detection, for an aerodynamic grid test...

  20. Some remarks on the statistical model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, V.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution is an attempt to assess what can be learned from the remarkable success of this statistical model in describing ratios of particle abundances in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

  1. Avian collision risk models for wind energy impact assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masden, E.A., E-mail: elizabeth.masden@uhi.ac.uk [Environmental Research Institute, North Highland College-UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Ormlie Road, Thurso, Caithness KW14 7EE (United Kingdom); Cook, A.S.C.P. [British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford IP24 2PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    With the increasing global development of wind energy, collision risk models (CRMs) are routinely used to assess the potential impacts of wind turbines on birds. We reviewed and compared the avian collision risk models currently available in the scientific literature, exploring aspects such as the calculation of a collision probability, inclusion of stationary components e.g. the tower, angle of approach and uncertainty. 10 models were cited in the literature and of these, all included a probability of collision of a single bird colliding with a wind turbine during passage through the rotor swept area, and the majority included a measure of the number of birds at risk. 7 out of the 10 models calculated the probability of birds colliding, whilst the remainder used a constant. We identified four approaches to calculate the probability of collision and these were used by others. 6 of the 10 models were deterministic and included the most frequently used models in the UK, with only 4 including variation or uncertainty in some way, the most recent using Bayesian methods. Despite their appeal, CRMs have their limitations and can be ‘data hungry’ as well as assuming much about bird movement and behaviour. As data become available, these assumptions should be tested to ensure that CRMs are functioning to adequately answer the questions posed by the wind energy sector. - Highlights: • We highlighted ten models available to assess avian collision risk. • Only 4 of the models included variability or uncertainty. • Collision risk models have limitations and can be ‘data hungry’. • It is vital that the most appropriate model is used for a given task.

  2. Mechanically induced residual stresses: Modelling and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranart, Jean-Claude E.

    Accurate characterisation of residual stress represents a major challenge to the engineering community. This is because it is difficult to validate the measurement and the accuracy is doubtful. It is with this in mind that the current research program concerning the characterisation of mechanically induced residual stresses was undertaken. Specifically, the cold expansion of fastener holes and the shot peening treatment of aerospace alloys, aluminium 7075 and titanium Ti-6Al-4V, are considered. The objective of this study is to characterise residual stresses resulting from cold working using three powerful techniques. These are: (i) theoretical using three dimensional non-linear finite element modelling, (ii) semi-destructive using a modified incremental hole drilling technique and (iii) nondestructive using a newly developed guided wave method supplemented by traditional C-scan measurements. The three dimensional finite element results of both simultaneous and sequential cold expansion of two fastener holes revealed the importance of the separation distance, the expansion level and the loading history upon the development and growth of the plastic zone and unloading residual stresses. It further showed that the commonly adopted two dimensional finite element models are inaccurate and incapable of predicting these residual stresses. Similarly, the dynamic elasto-plastic finite element studies of shot peening showed that the depth of the compressed layer, surface and sub-surface residual stresses are significantly influenced by the shot characteristics. Furthermore, the results reveal that the separation distance between two simultaneously impacting shots governs the plastic zone development and its growth. In the semi-destructive incremental hole drilling technique, the accuracy of the newly developed calibration coefficients and measurement techniques were verified with a known stress field and the method was used to measure peening residual stresses. Unlike

  3. Use of the Strong Collision Model to Calculate Spin Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Chow, K. H.; Smadella, M.; Hossain, M. D.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Ofer, O.; Morenzoni, E.; Salman, Z.; Saadaoui, H.; Song, Q.; Kiefl, R. F.

    The strong collision model is used to calculate spin relaxation of a muon or polarized radioactive nucleus in contact with a fluctuating environment. We show that on a time scale much longer than the mean time between collisions (fluctuations) the longitudinal polarization decays exponentially with a relaxation rate equal to a sum of Lorentzians-one for each frequency component in the static polarization function ps(t).

  4. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  5. Binary collisions in popovici’s photogravitational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioc V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of bodies under the combined action of the gravitational attraction and the radiative repelling force has large and deep implications in astronomy. In the 1920s, the Romanian astronomer Constantin Popovici proposed a modified photogravitational law (considered by other scientists too. This paper deals with the collisions of the two-body problem associated with Popovici’s model. Resorting to McGehee-type transformations of the second kind, we obtain regular equations of motion and define the collision manifold. The flow on this boundary manifold is wholly described. This allows to point out some important qualitative features of the collisional motion: existence of the black-hole effect, gradientlikeness of the flow on the collision manifold, regularizability of collisions under certain conditions. Some questions, coming from the comparison of Levi-Civita’s regularizing transformations and McGehee’s ones, are formulated.

  6. On a Three Dimensional Vision Based Collision Avoidance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzani, Céline; Filbet, Francis

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a three dimensional collision avoidance approach for aerial vehicles inspired by coordinated behaviors in biological groups. The proposed strategy aims to enable a group of vehicles to converge to a common destination point avoiding collisions with each other and with moving obstacles in their environment. The interaction rules lead the agents to adapt their velocity vectors through a modification of the relative bearing angle and the relative elevation. Moreover the model satisfies the limited field of view constraints resulting from individual perception sensitivity. From the proposed individual based model, a mean-field kinetic model is derived. Simulations are performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  7. A Mathematical Model for Analysis on Ships Collision Avoidance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study develops a mathematical model for analysis on collision avoidance of ships. The obtained model provides information on the quantitative effect of the ship's engine's response and the applied reversing force on separation distance and stopping abilities of the ships. Appropriate evasive maneuvers require the ...

  8. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-29

    Apr 29, 2015 ... We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression ...

  9. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progress on hydrodynamic modelling, investigation on the flow data and the extraction of the QGP shear viscosity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. 2. Hydrodynamic modelling – a short introduction. 2.1 Viscous hydrodynamics. Relativistic hydrodynamics is a macroscopic tool to simulate the QGP fireball ...

  10. Collision prediction models using multivariate Poisson-lognormal regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Sayed, Tarek

    2009-07-01

    This paper advocates the use of multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) regression to develop models for collision count data. The MVPLN approach presents an opportunity to incorporate the correlations across collision severity levels and their influence on safety analyses. The paper introduces a new multivariate hazardous location identification technique, which generalizes the univariate posterior probability of excess that has been commonly proposed and applied in the literature. In addition, the paper presents an alternative approach for quantifying the effect of the multivariate structure on the precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN approach is compared with the independent (separate) univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN) models with respect to model inference, goodness-of-fit, identification of hot spots and precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN is modeled using the WinBUGS platform which facilitates computation of posterior distributions as well as providing a goodness-of-fit measure for model comparisons. The results indicate that the estimates of the extra Poisson variation parameters were considerably smaller under MVPLN leading to higher precision. The improvement in precision is due mainly to the fact that MVPLN accounts for the correlation between the latent variables representing property damage only (PDO) and injuries plus fatalities (I+F). This correlation was estimated at 0.758, which is highly significant, suggesting that higher PDO rates are associated with higher I+F rates, as the collision likelihood for both types is likely to rise due to similar deficiencies in roadway design and/or other unobserved factors. In terms of goodness-of-fit, the MVPLN model provided a superior fit than the independent univariate models. The multivariate hazardous location identification results demonstrated that some hazardous locations could be overlooked if the analysis was restricted to the univariate models.

  11. Scaling properties in single collision model of light ion reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanic, J.; Simovic, R.

    2004-01-01

    Light ion reflection from solids in the keV energy region has been studied within the single collision model. Particle and energy reflection coefficients as functions of the scaled transport cross section have been calculated numerically by utilizing the exact scattering function for the Kr-C potential and analytically with an effective power approximation for the same potential. The obtained analytical formulae approximate very accurately to the numerical results. Comparison of the calculated reflection coefficients with the experimental data and computer simulations for different light ion-heavy target combinations shows that the scaled transport cross section remains a convenient scaling parameter in the single collision domain, as adopted previously in multiple collision theory

  12. Modeling gas kinetic effects in drop collision and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubynsky, Mykyta V.; Belousov, Kirill I.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Sprittles, James E.

    2017-11-01

    When liquid drops collide with each other (collision) or with a solid surface (impact), the thickness of the intervening gas film (which, in particular, gives rise to bouncing off wettable surfaces) is often comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules and thus gas kinetic effects are significant. We study drop collision and impact computationally using an interface-tracking finite element approach. The gas film is treated in the lubrication approximation. Gas kinetic effects are taken into account by introducing factors (functions of the Knudsen number) modifying the gas flow rate and shear stress. Our results for drop collision are in excellent agreement with those of Li who modeled the gas using the full Navier-Stokes equations with an effective viscosity. For impact, where Li's approach cannot be used, we obtain good agreement with drop bouncing experiments. We acknowledge the support of the Leverhulme Trust and the EPSRC (EP/N016602/1).

  13. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  14. Pseudo potentials and model potentials in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, O.; Jouin, H.; Fuentealba, P.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is discussed the main differences between the use of pseudo-potentials and model potentials in collision problems . It is shown the potential energy curves for distinct systems obtained with both kinds of potentials. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  15. Residual-based model diagnosis methods for mixture cure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingwei; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2017-06-01

    Model diagnosis, an important issue in statistical modeling, has not yet been addressed adequately for cure models. We focus on mixture cure models in this work and propose some residual-based methods to examine the fit of the mixture cure model, particularly the fit of the latency part of the mixture cure model. The new methods extend the classical residual-based methods to the mixture cure model. Numerical work shows that the proposed methods are capable of detecting lack-of-fit of a mixture cure model, particularly in the latency part, such as outliers, improper covariate functional form, or nonproportionality in hazards if the proportional hazards assumption is employed in the latency part. The methods are illustrated with two real data sets that were previously analyzed with mixture cure models. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  16. Multi module model for ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Magas, V K; Strottman, D D

    2001-01-01

    The Multi Module Model for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC energies is presented. It uses the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this model is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid calculations. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is also presented.

  17. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  18. NASA Lewis Launch Collision Probability Model Developed and Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D

    1999-01-01

    There are nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the earth. These objects encompass manned objects, active and decommissioned satellites, spent rocket bodies, and debris. They range from a few centimeters across to the size of the MIR space station. Anytime a new satellite is launched, the launch vehicle with its payload attached passes through an area of space in which these objects orbit. Although the population density of these objects is low, there always is a small but finite probability of collision between the launch vehicle and one or more of these space objects. Even though the probability of collision is very low, for some payloads even this small risk is unacceptable. To mitigate the small risk of collision associated with launching at an arbitrary time within the daily launch window, NASA performs a prelaunch mission assurance Collision Avoidance Analysis (or COLA). For the COLA of the Cassini spacecraft, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted an in-house development and analysis of a model for launch collision probability. The model allows a minimum clearance criteria to be used with the COLA analysis to ensure an acceptably low probability of collision. If, for any given liftoff time, the nominal launch vehicle trajectory would pass a space object with less than the minimum required clearance, launch would not be attempted at that time. The model assumes that the nominal positions of the orbiting objects and of the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time, and therefore, that any tracked object that comes within close proximity of the launch vehicle can be identified. For any such pair, these nominal positions can be used to calculate a nominal miss distance. The actual miss distances may differ substantially from the nominal miss distance, due, in part, to the statistical uncertainty of the knowledge of the objects positions. The model further assumes that these position uncertainties can be described with position covariance matrices

  19. Multiple-collision model for pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A simple model for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is developed based on nucleon-nucleon data, nuclear density distribution, and the assumption of straight-line trajectories. Multiplicity distributions for total pion production and for negative-pion production are predicted for 40 Ar incident on a Pb 3 O 4 target at 1.8 GeV/nucleon. Production through intermediate baryon resonances reduces the high-multiplicity region but insufficiently to yield agreement with data. This implies the need for a coherent production mechanism

  20. finite element model for predicting residual stresses in shielded

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Diffractometer (XRD 6000). From the Finite Element Model Simulation, the transverse residual stress in the x ... Keywords: Residual stress, 3D FEM, Shielded manual metal arc welding, Low Carbon Steel (ASTM A36), X-Ray diffraction, degree of ..... I. ''Residual stress effects on fatigue life of welded structures using LEFM'',.

  1. Comparison of models of high energy heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the main theoretical developments on heavy ion collisions at energies (0.1 to 2.0) GeV/nuc are reviewed. The fireball, firestreak, hydrodynamic (1-fluid, 2-fluids), ''row on row'', hard sphere and intranuclear cascades, and classical equations of motion models are discussed in detail. Results are compared to each other and to measured Ne + U → p + X reactions

  2. Sensor Fusion Based Model for Collision Free Mobile Robot Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Marwah; Elleithy, Khaled; Alajlan, Abrar

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous mobile robots have become a very popular and interesting topic in the last decade. Each of them are equipped with various types of sensors such as GPS, camera, infrared and ultrasonic sensors. These sensors are used to observe the surrounding environment. However, these sensors sometimes fail and have inaccurate readings. Therefore, the integration of sensor fusion will help to solve this dilemma and enhance the overall performance. This paper presents a collision free mobile robot navigation based on the fuzzy logic fusion model. Eight distance sensors and a range finder camera are used for the collision avoidance approach where three ground sensors are used for the line or path following approach. The fuzzy system is composed of nine inputs which are the eight distance sensors and the camera, two outputs which are the left and right velocities of the mobile robot’s wheels, and 24 fuzzy rules for the robot’s movement. Webots Pro simulator is used for modeling the environment and the robot. The proposed methodology, which includes the collision avoidance based on fuzzy logic fusion model and line following robot, has been implemented and tested through simulation and real time experiments. Various scenarios have been presented with static and dynamic obstacles using one robot and two robots while avoiding obstacles in different shapes and sizes. PMID:26712766

  3. Sensor Fusion Based Model for Collision Free Mobile Robot Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah Almasri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mobile robots have become a very popular and interesting topic in the last decade. Each of them are equipped with various types of sensors such as GPS, camera, infrared and ultrasonic sensors. These sensors are used to observe the surrounding environment. However, these sensors sometimes fail and have inaccurate readings. Therefore, the integration of sensor fusion will help to solve this dilemma and enhance the overall performance. This paper presents a collision free mobile robot navigation based on the fuzzy logic fusion model. Eight distance sensors and a range finder camera are used for the collision avoidance approach where three ground sensors are used for the line or path following approach. The fuzzy system is composed of nine inputs which are the eight distance sensors and the camera, two outputs which are the left and right velocities of the mobile robot’s wheels, and 24 fuzzy rules for the robot’s movement. Webots Pro simulator is used for modeling the environment and the robot. The proposed methodology, which includes the collision avoidance based on fuzzy logic fusion model and line following robot, has been implemented and tested through simulation and real time experiments. Various scenarios have been presented with static and dynamic obstacles using one robot and two robots while avoiding obstacles in different shapes and sizes.

  4. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple model of surface roughness is proposed. • Its key feature is a linearly varying target density at the surface. • The model can be used in 1D/2D/3D Monte Carlo binary collision simulations. • The model fits well experimental glancing incidence sputtering yield data. - Abstract: It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield – especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the “density gradient model”) which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target’s atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient – leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa (tensile) and minimum value of ... These results shows that the residual stresses obtained by prediction from the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  6. An Additive-Multiplicative Restricted Mean Residual Life Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansourvar, Zahra; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The mean residual life measures the expected remaining life of a subject who has survived up to a particular time. When survival time distribution is highly skewed or heavy tailed, the restricted mean residual life must be considered. In this paper, we propose an additive-multiplicative restricted...... mean residual life model to study the association between the restricted mean residual life function and potential regression covariates in the presence of right censoring. This model extends the proportional mean residual life model using an additive model as its covariate dependent baseline....... For the suggested model, some covariate effects are allowed to be time-varying. To estimate the model parameters, martingale estimating equations are developed, and the large sample properties of the resulting estimators are established. In addition, to assess the adequacy of the model, we investigate a goodness...

  7. Prediction of Collision Cross-Section Values for Small Molecules: Application to Pesticide Residue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Bade, Richard; Celma, Alberto; Mullin, Lauren; Cleland, Gareth; Stead, Sara; Hernandez, Felix; Sancho, Juan V

    2017-06-20

    The use of collision cross-section (CCS) values obtained by ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry has added a third dimension (alongside retention time and exact mass) to aid in the identification of compounds. However, its utility is limited by the number of experimental CCS values currently available. This work demonstrates the potential of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of CCS values of pesticides. The predictor, based on eight software-chosen molecular descriptors, was optimized using CCS values of 205 small molecules and validated using a set of 131 pesticides. The relative error was within 6% for 95% of all CCS values for protonated molecules, resulting in a median relative error less than 2%. In order to demonstrate the potential of CCS prediction, the strategy was applied to spinach samples. It notably improved the confidence in the tentative identification of suspect and nontarget pesticides.

  8. Artificial neural network modelling in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-dahshan, E.; Radi, A.; El-Bakry, M.Y.; El Mashad, M.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network (NN) model and parton two fireball model (PTFM) have been used to study the pseudo-rapidity distribution of the shower particles for C 12, O 16, Si 28 and S 32 on nuclear emulsion. The trained NN shows a better fitting with experimental data than the PTFM calculations. The NN is then used to predict the distributions that are not present in the training set and matched them effectively. The NN simulation results prove a strong presence modeling in heavy ion collisions

  9. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  10. Models for new particle production in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1986-04-01

    Following up our earlier work and also stimulated by recent experimental results on positron production in heavy ion collisions we investigate various mechanisms for the production of a light, previously unknown particle in such collisions. As more conventional mechanisms seem to be inadequate we concentrate on processes directly or indirectly connected with the strong electric or magnetic fields and quark degrees of freedom in nuclei. We also consider modifications of the color confinement scheme. Our analysis is confined to schemes staying within the framework of the standard SU(3)sub(C) x SU(2) x U(1) model. Since most of the possibilities discussed can be rejected, severe modifications of basic concepts of particle physics seem to be required if the production of a new particle is confirmed. (orig.)

  11. Quark model and high energy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Anisovich, V V; Nyíri, J; Shabelski, Yu M

    2004-01-01

    This is an updated version of the book published in 1985. QCD-motivated, it gives a detailed description of hadron structure and soft interactions in the additive quark model, where hadrons are regarded as composite systems of dressed quarks. In the past decade it has become clear that nonperturbative QCD, responsible for soft hadronic processes, may differ rather drastically from perturbative QCD. The understanding of nonperturbative QCD requires a detailed investigation of the experiments and the theoretical approaches. Bearing this in mind, the book has been rewritten paying special attenti

  12. 3-D Numerical Modelling of Oblique Continental Collisions with ASPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R.

    2017-12-01

    Among the fundamental types of tectonic plate boundaries, continent-continent collision is least well understood. Deformation of the upper and middle crustal layers can be inferred from surface structures and geophysical imaging, but the fate of lower crustal rocks and mantle lithosphere is not well resolved. Previous research suggests that shortening of mantle lithosphere generally may be occurring by either: 1) a distributed thickening with a formation of a Raleigh-Tailor (RT) type instability (possibly accompanied with lithospheric folding); or 2) plate-like subduction, which can be one- or two-sided, with or without delamination and slab break-off; a combination of both could be taking place too. 3-D features of the orogens such as along-trench material transfer, bounding subduction zones can influence the evolution of the collision zone significantly. The current study was inspired by South Island of New Zealand - a young collision system where a block of continental crust is being shortened by the relative Australian-Pacific plate motion. The collision segment of the plate boundary is relatively small ( 800 km), and is bounded by oppositely verging subduction zones to the North and South. Here, we present results of 3-D forward numerical modelling of continental collision to investigate some of these processes. To conduct the simulations, we used ASPECT - a highly parallel community-developed code based on the Finite Element method. Model setup for three different sets of models featured 2-D vertical across strike, 3-D with periodic front and back walls, and 3-D with open front and back walls, with velocities prescribed on the left and right faces. We explored the importance of values of convergent velocity, strike-slip velocity and their ratio, which defines the resulting velocity direction relative to the plate boundary (obliquity). We found that higher strike-slip motion promotes strain localization, weakens the lithosphere close to the plate boundary and

  13. Particle production at large transverse momentum and hard collision models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, G.; Ranft, J.

    1977-04-01

    The majority of the presently available experimental data is consistent with hard scattering models. Therefore the hard scattering model seems to be well established. There is good evidence for jets in large transverse momentum reactions as predicted by these models. The overall picture is however not yet well enough understood. We mention only the empirical hard scattering cross section introduced in most of the models, the lack of a deep theoretical understanding of the interplay between quark confinement and jet production, and the fact that we are not yet able to discriminate conclusively between the many proposed hard scattering models. The status of different hard collision models discussed in this paper is summarized. (author)

  14. Modelling of the Residual Stress State in a new Type of Residual Stress Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a study on a new type residual stress specimen which is proposed as a simple way to conduct experimental validation for model predictions. A specimen comprising of a steel plate with circular hole embedded into a stack of CSM glass fibre and further infused with an epoxy resin...... forms the experimental case which is analysed. A FE model of the specimen is used for analysing the curing history and the residual stress build up. The model is validated against experimental strain data which are recorded by a Fibre Brag Grating sensor and good agreement has been achieved....

  15. Modelling of the Residual Stress State in a new Type of Residual Stress Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2014-01-01

    forms the experimental case which is analysed. A FE model of the specimen is used for analysing the curing history and the residual stress build up. The model is validated against experimental strain data which are recorded by a Fibre Brag Grating sensor and good agreement has been achieved.......The paper presents a study on a new type residual stress specimen which is proposed as a simple way to conduct experimental validation for model predictions. A specimen comprising of a steel plate with circular hole embedded into a stack of CSM glass fibre and further infused with an epoxy resin...

  16. Noise Residual Learning for Noise Modeling in Distributed Video Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm which exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The noise model is one of the inherently difficult challenges in DVC. This paper considers Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes...... noise residual learning techniques that take residues from previously decoded frames into account to estimate the decoding residue more precisely. Moreover, the techniques calculate a number of candidate noise residual distributions within a frame to adaptively optimize the soft side information during...

  17. Economic Modeling of Residual Generation for the Lingayen Gulf Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas McGlone

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Philippines is one of four countries involved in the Southeast Asian core project of LOICZ (Land Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone which has among its general goals the determination of how changes in human activities affect the fluxes of materials between land, sea, and atmosphere through the coastal zone. The economic component of the Philippine project addresses the question: “How does a change in economic activity affect coastal waters?” Of particular concern is the introduction of anthropogenically-derived residuals (N, P, C, SS into coastal waters. A regional input-output (IO model for Region 1 of the Philippines has been developed to estimate how projected changes in economic activity may affect residual flows into Lingayen Gulf. A residual coefficient matrix, derived from information obtained with a rapid assessment model (RA of residual generation in the Lingayen Gulf watershed, has been incorporated into the IO model. Such a model allows for analysis of various economic scenarios for the region, with projections of residual generation as the output. The resulting changes in residual flows may then serve as inputs to biogeochemical models of Lingayen Gulf. From this process, the impact of various economic scenarios on the water quality of Lingayen Gulf may be ascertained.This paper discusses and compares the RA and IO models of residual generation for the Lingayen Gulf watershed and provides examples of the scenario analysis process.

  18. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens; Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  19. Modelling of the Internal Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of the structural damage due to ship collisions is developed. The method is based on the idealized structural unit method (ISUM). Longitudinal/transverse webs which connect the outer and the inner hulls are modelled by rectangular plate units. The responses are determined...... on the stiffness and the strength is considered as well. In order to include the coupling effects between local and global failure of the structure, the usual non-linear finite-element technique is applied. In order to deal with the gap and contact conditions between the striking and the struck ships, gap....../contact elements are employed. Dynamic effects are considered by inclusion of the influence of strain-Rate sensitivity in the material model. On the basis of the theory a computer program has been written. The procedure is verified by a comparison of experimental results obtained from test models of double...

  20. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Bottrill; J. van Hunen; M. B. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away...

  1. Net-Proton Nonstatistical Moments in High-Energy pp Collisions in PACIAE Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Limphirat, Ayut; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Yan, Yupeng; Zhou, Dai-Mei; Srisawad, Pornrad; Yan, Yu-Liang; Sa, Ben-Hao

    2014-01-01

    The parton and hadron cascade model, PACIAE 2.0, is employed to calculate the net-proton nonstatistical moments in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. By analyzing the results in the full phase space, it is found that the nonstatistical moments and moments products are significantly dependent on the collision energy. It is suggested that the net-proton nonstatistical moments in pp collisions may be studied in partial phase spaces with the PACIAE model. (author)

  2. Model-checking techniques based on cumulative residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D Y; Wei, L J; Ying, Z

    2002-03-01

    Residuals have long been used for graphical and numerical examinations of the adequacy of regression models. Conventional residual analysis based on the plots of raw residuals or their smoothed curves is highly subjective, whereas most numerical goodness-of-fit tests provide little information about the nature of model misspecification. In this paper, we develop objective and informative model-checking techniques by taking the cumulative sums of residuals over certain coordinates (e.g., covariates or fitted values) or by considering some related aggregates of residuals, such as moving sums and moving averages. For a variety of statistical models and data structures, including generalized linear models with independent or dependent observations, the distributions of these stochastic processes tinder the assumed model can be approximated by the distributions of certain zero-mean Gaussian processes whose realizations can be easily generated by computer simulation. Each observed process can then be compared, both graphically and numerically, with a number of realizations from the Gaussian process. Such comparisons enable one to assess objectively whether a trend seen in a residual plot reflects model misspecification or natural variation. The proposed techniques are particularly useful in checking the functional form of a covariate and the link function. Illustrations with several medical studies are provided.

  3. Geochemical Testing And Model Development - Residual Tank Waste Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, K.J.; Connelly, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  4. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  5. A cloud collision model for water maser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, J C; Welch, W J

    1986-06-01

    High-velocity collisions between small, dense, neutral clouds or between a dense cloud and a dense shell can provide the energy source required to excite H2O maser emission. The radiative precursor from the surface of the collisional shock front rapidly diffuses through the cloud, heating the dust grains but leaving the H2 molecules cool. Transient maser emission occurs as the conditions for the Goldreich and Kwan "hot-dust cold-gas" maser pump scheme are realized locally within the cloud. In time the local maser action quenches due to the heating of the H2 molecules by collisions against the grains. Although this model cannot explain the very long-lived steady maser features, it is quite successful in explaining a number of the observed properties of the high-velocity features in such sources as Orion, W51, and W49. In particular, it provides a natural explanation for the rapid time variations, the narrow line widths, juxtaposition of high- and low-velocity features, and the short lifetimes which are frequently observed for the so-called high-velocity maser "bullets" thought to be accelerated by strong stellar winds.

  6. Heavy ion collision evolution modeling with ECHO-QGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, V.; Inghirami, G.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical code modeling the evolution of the medium formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions, ECHO-QGP. The code solves relativistic hydrodynamics in (3 + 1)D, with dissipative terms included within the framework of Israel-Stewart theory; it can work both in Minkowskian and in Bjorken coordinates. Initial conditions are provided through an implementation of the Glauber model (both Optical and Monte Carlo), while freezeout and particle generation are based on the Cooper-Frye prescription. The code is validated against several test problems and shows remarkable stability and accuracy with the combination of a conservative (shock-capturing) approach and the high-order methods employed. In particular it beautifully agrees with the semi-analytic solution known as Gubser flow, both in the ideal and in the viscous Israel-Stewart case, up to very large times and without any ad hoc tuning of the algorithm.

  7. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield - especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the "density gradient model") which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target's atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient - leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  8. Basic Modelling principles and Validation of Software for Prediction of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2000-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software....

  9. A collision model for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touran, A; Brackstone, M A; McDonald, M

    1999-09-01

    This paper describes a general framework for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control in rear-end collisions. Using data and specifications from prototype devices, two collision models are developed. One model considers a train of four cars, one of which is equipped with autonomous intelligent cruise control. This model considers the car in front and two cars following the equipped car. In the second model, none of the cars is equipped with the device. Each model can predict the possibility of rear-end collision between cars under various conditions by calculating the remaining distance between cars after the front car brakes. Comparing the two collision models allows one to evaluate the effectiveness of autonomous intelligent cruise control in preventing collisions. The models are then subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the probability of collision. Based on crash probabilities, an expected value is calculated for the number of cars involved in any collision. It is found that given the model assumptions, while equipping a car with autonomous intelligent cruise control can significantly reduce the probability of the collision with the car ahead, it may adversely affect the situation for the following cars.

  10. Modeling mud flocculation using variable collision and breakup efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K.; Keyvani, A.

    2013-12-01

    Solution of the Winterwerp (1998) floc growth and breakup equation yields time dependent median floc size as an outcome of collision driven floc growth and shear induced floc breakage. The formulation is quite nice in that it is an ODE that yields fast solution for median floc size and can be incorporated into sediment transport models. The Winterwerp (1998) floc size equation was used to model floc growth and breakup data from laboratory experiments conducted under both constant and variable turbulent shear rate (Keyvani 2013). The data showed that floc growth rate starts out very high and then reduces with size to asymptotically approach an equilibrium size. In modeling the data, the Winterwerp (1998) model and the Son and Hsu (2008) variant were found to be able to capture the initial fast growth phase and the equilibrium state, but were not able to well capture the slow growing phase. This resulted in flocs reaching the equilibrium state in the models much faster than the experimental data. The objective of this work was to improve the ability of the general Winterwerp (1998) formulation to better capture the slow growth phase and more accurately predict the time to equilibrium. To do this, a full parameter sensitivity analysis was conducted using the Winterwerp (1998) model. Several modifications were tested, including the variable fractal dimension and yield strength extensions of Son and Hsu (2008, 2009). The best match with the in-house data, and data from the literature, was achieved using floc collision and breakup efficiency coefficients that decrease with floc size. The net result of the decrease in both of these coefficients is that floc growth slows without modification to the equilibrium size. Inclusion of these new functions allows for substantial improvement in modeling the growth phase of flocs in both steady and variable turbulence conditions. The improvement is particularly noticeable when modeling continual growth in a decaying turbulence field

  11. Biomass yield and modeling of logging residues of Terminalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Dbh as an independent variable in the prediction of models for estimating the biomass residues of the tree species was adjudged best because it performed well. The validation results showed that the selected models satisfied the assumptions of regression analysis. The practical implication of the models is that ...

  12. DEFECT MONITORING IN IRON CASTING USING RESIDUES OF AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanusa Andrea Casarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to monitor the index of general waste irons forecasting nodular and gray using the residues originated from the methodology Box & Jenkins by means of X-bar and R control charts. Search is to find a general class of model ARIMA (p, d, q but as data have autocorrelation is found to the number of residues which allowed the application of charts. The found model was the model SARIMA (0,1,1(0,1,1 . In step of checking the stability of the model was found that some comments are out of control due to temperature and chemical composition.

  13. 3D numerical modeling of India-Asia-like collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Erika Püsök, Adina; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2013-04-01

    One of the most striking features of plate tectonics and lithospheric deformation is the India-Asia collision zone, which formed when the Indian continent collided with Eurasia, around 50 million years ago. The rise of the abnormally thick Tibetan plateau, the deformation at its Eastern and Western syntaxes, the transition from subduction to collision and uplift and the interaction of tectonics and climate are processes not fully understood. Though various geophysical methods have been employed to shed light on the present structure of the Indian-Asian lithosphere, the driving mechanisms that uplifted the Tibetan plateau remain highly controversial and different hypotheses imply contradictory scenarios. Models for double crustal thickness include: wholescale underthrusting of Indian lithospheric mantle under Tibet (Argand model), distributed homogeneous shortening or the thin-sheet model (England and Houseman, 1986), slip-line field model to also explain extrusion of Eastern side of Tibet away from Indian indentor (Tapponier and Molnar, 1976) or lower crustal flow models for the exhumation of the Himalayan units and lateral spreading of the Tibetan plateau (Royden et al., 1998, Beaumont et al., 2004). The thin-sheet model has emerged as a more successful (or at least more widely used) model, but one of its major shortcomings is that it cannot simultaneously represent channel flow and gravitational collapse of the mantle lithosphere (Lechmann et al., 2011), since these mechanisms require the lithosphere to interact with the underlying mantle, or to have a vertically non-homogeneous rheology. Of those who favour a layered structure of the lithosphere beneath Tibet, some attribute the lack of substantial seismicity underneath the Moho as evidence that all the strength of the lithosphere resides in the upper crust and the mantle is weak - the crème brulée model (Jackson, 2002), while others point out that some processes can be well explained if the crust resides

  14. The Residual Value Models: A Framework for Business Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos J. Liapis

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between a firm’s performance and Residual Value Models (RVM) which serve as decision making tools in corporate management. The main measures are the Economic Value Added (EVA®) and Cash Value Added (CVA®), with key components the Residual Income (RI), Free Cash Flow (FCF) and Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC). These measures have attracted considerable interest among scientists, practitioners and organizations in recent years. This work focuses...

  15. Modelling early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggieri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we model early time dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions by an initial color-electric field which then decays to a plasma by the Schwinger mechanism. The dynamics of the many particles system produced by the decay is described by relativistic kinetic theory, taking into account the backreaction on the color field by solving self-consistently the kinetic and the field equations. Our main results concern isotropization and thermalization for a 1+1D expanding geometry. In case of small η/s (η/s ≲ 0.3 we find τisotropization ≈ 0.8 fm/c and τthermalization ≈ 1 fm/c in agreement with the common lore of hydrodynamics.

  16. Comparison of string models for heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1990-01-01

    An important method to explore new domains in physics is to compare new results with extrapolations from known areas. For heavy ion collision this can be done with string models, which extrapolate from light to heavy systems and which also may be used to extrapolate to higher energies. That does not mean that these string models are only background models, one may easily implement new ideas on top of the known aspects, providing much more reliable models than those formed from scratch. All the models to be considered in this paper have in common that they consist of three independent building blocks: (a) geometry, (b) string formation and (c) string fragmentation. The geometry aspect is treated quite similar in all models: nucleons are distributed inside each nucleus according to some standard parameterization of nuclear densities. The nuclei move through each other on a straight line trajectory, with all the nucleon positions being fixed. Whenever a projectile and a target nucleon come close, they interact. Such an interaction results in string formation. In the last step these strings decay into observable hadrons according to some string fragmentation procedure. The three building blocks are independent, so one can combine different methods in an arbitrary manner. Therefore rather than treating the models one after the other, the author discusses the procedures for string formation and string fragmentation as used by the models. He considers string models in a very general sense, so he includes models where the authors never use the word string, but which may be most naturally interpreted as string models and show strong similarities with real string models. Although very important he does not discuss - for time and space reasons - recent developments concerning secondary scattering

  17. Estimating inelastic heavy-particle - hydrogen collision data. II. Simplified model for ionic collisions and application to barium-hydrogen ionic collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Yakovleva, Svetlana A.

    2017-12-01

    Aims: A simplified model is derived for estimating rate coefficients for inelastic processes in low-energy collisions of heavy particles with hydrogen, in particular, the rate coefficients with high and moderate values. Such processes are important for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of cool stellar atmospheres. Methods: The derived method is based on the asymptotic approach for electronic structure calculations and the Landau-Zener model for nonadiabatic transition probability determination. Results: It is found that the rate coefficients are expressed via statistical probabilities and reduced rate coefficients. It is shown that the reduced rate coefficients for neutralization and ion-pair formation processes depend on single electronic bound energies of an atomic particle, while the reduced rate coefficients for excitation and de-excitation processes depend on two electronic bound energies. The reduced rate coefficients are calculated and tabulated as functions of electronic bound energies. The derived model is applied to barium-hydrogen ionic collisions. For the first time, rate coefficients are evaluated for inelastic processes in Ba+ + H and Ba2+ + H- collisions for all transitions between the states from the ground and up to and including the ionic state. Tables with calculated data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/608/A33

  18. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengchao Lyu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle’s collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident’s form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke’s law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  19. Crashworthiness Simulation of Front Bumper Model of MOROLIPI V2 During Head-on Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugraha Aditya Sukma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to conduct an impact test for bumper collision. The use of bumper as a protective components of a vehicle during collision. On this Paper, a crashworthiness simulation of front bumper model with correspond to the size of MOROLIPI V2 is conducted. The purpose of this study was to obtain simulation result used as a reference to predict mechanical behaviour of bumper due to collision. The Simulation result can be predicted deformation after collision, von misses stress criteria after collision with static dummy load. To simulate impact on bumper, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics is used. Simulations were run at three values of mobile robot speeds (5, 10 and 20 m/s. The simulation results also show contact force due to the collision, deformation, stress and internal energy of the bumper beam. It was known that the speed of the vehicle is the dominant parameter determine the results of the crashworthiness simulation.

  20. Development of residual stress prediction model in pipe weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Yun Yong; Lim, Se Young; Choi, Kang Hyeuk; Cho, Young Sam; Lim, Jae Hyuk [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    When Leak Before Break(LBB) concepts is applied to high energy piping of nuclear power plants, residual weld stresses is a important variable. The main purpose of his research is to develop the numerical model which can predict residual weld stresses. Firstly, basic theories were described which need to numerical analysis of welding parts. Before the analysis of pipe, welding of a flat plate was analyzed and compared. Appling the data of used pipes, thermal/mechanical analysis were accomplished and computed temperature gradient and residual stress distribution. For thermal analysis, proper heat flux was regarded as the heat source and convection/radiation heat transfer were considered at surfaces. The residual stresses were counted from the computed temperature gradient and they were compared and verified with a result of another research.

  1. Modeling of CMUTs with Multiple Anisotropic Layers and Residual Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling CMUTs uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. A highly accurate model is developed for analytical characterization of CMUTs taking an arbitrary number of layers...

  2. Estimating inelastic heavy-particle-hydrogen collision data. I. Simplified model and application to potassium-hydrogen collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Yakovleva, Svetlana A.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We derive a simplified model for estimating atomic data on inelastic processes in low-energy collisions of heavy-particles with hydrogen, in particular for the inelastic processes with high and moderate rate coefficients. It is known that these processes are important for non-LTE modeling of cool stellar atmospheres. Methods: Rate coefficients are evaluated using a derived method, which is a simplified version of a recently proposed approach based on the asymptotic method for electronic structure calculations and the Landau-Zener model for nonadiabatic transition probability determination. Results: The rate coefficients are found to be expressed via statistical probabilities and reduced rate coefficients. It turns out that the reduced rate coefficients for mutual neutralization and ion-pair formation processes depend on single electronic bound energies of an atom, while the reduced rate coefficients for excitation and de-excitation processes depend on two electronic bound energies. The reduced rate coefficients are calculated and tabulated as functions of electronic bound energies. The derived model is applied to potassium-hydrogen collisions. For the first time, rate coefficients are evaluated for inelastic processes in K+H and K++H- collisions for all transitions from ground states up to and including ionic states. Tables with calculated data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A147

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, William; Pratt, Scott

    2014-09-01

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition from the QGP stage to hadronization. Balance functions were constructed as the sum of these two charge production components, and four parameters were manipulated to match the model's output with experimental data taken from the STAR Collaboration at RHIC. Results show that the chemical composition of the super-hadronic matter are consistent with that of a thermally equilibrated QGP. High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition

  4. Numerical simulation of binary collisions using a modified surface tension model with particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhongguo; Xi Guang; Chen Xi

    2009-01-01

    The binary collision of liquid droplets is of both practical importance and fundamental value in computational fluid mechanics. We present a modified surface tension model within the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, and carry out two-dimensional simulations to investigate the mechanisms of coalescence and separation of the droplets during binary collision. The modified surface tension model improves accuracy and convergence. A mechanism map is established for various possible deformation pathways encountered during binary collision, as the impact speed is varied; a new pathway is reported when the collision speed is critical. In addition, eccentric collisions are simulated and the effect of the rotation of coalesced particle is explored. The results qualitatively agree with experiments and the numerical protocol may find applications in studying free surface flows and interface deformation

  5. Modeling Residual NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Lenhard

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A model is outlined that predicts NAPL which is held in pore wedges and as films or lenses on solid and water surfaces and contributes negligibly to NAPL advection. This is conceptually referred to as residual NAPL. Since residual NAPL is immobile, it remains in the vadose zone after all free NAPL has drained. Residual NAPL is very important because it is a long-term source for groundwater contamination. Recent laboratory experiments have demonstrated that current models for predicting subsurface NAPL behavior are inadequate because they do not correctly predict residual NAPL. The main reason for the failure is a deficiency in the current constitutive theories for multiphase flow that are used in numerical simulators. Multiphase constitutive theory governs the relations among relative permeability, saturation, and pressure for fluid systems (i.e., air, NAPL, water. In this paper, we outline a model describing relations between fluid saturations and pressures that can be combined with existing multiphase constitutive theory to predict residual NAPL. We test the revised constitutive theory by applying it to a scenario involving NAPL imbibition and drainage, as well as water imbibition and drainage. The results suggest that the revised constitutive theory is able to predict the distribution of residual NAPL in the vadose zone as a function of saturation-path history. The revised model describing relations between fluid saturation and pressures will help toward developing or improving numerical multiphase flow simulators.

  6. Applied exposure modeling for residual radioactivity and release criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The protection of public health and the environment from the release of materials with residual radioactivity for recycle or disposal as wastes without radioactive contents of concern presents a formidable challenge. Existing regulatory criteria are based on technical judgment concerning detectability and simple modeling. Recently, exposure modeling methodologies have been developed to provide a more consistent level of health protection. Release criteria derived from the application of exposure modeling methodologies share the same basic elements of analysis but are developed to serve a variety of purposes. Models for the support of regulations for all applications rely on conservative interpretations of generalized conditions while models developed to show compliance incorporate specific conditions not likely to be duplicated at other sites. Research models represent yet another type of modeling which strives to simulate the actual behavior of released material. In spite of these differing purposes, exposure modeling permits the application of sound and reasoned principles of radiation protection to the release of materials with residual levels of radioactivity. Examples of the similarities and differences of these models are presented and an application to the disposal of materials with residual levels of uranium contamination is discussed. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Relativistic Brownian motion: From a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation

    OpenAIRE

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter (Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult.)

    2006-01-01

    The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy point-like Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, non-relativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the non-relativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativi...

  8. Modeling irregularly spaced residual series as a continuous stochastic process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Asmuth, J.R.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the background and functioning of a simple but effective continuous time approach for modeling irregularly spaced residual series is presented. The basic equations were published earlier by von Asmuth et al. (2002), who used them as part of a continuous time transfer function noise

  9. Model unspecific search for new physics in pp collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Shivali

    2013-01-01

    The model-independent analysis systematically scans the data taken by Compact Muon Solenoid - CMS detector for deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. This approach is sensitive to a variety of models for new physics due to the minimal theoretical bias i.e. without assumptions on specific models of new physics and covering a large phase space. Possible causes of the significant deviations could be insufficient understanding of the collision event generation or detector simulation, or indeed genuine new physics in the data. Thus the output of MUSiC must be seen as only the first, but important step in the potential discovery of new physics. To get the distinctive final states, events with at least one electron or muon are classified according to their content of reconstructed objects (muons, electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy) and sorted into event classes. A broad scan of three kinematic distributions (scalar sum of the transverse momentum, invariant mass of reconstructed objects and missing transverse energy) in those event classes is performed by identifying deviations from SM expectations, accounting for systematic uncertainties. A scanning algorithm determines the regions in the considered distributions where the measured data deviates most from the SM predictions. This search is sensitive to an excess as well as a deficit in the comparison of data and SM background. This approach has been applied to the CMS data and we have obtained the preliminary results. I will talk about the details of the analysis techniques, its implementation in analyzing CMS data, results obtained and the discussion on the discrepancy observed

  10. Human-robot collision detection under modeling uncertainty using frequency boundary of manipulator dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Byung Jin; Koo, Ja Choon; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Moon, Hyung Pil [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents the development and experimental evaluation of a collision detection method for robotic manipulators sharing a workspace with humans. Fast and robust collision detection is important for guaranteeing safety and preventing false alarms. The main cause of a false alarm is modeling error. We use the characteristic of the maximum frequency boundary of the manipulator's dynamic model. The tendency of the frequency boundary's location in the frequency domain is applied to the collision detection algorithm using a band pass filter (band designed disturbance observer, BdDOB) with changing frequency windows. Thanks to the band pass filter, which considers the frequency boundary of the dynamic model, our collision detection algorithm can extract the collision caused by the disturbance from the mixed estimation signal. As a result, the collision was successfully detected under the usage conditions of faulty sensors and uncertain model data. The experimental result of a collision between a 7-DOF serial manipulator and a human body is reported.

  11. A Cross-Domain Survey of Metrics for Modelling and Evaluating Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A. Marvel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief survey of the metrics for measuring probability, degree, and severity of collisions as applied to autonomous and intelligent systems. Though not exhaustive, this survey evaluates the state-of-the-art of collision metrics, and assesses which are likely to aid in the establishment and support of autonomous system collision modelling. The survey includes metrics for 1 robot arms; 2 mobile robot platforms; 3 nonholonomic physical systems such as ground vehicles, aircraft, and naval vessels, and; 4 virtual and mathematical models.

  12. Modeling activities in air traffic control systems: antecedents and consequences of a mid-air collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor R; Ferreira, Bemildo

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a model of some functions and activities of the Brazilian Air traffic Control System (ATS) in the period in which occurred a mid-air collision between flight GLO1907, a commercial aircraft Boeing 737-800, and flight N600XL, an executive jet EMBRAER E-145, to investigate key resilience characteristics of the ATM. Modeling in some detail activities during the collision and related them to overall behavior and antecedents that stress the organization uncover some drift into failure mechanisms that erode safety defenses provided by the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), enabling a mid-air collision to be happen.

  13. Modeling of plates with multiple anisotropic layers and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Pedersen, Thomas; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2016-01-01

    , and an excellent agreement between the two models is seen with a relative difference of less than 2% for all calculations. The model was also used to extract the cell capacitance, the parasitic capacitance and the residual stress of a pressure sensor composed of a multilayered plate of silicon and silicon oxide....... The extracted values were in good agreement with the expected and it showed that the behavior of devices with a plate could easily be predicted with a low uncertainty....

  14. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  15. Collision-model-based approach to non-Markovian quantum dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ciccarello, F.; Palma, G.; Giovannetti, V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework to tackle quantum non-Markovian dynamics based on a microscopic collision model (CM), where the bath consists of a large collection of initially uncorrelated ancillas. Unlike standard memoryless CMs, we endow the bath with memory by introducing inter-ancillary collisions between next system-ancilla interactions. Our model interpolates between a fully Markovian dynamics and the continuous interaction of the system with a single ancilla, i.e., a strongly non-M...

  16. Semiclassical calculation for collision induced dissociation. II. Morse oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinek, I.; Roberts, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A recently developed semiclassical procedure for calculating collision induced dissociation probabilities P/sup diss/ is applied to the collinear collision between a particle and a Morse oscillator diatomic. The particle--diatom interaction is described with a repulsive exponential potential function. P/sup diss/ is reported for a system of three identical particles, as a function of collision energy E/sub t/ and initial vibrational state of the diatomic n 1 . The results are compared with the previously reported values for the collision between a particle and a truncated harmonic oscillator. The two studies show similar features, namely: (a) there is an oscillatory structure in the P/sup diss/ energy profiles, which is directly related to n 1 ; (b) P/sup diss/ becomes noticeable (> or approx. =10 -3 ) for E/sub t/ values appreciably higher than the energetic threshold; (c) vibrational enhancement (inhibition) of collision induced dissociation persists at low (high) energies; and (d) good agreement between the classical and semiclassical results is found above the classical dynamic threshold. Finally, the convergence of P/sup diss/ for increasing box length is shown to be rapid and satisfactory

  17. Development of a General Modelling Methodology for Vacuum Residue Hydroconversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Oliveira L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the development of a methodology for kinetic modelling of refining processes, and more specifically for vacuum residue conversion. The proposed approach allows to overcome the lack of molecular detail of the petroleum fractions and to simulate the transformation of the feedstock molecules into effluent molecules by means of a two-step procedure. In the first step, a synthetic mixture of molecules representing the feedstock for the process is generated via a molecular reconstruction method, termed SR-REM molecular reconstruction. In the second step, a kinetic Monte-Carlo method (kMC is used to simulate the conversion reactions on this mixture of molecules. The molecular reconstruction was applied to several petroleum residues and is illustrated for an Athabasca (Canada vacuum residue. The kinetic Monte-Carlo method is then described in detail. In order to validate this stochastic approach, a lumped deterministic model for vacuum residue conversion was simulated using Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm. Despite the fact that both approaches are based on very different hypotheses, the stochastic simulation algorithm simulates the conversion reactions with the same accuracy as the deterministic approach. The full-scale stochastic simulation approach using molecular-level reaction pathways provides high amounts of detail on the effluent composition and is briefly illustrated for Athabasca VR hydrocracking.

  18. In-Situ Residual Tracking in Reduced Order Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Slater

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD based reduced-order modelling is demonstrated to be a weighted residual technique similar to Galerkin's method. Estimates of weighted residuals of neglected modes are used to determine relative importance of neglected modes to the model. The cumulative effects of neglected modes can be used to estimate error in the reduced order model. Thus, once the snapshots have been obtained under prescribed training conditions, the need to perform full-order simulations for comparison is eliminates. This has the potential to allow the analyst to initiate further training when the reduced modes are no longer sufficient to accurately represent the predominant phenomenon of interest. The response of a fluid moving at Mach 1.2 above a panel to a forced localized oscillation of the panel at and away from the training operating conditions is used to demonstrate the evaluation method.

  19. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Boersma, Bendiks Jan; Westerweel, Jerry; Breugem, Wim-Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact. Long-range interactions are incorporated through an efficient and second-order-accurate immersed boundary method (IBM). Short-range interactions are also partly reproduced by the IBM. However, since the IBM uses a fixed grid, a lubrication model is needed for an interparticle gap width smaller than the grid spacing. The lubrication model is based on asymptotic expansions of analytical solutions for canonical lubrication interactions between spheres in the Stokes regime. Roughness effects are incorporated by making the lubrication correction independent of the gap width for gap widths smaller than ∼1% of the particle radius. This correction is applied until the particles reach solid-solid contact. To model solid-solid contact we use a variant of a linear soft-sphere collision model capable of stretching the collision time. This choice is computationally attractive because it allows us to reduce the number of time steps required for integrating the collision force accurately and is physically realistic, provided that the prescribed collision time is much smaller than the characteristic time scale of particle motion. We verified the numerical implementation of our collision model and validated it against several benchmark cases for immersed head-on particle-wall and particle-particle collisions, and oblique particle-wall collisions. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Large-scale model-based assessment of deer-vehicle collision risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hothorn

    Full Text Available Ungulates, in particular the Central European roe deer Capreolus capreolus and the North American white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, are economically and ecologically important. The two species are risk factors for deer-vehicle collisions and as browsers of palatable trees have implications for forest regeneration. However, no large-scale management systems for ungulates have been implemented, mainly because of the high efforts and costs associated with attempts to estimate population sizes of free-living ungulates living in a complex landscape. Attempts to directly estimate population sizes of deer are problematic owing to poor data quality and lack of spatial representation on larger scales. We used data on >74,000 deer-vehicle collisions observed in 2006 and 2009 in Bavaria, Germany, to model the local risk of deer-vehicle collisions and to investigate the relationship between deer-vehicle collisions and both environmental conditions and browsing intensities. An innovative modelling approach for the number of deer-vehicle collisions, which allows nonlinear environment-deer relationships and assessment of spatial heterogeneity, was the basis for estimating the local risk of collisions for specific road types on the scale of Bavarian municipalities. Based on this risk model, we propose a new "deer-vehicle collision index" for deer management. We show that the risk of deer-vehicle collisions is positively correlated to browsing intensity and to harvest numbers. Overall, our results demonstrate that the number of deer-vehicle collisions can be predicted with high precision on the scale of municipalities. In the densely populated and intensively used landscapes of Central Europe and North America, a model-based risk assessment for deer-vehicle collisions provides a cost-efficient instrument for deer management on the landscape scale. The measures derived from our model provide valuable information for planning road protection and defining

  1. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  2. Characteristics of particle production in high energy nuclear collisions a model-based analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharya, D P

    2002-01-01

    The present work pertains to the production of some very important negatively charged secondaries in lead-lead and gold-gold collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. We would like to examine here the role of the particular version of sequential chain model (SCM), which was applied widely in the past in analysing data on various high-energy hadronic collisions, in explaining now the latest findings on the features of particle production in the relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The agreement between the model of our choice and the measured data is found to be modestly satisfactory in cases of the most prominent and abundantly produced varieties of the secondaries in the above-stated two nuclear collisions. (25 refs).

  3. One-dimensional collision carts computer model and its design ideas for productive experiential learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2012-05-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to experience the physics of idealized one-dimensional collision carts. The physics model is described and simulated by both continuous dynamics and discrete transition during collision. In designing the simulations, we discuss briefly three pedagogical considerations namely (1) a consistent simulation world view with a pen and paper representation, (2) a data table, scientific graphs and symbolic mathematical representations for ease of data collection and multiple representational visualizations and (3) a game for simple concept testing that can further support learning. We also suggest using a physical world setup augmented by simulation by highlighting three advantages of real collision carts equipment such as a tacit 3D experience, random errors in measurement and the conceptual significance of conservation of momentum applied to just before and after collision. General feedback from the students has been relatively positive, and we hope teachers will find the simulation useful in their own classes.

  4. A Restitution Model of Two-car Collinear Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Batista

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper two-car collinear collisions are discussed usingNewton's law of mechanics, conservation of energy and linearconstitutive law connecting impact force and crush. Two waysof calculating the mutual restitution coefficient are given: onebased on car masses and one based on car stiffness. A numericalexample of an actual test is provided.

  5. Offsetting the difficulties of the molecular model of atomic collisions in the intermediate velocity range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1991-01-01

    To offset the defective behavior of the molecular method of atomic collisions at intermediate energies, we propose a method to approximate the probability flux towards continuum and discrete states not included in the molecular basis. We check the degree of accuracy and limitations of the method for a model case where transition probabilities can be calculated exactly. An application to the benchmark case of He + +H + collisions is also presented, and yields complementary information on the properties of this approach

  6. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  7. MODELLING DICLOFENAC AND IBUPROFEN RESIDUES IN MAJOR ESTONIAN SEASIDE CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erki Lember

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model was developed to model the fate of two common pharmaceutical residues: diclofenac and ibuprofen in eight Estonian seaside cities that discharge their wastewaters directly into the Baltic Sea. The consumption rates of the active ingredients of diclofenac and ibuprofen from 2006-2014 were analysed. A decrease of 19.9% for diclofenac consumption and an increase of 14.1% for ibuprofen were found. The fate of diclofenac and ibuprofen were modelled by considering the human metabolism removal rate for pharmaceuticals, the removal rate of diclofenac and ibuprofen in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTP and annual flow rates. An average decrease from 1 to 0.8 µg/l (decrease of 20% for diclofenac and an increase from 11.4 to 13.4 µg/l (increase of 14.9% for ibuprofen for the concentration in the effluents of the WWTP were modelled. The model gives us a good overview about the theoretical concentrations of pharmaceutical residues in the environment and is helpful for evaluating environmental impacts.

  8. Study of charged particle production in U-U collisions in the wounded quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, O. S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Singh, B. K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the study of deformed uranium-uranium (U-U) collisions in its various geometrical configurations due to their usefulness in understanding the different aspects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In this paper we have studied the particle production in deformed U-U collisions at √{s_{NN}} = 193 GeV using the modified wounded quark model (WQM). At first, we have shown the variation of quark-nucleus inelastic scattering cross-section ( σ_{qA}^{in} with respect to centralities for various geometrical orientations of U-U collisions in WQM. After that we have calculated the pseudorapidity density ( dn_{ch}/d η within WQM using a two-component prescription. Further we have calculated the transverse energy density distribution ( dET/d η along with the ratio of transverse energy to charged hadron multiplicity ( ET/N_{ch} for U-U collisions and compared them with the corresponding experimental data. We have shown the scaling behavior of dn_{ch}/d η and dET/d η for different initial geometry of U-U collision with respect to p - p data at √{s_{NN}}= 200 GeV. Furthermore we have shown the Bjorken energy density achieved in U-U collisions for various configurations and compared them with experimental data of Au-Au at 200GeV. We observe that the present model suitably describes the experimental data for minimum bias geometrical configuration of U-U collisions. An estimate for various observables in different initial geometries of U-U collisions is also presented which will be tested in future by experimental data.

  9. Colour rope model for extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Nielsen, H.B.; Knoll, J.

    1984-04-01

    Our goal is to investigate the possible cumulative effects of the colour fields of the observable meson multiplicity distribution in the central rapidity region in extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions. In the first Chapter we overview the space-time picture of the string formation in a central heavy ion collision. We take into account trivial geometrical factors in a straight line geometry. In the second Chapter we consider the colour chargation process of heavy ions as a random walk. We calculate the expectation value and the relative standard deviation of the total effective charge square. In the third Chapter we consider the stochastic decay of a K-fold string-rope to mesons by the Schwinger-mechanism. We calculate the expected lifetime of a K-fold string and the time for the first quark antiquark pair creation. In the fourth Chapter we deal with the meson production of a K-fold rope relative to that of a single string and hence we look for a scaling between A + A and p + p collisions. (orig./HSI)

  10. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  11. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  12. Mathematical Model for Collision-Coalescence Among Inclusions in the Bloom Continuous Caster with M-EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Jiang, Jimin; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Weixian; Dong, Guiwen

    2018-02-01

    Mathematical simulation is an effective tool to analyze the fluid flow and the inclusion behavior in the bloom continuous caster with mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS). The mathematical model is applied to the modeling of magnetic field, flow field, and inclusion field. Due to the introduction of Archimedes force, the collision mechanism and inclusion's slipping velocity should be modified in the inclusion mass and population conservation model. Numerically predicted magnetic field, flow field, and the inclusion spatial distribution conform to the experimental results in the existing literature. Lorentz force plays an important role in the fluid flow, and Archimedes force plays an important role in the inclusion distribution in the continuous caster. Due to Brownian collision, Stokes collision, Archimedes collision, and turbulent collision, the coalescence among inclusions occurs in the bloom continuous caster with M-EMS. Among the four types of collisions, turbulent collision occurs most frequently, followed by Archimedes collision and Stokes collision. The frequency of Brownian collision is several orders of magnitudes smaller and is therefore negligible. The inclusion volume concentration, number density, and characteristic radius exhibit a U-shape in the continuous caster without M-EMS. However, with M-EMS, they exhibit an inverted U-shape.

  13. Mathematical Model for Collision-Coalescence Among Inclusions in the Bloom Continuous Caster with M-EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Jiang, Jimin; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Weixian; Dong, Guiwen

    2018-04-01

    Mathematical simulation is an effective tool to analyze the fluid flow and the inclusion behavior in the bloom continuous caster with mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS). The mathematical model is applied to the modeling of magnetic field, flow field, and inclusion field. Due to the introduction of Archimedes force, the collision mechanism and inclusion's slipping velocity should be modified in the inclusion mass and population conservation model. Numerically predicted magnetic field, flow field, and the inclusion spatial distribution conform to the experimental results in the existing literature. Lorentz force plays an important role in the fluid flow, and Archimedes force plays an important role in the inclusion distribution in the continuous caster. Due to Brownian collision, Stokes collision, Archimedes collision, and turbulent collision, the coalescence among inclusions occurs in the bloom continuous caster with M-EMS. Among the four types of collisions, turbulent collision occurs most frequently, followed by Archimedes collision and Stokes collision. The frequency of Brownian collision is several orders of magnitudes smaller and is therefore negligible. The inclusion volume concentration, number density, and characteristic radius exhibit a U-shape in the continuous caster without M-EMS. However, with M-EMS, they exhibit an inverted U-shape.

  14. Anisotropic flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bravina, L V; Korotkikh, V L; Lokhtin, I P; Malinina, L V; Nazarova, E N; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Zabrodin, E E

    2015-01-01

    The possible mechanisms contributing to anisotropic flow fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. The LHC data on event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients measured in PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. To compare the model results with the experimental data the unfolding procedure is employed. It is shown that HYDJET++ correctly reproduces dynamical fluctuations of elliptic and triangular flows and related to it eccentricity fluctuations of the initial state.

  15. The independent quark-gluon string model for heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toneev, V.D.; Amelin, N.S.; Gudima, K.K.

    1989-06-01

    A dynamical model of independent quark-gluon strings is formulated for ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. The formation and fragmentation of the strings are described in terms of the dual parton model. The consideration of the nuclear interaction is based on a coupled system of relativistic Boltzmann-like kinetic equations including the concept of the hadron formation time. The evolution of energy and baryonic densities is discussed for central O+Au collisions. The calculated characteristics for both the central and fragmentation rapidity region are compared with the recent CERN experimental data to disentangle the contributions of different nuclear effects. (orig.)

  16. Estimation of residue depletion of cyadox and its marker residue in edible tissues of pigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lingli; Lin, Zhoumeng; Zhou, Xuan; Zhu, Meiling; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are powerful tools to predict tissue distribution and depletion of veterinary drugs in food animals. However, most models only simulate the pharmacokinetics of the parent drug without considering their metabolites. In this study, a PBPK model was developed to simultaneously describe the depletion in pigs of the food animal antimicrobial agent cyadox (CYA), and its marker residue 1,4-bisdesoxycyadox (BDCYA). The CYA and BDCYA sub-models included blood, liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, muscle, fat and other organ compartments. Extent of plasma-protein binding, renal clearance and tissue-plasma partition coefficients of BDCYA were measured experimentally. The model was calibrated with the reported pharmacokinetic and residue depletion data from pigs dosed by oral gavage with CYA for five consecutive days, and then extrapolated to exposure in feed for two months. The model was validated with 14 consecutive day feed administration data. This PBPK model accurately simulated CYA and BDCYA in four edible tissues at 24-120 h after both oral exposure and 2-month feed administration. There was only slight overestimation of CYA in muscle and BDCYA in kidney at earlier time points (6-12 h) when dosed in feed. Monte Carlo analysis revealed excellent agreement between the estimated concentration distributions and observed data. The present model could be used for tissue residue monitoring of CYA and BDCYA in food animals, and provides a foundation for developing PBPK models to predict residue depletion of both parent drugs and their metabolites in food animals.

  17. Statistical Model Predictions for p+p and Pb+Pb Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, I; Oeschler, H; Redlich, K; Wheaton, S

    2009-01-01

    Particle production in p+p and central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC is discussed in the context of the statistical thermal model. For heavy-ion collisions, predictions of various particle ratios are presented. The sensitivity of several ratios on the temperature and the baryon chemical potential is studied in detail, and some of them, which are particularly appropriate to determine the chemical freeze-out point experimentally, are indicated. Considering elementary interactions on the other hand, we focus on strangeness production and its possible suppression. Extrapolating the thermal parameters to LHC energy, we present predictions of the statistical model for particle yields in p+p collisions. We quantify the strangeness suppression by the correlation volume parameter and discuss its influence on particle production. We propose observables that can provide deeper insight into the mechanism of strangeness production and suppression at LHC.

  18. Residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi, a monsoonal estuary: A three-dimensional model study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijith, V.; Shetye, S.R.; Baetens, K.; Luyten, P.; Michael, G.S.

    then analyse the model results to define characteristics of residual estuarine circulation in the Mandovi. Our motivation to study this aspect of the Mandovi`s dynamics is derived from the following three considerations. First, residual circulation is important...

  19. High-Performance Computer Modeling of the Cosmos-Iridium Collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S; Cook, K; Fasenfest, B; Jefferson, D; Jiang, M; Leek, J; Levatin, J; Nikolaev, S; Pertica, A; Phillion, D; Springer, K; De Vries, W

    2009-08-28

    This paper describes the application of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness (SSA) enterprise, to the recent Cosmos-Iridium collision. This framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel, high-performance computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will describe the application of this framework to the recent collision of the Cosmos and Iridium satellites, including (1) detailed hydrodynamic modeling of the satellite collision and resulting debris generation, (2) orbital propagation of the simulated debris and analysis of the increased risk to other satellites (3) calculation of the radar and optical signatures of the simulated debris and modeling of debris detection with space surveillance radar and optical systems (4) determination of simulated debris orbits from modeled space surveillance observations and analysis of the resulting orbital accuracy, (5) comparison of these modeling and simulation results with Space Surveillance Network observations. We will also discuss the use of this integrated modeling and simulation framework to analyze the risks and consequences of future satellite collisions and to assess strategies for mitigating or avoiding future incidents, including the addition of new sensor systems, used in conjunction with the Space Surveillance Network, for improving space situational awareness.

  20. High-Performance Computer Modeling of the Cosmos-Iridium Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, S.

    This paper describes the application of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness (SSA) enterprise, to the recent Cosmos-Iridium collision. This framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will describe the application of this framework to the recent collision of the Cosmos and Iridium satellites, including (1) detailed hydrodynamic modeling of the satellite collision and resulting debris generation, (2) orbital propagation of the simulated debris and analysis of the increased risk to other satellites (3) calculation of the radar and optical signatures of the simulated debris and modeling of debris detection with space surveillance radar and optical systems (4) determination of simulated debris orbits from modeled space surveillance observations and analysis of the resulting orbital accuracy, (5) comparison of these modeling and simulation results with Space Surveillance Network observations. We will also discuss the use of this integrated modeling and simulation framework to analyze the risks and consequences of future satellite collisions and to assess strategies for mitigating or avoiding future incidents, including the addition of new sensor systems, used in conjunction with the Space Surveillance Network, for improving space situational awareness.

  1. Isotopic production cross sections of fission residues in 197Au-on-proton collisions at 800 A MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlliure, J.; Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.

    2000-02-01

    Interactions of 197 Au projectiles at 800 A MeV with protons leading to fission are investigated. We measured the production cross sections and velocities of all fission residues which are fully identified in atomic and mass number by using the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The new data are compared with partial measurements of the characteristics of fission in similar reactions. Both the production cross sections and the recoil energies are relevant for a better understanding of spallation reactions. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of nuclide cross-sections of spallation residues in 1 A GeV 238U + proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taieb, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Bernas, M.; Mustapha, B.; Rejmund, F.; Stephan, C.; Schmidt, K.H.; Armbruster, P.; Benlliure, J.; Enqvist, T.; Boudard, A.; Legrain, R.; Leray, S.; Volant, C.; Wlazlo, W.; Casarejos, E.; Czajkowski, S.; Pravikoff, M.

    2003-02-01

    The production of heavy nuclides from the spallation-evaporation reaction of 238 U induced by 1 GeV protons was studied in inverse kinematics. The evaporation residues from tungsten to uranium were identified in-flight in mass and atomic number. Their production cross-sections and their momentum distributions were determined. The data are compared with empirical systematics. A comparison with previous results from the spallation of 208 Pb and 197 Au reveals the strong influence of fission in the spallation of 238 U. (orig.)

  3. Scaling of multiplicity distribution in hadron collisions and diffractive-excitation like models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.J.; Dethlefsen, J.M.; Koba, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Multiplicity distribution of secondary particles in inelastic hadron collision at high energy is studied in the semiclassical impact parameter representation. The scaling function is shown to consist of two factors: one geometrical and the other dynamical. We propose a specific choice of these factors, which describe satisfactorily the elastic scattering, the ratio of elastic to total cross-section and the simple scaling behaviour of multiplicity distribution in p-p collisions. Two versions of diffractive-excitation like models (global and local excitation) are presented as interpretation of our choice of dynamical factor. (author)

  4. Modeling multi-nucleon transfer in symmetric collisions of massive nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, T.; Loveland, W.; Yanez, R.; Barrett, J. S.; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Johnson, T.; Zhu, S.; Greene, J. P.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Harker, J. L.; Walters, W. B.; Amro, B. M. S.; Copp, P.

    2017-08-01

    Symmetric collisions of massive nuclei, such as U-238 + Cm-248, have been proposed as ways to make new n-rich heavy nuclei via multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions. We have measured the yields of several projectile-like and target-like fragments from the reaction of 1360 MeV Hg-204 + Pt-198. We find that current models for this symmetric collision (GRAZING, DNS, ImQMD) significantly underestimate the yields of these transfer products, even for small transfers. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Optimal Calculation of Residuals for ARMAX Models with Applications to Model Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Residual tests for sufficient model orders are based on the assumption that prediction errors are white when the model is correct. If an ARMAX system has zeros in the MA part which are close to the unit circle, then the standard predictor can have large transients. Even when the correct model...

  6. Application of a distorted wave model to electron capture in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deco, G.R.; Martinez, A.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is presented the CDW-EIS approximation applied to the description of processes of electron capture in ion-atom collisions. Differential and total cross sections are compared to results obtained by other theoretical models, as well as, to experimental data. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Zhu, Tong

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N 2 ( 1 Σ g + )-N 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections

  8. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Neal, E-mail: neal.parsons@cd-adapco.com; Levin, Deborah A., E-mail: deblevin@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 233 Hammond Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Duin, Adri C. T. van, E-mail: acv13@engr.psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 136 Research East, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhu, Tong, E-mail: tvz5037@psu.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 136 Research East, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +})-N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections.

  9. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson's arms race model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Faisal; Niazi, Muaz A

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs), which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM) level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC) framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson's arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels-firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme.

  10. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson’s arms race model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muaz A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs), which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM) level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC) framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson’s arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels–firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme. PMID:29040294

  11. Collision model for fully resolved simulations of flows laden with finite-size particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, P.; Boersma, B.J.; Westerweel, J.; Breugem, W.P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a collision model for particle-particle and particle-wall interactions in interface-resolved simulations of particle-laden flows. Three types of interparticle interactions are taken into account: (1) long- and (2) short-range hydrodynamic interactions, and (3) solid-solid contact.

  12. Variability of orogenic magmatism during Mediterranean-style continental collisions : A numerical modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrić, N.; Vogt, K.; Matenco, L.; Cvetković, V.; Cloetingh, S.; Gerya, T.

    The relationship between magma generation and the tectonic evolution of orogens during subduction and subsequent collision requires self-consistent numerical modelling approaches predicting volumes and compositions of the produced magmatic rocks. Here, we use a 2D magmatic-thermomechanical numerical

  13. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson's arms race model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Riaz

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs, which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson's arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels-firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme.

  14. Charge distributions and correlations in fragmentation models for soft hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    1984-01-01

    Data on charge distributions and charge correlations in pp and meson-proton interactions at PS and SPS energies are successfully compared with the Lund fragmentation model for low-psub(T) hadron collisions. It is argued that local conservation of quantum numbers and resonance production, as implemented in fragmentation models, are sufficient ingredients to explain most of the available experimental results at these energies. No necessity is found for dual-sheet contributions considered in DTU-based parton models. (orig.)

  15. 4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP) Model Utilization: Case Studies on Collision in Indonesian and Japanese Maritime Traffic Systems (MTS)

    OpenAIRE

    Wanginingastuti Mutmainnah; Masao Furusho

    2016-01-01

    4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP) model is a new model, proposed by authors, to characterized MTS which is adopting epidemiological model that determines causes of accidents, including not only active failures but also latent failures and barriers. This model is still being developed. One of utilization of MOP model is characterizing accidents in MTS, i.e. collision in Indonesia and Japan that is written in this paper. The aim of this paper is to show the characteristics of ship collision accidents...

  16. Trending in Probability of Collision Measurements via a Bayesian Zero-Inflated Beta Mixed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Jonathon; Hejduk, Matt; Stamey, James

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the performance of a generalized linear mixed model in predicting the Probabilities of Collision (Pc) for conjunction events. Specifically, we apply this model to the log(sub 10) transformation of these probabilities and argue that this transformation yields values that can be considered bounded in practice. Additionally, this bounded random variable, after scaling, is zero-inflated. Consequently, we model these values using the zero-inflated Beta distribution, and utilize the Bayesian paradigm and the mixed model framework to borrow information from past and current events. This provides a natural way to model the data and provides a basis for answering questions of interest, such as what is the likelihood of observing a probability of collision equal to the effective value of zero on a subsequent observation.

  17. Collision risk in white-tailed eagles. Modelling kernel-based collision risk using satellite telemetry data in Smoela wind-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roel; Nygaard, Torgeir; Dahl, Espen Lie; Reitan, Ole; Bevanger, Kjetil

    2011-05-15

    Large soaring birds of prey, such as the white-tailed eagle, are recognized to be perhaps the most vulnerable bird group regarding risk of collisions with turbines in wind-power plants. Their mortalities have called for methods capable of modelling collision risks in connection with the planning of new wind-power developments. The so-called 'Band model' estimates collision risk based on the number of birds flying through the rotor swept zone and the probability of being hit by the passing rotor blades. In the calculations for the expected collision mortality a correction factor for avoidance behaviour is included. The overarching objective of this study was to use satellite telemetry data and recorded mortality to back-calculate the correction factor for white-tailed eagles. The Smoela wind-power plant consists of 68 turbines, over an area of approximately 18 km2. Since autumn 2006 the number of collisions has been recorded on a weekly basis. The analyses were based on satellite telemetry data from 28 white-tailed eagles equipped with backpack transmitters since 2005. The correction factor (i.e. 'avoidance rate') including uncertainty levels used within the Band collision risk model for white-tailed eagles was 99% (94-100%) for spring and 100% for the other seasons. The year-round estimate, irrespective of season, was 98% (95-99%). Although the year-round estimate was similar, the correction factor for spring was higher than the correction factor of 95% derived earlier from vantage point data. The satellite telemetry data may provide an alternative way to provide insight into relative risk among seasons, and help identify periods or areas with increased risk either in a pre- or post construction situation. (Author)

  18. SU-E-T-754: Three-Dimensional Patient Modeling Using Photogrammetry for Collision Avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, R; Cardan, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate photogrammetry for creating a three-dimensional patient model. Methods: A mannequin was configured on the couch of a CT scanner to simulate a patient setup using an indexed positioning device. A CT fiducial was placed on the indexed CT table-overlay at the reference index position. Two dimensional photogrammetry targets were placed on the table in known positions. A digital SLR camera was used to obtain 27 images from different positions around the CT table. The images were imported into a commercial photogrammetry package and a 3D model constructed. Each photogrammetry target was identified on 2 to 5 images. The CT DICOM metadata and the position of the CT fiducial were used to calculate the coordinates of the photogrammetry targets in the CT image frame of reference. The coordinates were transferred to the photogrammetry software to orient the 3D model. The mannequin setup was transferred to the treatment couch of a linear accelerator and positioned at isocenter using in-room lasers. The treatment couch coordinates were noted and compared with prediction. The collision free regions were measured over the full range of gantry and table motion and were compared with predictions obtained using a general purpose polygon interference algorithm. Results: The reconstructed 3D model consisted of 180000 triangles. The difference between the predicted and measured couch positions were 5 mm, 1 mm, and 1 mm for longitudinal, lateral, and vertical, respectively. The collision prediction tested 64620 gantry table combinations in 11.1 seconds. The accuracy was 96.5%, with false positive and negative results occurring at the boundaries of the collision space. Conclusion: Photogrammetry can be used as a tool for collision avoidance during treatment planning. The results indicate that a buffer zone is necessary to avoid false negatives at the boundary of the collision-free zone. Testing with human patients is underway. Research partially supported by a grant

  19. A viscous blast-wave model for high energy heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Amaresh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Employing a viscosity-based survival scale for initial geometrical perturbations formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, we model the radial flow velocity at freeze-out. Subsequently, we use the Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription, with viscous corrections to the distribution function, to extract the transverse momentum dependence of particle yields and flow harmonics. We fit the model parameters for central collisions, by fitting the spectra of identified particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and estimate them for other centralities using simple hydrodynamic relations. We use the results of Monte Carlo Glauber model for initial eccentricities. We demonstrate that this improved viscous blast-wave model leads to good agreement with transverse momentum distribution of elliptic and triangular flow for all centralities and estimate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s ≃ 0.24 at the LHC.

  20. Inclusion of the diffuseness in the schematic model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marta, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    The schematic model of central heavy ion collisions developed by Swiatecki includes the Coulomb and surface contributions to the potential energy of the system and one-body dissipation. This model is extended by considering the diffuseness of the nuclear surface; this has the implication that we must consider the proximity forces in the dynamics of the collisions. For the sake of simplicity we work with symmetrical systems. The results of the model studied are compared with experimental data and with other theoretical calculations. We conclude that the detailed consideration of the diffuseness of the nuclear surfaces does not substantially change the results of the schematic model for sharp surfaces in which the diffuseness is considered only through the parameters. (author) [pt

  1. Model-Based Estimation of Collision Risks of Predatory Birds with Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Eichhorn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of renewable energies, such as wind power, is a promising way of mitigating climate change. Because of the risk of collision with rotor blades, wind turbines have negative effects on local bird populations, particularly on raptors such as the Red Kite (Milvus milvus. Appropriate assessment tools for these effects have been lacking. To close this gap, we have developed an agent-based, spatially explicit model that simulates the foraging behavior of the Red Kite around its aerie in a landscape consisting of different land-use types. We determined the collision risk of the Red Kite with the turbine as a function of the distance between the wind turbine and the aerie and other parameters. The impact function comprises the synergistic effects of species-specific foraging behavior and landscape structure. The collision risk declines exponentially with increasing distance. The strength of this decline depends on the raptor's foraging behavior, its ability to avoid wind turbines, and the mean wind speed in the region. The collision risks, which are estimated by the simulation model, are in the range of values observed in the field. The derived impact function shows that the collision risk can be described as an aggregated function of distance between the wind turbine and the raptor's aerie. This allows an easy and rapid assessment of the ecological impacts of (existing or planned wind turbines in relation to their spatial location. Furthermore, it implies that minimum buffer zones for different landscapes can be determined in a defensible way. This modeling approach can be extended to other bird species with central-place foraging behavior. It provides a helpful tool for landscape planning aimed at minimizing the impacts of wind power on biodiversity.

  2. Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma: Excitation and Deexcitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    of an electron- hydrogen two-fluid system, using a generic, semi- classical model of collision cross sections. We find that in some cases, the...verified with direct Monte Carlo calculations, and various numerical tests are conducted for the case of an electron- hydrogen two-fluid system, using a...plasma-assisted combustion , and hypersonics8–13. The advantage of a CR model is two-fold. First, strong deviations from equilibrium of the internal states

  3. Application of JAERI quantum molecular dynamics model for collisions of heavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum molecular dynamics (QMD model incorporated into the general-purpose radiation transport code PHITS was revised for accurate prediction of fragment yields in peripheral collisions. For more accurate simulation of peripheral collisions, stability of the nuclei at their ground state was improved and the algorithm to reject invalid events was modified. In-medium correction on nucleon-nucleon cross sections was also considered. To clarify the effect of this improvement on fragmentation of heavy nuclei, the new QMD model coupled with a statistical decay model was used to calculate fragment production cross sections of Ag and Au targets and compared with the data of earlier measurement. It is shown that the revised version can predict cross section more accurately.

  4. Relativistic Brownian motion: from a microscopic binary collision model to the Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2006-11-01

    The Langevin equation (LE) for the one-dimensional relativistic Brownian motion is derived from a microscopic collision model. The model assumes that a heavy pointlike Brownian particle interacts with the lighter heat bath particles via elastic hard-core collisions. First, the commonly known, nonrelativistic LE is deduced from this model, by taking into account the nonrelativistic conservation laws for momentum and kinetic energy. Subsequently, this procedure is generalized to the relativistic case. There, it is found that the relativistic stochastic force is still delta correlated (white noise) but no longer corresponds to a Gaussian white noise process. Explicit results for the friction and momentum-space diffusion coefficients are presented and discussed.

  5. Semiclassical model of atomic collisions: stopping and capture of the heavy charged particles and exotic atom formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    The semiclassical model of atomic collisions, especially in different areas of the maximum stopping, when proton collides at the velocity of the boron order velocity, providing as the result for interactions of many bodies with an electron target, enabling application of the model with high degree of confidence to a clearly expressed experimental problem, such the antiproton capture on helium, is presented. The semiclassical collision model and stopping energy are considered. The stopping and capture of negatively-charged particles are investigated. The capture and angular moments of antiprotons, captures at the end of the collision cascade, are presented [ru

  6. Development of collision dynamics models to estimate the results of full-scale rail vehicle impact tests : Tufts University Master's Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    In an effort to study occupant survivability in train collisions, analyses and tests were conducted to understand and improve the crashworthiness of rail vehicles. A collision dynamics model was developed in order to estimate the rigid body motion of...

  7. Introduction to fluid model for RHIC heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraya, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An introductory review of the fluid model which has been looked upon as the promising phenomenological model for the heavy ion scattering experiments at RHIC is presented here. Subjects are especially focused on the fundamental assumptions of the model and the decision process of the phenomenological parameters considering newcomers to hadron physics. Introduction of thermodynamical quantities, 1+1 dimension model, time-space evolution of fluid, correspondence of fluid to particles, initial condition, boundary condition and comparison of the equation of state of fluid model and that of hadron model are described. Limitation of fluid picture and the validity of the model are discussed finally. It is summarized that the present fluid model does not predict much about results in advance but gives interpretation after the event, nevertheless it reproduces much of the experimental results in natural form. It is expected that the parameter of the fluid model is to be used as the intermediate theory to relate experimental results with theory. (S. Funahashi)

  8. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  9. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  10. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed. Keywords. Quark-gluon plasma; transport models; flow; jet quenching.

  11. Model unspecific search for new physics in pp collision at

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present the results of a model-independent analysis, which systematically scans the data taken by CMS for deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. Due to ... A broad scan of three kinematic distributions in those classes is performed by identifying deviations from SM expectations, accounting for systematic ...

  12. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, H.K.; Miller, W.O.; Levatin, J.L.; Pertica, A.J.; Olivier, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  13. Strangeness production in hadronic and nuclear collisions in the dual parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J.; Ranft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Λ, antiΛ and K s 0 production is studied in a Monte Carlo Dual Parton model for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions with a SU(3) symmetric sea for chain formation (chain ends) but strangeness suppression in the chain fragmentation. Additionally, (qq)-(antiqantiq) production from the sea was introduced into the chain formation process with the same probability as for the q → qq branching within the chain decay process. This together with the popcorn mechanism of diquark fragmentation result in a new central component of hyperon production, which was not present in previous versions of the model. With these assumptions rapidity distributions and multiplicity ratios for strange particles in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are compared to a comprehensive collection of experimental data. 5 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  14. Hanford tank residual waste - Contaminant source terms and release models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael L.; Jeffery Serne, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Residual waste from five Hanford spent fuel process storage tanks was evaluated. → Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations. → Non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P ± H phases are common in the U-rich residual. → Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples. → Uranium release is highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions. - Abstract: Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State, USA. In the long term, the residual wastes may represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt.%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt.%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2-29.1 wt.%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low ( 2 -saturated solution, or a CaCO 3 -saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO 3 -saturated solution than with the Ca(OH) 2 -saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH) 2 -saturated solution than by the CaCO 3 -saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt.% of the

  15. Modeling the Collision Phenomena of Ø11X19 Size Rolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Manescu jr.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical comparison using dynamic modeling techniques, of physical phenomena occurring at collisions between two rollers in a lot of distinct situations: impact on the edge at angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, 70°, 80° and impact on generator. These situations occur frequently in the manufacturing process of small cylindrical rollers.

  16. Sub-leading flow modes in PbPb collisions at from the HYDJET++ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Stojanovic, M.

    2017-07-01

    Recent LHC results on the appearance of sub-leading flow modes in PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV, related to initial-state fluctuations, are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. Using the newly introduced Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method applied to two-particle azimuthal correlations extracted from the model calculations, the leading and sub-leading flow modes are studied as a function of the transverse momentum (p T) over a wide centrality range. The leading modes of the elliptic and triangular flow calculated with the HYDJET++ model reproduce rather well the v 2{2} and v 3{2} coefficients measured experimentally using the two-particle correlations. Within the p T ⩽ 3 GeV/c range, where hydrodynamics dominates, the sub-leading flow effects are greatest at the highest p T of around 3 GeV/c. The sub-leading elliptic flow mode , which corresponds to the n = 2 harmonic, has a small non-zero value and slowly increases from central to peripheral collisions, while the sub-leading triangular flow mode , which corresponds to the n=3 harmonic, is even smaller and does not depend on centrality. For n= 2, the relative magnitude of the effect measured with respect to the leading flow mode shows a shallow minimum for semi-central collisions and increases for very central and for peripheral collisions. For the n= 3 case, there is no centrality dependence. The sub-leading flow mode results obtained from the HYDJET++ model are in rather good agreement with the experimental measurements of the CMS Collaboration. Supported by Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (171019)

  17. A Data-Based Approach for Modeling and Analysis of Vehicle Collision by LPV-ARMAX Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiugang Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle crash test is considered to be the most direct and common approach to assess the vehicle crashworthiness. However, it suffers from the drawbacks of high experiment cost and huge time consumption. Therefore, the establishment of a mathematical model of vehicle crash which can simplify the analysis process is significantly attractive. In this paper, we present the application of LPV-ARMAX model to simulate the car-to-pole collision with different initial impact velocities. The parameters of the LPV-ARMAX are assumed to have dependence on the initial impact velocities. Instead of establishing a set of LTI models for vehicle crashes with various impact velocities, the LPV-ARMAX model is comparatively simple and applicable to predict the responses of new collision situations different from the ones used for identification. Finally, the comparison between the predicted response and the real test data is conducted, which shows the high fidelity of the LPV-ARMAX model.

  18. Model Of Relaxation Of Residual Stresses In Hot-Rolled Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenin A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses in hot-rolled strips are of practical importance when the laser cutting of these strip is applied. The factors influencing the residual stresses include the non uniform distribution of elastic-plastic deformations, phase transformation occurring during cooling and stress relaxation during rolling and cooling. The latter factor, despite its significant effect on the residual stress, is scarcely considered in the scientific literature. The goal of the present study was development of a model of residual stresses in hot-rolled strips based on the elastic-plastic material model, taking into account the stress relaxation.

  19. Production of charm quarks in a parton cascade model for relativistic heavy ion collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Bass, Steffen A.; Chatterjee, Rupa

    2017-12-01

    We study the production and dynamics of heavy quarks in the parton cascade model for relativistic heavy ion collisions. The model is motivated by the QCD parton picture and describes the dynamics of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision in terms of cascading partons which undergo scattering and multiplication while propagating. We focus on the dynamics of charm quark production and evolution in p +p and Au + Au collisions for several different interaction scenarios, viz., collisions only between primary partons without radiation of gluons, multiple collisions without radiation of gluons, and multiple collisions with radiation of gluons, allowing us to isolate the contributions of parton rescattering and radiation to charm production. We also discuss results of an eikonal approximation of the collision which provides a valuable comparison with minijet calculations and clearly brings out the importance of multiple collisions.

  20. Galilean invariance in the exponential model of atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Pozo, A.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-11-01

    Using the X/sup n//sup +/(1s/sup 2/)+He/sup 2+/ colliding systems as specific examples, we study the origin dependence of results in the application of the two-state exponential model, and we show the relevance of polarization effects in that study. Our analysis shows that polarization effects of the He/sup +/(1s) orbital due to interaction with X/sup (//sup n//sup +1)+/ ion in the exit channel yield a very small contribution to the energy difference and render the dynamical coupling so strongly origin dependent that it invalidates the basic premises of the model. Further study, incorporating translation factors in the formalism, is needed.

  1. Adiabatic analysis of collisions. III. Remarks on the spin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of a spin-rotation model illustrates how transitions between adiabatic channel states stem from the second, rather than from the first, rate of change of these states, provided that appropriate identification of channels and scaling of the independent variable are used. These remarks, like the earlier development of a post-adiabatic approach, aim at elucidating the surprising success of approximate separation of variables in the treatment of complex mechanical systems

  2. Collision dynamics of the coherent Jaynes-Cummings model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabello, M.L.C.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de.

    1985-01-01

    The anatomy of the dynamics of quantum correlations of two interacting subsystems described by the Jaynes-Cummings Model is studied, making use of a natural states decomposition, following an old suggestion by Schroedinger. The amplitude modulation of the fast Rabi oscillations which occur for a strong, coherent initial field is obtained from the spin intrinsic depolarization resulting from corrections to the mean field approximation. (Author) [pt

  3. Collision dynamics of the coherent Jaynes-Cumminings model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabello, M.L.C.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de

    1984-01-01

    The anatomy of the dynamics of quantum correlations of two interacting subsystems described by the Jaynes-Cummings Model is studied, making use of a natural states decomposition, following an old suggestion by Schroedinger. The amplitude modulation of the fast Rabi oscillations which occur for a strong, coherent initial field is obtained from the spin intrinsic depolarization resulting from corrections to the mean field approximation. (Author) [pt

  4. Nonequilibrium models of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecker, H; Bratkovskaya, E L; Bleicher, M; Soff, S; Zhu, X

    2005-01-01

    We review the results from the various hydrodynamical and transport models on the collective flow observables from AGS to RHIC energies. A critical discussion of the present status of the CERN experiments on hadron collective flow is given. We emphasize the importance of the flow excitation function from 1 to 50 A GeV: here the hydrodynamic model has predicted the collapse of the v 1 -flow and of the v 2 -flow at ∼10 A GeV; at 40 A GeV it has been recently observed by the NA49 collaboration. Since hadronic rescattering models predict much larger flow than observed at this energy we interpret this observation as evidence for a first-order phase transition at high baryon density ρ B . Moreover, the connection of the elliptic flow v 2 to jet suppression is examined. It is proven experimentally that the collective flow is not faked by minijet fragmentation. Additionally, detailed transport studies show that the away-side jet suppression can only partially ( 1 , v 2 closer to beam rapidity is related to the occurrence of a high density first order phase transition in the RHIC data at 62.5, 130 and 200 A GeV

  5. Border Collision Bifurcations in a Generalized Model of Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia M. Ladino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the dynamics of a generalized discrete time population model of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture. This generalization, which is inspired by other approaches and real data that one can find in literature, consists in considering no restriction for the value of the two key parameters appearing in the model, that is, the natural death rate and the mortality rate due to fishing activity. In the more general case the feasibility of the system has been preserved by posing opportune formulas for the piecewise map defining the model. The resulting two-dimensional nonlinear map is not smooth, though continuous, as its definition changes as any border is crossed in the phase plane. Hence, techniques from the mathematical theory of piecewise smooth dynamical systems must be applied to show that, due to the existence of borders, abrupt changes in the dynamic behavior of population sizes and multistability emerge. The main novelty of the present contribution with respect to the previous ones is that, while using real data, richer dynamics are produced, such as fluctuations and multistability. Such new evidences are of great interest in biology since new strategies to preserve the survival of the species can be suggested.

  6. Evaluating the impact of bike network indicators on cyclist safety using macro-level collision prediction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osama, Ahmed; Sayed, Tarek

    2016-12-01

    Many cities worldwide are recognizing the important role that cycling plays in creating green and livable communities. However, vulnerable road users such as cyclists are usually subjected to an elevated level of injury risk which discourages many road users to cycle. This paper studies cyclist-vehicle collisions at 134 traffic analysis zones in the city of Vancouver to assess the impact of bike network structure on cyclist safety. Several network indicators were developed using Graph theory and their effect on cyclist safety was investigated. The indicators included measures of connectivity, directness, and topography of the bike network. The study developed several macro-level (zonal) collision prediction models that explicitly incorporated bike network indicators as explanatory variables. As well, the models incorporated the actual cyclist exposure (bike kilometers travelled) as opposed to relying on proxies such as population or bike network length. The macro-level collision prediction models were developed using generalized linear regression and full Bayesian techniques, with and without spatial effects. The models showed that cyclist collisions were positively associated with bike and vehicle exposure. The exponents of the exposure variables were less than one which supports the "safety in numbers" hypothesis. Moreover, the models showed positive associations between cyclist collisions and the bike network connectivity and linearity indicators. In contrast, negative associations were found between cyclist collisions and the bike network continuity and topography indicators. The spatial effects were statistically significant in all of the developed models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multichannel approach to the Glauber model for heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzi, S.M.; Zardi, F.; Vitturi, A.

    1990-01-01

    A formalism is developed in order to describe, within the Glauber model, the scattering processes between heavy ions in situations involving several coupled channels. The approach is based on a suitable truncation of the number of nuclear states which can be excited at each microscopic nucleon-nucleon collision. The set of coupled equations for the S-matrix elements of the conventional reaction theory is replaced by simple matrix relations, only involving the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude and the nuclear densities and transition densities. This method avoids the difficulties arising from the combinatorial aspects of the multiple scattering theories, the slow convergence of the series, and the problems of center-of-mass correlations. We discuss some specific examples of multichannel collisions where the multiple-scattering series can be summed to give analytic expressions for the scattering amplitude. We finally explicate the formalism for the perturbative treatment of mutual excitation and charge-exchange processes

  8. A Bio-inspired Collision Avoidance Model Based on Spatial Information Derived from Motion Detectors Leads to Common Routes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier J N Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Avoiding collisions is one of the most basic needs of any mobile agent, both biological and technical, when searching around or aiming toward a goal. We propose a model of collision avoidance inspired by behavioral experiments on insects and by properties of optic flow on a spherical eye experienced during translation, and test the interaction of this model with goal-driven behavior. Insects, such as flies and bees, actively separate the rotational and translational optic flow components via behavior, i.e. by employing a saccadic strategy of flight and gaze control. Optic flow experienced during translation, i.e. during intersaccadic phases, contains information on the depth-structure of the environment, but this information is entangled with that on self-motion. Here, we propose a simple model to extract the depth structure from translational optic flow by using local properties of a spherical eye. On this basis, a motion direction of the agent is computed that ensures collision avoidance. Flying insects are thought to measure optic flow by correlation-type elementary motion detectors. Their responses depend, in addition to velocity, on the texture and contrast of objects and, thus, do not measure the velocity of objects veridically. Therefore, we initially used geometrically determined optic flow as input to a collision avoidance algorithm to show that depth information inferred from optic flow is sufficient to account for collision avoidance under closed-loop conditions. Then, the collision avoidance algorithm was tested with bio-inspired correlation-type elementary motion detectors in its input. Even then, the algorithm led successfully to collision avoidance and, in addition, replicated the characteristics of collision avoidance behavior of insects. Finally, the collision avoidance algorithm was combined with a goal direction and tested in cluttered environments. The simulated agent then showed goal-directed behavior reminiscent of

  9. Accurate Treatment of Collisions and Water-Delivery in Models of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Maindl, Thomas; Schaefer, Christoph

    2017-10-01

    It is widely accepted that collisions among solid bodies, ignited by their interactions with planetary embryos is the key process in the formation of terrestrial planets and transport of volatiles and chemical compounds to their accretion zones. Unfortunately, due to computational complexities, these collisions are often treated in a rudimentary way. Impacts are considered to be perfectly inelastic and volatiles are considered to be fully transferred from one object to the other. This perfect-merging assumption has profound effects on the mass and composition of final planetary bodies as it grossly overestimates the masses of these objects and the amounts of volatiles and chemical elements transferred to them. It also entirely neglects collisional-loss of volatiles (e.g., water) and draws an unrealistic connection between these properties and the chemical structure of the protoplanetary disk (i.e., the location of their original carriers). We have developed a new and comprehensive methodology to simulate growth of embryos to planetary bodies where we use a combination of SPH and N-body codes to accurately model collisions as well as the transport/transfer of chemical compounds. Our methodology accounts for the loss of volatiles (e.g., ice sublimation) during the orbital evolution of their careers and accurately tracks their transfer from one body to another. Results of our simulations show that traditional N-body modeling of terrestrial planet formation overestimates the amount of the mass and water contents of the final planets by over 60% implying that not only the amount of water they suggest is far from being realistic, small planets such as Mars can also form in these simulations when collisions are treated properly. We will present details of our methodology and discuss its implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery to Earth.

  10. Predictive models of forest logging residues of Triplochiton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, biomass yield residue was quantified and equations developed for Triplochiton scleroxylon, in secondary forests, Ondo State, Nigeria. Plotless sampling technique was used for the study. A total of 31 Triplochiton scleroxylon were randomly selected. Tree identification and detailed growing stock of outside bark ...

  11. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  12. Modelling of transport and collisions between rigid bodies to simulate the jam formation in urban flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hadji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the simulation of transport and interaction betweenbodies considered as a rectangular shape particles, in urban flow. We usedan hydrodynamic two-dimensional finite elements model coupled to theparticles model based on Maxey-Riley equations, and taking into accountof contact between bodies. The finite element discretization is based onthe velocity field richer than pressure field, and the particles displacementsare computed by using a rigid body motion method. A collision strategy isalso developed to handle cases in which bodies touch.

  13. Resonance Model of $\\pi \\Delta \\rightarrow Y K$ for Kaon Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Tsushima, K.; Huang, S. W.; Faessler, Amand

    1994-01-01

    The elementary production cross sections $\\pi \\Delta \\rightarrow Y K$ $(Y=\\Sigma,\\,\\, \\Lambda)$ and $\\pi N \\rightarrow Y K$ are needed to describe kaon production in heavy ion collisions. The $\\pi N \\rightarrow Y K$ reactions were studied previously by a resonance model. The model can explain the experimental data quite well \\cite{tsu}. In this article, the total cross sections $\\pi \\Delta \\rightarrow Y K$ at intermediate energies (from the kaon production threshold to3 GeV of $\\pi \\Delta$ ce...

  14. Classical solutions for the ellipsoidal BGK model with fixed collision frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seok-Bae

    2015-12-01

    We establish the existence of global in time smooth solutions for the ellipsoidal BGK model, which is a variant of the BGK model for the Boltzmann equation designed to yield the correct Prandtl number in the hydrodynamic approximation at the Navier-Stokes level. For this, we carefully design a function space which captures the growth of the solution in a weighted Sobolev norm, and show that the ellipsoidal relaxation operator is Lipschitz continuous in the induced metric. This approach is restricted to the case when the collision frequency does not depend on the macroscopic field, but no smallness on the initial data is required.

  15. Higher harmonics of azimuthal anisotropy in relativistic heavy ion collisions in HYDJET++ model

    CERN Document Server

    Bravina, L V; Eyyubova, G. Kh.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Lokhtin, I.P.; Malinina, L.V.; Petrushanko, S.V.; Snigirev, A.M.; Zabrodin, E.E.

    2014-01-01

    The LHC data on azimuthal anisotropy harmonics from PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted in the framework of the HYDJET++ model. The cross-talk of elliptic $v_2$ and triangular $v_3$ flow in the model generates both even and odd harmonics of higher order. Comparison with the experimental data shows that this mechanism is able to reproduce the $p_{\\rm T}$ and centrality dependencies of quadrangular flow $v_4$, and also the basic trends for pentagonal $v_5$ and hexagonal $v_6$ flows.

  16. Study regarding seat’s rigidity during rear end collisions using a MADYMO occupant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionut Radu, Alexandru; Cofaru, Corneliu; Tolea, Bogan; Popescu, Mihaela

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of different front occupant backseat’s rigidities in the case of a rear end collision using a multibody virtual model of an occupant. Simulation will be conducted in PC Crash, the most common accident reconstruction software using a MADYMO multibody occupant to simulate kinematics and dynamic of the passenger. Different backseat torques will be used to see how this will influence the acceleration in the head and torso of the occupant. Also, a real crash test is made to analyze the kinematics of the occupant. We believe that the softer seat’s rigidity will reduce not only the head’s acceleration but also reduces the effect of „whiplash” upon the neck due to the fact that the backseat will rotate backwards increasing its displacement and absorb some of the energy generated by the collision. Although a softer seat could reduce the head’s acceleration, a broken seat will increase it due to the fact that the impact of the backseat with the vehicle’s rear seats will generate a second collision. So, in order to achieve a lower acceleration, a controlled torque is recommended and a controlled angular displacement of the backseat is to be used.

  17. Dynamical initial-state model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Schenke, Björn

    2018-02-01

    We present a fully three-dimensional model providing initial conditions for energy and net-baryon density distributions in heavy-ion collisions at arbitrary collision energy. The model includes the dynamical deceleration of participating nucleons or valence quarks, depending on the implementation. The duration of the deceleration continues until the string spanned between colliding participants is assumed to thermalize, which is either after a fixed proper time, or a fluctuating time depending on sampled final rapidities. Energy is deposited in space time along the string, which in general will span a range of space-time rapidities and proper times. We study various observables obtained directly from the initial-state model, including net-baryon rapidity distributions, two-particle rapidity correlations, as well as the rapidity decorrelation of the transverse geometry. Their dependence on the model implementation and parameter values is investigated. We also present the implementation of the model with 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamics, which involves the addition of source terms that deposit energy and net-baryon densities produced by the initial-state model at proper times greater than the initial time for the hydrodynamic simulation.

  18. Modeling crop residue burning experiments to evaluate smoke emissions and plume transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxi Zhou; Kirk R. Baker; Sergey L. Napelenok; George Pouliot; Robert Elleman; Susan M. O' Neill; Shawn P. Urbanski; David C. Wong

    2018-01-01

    Crop residue burning is a common land management practice that results in emissions of a variety of pollutants with negative health impacts. Modeling systems are used to estimate air quality impacts of crop residue burning to support retrospective regulatory assessments and also for forecasting purposes. Ground and airborne measurements from a recent field experiment...

  19. Modeling crop residue burning experiments to evaluate smoke emissions and plume transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop residue burning is a common land management practice that results in emissions of a variety of pollutants with negative health impacts. Modeling systems are used to estimate air quality impacts of crop residue burning to support retrospective regulatory assessments and also ...

  20. Detecting Local Residue Environment Similarity for Recognizing Near-Native Structure Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungrae; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    We developed a new representation of local amino acid environments in protein structures called the Side-chain Depth Environment (SDE). An SDE defines a local structural environment of a residue considering the coordinates and the depth of amino acids that locate in the vicinity of the side-chain centroid of the residue. SDEs are general enough that similar SDEs are found in protein structures with globally different folds. Using SDEs, we developed a procedure called PRESCO (Protein Residue Environment SCOre) for selecting native or near-native models from a pool of computational models. The procedure searches similar residue environments observed in a query model against a set of representative native protein structures to quantify how native-like SDEs in the model are. When benchmarked on commonly used computational model datasets, our PRESCO compared favorably with the other existing scoring functions in selecting native and near-native models. PMID:25132526

  1. Modeling near-barrier collisions of heavy ions based on a Langevin-type approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A. V.; Saiko, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    Background: Multinucleon transfer in low-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is proposed as a method of production of yet-unknown neutron-rich nuclei hardly reachable by other methods. Purpose: Modeling of dynamics of nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions in their full complexity of competing reaction channels remains to be a challenging task. The work is aimed at development of such a model and its application to the analysis of multinucleon transfer in deep inelastic collisions of heavy ions leading, in particular, to formation of neutron-rich isotopes in the vicinity of the N =126 shell closure. Method: Multidimensional dynamical model of nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the Langevin equations has been proposed. It is combined with a statistical model for simulation of de-excitation of primary reaction fragments. The model provides a continuous description of the system evolution starting from the well-separated target and projectile in the entrance channel of the reaction up to the formation of final reaction products. Results: A rather complete set of experimental data available for reactions 136Xe+198Pt,208Pb,209Bi was analyzed within the developed model. The model parameters have been determined. The calculated energy, mass, charge, and angular distributions of reaction products, their various correlations as well as cross sections for production of specific isotopes agree well with the data. On this basis, optimal experimental conditions for synthesizing the neutron-rich nuclei in the vicinity of the N =126 shell were formulated and the corresponding cross sections were predicted. Conclusions: The production yields of neutron-rich nuclei with N =126 weakly depend on the incident energy. At the same time, the corresponding angular distributions are strongly energy dependent. They are peaked at grazing angles for larger energies and extend up to the forward angles at low near-barrier collision energies. The corresponding cross sections exceed 100 nb for

  2. Model checks for Cox-type regression models based on optimally weighted martingale residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Axel; Jensen, Uwe

    2009-12-01

    We introduce directed goodness-of-fit tests for Cox-type regression models in survival analysis. "Directed" means that one may choose against which alternatives the tests are particularly powerful. The tests are based on sums of weighted martingale residuals and their asymptotic distributions.We derive optimal tests against certain competing models which include Cox-type regression models with different covariates and/or a different link function. We report results from several simulation studies and apply our test to a real dataset.

  3. Normal linear models with genetically structured residual variance heterogeneity: a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Daniel; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    2003-01-01

    Normal mixed models with different levels of heterogeneity in the residual variance are fitted to pig litter size data. Exploratory analysis and model assessment is based on examination of various posterior predictive distributions. Comparisons based on Bayes factors and related criteria favour...... models with a genetically structured residual variance heterogeneity. There is, moreover, strong evidence of a negative correlation between the additive genetic values affecting litter size and those affecting residual variance. The models are also compared according to the purposes for which they might...... be used, such as prediction of 'future' data, inference about response to selection and ranking candidates for selection. A brief discussion is given of some implications for selection of the genetically structured residual variance model....

  4. 4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP Model Utilization: Case Studies on Collision in Indonesian and Japanese Maritime Traffic Systems (MTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanginingastuti Mutmainnah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP model is a new model, proposed by authors, to characterized MTS which is adopting epidemiological model that determines causes of accidents, including not only active failures but also latent failures and barriers. This model is still being developed. One of utilization of MOP model is characterizing accidents in MTS, i.e. collision in Indonesia and Japan that is written in this paper. The aim of this paper is to show the characteristics of ship collision accidents that occur both in Indonesian and Japanese maritime traffic systems. There were 22 collision cases in 2008–2012 (8 cases in Indonesia and 14 cases in Japan. The characteristics presented in this paper show failure events at every stage of the three accident development stages (the beginning of an accident, the accident itself, and the evacuation process.

  5. Modelling the Effects of Surface Residual Stresses on Fatigue Behavior of PM Disk Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A finite element based model will be developed and validated to capture the evolution of residual stresses and cold work at machined features of compressor and...

  6. The development and application of an injury prediction model for noncontact, soft-tissue injuries in elite collision sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2010-10-01

    Limited information exists on the training dose-response relationship in elite collision sport athletes. In addition, no study has developed an injury prediction model for collision sport athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an injury prediction model for noncontact, soft-tissue injuries in elite collision sport athletes. Ninety-one professional rugby league players participated in this 4-year prospective study. This study was conducted in 2 phases. Firstly, training load and injury data were prospectively recorded over 2 competitive seasons in elite collision sport athletes. Training load and injury data were modeled using a logistic regression model with a binomial distribution (injury vs. no injury) and logit link function. Secondly, training load and injury data were prospectively recorded over a further 2 competitive seasons in the same cohort of elite collision sport athletes. An injury prediction model based on planned and actual training loads was developed and implemented to determine if noncontact, soft-tissue injuries could be predicted and therefore prevented in elite collision sport athletes. Players were 50-80% likely to sustain a preseason injury within the training load range of 3,000-5,000 units. These training load 'thresholds' were considerably reduced (1,700-3,000 units) in the late-competition phase of the season. A total of 159 noncontact, soft-tissue injuries were sustained over the latter 2 seasons. The percentage of true positive predictions was 62.3% (n = 121), whereas the total number of false positive and false negative predictions was 20 and 18, respectively. Players that exceeded the training load threshold were 70 times more likely to test positive for noncontact, soft-tissue injury, whereas players that did not exceed the training load threshold were injured 1/10 as often. These findings provide information on the training dose-response relationship and a scientific method of monitoring and regulating training load in

  7. Fault-plane Solutions Determined by Waveform Modeling Confirm Tectonic Collision in the Eastern Adriatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvari, E.; Kiratzi, A.; Papazachos, B.; Hatzidimitriou, P.

    - Source parameters for thirteen earthquakes in the SE Adriatic region have been determined using P and SH body-waveform inversion. The results of this modeling are combined with eleven other earthquakes with M>=5 whose focal mechanisms have been determined mainly by waveform modeling. The results confirm that movement on mainly low-angle reverse faults causes the deformation in coastal southern Yugoslavia through Albania up to the Lefkada Island in NW Greece. This zone of thrusting has a NW-SE trend (N34°W), follows the coastline, and dips towards the continent. The slip vectors of these events trend at N229° along the Dalmatian coasts, to N247° along Albania and NW Greece. The deformation is attributed to the continental collision between the Adriatic block to the west and Eurasia to the east. Along the mountain line in eastern Albania (Albanides Mts.) and in NW Greece (Hellenides Mts.), E-W extension is occurring. The E-W extension associated with the orogenic belt could be attributed to a variety of models such as: gravity, internal deformation of the thrust wedge, a probable down bulge of the dense lithosphere of the Adriatic block beneath the Eurasian lithospheric plate in combination with the compressional stresses applied along the collision belt.

  8. Description of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in a field theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, J.

    1984-08-01

    For the purpose of studying high energy heavy-ion collisions a self-consistent theory of relativistic nuclear fluid-dynamics coupled to classical meson fields is developed. The essential difference to the conventional fluid dynamic description arises from the coupling of meson fields to the nuclear fluid and from the non-linear relation for the effective baryon mass leading to a relativistic self-consistent description for the nuclear equation of state. The effects of different equations of state resulting from linear and nonlinear mean field approaches are studied in the event-by-event kinetic flow analysis of heavy ion collisions. The predictions for the symmetrical system Nb(Esub(Lab)=400 MeV/N)Nb are in good agreement with the experimental 4π-data. Investigating the phase structure in the linear mean field approach a phase transition occuring at Tapprox.=200 MeV for chemical potential μ=0 was found in this model. This transition is similar to recent QCD predictions. The model indicates a further phase transition at Tapprox.=20 MeV (baryon fluid to gas). There is, however, no correct description of the compressibility of nuclear matter in the linear mean field model. The extension to nonlinear scalar meson interaction allows for a correct description of the bulk properties of nuclear matter. It was found though that the phase transition is always present for reasonable values of the coupling constants. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Collision avoidance in unstructured environments for autonomous robots: a behavioural modelling approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yinka-Banjo, CO

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Collision avoidance is one of the important safety key operations that needs attention in the navigation system of an autonomous robot. In this paper, a Behavioural Bayesian Network approach is proposed as a collision avoidance strategy...

  10. Anisotropic hydrodynamic modeling of 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mubarak; Nopoush, Mohammad; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2017-10-01

    We compare phenomenological results from 3 +1 D quasiparticle anisotropic hydrodynamics (aHydroQP) with experimental data collected in the CERN Large Hadron Collider 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions. In particular, we present comparisons of particle spectra, average transverse momentum, elliptic flow, and Hanbury Brown-Twiss radii. The aHydroQP model relies on the introduction of a single temperature-dependent quasiparticle mass which is fit to lattice QCD data. By taking moments of the resulting Boltzmann equation, we obtain the dynamical equations used in the hydrodynamic stage which include the effects of both shear and bulk viscosities. At freeze-out, we use anisotropic Cooper-Frye freeze-out performed on a fixed-energy-density hypersurface to convert to hadrons. To model the production and decays of the hadrons we use therminator2 which is customized to sample from ellipsoidal momentum-space distribution functions. Using smooth Glauber initial conditions, we find very good agreement with many heavy-ion collision observables.

  11. Calibrating a multi-model approach to defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1994-01-01

    A multi-model approach to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, thus providing information similar to that obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations. ((orig.))

  12. Modeling and experimental verification of thermally induced residual stress in RF-MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somà, Aurelio; Saleem, Muhammad Mubasher

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF-MEMS) generally consist of microcantilevers and clamped–clamped microbeams. The presence of residual stress in these microstructures affects the static and dynamic behavior of the device. In this study, nonlinear finite element method (FEM) modeling and the experimental validation of residual stress induced in the clamped–clamped microbeams and the symmetric toggle RF-MEMS switch (STS) is presented. The formation of residual stress due to plastic deformation during the thermal loading-unloading cycle in the plasma etching step of the microfabrication process is explained and modeled using the Bauschinger effect. The difference between the designed and the measured natural frequency and pull-in voltage values for the clamped–clamped microbeams is explained by the presence of the nonhomogenous tensile residual stress. For the STS switch specimens, three-dimensional (3D) FEM models are developed and the initial deflection at zero bias voltage, observed during the optical profile measurements, is explained by the residual stress developed during the plasma etching step. The simulated residual stress due to the plastic deformation is included in the STS models to obtain the switch pull-in voltage. At the end of the simulation process, a good correspondence is obtained between the FEM model results and the experimental measurements for both the clamped–clamped microbeams and the STS switch specimens. (paper)

  13. Contributory fault and level of personal injury to drivers involved in head-on collisions: Application of copula-based bivariate ordinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Behram; Khattak, Asad J; Xu, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to simultaneously investigate the degree of injury severity sustained by drivers involved in head-on collisions with respect to fault status designation. This is complicated to answer due to many issues, one of which is the potential presence of correlation between injury outcomes of drivers involved in the same head-on collision. To address this concern, we present seemingly unrelated bivariate ordered response models by analyzing the joint injury severity probability distribution of at-fault and not-at-fault drivers. Moreover, the assumption of bivariate normality of residuals and the linear form of stochastic dependence implied by such models may be unduly restrictive. To test this, Archimedean copula structures and normal mixture marginals are integrated into the joint estimation framework, which can characterize complex forms of stochastic dependencies and non-normality in residual terms. The models are estimated using 2013 Virginia police reported two-vehicle head-on collision data, where exactly one driver is at-fault. The results suggest that both at-fault and not-at-fault drivers sustained serious/fatal injuries in 8% of crashes, whereas, in 4% of the cases, the not-at-fault driver sustained a serious/fatal injury with no injury to the at-fault driver at all. Furthermore, if the at-fault driver is fatigued, apparently asleep, or has been drinking the not-at-fault driver is more likely to sustain a severe/fatal injury, controlling for other factors and potential correlations between the injury outcomes. While not-at-fault vehicle speed affects injury severity of at-fault driver, the effect is smaller than the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on at-fault injury outcome. Contrarily, and importantly, the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on injury severity of not-at-fault driver is almost equal to the effect of not-at-fault vehicle speed on injury outcome of not-at-fault driver. Compared to traditional ordered probability

  14. Various models for pion probability distributions from heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekjian, A.Z.; Mekjian, A.Z.; Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D.; Schlei, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    Various models for pion multiplicity distributions produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. The models include a relativistic hydrodynamic model, a thermodynamic description, an emitting source pion laser model, and a description which generates a negative binomial description. The approach developed can be used to discuss other cases which will be mentioned. The pion probability distributions for these various cases are compared. Comparison of the pion laser model and Bose-Einstein condensation in a laser trap and with the thermal model are made. The thermal model and hydrodynamic model are also used to illustrate why the number of pions never diverges and why the Bose-Einstein correction effects are relatively small. The pion emission strength η of a Poisson emitter and a critical density η c are connected in a thermal model by η/n c =e -m/T <1, and this fact reduces any Bose-Einstein correction effects in the number and number fluctuation of pions. Fluctuations can be much larger than Poisson in the pion laser model and for a negative binomial description. The clan representation of the negative binomial distribution due to Van Hove and Giovannini is discussed using the present description. Applications to CERN/NA44 and CERN/NA49 data are discussed in terms of the relativistic hydrodynamic model. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  15. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution

  16. Stress and Fatigue Life Modeling of Cannon Breech Closures Including Effects of Material Strength and Residual Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Underwood, John

    2000-01-01

    ...; overload residual stress. Modeling of applied and residual stresses at the location of the fatigue failure site is performed by elastic-plastic finite element analysis using ABAQUS and by solid...

  17. A Residual Approach for Balanced Truncation Model Reduction (BTMR of Compartmental Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William La Cruz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a residual approach of the square root balanced truncation algorithm for model order reduction of continuous, linear and time-invariante compartmental systems. Specifically, the new approach uses a residual method to approximate the controllability and observability gramians, whose resolution is an essential step of the square root balanced truncation algorithm, that requires a great computational cost. Numerical experiences are included to highlight the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  18. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues : new modeling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira , Cristina; Tayakout-Fayolle , Melaz; Guibard , Isabelle; Lemos , Francisco

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In order to be able to upgrade the heaviest part of the crude oil one needs to remove several impurities, such as sulfur or metals. Residue hydrotreatment in fixed beds, under high hydrogen pressure can achieve high removal performances, with an industrial catalysts optimized staging. Despite the recent improvements, petroleum residues remain very difficult to describe and characterize in detail. Several kinetic models have been developed, but mostly they are feed depe...

  19. Effect of coherence of nonthermal reservoirs on heat transport in a microscopic collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zou, Jian; Li, Hai; Xu, Bao-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Mei; Shao, Bin

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the heat transport between two nonthermal reservoirs based on a microscopic collision model. We consider a bipartite system consisting of two identical subsystems, and each subsystem interacts with its own local reservoir, which consists of a large collection of initially uncorrelated ancillas. Then a heat transport is formed between two reservoirs by a sequence of pairwise collisions (intersubsystem and subsystem-local reservoir). In this paper we consider two kinds of the reservoir's initial states: the thermal state and the state with coherence whose diagonal elements are the same as that of the thermal state and the off-diagonal elements are nonzero. In this way, we define the effective temperature of the reservoir with coherence according to its diagonal elements. We find that for two reservoirs having coherence the direction of the steady current of heat is different for different phase differences between the two initial states of two reservoirs, especially the heat can transfer from the "cold reservoir" to the "hot reservoir" in the steady regime for particular phase difference. In the limit of the effective temperature difference between the two reservoirs Δ T →0 , for most of the phase differences, the steady heat current increases with the increase of effective temperature until it reaches the high effective temperature limit, while for the thermal state or particular phase difference the steady heat current decreases with the increase of temperature at high temperatures, and in this case the conductance can be obtained.

  20. The collision of a strong shock with a gas cloud: a model for Cassiopeia A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    The result of the collision of the shock with the cloud is a shock traveling around the cloud, a shock transmitted into the cloud, and a shock reflected from the cloud. By equating the cooling time of the posttransmitted shock gas to the time required for the transmitted shock to travel the length of the cloud, a critical cloud density n/subc/ /sup prime/ is defined. For clouds with density greater than n/subc/ /sup prime/, the posttransmitted shock gas cools rapidly and then emits the lines of the lower ionization stages of its constituent elements. The structure of such and its expected appearance to an observer are discussed and compared with the quasi-stationary condensations of Cas A. Conversely, clouds with density less than n/subc//sup prime/ remain hot for several thousand years, and are sources of X-radiation whose temperatures are much less than that of the intercloud gas. After the transmitted shock passes, the cloud pressure is greater than the pressure in the surrounding gas, causing the cloud to expand and the emission to decrease from its value just after the collision. A model in which the soft X-radiation of Cas A is due to a collection of such clouds is discussed. The faint emission patches to the north of Cas A are interpreted as preshocked clouds which will probably become quasi-stationary condensations after being hit by the shock

  1. Modeling Solar Wind Expansion with Wave-Particle Interactions and Coulomb Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, L.; Hellinger, P.; Landi, S.; Pantellini, F. G. E.; Velli, M.; Franci, L.; Verdini, A.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of the solar wind plasma is strongly influenced by its spherical expansion in interplanetary space. Due to the weak - but not fully negligible - collisionality of the plasma, the behaviour of the system can be hardly modelled through standard approaches, either fluid or fully collisionless. Moreover, solar wind microphysics depends on many different processes, including the interaction of particles with background waves and turbulence, and plasma instabilities. Disentangling the effect of these processes from the role of intra- and inter-species particle collisions in the framework of the overall secular evolution imposed by the expansion is particularly challenging.In this presentation we will review some basics of the solar wind expansion as well as some of the recent results obtained by means of kinetic numerical models which take into account the radial expansion on the plasma, with emphasis on the comparison with in situ observations and the role of the forthcoming Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe missions.

  2. Sticking transition in a minimal model for the collisions of active particles in quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Brachet, Marc; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    Particles of low velocity, traveling without dissipation in a superfluid, can interact and emit sound when they collide. We propose a minimal model in which the equations of motion of the particles, including a short-range repulsive force, are self-consistently coupled with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We show that this model generates naturally an effective superfluid-mediated attractive interaction between the particles; and we study numerically the collisional dynamics of particles as a function of their incident kinetic energy and the length scale of the repulsive force. We find a transition from almost elastic to completely inelastic (sticking) collisions as the parameters are tuned. We find that aggregation and clustering result from this sticking transition in multiparticle systems.

  3. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in

  4. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  5. Approaches for Modelling the Residual Service Life of Marine Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the service life design of existing reinforced concrete structures in a marine environment. The general procedure of condition assessment for estimating the residual service life of structures before a repair measure is illustrated. For assessment of the residual service life of structures which have undergone a repair measure a simplified mathematical model of chloride diffusion in a 2-layer system is presented. Preliminary probabilistic calculations demonstrate the effect of various conditions on the residual service life. First studies of the chloride diffusion in a 2-layer system have been conducted using the finite element method. Results of a long-term exposure test are presented to illustrate the performance of two different repair materials. The distribution of residual chlorides after application of a repair material is being studied in laboratory investigations. The residual chlorides migrate from the concrete layer into the new layer immediately after the repair material has been applied to the concrete member. The content and gradient of residual chlorides, along with the thickness and the chloride ingress resistance of both the remaining and the new layer of cover, will determine the residual service life of the repaired structures.

  6. Bayesian model comparison for one-dimensional azimuthal correlations in 200GeV AuAu collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggers Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of data modeling and comparisons between different fit models, Bayesian analysis calls that model best which has the largest evidence, the prior-weighted integral over model parameters of the likelihood function. Evidence calculations automatically take into account both the usual chi-squared measure and an Occam factor which quantifies the price for adding extra parameters. Applying Bayesian analysis to projections onto azimuth of 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV AuAu collisions, we consider typical model choices including Fourier series and a Gaussian plus combinations of individual cosine components. We find that models including a Gaussian component are consistently preferred over pure Fourier-series parametrizations, sometimes strongly so. For 0–5% central collisions the Gaussian-plus-dipole model performs better than Fourier Series models or any other combination of Gaussian-plus-multipoles.

  7. Modeling of the devolatilization kinetics during pyrolysis of grape residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Luca; Valbusa, Michele; Lorenzi, Denis; Fambri, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed on grape seeds, skins, stalks, marc, vine-branches, grape seed oil and grape seeds depleted of their oil. The TGA data was modeled through Gaussian, logistic and Miura-Maki distributed activation energy models (DAEMs) and a simpler two-parameter model. All DAEMs allowed an accurate prediction of the TGA data; however, the Miura-Maki model could not account for the complete range of conversion for some substrates, while the Gaussian and logistic DAEMs suffered from the interrelation between the pre-exponential factor k0 and the mean activation energy E0--an obstacle that can be overcome by fixing the value of k0 a priori. The results confirmed the capabilities of DAEMs but also highlighted some drawbacks in their application to certain thermodegradation experimental data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A parallel Discrete Element Method to model collisions between non-convex particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakotonirina Andriarimina Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many dry granular and suspension flow configurations, particles can be highly non-spherical. It is now well established in the literature that particle shape affects the flow dynamics or the microstructure of the particles assembly in assorted ways as e.g. compacity of packed bed or heap, dilation under shear, resistance to shear, momentum transfer between translational and angular motions, ability to form arches and block the flow. In this talk, we suggest an accurate and efficient way to model collisions between particles of (almost arbitrary shape. For that purpose, we develop a Discrete Element Method (DEM combined with a soft particle contact model. The collision detection algorithm handles contacts between bodies of various shape and size. For nonconvex bodies, our strategy is based on decomposing a non-convex body into a set of convex ones. Therefore, our novel method can be called “glued-convex method” (in the sense clumping convex bodies together, as an extension of the popular “glued-spheres” method, and is implemented in our own granular dynamics code Grains3D. Since the whole problem is solved explicitly, our fully-MPI parallelized code Grains3D exhibits a very high scalability when dynamic load balancing is not required. In particular, simulations on up to a few thousands cores in configurations involving up to a few tens of millions of particles can readily be performed. We apply our enhanced numerical model to (i the collapse of a granular column made of convex particles and (i the microstructure of a heap of non-convex particles in a cylindrical reactor.

  9. Modeling collision energy transfer in APCI/CID mass spectra of PAHs using thermal-like post-collision internal energy distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Eduardo A; Mohamed, Sabria; Mayer, Paul M

    2016-10-28

    The internal energy transferred when projectile molecular ions of naphthalene collide with argon gas atoms was extracted from the APCI-CID (atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization collision-induced dissociation) mass spectra acquired as a function of collision energy. Ion abundances were calculated by microcanonical integration of the differential rate equations using the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus rate constants derived from a UB3LYP/6-311G+(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) fragmentation mechanism and thermal-like vibrational energy distributions p M E,T char . The mean vibrational energy excess of the ions was characterized by the parameter T char ("characteristic temperature"), determined by fitting the theoretical ion abundances to the experimental breakdown graph (a plot of relative abundances of the ions as a function of kinetic energy) of activated naphthalene ions. According to these results, the APCI ion source produces species below T char = 1457 K, corresponding to 3.26 eV above the vibrational ground state. Subsequent collisions heat the ions up further, giving rise to a sigmoid curve of T char as a function of E com (center-of-mass-frame kinetic energy). The differential internal energy absorption per kinetic energy unit (dE vib /dE com ) changes with E com according to a symmetric bell-shaped function with a maximum at 6.38 ± 0.32 eV (corresponding to 6.51 ± 0.27 eV of vibrational energy excess), and a half-height full width of 6.30 ± 1.15 eV. This function imposes restrictions on the amount of energy that can be transferred by collisions, such that a maximum is reached as kinetic energy is increased. This behavior suggests that the collisional energy transfer exhibits a pronounced increase around some specific value of energy. Finally, the model is tested against the CID mass spectra of anthracene and pyrene ions and the corresponding results are discussed.

  10. Concept of an enhanced V2X pedestrian collision avoidance system with a cost function-based pedestrian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotte, Jens; Schmeichel, Carsten; Zlocki, Adrian; Gathmann, Hauke; Eckstein, Lutz

    2017-05-29

    State-of-the-art collision avoidance and collision mitigation systems predict the behavior of pedestrians based on trivial models that assume a constant acceleration or velocity. New sources of sensor information-for example, smart devices such as smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, etc.-can support enhanced pedestrian behavior models. The objective of this article is the development and implementation of a V2Xpedestrian collision avoidance system that uses new information sources. A literature review of existing state-of-the-art pedestrian collision avoidance systems, pedestrian behavior models in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), and traffic simulations is conducted together with an analysis of existing studies on typical pedestrian patterns in traffic. Based on this analysis, possible parameters for predicting pedestrian behavior were investigated. The results led to new requirements from which a concept was developed and implemented. The analysis of typical pedestrian behavior patterns in traffic situations showed the complexity of predicting pedestrian behavior. Requirements for an improved behavior prediction were derived. A concept for a V2X collision avoidance system, based on a cost function that predicts pedestrian near future presence, and its implementation is presented. The concept presented considers several challenges such as information privacy, inaccuracies of the localization, and inaccuracies of the prediction. A concept for an enhanced V2X pedestrian collision avoidance system was developed and introduced. The concept uses new information sources such as smart devices to improve the prediction of the pedestrian's presence in the near future and considers challenges that come along with the usage of these information sources.

  11. New Algorithms for Computing the Time-to-Collision in Freeway Traffic Simulation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ways to estimate the time-to-collision are explored. In the context of traffic simulation models, classical lane-based notions of vehicle location are relaxed and new, fast, and efficient algorithms are examined. With trajectory conflicts being the main focus, computational procedures are explored which use a two-dimensional coordinate system to track the vehicle trajectories and assess conflicts. Vector-based kinematic variables are used to support the calculations. Algorithms based on boxes, circles, and ellipses are considered. Their performance is evaluated in the context of computational complexity and solution time. Results from these analyses suggest promise for effective and efficient analyses. A combined computation process is found to be very effective.

  12. Pion production in proton-proton collisions in a covariant one boson exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, R.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the pion production in proton-proton collisions over an energy range of 300 MeV to 2 GeV. Starting from a realistic one-boson exchange model with parameters fitted to the amplitudes of the elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, we perform fully covariant calculations for the total, double and triple differential cross sections of the p(p,nπ + )p and p(p,pπ 0 )p reactions. The calculations incorporate the exchange of π, ρ, ω and σ mesons and treat nucleon and delta isobar as intermediate states. We obtain a reasonably good agreement with the experimental data in the entire range of beam energies. The form of the covariant delta propagator, the cut-off parameter for the πN N and πN Δ vertex form factors and the energy dependence of the delta isobar decay width is investigated. (author)

  13. Collision-model approach to steering of an open driven qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Konstantin; Luoma, Kimmo; Strunz, Walter T.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate quantum steering of an open quantum system by measurements on its environment in the framework of collision models. As an example we consider a coherently driven qubit dissipatively coupled to a bath. We construct local nonadaptive and adaptive as well as nonlocal measurement scenarios specifying explicitly the measured observable on the environment. Our approach shows transparently how the conditional evolution of the open system depends on the type of the measurement scenario and the measured observables. These can then be optimized for steering. The nonlocal measurement scenario leads to maximal violation of the used steering inequality at zero temperature. Further, we investigate the robustness of the constructed scenarios against thermal noise. We find generally that steering becomes harder at higher temperatures. Surprisingly, the system can be steered even when bipartite entanglement between the system and individual subenvironments vanishes.

  14. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    . Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold...... dynamics is examined by different variational methods for inequality constrained minimization problems, namely the Lagrange multiplier method and the penalty method. In contrast to the penalty solution, which is related to classical spring-like contact forces, numerical examples show that the parameter......-independent Lagrange multiplier solution is more robust and accurate in the estimation of dynamical and mechanical features at vocal fold contact. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the temporal integration schemes in relation to the contact problem, the results suggesting an advantage of highly diffusive...

  15. A neural computational model for animal's time-to-collision estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Yao, Dezhong

    2013-04-17

    The time-to-collision (TTC) is the time elapsed before a looming object hits the subject. An accurate estimation of TTC plays a critical role in the survival of animals in nature and acts as an important factor in artificial intelligence systems that depend on judging and avoiding potential dangers. The theoretic formula for TTC is 1/τ≈θ'/sin θ, where θ and θ' are the visual angle and its variation, respectively, and the widely used approximation computational model is θ'/θ. However, both of these measures are too complex to be implemented by a biological neuronal model. We propose a new simple computational model: 1/τ≈Mθ-P/(θ+Q)+N, where M, P, Q, and N are constants that depend on a predefined visual angle. This model, weighted summation of visual angle model (WSVAM), can achieve perfect implementation through a widely accepted biological neuronal model. WSVAM has additional merits, including a natural minimum consumption and simplicity. Thus, it yields a precise and neuronal-implemented estimation for TTC, which provides a simple and convenient implementation for artificial vision, and represents a potential visual brain mechanism.

  16. Strangeness production in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the dual parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehring, H.; Ranft, J.; Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1993-01-01

    Λ, bar Λ, and K S 0 production is studied in a Monte Carlo dual parton model for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions with an SU(3) symmetric sea for chain formation (chain ends) but strangeness suppression in the chain fragmentation process. Additionally, (qq)-(bar q bar q) production from the sea was introduced into the chain formation process with the same probability as for the q→qq branching within the chain decay process. With these assumptions, multiplicity ratios and Feynman-x distributions for strange particles in h-h and multiplicity ratios in heavy ion collisions are reasonably well reproduced

  17. Modeling the locomotion of the African trypanosome using multi-particle collision dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Sujin B; Stark, Holger

    2012-01-01

    The African trypanosome is a single flagellated micro-organism that causes the deadly sleeping sickness in humans and animals. We study the locomotion of a model trypanosome by modeling the spindle-shaped cell body using an elastic network of vertices with additional bending rigidity. The flagellum firmly attached to the model cell body is either straight or helical. A bending wave propagates along the flagellum and pushes the trypanosome forward in its viscous environment, which we simulate with the method of multi-particle collision dynamics. The relaxation dynamics of the model cell body due to a static bending wave reveals the sperm number from elastohydrodynamics as the relevant parameter. Characteristic cell body conformations for the helically attached flagellum resemble experimental observations. We show that the swimming velocity scales as the root of the angular frequency of the bending wave reminiscent of predictions for an actuated slender rod attached to a large viscous load. The swimming velocity for one geometry collapses on a single master curve when plotted versus the sperm number. The helically attached flagellum leads to a helical swimming path and a rotation of the model trypanosome about its long axis as observed in experiments. The simulated swimming velocity agrees with the experimental value. (paper)

  18. LEXUS heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Yong Jeon

    1997-01-01

    We use a Glauber-like approach to describe very energetic nucleus- nucleus collisions as a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. No free parameters are needed: all the information comes from simple parametrizations of nucleon-nucleon collision data. Produced mesons are assumed not to interact with each other or with the original baryons. Comparisons are made to published experimental measurements of baryon rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, negative hadron rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, average multiplicities of pions, kaons, hyperons, and antihyperons, and zero degree energy distributions for sulfur-sulfur collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon and for lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. Good agreement is found except that the number of strange particles produced, especially antihyperons, is too small compared with experiment. We call this model LEXUS: Linear EXtrapolation of Ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon Scattering to heavy ion collisions. (11 refs).

  19. Residual stress behaviors induced by laser peening along the edge of curved models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jong Bin; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Ro, Young Hee

    2012-01-01

    Laser peening (LP) induces high magnitude compressive residual stresses in a small region of a component. The compressive residual stresses cause plastic deformation that is resistant to fatigue fracture. Fatigue cracks are generally nucleated at critical areas, and LP is applied for those regions so as to delay the crack initiation. Many critical regions are located on the edge of the curved portion of structures because of stress concentration effects. Several investigations that are available for straight components may not give meaningful guidelines for peening curved components. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate residual stress behaviors induced by LP along the edge of curved models. Three curved models that have different curvatures are investigated for peening performance. Two types of peening configurations, which are simultaneous corner shot and sequential corner shots, are considered in order to obtain compressive residual stresses along an edge. LP simulations of multiple shots are performed to identify overlapping effects on the edge portion of a curved model. In addition, the uncertainty calculation of residual stress induced by LP considering laser pulse duration is performed

  20. Failure Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) Analyzer Model SP-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) subcontractor Wiltech contacted the NASA Electrical Lab (NE-L) and requested a failure analysis of a Solvent Purity Meter; model SP-IOOO produced by the VerTis Instrument Company. The meter, used to measure the contaminate in a solvent to determine the relative contamination on spacecraft flight hardware and ground servicing equipment, had been inoperable and in storage for an unknown amount of time. NE-L was asked to troubleshoot the unit and make a determination on what may be required to make the unit operational. Through the use of general troubleshooting processes and the review of a unit in service at the time of analysis, the unit was found to be repairable but would need the replacement of multiple components.

  1. Collision of the glass shards with the eye: A computational fluid-structure interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Biglari, Hasan; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2017-12-27

    The main stream of blunt trauma injuries has been reported to be related to the automobile crashes, sporting activities, and military operations. Glass shards, which can be induced due to car accident, earthquake, gunshot, etc., might collide with the eye and trigger substantial scarring and, consequently, permanently affect the vision. The complications as a result of the collision with the eye and its following injuries on each component of the eye are difficult to be diagnosed. The objective of this study was to employ a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye to assess the results of the glass shards collision with the eye. To do this, a rigid steel-based object hit a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) glass wall at the velocities of 100, 150, and 200 m/s and, subsequently, the resultant glass shards moved toward the eye. The amount of injury, then, quantified in terms of the stresses and strains. The results revealed the highest amount of stress in the cornea while the lowest one was observed in the vitreous body. It was also found that increasing the speed of the glass shards amplifies the amount of the stress in the components which are located in the central anterior zone of the eye, such as the cornea, aqueous body, and iris. However, regarding those components located in the peripheral/posterior side of the eye, especially the optic nerve, by increasing the amount of velocity a reduction in the stresses was observed and the optic nerve is hardly damaged. These findings have associations not only for understanding the amount of stresses/strains in the eye components at three different velocities, but also for providing preliminary information for the ophthalmologists to have a better diagnosis after glass shards (small objects impact) injuries to the eye. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Braking Analysis For Collision Avoidance-- Autonomous Braking System Performance Modeling And Benefits Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-24

    THIS REPORT IS AN ANALYSIS OF THE BENEFITS OF A COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM IN REDUCING REAR-END CRASHES. THE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM CONSIDERED IN THIS STUDY UTILIZES THE SIGNAL FROM A FORWARD LOOKING SENSOR TO ACTIVATE THE TRACTION CONTROL VALVE ...

  3. A correlated-cluster model and the ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel

    2017-03-10

    A study of the near-side ridge phenomenon in hadron-hadron collisions based on a cluster picture of multiparticle production is presented. The near-side ridge effect is shown to have a natural explanation in this context provided that clusters are produced in a correlated manner in the collision transverse plane.

  4. 2D numerical model of particle-bed collision in fluid-particle flows over bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2006), s. 70-78 ISSN 0022-1686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation * particle-bed collision * collision angle * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2006

  5. A modeled experiment of gas behavior in aquifer and residual gas formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Murata, S.; Nakano, M.; Matsuoka, T.

    2007-12-01

    National and international concern is rising about the possible effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the climate. Several methods are proposed to reduce the gas in the atmosphere and underground sequestration is recently expected as an effective concept. Especially, residual gas can be the most effective method to store the gas in reservoir. Underground sequestration requires the gas injected into a reservoir. When the gas is injected into a water- saturated aquifer, it pushes water out of the pore space. As the gas bubbles go upward, the gas space is filled with water again, but small gas bubbles are trapped in the pore space by surface force and capillary pressure of water. This is the residual gas formation. Once the residual gas is formed, it seldom moves again from the pore space. Residual gas formation needs neither cap-rock nor structural trap, thus has a potential to be applied to broader regions. The purpose of this study is to examine the fundamental mechanism of residual gas formation and gas migration underground by injecting the gas into a modeled and visualized aquifer. We designed and constructed an experimental apparatus to measure the distribution and the saturation of the residual gas. We used glass beads of 1 or 2mm diameters as porous media to construct some reservoir models that have various porosity, permeability, and wettability. The glass beads packed in our apparatus which has 30cm width, 33.5cm height, and 1cm thickness. It has 1§¤volume in amount. The pore space was filled with viscous liquid, then air was injected from the bottom. Some conditions in the injection time and rate were tested. We observed air behavior and measured the volume of the distribution area of residual gas from its digital photographs, and the volume of residual gas from the amount of water that was pushed out from the apparatus. The experimental results showed that differences of reservoir properties made changes in the gas behavior and residual gas volume. It

  6. Major leaching processes of combustion residues - Characterisation, modelling and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jinying

    1998-12-31

    Characterising leaching behaviour provides ample evidence to identify the major leaching processes of combustion residues. Neutralisation and chemical weathering govern the leaching reactions and control the release of elements from combustion residues, and are thus considered to be the major leaching processes. According to experimental investigations and geochemical simulations, the leaching kinetics of buffering materials are key issues for the understanding of the neutralizing processes. The acid neutralizing capacity at different pH levels depends mainly on the mineralogy of the combustion residues. In combustion residues, the dissolution of glass phases is expected to play an important role in a long-term neutralizing process. The neutralizing process in a flow system is significantly different from that in a batch system. The neutralizing ability of a combustion residue may be strongly affected by solute transport and carbonation reactions in a natural leaching environment. The chemical weathering mainly involves the matrix of combustion residues consisting mostly of glass phases. The dissolution kinetics of waste glass and other possible processes involved in the chemical weathering have been investigated and incorporated into a kinetic reactive transport model. Most important processes in the chemical weathering can be simulated simultaneously using this model. The results show that there is a complicated relationship between the factors controlling the long-term chemical weathering. The environmental impact of the glass dissolution cannot be neglected. Although the glass dissolution provides considerable buffering capacity in long-term weathering, the carbonate is usually a dominant buffering mineral in actual weathering processes. The transformation of carbonate should be considered as an important process in the chemical weathering. The formation of secondary minerals may considerably alter the mineralogy of the waste, and thus change the leaching

  7. Mass residuals in implicit finite volume models for overland and groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, A. M. Wasantha; Wang, Naming; Moustafa, M. Z.; Brown, M. C.

    2010-04-01

    SummaryA primary advantage in using the finite volume method for simulating groundwater flow and overland flow is the conservation property or the ability to conserve mass. However, when implicit finite volume methods are used with large time steps, small cell areas, or parameters with extreme value ranges, the conservation of mass equation becomes slightly unbalanced with a residual. Problems with large mass residuals can be predicted using the condition number of the solution matrix, and the convergence criterion used in the sparse matrix solver. The amount of practical guidance available on how to manage the magnitude of the mass residual or the matrix condition number is limited. To address this need, the current paper shows the usefulness of the mesh ratio. The mesh ratio is a dimensionless number that is a function of the mesh resolution and the temporal resolution. It is directly related to the condition number of the matrix, which in turn affects the mass residual and the model run time. During the current study, several numerical experiments are carried out to determine how the mesh ratio and the water level are related to the condition number, how the critical mesh ratio is related to the number of cells, how the run time is related to the mesh ratio, and how the mass residual is related to the mesh ratio. The results are useful in creating guidelines for mesh design during large-scale model applications. These guidelines can be applied to reducing the mass residual and the run time. The usefulness of the mesh ratio is illustrated using a Regional Simulation Model (RSM) (Lal, A.M.W., Van Zee, Randy, Belnap, Mark, 2005. Case study: model to simulate regional flow in South Florida. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 131 (4), 247-258) application in south Florida.

  8. On the residual stress modeling of shot-peened AISI 4340 steel: finite element and response surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ali; Dehestani, Pouya; Poruraminaie, Iman

    2018-02-01

    Shot peening is a well-known process in applying the residual stress on the surface of industrial parts. The induced residual stress improves fatigue life. In this study, the effects of shot peening parameters such as shot diameter, shot speed, friction coefficient, and the number of impacts on the applied residual stress will be evaluated. To assess these parameters effect, firstly the shot peening process has been simulated by finite element method. Then, effects of the process parameters on the residual stress have been evaluated by response surface method as a statistical approach. Finally, a strong model is presented to predict the maximum residual stress induced by shot peening process in AISI 4340 steel. Also, the optimum parameters for the maximum residual stress are achieved. The results indicate that effect of shot diameter on the induced residual stress is increased by increasing the shot speed. Also, enhancing the friction coefficient magnitude always cannot lead to increase in the residual stress.

  9. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation coefficient and temperature gradient inside droplets. It is pointed out that for the parameters typical for Diesel engine-like conditions, the heat flux in the kinetic region is a linear function of the vapour temperature at the outer boundary of this region, but practically does not depend on vapour density at this boundary for all models, including and not including the effects of inelastic collisions, and including and not including the effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient. For any given temperature at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the heat flux are shown to decrease with increasing numbers of internal degrees of freedom of the molecules. The rate of this decrease is strong for small numbers of these degrees of freedom but negligible when the number of these degrees exceeds 20. This allows us to restrict the analysis to the first 20 arbitrarily chosen degrees of freedom of n-dodecane molecules when considering the effects of inelastic collisions. The mass flux at this boundary decreases almost linearly with increasing vapour density at the same location for all above-mentioned models. For any given vapour density at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the mass flux are smaller for the model, taking into account the contribution of internal degrees of freedom, than for the model ignoring these degrees of freedom. It is shown that the effects of inelastic collisions lead to stronger increase in the predicted droplet evaporation time in Diesel engine-like conditions relative to the hydrodynamic model, compared with the similar increase predicted by the kinetic model considering only elastic collisions. The effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient are shown to be

  10. Mechanics of train collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-30

    A simple and a more detailed mathematical model for the simulation of train collisions are presented. The study presents considerable insight as to the causes and consequences of train motions on impact. Comparison of model predictions with two full ...

  11. A NEW ALGORITHM FOR SELF-CONSISTENT THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF COLLISIONS IN DUSTY DEBRIS DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new 'collisional grooming' algorithm that enables us to model images of debris disks where the collision time is less than the Poynting-Robertson (PR) time for the dominant grain size. Our algorithm uses the output of a collisionless disk simulation to iteratively solve the mass flux equation for the density distribution of a collisional disk containing planets in three dimensions. The algorithm can be run on a single processor in ∼1 hr. Our preliminary models of disks with resonant ring structures caused by terrestrial mass planets show that the collision rate for background particles in a ring structure is enhanced by a factor of a few compared to the rest of the disk, and that dust grains in or near resonance have even higher collision rates. We show how collisions can alter the morphology of a resonant ring structure by reducing the sharpness of a resonant ring's inner edge and by smearing out azimuthal structure. We implement a simple prescription for particle fragmentation and show how PR drag and fragmentation sort particles by size, producing smaller dust grains at smaller circumstellar distances. This mechanism could cause a disk to look different at different wavelengths, and may explain the warm component of dust interior to Fomalhaut's outer dust ring seen in the resolved 24 μm Spitzer image of this system.

  12. Influence of variable selection on partial least squares discriminant analysis models for explosive residue classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lucia, Frank C., E-mail: frank.delucia@us.army.mil; Gottfried, Jennifer L.

    2011-02-15

    Using a series of thirteen organic materials that includes novel high-nitrogen energetic materials, conventional organic military explosives, and benign organic materials, we have demonstrated the importance of variable selection for maximizing residue discrimination with partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). We built several PLS-DA models using different variable sets based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of the organic residues on an aluminum substrate under an argon atmosphere. The model classification results for each sample are presented and the influence of the variables on these results is discussed. We found that using the whole spectra as the data input for the PLS-DA model gave the best results. However, variables due to the surrounding atmosphere and the substrate contribute to discrimination when the whole spectra are used, indicating this may not be the most robust model. Further iterative testing with additional validation data sets is necessary to determine the most robust model.

  13. Model validation through long-term promising sustainable maize/pigeon pea residue management in Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwale, C.D.; Kabambe, V.H.; Sakale, W.D.; Giller, K.E.; Kauwa, A.A.; Ligowe, I.; Kamalongo, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 2005/2006 season, the Model Validation Through Long-Term Promising Sustainable Maize/Pigeon Pea Residue Management experiment was in the 11th year at Chitedze and Chitala, and in the 8th year at Makoka and Zombwe. The experiment was a split-plot design with cropping system as the main plot

  14. Stellite failure on a P91 HP valve - failure investigation and modelling of residual stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Jesper; Hald, John; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2006-01-01

    The sequence of the primary welding process and the following secondary processes of machining, and heat treatment has been modelled to predict the residual conditions in a Stellite 6 overlay weld on a P91 steam turbine valve. The different process steps are coupled in order to transfer the resid...

  15. Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2010-06-18

    This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

  16. Determination and modeling of residual stress in functionally graded WC-Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvilian, Leila

    Gradual variations in composition and/or structure through the volume of functionally graded materials (FGMs) generally result in corresponding continuous spatial variations in mechanical/physical properties, and often in significant residual stresses that develop during processing. Due to inhomogeneous properties in these materials, residual stress measurement in FGMs can be a very challenging problem. In this study, residual stresses in functionally graded cemented tungsten carbide (FG-WC-Co) were investigated by numerical, analytical and experimental approaches by means of a layer removal technique. The numerical method consisted of finite element analysis (FEA) modeling for the FGM plate, in order to calculate residual stress distribution over the volume and to develop a method for predicting residual stress levels in closely related materials. The analytical procedure embodied a mathematical approach to determine residual stress distributions, and analytically determined values are compared with those obtained from FEA modeling and experimental results. The experimental approach consisted of fabricating and heat treating FG-WC-Co flat samples, then measuring strain changes by strain gauge after each sequential layer removal from the opposite side of the specimen from the graded region. Good agreement was found between analytical, numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, thermal residual stress distribution in FG-WC-Co hollow cylinder was examined with an emphasis on the effects of key variables, the gradient profile and the gradient thickness, on the magnitude and distribution of the stress field. An analytical direct solution based on solving the governing equations of a cylinder composed of a uniform inner core and a functionally graded outer shell was developed. The cylindrical compound was considered as two separate elements: homogeneous cylinder and functionally graded shell. Material properties, such as the elastic modulus and the coefficient of

  17. Pliocene-Quaternary syn-collision volcanism of the Javakheti Ridge, NW Armenia: impact on models of magma generation in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliksetian, Kh.; Neill, I.; Allen, M. B.; Navarsardyan, G.; Karapetyan, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Armenian Highlands and Southern Caucasus formed during convergence and collision between the Arabian and Eurasian margins from the Late Mesozoic to the present. These events culminate in the growth of the present-day Turkish-Iranian high plateau. Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism followed plateau building, and is a key feature of the entire region. However, petrogenetic models are sparse, particularly for outcrops in the Armenia sector. Mantle-derived magmatism in Turkey has been linked to Tethyan slab break-off and/or lithospheric delamination following the Arabia-Eurasia collision. In this study we consider preliminary petrographic and geochemical results from the Javakheti ridge and surrounding areas, in NW Armenia, and their relationship to the orogenic plateau as a whole. The N-S trending Javakheti ridge is the southerly extension of the Samsari ridge in Georgia, and is one of several Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic uplands in Armenia and the Lesser Caucasus (e.g. Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik). The basement consists of the Sevan-Akera suture between the South Armenian Block, of Gondwanaland origin, and the Eurasian active margin and associated Mesozoic island arc of the Lesser Caucasus. Arc-continent collision and obduction occurred in the Late Cretaceous or Paleocene-Eocene. The first Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism in the area is represented by valley-filling fissure-fed basaltic flows, examples of which have been dated to ~2.7-2.0 Ma in Georgia and Armenia. The ridge itself consists of eroded intermediate to felsic flows forming a central volcanic complex. Recently published Ar-Ar dating of ash layers related to the complex reveal ages of ~1.8-1.9 Ma. The flows are cut by numerous Quaternary cinder cones. Volcanism on the ridge complex appears to young towards the north, and the ridge remains tectonically active, undergoing extension at 1.25 mm/yr, according to GPS data. Preliminary geochemical results indicate the valley-filling flows, the ridge, and cinder

  18. Plant uptake of pesticides and human health: dynamic modeling of residues in wheat and ingestion intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantke, Peter; Charles, Raphaël; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Friedrich, Rainer; Jolliet, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Human intake of pesticide residues from consumption of processed food plays an important role for evaluating current agricultural practice. We take advantage of latest developments in crop-specific plant uptake modeling and propose an innovative dynamic model to estimate pesticide residues in the wheat-environment system, dynamiCROP. We used this model to analyze uptake and translocation of pesticides in wheat after foliar spray application and subsequent intake fractions by humans. Based on the evolution of residues in edible parts of harvested wheat we predict that between 22 mg and 2.1 g per kg applied pesticide are taken in by humans via consumption of processed wheat products. Model results were compared with experimentally derived concentrations in wheat ears and with estimated intake via inhalation and ingestion caused by indirect emissions, i.e. the amount lost to the environment during pesticide application. Modeled and measured concentrations in wheat fitted very well and deviate from less than a factor 1.5 for chlorothalonil to a maximum factor 3 for tebuconazole. Main aspects influencing pesticide fate behavior are degradation half-life in plant and time between pesticide application and crop harvest, leading to variations in harvest fraction of at least three orders of magnitude. Food processing may further reduce residues by approximately 63%. Intake fractions from residues in sprayed wheat were up to four orders of magnitude higher than intake fractions estimated from indirect emissions, thereby demonstrating the importance of exposure from consumption of food crops after direct pesticide treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Thermodamage Strength Theoretical Model of Ceramic Materials Taking into Account the Effect of Residual Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodamage strength theoretical model taking into account the effect of residual stress was established and applied to each temperature phase based on the study of effects of various physical mechanisms on the fracture strength of ultrahigh-temperature ceramics. The effects of SiC particle size, crack size, and SiC particle volume fraction on strength corresponding to different temperatures were studied in detail. This study showed that when flaw size is not large, the bigger SiC particle size results in the greater effect of tensile residual stress in the matrix grains on strength reduction, and this prediction coincides with experimental results; and the residual stress and the combined effort of particle size and crack size play important roles in controlling material strength.

  20. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  1. Modeling of Prosthetic Limb Rotation Control by Sensing Rotation of Residual Arm Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiken, Todd A.

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a new approach to improve the control of prosthetic arm rotation in amputees. Arm rotation is sensed by implanting a small permanent magnet into the distal end of the residual bone, which produces a magnetic field. The position of the bone rotation can be derived from magnetic field distribution detected with magnetic sensors on the arm surface, and then conveyed to the prosthesis controller to manipulate the rotation of the prosthesis. Proprioception remains intact for residual limb skeletal structures; thus, this control system should be natural and easy-to-use. In this study, simulations have been conducted in an upper arm model to assess the feasibility and performance of sensing the voluntary rotation of residual humerus with an implanted magnet. A sensitivity analysis of the magnet size and arm size was presented. The influence of relative position of the magnet to the magnetic sensors, orientation of the magnet relative to the limb axis, and displacement of the magnetic sensors on the magnetic field was evaluated. The performance of shielding external magnetostatic interference was also investigated. The simulation results suggest that the direction and angle of rotation of residual humerus could be obtained by decoding the magnetic field signals with magnetic sensors built into a prosthetic socket. This pilot study provides important guidelines for developing a practical interface between the residual bone rotation and the prosthesis for control of prosthetic rotation. PMID:18713682

  2. An analytical model to predict and minimize the residual stress of laser cladding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, N.; Crouch, R.; Kabir, I. R.; Naher, S.

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the advanced thermal techniques used to repair or modify the surface properties of high-value components such as tools, military and aerospace parts. Unfortunately, tensile residual stresses generate in the thermally treated area of this process. This work focuses on to investigate the key factors for the formation of tensile residual stress and how to minimize it in the clad when using dissimilar substrate and clad materials. To predict the tensile residual stress, a one-dimensional analytical model has been adopted. Four cladding materials (Al2O3, TiC, TiO2, ZrO2) on the H13 tool steel substrate and a range of preheating temperatures of the substrate, from 300 to 1200 K, have been investigated. Thermal strain and Young's modulus are found to be the key factors of formation of tensile residual stresses. Additionally, it is found that using a preheating temperature of the substrate immediately before laser cladding showed the reduction of residual stress.

  3. Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modeling in the NRC International Round Robin Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Weld residual stresses (WRS) have a large influence on the behavior of cracks growing under normal operation loads and on the leakage flow from a through-wall crack. Accurate prediction on weld residual stresses is important to make proper decisions when cracks in weld joints are detected. During the latest years, there has been a strong development in both analytical procedures to numerically determine WRS and experimental measurements of WRS. The USNRC (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has formed a program for validation of WRS predictions through comparison of numerically calculated residual stress fields in dissimilar welds measured by different methods. The present report describes the results of the project with special focus on the contribution from Inspecta Technology. Objectives: The principal objective of the project is to compare different WRS predictions for a dissimilar pipe weld with careful measurements on a mock-up weld. The results of the project will make it possible to make recommendations on computational procedures for WRS in dissimilar metal welds. Results: It is concluded that numerical analysis of weld residual stresses using the finite element method is very useful for the estimation of weld residual stresses in complex geometries and dissimilar metal welds. The validation study increases the understanding of uncertainties associated with different modeling approaches and helps to identify the most sensitive parameters

  4. A simple nonbinary scattering model applicable to atomic collisions is crystals at 1ow energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Sigmund, Peter

    1966-01-01

    the projectile and each ring atom is described by a Born-Mayer potential, and the scattering is assumed to be elastic and governed by the classical equations of motion. Because of symmetry, the problem can be reduced to plane motion of a particle in a potential of elliptic symmetry. The elliptic force field...... the elliptic to the spherical potential are investigated. Special attention is paid to proper definitions of collision time and collision length which are important in collisions in crystals. Limitations to classical scattering arising from the uncertainty principle prove to be more serious than assumed...

  5. Estimating parameter and predictive uncertainty when model residuals are correlated, heteroscedastic, and non-Gaussian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoups, Gerrit; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2010-05-01

    Estimation of parameter and predictive uncertainty of hydrologic models usually relies on the assumption of additive residual errors that are independent and identically distributed according to a normal distribution with a mean of zero and a constant variance. Here, we investigate to what extent estimates of parameter and predictive uncertainty are affected when these assumptions are relaxed. Parameter and predictive uncertainty are estimated by Monte Carlo Markov Chain sampling from a generalized likelihood function that accounts for correlation, heteroscedasticity, and non-normality of residual errors. Application to rainfall-runoff modeling using daily data from a humid basin reveals that: (i) residual errors are much better described by a heteroscedastic, first-order auto-correlated error model with a Laplacian density characterized by heavier tails than a Gaussian density, and (ii) proper representation of the statistical distribution of residual errors yields tighter predictive uncertainty bands and more physically realistic parameter estimates that are less sensitive to the particular time period used for inference. The latter is especially useful for regionalization and extrapolation of parameter values to ungauged basins. Application to daily rainfall-runoff data from a semi-arid basin shows that allowing skew in the error distribution yields improved estimates of predictive uncertainty when flows are close to zero.

  6. The effective Schroedinger equation of the optical model of composite nuclei elastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, A.; Hernandez, E.

    1980-01-01

    An effective hamiltonian for elastic collisions between composite nuclei is obtained from the Schroedinger equation of the complete many-body system and its fully antisymmetric wave functions by means of a projection operator technique. This effective hamiltonian, defined in such a way that it has to reproduce the scattering amplitude in full detail, including exchange effects, is explicitly Galilean invariant. The effective interaction operator is a function of the relative distance between the centers of mass of the colliding nuclei and the constants of the motion of the whole system. The interaction operator of the optical model is obtained next, requiring as usual, that it reproduces the average over the energy of the scattering amplitude and keeping the Galilean invariance. The resulting optical potential operator has some terms identical to those obtained in the Resonating Group Method, and others coming from the elimination of all non elastic channels and the delayed elastic scattering. This result makes the relation existing among the projection operator method to the Feshbach and the cluster model equations of motion for positive energies (RGM) explicit. The additional interaction terms due to the flux loss in the elastic channel are non-local, and non-hermitean operators expressed in terms of the transition amplitudes and the density of states of the compound nucleus in such a way that an approximate evaluation, in a systematic fashion, seems possible. Theangular momentum dependence of the optical potential operator is discussed in some detail. (author)

  7. Combined binary collision and continuum mechanics model applied to focused ion beam milling of a silicon membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Many experiments indicate the importance of stress and stress relaxation upon ion implantation. In this paper, a model is proposed that is capable of describing ballistic effects as well as stress relaxation by viscous flow. It combines atomistic binary collision simulation with continuum mechanics. The only parameters that enter the continuum model are the bulk modulus and the radiation-induced viscosity. The shear modulus can also be considered but shows only minor effects. A boundary-fitted grid is proposed that is usable both during the binary collision simulation and for the spatial discretization of the force balance equations. As an application, the milling of a slit into an amorphous silicon membrane with a 30 keV focused Ga beam is studied, which demonstrates the relevance of the new model compared to a more heuristic approach used in previous work

  8. Workshop on electronic and ionic collision cross sections needed in the modeling of radiation interactions with matter: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-05-01

    The term modeling in the Workship title refers to the mathematical analysis of the consequences of many collision processes for characterizing the physical stage of radiation actions. It requires as input some knowledge of collision cross sections. Traditionally, work on cross sections and work on the modeling are conducted by separate groups of scientists. It was the purpose of the Workshop to bring these two groups together in a forum that would promote effective communication. Cross-section workers described the status of their work and told what data were available or trustworthy. Modeling workers told what kind of data were needed or were most important. Twenty-two items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  9. Workshop on electronic and ionic collision cross sections needed in the modeling of radiation interactions with matter: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The term modeling in the Workship title refers to the mathematical analysis of the consequences of many collision processes for characterizing the physical stage of radiation actions. It requires as input some knowledge of collision cross sections. Traditionally, work on cross sections and work on the modeling are conducted by separate groups of scientists. It was the purpose of the Workshop to bring these two groups together in a forum that would promote effective communication. Cross-section workers described the status of their work and told what data were available or trustworthy. Modeling workers told what kind of data were needed or were most important. Twenty-two items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base

  10. Statistical modeling to management and treatment of scrap with low and very low residual activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Bermejo Fernandez, R.; Anaya Lazaro, M.

    2011-01-01

    The experience of recent years on the management of scrap metal containing residual activity have allowed the development of a simple statistical model for the management of these materials. This statistical model includes a breakdown of the various processing operations to which these materials undergo and the effects in the process of radiological controls associated to the control of declassification that defines disposal (recycled by smelting, reclamation, temporary storage the plant or sent to final storage of radioactive waste.

  11. On the extension of multi-phase models to sub-residual saturations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingineni, S.; Chen, Y.T.; Boehm, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the limitations of applying multi-phase flow and transport models to simulate the hydrothermal processes occurring when the liquid saturation falls below residual levels. A typical scenario of a heat-generating high-level waste package emplaced in a backfilled drift of a waste repository is presented. The hydrothermal conditions in the vicinity of the waste package as well as in the far-field are determined using multi-phase, non-isothermal codes such as TOUGH2 and FEHM. As the waste package temperature increases, heat-pipe effects are created and water is driven away from the package into colder regions where it condenses. The variations in the liquid saturations close to the waste package are determined using these models with extended capillary pressure-saturations relationships to sub-residual regime. The predictions indicate even at elevated temperatures, waste package surroundings are not completely dry. However, if transport based modeling is used to represent liquid saturation variations in the sub-residual regime, then complete dry conditions are predicted within the backfill for extended periods of time. The relative humidity conditions near the waste package are also found to be sensitive to the representation of capillary pressure-saturation relationship used for sub-residual regime. An experimental investigation is carried out to study the variations in liquid saturations and relative humidity conditions in sub-residual regimes. Experimental results indicated that extended multi-phase models without interphase transport can not predict dry-out conditions and the simulations underpredict the humidity conditions near the waste package

  12. Collision thrills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2016-01-01

    . The working hypothesis is that the aesthetics of action and the affinities between medias centre on collision. It will be suggested that collisions produce thrills ranging from the pleasure of destruction to the experience of spatial disorientation. Following will the aesthetics of action be coined ‘collision...

  13. Model of the humanoid body for self collision detection based on elliptical capsules

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dube, C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a self collision detection scheme for humanoid robots using elliptical and circular capsules as bounding volumes. A capsule is defined as an elliptical or circular cylinder capped with ellipsoids or spheres respectively...

  14. Polycrystalline models for the calculation of residual stresses in zirconium alloys tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorelli, J.W.; Turner, P.A.; Lebensohn, R.A.; Pochettino, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Tubes made of different Zirconium alloys are used in various types of reactors. The final texture of tubes as well as the distribution of residual stresses depend on the mechanical treatments done during their manufacturing process. The knowledge and prediction of both the final texture and the distribution of residual stresses in a tube for nuclear applications are of outstanding importance in relation with in-reactor performance of the tube, especially in what concerns to its irradiation creep and growth behaviour. The viscoplastic and the elastoplastic self consistent polycrystal models are used to investigate the influence of different mechanical treatments, performed during rolling processes on the final distribution of intergranular residual stresses of zirconium alloys tubes. The residual strains predictions with both formulations show a non linear dependence with the orientation, but they are qualitatively different. This discrepancy could be explain in terms of the relative plastic activity between the -type and -type deformation modes predicted with the viscoplastic and elastoplastic models. (author). 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Fitting correlated residual error structures in nonlinear mixed-effects models using SAS PROC NLMIXED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R; Blozis, Shelley A

    2014-06-01

    Nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) models remain popular among practitioners for analyzing continuous repeated measures data taken on each of a number of individuals when interest centers on characterizing individual-specific change. Within this framework, variation and correlation among the repeated measurements may be partitioned into interindividual variation and intraindividual variation components. The covariance structure of the residuals are, in many applications, consigned to be independent with homogeneous variances, [Formula: see text], not because it is believed that intraindividual variation adheres to this structure, but because many software programs that estimate parameters of such models are not well-equipped to handle other, possibly more realistic, patterns. In this article, we describe how the programmatic environment within SAS may be utilized to model residual structures for serial correlation and variance heterogeneity. An empirical example is used to illustrate the capabilities of the module.

  16. A residue level protein-protein interaction model in electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueyu

    2014-03-01

    The osmotic second virial coefficients B2 are directly related to the solubility of protein molecules in electrolyte solutions and can be useful to narrow down the search parameter space of protein crystallization conditions. Using a residue level model of protein-protein interaction in electrolyte solutions B2 of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and lysozyme in various solution conditions such as salt concentration, pH and temperature are calculated using an extended Fast Multipole Methods in combination with the boundary element formulation. Overall, the calculated B2 are well correlated with the experimental observations for various solution conditions. In combination with our previous work on the binding affinity calculations of protein complexes it is demonstrated that our residue level model can be used as a reliable model to describe protein-protein interaction in solutions.

  17. Generalized Residual Terrain Model and Its Application in Regional Gravity Field Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Yihao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the so-called non-harmonic problem in residual terrain model (RTM and compared the RTM corrections based on prisms and tesseroids. Moreover, we proposed the generalized RTM based on tesseroids, together with which the regional gravity field was modeled based on Poisson wavelets basis function by using heterogeneous gravity data sets. The results show that the RTM correction based on prism integral has a poor performance in mountainous regions, which may introduce errors with the magnitude of several mGal. Thus, we suggest using RTM based on tesseroids, which lead to a better approximation of the topography. Compared to original residual terrain model,the generalized one leads a better approximation of the regional gravity filed at the high-frequency part caused by local topographical variation.

  18. A collision model for grain-resolving simulations of flows over dense, mobile, polydisperse granular sediment beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegert, Edward; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Meiburg, Eckart

    2017-07-01

    We present a collision model for phase-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of sediment transport that couple the fluid and particles by the Immersed Boundary Method. Typically, a contact model for these types of simulations comprises a lubrication force for particles in close proximity to another solid object, a normal contact force to prevent particles from overlapping, and a tangential contact force to account for friction. Our model extends the work of previous authors to improve upon the time integration scheme to obtain consistent results for particle-wall collisions. Furthermore, we account for polydisperse spherical particles and introduce new criteria to account for enduring contact, which occurs in many sediment transport situations. This is done without using arbitrary values for physically-defined parameters and by maintaining the full momentum balance of a particle in enduring contact. We validate our model against several test cases for binary particle-wall collisions as well as the collective motion of a sediment bed sheared by a viscous flow, yielding satisfactory agreement with experimental data by various authors.

  19. Transverse momentum spectra of hadrons in p + p collisions at CERN SPS energies from the UrQMD transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Rybicki, A.

    2018-05-01

    The UrQMD transport model, version 3.4, is used to study the new experimental data on transverse momentum spectra of π±, K±, p and p bar produced in inelastic p + p interactions at SPS energies, recently published by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration. The comparison of model predictions to these new measurements is presented as a function of collision energy for central and forward particle rapidity intervals. In addition, the inverse slope parameters characterizing the transverse momentum distributions are extracted from the predicted spectra and compared to the corresponding values obtained from NA61/SHINE distributions, as a function of particle rapidity and collision energy. A complex pattern of deviations between the experimental data and the UrQMD model emerges. For charged pions, the fair agreement visible at top SPS energies deteriorates with the decreasing energy. For charged K mesons, UrQMD significantly underpredicts positive kaon production at lower beam momenta. It also underpredicts the central rapidity proton yield at top collision energy and overpredicts antiproton production at all considered energies. We conclude that the new experimental data analyzed in this paper still constitute a challenge for the present version of the model.

  20. Residue conservation and dimer-interface analysis of olfactory receptor molecular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Sowdhamini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory Receptors (ORs are members of the Class A rhodopsin like G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs which are the initial players in the signal transduction cascade, leading to the generation of nerve impulses transmitted to the brain and resulting in the detection of odorant molecules. Despite the accumulation of thousands of olfactory receptor sequences, no crystal structures of ORs are known tο date. However, the recent availability of crystallographic models of a few GPCRs allows us to generate homology models of ORs and analyze their amino acid patterns, as there is a huge diversity in OR sequences. In this study, we have generated three-dimensional models of 100 representative ORs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Sacharomyces cerevisiae which were selected on the basis of a composite classification scheme and phylogenetic analysis. The crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin was used as a template and it was found that the full-length models have more than 90% of their residues in allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot. The structures were further used for analysis of conserved residues in the transmembrane and extracellular loop regions in order to identify functionally important residues. Several ORs are known to be functional as dimers and hence dimer interfaces were predicted for OR models to analyse their oligomeric functional state.

  1. Study on grey theoretical model of passive residual heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Yang Ruichang; Su, G.H.; Jia Dounan; Sugiyama, K.

    2004-01-01

    Natural Circulation Passive Residual Heat Removal System is treated as a Grey System by taking into account of its complexity and uncertainty of effect for factors each other. The magnitude and degree of some factors are confirmed by grey incidence analysis method; The one-one relationship of some variables is built by GM (1, 1) model; The relationship between key factor and other effect factors is built (1, 4) model. Grey model shows its more advantage of precision through comparing with multivariate model. (author)

  2. Biomass supply from alternative cellulosic crops and crop residues: A spatially explicit bioeconomic modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, Scott M.; Izaurralde, César R.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatially-explicit bioeconomic model for the study of potential cellulosic biomass supply. For biomass crops to begin to replace current crops, farmers must earn more from them than from current crops. Using weather, topographic and soil data, the terrestrial ecosystem model, EPIC, dynamically simulates multiple cropping systems that vary by crop rotation, tillage, fertilization and residue removal rate. EPIC generates predicted crop yield and environmental outcomes over multiple watersheds. These EPIC results are used to parameterize a regional profit-maximization mathematical programming model that identifies profitable cropping system choices. The bioeconomic model is calibrated to 2007–09 crop production in a 9-county region of southwest Michigan. A simulation of biomass supply in response to rising biomass prices shows that cellulosic residues from corn stover and wheat straw begin to be supplied at minimum delivered biomass:corn grain price ratios of 0.15 and 0.18, respectively. At the mean corn price of $162.6/Mg ($4.13 per bushel) at commercial moisture content during 2007–2009, these ratios correspond to stover and straw prices of $24 and $29 per dry Mg. Perennial bioenergy crops begin to be supplied at price levels 2–3 times higher. Average biomass transport costs to the biorefinery plant range from $6 to $20/Mg compared to conventional crop production practices in the area, biomass supply from annual crop residues increased greenhouse gas emissions and reduced water quality through increased nutrient loss. By contrast, perennial cellulosic biomass crop production reduced greenhouse gas emissions and improved water quality. -- Highlights: ► A new bioeconomic model predicts biomass supply and its environmental impacts. ► The model captures the opportunity cost of switching to new cellulosic crops. ► Biomass from crop residues is supplied at lower biomass price than cellulosic crops. ► Biomass from cellulosic crops has

  3. Systematic Identification of Machine-Learning Models Aimed to Classify Critical Residues for Protein Function from Protein Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Corral, Ricardo; Beltrán, Jesús A; Brizuela, Carlos A; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2017-10-09

    Protein structure and protein function should be related, yet the nature of this relationship remains unsolved. Mapping the critical residues for protein function with protein structure features represents an opportunity to explore this relationship, yet two important limitations have precluded a proper analysis of the structure-function relationship of proteins: (i) the lack of a formal definition of what critical residues are and (ii) the lack of a systematic evaluation of methods and protein structure features. To address this problem, here we introduce an index to quantify the protein-function criticality of a residue based on experimental data and a strategy aimed to optimize both, descriptors of protein structure (physicochemical and centrality descriptors) and machine learning algorithms, to minimize the error in the classification of critical residues. We observed that both physicochemical and centrality descriptors of residues effectively relate protein structure and protein function, and that physicochemical descriptors better describe critical residues. We also show that critical residues are better classified when residue criticality is considered as a binary attribute (i.e., residues are considered critical or not critical). Using this binary annotation for critical residues 8 models rendered accurate and non-overlapping classification of critical residues, confirming the multi-factorial character of the structure-function relationship of proteins.

  4. Modelling and experimental characterisation of a residual stress field in a ferritic compact tension specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenman, M.R.; Price, A.J.; Steuwer, A.; Chard-Tuckey, P.R.; Crocombe, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work is to elucidate the influence of plasticity behaviour on the residual stress field in a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel. To this end, we investigate two compressively pre-loaded compact tension (CT) specimens to generate a mechanical residual stress field. One specimen was subsequently pre-cracked by fatigue before both specimens were measured using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A fine grain size microstructure (∼5-10 μm grain size) allowed a small X-ray beam slit size and therefore gauge volume. The results provide an excellent data set for validation of finite element (FE) modelling predictions against which they have been compared. The results of both mechanical testing and modelling suggest that the use of a combined hardening model is needed to accurately predict the residual stress field present in the specimen after pre-loading. Some discrepancy between the modelled crack tip stress values and those found by X-ray diffraction remain which can be partly explained by volume averaging effects in the presence of very high stress/strain gradients.

  5. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: Parameterization and validation of a simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R.; Poole, Leslie B.; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pKas from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pKas. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pKas; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pKas. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pKa values (where the calculation should reproduce the pKa within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pKa in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pKa should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. PMID:22777874

  6. Characterization of Flame Cut Heavy Steel: Modeling of Temperature History and Residual Stress Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiaho, T.; Laitinen, A.; Santa-aho, S.; Isakov, M.; Peura, P.; Saarinen, T.; Lehtovaara, A.; Vippola, M.

    2017-12-01

    Heavy steel plates are used in demanding applications that require both high strength and hardness. An important step in the production of such components is cutting the plates with a cost-effective thermal cutting method such as flame cutting. Flame cutting is performed with a controlled flame and oxygen jet, which burns the steel and forms a cutting edge. However, the thermal cutting of heavy steel plates causes several problems. A heat-affected zone (HAZ) is generated at the cut edge due to the steep temperature gradient. Consequently, volume changes, hardness variations, and microstructural changes occur in the HAZ. In addition, residual stresses are formed at the cut edge during the process. In the worst case, unsuitable flame cutting practices generate cracks at the cut edge. The flame cutting of thick steel plate was modeled using the commercial finite element software ABAQUS. The results of modeling were verified by X-ray diffraction-based residual stress measurements and microstructural analysis. The model provides several outcomes, such as obtaining more information related to the formation of residual stresses and the temperature history during the flame cutting process. In addition, an extensive series of flame cut samples was designed with the assistance of the model.

  7. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  8. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  9. Particle–particle collisions in the Lagrangian modelling of saltating grains By ROBERT J. BIALIK, Journal of Hydraulic Research, Vol. 49, No. 1 (2011), pp. 23–31

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2012), s. 251-252 ISSN 0022-1686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation * spherical particle * particle-particle collision * numerical model Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  10. Influences of model structure and calibration data size on predicting chlorine residuals in water storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; de Oliveira, Keila Roberta Ferreira; Cheung, Peter; Gonçalves, Fábio Veríssimo; Zhang, Jin

    2018-04-09

    This study evaluated the influences of model structure and calibration data size on the modelling performance for the prediction of chlorine residuals in household drinking water storage tanks. The tank models, which consisted of two modules, i.e., hydraulic mixing and water quality modelling processes, were evaluated under identical calibration conditions. The hydraulic mixing modelling processes investigated included the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and multi-compartment (MC) methods, and the water quality modelling processes included first order (FO), single-reactant second order (SRSO), and variable reaction rate coefficients (VRRC) second order chlorine decay kinetics. Different combinations of these hydraulic mixing and water quality methods formed six tank models. Results show that by applying the same calibration datasets, the tank models that included the MC method for modelling the hydraulic mixing provided better predictions compared to the CSTR method. In terms of water quality modelling, VRRC kinetics showed better predictive abilities compared to FO and SRSO kinetics. It was also found that the overall tank model performance could be substantially improved when a proper method was chosen for the simulation of hydraulic mixing, i.e., the accuracy of the hydraulic mixing modelling plays a critical role in the accuracy of the tank model. Advances in water quality modelling improve the calibration process, i.e., the size of the datasets used for calibration could be reduced when a suitable kinetics method was applied. Although the accuracies of all six models increased with increasing calibration dataset size, the tank model that consisted of the MC and VRRC methods was the most suitable of the tank models as it could satisfactorily predict chlorine residuals in household tanks by using invariant parameters calibrated against the minimum dataset size. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigating Mars South Residual CO2 Cap with a Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Dequaire, J.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    The CO2 cycle is one of the three controlling climate cycles on Mars. One aspect of the CO2 cycle that is not yet fully understood is the existence of a residual CO2 ice cap that is offset from the south pole. Previous investigations suggest that the atmosphere may control the placement of the south residual cap (e.g., Colaprete et al., 2005). These investigations show that topographically forced stationary eddies in the south during southern hemisphere winter produce colder atmospheric temperatures and increased CO2 snowfall over the hemisphere where the residual cap resides. Since precipitated CO2 ice produces higher surface albedos than directly deposited CO2 ice, it is plausible that CO2 snowfall resulting from the zonally asymmetric atmospheric circulation produces surface ice albedos high enough to maintain a residual cap only in one hemisphere. The goal of the current work is to further evaluate Colaprete et al.'s hypothesis by investigating model-predicted seasonally varying snowfall patterns in the southern polar region and the atmospheric circulation components that control them.

  12. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Phillion, André

    2010-01-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regim...

  13. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Particles laying motionless at the bed of rivers, lakes and estuaries can be put into motion when the shear stress exerted by the flow on the particles exceeds the critical shear stress. When these particles start their motion they can either remain suspended by long periods of time (suspended load) or move close to the bed (bed load). Particles are transported as bed load in three different modes: Sliding, rolling and saltation. Saltation is usually described as the bouncing motion of sediment particles in a layer a few particle diameters thick. The amount of particles and the bed-load mode in which they move depend on the particle size and density, and the flow intensity, usually quantified by the shear velocity. The bottom shear stress in natural streams will most likely be large enough to set saltation as the most important bed-load transport mechanism among all three modes. Thus, studying the saltation process is crucial for the overall understanding of bed-load transport. Particularly, numerical simulations of this process have been providing important insight regarding the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in it. Several processes occur when particles are saltating near the bed: i) Particles collide with the bed, ii) they "fly" between collisions with the bed, as a result of their interaction with the fluid flow, iii) and they collide among themselves. These processes can be simulated using a three-dimensional Eulerian-Lagrangian model. In order to mimic these processes we have experimented with an averaged turbulent flow field represented by the logarithmic law of the wall, and with a more involved approach in which a computed turbulent velocity field for a flat plate was used as a surrogate of the three-dimensional turbulent conditions present close to stream beds. Since flat-plate and open-channel boundary layers are essentially different, a dynamic similarity analysis was performed showing that the highly-resolved three

  14. Calibration and validation of models for short-term decomposition and N mineralization of plant residues in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ferreira do Nascimento

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Insight of nutrient release patterns associated with the decomposition of plant residues is important for their effective use as a green manure in food production systems. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the ability of the Century, APSIM and NDICEA simulation models for predicting the decomposition and N mineralization of crop residues in the tropical Atlantic forest biome, Brazil. The simulation models were calibrated based on actual decomposition and N mineralization rates of three types of crop residues with different chemical and biochemical composition. The models were also validated for different pedo-climatic conditions and crop residues conditions. In general, the accuracy of decomposition and N mineralization improved after calibration. Overall RMSE values for the decomposition and N mineralization of the crop materials varied from 7.4 to 64.6% before models calibration compared to 3.7 to 16.3 % after calibration. Therefore, adequate calibration of the models is indispensable for use them under humid tropical conditions. The NDICEA model generally outperformed the other models. However, the decomposition and N mineralization was not very accurate during the first 30 days of incubation, especially for easily decomposable crop residues. An additional model variable may be required to capture initial microbiological growth as affected by the moisture dynamics of the residues, as is the case in surface residues decomposition models.

  15. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-06-03

    CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  16. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-01-01

    CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL

  17. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash, E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@students.itb.ac.id, E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com [Earth Sciences Graduate Program, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro [Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG), Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  18. Computation of a Reference Model for Robust Fault Detection and Isolation Residual Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mazars

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers matrix inequality procedures to address the robust fault detection and isolation (FDI problem for linear time-invariant systems subject to disturbances, faults, and polytopic or norm-bounded uncertainties. We propose a design procedure for an FDI filter that aims to minimize a weighted combination of the sensitivity of the residual signal to disturbances and modeling errors, and the deviation of the faults to residual dynamics from a fault to residual reference model, using the ℋ∞-norm as a measure. A key step in our procedure is the design of an optimal fault reference model. We show that the optimal design requires the solution of a quadratic matrix inequality (QMI optimization problem. Since the solution of the optimal problem is intractable, we propose a linearization technique to derive a numerically tractable suboptimal design procedure that requires the solution of a linear matrix inequality (LMI optimization. A jet engine example is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Residual stress distribution analysis of heat treated APS TBC using image based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Zhang, Xun; Chen, Ying; Carr, James; Jacques, Simon; Behnsen, Julia; di Michiel, Marco; Xiao, Ping; Cernik, Robert

    2017-08-01

    We carried out a residual stress distribution analysis in a APS TBC throughout the depth of the coatings. The samples were heat treated at 1150 °C for 190 h and the data analysis used image based modelling based on the real 3D images measured by Computed Tomography (CT). The stress distribution in several 2D slices from the 3D model is included in this paper as well as the stress distribution along several paths shown on the slices. Our analysis can explain the occurrence of the "jump" features near the interface between the top coat and the bond coat. These features in the residual stress distribution trend were measured (as a function of depth) by high-energy synchrotron XRD (as shown in our related research article entitled 'Understanding the Residual Stress Distribution through the Thickness of Atmosphere Plasma Sprayed (APS) Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by high energy Synchrotron XRD; Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and Image Based Modelling') (Li et al., 2017) [1].

  20. Probability of Ship on Collision Courses Based on the New PAW Using MMG Model and AIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Sindhu Asmara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an estimation method for ships on collision courses taking crash astern maneuvers based on a new potential area of water (PAW for maneuvering. A crash astern maneuver is an emergency option a ship can take when exposed to the risk of a collision with other ships that have lost control. However, lateral forces and yaw moments exerted by the reversing propeller, as well as the uncertainty of the initial speed and initial yaw rate, will move the ship out of the intended stopping position landing it in a dangerous area. A new PAW for crash astern maneuvers is thus introduced. The PAW is developed based on a probability density function of the initial yaw rate. Distributions of the yaw rates and speeds are analyzed from automatic identification system (AIS data in Madura Strait, and estimated paths of the maneuvers are simulated using a mathematical maneuvering group model.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of amorphous pocket formation in Si at low energies and its application to improve binary collision models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ivan; Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present classical molecular dynamics results about the formation of amorphous pockets in silicon for energy transfers below the displacement threshold. While in binary collision simulations ions with different masses generate the same number of Frenkel pairs for the same deposited nuclear energy, in molecular dynamics simulations the amount of damage and its complexity increase with ion mass. We demonstrate that low-energy transfers to target atoms are able to generate complex damage structures. We have determined the conditions that have to be fulfilled to produce amorphous pockets, showing that the order-disorder transition depends on the particular competition between melting and heat diffusion processes. We have incorporated these molecular dynamics results in an improved binary collision model that is able to provide a good description of damage with a very low computational cost

  2. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  3. Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs

  4. Assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaneuf, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section data for ion-atom collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, He, Li, Be, C, O, Ne, Al, Si, Ar, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and their ions. The most important ion-atom collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and ionization processes are also considered. The scope is limited to atomic species and to collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 2-200 eV range. Sources of evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible, and deficiencies in the data base are indicated. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojian; Cui, Tingting; Fu, Jianhong; Peng, Jianwei; Shan, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Low-cost GPS (receiver) has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a) it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b) only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c) it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d) it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  6. Trend-Residual Dual Modeling for Detection of Outliers in Low-Cost GPS Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost GPS (receiver has become a ubiquitous and integral part of our daily life. Despite noticeable advantages such as being cheap, small, light, and easy to use, its limited positioning accuracy devalues and hampers its wide applications for reliable mapping and analysis. Two conventional techniques to remove outliers in a GPS trajectory are thresholding and Kalman-based methods, which are difficult in selecting appropriate thresholds and modeling the trajectories. Moreover, they are insensitive to medium and small outliers, especially for low-sample-rate trajectories. This paper proposes a model-based GPS trajectory cleaner. Rather than examining speed and acceleration or assuming a pre-determined trajectory model, we first use cubic smooth spline to adaptively model the trend of the trajectory. The residuals, i.e., the differences between the trend and GPS measurements, are then further modeled by time series method. Outliers are detected by scoring the residuals at every GPS trajectory point. Comparing to the conventional procedures, the trend-residual dual modeling approach has the following features: (a it is able to model trajectories and detect outliers adaptively; (b only one critical value for outlier scores needs to be set; (c it is able to robustly detect unapparent outliers; and (d it is effective in cleaning outliers for GPS trajectories with low sample rates. Tests are carried out on three real-world GPS trajectories datasets. The evaluation demonstrates an average of 9.27 times better performance in outlier detection for GPS trajectories than thresholding and Kalman-based techniques.

  7. Parton model description of multiparticle azimuthal correlations in p A collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusling, Kevin; Mace, Mark; Venugopalan, Raju

    2018-01-01

    In K. Dusling et al. [arXiv:1705.00745.], an initial-state "parton model" of quarks scattering off a dense nuclear target was shown to qualitatively reproduce the systematics of multiparticle azimuthal anisotropy cumulants measured in proton/deuteron-nucleus (p A ) collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the LHC. The systematics included (i) the behavior of the four-particle cumulant c2{4 }, which generates a real four-particle second Fourier harmonic v2{4 }; (ii) the ordering v2{2 }>v2{4 }≈v2{6 }≈v2{8 } for two-, four-, six-, and eight-particle Fourier harmonics; and (iii) the behavior of so-called symmetric cumulants SC(2,3) and SC(2,4). These features of azimuthal multiparticle cumulants were previously interpreted as a signature of hydrodynamic flow; our results challenge this interpretation. We expand here upon our previous study and present further details and novel results on the saturation scale and transverse momentum (p⊥) dependence of multiparticle azimuthal correlations. We find that the dependence of v2{2 } and v2{4 } on the number of color domains in the target varies with the p⊥ window explored. We extend our prior discussion of symmetric cumulants and compute as yet unmeasured symmetric cumulants. We investigate the Nc dependence of v2{2 } and v2{4 }. We contrast our results, which include multiple scatterings of each quark off the target, to the Glasma graph approximation, where each quark suffers at most two-gluon exchanges with the target. We find that coherent multiple scattering is essential to obtain a positive definite v2{4 }. We provide an algorithm to compute expectation values of arbitrary products of the "dipole" lightlike Wilson line correlators.

  8. SU-D-16A-06: Modeling Biological Effects of Residual Uncertainties For Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Larson, D; McDermott, M; Sneed, P [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Residual uncertainties on the order of 1-2 mm are frequently observed when delivering stereotactic radiosurgery via on-line imaging guidance with a relocatable frame. In this study, a predictive model was developed to evalute potentiral late radiation effects associated with such uncertainties. Methods: A mathematical model was first developed to correlate the peripherial isodose volume with the internal and/or setup margins for a radiosurgical target. Such a model was then integrated with a previoulsy published logistic regression normal tissue complication model for determining the symptomatic radiation necrosis rate at various target sizes and prescription dose levels. The model was tested on a cohort of 15 brain tumor and tumor resection cavity patient cases and model predicted results were compared with the clinical results reported in the literature. Results: A normalized target diameter (D{sub 0}) in term of D{sub 0} = 6V/S, where V is the volume of a radiosurgical target and S is the surface of the target, was found to correlate excellently with the peripheral isodose volume for a radiosurgical delivery (logarithmic regression R{sup 2} > 0.99). The peripheral isodose volumes were found increase rapidly with increasing uncertainties levels. In general, a 1-mm residual uncertainties as calculated to result in approximately 0.5%, 1%, and 3% increases in the symptomatic radiation necrosis rate for D{sub 0} = 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm based on the prescription guideline of RTOG 9005, i.e., 21 Gy to a lesion of 1 cm in diameter, 18 Gy to a lesion 2 cm in diameter, and 15 Gy to a lesion 3 cm in diameter respectively. Conclusion: The results of study suggest more stringent criteria on residual uncertainties are needed when treating a large target such as D{sub 0}≤ 3 cm with stereotactic radiosurgery. Dr. Ma and Dr. Sahgal are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery (ISRS)

  9. Modeling of residual stress mitigation in austenitic stainless steel pipe girth weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; West, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This study provides numerical procedures to model 40-cm-diameter, schedule 40, Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welding and a newly proposed post-weld treatment. The treatment can be used to accomplish the goal of imparting compressive residual stresses at the inner surface of a pipe girth weldment to prevent/retard the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the piping system in nuclear reactors. This new post-weld treatment for mitigating residual stresses is cooling stress improvement (CSI). The concept of CSI is to establish and maintain a certain temperature gradient across the pipe wall thickness to change the final stress state. Thus, this process involves sub-zero low temperature cooling of the inner pipe surface of a completed girth weldment, while simultaneously keeping the outer pipe surface at a slightly elevated temperature with the help of a certain heating method. Analyses to obtain quantitative results on pipe girth welding and CSI by using a thermo-elastic-plastic finite element model are described in this paper. Results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of CSI for introducing compressive residual stresses to prevent/retard IGSCC. Because of the symmetric nature of CSI, it shows great potential for industrial application

  10. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-05-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  11. Study on Colloidal Model of Petroleum Residues through the Attraction Potential between Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The samples of DaGang atmospheric residue (DG-AR, Middle East atmospheric residue (ME-AR, TaHe atmospheric residue (TH-AR, and their thermal reaction samples were chosen for study. All the samples were fractioned into six components separately, including saturates plus light aromatics, heavy aromatics, light resins, middle resins, heavy resins, and asphaltenes. The dielectric permittivity of the solutions of these components was measured, and the dielectric permittivity values of the components can be determined by extrapolation, which increased steadily from saturates plus light aromatics to asphaltenes. Moreover, the Hamaker constants of the components were calculated from their dielectric permittivity values. The Van der Waals attractive potential energy between colloids corresponding to various models could be calculated from the fractional composition and the Hamaker constants of every component. It was assumed that the cores of colloidal particles were formed by asphaltenes and heavy resins mainly; the other fractions acted as dispersion medium. For the three serials of thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy between colloids for this kind of model was calculated. For TH-AR thermal reaction samples, the Van der Waals attraction potential energy presented the maximum as thermal reaction is going on, which was near to the end of coke induction period.

  12. Using cumulative sums of martingale residuals for model checking in nested case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgan, Ørnulf; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Standard use of Cox regression requires collection of covariate information for all individuals in a cohort even when only a small fraction of them experiences the event of interest (fail). This may be very expensive for large cohorts. Further in biomarker studies, it will imply a waste of valuable biological material that one may want to save for future studies. A nested case-control study offers a useful alternative. For this design, covariate information is only needed for the failing individuals (cases) and a sample of controls selected from the cases' at-risk sets. Methods based on martingale residuals are useful for checking the fit of Cox's regression model for cohort data. But similar methods have so far not been developed for nested case-control data. In this article, it is described how one may define martingale residuals for nested case-control data, and it is shown how plots and tests based on cumulative sums of martingale residuals may be used to check model fit. The plots and tests may be obtained using available software. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  13. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  14. Current challenges in glioblastoma: intratumour heterogeneity, residual disease and models to predict disease recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Patricia Ellis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most common malignant primary brain tumour, and despite the availability of chemotherapy and radiotherapy to combat the disease, overall survival remains low with a high incidence of tumour recurrence. Technological advances are continually improving our understanding of the disease and in particular our knowledge of clonal evolution, intratumour heterogeneity and possible reservoirs of residual disease. These may inform how we approach clinical treatment and recurrence in GB. Mathematical modelling (including neural networks, and strategies such as multiple-sampling during tumour resection and genetic analysis of circulating cancer cells, may be of great future benefit to help predict the nature of residual disease and resistance to standard and molecular therapies in GB.

  15. Collision tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  16. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  17. GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR THE ACCELERATED FAILURE TIME MODEL BASED ON MARTINGALE RESIDUALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2013), s. 40-59 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06047 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) SVV 261315/2011 Keywords : accelerated failure time model * survival analysis * goodness-of-fit Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.563, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/SI/novak-goodness-of-fit test for the aft model based on martingale residuals.pdf

  18. Threshold conditions for integrated pest management models with pesticides that have residual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sanyi; Liang, Juhua; Tan, Yuanshun; Cheke, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations (hybrid dynamical systems) can provide a natural description of pulse-like actions such as when a pesticide kills a pest instantly. However, pesticides may have long-term residual effects, with some remaining active against pests for several weeks, months or years. Therefore, a more realistic method for modelling chemical control in such cases is to use continuous or piecewise-continuous periodic functions which affect growth rates. How to evaluate the effects of the duration of the pesticide residual effectiveness on successful pest control is key to the implementation of integrated pest management (IPM) in practice. To address these questions in detail, we have modelled IPM including residual effects of pesticides in terms of fixed pulse-type actions. The stability threshold conditions for pest eradication are given. Moreover, effects of the killing efficiency rate and the decay rate of the pesticide on the pest and on its natural enemies, the duration of residual effectiveness, the number of pesticide applications and the number of natural enemy releases on the threshold conditions are investigated with regard to the extent of depression or resurgence resulting from pulses of pesticide applications and predator releases. Latin Hypercube Sampling/Partial Rank Correlation uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques are employed to investigate the key control parameters which are most significantly related to threshold values. The findings combined with Volterra's principle confirm that when the pesticide has a strong effect on the natural enemies, repeated use of the same pesticide can result in target pest resurgence. The results also indicate that there exists an optimal number of pesticide applications which can suppress the pest most effectively, and this may help in the design of an optimal control strategy.

  19. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  20. [Joint application of mathematic models in assessing the residual risk of hepatitis C virus transmitted through blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Jia, Yao; Xie, Yun-zheng; Li, Xiu-mei; Liu, Xiao-ying; Wu, Xiao-fei

    2011-09-01

    The practicable and effective methods for residual risk assessment on transfusion-transmitted disease was to establish the mathematic models. Based on the characteristics of the repeat donors which donated their blood on a regular base, a model of sero-conversion during the interval of donations was established to assess the incidence of the repeat donors. Based on the characteristics of the prevalence in the population, a model of 'prevalence increased with the age of the donor' was established to assess the incidence of those first-time donors. And based on the impact of the windows period through blood screening program, a model of residual risk associated with the incidence and the length of the windows period was established to assess the residual risk of blood transfusion. In this paper, above said 3 kinds of mathematic models were jointly applied to assess the residual risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) which was transmitted through blood transfusion in Shanghai, based on data from the routine blood collection and screening program. All the anti-HCV unqualified blood donations were confirmed before assessment. Results showed that the residual risk of HCV transmitted through blood transfusion during Jan. 1(st), 2007 to Dec. 31(st), 2008 in Shanghai was 1:101 000. Data showed that the results of residual risk assessment with mathematic models was valuable. The residual risk of transfusion-transmitted HCV in Shanghai was at a safe level, according to the results in this paper.

  1. New formulation of the constituent quark model for projectile fragmentation in hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, F.

    1985-01-01

    Constituent quark model for projectile fragmentation in hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus collisions is reformulated by taking into account (i) quark-antiquark annihilation, (ii) quark flavour content in the central region and (iii) quark shadowing effect. The model provides a satisfactory explanation of strong long range correlations observed in the projectile fragmentation regions of inclusive reaction πsup(+-)+p-> or anti p + anything, πsup(+-)+A->p,anti p,Λ or anti Λ + anything p+p->Λ or Δ ++ + anything and anti p+p->anti Λ or Δ ++ + anything. (orig.)

  2. Usefulness of a collision term for the guiding center-plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Pierre; Baumann, Germain

    1976-01-01

    Difficulties occurring in the treatment of the guiding-center-plasma equations by means of the spectral method, are connected to the finite number of Fourier components which must be retained. It is shown that the introduction of viscosity-like collisions will remove appreciably the numerical difficulties, without destroying the interesting phenomena [fr

  3. Modeling energy transfer in molecular collisions: Statistical theory versus experiment for highly excited toluene and azulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Nordholm, Sture

    2003-12-01

    The recent development and application of the method of kinetically controlled selective ionization has produced detailed and reliable data on the collisional energy transfer kernel P(E',E) entering master equation theories of unimolecular reaction rates. Here we test the ability of our partially ergodic collision theory (PECT) to predict the functional form of the observed kernel leaving only one parameter, the first moment of the distribution , to be input from other sources. The data explored here include two reactant molecules, toluene and azulene, in collisions with 18 and 8 medium molecules, respectively, ranging from inert gas atoms to n-heptane. The initial energy of the reactant molecule is varied from 10 000 cm-1 to 49 000 cm-1 and 30 000 cm-1, respectively. The energy transfer efficiency βE is about one-tenth of its ergodic collision limit of unity. The PECT is found to fit the monoexponential form of the kernel determined from the experimental data over a broad range of initial energies E including tail regions of very low probability. A minor but systematic deviation is observed for nearly elastic collisions of large medium molecules. The functional fit is good enough to effectively allow the three parameters of the monoexponential experimental kernel to be replaced by a single parameter representing energy transfer efficiency.

  4. Coupling constant corrections in a holographic model of heavy ion collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Schee, Wilke van der|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330953974

    2017-01-01

    We initiate a holographic study of coupling-dependent heavy ion collisions by analysing for the first time the effects of leading-order, inverse coupling constant corrections. In the dual description, this amounts to colliding gravitational shock waves in a theory with curvature-squared terms. We

  5. PACIAE 2.0: An updated parton and hadron cascade model (program) for the relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Ben-Hao; Zhou, Dai-Mei; Yan, Yu-Liang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Feng, Sheng-Qin; Dong, Bao-Guo; Cai, Xu

    2012-02-01

    We have updated the parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE for the relativistic nuclear collisions, from based on JETSET 6.4 and PYTHIA 5.7 to based on PYTHIA 6.4, and renamed as PACIAE 2.0. The main physics concerning the stages of the parton initiation, parton rescattering, hadronization, and hadron rescattering were discussed. The structures of the programs were briefly explained. In addition, some calculated examples were compared with the experimental data. It turns out that this model (program) works well. Program summaryProgram title: PACIAE version 2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEKI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 297 523 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 051 274 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: DELL Studio XPS and others with a FORTRAN 77 or GFORTRAN compiler Operating system: Unix/Linux RAM: 1 G words Word size: 64 bits Classification: 11.2 Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo simulation of hadron transport (cascade) model is successful in studying the observables at final state in the relativistic nuclear collisions. However the high p suppression, the jet quenching (energy loss), and the eccentricity scaling of v etc., observed in high energy nuclear collisions, indicates the important effect of the initial partonic state on the final hadronic state. Therefore better parton and hadron transport (cascade) models for the relativistic nuclear collisions are highly required. Solution method: The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE is originally based on the JETSET 7.4 and PYTHIA 5.7. The PYTHIA model has been updated to PYTHIA 6.4 with the additions of new physics, the improvements in existing physics, and the

  6. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Collision Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Servis, D.P.; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    The first section of the present report describes the procedures that are being programmed at DTU for evaluation of the external collision dynamics. Then follows a detailed description of a comprehensive finite element analysis of one collision scenario for MS Dextra carried out at NTUA. The last...

  8. Modelling of different enzyme productions by solid-state fermentation on several agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ana Belen; Blandino, Ana; Webb, Colin; Caro, Ildefonso

    2016-11-01

    A simple kinetic model, with only three fitting parameters, for several enzyme productions in Petri dishes by solid-state fermentation is proposed in this paper, which may be a valuable tool for simulation of this type of processes. Basically, the model is able to predict temporal fungal enzyme production by solid-state fermentation on complex substrates, maximum enzyme activity expected and time at which these maxima are reached. In this work, several fermentations in solid state were performed in Petri dishes, using four filamentous fungi grown on different agro-industrial residues, measuring xylanase, exo-polygalacturonase, cellulose and laccase activities over time. Regression coefficients after fitting experimental data to the proposed model turned out to be quite high in all cases. In fact, these results are very interesting considering, on the one hand, the simplicity of the model and, on the other hand, that enzyme activities correspond to different enzymes, produced by different fungi on different substrates.

  9. Uncertainty "escalation" and use of machine learning to forecast residual and data model uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    When speaking about model uncertainty many authors implicitly assume the data uncertainty (mainly in parameters or inputs) which is probabilistically described by distributions. Often however it is look also into the residual uncertainty as well. It is hence reasonable to classify the main approaches to uncertainty analysis with respect to the two main types of model uncertainty that can be distinguished: A. The residual uncertainty of models. In this case the model parameters and/or model inputs are considered to be fixed (deterministic), i.e. the model is considered to be optimal (calibrated) and deterministic. Model error is considered as the manifestation of uncertainty. If there is enough past data about the model errors (i.e. it uncertainty), it is possible to build a statistical or machine learning model of uncertainty trained on this data. The following methods can be mentioned: (a) quantile regression (QR) method by Koenker and Basset in which linear regression is used to build predictive models for distribution quantiles [1] (b) a more recent approach that takes into account the input variables influencing such uncertainty and uses more advanced machine learning (non-linear) methods (neural networks, model trees etc.) - the UNEEC method [2,3,7] (c) and even more recent DUBRAUE method (Dynamic Uncertainty Model By Regression on Absolute Error), a autoregressive model of model residuals (it corrects the model residual first and then carries out the uncertainty prediction by a autoregressive statistical model) [5] B. The data uncertainty (parametric and/or input) - in this case we study the propagation of uncertainty (presented typically probabilistically) from parameters or inputs to the model outputs. In case of simple functions representing models analytical approaches can be used, or approximation methods (e.g., first-order second moment method). However, for real complex non-linear models implemented in software there is no other choice except using

  10. The IONORT-ISP-WC system: Inclusion of an electron collision frequency model for the D-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settimi, Alessandro; Pietrella, Marco; Pezzopane, Michael; Bianchi, Cesidio

    2015-04-01

    The IONORT-ISP system (IONOspheric Ray-Tracing - IRI-SIRMUP-PROFILES) was recently developed and tested by comparing the measured oblique ionograms over the radio link between Rome (41.89°N, 12.48°E), Italy, and Chania (35.51°N, 24.02°E), Greece, with the IONORT-ISP simulated oblique ionograms (Settimi et al., 2013). The present paper describes an upgrade of the system to include: (a) electron-neutral collision have been included by using a collision frequency model that consists of a double exponential profile; (b) the ISP three dimensional (3-D) model of electron density profile grid has been extended down to the altitude of the D-layer; (c) the resolution in latitude and longitude of the ISP 3-D model of electron density profile grid has been increased from 2° × 2° to 1° × 1°. Based on these updates, a new software tool called IONORT-ISP-WC (WC means with collisions) was developed, and a database of 33 IONORT-ISP-WC synthesized oblique ionograms calculated for single (1-hop paths) and multiple (3-hop paths) ionospheric reflections. The IONORT-ISP-WC simulated oblique ionograms were compared with the IONORT-IRI-WC synthesized oblique ionograms, generated by applying IONORT in conjunction with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 3-D electron density grid, and the observed oblique ionograms over the aforementioned radio link. The results obtained show that (1) during daytime, for the lower ionospheric layers, the traces of the synthesized ionograms are cut away at low frequencies because of HF absorption; (2) during night-time, for the higher ionospheric layers, the traces of the simulated ionograms at low frequencies are not cut off (very little HF absorption); (3) the IONORT-ISP-WC MUF values are more accurate than the IONORT-IRI-WC MUF values.

  11. Hydrodynamic modeling of 3He–Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bożek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collective flow and femtoscopy in ultrarelativistic 3He–Au collisions are investigated within the 3+1-dimensional (3+1D viscous event-by-event hydrodynamics. We evaluate elliptic and triangular flow coefficients as functions of the transverse momentum. We find the typical long-range ridge structures in the two-particle correlations in the relative azimuth and pseudorapidity, in the pseudorapidity directions of both Au and 3He. We also make predictions for the pionic interferometric radii, which decrease with the transverse momentum of the pion pair. All features found hint on collectivity of the dynamics of the system formed in 3He–Au collisions, with hydrodynamics leading to quantitative agreement with the up-to-now released data.

  12. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Grosman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of moose-vehicle collisions. Moose road crossings were used as a proxy measure. A GPS telemetry data set consisting of approximately 200,000 locations of 47 moose over 2 yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve was used as an empirical basis for the model. Twelve moose were selected from this data set and programmed in the model to forage and travel in the study area. Five parameters with an additional application of stochasticity were used to determine moose movement between forest polygons. These included food quality; cover quality, i.e., protection from predators and thermal stress; proximity to salt pools; proximity to water; and slope. There was a significant reduction in road crossings when either all or two thirds of the roadside salt pools were removed, with and/or without salt pool displacement. With 100% salt pool removal, the reduction was greater (49% without compensatory salt pools than with them (18%. When two thirds of the salt pools were removed, the reduction was the same with and without compensatory salt pools (16%. Although moose-vehicle collisions are not a significant mortality factor for the moose population in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, in areas with higher road densities, hunting pressure, and/or predator densities it could mean the difference between a stable and a declining population, and salt pool removal could be part of a good mitigation plan to halt population declines. This model can be used, with improvements such as

  13. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Paul D. Grosman; Jochen A. G. Jaeger; Pascale M. Biron; Christian Dussault; Jean-Pierre Ouellet

    2009-01-01

    Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of ...

  14. Hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in a mouse model for glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmans, Brenda S; Boss, Andreas; van Dijk, Theo H; Soty, Maud; Wolters, Henk; Mutel, Elodie; Groen, Albert K; Derks, Terry G J; Mithieux, Gilles; Heerschap, Arend; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H

    2017-12-01

    It is a long-standing enigma how glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I patients retain a limited capacity for endogenous glucose production despite the loss of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Insight into the source of residual endogenous glucose production is of clinical importance given the risk of sudden death in these patients, but so far contradictory mechanisms have been proposed. We investigated glucose-6-phosphatase-independent endogenous glucose production in hepatocytes isolated from a liver-specific GSD Ia mouse model (L-G6pc -/- mice) and performed real-time analysis of hepatic glucose fluxes and glycogen metabolism in L-G6pc -/- mice using state-of-the-art stable isotope methodologies. Here we show that G6pc-deficient hepatocytes are capable of producing glucose. In vivo analysis of hepatic glucose metabolism revealed that the hepatic glucokinase flux was decreased by 95% in L-G6pc -/- mice. It also showed increased glycogen phosphorylase flux in L-G6pc -/- mice, which is coupled to the release of free glucose through glycogen debranching. Although the ex vivo activities of debranching enzyme and lysosomal acid maltase, two major hepatic α-glucosidases, were unaltered in L-G6pc -/- mice, pharmacological inhibition of α-glucosidase activity almost completely abolished residual glucose production by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes. Our data indicate that hepatocytes contribute to residual glucose production in GSD Ia. We show that α-glucosidase activity, i.e. glycogen debranching and/or lysosomal glycogen breakdown, contributes to residual glucose production by GSD Ia hepatocytes. A strong reduction in hepatic GCK flux in L-G6pc-/- mice furthermore limits the phosphorylation of free glucose synthesized by G6pc-deficient hepatocytes, allowing the release of glucose into the circulation. The almost complete abrogation of GCK flux in G6pc-deficient liver also explains the contradictory reports on residual glucose production in GSD Ia patients. (Hepatology

  15. Modelling of pharmaceutical residues in Australian sewage by quantities of use and fugacity calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Stuart J; Ongerth, Jerry E

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented for determining which currently prescribed pharmaceutical compounds are most likely to be found in sewage, and for estimating their concentrations, both in raw sewage and after successive stages of secondary sewage treatment. A ranking of the "top-50" pharmaceutical compounds (by total mass dispensed) in Australia over the 1998 calendar year was prepared. Information on the excretion ratios and some metabolites of the pharmaceuticals enabled prediction of the overall rates of excretion into Australian sewage. Mass-balance and fugacity modelling, applied to sewage generation and to a sewage treatment plant, allowed calculation of predicted concentrations of the compounds in raw, primary and secondary treated sewage effluents. Twenty nine of the modelled pharmaceutical residuals were predicted to be present in raw sewage influent at concentrations of 1 microgl(-1) or greater. Twenty of the compounds were predicted to remain in secondary effluent at concentrations of 1 microgl(-1) or greater.

  16. A Cross-Platform Numerical Model of Ion-Wall Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Veitzer, Seth A; Molvik, Arthur; Stoltz, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    Ion collisions with beam-pipe walls is a significant source of secondary electron clouds and desorbed neutral gasses in particle accelerators. Ions may reflect from beam-pipe walls and undergo further collisions downstream. These effects can cause beam degradation and are expected to be problematic in the design of heavy ion accelerators. The well-known SRIM code provides physically-based monte carlo simulations of ion-wall collisions. However, it is difficult to interface SRIM with high-performance simulation codes. We present details on the development of a package of Python modules which integrate the simulation of ion-wall interactions at grazing incidences with the high-performance particle-in-cell and electron cloud codes WARP and POSINST. This software package, called GriPY, calculates reflected angles and energies of ions which strike beam-pipe walls at grazing incidences, based upon interpolation of monte carlo statistics generated by benchmark simulations run in SRIM for a variety of relevant incide...

  17. Regression models for the restricted residual mean life for right-censored and left-truncated data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Holmboe, Stine A.; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    estimators to model potential right censoring. Furthermore, we show how to extend the models and the estimators to deal with delayed entries. We demonstrate that the restricted residual mean life estimator is equivalent to integrals of Kaplan-Meier estimates in the case of simple factor variables. Estimation...... to interpret than the hazard ratio; the residual mean time is an important example of those measures. However, because of the presence of right censoring, the tail of the survival distribution is often difficult to estimate correctly. Therefore, we consider the restricted residual mean time, which represents...... a partial area under the survival function, given any time horizon τ, and is interpreted as the residual life expectancy up to τ of a subject surviving up to time t. We present a class of regression models for this measure, based on weighted estimating equations and inverse probability of censoring weighted...

  18. Tetrahedral percolation model and energy spectra in proton-nucleus collisions at high energies (300 GeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa Faulhaber, Jose Carlos da.

    1989-02-01

    We study the mass, isotopic and energy spectrum of fragments arising from a high-energy proton-nucleus collision using the tetrahedrical percolation model. The purpose is to verify whether the model above can reproduce the existing experimental data and to draw, from the deviations observed between the predictions of the model and the experimental results, conclusions which can help us to clarify the essential physical features of multifragmentation. We have determined that the only experimental result that possesses relevant physical information is the high-energy part of the energy spectrum. This is an important point, since many existing models are based on hypothesis suitable to reproduce the mass and isotopic spectrum. This analysis constitutes the original contribution of this work. (author). 44 refs., 30 figs

  19. Modeling the Influence of Process Parameters and Additional Heat Sources on Residual Stresses in Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, F.; Lepski, D.; Beyer, E.

    2007-09-01

    In laser cladding thermal contraction of the initially liquid coating during cooling causes residual stresses and possibly cracks. Preweld or postweld heating using inductors can reduce the thermal strain difference between coating and substrate and thus reduce the resulting stress. The aim of this work is to better understand the influence of various thermometallurgical and mechanical phenomena on stress evolution and to optimize the induction-assisted laser cladding process to get crack-free coatings of hard materials at high feed rates. First, an analytical one-dimensional model is used to visualize the most important features of stress evolution for a Stellite coating on a steel substrate. For more accurate studies, laser cladding is simulated including the powder-beam interaction, the powder catchment by the melt pool, and the self-consistent calculation of temperature field and bead shape. A three-dimensional finite element model and the required equivalent heat sources are derived from the results and used for the transient thermomechanical analysis, taking into account phase transformations and the elastic-plastic material behavior with strain hardening. Results are presented for the influence of process parameters such as feed rate, heat input, and inductor size on the residual stresses at a single bead of Stellite coatings on steel.

  20. Comparative behaviour of organochlorine insecticides and related chemical residues in model ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.; Anagnostopoulos, M.; Begum, S.; Elsner, E.; Freitag, D.; Gaeb, W.; Greb, W.; Haque, A.; Hustert, K.; Kilzer, L.; Kohli, J.; Korte, F.; Kotzias, D.; Lay, J.P.; Moza, P.N.; Mueller, H.; Mueller, Werner; Mueller, Wolfgang; Nohynek, G.; Parlar, A.; Prestel, D.; Sandrock, K.; Sotiriou, N.; Viswanathan, P.; Viswanathan, S.; Vockel, D.; Weisgerber, I.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive series of isotopictracer-aided studies of the behaviour of organochlorine residues in model ecosystems is reported. Studies of the fate of 14 C-labelled aldrin or dieldrin in soil supporting carrots and potatoes under simulated conditions of agricultural practice have been extended. The formation of the polar metabolite dihydrochlordene dicarboxylic acid was confirmed. The metabolism of these compounds, and of 14 C-heptachlor and 14 C-lindane by green algae were also studied. Aldrin and heptachlor underwent epoxidation and lindane dehydrochlorination. Comparative studies were made of the metabolism of 14 C-PCBs in rat, monkey, microorganisms, higher plants and of their movement from contaminated soil into crops. Experiments on abiotic transformation of organochlorine residues by ultraviolet radiation are reported. The significance of some of the ratios observed in the context of environmental behaviour is discussed. The fate of dieldrin in soil-plant-food-animal systems is discussed as a model ''trace contaminant'' in view of the relative wealth of data now available, some as a result of experiments initiated 20 years ago. (author)

  1. The role of continuity in residual-based variational multiscale modeling of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, I.; Bazilevs, Y.; Calo, V. M.; Hughes, T. J. R.; Hulshoff, S.

    2008-02-01

    This paper examines the role of continuity of the basis in the computation of turbulent flows. We compare standard finite elements and non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) discretizations that are employed in Isogeometric Analysis (Hughes et al. in Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng, 194:4135 4195, 2005). We make use of quadratic discretizations that are C 0-continuous across element boundaries in standard finite elements, and C 1-continuous in the case of NURBS. The variational multiscale residual-based method (Bazilevs in Isogeometric analysis of turbulence and fluid-structure interaction, PhD thesis, ICES, UT Austin, 2006; Bazilevs et al. in Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng, submitted, 2007; Calo in Residual-based multiscale turbulence modeling: finite volume simulation of bypass transition. PhD thesis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, 2004; Hughes et al. in proceedings of the XXI international congress of theoretical and applied mechanics (IUTAM), Kluwer, 2004; Scovazzi in Multiscale methods in science and engineering, PhD thesis, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford Universty, 2004) is employed as a turbulence modeling technique. We find that C 1-continuous discretizations outperform their C 0-continuous counterparts on a per-degree-of-freedom basis. We also find that the effect of continuity is greater for higher Reynolds number flows.

  2. Consumers’ Collision Insurance Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Laurel; Fischhoff, Baruch

    Using interviews with 74 drivers, we elicit and analyse how people think about collision coverage and, more generally, about insurance decisions. We compare the judgments and behaviours of these decision makers to the predictions of a range of theoretical models: (a) A model developed by Lee (2007...... a cognitive model based on budgeting. Our findings emphasize the importance of budget constraints, which lead consumers to budget their income across consumption categories. We find also that a simple heuristic accounts for many collision coverage decisions: purchase coverage for cars worth more than some...

  3. Channel Model Optimization with Reflection Residual Component for Indoor MIMO-VLC System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Li, Tengfei; Liu, Huanlin; Li, Yichao

    2017-12-01

    A fast channel modeling method is studied to solve the problem of reflection channel gain for multiple input multiple output-visible light communications (MIMO-VLC) in the paper. For reducing the computational complexity when associating with the reflection times, no more than 3 reflections are taken into consideration in VLC. We think that higher order reflection link consists of corresponding many times line of sight link and firstly present reflection residual component to characterize higher reflection (more than 2 reflections). We perform computer simulation results for point-to-point channel impulse response, receiving optical power and receiving signal to noise ratio. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation results, the proposed method can effectively reduce the computational complexity of higher order reflection in channel modeling.

  4. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow ...... is the first in a two-paper series describing contaminant transport at a waste residue site. III the second paper, reactive transport at the site is investigated.......An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow...

  5. An additive-multiplicative mean residual life model for right-censored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingheng; He, Haijin; Song, Xinyuan; Sun, Liuquan

    2017-05-01

    Many studies have focused on determining the effect of the body mass index (BMI) on the mortality in different cohorts. In this article, we propose an additive-multiplicative mean residual life (MRL) model to assess the effects of BMI and other risk factors on the MRL function of survival time in a cohort of Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. The proposed model can simultaneously manage additive and multiplicative risk factors and provide a comprehensible interpretation of their effects on the MRL function of interest. We develop an estimation procedure through pseudo partial score equations to obtain parameter estimates. We establish the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators and conduct simulations to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. The application of the procedure to a study on the life expectancy of type 2 diabetic patients reveals new insights into the extension of the life expectancy of such patients. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Worst-case residual clipping noise power model for bit loading in LACO-OFDM

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    2018-03-19

    Layered ACO-OFDM enjoys better spectral efficiency than ACO-OFDM, but its performance is challenged by residual clipping noise (RCN). In this paper, the power of RCN of LACO-OFDM is analyzed and modeled. As RCN is data-dependent, the worst-case situation is considered. A worst-case indicator is defined for relating the power of RCN and the power of noise at the receiver, wherein a linear relation is shown to be a practical approximation. An LACO-OFDM bit-loading experiment is performed to examine the proposed RCN power model for data rates of 6 to 7 Gbps. The experiment\\'s results show that accounting for RCN has two advantages. First, it leads to better bit loading and achieves up to 59% lower overall bit-error rate (BER) than when the RCN is ignored. Second, it balances the BER across layers, which is a desired property from a channel coding perspective.

  7. Computational models for residual creep life prediction of power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, G.S.; Singh, A.K.; Ramamoortry, M.

    2006-01-01

    All high temperature - high pressure power plant components are prone to irreversible visco-plastic deformation by the phenomenon of creep. The steady state creep response as well as the total creep life of a material is related to the operational component temperature through, respectively, the exponential and inverse exponential relationships. Minor increases in the component temperature can thus have serious consequences as far as the creep life and dimensional stability of a plant component are concerned. In high temperature steam tubing in power plants, one mechanism by which a significant temperature rise can occur is by the growth of a thermally insulating oxide film on its steam side surface. In the present paper, an elegantly simple and computationally efficient technique is presented for predicting the residual creep life of steel components subjected to continual steam side oxide film growth. Similarly, fabrication of high temperature power plant components involves extensive use of welding as the fabrication process of choice. Naturally, issues related to the creep life of weldments have to be seriously addressed for safe and continual operation of the welded plant component. Unfortunately, a typical weldment in an engineering structure is a zone of complex microstructural gradation comprising of a number of distinct sub-zones with distinct meso-scale and micro-scale morphology of the phases and (even) chemistry and its creep life prediction presents considerable challenges. The present paper presents a stochastic algorithm, which can be' used for developing experimental creep-cavitation intensity versus residual life correlations for welded structures. Apart from estimates of the residual life in a mean field sense, the model can be used for predicting the reliability of the plant component in a rigorous probabilistic setting. (author)

  8. A Coupled Creep Plasticity Model for Residual Stress Relaxation of a Shot Peened Nickel-Base Superalloy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    recovery into a single viscoplastic model. Chaboche and Jung [10] and Ahmad et al. [5], using viscoplasticity models, predict residual stress relaxation... UMAT ) for implementation into ABAQUS/Standard. Details of the physical deformation mechanism, constitutive equations and solution procedure follow...range of operating conditions. Many of the viscoplastic models in the literature follow similar arguments about microstructural behavior in the

  9. SU-E-T-64: CG-Based Radiation Therapy Simulator with Physical Modeling for Avoidance of Collisions Between Gantry and Couch Or Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanouchi, M; Arimura, H; Yuda, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is time-consuming and might cause re-planning to check couch-gantry and patient-gantry collisions on a radiotherapy machine when using couch rotations for non-coplanar beam angles. The aim of this study was to develop a computer-graphics (CG)-based radiation therapy simulator with physical modeling for avoidance of collisions between gantry and couch or patient on a radiotherapy machine. Methods: The radiation therapy simulator was three-dimensionally constructed including a radiotherapy machine (Clinac iX, Varian Medical Systems), couch, and radiation treatment room according to their designs by using a physical-modeling-based computer graphics software (Blender, free and open-source). Each patient was modeled by applying a surface rendering technique to their planning computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 16-slice CT scanner (BrightSpeed, GE Healthcare). Immobilization devices for patients were scanned by the CT equipment, and were rendered as the patient planning CT images. The errors in the collision angle of the gantry with the couch or patient between gold standards and the estimated values were obtained by fixing the gantry angle for the evaluation of the proposed simulator. Results: The average error of estimated collision angles to the couch head side was -8.5% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and -5.5% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Moreover, the average error of estimated collision angles to the couch foot side was -1.1% for gantry angles of 60 to 135 degree, and 1.4% for gantry angles of 225 to 300 degree. Conclusion: The CG-based radiation therapy simulator could make it possible to estimate the collision angle between gantry and couch or patient on the radiotherapy machine without verifying the collision angles in the radiation treatment room

  10. Boson-Jet Correlations in a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model for Jet Quenching in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Milhano, Jose Guilherme; Pablos, Daniel; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-06-11

    We confront a hybrid strong/weak coupling model for jet quenching to data from LHC heavy ion collisions. The model combines the perturbative QCD physics at high momentum transfer and the strongly coupled dynamics of non- abelian gauge theories plasmas in a phenomenological way. By performing a full Monte Carlo simulation, and after fitting one single parameter, we successfully describe several jet observables at the LHC, including dijet and photon jet measurements. Within current theoretical and experimental uncertainties, we find that such observables show little sensitivity to the specifics of the microscopic energy loss mechanism. We also present a new observable, the ratio of the fragmentation function of inclusive jets to that of the associated jets in dijet pairs, which can discriminate among different medium models. Finally, we discuss the importance of plasma response to jet passage in jet shapes.

  11. 3-D numerical evaluation of residual stress and deformation due welding process using simplified heat source models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslampanah, Amir Hossein [Islamic Azad University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aalami-aleagha, Mohammad Ebrahim; Feli, Saeid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaderi, Mohammad Reza [Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Thermal elastic-plastic finite element method has been employed to predict residual stress and deformation in a T-Fillet welded joint. An uncoupled thermal-mechanical three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed. A nonlinear-transient heat flow analysis was used to obtain the temperature distribution; then by applying thermal results in the three dimensional elastic-plastic model, residual stress and deformation distribution were obtained. Experiments were carried out to find fusion zone dimensions and displacement. Two heat source models with infinite speed are proposed and the mechanical result of the mentioned models and normal moving heat source are compared.

  12. Anelastic Models of Fully-Convective Stars: Differential Rotation, Meridional Circulation and Residual Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix; Browning, Matthew; Miesch, Mark; Featherstone, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    Low-Mass stars are typically fully convective, and as such their dynamics may differ significantly from sun-like stars. Here we present a series of 3D anelastic HD and MHD simulations of fully convective stars, designed to investigate how the meridional circulation, the differential rotation, and residual entropy are affected by both varying stellar parameters, such as the luminosity or the rotation rate, and by the presence of a magnetic field. We also investigate, more specifically, a theoretical model in which isorotation contours and residual entropy (σ‧ = σ ‑ σ(r)) are intrinsically linked via the thermal wind equation (as proposed in the Solar context by Balbus in 2009). We have selected our simulation parameters in such as way as to span the transition between Solar-like differential rotation (fast equator + slow poles) and ‘anti-Solar’ differential rotation (slow equator + fast poles), as characterised by the convective Rossby number and △Ω. We illustrate the transition from single-celled to multi-celled MC profiles, and from positive to negative latitudinal entropy gradients. We show that an extrapolation involving both TWB and the σ‧/Ω link provides a reasonable estimate for the interior profile of our fully convective stars. Finally, we also present a selection of MHD simulations which exhibit an almost unsuppressed differential rotation profile, with energy balances remaining dominated by kinetic components.

  13. Two-stage residual inclusion estimation: addressing endogeneity in health econometric modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terza, Joseph V; Basu, Anirban; Rathouz, Paul J

    2008-05-01

    The paper focuses on two estimation methods that have been widely used to address endogeneity in empirical research in health economics and health services research-two-stage predictor substitution (2SPS) and two-stage residual inclusion (2SRI). 2SPS is the rote extension (to nonlinear models) of the popular linear two-stage least squares estimator. The 2SRI estimator is similar except that in the second-stage regression, the endogenous variables are not replaced by first-stage predictors. Instead, first-stage residuals are included as additional regressors. In a generic parametric framework, we show that 2SRI is consistent and 2SPS is not. Results from a simulation study and an illustrative example also recommend against 2SPS and favor 2SRI. Our findings are important given that there are many prominent examples of the application of inconsistent 2SPS in the recent literature. This study can be used as a guide by future researchers in health economics who are confronted with endogeneity in their empirical work.

  14. A simulation model for the prediction of tissue:plasma partition coefficients for drug residues in natural casings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritova, Aneliya Milanova; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2010-09-01

    Tissue residues arise from the exposure of animals to undesirable substances in animal feed materials and drinking water and to the therapeutic or zootechnical use of veterinary medicinal products. In the framework of this study, an advanced toxicokinetic model was developed to predict the likelihood of residue disposition of licensed veterinary products in natural casings used as envelope for a variety of meat products, such as sausages. The model proved suitable for the calculation of drug concentrations in the muscles of pigs, cattle and sheep, the major species of which intestines are used. On the basis of drug concentrations in muscle tissue, the model allowed a prediction of intestinal concentrations and residues in the intestines that remained equal to or below the concentrations in muscle tissue, the major consumable product of slaughter animals. Subsequently, residues in intestines were found to be below the maximum residue limit value for muscle tissue when drugs were used according to prescribed procedures, including the application of appropriate withdrawal times. Considering the low consumption of natural casings (which represents only about 1-2% of the weight of a normal sausage), it was concluded that the exposure to drug residues from casings is negligible. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling of thermal processes during extrusion based densification of agricultural biomass residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulandrić, Robert; Vermeulen, Brecht; Nicolai, Bart; Saeys, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal models have been coupled in finite element modelling program for process analysis. • Process has been simulated based on available model parameters from literature. • Model has been validated based on measurement data from field tests. • Heat losses during biomass densification have been estimated to be 10–25%. • Suggestions for process improvement have been proposed. - Abstract: Biomass residues are increasing their share as a feedstock for renewable heat and power systems. Agricultural biomass is available in large quantities but to be utilised in energy systems the bulk density of the material should be increased. A large number of process parameters influence biomass compression and thus affect machinery efficiency and particular energy consumption. Increased concerns related to energy efficiency and environmental impacts of agricultural machinery have led to an increased interest in simulation models which can be used for process optimisation. In this study the influence of temperature on the biomass compression process performance has been analysed. For this purpose, mathematical models describing the thermal processes in the biomass material and the surrounding compression chamber have been elaborated. The heat transfer in the biological material has been described with time dependent Navier–Stokes equations for non-isothermal flow, while time dependent Navier–Stokes equations for heat transfer in solids have been utilised to describe heat transfer in metal structures of the chamber. The prediction performance of the model has been verified by comparing the simulated temperature evolution in the biomass and chamber walls to the corresponding values measured from a biomass compression machine through dedicated tests. The model was found to be able to predict the measured values with an average R 2 of 0.82. The influence of friction heat in the compression chamber has been simulated and heat losses during the process have

  16. Multilevel models for multiple-baseline data: modeling across-participant variation in autocorrelation and residual variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Eun Kyeng; Ferron, John M

    2013-03-01

    Multilevel models (MLM) have been used as a method for analyzing multiple-baseline single-case data. However, some concerns can be raised because the models that have been used assume that the Level-1 error covariance matrix is the same for all participants. The purpose of this study was to extend the application of MLM of single-case data in order to accommodate across-participant variation in the Level-1 residual variance and autocorrelation. This more general model was then used in the analysis of single-case data sets to illustrate the method, to estimate the degree to which the autocorrelation and residual variances differed across participants, and to examine whether inferences about treatment effects were sensitive to whether or not the Level-1 error covariance matrix was allowed to vary across participants. The results from the analyses of five published studies showed that when the Level-1 error covariance matrix was allowed to vary across participants, some relatively large differences in autocorrelation estimates and error variance estimates emerged. The changes in modeling the variance structure did not change the conclusions about which fixed effects were statistically significant in most of the studies, but there was one exception. The fit indices did not consistently support selecting either the more complex covariance structure, which allowed the covariance parameters to vary across participants, or the simpler covariance structure. Given the uncertainty in model specification that may arise when modeling single-case data, researchers should consider conducting sensitivity analyses to examine the degree to which their conclusions are sensitive to modeling choices.

  17. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2007-05-23

    This report was revised in May 2007 to correct values in Section 3.4.1.7, second paragraph, last sentence; 90Sr values in Tables 3.22 and 3.32; and 99Tc values Table 4.3 and in Chapter 5. In addition, the tables in Appendix F were updated to reflect corrections to the 90Sr values. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in May 2005. CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contam¬inants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  18. Residual deposits (residual soil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Residual soil deposits is accumulation of new formate ore minerals on the earth surface, arise as a result of chemical decomposition of rocks. As is well known, at the hyper genes zone under the influence of different factors (water, carbonic acid, organic acids, oxygen, microorganism activity) passes chemical weathering of rocks. Residual soil deposits forming depends from complex of geologic and climatic factors and also from composition and physical and chemical properties of initial rocks

  19. Residual waste from Hanford tanks 241-C-203 and 241-C-204. 2. Contaminant release model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Kirk J; Krupka, Kenneth M; Deutsch, William J; Lindberg, Michael J

    2006-06-15

    Release of U and 99Tc from residual sludge in Hanford waste tanks 241-C-203 and 241-C-204 atthe U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state was quantified by water-leaching, selective extractions, empirical solubility measurements, and thermodynamic modeling. A contaminant release model was developed based on these experimental results and solid-phase characterization results presented elsewhere. Uranium release was determined to be controlled by two phases and occurred in three stages. In the first stage, U release is controlled by the solubility of tejkaite, which is suppressed by high concentrations of sodium released from the dissolution of NaNO3 in the residual sludges. Equilibrium solubility calculations indicate the U released during this stage will have a maximum concentration of 0.021 M. When all the NaNO3 has dissolved from the sludge, the solubility of the remaining cejkaite will increase to 0.28 M. After cejkaite has completely dissolved, the majority of the remaining U is in the form of poorly crystalline Na2U2O7 [or clarkeite Na[(UO2)O(OH)](H20)0-1]. In contact with Hanford groundwater this phase is not stable, and becquerelite becomes the U solubility controlling phase, with a calculated equilibrium concentration of 1.2 x 10(-4) M. For Tc, a significant fraction of its concentration in the residual sludge was determined to be relatively insoluble (20 wt % for C-203 and 80 wt % for C-204). Because of the low concentrations of Tc in these sludge materials, the characterization studies did not identify any discrete Tc solids phases. Release of the soluble fraction of Tc was found to occur concomitantly with NO3-. It was postulated that a NaNO3-NaTcO4 solid solution could be responsible for this behavior. The Tc release concentrations for the soluble fraction were estimated to be 2.4 x 10-6 M for C-203 and 2.7 x 10(-5) M for C-204. Selective extraction results indicated that the recalcitrant fraction of Tc was

  20. Modeling and simulation of stamp deflections in nanoimprint lithography: Exploiting backside grooves to enhance residual layer thickness uniformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Hayden; Smistrup, Kristian; Boning, Duane

    2011-01-01

    We describe a model for the compliance of a nanoimprint stamp etched with a grid of backside grooves. We integrate the model with a fast simulation technique that we have previously demonstrated, to show how etched grooves help reduce the systematic residual layer thickness (RLT) variations...

  1. MODELING OF INTERACTION OF THE PASSENGER TRAIN VEHICLES, EQUIPPED BY PASSIVE SAFETY, AT ACCIDENTAL COLLISION WITH OBSTACLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ye. Naumenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of high-speed railway traffic requires the updating of requirements for the design of passenger rolling stock and revision of safety standards on emergency situation of trains with an obstacle. To the construction crews of the new generation demands by equipping them with passive crash systems, ensuring the safety of passengers and personnel in an emergency situation. In order to refine test scenarios train collision with an obstacle and evaluation indicators of energy absorption of the collision of the passive protection devices which are used in computer modeling. The first step in the research of dynamic processes in the train when excessive shock effects, is to assess the maximum values of the compressive forces generated in intercar compound trains, locomotive and cars which are equipped with passive safety systems.Methodology. Based on the concept of passive protection of passenger rolling stock for track with width of 1520 mm on emergency situation the conceptual passive safety system for passenger trains with locomotive traction are formed from the crews of the new generation was proposed. The passive safety system is recommended to be equipped both the locomotive and cars. For a preliminary assessment of compliance for the passive safety system of a passenger train on emergency situation, as a rule, the simplified discrete-mass model is used, in which the train is considered as one-dimensional chain of rigid bodies connected by nonlinear deformable elements. Findings. The algorithm for computing efforts in the inter-connections of the train locomotive traction of the permanent formation is developed, taking into account the specifics of work of coupling devices, devices, energy absorption and elastic-plastic properties of the body structure of crews at emergency situation. Originality. The proposed algorithm allows taking into account the peculiarities of train locomotives of the new generation and the work of

  2. Numerical modeling of residual stresses generation due to 316L turning. A new experimental and numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiorgue, F.

    2008-12-01

    The main goal of this thesis proposed by AREVA NP is to predict the residual stresses induced by finishing turning of AISI 316L. The numerical model is simulating the residual stresses generation with a new approach by applying directly equivalent thermo-mechanical loadings onto the finished work piece surface without modeling the chip removal process. Thus, this study is divided in two complementary main subsections. On one hand, an experimental campaign is carried out to record data and to compute thermomechanical loadings. This task is made using the AREVA NP parameters. On the other hand numerical models are set up using previous measured values. They are made to reproduce the residual stresses generation by applying and moving the thermo mechanical loadings. The study leads to interesting results because the shapes of the residual stresses curves agree with previous works concerning this topic and with XRD measured residual stresses. The new approach seems to be pertinent because it is possible to simulate several tool passages like no other numerical model. (author)

  3. Semiclassical calculation for collision induced dissociation. III. Restricted two dimensional Morse oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinek, I.

    1980-01-01

    A semiclassical procedure previously used for collinear CID calculations is applied to the perpendicular collisions (2D, no rotation, zero impact parameter) of a Morse homonuclear diatomic molecule and an atom, interacting via an exponential repulsive potential. Values of the dissociation probability (P/sup diss/) are given as a function of total energy (E/sub t/) and initial vibrational state (n 1 =0,1,3,5) for a system with three identical masses. The results are compared with the P/sup diss/ previously reported for an identical one dimensional system. We find: (a) quasiclassical P/sup diss/ that are a good approximation to the semiclassical ones, if CID is classically allowed, (b) vibrational enhancement of CID, and (c) energetic thresholds for dissociation similar to the ones found in the collinear case

  4. Development of risk-based computer models for deriving criteria on residual radioactivity and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing multimedia environmental pathway and health risk computer models to assess radiological risks to human health and to derive cleanup guidelines for environmental restoration, decommissioning, and recycling activities. These models are based on the existing RESRAD code, although each has a separate design and serves different objectives. Two such codes are RESRAD-BUILD and RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC. The RESRAD code was originally developed to implement the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) residual radioactive materials guidelines for contaminated soils. RESRAD has been successfully used by DOE and its contractors to assess health risks and develop cleanup criteria for several sites selected for cleanup or restoration programs. RESRAD-BUILD analyzes human health risks from radioactive releases during decommissioning or rehabilitation of contaminated buildings. Risks to workers are assessed for dismantling activities; risks to the public are assessed for occupancy. RESRAD-BUILD is based on a room compartmental model analyzing the effects on room air quality of contaminant emission and resuspension (as well as radon emanation), the external radiation pathway, and other exposure pathways. RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC, currently under development, is intended to perform uncertainty analysis for RESRAD by using the Monte Carlo approach based on the Latin-Hypercube sampling scheme. The codes being developed at ANL are tailored to meet a specific objective of human health risk assessment and require specific parameter definition and data gathering. The combined capabilities of these codes satisfy various risk assessment requirements in environmental restoration and remediation activities

  5. Development of risk-based computer models for deriving criteria on residual radioactivity and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Yew

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing multimedia environmental pathway and health risk computer models to assess radiological risks to human health and to derive cleanup guidelines for environmental restoration, decommissioning, and recycling activities. These models are based on the existing RESRAD code, although each has a separate design and serves different objectives. Two such codes are RESRAD-BUILD and RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC. The RESRAD code was originally developed to implement the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) residual radioactive materials guidelines for contaminated soils. RESRAD has been successfully used by DOE and its contractors to assess health risks and develop cleanup criteria for several sites selected for cleanup or restoration programs. RESRAD-BUILD analyzes human health risks from radioactive releases during decommissioning or rehabilitation of contaminated buildings. Risks to workers are assessed for dismantling activities; risks to the public are assessed for occupancy. RESRAD-BUILD is based on a room compartmental model analyzing the effects on room air quality of contaminant emission and resuspension (as well as radon emanation), the external radiation pathway, and other exposure pathways. RESRAD-PROBABILISTIC, currently under development, is intended to perform uncertainty analysis for RESRAD by using the Monte Carlo approach based on the Latin-Hypercube sampling scheme. The codes being developed at ANL are tailored to meet a specific objective of human health risk assessment and require specific parameter definition and data gathering. The combined capabilities of these codes satisfy various risk assessment requirements in environmental restoration and remediation activities. (author)

  6. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie New

    Full Text Available Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1 in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4; 80th

  7. A Collision Risk Model to Predict Avian Fatalities at Wind Facilities: An Example Using Golden Eagles, Aquila chrysaetos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Leslie; Bjerre, Emily; Millsap, Brian; Otto, Mark C; Runge, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Wind power is a major candidate in the search for clean, renewable energy. Beyond the technical and economic challenges of wind energy development are environmental issues that may restrict its growth. Avian fatalities due to collisions with rotating turbine blades are a leading concern and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding avian collision risk at wind facilities. This uncertainty is not reflected in many models currently used to predict the avian fatalities that would result from proposed wind developments. We introduce a method to predict fatalities at wind facilities, based on pre-construction monitoring. Our method can directly incorporate uncertainty into the estimates of avian fatalities and can be updated if information on the true number of fatalities becomes available from post-construction carcass monitoring. Our model considers only three parameters: hazardous footprint, bird exposure to turbines and collision probability. By using a Bayesian analytical framework we account for uncertainties in these values, which are then reflected in our predictions and can be reduced through subsequent data collection. The simplicity of our approach makes it accessible to ecologists concerned with the impact of wind development, as well as to managers, policy makers and industry interested in its implementation in real-world decision contexts. We demonstrate the utility of our method by predicting golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) fatalities at a wind installation in the United States. Using pre-construction data, we predicted 7.48 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.1, 19.81)). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses the 80th quantile (11.0 eagle fatalities year-1) in their permitting process to ensure there is only a 20% chance a wind facility exceeds the authorized fatalities. Once data were available from two-years of post-construction monitoring, we updated the fatality estimate to 4.8 eagle fatalities year-1 (95% CI: (1.76, 9.4); 80th quantile, 6

  8. ORTH: R and SAS software for regression models of correlated binary data based on orthogonalized residuals and alternating logistic regressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    By, Kunthel; Qaqish, Bahjat F; Preisser, John S; Perin, Jamie; Zink, Richard C

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a new software for modeling correlated binary data based on orthogonalized residuals, a recently developed estimating equations approach that includes, as a special case, alternating logistic regressions. The software is flexible with respect to fitting in that the user can choose estimating equations for association models based on alternating logistic regressions or orthogonalized residuals, the latter choice providing a non-diagonal working covariance matrix for second moment parameters providing potentially greater efficiency. Regression diagnostics based on this method are also implemented in the software. The mathematical background is briefly reviewed and the software is applied to medical data sets. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Estimation of pharmaceutical residues in primary and secondary sewage sludge based on quantities of use and fugacity modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S J; Ongerth, J E

    2002-01-01

    A general procedure was developed for estimating the concentrations of pharmaceutical residues in fresh primary and secondary sewage sludge. Prescribed quantities coupled with information on the various excretion ratios of 20 pharmaceuticals and 2 of their metabolites enabled prediction of the overall rates of excretion into Australian sewage. Fugacity modelling was applied to predict concentrations of these residues in fresh primary and secondary sludge. Predicted concentrations ranged from 10(-3)-884 microg/L in primary sludge and 10(-4)-36 microg/L in secondary sludge. Overall rates of removal to sludges ranged from 1-39%. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparison to analytical data.

  10. A physically-motivated model describing the dynamic interactions between residual limb and socket in lower limb prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noll Veronika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The amputee’s well-being and mobility are distinclty related to socket fit and resulting biomechanical interaction between residual limb and prosthetic socket. Understanding the dynamic interactions at the interface may lead to new socket standards. This paper introduces a physically-motivated reduced model of the interface, describing the dynamic interactions between residual limb and prosthetic socket. The model allows to investigate the sensitivity to changes of specific parameters in an isolated matter. A simulation study shows how stress distribution changes if friction coefficients are varied which might advance liner design.

  11. As-Cast Residual Stresses in an Aluminum Alloy AA6063 Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of thermally induced residual stresses, created during the industrial direct chill (DC) casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns and the formation of defects during downstream processing. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. Recently, the variation in residual elastic strains in the steady-state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction (ND) in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. In the present study, these measurements are used to show that a well-designed thermomechanical finite element (FE) process model can reproduce relatively well the experimental results. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out to determine the relative effect of the various mechanical parameters when computing the as-cast residual stresses in a cylindrical billet. Two model parameters have been investigated: the temperature when the alloy starts to thermally contract and the plasticity behavior. It is shown that the mechanical properties at low temperatures have a much larger influence on the residual stresses than those at high temperatures.

  12. Quantum-kinetic modeling of electron release in low-energy surface collisions of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marbach, Johannes

    2012-09-20

    In this work we present a theoretical description of electron release in the collision of atomic and molecular projectiles with metallic and especially dielectric surfaces. The associated electron yield, the secondary electron emission coefficient, is an important input parameter for numerical simulations of dielectric barrier discharges and other bounded low-temperature gas discharges. The available reference data for emission coefficients is, however, very sparse and often uncertain, especially for molecular projectiles. With the present work we aim to contribute to the filling of these gaps by providing a flexible and easy-to-use model that allows for a convenient calculation of the emission coefficient and related quantities for a wide range of projectile-surface systems and the most dominant reaction channels.

  13. Collision Probability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Friis; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1998-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to apply a rational model for prediction of ship-ship collision probabilities as function of the ship and the crew characteristics and the navigational environment for MS Dextra sailing on a route between Cadiz and the Canary Islands.The most important ship and crew...

  14. Model reduction and frequency residuals for a robust estimation of nonlinearities in subspace identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, G.; Noël, J. P.; Kerschen, G.; Soria, L.; Stephan, C.

    2017-09-01

    The introduction of the frequency-domain nonlinear subspace identification (FNSI) method in 2013 constitutes one in a series of recent attempts toward developing a realistic, first-generation framework applicable to complex structures. If this method showed promising capabilities when applied to academic structures, it is still confronted with a number of limitations which needs to be addressed. In particular, the removal of nonphysical poles in the identified nonlinear models is a distinct challenge. In the present paper, it is proposed as a first contribution to operate directly on the identified state-space matrices to carry out spurious pole removal. A modal-space decomposition of the state and output matrices is examined to discriminate genuine from numerical poles, prior to estimating the extended input and feedthrough matrices. The final state-space model thus contains physical information only and naturally leads to nonlinear coefficients free of spurious variations. Besides spurious variations due to nonphysical poles, vibration modes lying outside the frequency band of interest may also produce drifts of the nonlinear coefficients. The second contribution of the paper is to include residual terms, accounting for the existence of these modes. The proposed improved FNSI methodology is validated numerically and experimentally using a full-scale structure, the Morane-Saulnier Paris aircraft.

  15. Rural electrification for isolated consumers: Sustainable management model based on residue biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, Giorgiana; Rendeiro, Goncalo; Pinho, Joao; Macedo, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the electrification of a riparian community in the State of Para, Brazil, within the scope of the Program for Electric Power Service Universalization in Brazil. The community is located in a remote area; approximately 100 km from the municipal district, there is no regular transport to access the community, and adequate communication service. The community is provided with electrification facilities through a small biomass-based power plant, directly firing residues produced by the local economic activity. The objective of the paper is to propose a sustainable management model that is suitable for community's isolation conditions, considering the high costs with operation and maintenance related to the supply of isolated consumers in small locations. A simulation is conducted for the operation of the small biomass-based power plant, the generation costs are determined, the legal aspects are analyzed, and a suggestion for the management model is presented. - Highlights: → Electrification of isolated consumers is a great challenge for utilities. → Using local labor and resources allows lower energy costs for electrification. → Creation of a specific legislation for utilities is required. → Should also be implemented social activities together with electrification.

  16. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU—A spatially explicit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, U. Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates’ biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures’ carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent). PMID:28141827

  17. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU-A spatially explicit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Einarsson

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates' biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures' carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops, or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent.

  18. Prediction of residual stress in the welding zone of dissimilar metals using data-based models and uncertainty analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dong Hyuk; Bae, In Ho [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Man Gyun, E-mail: magyna@chosun.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Weon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since welding residual stress is one of the major factors in the generation of primary water stress-corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is essential to examine the welding residual stress to prevent PWSCC. Therefore, several artificial intelligence methods have been developed and studied to predict these residual stresses. In this study, three data-based models, support vector regression (SVR), fuzzy neural network (FNN), and their combined (FNN + SVR) models were used to predict the residual stress for dissimilar metal welding under a variety of welding conditions. By using a subtractive clustering (SC) method, informative data that demonstrate the characteristic behavior of the system were selected to train the models from the numerical data obtained from finite element analysis under a range of welding conditions. The FNN model was optimized using a genetic algorithm. The statistical and analytical uncertainty analysis methods of the models were applied, and their uncertainties were evaluated using 60 sampled training and optimization data sets, as well as a fixed test data set.

  19. Regression models for the restricted residual mean life for right-censored and left-truncated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Holmboe, Stine A; Scheike, Thomas H

    2017-05-20

    The hazard ratios resulting from a Cox's regression hazards model are hard to interpret and to be converted into prolonged survival time. As the main goal is often to study survival functions, there is increasing interest in summary measures based on the survival function that are easier to interpret than the hazard ratio; the residual mean time is an important example of those measures. However, because of the presence of right censoring, the tail of the survival distribution is often difficult to estimate correctly. Therefore, we consider the restricted residual mean time, which represents a partial area under the survival function, given any time horizon τ, and is interpreted as the residual life expectancy up to τ of a subject surviving up to time t. We present a class of regression models for this measure, based on weighted estimating equations and inverse probability of censoring weighted estimators to model potential right censoring. Furthermore, we show how to extend the models and the estimators to deal with delayed entries. We demonstrate that the restricted residual mean life estimator is equivalent to integrals of Kaplan-Meier estimates in the case of simple factor variables. Estimation performance is investigated by simulation studies. Using real data from Danish Monitoring Cardiovascular Risk Factor Surveys, we illustrate an application to additive regression models and discuss the general assumption of right censoring and left truncation being dependent on covariates. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Lp-norm-residual constrained regularization model for estimation of particle size distribution in dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinjun; Li, Jing; Thomas, John C; Song, Limei; Guo, Qinghua; Shen, Jin

    2017-07-01

    In particle size measurement using dynamic light scattering (DLS), noise makes the estimation of the particle size distribution (PSD) from the autocorrelation function data unreliable, and a regularization technique is usually required to estimate a reasonable PSD. In this paper, we propose an Lp-norm-residual constrained regularization model for the estimation of the PSD from DLS data based on the Lp norm of the fitting residual. Our model is a generalization of the existing, commonly used L2-norm-residual-based regularization methods such as CONTIN and constrained Tikhonov regularization. The estimation of PSDs by the proposed model, using different Lp norms of the fitting residual for p=1, 2, 10, and ∞, is studied and their performance is determined using simulated and experimental data. Results show that our proposed model with p=1 is less sensitive to noise and improves stability and accuracy in the estimation of PSDs for unimodal and bimodal systems. The model with p=1 is particularly applicable to the noisy or bimodal PSD cases.

  1. Improvement of a Robotic Manipulator Model Based on Multivariate Residual Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Gale

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method is presented for extending a dynamic model of a six degrees of freedom robotic manipulator. A non-linear multivariate calibration of input–output training data from several typical motion trajectories is carried out with the aim of predicting the model systematic output error at time (t + 1 from known input reference up till and including time (t. A new partial least squares regression (PLSR based method, nominal PLSR with interactions was developed and used to handle, unmodelled non-linearities. The performance of the new method is compared with least squares (LS. Different cross-validation schemes were compared in order to assess the sampling of the state space based on conventional trajectories. The method developed in the paper can be used as fault monitoring mechanism and early warning system for sensor failure. The results show that the suggested methods improves trajectory tracking performance of the robotic manipulator by extending the initial dynamic model of the manipulator.

  2. Collision Risk and Damage after Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a new and complete procedure for calculation of ship-ship collision rates on specific routes and the hull damage caused by such collisions.The procedure is applied to analysis of collision risks for Ro-Ro pasenger vessels. Given a collision the spatial probability distribution...

  3. Genomic prediction and genomic variance partitioning of daily and residual feed intake in pigs using Bayesian Power Lasso models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Janss, L. L. G.; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    Improvement of feed efficiency is essential in pig breeding and selection for reduced residual feed intake (RFI) is an option. The study applied Bayesian Power LASSO (BPL) models with different power parameter to investigate genetic architecture, to predict genomic breeding values, and to partition...

  4. A simulation model for the prediction of tissue:plasma partition coefficients for drug residues in natural casings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haritova, A.M.; Fink-Gremmels, J.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue residues arise from the exposure of animals to undesirable substances in animal feed materials and drinking water and to the therapeutic or zootechnical use of veterinary medicinal products. In the framework of this study, an advanced toxicokinetic model was developed to predict the

  5. CONSRANK: a server for the analysis, comparison and ranking of docking models based on inter-residue contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Chermak, Edrisse

    2014-12-21

    Summary: Herein, we present CONSRANK, a web tool for analyzing, comparing and ranking protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid docking models, based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts and its visualization in 2D and 3D interactive contact maps.

  6. Assessment of HRSC Digital Terrain Models Produced for the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The current Digital Terrain Models available for Mars consist of NASA MOLA (Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter) Digital Terrain Models with an average resolution of 112 m/ pixel (512 pixels/degree) for the polar region. The ESA/DLR High Resolution Stereo Camera is currently orbiting Mars and mapping its surface, 98% with resolution of ≤100 m/pixel and better and 100% at lower resolution [1]. It is possible to produce Digital Terrain Models from HRSC images using various methods. In this study, the method developed on Kim and Muller [2] which uses the VICAR open source program together with photogrammetry sofrware from DLR (Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt) with image matching based on the GOTCHA (Gruen-Otto-Chau) algorithm [3]. Digital Terrain Models have been processed over the South Pole with emphasis on areas around South Polar Residual Cap from High Resolution Stereo Camera images [4]. Digital Terrain Models have been produced for 31 orbits out of 149 polar orbits available. This study analyses the quality of the DTMs including an assessment of accuracy of elevations using the MOLA MEGDR (Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records) which has roughly 42 million MOLA PEDR (Precision Experiment Data Records) points between latitudes of 78 o -90 o S. The issues encountered in the production of Digital Terrain Models will be described and the statistical results and assessment method will be presented. The resultant DTMs will be accessible via http://i-Mars.eu/web-GIS References: [1] Neukum, G. et. al, 2004. Mars Express: The Scientific Payload pp. 17-35. [2] Kim, J.-R. and J.-P. Muller. 2009. PSS vol. 57, pp. 2095-2112. [3] Shin, D. and J.-P. Muller. 2012. Pattern Recognition, 45(10), 3795 -3809. [4] Putri, A.R. D., et al., Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B4, 463-469 Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received partial funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the

  7. Classification and modelling of non-extractable residue (NER) formation from xenobiotics in soil - a synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Matthias; Nowak, Karolina; Miltner, Anja; Trapp, Stefan; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides a comprehensive overview about the formation of non-extractable residues (NER) from organic pesticides and contaminants in soil and tries classifying the different types. Anthropogenic organic chemicals are deliberately (e.g. pesticides) or unintentionally (e.g. polyaromatic hydrocarbons [PAH], chlorinated solvents, pharmaceuticals) released in major amounts to nearly all compartments of the environment. Soils and sediments as complex matrices provide a wide variety of binding sites and are the major sinks for these compounds. Many of the xenobiotics entering soil undergo turnover processes and can be volatilised, leached to the groundwater, degraded by microorganisms or taken up and enriched by living organisms. Xenobiotic NER may be derived from parent compounds and primary metabolites that are sequestered (sorbed or entrapped) within the soil organic matter (type I NER) or can be covalently bound (type II NER). Especially type I NER may pose a considerably environmental risk of potential release. However, NER resulting from productive biodegradation, which means the conversion of carbon (or nitrogen) from the compounds into microbial biomass molecules during microbial degradation (type III, bioNER), do not pose any risk. Experimental and analytical approaches to clearly distinguish between the types are provided and a model to prospectively estimate their fate in soil is proposed.

  8. Composite Cure Process Modeling and Simulations using COMPRO(Registered Trademark) and Validation of Residual Strains using Fiber Optics Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite cure process induced residual strains and warping deformations in composite components present significant challenges in the manufacturing of advanced composite structure. As a part of the Manufacturing Process and Simulation initiative of the NASA Advanced Composite Project (ACP), research is being conducted on the composite cure process by developing an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which the process induced factors influence the residual responses. In this regard, analytical studies have been conducted on the cure process modeling of composite structural parts with varied physical, thermal, and resin flow process characteristics. The cure process simulation results were analyzed to interpret the cure response predictions based on the underlying physics incorporated into the modeling tool. In the cure-kinetic analysis, the model predictions on the degree of cure, resin viscosity and modulus were interpreted with reference to the temperature distribution in the composite panel part and tool setup during autoclave or hot-press curing cycles. In the fiber-bed compaction simulation, the pore pressure and resin flow velocity in the porous media models, and the compaction strain responses under applied pressure were studied to interpret the fiber volume fraction distribution predictions. In the structural simulation, the effect of temperature on the resin and ply modulus, and thermal coefficient changes during curing on predicted mechanical strains and chemical cure shrinkage strains were studied to understand the residual strains and stress response predictions. In addition to computational analysis, experimental studies were conducted to measure strains during the curing of laminated panels by means of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGs) embedded in the resin impregnated panels. The residual strain measurements from laboratory tests were then compared with the analytical model predictions. The paper describes the cure process

  9. Development of Circular Disk Model for Polymeric Nanocomposites and Micromechanical Analysis of Residual Stresses in Reinforced Fibers with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Ghasemi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Circular Disk Model (CDM has been developed to determine the residual stresses in twophase and three- phase unit cell. The two-phase unit cell is consisting of carbon fiber and matrix. The three-phase unit cell is consisting of carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes and matrix in which the carbon fiber is reinforced with the carbon nanotube using electrophoresis method. For different volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, thermal properties of the carbon fiber and carbon nanotube in different linear and lateral directions and also different placement conditions of carbon nanotubes have been considered. Also, residual stresses distribution in two and three phases has been studied, separately. Results of micromechanical analysis of residual stresses obtained from Finite Element Method and CDM, confirms the evaluation and development of three dimensional CDM.

  10. Study on residues of 14C-fenitrothion in model rice-fish ecosystem and field rice-fish ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongliang; Wang Huaxin; Guo Dazhi; Chen Zhiyu; wu Suqiong

    1994-01-01

    When equal amounts of the pesticide are applied, the extractable residues in brown rice (equivalent to 34.3 +- 1.9 μg/kg fenitrothion) and rice stems and leaves (20.9 +- 1.5 μg/kg) of the model rice-fish ecosystem are 10-15 times higher than those of the field rice-fish ecosystem (4.48 +- 0.13 μg/kg and 1.27 +- 0.34 μg/kg respectively). Residues in upper part of the soil (6.50 +- 0.1-8.10 +- 0.2 μg/kg) and lower part of the soil (1.30 +- 0.1-1.50 +- 0.1 μg/kg)of the model rice-fish ecosystem are 10-40 times higher than those of the field rice-fish ecosystem (0.17 +- 0.01 μg/kg). The extractable residues in paddy water of the model ecosystem (0.30 +- 0.01 μg/kg) are similar to that the the field ecosystem (0.20 +- 0.02 μg/kg). When the fenitrothion is sprayed on the rice plants, residues in brown rice, fish body, soil and paddy water are lower than those when the pesticide is sprayed on the surface of the soil

  11. Multi-scale Model of Residual Strength of 2D Plain Weave C/SiC Composites in Oxidation Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-02-01

    Multi-scale models play an important role in capturing the nonlinear response of woven carbon fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In plain weave carbon fiber/silicon carbon (C/SiC) composites, the carbon fibers and interphases will be oxidized at elevated temperature and the strength of the composite will be degraded when oxygen enters micro-cracks formed in the as-produced parts due to the mismatch in thermal properties between constituents. As a result of the oxidation on fiber surface, fiber shows a notch-like morphology. In this paper, the change rule of fiber notch depth is fitted by circular function. And a multi-scale model based upon the change rule of fiber notch depth is developed to simulate the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. The multi-scale model is able to accurately predict the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of 2D plain weave C/SiC composites in oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the oxidation time and temperature of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of plain weave C/SiC composites.

  12. Modeling of Prosthetic Limb Rotation Control by Sensing Rotation of Residual Arm Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guanglin; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    We proposed a new approach to improve the control of prosthetic arm rotation in amputees. Arm rotation is sensed by implanting a small permanent magnet into the distal end of the residual bone, which produces a magnetic field. The position of the bone rotation can be derived from magnetic field distribution detected with magnetic sensors on the arm surface, and then conveyed to the prosthesis controller to manipulate the rotation of the prosthesis. Proprioception remains intact for residual l...

  13. An empirical tool to evaluate the safety of cyclists: Community based, macro-level collision prediction models using negative binomial regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Lovegrove, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Today, North American governments are more willing to consider compact neighborhoods with increased use of sustainable transportation modes. Bicycling, one of the most effective modes for short trips with distances less than 5km is being encouraged. However, as vulnerable road users (VRUs), cyclists are more likely to be injured when involved in collisions. In order to create a safe road environment for them, evaluating cyclists' road safety at a macro level in a proactive way is necessary. In this paper, different generalized linear regression methods for collision prediction model (CPM) development are reviewed and previous studies on micro-level and macro-level bicycle-related CPMs are summarized. On the basis of insights gained in the exploration stage, this paper also reports on efforts to develop negative binomial models for bicycle-auto collisions at a community-based, macro-level. Data came from the Central Okanagan Regional District (CORD), of British Columbia, Canada. The model results revealed two types of statistical associations between collisions and each explanatory variable: (1) An increase in bicycle-auto collisions is associated with an increase in total lane kilometers (TLKM), bicycle lane kilometers (BLKM), bus stops (BS), traffic signals (SIG), intersection density (INTD), and arterial-local intersection percentage (IALP). (2) A decrease in bicycle collisions was found to be associated with an increase in the number of drive commuters (DRIVE), and in the percentage of drive commuters (DRP). These results support our hypothesis that in North America, with its current low levels of bicycle use (<4%), we can initially expect to see an increase in bicycle collisions as cycle mode share increases. However, as bicycle mode share increases beyond some unknown 'critical' level, our hypothesis also predicts a net safety improvement. To test this hypothesis and to further explore the statistical relationships between bicycle mode split and overall road

  14. Effect of the spray volume adjustment model on the efficiency of fungicides and residues in processing tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Ratajkiewicz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of a proportionate spray volume (PSV adjustment model and a fixed model (300 L/ha on the infestation of processing tomato with potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary (PLB and azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residues in fruits in three consecutive seasons. The fungicides were applied in alternating system with or without two spreader adjuvants. The proportionate spray volume adjustment model was based on the number of leaves on plants and spray volume index. The modified Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS method was optimized and validated for extraction of azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residue. Gas chromatography with a nitrogen and phosphorus detector and an electron capture detector were used for the analysis of fungicides. The results showed that higher fungicidal residues were connected with lower infestation of tomato with PLB. PSV adjustment model resulted in lower infestation of tomato than the fixed model (300 L/ha when fungicides were applied at half the dose without adjuvants. Higher expected spray interception into the tomato canopy with the PSV system was recognized as the reasons of better control of PLB. The spreader adjuvants did not have positive effect on the biological efficacy of spray volume application systems. The results suggest that PSV adjustment model can be used to determine the spray volume for fungicide application for processing tomato crop.

  15. Effect of the spray volume adjustment model on the efficiency of fungicides and residues in processing tomato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratajkiewicz, H.; Kierzek, R.; Raczkowski, M.; Hołodyńska-Kulas, A.; Łacka, A.; Wójtowicz, A.; Wachowiak, M.

    2016-11-01

    This study compared the effects of a proportionate spray volume (PSV) adjustment model and a fixed model (300 L/ha) on the infestation of processing tomato with potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary) (PLB) and azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residues in fruits in three consecutive seasons. The fungicides were applied in alternating system with or without two spreader adjuvants. The proportionate spray volume adjustment model was based on the number of leaves on plants and spray volume index. The modified Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) method was optimized and validated for extraction of azoxystrobin and chlorothalonil residue. Gas chromatography with a nitrogen and phosphorus detector and an electron capture detector were used for the analysis of fungicides. The results showed that higher fungicidal residues were connected with lower infestation of tomato with PLB. PSV adjustment model resulted in lower infestation of tomato than the fixed model (300 L/ha) when fungicides were applied at half the dose without adjuvants. Higher expected spray interception into the tomato canopy with the PSV system was recognized as the reasons of better control of PLB. The spreader adjuvants did not have positive effect on the biological efficacy of spray volume application systems. The results suggest that PSV adjustment model can be used to determine the spray volume for fungicide application for processing tomato crop. (Author)

  16. How does the Quark-Gluon Plasma know the collision energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Heavy ion collisions at the LHC facility generate a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) which, for central collisions, has a higher energy density and temperature than the plasma generated in central collisions at the RHIC. But sufficiently peripheral LHC collisions give rise to plasmas which have the same energy density and temperature as the "central" RHIC plasmas. One might assume that the two versions of the QGP would have very similar properties (for example, with regard to jet quenching), but recent investigations have suggested that they do not: the plasma "knows" that the overall collision energy is different in the two cases. We argue, using a gauge-gravity analysis, that the strong magnetic fields arising in one case (peripheral collisions), but not the other, may be relevant here. If the residual magnetic field in peripheral LHC plasmas is of the order of at least eB ≈ 5mπ2, then the model predicts modifications of the relevant quenching parameter which approach those recently reported.

  17. Modelling and Analysis of a Collision Avoidance Protocol using SPIN and UPPAAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Arne; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Jensen, Henrik Ejersbo

    1997-01-01

    , the modelling of the media becomes ackward due to the lack of broadcast communication in the PROMELA language. On the other hand we find it easy to model the timed aspects using the UPPAAL tool. Especially, the notion of committed locations supports the modelling of broadcast communication. However...

  18. A hybrid model for the investigation of heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    The following topics were dealt with: The coupling of the Botzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model with Kopenhagen multifragmentation model realising a new hybrid model, application on 197 Au+ 197 Au reactions between 100 and 250 A.MeV, calculation of the chracteristics of the fragmentation system including mass number, excitation energy, angular momenta, two-particle correlation function

  19. Discrete model in the analysis of residual stresses in unidirectional winding cylinders made of fiber-reinforced plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turusov Robert Alekseevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today works in cosmos and at great sea depths are becoming very current. In order to execute these works tanks with great mass perfection are needed, which represents the relation of the product of pressure and inner volume to its mass. Usually such tanks are usually produced as a cocoon by winding methods, which can be automated. The simplest model of a cocoon is a cylinder with hemispheric blinds at the edges. The radial stresses arise in thick walled composite cylinders due to anisotropic thermal shrinkage during cooling process after curing. It also can lead to formation of radial cracks. The results of the analyses when a material is simplified to a homogenous orthotropic material show a very small residual radial stress value. In this paper we have used discrete model to evaluate residual radial stresses in thick-walled unidirectional filament wound cylinder and the results were compared to the results of homogenous orthotropic model.

  20. The effect of hardening laws and thermal softening on modeling residual stresses in FSW of aluminum alloy 2024-T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model consisting of a heat transfer analysis based on the Thermal Pseudo Mechanical (TPM) model for heat generation, and a sequentially coupled quasi-static stress analysis with a built-in metallurgical softening model was implemented in ABAQUS. Both isotropic...... or kinematic hardening together with the metallurgical softening model were applied in order to give a first impression of the tendencies in residual stresses in friction stir welds when choosing different hardening and softening behaviors. Secondly, real friction stir butt welding of aluminum alloy 2024-T3...

  1. Chemical modelling of trace elements in pore water from PFBC residues containing ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, L.G.; Brandberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ammonia is added to the PFBC process with the purpose to reduce the emissions of NO x in the stack gases. The design of the system for cleaning the stack gases will lead to an increased adsorption of ammonia and an accumulation of soluble ammonium salts in the cyclone ash from PFBC processes. This can be an environmental problem since the amounts will increase over the coming years and there will be a need to dispose the residues. When infiltrating rainwater penetrates the disposed residues ammonia and ammonium salts result in a contamination of the pore water with ammonia in the disposed residues. This entail the solubility of several trace elements in the residues that form soluble complexes with ammonia will increase and cause an increased contamination of groundwater and surface water. In this study the increased solubilities is calculated for the trace elements cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc in the residues using thermodynamical data. The calculations have been performed with probable solid phases of the trace elements at oxidizing and reducing conditions as a function of pH and at varying concentration of ammonia in the pore water. The thermodynamic calculations have been performed with the geochemical code EQ3NR. The results from the calculations show that as a concentration of 17 mg NH 3 /l in the pore water of the residues increases the solubilities for copper and silver. If the concentration of ammonia increases to 170 mg NH 3 /l will the solubilities increase also for cadmium, nickel and zinc. (12 refs., 39 figs.)

  2. Model unspecific search for new physics in pp collision at √ s = 7 TeV

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-16

    Nov 16, 2012 ... Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. ∗. Corresponding author. E-mail: shivali.malhotra@cern.ch. Abstract. We present the results of a model-independent analysis, which systematically scans the data taken by CMS for deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions.

  3. Prediction of hydrodynamic and other solution properties of rigid proteins from atomic- and residue-level models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A; Amorós, D; García de la Torre, J

    2011-08-17

    Here we extend the ability to predict hydrodynamic coefficients and other solution properties of rigid macromolecular structures from atomic-level structures, implemented in the computer program HYDROPRO, to models with lower, residue-level resolution. Whereas in the former case there is one bead per nonhydrogen atom, the latter contains one bead per amino acid (or nucleotide) residue, thus allowing calculations when atomic resolution is not available or coarse-grained models are preferred. We parameterized the effective hydrodynamic radius of the elements in the atomic- and residue-level models using a very large set of experimental data for translational and rotational coefficients (intrinsic viscosity and radius of gyration) for >50 proteins. We also extended the calculations to very large proteins and macromolecular complexes, such as the whole 70S ribosome. We show that with proper parameterization, the two levels of resolution yield similar and rather good agreement with experimental data. The new version of HYDROPRO, in addition to considering various computational and modeling schemes, is far more efficient computationally and can be handled with the use of a graphical interface. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Matter power spectrum in hidden neutrino interacting dark matter models: a closer look at the collision term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Tobias; Covi, Laura [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Georg-August University Göttingen,Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, Göttingen, D-37077 (Germany); Kamada, Ayuki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Takahashi, Tomo [Department of Physics, Saga University,Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tokyo,Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency,4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan)

    2016-11-21

    Dark Matter (DM) models providing possible alternative solutions to the small-scale crisis of the standard cosmology are nowadays of growing interest. We consider DM interacting with light hidden fermions via well-motivated fundamental operators showing the resultant matter power spectrum is suppressed on subgalactic scales within a plausible parameter region. Our basic description of the evolution of cosmological perturbations relies on a fully consistent first principles derivation of a perturbed Fokker-Planck type equation, generalizing existing literature. The cosmological perturbation of the Fokker-Planck equation is presented for the first time in two different gauges, where the results transform into each other according to the rules of gauge transformation. Furthermore, our focus lies on a derivation of a broadly applicable and easily computable collision term showing important phenomenological differences to other existing approximations. As one of the main results and concerning the small-scale crisis, we show the equal importance of vector and scalar boson mediated interactions between the DM and the light fermions.

  5. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  6. Particle production in high energy collisions and the non-relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisovich, V.V.; Nyiri, J.

    1981-07-01

    The present review deals with multiparticle production processes at high energies using ideas which originate in the non-relativistic quark model. Consequences of the approach are considered and they are compared with experimental data. (author)

  7. The Search for physics beyond the standard model in the $B\\bar{B}$ spectrum observed in tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Kara Dion [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Many extensions have been proposed to the Standard Model of fundamental particles and interactions, therefore we have conducted a general search with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) for particles which would be expected to appear as a resonance in the b$\\bar{b}$ mass spectrum produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair in pp collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Selvaggi, Michele; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Tikvica, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Kuotb Awad, Alaa Metwaly; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Saxena, Pooja; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Biasotto, Massimo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Grigelionis, Ignas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Wolszczak, Weronika; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; 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Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Asavapibhop, Burin; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; 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Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; 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Baden, Drew; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Lusito, Letizia; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; 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Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Walker, Matthew; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-05-28

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair is presented using data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns (5.1 inverse femtobarns) collected in pp collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV (8 TeV). Events are considered where the top-quark pair decays to either one lepton+jets ($t\\bar{t} \\to \\ell\

  9. Particle yields, antiproton scaling and the average transverse momenta in high energy lead-lead collisions a model-based study

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P; De, B; Bhattacharya, D P

    2001-01-01

    The study aims at explaining the behaviour of some of the very important observables measured in the latest lead-lead collisions at CERN in the light of a variety of the sequential chain model. Calculated values, to our surprise, are in excellent agreement with the measurements, especially when the effect of cascading and rescattering is empirically introduced in the calculations of the average transverse momenta. Implications of the results are discussed. (17 refs).

  10. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: Leaching characterization and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sri, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column...

  11. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSWI air-pollution control residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astrup, T.; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Sloot, van der H.A.; Christensen, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from

  12. Hepatocytes Contribute to Residual Glucose Production in a Mouse Model for Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Brenda S.; Boss, Andreas; van Dijk, Theo H.; Soty, Maud; Wolters, Henk; Mutel, Elodie; Groen, Albert K.; Derks, Terry G. J.; Mithieux, Gilles; Heerschap, Arend; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Rajas, Fabienne; Oosterveer, Maaike H.

    2017-01-01

    It is a long-standing enigma how glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I patients retain a limited capacity for endogenous glucose production despite the loss of glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Insight into the source of residual endogenous glucose production is of clinical importance given the risk

  13. Residual water transport in the Marsdiep tidal inlet inferred from observations and a numerical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Gerkema, T.; Duran-Matute, M.; Nauw, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    At tidal inlets, large amounts of water are exchanged with the adjacent sea during the tidal cycle.The residual flows, the net effect of ebb and flood, are generally small compared with the gross flux;they vary in magnitude and sign from one tidal period to the other; and their long-term mean

  14. Puck collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  15. Effective-gluon model description of inclusive meson production in π+- p and pp collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Look, G.W.; Fischbach, E.

    1977-01-01

    The recently introduced effective-gluon (EG) model is applied to inclusive meson production at large transverse momentum (p/sub t)/from π +- p and pp interactions. In the EG model the dependence of the inclusive differential cross section on p/ sub t/ and center-of-momentum energy √s is characterized by a single universal constant B = 18 GeV 2 ; this constant is obtained by fitting to the inclusive data for pp → cX with c = π +- π 0 , K +- p, and p-bar. Since the EG model requires that the inclusive differential cross sections for π +- p → X/should be characterized by the same constant B, the dependence of these cross sections on p/sub t/and √s should follow from the previous analysis of pp → cX without the introduction of any additional parameters. The only new information required is the form of the momentum distribution function for partons in the incident pion. Several models for this function are considered and it it shown that all of the alternatives lead to approximately the same predictions. Comparison of theory and experiment indicates that the EG model description of the recent Fermilab data of Donaldson et al. is good to approximately 15--20 % per data point over a range of more than 10 5 in the magnitude of the inclusive cross section

  16. On use of the Wigner function in the semiclassical model of inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, V.P.; Sidorenko, V.Yi.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier work we formulated the semiclassical model of nuclear reactions induced by projectiles weakly bound with respect to the 2-particle decay. In the present work the model is extended to projectiles with low 3-particle decay threshold. Treating 6 He as a three-particle system a+n+n, we calculate the total cross sections of ( 6 He,n), ( 6 He,a),( 6 He,an), ( 6 He,nn),( 6 He,ann), and fusion reactions on 232 Th at a beam energy above the Coulomb barrier

  17. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Hemelrijk, C. K.; Padding, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed

  18. Λ polarization in an exact fluid dynamical model for heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yilong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Λ polarization is calculated in an exact analytical, rotating model based on parameters from a high resolution (3+1D Particle-in-Cell Relativistic hydrodynamics calculation. The polarization is attributed to effects from thermal vorticity and for the first time the effects of the radial and axial acceleration are also studied separately.

  19. Rotational diffusion model with a variable collision distribution. II. The effect of energy transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.; Wegdam, G.H.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of model calculations on the rotational motion of linear molecules in dense systems. To this end we have developed a matrix description for the rotational diffusion, which is extended in this article to the J-diffusion limit. Closed expressions are obtained for

  20. Simulation of balloon angioplasty in residually stressed blood vessels-Application of a gradient-enhanced fibre damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polindara, César; Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2016-08-16

    In this contribution we study the balloon angioplasty in a residually stressed artery by means of a non-local gradient-enhanced fibre damage model. The balloon angioplasty is a common surgical intervention used to extend or reopen narrowed blood vessels in order to restore the continuous blood flow in, for instance, atherosclerotic arteries. Inelastic, i.e. predominantly damage-related and elastoplastic processes are induced in the artery during its inflation resulting in an irreversible deformation. As a beneficial consequence, provided that the inelastic deformations do not exceed a specific limit, higher deformations can be obtained within the same pressure level and a continuous blood flow can be guaranteed. In order to study the mechanical response of the artery in this scenario, we make use of the non-local gradient-enhanced model proposed in Waffenschmidt et al. (2014). In this contribution, we extend this model to make use of an incompressible format in connection with a Q1Q1P0 finite element implementation. The residual stresses in the artery are also taken into account following the framework presented in Waffenschmidt (2015). From the results it becomes apparent that, when the artery is subjected to radial stresses beyond the physiological range, damage evolution is triggered in the collagen fibres. The impact of the residual stresses on the structural response and on the circumferential stress distribution along the thickness of the arterial wall is also studied. It is observed that the residual stresses have a beneficial effect on the mechanical response of the arterial wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Degenerate vacua to vacuumless model and kink–antikink collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Simas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate a Z2 symmetric model of one scalar field ϕ in (1,1 dimension. The model is characterized by a continuous transition from a potential V(ϕ with two vacua to the vacuumless case. The model has kink and antikink solutions that minimize energy. Stability analysis is described by a Schrödinger-like equation with a potential that transits from a volcano-shape with no vibrational states (in the case of vacuumless limit to a smooth valley with one vibrational state. We are interested in the structure of two-bounce windows present in kink–antikink scattering processes. The standard mechanism of Campbell–Schonfeld–Wingate (CSW requires the presence of one vibrational state for the occurrence of two-bounce windows. We report that the effect of increasing the separation of vacua from the potential V(ϕ has the consequence of trading some of the first two-bounce windows predicted by the CSW mechanism by false two-bounce windows. Another consequence is the appearance of false two-bounce windows of zero-order.

  2. On Impact Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship-ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived...... mathematical models include friction at the contact point so that situation where the collision results in a sliding motion is included. Results obtained by application of the present procedure are compared with results obtained by time simulations and good agreement has been achieved. In addition, a number...... of illustrative examples are presented. The procedure presented in the paper is well suited for inclusion in a probabilistic calculation model for damage of ship structures due to collisions....

  3. On impact mechanics in ship collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present analytical, closed-form expressions for the energy released for crushing and the impact impulse during ship collisions. Ship–ship collisions, ship collisions with rigid walls and ship collisions with flexible offshore structures are considered. The derived...... mathematical models include friction at the contact point so that situation where the collision results in a sliding motion is included. Results obtained by application of the present procedure are compared with results obtained by time simulations and good agreement has been achieved. In addition, a number...... of illustrative examples are presented. The procedure presented in the paper is well suited for inclusion in a probabilistic calculation model for damage of ship structures due to collisions....

  4. In-situ observation of dislocation and analysis of residual stresses by FEM/DDM modeling in water cavitation peening of pure titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Ju, D.; Han, B.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, in order to approach this problem, specimens of pure titanium were treated with WCP, and the subsequent changes in microstructure, residual stress, and surface morphologies were investigated as a function of WCP duration. The influence of water cavitation peening (WCP) treatment on the microstructure of pure titanium was investigated. A novel combined finite element and dislocation density method (FEM/DDM), proposed for predicting macro and micro residual stresses induced on the material subsurface treated with water cavitation peening, is also presented. A bilinear elastic-plastic finite element method was conducted to predict macro-residual stresses and a dislocation density method was conducted to predict micro-residual stresses. These approaches made possible the prediction of the magnitude and depth of residual stress fields in pure titanium. The effect of applied impact pressures on the residual stresses was also presented. The results of the FEM/DDM modeling were in good agreement with those of the experimental measurements.

  5. Collision-Induced Melting in Collisions of Water Ice Nanograins: Strong Deformations and Prevention of Bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Umstätter, Philipp; Alabd Alhafez, Iyad; Rosandi, Yudi; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2017-11-01

    Collisions between ice grains are ubiquitous in the outer solar system. The mechanics of such collisions is traditionally described by the elastic contact theory of adhesive spheres. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to study collisions between nanometer-sized amorphous water ice grains. We demonstrate that the collision-induced heating leads to grain melting in the interface of the colliding grains. The large lateral deformations and grain sticking induced considerably modify available macroscopic collision models. We report on systematic increases of the contact radius, strong grain deformations, and the prevention of grain bouncing.

  6. Degradation of cefquinome in spiked milk as a model for bioremediation of dairy farm waste milk containing cephalosporin residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, R A; Randall, L P; Bailey-Horne, V; Heinrich, K; Sharman, M; Brunton, L A; La Ragione, R M; Jones, J R

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this work were to develop a model of dairy farm waste milk and to investigate methods for the bioremediation of milk containing cefquinome residues. Unpasteurized milk and UHT milk that had both been spiked with cefquinome at a concentration of 2 μg ml(-1) were used as a model for waste milk containing cephalosporin residues. Adjustment of the spiked UHT milk to pH 10 or treatment with conditioned medium from bacterial growth producing cefotaximase, were the most effective methods for decreasing the cefquinome concentrations within 24 h. A large-scale experiment (10 l of cefquinome-spiked unpasteurized milk) suggested that fermentation for 22 h at 37°C followed by heating at 60°C for 2 h was sufficient to decrease cefquinome concentrations to below the limit of quantification (milk. Treatment of waste milk to decrease cephalosporin residue concentrations and also to kill bacteria prior to feeding to dairy calves could decrease the risk of selection for ESBL bacteria on dairy farms. © 2015 Crown copyright. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  7. Theory and Validation for the Collision Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1999-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the Collision Module for the computer program DAMAGE....

  8. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    to steady state versus transient flow conditions and to the amount of hydraulic and solute data used is investigated. The flow parameters, transmissivity and leakage factor, are estimated simultaneously with the transport parameters: source strength, porosity, and longitudinal dispersivity. This paper...... is the first in a two-paper series describing contaminant transport at a waste residue site. III the second paper, reactive transport at the site is investigated....

  9. Collision avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glynn, P.

    2008-04-01

    A suite of new collision avoidance systems (CAS 1,2,3, and 4) for heavy vehicles particularly mine haul trucks, is presented for vehicles whose structure and size necessarily impeded driver visibility. The systems use probe radar systems, continuous wave Doppler radar, ultrasonic Doppler, radio frequency tagging and laser scanning technology. The main goal of the ACARP/CSIRO funded projects is to determine the appropriate use and adaptation of commercially available technologies, and where possible, produce a low cost variant suitable for use in proximity detection on large mining industry haul trucks. CAS variants produced were subjected to a field demonstration and linked to the output from the earlier CAS 1 project. The research concentrated on large mine haul trucks operating in open cut coal mines. While the results are especially applicable to the Queensland and New South Wales coal industries, they are also applicable worldwide. 1 tab.

  10. Genomic dissection and prediction of feed intake and residual feed intake traits using a longitudinal model in F2 chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begli, Hakimeh Emamgholi; Torshizi, Rasoul vaez; Masoudi, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    -density single nucleotide polymorphism (S N P ) genotypes , a nd to conduct a GWA study on longitudinal FI and residual feed intake (RFI) in a tot al of 312 chick ens with phenotype and genotype in the F 2 population. The GWA and GS studies reported in this pap er were conducted using β-spline random regression......Feed efficiency trait s (FETs) ar e import ant economic indicators in poultry production. Because feed intake (FI) is a time -dependent variable, longitudinal models can provide insights into the genetic basis of FET variation over time. It is expected that the application of longitudinal models...

  11. Modeling and Parameter Optimization for Surface Roughness and Residual Stress in Dry Turning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. El-Axir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of some turning variables and tool overhang on surface roughness parameters and residual stress induced due to machining 6061-T6 aluminum alloy is investigated in this paper. Four input parameters (cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and tool overhang are considered. Tests are carried out by precision turning operation on a lathe. Design of experiment techniques, i.e. response surface methodology (RSM and Taguchi's technique have been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Surface roughness parameters are measured using a portable surface roughness device while residual stresses are measured employing deflection-etching technique using electrochemical analysis. The results obtained reveal that feed and rotational speed play significant role in determining the average surface roughness. Furthermore, the depth of cut and tool overhang are less significant parameters, whereas tool overhang interacts with feed rate. The best result of surface roughness was obtained using low or medium values of overhang with low speed and /or feed rate. Minimum maximum tensile residual stress can be obtained with a combination of tool overhang of 37 mm with very low depth of cut, low rotational speed and feed rate of 0.188 mm/rev.

  12. Mathematical model for studying cyclist kinematics in vehicle-bicycle frontal collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condrea, OA; Chiru, A.; Chiriac, RL; Vlase, S.

    2017-10-01

    For the development of effective vehicle related safety solutions to improve cyclist protection, kinematic predictions are essential. The objective of the paper was the elaboration of a simple mathematical model for predicting cyclist kinematics, with the advantage of yielding simple results for relatively complicated impact situations. Thus, the use of elaborated math software is not required and the calculation time is shortened. The paper presents a modelling framework to determine cyclist kinematic behaviour for the situations in which a M1 category vehicle frontally hits the rear part of a bicycle. After the primary impact between the vehicle front bumper and the bicycle, the cyclist hits the vehicle’s bonnet, the windscreen or both the vehicle’s bonnet and the windscreen in short succession. The head-windshield impact is often the most severe impact, causing serious and potentially lethal injuries. The cyclist is represented by a rigid segment and the equations of motion for the cyclist after the primary impact are obtained by applying Newton’s second law of motion. The impact time for the contact between the vehicle and the cyclist is yielded afterwards by formulating and intersecting the trajectories for two points positioned on the cyclist’s head/body and the vehicle’s windscreen/bonnet while assuming that the cyclist’s equations of motion after the primary impact remain the same. Postimpact kinematics for the secondary impact are yielded by applying linear and angular momentum conservation laws.

  13. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun You

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972 and collision avoidance rules (2001 are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  14. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Youngjun; Rhee, Key-Pyo; Ahn, Kyoungsoo

    2013-06-01

    In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA) and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA) information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972) and collision avoidance rules (2001) are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  15. A stochastic logical system approach to model and optimal control of cyclic variation of residual gas fraction in combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuhu; Kumar, Madan; Shen, Tielong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-cylinder pressure based measuring method for the RGF is derived. • A stochastic logical dynamical model is proposed to represent the transient behavior of the RGF. • The receding horizon controller is designed to reduce the variance of the RGF. • The effectiveness of the proposed model and control approach is validated by the experimental evidence. - Abstract: In four stroke internal combustion engines, residual gas from the previous cycle is an important factor influencing the combustion quality of the current cycle, and the residual gas fraction (RGF) is a popular index to monitor the influence of residual gas. This paper investigates the cycle-to-cycle transient behavior of the RGF in the view of systems theory and proposes a multi-valued logic-based control strategy for attenuation of RGF fluctuation. First, an in-cylinder pressure sensor-based method for measuring the RGF is provided by following the physics of the in-cylinder transient state of four-stroke internal combustion engines. Then, the stochastic property of the RGF is examined based on statistical data obtained by conducting experiments on a full-scale gasoline engine test bench. Based on the observation of the examination, a stochastic logical transient model is proposed to represent the cycle-to-cycle transient behavior of the RGF, and with the model an optimal feedback control law, which targets on rejection of the RGF fluctuation, is derived in the framework of stochastic logical system theory. Finally, experimental results are demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the proposed model and the control strategy.

  16. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  17. Prediction of residual stress for dissimilar metals welding at nuclear power plants using fuzzy neural network models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Jin Weon; Lim, Dong Hyuk

    2007-01-01

    A fuzzy neural network model is presented to predict residual stress for dissimilar metal welding under various welding conditions. The fuzzy neural network model, which consists of a fuzzy inference system and a neuronal training system, is optimized by a hybrid learning method that combines a genetic algorithm to optimize the membership function parameters and a least squares method to solve the consequent parameters. The data of finite element analysis are divided into four data groups, which are split according to two end-section constraints and two prediction paths. Four fuzzy neural network models were therefore applied to the numerical data obtained from the finite element analysis for the two end-section constraints and the two prediction paths. The fuzzy neural network models were trained with the aid of a data set prepared for training (training data), optimized by means of an optimization data set and verified by means of a test data set that was different (independent) from the training data and the optimization data. The accuracy of fuzzy neural network models is known to be sufficiently accurate for use in an integrity evaluation by predicting the residual stress of dissimilar metal welding zones

  18. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysa, Radika; Venselaar, Hanka; Poston, Jacqueline; Ullman, Buddy; Hasne, Marie-Pierre

    2013-06-15

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural determinants critical for function of these permeases are unknown. To elucidate the key residues involved in putrescine translocation and recognition by this APC family member, a homology model of TcPOT1.1 was constructed on the basis of the atomic co-ordinates of the Escherichia coli AdiC arginine/agmatine antiporter crystal structure. The TcPOT1.1 homology model consisted of 12 transmembrane helices with the first ten helices organized in two V-shaped antiparallel domains with discontinuities in the helical structures of transmembrane spans 1 and 6. The model suggests that Trp241 and a Glu247-Arg403 salt bridge participate in a gating system and that Asn245, Tyr148 and Tyr400 contribute to the putrescine-binding pocket. To test the validity of the model, 26 site-directed mutants were created and tested for their ability to transport putrescine and to localize to the parasite cell surface. These results support the robustness of the TcPOT1.1 homology model and reveal the importance of specific aromatic residues in the TcPOT1.1 putrescine-binding pocket.

  19. Combining modelling and mutagenesis studies of synaptic vesicle protein 2A to identify a series of residues involved in racetam binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiye; Anderson, Dina; Lynch, Berkley A; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Foerch, Patrik; Lebon, Florence

    2011-10-01

    LEV (levetiracetam), an antiepileptic drug which possesses a unique profile in animal models of seizure and epilepsy, has as its unique binding site in brain, SV2A (synaptic vesicle protein 2A). Previous studies have used a chimaeric and site-specific mutagenesis approach to identify three residues in the putative tenth transmembrane helix of SV2A that, when mutated, alter binding of LEV and related racetam derivatives to SV2A. In the present paper, we report a combined modelling and mutagenesis study that successfully identifies another 11 residues in SV2A that appear to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis and modelling of SV2A suggested residues equivalent to critical functional residues of other MFS (major facilitator superfamily) transporters. Alanine scanning of these and other SV2A residues resulted in the identification of residues affecting racetam binding, including Ile273 which differentiated between racetam analogues, when mutated to alanine. Integrating mutagenesis results with docking analysis led to the construction of a mutant in which six SV2A residues were replaced with corresponding SV2B residues. This mutant showed racetam ligand-binding affinity intermediate to the affinities observed for SV2A and SV2B.

  20. Radiations from atomic collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernyi, D.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of atomic collision phenomena in which only the Coulomb forces have a role is an actual field or the research of the present days. The impact energy range in these collisions is very broad,it extends from the eV or even lower region to the GeV region or higher,i.e. it spans the region of three branches of physics,namely that of the atomic,the nuclear and the particle physics.To describe and explain the collision processes themselves, different models (collision mechanisms) are used and they are surveyed in the presentation. Different electromagnetic radiations and particles are emitted from the collision processes.Their features are shown in details together with the most important methods in their detection and study.Examples are given based on the literature and on the investigations of the author and his coworkers. The applications of the radiation from atomic collisions in other scientific fields and in the solution of different practical problems are also surveyed shortly. 16 figs., 2 tabs., 76 refs. (author)

  1. A collision-based model for measuring bedload transport from the seismic waves generated by rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D. L.; Finnegan, N. J.; Brodsky, E. E.; Stark, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Accurately predicting rates of coarse sediment transport in river channels is a central goal of fluvial geomorphology and civil engineering. However, it is difficult to evaluate sediment transport and bedrock abrasion models in large rivers because quantitative measures of bedload transport are labor intensive and often dangerous to obtain in floods. Two recent studies show that the amplitude of seismic waves near rivers may record bedload flux, indicating that seismometers near rivers provide a potential means of monitoring bedload transport. In an effort to better interpret seismic waves generated by rivers, we seek a relationship between the variables governing bedload transport and seismic waves. Our approach relies on the fact that elastic waves are generated when momentum is transferred to the bed during a bedload particle impact. For an impacting particle of known mass and velocity, the momentum transfer can be computed from Hertzian impact theory. Here we combine analytic results based on Hertzian and elastic wave theories with empirical equations developed to describe the ballistics of bedload particles in terms of fluid shear stress and grain size. From this synthesis we arrive at a semi-analytic expression that predicts how the characteristic frequencies and amplitudes of seismic waves generated from saltating bedload particles should scale with fluid shear stress, grain size, and coarse sediment flux. Preliminary tests of our predictions using previously published and newly acquired laboratory data indicate that seismic signals near rivers can record information about the size, velocity and number of particles impacting the bed. Additionally, our analytical results help identify bedload transport events in seismic data collected along the Chijiawan River in Taiwan. Here the river is evolving rapidly in response to a dam removal - resulting in predictable changes in bedload transport efficiency in time and space that we can compare to local seismic data.

  2. Quantitative prediction of residual wetting film generated in mobilizing a two-phase liquid in a capillary model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Joshi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the motion of immiscible two-phase liquid flow in a capillary tube through a numerical approach employing the volume of fluid method, for simulating the core-annular flow and water flooding in oil reservoirs of porous media. More specifically, the simulations are a representation of water flooding at a pore scale. A capillary tube model is established with ANSYS Fluent and verified. The numerical results matches well with the existing data available in the literature. Penetration of a less viscous liquid in a liquid of higher viscosity and the development of a residual wetting film of the higher viscosity liquid are thoroughly investigated. The effects of Capillary number, Reynolds Number and Viscosity ratio on the residual wetting film are studied in detail, as the thickness is directly related to the residual oil left in the porous media after water flooding. It should be noticed that the liquids considered in this research can be any liquids of different viscosity not necessarily oil and water. The results of this study can be used as guidance in the field of water flooding.

  3. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Reliability analysis on passive residual heat removal of AP1000 based on Grey model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Shi; Zhou, Tao; Shahzad, Muhammad Ali; Li, Yu [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, Beijing (China); Jiang, Guangming [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China). Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory

    2017-06-15

    It is common to base the design of passive systems on the natural laws of physics, such as gravity, heat conduction, inertia. For AP1000, a generation-III reactor, such systems have an inherent safety associated with them due to the simplicity of their structures. However, there is a fairly large amount of uncertainty in the operating conditions of these passive safety systems. In some cases, a small deviation in the design or operating conditions can affect the function of the system. The reliability of the passive residual heat removal is analysed.

  5. IRAS high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies. Galaxy collisions: Infrared observations and analysis of numerical models. UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Technical Report covering the period from 15 Aug. 1989 to 14 Aug. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies; galaxy collisions: infrared observations and analysis of numerical models; and UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies. Both observational studies and theoretical modelling of interacting galaxies are covered. As a consequence the report is divided into two parts, one on each aspect of the overall project.

  6. Three dimensional model for particle saltation close to stream beds, including a detailed description of the particle interaction with turbulence and inter-particle collisions

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno, Pablo M.

    2011-05-19

    We present in this paper a new three-dimensional (3-D) model for bed-load sediment transport, based on a Lagrangian description. We analyze generalized sub-models for the velocities after collision and the representation of the bed-roughness. The free-flight sub-model includes the effect of several forces, such as buoyancy, drag, virtual mass, lift, Basset and Magnus, and also addresses the particle rotation. A recent methodology for saving computational time in the Basset force is also employed. The sub-models for the post-collision velocity and rotation are based on the conservation of linear and angular momentum during the collision with the bed. We develop a new 3-D representation for the bed roughness by using geometric considerations. In order to address the interaction of particles with the turbulent flow, we tracked the particles through a computed turbulent velocity field for a smooth flat plate. This velocity field was used as a surrogate of the 3-D turbulent conditions close to the bed in streams. We first checked that the basic turbulence statistics for this velocity field could be used to approximate those in an open-channel flow. We then analyzed the interaction of the sediment and the turbulence for a single and multiple particles. We compared numerical results with experimental data obtained by Niño and García (1998b). We show that model predictions are in good agreement with existing data, in the sand size range. © 2011 ASCE.

  7. Telerobotics with whole-arm collision avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Strenn, Stephen

    1993-12-01

    The complexity of telerobotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection is desirable. With this goal in mind Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinetically similar master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  8. Modelling tide-driven currents and residual eddies in the Gulf of Kachchh and their seasonal variability: A marine environmental planning perspective

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.; Desa, E.

    -monsoon transition. Irregular topography of the western gulf slows down the tidal wave propagation and induces a phase shift. Tidal residual currents computed from the model results exhibit the presence of three eddies in the western gulf. The tide...

  9. Residual tumour detection in post-treatment granulation tissue by using advanced diffusion models in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujima, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Daisuke; Sakashita, Tomohiro; Homma, Akihiro; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the detectability of the residual tumour in post-treatment granulation tissue using parameters obtained with an advanced diffusion model in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated by chemoradiation therapy. We retrospectively evaluated 23 patients with HNSCC after the full course of chemoradiation therapy. The diffusion-weighted image (DWI) acquisition used single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging with 11 b-values (0-1000). We calculated 10 DWI parameters using a mono-exponential model, a bi-exponential model, a stretched exponential model (SEM), a diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) model and a statistical diffusion model (SDM) in the region of interest (ROI) placed on the post-treatment granulation tissue. The presence of residual tumour was determined by histological findings or clinical follow-up. Among the 23 patients, seven patients were revealed to have residual tumour. The univariate analysis revealed significant differences in six parameters between the patients with and without residual tumour. From the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the highest area under curve was detected in the center of the Gaussian distribution of diffusion coefficient (D s ) obtained by the SDM. The multivariate analysis revealed that the D s and diffusion heterogeneity (α) obtained by the SEM were predictors for the presence of residual tumour. DWI parameters obtained by advanced fitting models will be one of the diagnostic tools for the detection of residual tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffusion-bonded 16MND5-Inconel 690-316LN junction: elaboration and process residual stresses modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is, on the one hand, to elaborate and to characterise a bonded junction of 16MND5 and 316LN steels, and, on the other hand, to develop a simulation tool for the prediction of microstructures after bonding, as well as residual stresses related to this process. The author first reports the study of the use of diffusion bonding by hot isostatic pressing (HIP diffusion bonding) for the bonding of 16MND5 (steel used in French PWR vessel) and 316LN (austenitic stainless steel used in piping), in order to obtain junctions adapted to a use within PWRs. In this case, the use of an Inconel insert material appeared to be necessary to avoid stainless steel carburization. Thus, inserts in Inconel 600 and 690 have been tested. The objective has then been to develop a realistic calculation of residual stresses in this assembly. These stresses are stimulated by quenching. The author notably studied the simulation of temperature dependent phase transformations, and stress induced phase transformations. An existing model is validated and applied to HIP and quenching cycles. The last part reports the calculation of residual stresses by simulation of the mechanical response of the three-component material cooled from 900 C to room temperature and thus submitted to a loading of thermal origin (dilatation) and metallurgical origin (phase transformations in the 16MND5). The effect of carbon diffusion on mechanical properties has also been taken into account. The author discusses problems faced by existing models, and explains the choice of conventional macro-mechanical models. The three materials are supposed to have a plastic-viscoplastic behaviour with isotropic and kinematic strain hardening, and this behaviour is identified between 20 and 900 C [fr

  11. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  12. Modeling seasonal redox dynamics and the corresponding fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Massmann, Gudrun; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2006-11-01

    Reactive multicomponent transport modeling was used to investigate and quantify the factors that affect redox zonation and the fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater at an infiltration site in Berlin, Germany. The calibrated model and the corresponding sensitivity analysis demonstrated thattemporal and spatial redox zonation at the study site was driven by seasonally changing, temperature-dependent organic matter degradation rates. Breakthrough of phenazone at monitoring wells occurred primarily during the warmer summer months, when anaerobic conditions developed. Assuming a redox-sensitive phenazone degradation behavior the model results provided an excellent agreement between simulated and measured phenazone concentrations. Therefore, the fate of phenazone was shown to be indirectly controlled by the infiltration water temperature through its effect on the aquifer's redox conditions. Other factors such as variable residence times appeared to be of less importance.

  13. Video compressed sensing using iterative self-similarity modeling and residual reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yookyung; Oh, Han; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has great potential for use in video data acquisition and storage because it makes it unnecessary to collect an enormous amount of data and to perform the computationally demanding compression process. We propose an effective CS algorithm for video that consists of two iterative stages. In the first stage, frames containing the dominant structure are estimated. These frames are obtained by thresholding the coefficients of similar blocks. In the second stage, refined residual frames are reconstructed from the original measurements and the measurements corresponding to the frames estimated in the first stage. These two stages are iterated until convergence. The proposed algorithm exhibits superior subjective image quality and significantly improves the peak-signal-to-noise ratio and the structural similarity index measure compared to other state-of-the-art CS algorithms.

  14. Conceptual model and procedures to assimilate production technologies of bioenergetics of residual biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto Lubota, David; González Suárez, Erenio; Hernández Pérez, Gilberto; Miño Valdés, Juan Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The present work expose the conceptual pattern for a process of assimilation of technologies with the purpose of creating obtaining capacities of bio energy with the objective of achieving an energy insurance of the recycle of Urban Solid Residuals (RSU) in the municipality of Cabinda, Angola. The conceptual pattern is novel because it considers the south-south collaboration, and it is supported by a general procedure of assimilation of the technologies that includes in one of its steps a specify procedure for the step concerning the insurance of the chain supply that contains as additional aspect, in a novel way, the determination of the initial’s investors capacities assisting to the demand of final products as well as to the readiness of the raw materials, based in the problems of uncertainty to the future changes. Finally conclusions are elaborated with projections for the future work. (author)

  15. Statistical modeling to management and treatment of scrap with low and very low residual activity; Hacia la modelizacion estadistica de la gestion y tratamiento de chatarras con baja y muy bajo actividad residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Bermejo Fernandez, R.; Anaya Lazaro, M.

    2011-07-01

    The experience of recent years on the management of scrap metal containing residual activity have allowed the development of a simple statistical model for the management of these materials. This statistical model includes a breakdown of the various processing operations to which these materials undergo and the effects in the process of radiological controls associated to the control of declassification that defines disposal (recycled by smelting, reclamation, temporary storage the plant or sent to final storage of radioactive waste).

  16. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  17. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into two photons in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    OpenAIRE

    CMS Collaboration; Alver, Burak Han; Bauer, Gerry P.; Bendavid, Joshua L.; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik M.; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, M.; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristian Allan; Kim, Y.; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie

    2012-01-01

    This is the Pre-print version of the Article. The official published version can be accessed from the link below - Copyright @ 2012 Elsevier A search for a Higgs boson decaying into two photons is described. The analysis is performed using a dataset recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC from pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 inverse femtobarns. Limits are set on the cross section of the standard model Higgs boson dec...

  18. Peranan Konservatisme Akuntansi dan Faktor Risiko Makro dalam Model Laba Residual: Sebuah Studi di Bursa Efek Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Irwanto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the association of accounting conservatism, growth and macro-economic risk factors and valuation error of residual income model in Indonesian Stock Exchange. We use beta, book to market ratio, and size as proxies for macro-economic risk. Using sample of 186 companies taken from LQ-45 for the year of 2001 – 2005, we find that accounting conservatism and growth, have no significant influence toward residual income model valuation error. B/M has significant influence toward valuation error and has consistent sign as predicted by theory. Beta and Size has no significant influence toward valuation error. Overall, macro-economic risk factors can explain the valuation error better than accounting-based factors.Future research is expected to find accounting variables that can represent macro-economic risk and test their ability to explain valuation error. Also, future research need to confirm the relevance of accounting conservatism in stock valuation after implementation of IFRS in Indonesia.

  19. Next-to-leading order improved perturbative QCD + saturation + hydrodynamics model for A+A collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatelainen, R.; Eskola, K.J. [Department of Physics, P.O.Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Holopainen, H. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Niemi, H. [Department of Physics, P.O.Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Tuominen, K. [Department of Physics, P.O.Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-06-15

    We calculate initial conditions for the hydrodynamical evolution in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC in an improved next-to-leading order perturbative QCD + saturation framework. Using viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, we show that we obtain a good simultaneous description of the centrality dependence of charged particle multiplicities, transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow at the LHC and at RHIC. In particular, we discuss how the temperature dependence of the shear viscosity is constrained by these data.

  20. Magnitude of long-term non-lithostatic pressure variations in lithospheric processes: insight from thermo-mechanical subduction/collision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, Taras

    2014-05-01

    On the one hand, the principle of lithostatic pressure is habitually used in metamorphic geology to calculate paleo-depths of metamorphism from mineralogical pressure estimates given by geobarometry. On the other hand, it is obvious that this lithostatic (hydrostatic) pressure principle should only be valid for an ideal case of negligible deviatoric stresses during the long-term development of the entire tectono-metamorphic system - the situation, which newer comes to existence in natural lithospheric processes. The question is therefore not "Do non-lithostatic pressure variations exist?" but " What is the magnitude of long-term non-lithostatic pressure variations in various lithospheric processes, which can be recorded by mineral equilibria of respective metamorphic rocks?". The later question is, in particular, relevant for various types of high-pressure (HP) and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks, which are often produced in convergent plate boundary settings (e.g., Hacker and Gerya, 2013). This question, can, in particular, be answered with the use of thermo-mechanical models of subduction/collision processes employing realistic P-T-stress-dependent visco-elasto-brittle/plastic rheology of rocks. These models suggest that magnitudes of pressure deviations from lithostatic values can range >50% underpressure to >100% overpressure, mainly in the regions of bending of rheologically strong mantle lithosphere (Burg and Gerya, 2005; Li et al., 2010). In particular, strong undepresures along normal faults forming within outer rise regions of subducting plates can be responsible for downward water suction and deep hydration of oceanic slabs (Faccenda et al., 2009). Weaker HP and UHP rocks of subduction/collision channels are typically subjected to lesser non-lithostatic pressure variations with characteristic magnitudes ranging within 10-20% from the lithostatic values (Burg and Gerya, 2005; Li et al., 2010). The strength of subducted crustal rocks and the degree of

  1. Quantitative estimation of nonmonotonic residual stress depth-profiles using an extended Kypris-Jiles model of the magnetic Barkhausen noise spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaosa, Aitor; Gurruchaga, Kizkitza; Arizti, Fernando; Martínez-de-Guerenu, Ane

    2018-01-01

    Using nondestructive techniques to quantitatively estimate residual stresses along the depth is necessary to improve the ability to predict the real fatigue life of pieces for many applications. Magnetic Barkhausen noise has been proven to successfully estimate the residual stress at the surface produced by machining, plastic deformation, phase transformation or surface treatments such as shot peening, also allowing one to obtain information of the residual stress depth-profile in shot peened pieces which presented similar depth-profile shapes. However, residual stress depth-profiles with nonmonotonic or different shapes have not been successfully estimated. In the present study, an extended approach is developed in order to estimate these stresses independent of the shape of the residual stress depth-profile. The approach proposed here improves an existing model of the Barkhausen noise spectrum (Kypris-Jiles model) by adding the effect of the attenuation of the applied magnetic field on the Barkhausen noise. This extended approach is used to estimate the residual stress depth-profiles of samples with different depth-profiles using a calibration process. The approach is validated by estimating the residual stress depth-profiles, with errors smaller than 70 MPa in a depth of 130 μm, in all the samples studied.

  2. Collision Frequency for Energy Transfer in Unimolecular Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira

    2018-03-01

    Pressure dependence of unimolecular reaction rates is governed by the energy transfer in collisions of reactants with bath gas molecules. Pressure-dependent rate constants can be theoretically determined by solving master equations for unimolecular reactions. In general, master equation formulations describe energy transfer processes using a collision frequency and a probability distribution model of the energy transferred per collision. The present study proposes a novel method for determining the collision frequency from the results of classical trajectory calculations. Classical trajectories for collisions of several polyatomic molecules (ethane, methane, tetrafluoromethane, and cyclohexane) with monatomic colliders (Ar, Kr, and Xe) were calculated on potential energy surfaces described by the third-order density-functional tight-binding method in combination with simple pairwise interaction potentials. Low-order (including non-integer-order) moments of the energy transferred in deactivating collisions were extracted from the trajectories and compared with those derived using some probability distribution models. The comparison demonstrates the inadequacy of the conventional Lennard-Jones collision model for representing the collision frequency and suggests a robust method for evaluating the collision frequency that is consistent with a given probability distribution model, such as the exponential-down model. The resulting collision frequencies for the exponential-down model are substantially higher than the Lennard-Jones collision frequencies and are close to the (hypothetical) capture rate constants for dispersion interactions. The practical adequacy of the exponential-down model is also briefly discussed.

  3. PLS models for determination of SARA analysis of Colombian vacuum residues and molecular distillation fractions using MIR-ATR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Orrego-Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, prediction models of Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphaltenes fractions (SARA from thirty-seven vacuum residues of representative Colombian crudes and eighteen fractions of molecular distillation process were obtained. Mid-Infrared (MIR Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS regression analysis was used to estimate accurately SARA analysis in these kind of samples. Calibration coefficients of prediction models were for saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes fractions, 0.99, 0.96, 0.97 and 0.99, respectively. This methodology permits to control the molecular distillation process since small differences in chemical composition can be detected. Total time elapsed to give the SARA analysis per sample is 10 minutes.

  4. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to $W^+ W^-$ in the fully leptonic final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Cabrera, Andrés; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Falkiewicz, Anna; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Lomidze, David; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Berzano, Umberto; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gramenitski, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Vasilyev, Sergey; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Breuker, Horst; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; 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Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; 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Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sfiligoi, Igor; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Eartly, David P; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jensen, Hans; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pivarski, James; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Schwarz, Thomas; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Goldberg, Sean; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Schmitt, Michael Houston; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Bonato, Alessio; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Sakumoto, Willis; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Gurrola, Alfredo; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Bernardini, Jacopo; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-07-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  5. Phenomenological approaches of dissipative heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, C.

    1983-09-01

    These lectures describe the properties of dissipative heavy ion collisions observed in low bombarding energy heavy ion reactions. These dissipative collisions are of two different types: fusion and deep inelastic reactions. Their main experimental properties are described on selected examples. It is shown how it is possible to give a simple interpretation to the data. A large number of phenomenological models have been developped to understand dissipative heavy ion collisions. The most important are those describing the collision by classical mechanics and friction forces, the diffusion models, and transport theories which merge both preceding approaches. A special emphasis has been done on two phenomena observed in dissipative heavy ion collisions: charge equilibratium for which we can show the existence of quantum fluctuations, and fast fission which appears as an intermediate mechanism between deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation [fr

  6. Neuromorphic UAS Collision Avoidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Collision avoidance for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) traveling at high relative speeds is a challenging task. It requires both the detection of a possible collision...

  7. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  8. Geochemical modeling of leaching from MSVI air-pollution-control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Dijkstra, J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an improved understanding of the leaching behavior of waste incineration air-pollution-control (APC) residues in a long-term perspective. Leaching was investigated by a series of batch experiments reflecting leaching conditions after initial washout of highly soluble salts from...... of Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Pb, S, Si, V, and Zn was found influenced by solubility control from Al2O3, Al(OH)3, Ba(S,Cr)O4 solid solutions, BaSO4, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12â26H2O, CaAl2Si4O12â2H2O, Ca-(OH)2, CaSiO3, CaSO4â2H2O, CaZn2(OH)6â2H2O, KAlSi2O6, PbCO3, PbCrO4, Pb2O3, Pb2V2O7, Pb3(VO4)2, ZnO, Zn2SiO4, and Zn...

  9. Measurement and modelling of the residual stresses in autogenous and narrow gap laser welded AISI grade 316L stainless steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmesalamy, A.S.; Abdolvand, H.; Walsh, J.N.; Francis, J.A.; Suder, W.; Williams, S.; Li, L.

    2016-01-01

    Thick-section austenitic stainless steels have widespread industrial applications, where stress-corrosion cracking is often of major concern. Problems tend to arise in the vicinity of welds, where substantial residual stresses often reside. This paper describes an investigation into the residual stresses in autogenous high power laser welds and narrow gap laser welds (NGLW) in 10 mm thick AISI grade 316L steel plates, using both neutron diffraction and the contour method. The influences of laser power, welding speed and the time interval between weld passes on residual stress were analysed. For the NGLW process, finite element modelling was employed to understand the influence of thermal history on residual stress. The results for the NGLW technique show that the laser power has a significant effect on the peak value of residual stress, while the welding speed has a more significant influence on the width of the region sustaining tensile stresses. - Highlights: • We compare the residual stress behaviour in high power autogenous laser welding and Narrow gap laser welding [NGLW] of 10 mm thickplates of 316L stainless steel. • We use contour method for residual stress evaluation. The results have been validated by using neutron diffraction. • The experimental results show that, lower residual stress distribution can be achieved by using the NGLW technique. • We investigate the influence of the power and speed on both peak value and width of the tensile region for both autogenous laser welding and NGLW technique. • The welding speed in NGLW technique has a more significant influence on the width of the tensile region. The laser power shows a more significant influence on the peak value of the residual stress with respect to width of the residual stress tensile region.

  10. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Baldassi

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids, exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  11. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassi, Carlo; Zamparo, Marco; Feinauer, Christoph; Procaccini, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Weigt, Martin; Pagnani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation) have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids), exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i) the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii) the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  12. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  13. Checking Fine and Gray subdistribution hazards model with cumulative sums of residuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jianing; Scheike, Thomas; Zhang, Mei Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Fine and Gray (J Am Stat Assoc 94:496–509, 1999) proposed a semi-parametric proportional regression model for the subdistribution hazard function which has been used extensively for analyzing competing risks data. However, failure of model adequacy could lead to severe bias in parameter...

  14. The impact of energy conservation in transport models on the π−/π+ multiplicity ratio in heavy-ion collisions and the symmetry energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Cozma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy central heavy-ion collisions has been proposed as a suitable observable to constrain the high density dependence of the isovector part of the equation of state. A comparison of various transport model predictions with existing experimental data has led, however, to contradictory results. Using an upgraded version of the Tübingen QMD transport model, which allows the conservation of energy at a local or global level by accounting for the potential energy of hadrons in two-body collisions and leading thus to particle production threshold shifts, we demonstrate that compatible constraints for the symmetry energy stiffness can be extracted from pion multiplicity and elliptic flow observables. However, pion multiplicities and ratios are proven to be highly sensitive to the yet unknown isovector part of the in-medium Δ(1232 potential which hinders, at present, the extraction of meaningful information on the high density dependence of the symmetry energy. A solution to this problem together with the inclusion of contributions presently neglected, such as in-medium pion potentials and retardation effects, are needed for a final verdict on this topic.

  15. Assessment of ex-vitro anaerobic digestion kinetics of crop residues through first order exponential models: effect of lag phase period and curve factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, A.R.; Brohi, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic studies of AD (Anaerobic Digestion) process are useful to predict the performance of digesters and design appropriate digesters and also helpful in understanding inhibitory mechanisms of biodegradation. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic kinetics of crop residues digestion with buffalo dung. Seven crop residues namely, bagasse, banana plant waste, canola straw, cotton stalks, rice straw, sugarcane trash and wheat straw were selected from the field and were analyzed on MC (Moisture Contents), TS (Total Solids) and VS (Volatile Solids) with standard methods. In present study, three first order exponential models namely exponential model, exponential lag phase model and exponential curve factor model were used to assess the kinetics of the AD process of crop residues and the effect of lag phase and curve factor was analyzed based on statistical hypothesis testing and on information theory. Assessment of kinetics of the AD of crop residues and buffalo dung follows the first order kinetics. Out of the three models, the simple exponential model was the poorest model, while the first order exponential curve factor model is the best fit model. In addition to statistical hypothesis testing, the exponential curve factor model has least value of AIC (Akaike's Information Criterion) and can generate methane production data more accurately. Furthermore, there is an inverse linear relationship between the lag phase period and the curve factor. (author)

  16. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  17. The Effect of Fiber Collisions on the Galaxy Power Spectrum Multipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Scoccimarro, Roman; Blanton, Michael R.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.

    2017-05-01

    Fibre-fed multi-object spectroscopic surveys, with their ability to collect an unprecedented number of redshifts, currently dominate large-scale structure studies. However, physical constraints limit these surveys from successfully collecting redshifts from galaxies too close to each other on the focal plane. This ultimately leads to significant systematic effects on galaxy clustering measurements. Using simulated mock catalogues, we demonstrate that fibre collisions have a significant impact on the power spectrum, P(k), monopole and quadrupole that exceeds sample variance at scales smaller than k ˜ 0.1 h Mpc-1. We present two methods to account for fibre collisions in the power spectrum. The first, statistically reconstructs the clustering of fibre-collided galaxy pairs by modelling the distribution of the line-of-sight displacements between them. It also properly accounts for fibre collisions in the shot-noise correction term of the P(k) estimator. Using this method, we recover the true P(k) monopole of the mock catalogues with residuals of nuisance parameters. Using this method, we reliably model the effect of fibre collisions on the monopole and quadrupole down to the scale limits of theoretical predictions. The methods we present in this paper will allow us to robustly analyse galaxy power spectrum multipole measurements to much smaller scales than previously possible.

  18. Calculation of high power relativistic beams with consideration of collision effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the numerical calculation of relativistic charged particle beams moving in axisymmetric systems in which the presence of a residual neutral gas is possible. It is essential to consider phenomena related to collisions between charged particles and neutrals. Algorithms are constructed for numerical modeling of ionization processes within the framework of the ERA program complex. Solutions of model and practical problems are presented as examples. Such problems were studied where ionization processes were considered by a more complex method requiring a greater volume of calculations but valid at lower pressures

  19. Wave-induced collisions of thin floating disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiew, L. J.; Bennetts, L. G.; Meylan, M. H.; Thomas, G. A.; French, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Collisions between two thin floating disks forced by regular water waves are studied for a range of wave amplitudes and lengths, using laboratory wave basin experiments and a mathematical model. Three collision regimes are identified from the experiments in terms of collision frequency and strength, and the collisions are shown to be caused by drift for short incident wavelengths and relative surge motion between the disks for longer incident waves. The model is based on slope-sliding theory for the wave-induced disk motions and rigid-body collisions. It is shown to predict collision frequencies and velocities accurately for intermediate-long incident wavelengths. Incorporating drift and wave scattering forces into the model is shown to capture the collision behaviours for short incident wavelengths.

  20. DOE Final Report: A Unified Understanding of Residual Stress in Thin Films: Kinetic Models, Experiments and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Thin films are critical for a wide range of advanced technologies. However, the deposited films often have high levels of residual stress that can limit their performance or lead to failure. The stress is known to depend on many variables, including the processing conditions, type of material, deposition technique and the film’s microstructure. The goal of this DOE program was to develop a fundamental understanding of how the different processes that control thin film growth under different conditions can be related to the development of stress. In the program, systematic experiments were performed or analyzed that related the stress to the processing conditions that were used. Measurements of stress were obtained for films that were grown at different rates, different solutions (for electrodeposition), different particle energies (for sputter deposition) and different microstructures. Based on this data, models were developed to explain the observed dependence on the different parameters. The models were based on considering the balance among different stress-inducing mechanism occurring as the film grows (for both non-energetic and energetic deposition). Comparison of the model predictions with the experiments enabled the kinetic parameters to be determined for different materials. The resulting model equations provide a comprehensive picture of how stress changes with the processing conditions that can be used to optimize the growth of thin films.

  1. Analysis and Modeling of Process of Residual Deformations Accumulation in Soils and Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, A. S.; Dolgih, G. V.; Kalinin, A. L.

    2017-11-01

    It is established that under the influence of repeated loads the process of plastic deformation in soils and discrete materials is hereditary. To perform the mathematical modeling of plastic deformation, the authors applied the integral equation by solution of which they manage to obtain the power and logarithmic dependencies connecting plastic deformation with the number of repeated loads, the parameters of the material and components of the stress tensor in the principal axes. It is shown that these dependences generalize a number of models proposed earlier in Russia and abroad. Based on the analysis of the experimental data obtained during material testing in the dynamic devices of triaxial compression at different values of the stress deviator, the coefficients in the proposed models of deformation are determined. The authors determined the application domain for logarithmic and degree dependences.

  2. Deriving Genomic Breeding Values for Residual Feed Intake from Covariance Functions of Random Regression Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strathe, Anders B; Mark, Thomas; Nielsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Random regression models were used to estimate covariance functions between cumulated feed intake (CFI) and body weight (BW) in 8424 Danish Duroc pigs. Random regressions on second order Legendre polynomials of age were used to describe genetic and permanent environmental curves in BW and CFI...

  3. Theory of Electron Detachment in Collisions of Negative Ions with Atoms. I. Close-Coupling Formalism and Solution to a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. D.; Delos, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A general theory is developed of electron detachment in slow collisions of negative ions with atoms. This theory, which follows earlier ideas of Fano and of Demkov, is based on a semiclassical close-coupling framework. The assumptions involved are stated precisely. In general, they consist of: (i) semiclassical description of the nuclear motion; (ii) diabatic representation of electronic states, with a discrete state crossing a continuum; (iii) neglect of continuum-continuum couplings, (iv) linear or quadratic time-dependence of the energy gap between discrete and continuum states. With such assumptions, the Schrodinger equation is reduced to a nondenumerably infinite set of coupled equations. The solution to these equations is the main topic of this paper. It is shown that the solution depends on just two functions, a coupling function G(E) and an energy-gap function Δ(t). A simple model for the coupling function is given. With reasonable assumptions about the energy gap Δ(t), the coupled equations can be solved. The final result of this paper is a formula for the S-matrix, which contains all probabilities and phases associated with the collision.

  4. Centrality determination using the Glauber model in Xe-Xe collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.44$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This document describes the methods used by the ALICE Collaboration for determining the centrality of Xe-Xe collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.44$ TeV at the LHC within the Glauber model. The half-density radius $R$ and the diffusivity $a$ describing the Xe-129 nucleus with a 2-parameter Fermi distribution have been derived from a recent electron scattering measurement for the Xe-132 nucleus. The deformation parameter $\\beta$ has been derived by an interpolation between measured deformation parameters for the even-$A$ Xe isotopes. The inelastic nucleon-nucleon cross-section at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.44$ TeV has been estimated by interpolation of pp data at different center-of-mass energies. The particle multiplicity per nucleon-nucleon collision has been parameterized by a negative binomial distribution (NBD) and a number of independently emitting sources (ancestors) given by a linear combination of $N_{\\rm part}$ and $N_{\\rm coll}$. The NBD parameters $\\mu$ and $k$ and the ancestor parameter $f$ are then...

  5. Study of the heavy ions (Au+Au at 150 AMeV) collisions with the FOPI detector. Comparison with the Landau-Vlasov model; Etude des collisions d`ions lourds AU+AU a 150 A.MeV avec le detecteur FOPI. Comparaison avec le modele de Landau-Vlasov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussange, S.

    1995-09-15

    In this thesis, heavy ions (Au+Au) collisions experiments are made at 150 AMeV.In the first part, a general study of the nuclear matter equation is presented. Then the used Landau-Vlasov theoretical model is describe. The third part presents the FOPI experience and the details of how to obtain this theoretical predictions (filter, cuts, corrections, possible centrality selections).At the end, experimental results and comparisons with the Landau-Vlasov model are presented. (TEC). 105 refs., 96 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. A Changing Wind Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, Yaël; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Pittard, Julian M.; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Rauw, Gregor; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hillier, D. John

    2018-02-01

    We report on the first detection of a global change in the X-ray emitting properties of a wind–wind collision, thanks to XMM-Newton observations of the massive Small Magellenic Cloud (SMC) system HD 5980. While its light curve had remained unchanged between 2000 and 2005, the X-ray flux has now increased by a factor of ∼2.5, and slightly hardened. The new observations also extend the observational coverage over the entire orbit, pinpointing the light-curve shape. It has not varied much despite the large overall brightening, and a tight correlation of fluxes with orbital separation is found without any hysteresis effect. Moreover, the absence of eclipses and of absorption effects related to orientation suggests a large size for the X-ray emitting region. Simple analytical models of the wind–wind collision, considering the varying wind properties of the eruptive component in HD 5980, are able to reproduce the recent hardening and the flux-separation relationship, at least qualitatively, but they predict a hardening at apastron and little change in mean flux, contrary to observations. The brightness change could then possibly be related to a recently theorized phenomenon linked to the varying strength of thin-shell instabilities in shocked wind regions. Based on XMM-Newton and Chandra data.

  7. Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model Using Multilepton Signatures in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in events with at least three leptons and any number of jets is presented. The data sample corresponds to 35 inverse picobarns of integrated luminosity in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. A number of exclusive multileptonic channels are investigated and standard model backgrounds are suppressed by requiring sufficient missing transverse energy, invariant mass inconsistent with that of the Z boson, or high jet activity. Control samples in data are used to ascertain the robustness of background evaluation techniques and to minimise the reliance on simulation. The observations are consistent with background expectations. These results constrain previously unexplored regions of supersymmetric parameter space.

  8. Search for physics beyond the standard model in events with two leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma

    2015-04-22

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model in final states with two opposite-sign same-flavor leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC in 2012. The analysis focuses on searches for a kinematic edge in the invariant mass distribution of the opposite-sign same-flavor lepton pair and for final states with an on-shell Z boson. The observations are consistent with expectations from standard model processes and are interpreted in terms of upper limits on the production of supersymmetric particles.

  9. Modeling of Residual Stress and Machining Distortion in Aerospace Components (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    conditions of cutting speed, feed , radial and 29 axial depths of cut, cutter geometry (including edge preparation, axial and radial rake angles ...sharp. • Chip formation is of continuous type (no serrations). • The width of cut must be more than 10 times the feed rate to satisfy the plane...captured in the 2-D axisymmetric model. • Inaccuracy in extrapolated low strain rate stress-strain data. • Sag in the furnace: effect of heat treat

  10. Sensitivity analysis of six soil organic matter models applied to the decomposition of animal manures and crop residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cavalli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two features distinguishing soil organic matter simulation models are the type of kinetics used to calculate pool decomposition rates, and the algorithm used to handle the effects of nitrogen (N shortage on carbon (C decomposition. Compared to widely used first-order kinetics, Monod kinetics more realistically represent organic matter decomposition, because they relate decomposition to both substrate and decomposer size. Most models impose a fixed C to N ratio for microbial biomass. When N required by microbial biomass to decompose a given amount of substrate-C is larger than soil available N, carbon decomposition rates are limited proportionally to N deficit (N inhibition hypothesis. Alternatively, C-overflow was proposed as a way of getting rid of excess C, by allocating it to a storage pool of polysaccharides. We built six models to compare the combinations of three decomposition kinetics (first-order, Monod, and reverse Monod, and two ways to simulate the effect of N shortage on C decomposition (N inhibition and C-overflow. We conducted sensitivity analysis to identify model parameters that mostly affected CO2 emissions and soil mineral N during a simulated 189-day laboratory incubation assuming constant water content and temperature. We evaluated model outputs sensitivity at different stages of organic matter decomposition in a soil amended with three inputs of increasing C to N ratio: liquid manure, solid manure, and low-N crop residue. Only few model parameters and their interactions were responsible for consistent variations of CO2 and soil mineral N. These parameters were mostly related to microbial biomass and to the partitioning of applied C among input pools, as well as their decomposition constants. In addition, in models with Monod kinetics, CO2 was also sensitive to a variation of the half-saturation constants. C-overflow enhanced pool decomposition compared to N inhibition hypothesis when N shortage occurred. Accumulated C in the

  11. (Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy (< 10 MeV/A), intermediate energy (10--100 MeV/A) and relativistic (> 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of best'' semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon {sup 129}Xe with {sup 197}Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon {sup 12}C with {sup 197}Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated.

  12. [Studies of target fragmentation in intermediate energy, relativistic and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.D.

    1991-08-01

    The work described herein is part of a project involving the study of low energy ( 250 MeV/A) heavy ion reactions. In the low energy regime, we published a monograph on the properties of the heaviest elements and used that publication as a basis for making a set of ''best'' semi-empirical predictions of heavy element decay properties. The intermediate energy research effort focussed upon the completion of studies already begun and the initiation of a number of new experiments. In our study of a interaction of 21 MeV/nucleon 129 Xe with 197 Au, we compared the characteristics of the observed deep inelastic phenomena with various models of dissipative reactions and found significant discrepancies between observations and predictions. These discrepancies seemed to be caused by an improper treatment of pre-equilibrium in the early stages of the collision. In our study of the relativistic interaction of 400 MeV/nucleon 12 C with 197 Au, we reported the first direct physical measurement of the properties of the spallation residues from a nucleus-nucleus collision. We found the residue energies to be much lower than those predicted by the intranuclear cascade model, indicating some substantial modifications of that model are needed. But, we also found, indications of significant, non-zero values of the residue transverse momentum, a finding that calls into question the interpretation of a number of radiochemical recoil studies of the kinematics of high energy reactions. A program of performing numerical simulations of intermediate and high energy nuclear collisions using the QMD model was initiated

  13. Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 and 241 C 204: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2007-05-23

    This report was revised in May 2007 to correct 90Sr values in Chapter 3. The changes were made on page 3.9, paragraph two and Table 3.10; page 3.16, last paragraph on the page; and Tables 3.21 and 3.31. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in October 2004. This report describes the development of release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. Key results from this work are (1) future releases from the tanks of the primary contaminants of concern (99Tc and 238U) can be represented by relatively simple solubility relationships between infiltrating water and solid phases containing the contaminants; and (2) high percentages of technetium-99 in the sludges (20 wt% in C-203 and 75 wt% in C-204) are not readily water leachable, and, in fact, are very recalcitrant. This is similar to results found in related studies of sludges from Tank AY-102. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 and 241-C-204: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2004-10-28

    This report describes the development of release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. Key results from this work are (1) future releases from the tanks of the primary contaminants of concern (99Tc and 238U) can be represented by relatively simple solubility relationships between infiltrating water and solid phases containing the contaminants; and (2) high percentages of technetium-99 in the sludges (20 wt% in C-203 and 75 wt% in C-204) are not readily water leachable, and, in fact, are very recalcitrant. This is similar to results found in related studies of sludges from Tank AY-102. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Hanford Tanks 241-C-202 and 241-C-203 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2007-09-13

    As directed by Congress, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of River Protection in 1998 to manage DOE's largest, most complex environmental cleanup project – retrieval of radioactive waste from Hanford tanks for treatment and eventual disposal. Sixty percent by volume of the nation's high-level radioactive waste is stored at Hanford in aging deteriorating tanks. If not cleaned up, this waste is a threat to the Columbia River and the Pacific Northwest. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., is the Office of River Protection's prime contractor responsible for the storage, retrieval, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. As part of this effort, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for DOE.

  16. Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 and 241-C-204: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development of release models for key contaminants that are present in residual sludge remaining after closure of Hanford Tanks 241-C-203 (C-203) and 241-C-204 (C-204). The release models were developed from data generated by laboratory characterization and testing of samples from these two tanks. Key results from this work are (1) future releases from the tanks of the primary contaminants of concern (99Tc and 238U) can be represented by relatively simple solubility relationships between infiltrating water and solid phases containing the contaminants; and (2) high percentages of technetium-99 in the sludges (20 wt% in C-203 and 75 wt% in C-204) are not readily water leachable, and, in fact, are very recalcitrant. This is similar to results found in related studies of sludges from Tank AY-102. These release models are being developed to support the tank closure risk assessments performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy

  17. The relationship between multilevel models and non-parametric multilevel mixture models: Discrete approximation of intraclass correlation, random coefficient distributions, and residual heteroscedasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rights, Jason D; Sterba, Sonya K

    2016-11-01

    Multilevel data structures are common in the social sciences. Often, such nested data are analysed with multilevel models (MLMs) in which heterogeneity between clusters is modelled by continuously distributed random intercepts and/or slopes. Alternatively, the non-parametric multilevel regression mixture model (NPMM) can accommodate the same nested data structures through discrete latent class variation. The purpose of this article is to delineate analytic relationships between NPMM and MLM parameters that are useful for understanding the indirect interpretation of the NPMM as a non-parametric approximation of the MLM, with relaxed distributional assumptions. We define how seven standard and non-standard MLM specifications can be indirectly approximated by particular NPMM specifications. We provide formulas showing how the NPMM can serve as an approximation of the MLM in terms of intraclass correlation, random coefficient means and (co)variances, heteroscedasticity of residuals at level 1, and heteroscedasticity of residuals at level 2. Further, we discuss how these relationships can be useful in practice. The specific relationships are illustrated with simulated graphical demonstrations, and direct and indirect interpretations of NPMM classes are contrasted. We provide an R function to aid in implementing and visualizing an indirect interpretation of NPMM classes. An empirical example is presented and future directions are discussed. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Effect of process variables on the Drucker-Prager cap model and residual stress distribution of tablets estimated by the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Otoguro, Saori; Miura, Takahiro; Onuki, Yoshinori; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A multivariate statistical technique was applied to clarify the causal correlation between variables in the manufacturing process and the residual stress distribution of tablets. Theophylline tablets were prepared according to a Box-Behnken design using the wet granulation method. Water amounts (X1), kneading time (X2), lubricant-mixing time (X3), and compression force (X4) were selected as design variables. The Drucker-Prager cap (DPC) model was selected as the method for modeling the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Simulation parameters, such as Young's modulus, Poisson rate, internal friction angle, plastic deformation parameters, and initial density of the powder, were measured. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the simulation parameters were significantly affected by process variables. The constructed DPC models were fed into the analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders during the tableting process was analyzed using the FEM. The results of this analysis revealed that the residual stress distribution of tablets increased with increasing X4. Moreover, an interaction between X2 and X3 also had an effect on shear and the x-axial residual stress of tablets. Bayesian network analysis revealed causal relationships between the process variables, simulation parameters, residual stress distribution, and pharmaceutical responses of tablets. These results demonstrated the potential of the FEM as a tool to help improve our understanding of the residual stress of tablets and to optimize process variables, which not only affect tablet characteristics, but also are risks of causing tableting problems.

  19. In-situ observation of dislocation and analysis of residual stresses by FEM/DDM modeling in water cavitation peening of pure titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, D Y; Han, B

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, in order to approach this problem, specimens of pure titanium were treated with WCP, and the subsequent changes in microstructure, residual stress, and surface morphologies were investigated as a function of WCP duration. The influence of water cavitation peening (WCP) treatment on the microstructure of pure titanium was investigated. A novel combined finite element and dislocation density method (FEM/DDM), proposed for predicting macro and micro residual stresses induced on the material subsurface treated with water cavitation peening, is also presented. A bilinear elastic-plastic finite element method was conducted to predict macro-residual stresses and a dislocation density method was conducted to predict micro-residual stresses. These approaches made possible the prediction of the magnitude and depth of residual stress fields in pure titanium. The effect of applied impact pressures on the residual stresses was also presented. The results of the FEM/DDM modeling were in good agreement with those of the experimental measurements. (paper)

  20. Heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.; Amsden, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of measurement are proposed for the analysis of heavy ion collisions in the range of energy of 20--200 MeV/A. First, measurement of the longitudinal component of the kinetic energy of the collision products characterizes the impact parameter of the collision. The distribution in this quantity allows the dissipation in the theoretical models to be determined. A second kind of measurement is that of the coefficients of a spherical harmonic expansion of the angular distribution of the products. Besides giving independent information on the impact parameter and reaction dynamics, measurement of these coefficients offers the possibility of measuring the stiffness of the equation of state of nuclear matter. These ideas are explored in the context of a hydrodynamic model for the collision. In the purely hydrodynamic model there is a large measurable asymmetry in the angular distribution, but the dependence on the equation of state is small