WorldWideScience

Sample records for residents receive preventative

  1. Communication received from the Resident Representatives of Argentina and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document reproduces the communication received by the Director General from the Resident Representatives of Argentina and Brazil to the Agency to inform him about the official inauguration on 9 December 1992 of the headquarters of the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) in Rio de Janeiro

  2. Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Reardon,1 Naushira Pandya,2 Robert A Bailey31Informagenics, LLC and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USAPurpose: Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents.Methods: Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (≥1 fall and recurrent falls (>1 fall. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders.Results: A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57% of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males. Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]. Rates of falls/recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001. Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all.Conclusion: Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia

  3. [Daily living activities and oral condition among care facility residents with severe intellectual disabilities. Comparative analyses between residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance and those not receiving tooth-brushing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiwata, Kaoru; Takeda, Fumi

    2007-06-01

    caries and filled teeth and a significant decrease in the number of healthy teeth were observed in residents requiring assistance only at the second screening and those not requiring assistance at either screening. Over the nine-year period, the subjects of tooth-brushing assistance changed, and assistance was given to those able to brush their teeth independently in addition to those unable to brush their teeth independently. The number of healthy teeth did not change in residents receiving tooth-brushing assistance during this period, but in residents never receiving tooth-brushing assistance, decrease was noted. Therefore, even for individuals able to brush their teeth independently, some form of tooth-brushing assistance is needed to sufficiently prevent oral diseases.

  4. Consensus on core competencies for preventive medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D S; Ross, V

    1994-01-01

    Of the currently available literature on assessment of physician competency, very little applies to the needs of preventive medicine specialists. Yet the diversity of the field and the confusion among other medical specialists about the particular expertise of preventive medicine physicians suggest a need for consensus on fundamental competencies expected of graduates of preventive medicine residency training programs. We apply theoretical material on competency-based education from teacher training and instructional development to professional training in preventive medicine. We describe the process by which the Graduate Medical Education Subcommittee of the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), a working group of specialists, derived and refined core competencies in working sessions at professional meetings. The drafts produced at these sessions were circulated widely to residency directors and other individuals and groups in preventive medicine before being approved by the ACPM Board of Regents and included in the Residency Training Manual distributed by ACPM. This article includes this list of core competencies for preventive medicine residents. In addition, the article describes assumptions about competency development that guided the process and identifies recurrent problems in competency development. This information may be helpful to readers who wish to develop additional competencies or to tailor these competencies for their own preventive medicine residency programs.

  5. Are Graduating Pediatric Residents Prepared to Engage in Obesity Prevention and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frintner, Mary Pat; Liebhart, Janice L; Lindros, Jeanne; Baker, Alison; Hassink, Sandra G

    2016-01-01

    Little information is available to gauge residents' perceived receipt of comprehensive training and preparedness to manage children with obesity in practice. A national, random sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents were surveyed in 2013 on childhood overweight/obesity and preparedness to prevent and treat obesity. A composite training measure was created by summing the number of areas (10 possible) where training on overweight/obesity was received. Multivariable logistic regression explored relationships of resident and training characteristics to residents' belief that their own counseling on prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity is very effective (vs somewhat/slightly/not effective). Of 625 survey respondents (63% response), most (68-92%) reported receipt of training in each of 10 assessed areas on overweight/obesity prevention, assessment, and treatment. Most residents did not desire more training in the assessed areas; however, 54% wanted more training in motivational interviewing. About one-fourth believed that their own counseling on the prevention of overweight/obesity (26%) and treatment of obesity (22%) was very effective. Residents who rated their ability to use motivational interviewing as very good/excellent were more likely to rate their counseling on both the prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity as very effective (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.63-7.13; and aOR 4.69, 95% CI 2.72-8.07, respectively). Residents who received training in all 10 assessed areas were also more likely to rate their counseling on both prevention and treatment as very effective (aOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61-4.14; aOR 2.41, 95% CI 1.46-3.97, respectively). Comprehensive training on overweight/obesity and inclusion of training in motivational interviewing may help residents feel better prepared to care for children with overweight/obesity. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  7. Fall Prevention for Older Adults Receiving Home Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamgbade, Sarah; Dearmon, Valorie

    2016-02-01

    Falls pose a significant risk for community-dwelling older adults. Fall-related injuries increase healthcare costs related to hospitalization, diagnostic procedures, and/or surgeries. This article describes a quality improvement project to reduce falls in older adults receiving home healthcare services. The fall prevention program incorporated best practices for fall reduction, including fall risk assessment, medication review/management, home hazard and safety assessment, staff and patient fall prevention education, and an individualized home-based exercise program. The program was implemented and evaluated during a 6-month time frame. Fewer falls occurred post implementation of the falls prevention program with no major injuries.

  8. Communication dated 14 July 2006 received from the Resident Representative of France to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 14 July 2006 from the Resident Representative of France, on behalf of the Resident Representatives of China, France, Germany, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, and the Secretary-General and High Representative of the European Union attaching the text of the offer which was approved on 1 June 2006 at the ministerial meeting in Vienna and delivered to the Iranian authorities in Tehran on 6 June 2006 by Mr. Javier Solana. The communication and, as requested therein, the attached text, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  9. Knowledge of Emergency Medicine Residents in Relation to Prevention of Tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Derakhshanfar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of emergency medicine residents about the management of patients suspected of having tetanus favoring wounds is very important due to their responsibility for the treatment of such patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this knowledge and making sure of the adequacy of instructions they have received in relation to prevention of tetanus.  Methods: A reliable and reproducible questionnaire was used to evaluate knowledge of all the emergency medicine residents in Imam Hussein Hospital in Tehran, Iran, about conditions favoring tetanus (9 questions and proper interventions in such conditions (12 questions. The questionnaires were completed and scored as poor and good. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze data. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results: In the present study, 73 emergency medicine residents were evaluated (45.2% male. Knowledge of 31 (42.5% residents in relation to conditions favoring tetanus and 41 (56.2% residents in correct therapeutic interventions was in good level. The most frequent incorrect answer was related to diabetic ulcers and wounds in patients with sepsis. There was an increase in scores of conditions favoring tetanus (P<0.001 and correct therapeutic interventions (P=0.001 with an increase in educational years. However, age (P=0.64, gender (P=0.31, job experience (P=0.38 and participation in educational courses (P=0.67 had no effect on the knowledge level of emergency medicine residents. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, the knowledge of emergency medicine residents about correct management of patients suspected of tetanus was low, which emphasizes the necessity of providing further instructions on prevention of tetanus in wound management. 

  10. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2018-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. [Counseling and preventive action in elderly population in hospitals and residences in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Miquel, Clara; Figueroa, Carmen; Santos, Juana; Astasio, Paloma; Gil, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    To establish the profile of elderly patients, and to assess current preventive actions in hospitals, geriatric residences, and different health-care centres in Spain. Cross-sectional descriptive study, based on a questionnaire to be answered by doctors who treat the elderly population in Spain (2013). Health-care centres from different regions of Spain. A total of 420 practitioners from hospitals, residences and other community centres, with data from 840 geriatric clinics. Main outcome variables are: dependence, reason for assistance, comorbidity, professional consultation, and life style recommendations. Association factor, type of institution where patients have been attended. Analysis of prevalence and association using Chi-squared test. Two-thirds (66.7%) of the study population were shown to be dependent, with a higher percentage among women than men: 68.9% vs. 62.4% (P=.055). It was also found that among the population aged 85 or more, 88.6% of the women and 85.2% of the men suffered comorbidity. In spite of these results, only 6.6% of the patients suffering comorbidity received additional advice concerning healthy-lifestyle. A large majority (79.6%) of the patients treated in hospitals received advice concerning healthy lifestyle, while 59.62% of those treated in nursing homes received it (P<.001). It was observed that there is a lack of preventive action related to health promotion among the elderly, with differences between hospitals and geriatric residences. This suggests that it is time to put forward new specialised programs addressed to health professionals, in order to reinforce health promotion attitudes and preventive interventions in gerontology clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Communication dated 20 December 2006 received from the Resident Representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 20 December 2006 from the Resident Representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The letter and, as requested therein, its attachment, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Receiving Trauma-Informed Practices on Domestic Violence Shelter Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Cris M; Goodman, Lisa A; Virden, Tyler; Strom, Jennifer; Ramirez, Rachel

    2017-08-17

    Domestic violence is a potentially traumatizing experience that has devastating psychological and physical consequences. In response, domestic violence shelter programs have focused increasing attention on helping adult and child survivors understand and heal from this trauma. What have come to be called trauma-informed practices include (a) reflecting an understanding of trauma and its many effects on health and behavior, (b) addressing both physical and psychological safety concerns, (c) using a culturally informed strengths-based approach, (d) helping to illuminate the nature and effects of abuse on survivors' everyday experience; and (e) providing opportunities for clients to regain control over their lives. Despite the proliferation of these practices, little is known about their effects on survivors. In response, the current study explored the extent to which trauma-informed practices, as experienced by shelter residents, related to changes in their levels of self-efficacy, safety-related empowerment, and depressive symptoms over the course of approximately 30 days in shelter. Fifty-seven shelter residents from 4 programs in Ohio completed surveys shortly after arriving in shelter and again before exit. Their perception of the degree to which they received trauma-informed services was associated with significant improvement in their self-efficacy and safety-related empowerment, but had no impact on depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms decreased over time, regardless of receipt of trauma-informed practice. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. 41 CFR 302-11.4 - Who is not eligible to receive an allowance for expenses incurred in connection with residence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... receive an allowance for expenses incurred in connection with residence transactions? 302-11.4 Section 302... RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE... connection with residence transactions? You are not eligible to receive an allowance for expenses incurred in...

  15. 41 CFR 302-11.2 - Am I eligible to receive an allowance for expenses incurred in connection with my residence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... an allowance for expenses incurred in connection with my residence transactions? 302-11.2 Section 302... RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE... with my residence transactions? You are eligible to receive an allowance for expenses incurred in...

  16. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency concerning the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 16 September 2009 from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency attaching the text of the Statement of Principles of the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN). The letter and, as requested therein, the Statement of Principles are herewith circulated for the information of Member States [es

  17. Communication of 12 April 1996 received from the resident representative of Brazil to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a note verbale received by the Director general of the IAEA on 12 April 1996 from the Resident Representative of Brazil providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of the Federative Republic of Brazil

  18. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency concerning the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 16 September 2009 from the Resident Representative of Australia to the Agency attaching the text of the Statement of Principles of the Asia-Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN). The letter and, as requested therein, the Statement of Principles are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  19. Effectiveness of Residence Restrictions in Preventing Sex Offense Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Matt R.; Levenson, Jill S.; Youstin, Tasha J.

    2012-01-01

    Many municipalities have recently extended residence restrictions for sex offenders beyond the provisions of state law, although the efficacy of these measures in reducing recidivism has not been empirically established. This study used arrest histories in Jacksonville, Florida, to assess the effects of a recently expanded municipal 2,500-foot…

  20. Management of Obstetric Perineal Tears: Do Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents Receive Adequate Training? Results of an Anonymous Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cornet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To evaluate the obstetrics and gynaecology residents' perspective of their training and experience in the management of perineal tears that occur during assisted vaginal delivery. We hypothesised that residents would perceive room for improvement in their knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and the training received in tears repair. Design. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Population/Setting. Seventy-two major residents from all teaching hospitals in Catalonia. Methods. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate experience, perception of the training and supervision provided. Results. The questionnaire was sent to all residents (=72, receiving 46 responses (64%. The participants represented 15 out of the 16 teaching hospitals included in the study (94% of the hospitals represented. Approximately, 52% of residents were in their third year while 48% were in their fourth. The majority of them thought that their knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy was poor (62%, although 98% felt confident that they would know when an episiotomy was correctly indicated. The survey found that they lacked experience in the repair of major degree tears (70% had repaired fewer than ten, and most did not carry out followup procedures. Conclusion. The majority of them indicated that more training in this specific area is necessary (98%.

  1. Perception of physicians about medical education received during their Nephrology residency training in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Añazco, Percy; Bonilla-Vargas, Luis; Hernandez, Adrian V; Silveira-Chau, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In Peru there are different hospitals and university programs for training of specialists in nephrology. To assess the perception of physicians who attend such programs. We carried out a descriptive cross-sectional national-level study in physicians who were in the last two years of nephrology training during February 2012 and who had graduated from it in 2010 and 2011. A self-applied questionnaire was developed along with the Peruvian Society of Nephrology based on international standards. The questionnaire evaluated: mentoring, clinical training, procedures, external rotations, research and global perception. Forty doctors were surveyed nationwide. 82.5% had tutors, 22.5% of them said their support was poor. A 27.5% described their theoretical formation as deficient. The practical training was perceived as acceptable globally; however, improvements in training on peritoneal dialysis and reading kidney transplant biopsies are necessary. A 90% have national external rotations and 65% reported to have an international rotation. In the assessment of research, 77.5% thought this is deficient. In addition, 82.5% believed that residency should last four years. However, 60% reported that their residency training was good. There is a decrease in the positive perception of the aspects studied among residents regarding graduates. The overall perception of nephrology residency training was considered good; however, areas of tutoring, and academic and research activities on average were deficient.

  2. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  3. Survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Yamada, H.; Marks, S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the United States. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutron-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter

  4. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Jiménez López; Jesús Arenas Osuna

    2017-01-01

    High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment o...

  5. Hydraulic residence time and iron removal in a wetland receiving ferruginous mine water over a 4 year period from commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusin, F M; Jarvis, A P; Gandy, C J

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) has been conducted for the UK Coal Authority's mine water treatment wetland at Lambley, Northumberland, to determine the hydraulic performance of the wetland over a period of approximately 4 years since site commissioning. The wetland RTD was evaluated in accordance with moment analysis and modelled based on a tanks-in-series (TIS) model to yield the hydraulic characteristics of system performance. Greater hydraulic performance was seen during the second site monitoring after 21 months of site operation i.e. longer hydraulic residence time to reflect overall system hydraulic efficiency, compared to wetland performance during its early operation. Further monitoring of residence time during the third year of wetland operation indicated a slight reduction in hydraulic residence time, thus a lower system hydraulic efficiency. In contrast, performance during the fourth year of wetland operation exhibited an improved overall system hydraulic efficiency, suggesting the influence of reed growth over the lifetime of such systems on hydraulic performance. Interestingly, the same pattern was found for iron (which is the primary pollutant of concern in ferruginous mine waters) removal efficiency of the wetland system from the second to fourth year of wetland operation. This may therefore, reflect the maturity of reeds for maintaining efficient flow distribution across the wetland to retain a longer residence time and significant fractions of water involved to enhance the extent of treatment received for iron attenuation. Further monitoring will be conducted to establish whether such performance is maintained, or whether efficiency decreases over time due to accumulation of dead plant material within the wetland cells.

  6. External and internal radiation doses from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident received by residents of Chiba, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Hikaru; Ohta, Yuji; Banba, Shigeru; Maeyama, Takeshi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive substances discharged into the atmosphere from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) first reached the Chiba-City on March 15, 2011. Atmospheric and tap water samples were collected from March 2011 to August 2012 to measure of radioactivity in the Chiba-City, about 220 km SSE of the Fukushima NPP. We then used the data to analyze the external and internal (from inhalation of contaminated air or ingestion of contaminated drinking water) radiation doses received by the residents of the Chiba-City after the accident. (author)

  7. Communication of 28 February 1997 received from the resident representative of Brazil to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the 'Joint Declaration on the Transport of Radioactive Waste' of the Governments of the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Republic of Chile and the Eastern Republic of Uruguay, issued to the press on 17 January 1997. The document was received by the Director General of the IAEA on 4 March 1997 from the Resident Representative of the Federative Republic of Brazil on behalf of his Government and the Governments of the other three countries involved

  8. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  9. The Impact of Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention on University Resident Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Miles, Nathan; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.; Werden, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Resident assistants (RAs) can serve as important suicide prevention gatekeepers. The purpose of the study was to determine if training improved RAs' crisis communications skills and suicide-related knowledge and to determine if the knowledge elements predicted crisis communications skills. New RAs showed significant improvement in all areas from…

  10. Detecting and Preventing Beacon Replay Attacks in Receiver-Initiated MAC Protocols for Energy Efficient WSNs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Mauro, Alessio; Fafoutis, Xenofon; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2013-01-01

    nodes, pretending to have a fake identity within the network. To prevent this attack we propose RAP, a challenge-response authentication protocol that is able to detect and prevent the beacon replay attack. The effectiveness of the protocol is formally verified using OFMC and ProVerif. Furthermore, we......In receiver-initiated MAC protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), communication is initiated by the receiver of the data through beacons containing the receiver's identity. In this paper, we consider the case of a network intruder that captures and replays such beacons towards legitimate...

  11. Two-year outcomes of the Early Risers prevention trial with formerly homeless families residing in supportive housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Lee, Susanne; Morrell, Nicole; August, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    This article reports 2-year outcomes from a cluster randomized, controlled trial of the Early Risers (ER) program implemented as a selective preventive intervention in supportive housing settings for homeless families. Based on the goals of this comprehensive prevention program, we predicted that intervention participants receiving ER services would show improvement in parenting and child outcomes relative to families in treatment-as-usual sites. The sample included 270 children in 161 families, residing in 15 supportive housing sites; multimethod, multi-informant assessments conducted at baseline and yearly thereafter included parent and teacher report of child adjustment, parent report of parenting self-efficacy, and parent-child observations that yielded scores of effective parenting practices. Data were modeled in HLM7 (4-level model accounting for nesting of children within families and families within housing sites). Two years' postbaseline, intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses indicated that parents in the ER group showed significantly improved parenting self-efficacy, and parent report indicated significant reductions in ER group children's depression. No main effects of ITT were shown for observed parenting effectiveness. However, over time, average levels of parenting self-efficacy predicted observed effective parenting practices, and observed effective parenting practices predicted improvements in both teacher- and parent-report of child adjustment. This is the first study to our knowledge to demonstrate prevention effects of a program for homeless families residing in family supportive housing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. The disaster prevention awareness of foreign residents and disaster management of organizations for foreign employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tan Yen; Sugiki, Nao; Matsuo, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Japan is known to have many natural disasters occurrences, especially in recent years, the seismic hazard named "Nankai-trough Disastrous Earthquake" of magnitude 9(M) was predicted and will have caused huge damages. Therefore, disaster management should be well planned and executed to ensure minimal amount of victims and damages from disaster. However, foreign residents are mostly vulnerable and ill-equipped to face such consequences compared to Japanese residents, especially when there is limited information available for foreigners presently. As the influx of foreigner migration has been steadily increasing annually, it is vital for disaster management to be compulsively planned to cope up with the great variety of foreigners' needs from diverse backgrounds accordingly. The purpose of this study is to comprehend foreign residents' disaster prevention awareness, in order to provide a more effective information provision on disaster management, so as to help improve their disaster prevention awareness. Thus, this study is set in Toyohashi city, and the methodology used is by conducting two questionnaires. Firstly, to have an accurate understanding on the awareness of foreign residents towards disasters prevention, the questionnaire is conducted towards foreign university students, on pertinent issues such as on the degree of preparedness and their matters of concern of which is related to natural disasters. Secondly, to comprehend disaster management of organizations, the other focuses on preventive measures adopted by manufacturing industry organizations, such as types of preventive measures as a whole and on the issues and challenges encountered during foreign employee-related enforcement of disaster management. Finally, based both results of the questionnaire, the key factors on effective information provision of disaster management is considered.

  13. Communication dated 8 August 2005 received from the Resident Representatives of France, Germany and the United Kingdom to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication from the Resident Representatives of France, Germany and the United Kingdom, dated 8 August 2005, attaching the text of a letter dated 5 August 2005 sent by the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of France, Germany and the United Kingdom, and the High Representative of the European Union, to the Secretary of the Supreme National Security Council of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The letter transmits proposals for a Framework for a Long-Term Agreement between the Islamic Republic of Iran and France, Germany and the United Kingdom, with the Support of the High Representative of the European Union. The communication from the Permanent Missions and, as requested therein, the text of the letter and its enclosure, are herewith attached for the information of all Member States

  14. Funding antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia prevents transmission and is inexpensive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard T; Watson, Jo; Cogle, Aaron J; Smith, Don E; Hoy, Jennifer F; Bastian, Lisa A; Finlayson, Robert; Drummond, Fraser M; Whittaker, Bill; Law, Matthew G; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2018-02-01

    Background The aim of this study is to estimate the reduction in new HIV infections and resultant cost outcomes of providing antiretroviral treatment (ART) through Australia's 'universal access' health scheme to all temporary residents with HIV infection living legally in Australia, but currently deemed ineligible to access subsidised ART via this scheme. A mathematical model to estimate the number of new HIV infections averted and the associated lifetime costs over 5 years if all HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia had access to ART and subsidised medical care was developed. Input data came from a cohort of 180 HIV-positive temporary residents living in Australia who are receiving free ART donated by pharmaceutical companies for up to 4 years. Expanding ART access to an estimated total 450 HIV+ temporary residents in Australia for 5 years could avert 80 new infections. The model estimated the total median discounted (5%) cost for ART and associated care to be A$36million, while the total savings in lifetime-discounted costs for the new infections averted was A$22million. It is estimated that expanded access to ART for all HIV-positive temporary residents in Australia will substantially reduce HIV transmission to their sexual partners at little additional cost. In the context of Australia's National HIV strategy and Australia's endorsement of global goals to provide universal access to ART for all people with HIV, this is an important measure to remove inequities in the provision of HIV-related treatment and care.

  15. Does time pressure create barriers for people to receive preventive health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoxi; Dembe, Allard E; Wickizer, Thomas; Lu, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Regular use of recommended preventive health services can promote good health and prevent disease. However, individuals may forgo obtaining preventive care when they are busy with competing activities and commitments. This study examined whether time pressure related to work obligations creates barriers to obtaining needed preventive health services. Data from the 2002-2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) were used to measure the work hours of 61,034 employees (including 27,910 females) and their use of five preventive health services (flu vaccinations, routine check-ups, dental check-ups, mammograms and Pap smear). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to test the association between working hours and use of each of those five services. Individuals working long hours (>60 per week) were significantly less likely to obtain dental check-ups (OR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.72-0.91) and mammograms (OR=0.47, 95% CI: 0.31-0.73). Working 51-60 h weekly was associated with less likelihood of receiving Pap smear (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.96). No association was found for flu vaccination. Time pressure from work might create barriers for people to receive particular preventive health services, such as breast cancer screening, cervical cancer screening and dental check-ups. Health practitioners should be aware of this particular source of barriers to care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 41 CFR 302-11.307 - May I receive an advance of funds for my residence transaction expenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds for my residence transaction expenses? 302-11.307 Section 302-11.307 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE TRANSACTIONS Request for...

  17. 41 CFR 302-11.100 - For which residence may I receive reimbursement for under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false For which residence may... Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 11-ALLOWANCES FOR EXPENSES INCURRED IN CONNECTION WITH RESIDENCE TRANSACTIONS Title Requirements...

  18. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment of mental disorders and mental health promotion. Unlike the reports of other countries, we get participation of more than 95%, we provide appropriate treatment and follow-up to residents with mental disorder, and there has not been a consummate suicide. We assume that the use of different strategies (scrutiny, adapting models of prevention of suicide as a peer and gatekeeper training, informative sessions of mental health promotion and stigma, interventions targeted at individuals and groups with conflicts has been useful against barriers that do not allow doctors to identify the risk of suicide warning signs, seek help for mental disorder, and seek to improve their mental health.

  19. Prevention of blood transfusion with intravenous iron in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athibovonsuk, Punnada; Manchana, Tarinee; Sirisabya, Nakarin

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravenous iron and oral iron for prevention of blood transfusions in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Sixty-four non anemic gynecologic cancer patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy were stratified and randomized according to baseline hemoglobin levels and chemotherapy regimen. The study group received 200mg of intravenous iron sucrose immediately after each chemotherapy infusion. The control group received oral ferrous fumarate at a dose of 200mg three times a day. Complete blood count was monitored before each chemotherapy infusion. Blood transfusions were given if hemoglobin level was below 10mg/dl. There were 32 patients in each group. No significant differences in baseline hemoglobin levels and baseline characteristics were demonstrated between both groups. Nine patients (28.1%) in the study group and 18 patients (56.3%) in the control group required blood transfusion through 6 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.02). Fewer median number of total packed red cell units were required in the study group compared to the control group (0 and 0.5 unit, respectively, p=0.04). Serious adverse events and hypersensitivity reactions were not reported. However, constipation was significantly higher in the control group (3.1% and 40.6%, p=gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, associated with less constipation than the oral formulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Understanding the risk factors for infectious diseases, their prevention, and control, among residents of Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y S; Wu, Q Q; Xu, S Y; Wang, L; Liu, H; Yao, D M; Di, Z Q; Tian, X Y

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To investigate the understanding of infectious diseases, their prevention, and control, and the factors influencing this literacy among urban and rural residents of Zhejiang Province. Methods: In November- December 2014, a multistage stratified cluster sampling questionnaire was administered at study sites in eight districts of Zhejiang province: Hangzhou city Gongshu district, Hangzhou city Chun'an county, Wenzhou city Cangnan county, Dongyang city, Jiaxing city Jiashan county, Zhoushan city Putuo district, Linhai city, Lishui city Jinyun county. The inclusion criteria were: 15-60 years old, living locally for more than six continuous months, and no mental illness. The exclusion criteria were: foreigner residing locally, resident of Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan, or unable to communicate through speech or writing. In this study, 4 091 questionnaires were distributed, and 4 020 valid questionnaires were returned(98.26%). Health literacy regarding infectious diseases was measured at five levels: knowledge, skills, behaviors, access to information, and understanding of the prevention of infectious diseases. A total score was calculated for each questionnaire, and a total score of ≥80 was deemed to indicate an understanding of the prevention of infectious diseases. A χ 2 test was used to compare the levels of health literacy in different populations with single-factor analyses, and a multivariate unconditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the factors affecting infectious diseases prevention and treatment literacy levels. Results: Of the 4 020 respondents(aged(43.84 ± 10.28)years), 1 964 were male(48.86%)and 2 056 were female(51.14%). In the total surveyed population, 15.17%( n =610)understood the prevention of infectious diseases, 294 were male(14.97%)and 316 were female(15.37%)(χ 2 =2.48, P =0.115). When the participants in the different age groups were analyzed, 23.11%, 20.29%, 13.27%, and 11.04% of those aged 18- 29( n =116), 30- 39

  1. Communication of 19 June 1997 received from the resident representative of the People's Republic of China to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 19 June 1997 received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of the People's Republic of China, regarding the continued participation of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China in the activities of the IAEA as from 1 July 1997

  2. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Germany to the IAEA with regard to the German proposal on the multilateralization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Agency has received a communication dated 26 April 2007 from the Resident Representative of Germany, attaching the German proposal on the Multilateralization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. As requested in that communication, the proposal is herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  3. Communication dated 16 July 2008 received from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning an International Initiative on 3S-Based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 16 July 2008 from the Resident Representative of Japan attaching a document entitled 'International Initiative on 3S-based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure'. The communication, and as requested therein, its attachment, are circulated herewith for information

  4. Communication received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the IAEA on the establishment, structure and operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 7 June 2007 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, with an attachment entitled 'Establishment, Structure and Operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre'. As requested in that communication, the letter and its attachment are circulated for the information of Member States

  5. Adherence to vector preventive measures decrease cases of acute Dengue among Abuja residents, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Abdullahi Nasir

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigeria is one of the dengue hyper-endemic nations. This study investigated the level of knowledge about dengue and vector preventive practices and their impacts on acute dengue among febrile patients at Abuja, Nigeria. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted on febrile patients attending University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria. Blood samples were individually collected from 171 febrile patients residing at Gwagwalada suburb. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to assess subjects’ knowledge about preventive measures against vector breeding and bites. Blood samples were tested for dengue virus Nonstructural glycoprotein-1antigen using enzyme linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: Fifteen out of 171 febrile persons (8.8% were Dengue NS1 positive. Sixty percent of the subjects do not know about dengue, while 33% knew about dengue virus infection through television/ radio programs, 5% through healthcare professionals and 2% from friends/families. Those who persistently use indoor residual spraying and long sleeves/trousers during daytime had less cases of DENV NS1 than those who do not. There was statistical association between DENV NS1 and residence in proximity to waste dumpsites (P<0.0001 and frequent use of long sleeve clothing and trousers (P=0.005. However, there was no statistical association between DENV NS1 antigenemia and persistent use of indoor residual spraying and presence of in-door water containers (P>0.05. Conclusions: Findings from this study imply that proper education and adherence to preventive measures minimize people from being susceptible to Dengue virus infections.

  6. A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M Todd; Meddings, Jennifer; Krein, Sarah L; McNamara, Sara E; Trautner, Barbara W; Ratz, David; Stone, Nimalie D; Min, Lillian; Schweon, Steven J; Rolle, Andrew J; Olmsted, Russell N; Burwen, Dale R; Battles, James; Edson, Barbara; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    utilization remained unchanged (4.50 at baseline, 4.45 at conclusion of project; IRR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.03; P = .26) in adjusted analyses. The number of urine cultures ordered for all residents decreased from 3.49 per 1000 resident-days to 3.08 per 1000 resident-days. Similarly, after adjustment, the rates were shown to decrease from 3.52 to 3.09 (IRR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77-0.94; P = .001). In a large-scale, national implementation project involving community-based nursing homes, combined technical and socioadaptive catheter-associated UTI prevention interventions successfully reduced the incidence of catheter-associated UTIs.

  7. Communication of 19 June 1997 received from the resident representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 19 June 1997 received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, referring to the Revised Supplementary Agreement Concerning the Provision of Technical Assistance by the International Atomic Energy Agency to the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on behalf of the Government of Hong Kong done at Vienna on 4 February 1983

  8. Communication received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the Agency concerning a statement of the Collective Security Treaty Organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Agency has received a communication dated 30 August 2005 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, attaching a statement by the heads of State of Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Russian Federation and Tajikistan adopted at the Moscow session of the Collective Security Council of the Collective Security Treaty Organization on 23 June 2005. The communication from the Russian Federation and, as requested therein, its attachment, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  9. Communication of 1 October 2009 received from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the Participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 October 2009 from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the Participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Attached to this letter is an updated version of a paper entitled 'The Nuclear Suppliers Group: Its Origins, Role and Activities.' The original version of this paper was issued as INFCIRC/539 on 15 September 1997: revisions were issued on 17 April 2000, 16 September 2003 and 30 May 2005

  10. Communication of 1 October 2009 received from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the Participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 October 2009 from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the Participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Attached to this letter is an updated version of a paper entitled 'The Nuclear Suppliers Group: Its Origins, Role and Activities.' The original version of this paper was issued as INFCIRC/539 on 15 September 1997: revisions were issued on 17 April 2000, 16 September 2003 and 30 May 2005 [es

  11. Travel risk behaviors as a determinants of receiving pre-travel health consultation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim; Gaafer, Mohammed; Bassiony, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 30-60 % of travelers experience an illness while traveling. The incidence of travel-related illness can be reduced by preventive measures such as those provided by the Traveler Health Clinic (THC) in Kuwait. The present study is an analytical comparative study between groups of travelers visiting the THC during the study period (May 2009 - December 2010) and an age- and gender-matched control group of non-visitors (800 people). Both groups completed a modified pre-departure questionnaire. Bivariate analysis revealed that Kuwaitis (68.2 %), those traveling for work (25.3 %) or leisure (59.5 %), those living in camps (20.4 %) or hotels (64.0 %), and those with knowledge of the THC from the media (28.1 %) or other sources (57.3 %), were more likely to be associated with a high frequency of visits to the THC ( p  travelers heading to Africa (47 %) and South America (10 %) visited the THC more than did others ( P  travel, duration of stay, and choice of travel destination are independent predictors of receiving pre-travel consultation from the THC. Nationality, purpose of travel, length of stay, and travel destination are predictors for receiving a pre-travel consultation from the THC.

  12. Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: oral cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen V; Littlewood, Anne; Clarkson, Jan E; McCabe, Martin G

    2015-12-23

    Oral mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy, head and neck radiotherapy, and targeted therapy, affecting over 75% of high risk patients. Ulceration can lead to severe pain and difficulty eating and drinking, which may necessitate opioid analgesics, hospitalisation and nasogastric or intravenous nutrition. These complications may lead to interruptions or alterations to cancer therapy, which may reduce survival. There is also a risk of death from sepsis if pathogens enter the ulcers of immunocompromised patients. Ulcerative oral mucositis can be costly to healthcare systems, yet there are few preventive interventions proven to be beneficial. Oral cryotherapy is a low-cost, simple intervention which is unlikely to cause side-effects. It has shown promise in clinical trials and warrants an up-to-date Cochrane review to assess and summarise the international evidence. To assess the effects of oral cryotherapy for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 17 June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 17 June 2015), EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 17 June 2015), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 17 June 2015) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 17 June 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry, and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching databases. We included parallel-design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment. We used outcomes from a published core outcome set registered on the COMET website. Two review authors independently screened the results of electronic searches, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for information

  13. Screening for Trauma Exposure, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Symptoms among Mothers Receiving Child Welfare Preventive Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Claude M.; Griffing, Sascha; Tullberg, Erika; Roberts, Elizabeth; Ellis, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    The role of parental trauma exposure and related mental health symptoms as risk factors for child maltreatment for parents involved with the child welfare (CW) system has received limited attention. In particular, little is known about the extent to which mothers receiving CW services to prevent maltreatment have experienced trauma and suffered…

  14. A survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Yamada, H.; Marks, S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the U.S. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutral-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter. (author)

  15. How study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines to prevent ischemic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death in Uruguay and cancer is the second. The pillar of the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer are fluo pyrimidines and cause acute ischemic events in 3-8% of t rated patients. The 5 fluorouracil is the third anticancer drug most used Objective: Due to the high incidence of the two diseases and the risk of death caused by the ischemic treatment complications, the literature is analyzed to define how to study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines as a medium of preventing the same. Development: fluo pyrimidines cardio-toxicity can occur by myocardial toxicity, vasospasm, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency, autoimmune phenomena, platelet hyper aggregability, etc. The clinic is varied and underestimated: angina, abnormal ST silent and reversible, arrhythmias, heart failure, hypertension and heart failure. It is the most common complication with continuous infusion of 5 Fu and its equivalent capecitabine with bolus f lou pyrimidines. It is common that ischemic heart disease prioritises the risk increase of complications, but their absence does not exist. Without ischemic heart disease it is difficult to prevent ischemic events, however proposes that the older higher risk. Results: No uniform guidelines is advised: detailed history, determine if risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia and They are present electrocardiogram and cardiac evaluation. Warn the patient about angina l pain as early symptom and monitor symptoms during chemotherapy including cardio-vascular hypotension. Discontinue the medication and perform classic anti-angina l symptoms and / or signs of ischemia. Not reintroduce unless it is the only therapeutic option, since mortality may exceed

  16. Preventive Dental Checkups and Their Association With Access to Usual Source of Care Among Rural and Urban Adult Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aishah; Thapa, Janani R; Zhang, Donglan

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between rural or urban residence and having a usual source of care (USC), and the utilization of preventive dental checkups among adults. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2012. We performed a logit regression on the relationship between rural and urban residence, having a USC, and having at least 1 dental checkup in the past year, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health status. After controlling for covariates, rural adult residents had significantly lower odds of having at least 1 dental checkup per year compared to their urban counterparts (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.86, P rural and urban residents, having a USC was significantly associated with an 11% (95% CI = 9%-13%) increase in the probability of having a preventive dental checkup within a year. Individuals with a USC were more likely to obtain a preventive dental visit, with similar effects in rural and urban settings. We attributed the lower odds of having a checkup in rural regions to the lower density of oral health care providers in these areas. Integration of rural oral health care into primary care may help mitigate the challenges due to a shortage of oral health care providers in rural areas. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Determinants of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Seeking Behaviours of Pregnant Undergraduates Resident in University Hostels, South-East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinweuba, Anthonia Ukamaka; Agbapuonwu, Noreen Ebelechukwu; Onyiapat, JaneLovena Enuma; Israel, Chidimma Egbichi; Ilo, Clementine Ifeyinwa; Arinze, Joyce Chinenye

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive survey investigated determinants of malaria prevention and treatment seeking behaviours of pregnant undergraduates resident in university hostels, South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling was used to enrol 121 accessible and consenting undergraduates with self-revealed and noticeable pregnancy residing in twenty-three female hostels of four university campuses in Enugu State, Nigeria. Structured interview guide developed based on reviewed literature and WHO-recommended malaria prevention and treatment measures was used to collect students' self-report data on malaria preventive health behaviours, sick role behaviours, and clinic use using mixed methods. The WHO-recommended malaria prevention measures were sparingly used. Some believed that pregnancy does not play any role in a woman's reaction to malaria infection. Only 41 (50.6%) visited a hospital for screening and treatment. Thirty-four (28.1%) used antimalaria medicine bought from chemist shop or over-the-counter medicines, while 33 (27.3%) used untreated net. The students were more likely to complete their antimalaria medicine when they were sick with malaria infection than for prevention ( p = 0.0186). Knowledge, academic schedule, cultural influence on perception and decision-making, and accessibility of health facility were key determinants of the women's preventive and treatment seeking behaviours. Health education on malaria prevention and dangers of drug abuse should form part of orientation lectures for all freshmen. University health centres should be upgraded to provide basic antenatal care services.

  18. Determinants of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Seeking Behaviours of Pregnant Undergraduates Resident in University Hostels, South-East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonia Ukamaka Chinweuba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional descriptive survey investigated determinants of malaria prevention and treatment seeking behaviours of pregnant undergraduates resident in university hostels, South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling was used to enrol 121 accessible and consenting undergraduates with self-revealed and noticeable pregnancy residing in twenty-three female hostels of four university campuses in Enugu State, Nigeria. Structured interview guide developed based on reviewed literature and WHO-recommended malaria prevention and treatment measures was used to collect students’ self-report data on malaria preventive health behaviours, sick role behaviours, and clinic use using mixed methods. The WHO-recommended malaria prevention measures were sparingly used. Some believed that pregnancy does not play any role in a woman’s reaction to malaria infection. Only 41 (50.6% visited a hospital for screening and treatment. Thirty-four (28.1% used antimalaria medicine bought from chemist shop or over-the-counter medicines, while 33 (27.3% used untreated net. The students were more likely to complete their antimalaria medicine when they were sick with malaria infection than for prevention (p=0.0186. Knowledge, academic schedule, cultural influence on perception and decision-making, and accessibility of health facility were key determinants of the women’s preventive and treatment seeking behaviours. Health education on malaria prevention and dangers of drug abuse should form part of orientation lectures for all freshmen. University health centres should be upgraded to provide basic antenatal care services.

  19. The longitudinal prevalence of MRSA in care home residents and the effectiveness of improving infection prevention knowledge and practice on colonisation using a stepped wedge study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, C; Wilcox, M; Barr, B; Hall, D; Hodgson, G; Parnell, P; Tompkins, D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence and health outcomes of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation in elderly care home residents. To measure the effectiveness of improving infection prevention knowledge and practice on MRSA prevalence. Setting Care homes for elderly residents in Leeds, UK. Participants Residents able to give informed consent. Design A controlled intervention study, using a stepped wedge design, comprising 65 homes divided into three groups. Baseline MRSA prevalence was determined by screening the nares of residents (n=2492). An intervention based upon staff education and training on hand hygiene was delivered at three different times according to group number. Scores for three assessment methods, an audit of hand hygiene facilities, staff hand hygiene observations and an educational questionnaire, were collected before and after the intervention. After each group of homes received the intervention, all participants were screened for MRSA nasal colonisation. In total, four surveys took place between November 2006 and February 2009. Results MRSA prevalence was 20%, 19%, 22% and 21% in each survey, respectively. There was a significant improvement in scores for all three assessment methods post-intervention (p≤0.001). The intervention was associated with a small but significant increase in MRSA prevalence (p=0.023). MRSA colonisation was associated with previous and subsequent MRSA infection but was not significantly associated with subsequent hospitalisation or mortality. Conclusions The intervention did not result in a decrease in the prevalence of MRSA colonisation in care home residents. Additional measures will be required to reduce endemic MRSA colonisation in care homes.

  20. Communication of 1 October 2009 received from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 October 2009 from the Resident Representative of Hungary to the Agency on behalf of the Participating Governments of the Nuclear Suppliers Group.1 Attached to this letter is an updated version of a paper entitled 'The Nuclear Suppliers Group: Its Origins, Role and Activities. The original version of this paper was issued as INFCIRC/539 on 15 September 1997: revisions were issued on 17 April 2000, 16 September 2003 and 30 May 2005. As requested in the letter, the revised version of the paper, attached hereto, is being circulated to Member States of the IAEA

  1. Obesity prevention in pediatrics: A pilot pediatric resident curriculum intervention on nutrition and obesity education and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose L; Gilmer, Loise

    2006-09-01

    Obesity is a highly burdensome public health issue associated with premature death, multiple comorbid disabilities and staggering healthcare costs. Between 1980-2000, the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents nearly tripled. Obesity subjects youth to social stigmatization and discrimination. These economic and personal burdens mandate targeted prevention and detection educational programs for all individuals at risk. The most cost-effective method of approaching this obesity epidemic is through education of health professionals. As part of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum, postgraduate-year (PGY)-2 residents first observed and then participated in the dietary evaluation and counseling of pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal questionnaires, multiple-choice knowledge examinations and a pre-established checklist of desired skills and behaviors provided evaluation of the curriculum's effect on the participants' ability and willingness to manage actually obese or at-risk pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal survey and knowledge test scores from control PGY-3 residents generally confirmed that their knowledge and counseling skills on obesity prevention and management were well below expectation. Following participation in the curriculum, study residents' knowledge tended to improve, as did their level of comfort in counseling obese and at-risk children, adolescents and their parents. Implementation of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum appears to improve participants' knowledge base as well as their skills and level of personal comfort in the recognition, evaluation and management, including counseling, of both obese and at-risk pediatric patients and their families.

  2. A structured women's preventive health clinic for residents: a quality improvement project designed to meet training needs and improve cervical cancer screening rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta K; Einstadter, Douglas; Lawrence, Renee

    2010-10-01

    Multiple resident-related factors contribute to 'missed opportunities' in providing comprehensive preventive care for female patients, including comfort level, knowledge and experience--all of which are compounded by resident turnover rates. Of particular concern among Internal Medicine (IM) residents is their knowledge and comfort level in performing pelvic exams. To evaluate the impact of a quality improvement project of implementing a Women's Preventive Health Clinic (WPHC) on addressing gaps identified by needs assessments: residents' comfort and knowledge with female preventive care and cervical cancer screening. The WPHC, a multidisciplinary weekly clinic, focused on preventive services for women with chronic conditions. The alternating didactic and clinic sessions emphasised women's preventive health topics for IM residents. Sixty-three IM residents participated in WPHC between 2002 and 2005. Pre- and post-test design was used to assess resident knowledge and comfort levels. Cervical cancer screening rates of residents' patients were assessed pre- and post-WPHC initiation. There was a significant improvement in general knowledge (64% correct at pretest vs 73% at post-test, p=0.0002), resident comfort level in discussing women's health topics and performing gynaecological exams (p<0.0002). Cervical cancer screening rates among IM residents' patients improved from 54% (pre-WPHC initiation) to 65% (post-WPHC initiation period). The results indicate that a focused resident preventive programme can meet gaps identified by education and needs assessments, and simultaneously have a positive impact on cervical cancer screening rates and thus may serve as a model for other residency programmes.

  3. Fluorosis and dental caries in Mexican schoolchildren residing in areas with different water fluoride concentrations and receiving fluoridated salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, A; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E; Borges-Yáñez, A

    2013-01-01

    To explore the association between fluoride in drinking water and the prevalence and severity of fluorosis and dental caries in children living in communities receiving fluoridated salt. Participants were schoolchildren (n = 457) living in two rural areas of the State of Morelos, Mexico, where the water fluoride concentration was 0.70 or 1.50 ppm. Dental caries status was assessed using Pitts' criteria. Lesions that were classified as D3 (decayed) were identified to determine the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (D3MFT). Fluorosis was assessed using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI). Information regarding drinking water source and oral hygiene practices (tooth brushing frequency, dentifrice use, and oral hygiene index) was obtained. The prevalence of fluorosis (TFI ≥1) in communities with 0.70 and 1.50 ppm water fluoride was 39.4 and 60.5% (p = 0.014), respectively, while the prevalence of more severe forms (TFI ≥4) was 7.9 and 25.5% (p caries (D3 >1) showed that higher fluorosis categories (TFI 5-6 OR = 6.81, p = 0.001) were associated with higher caries experience, adjusted by age, number of teeth present, tooth brushing frequency, bottled water use, and natural water fluoride concentration. The prevalence of fluorosis was associated with the water fluoride concentration. Fluorosis at moderate and severe levels was associated with a higher prevalence of dental caries, compared with lesser degrees of fluorosis. The impact of dental fluorosis should be considered in dental public health programs. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Factors that influence utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing at a selected university campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndabarora, Eléazar; Mchunu, Gugu

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported that university students, who are mostly young people, rarely use existing HIV/AIDS preventive methods. Although studies have shown that young university students have a high degree of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and HIV modes of transmission, they are still not utilising the existing HIV prevention methods and still engage in risky sexual practices favourable to HIV. Some variables, such as awareness of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods, have been associated with utilisation of such methods. The study aimed to explore factors that influence use of existing HIV/AIDS prevention methods among university students residing in a selected campus, using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a theoretical framework. A quantitative research approach and an exploratory-descriptive design were used to describe perceived factors that influence utilisation by university students of HIV/AIDS prevention methods. A total of 335 students completed online and manual questionnaires. Study findings showed that the factors which influenced utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods were mainly determined by awareness of the existing university-based HIV/AIDS prevention strategies. Most utilised prevention methods were voluntary counselling and testing services and free condoms. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS score was also found to correlate with HIV risk index score. Perceived susceptibility and perceived threat of HIV/AIDS showed correlation with self-efficacy on condoms and their utilisation. Most HBM variables were not predictors of utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students. Intervention aiming to improve the utilisation of HIV/AIDS prevention methods among students at the selected university should focus on removing identified barriers, promoting HIV/AIDS prevention services and providing appropriate resources to implement such programmes.

  5. Receipt of HIV/STD prevention counseling by HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuko; Zhu, Julia; Crepaz, Nicole; Beer, Linda; Purcell, David W; Johnson, Christopher H; Valverde, Eduardo E; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-28

    Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a healthcare provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines.

  6. [Dynamics of tooth decay prevalence in children receiving long-term preventive program in school dental facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamova, O G; Kulazhenko, T V; Gabitova, K F

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the assessment of tooth decay prevalence in clinically homogenous groups of children receiving long-term preventive program (PP) in school dental facilities. Five-years PP were introduced in clinical practice in 2 Moscow schools. Preventive treatment was performed by dental hygienist. The results show that systematic preventive treatment in school dental offices starting from elementary school allows reducing dental caries incidence 46-53% and stabilize the incidence of caries complications. It should be mentioned though that analysis of individualized outcomes proves heterogeneity of study results despite of equal conditions of PP. Potentially significant hence is early diagnostics and treatment of initial caries forms as demineralization foci, especially in children with intensive tooth decay. Optimization of pediatric dentist and dental hygienist activity in school dental facilities is the main factor of caries prevention efficiency.

  7. Role of depression in secondary prevention of Chinese coronary heart disease patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Feng

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI have higher rates of depression than the general population. However, few researchers have assessed the impact of depression on the secondary prevention of CHD in China.The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between depression and secondary prevention of CHD in Chinese patients after PCI.This descriptive, cross-sectional one-site study recruited both elective and emergency PCI patients one year after discharge. Data from 1934 patients were collected in the clinic using questionnaires and medical history records between August 2013 and September 2015. Depression was evaluated by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Secondary prevention of CHD was compared between depression and non-depression groups.We found that depression affected secondary prevention of CHD in the following aspects: lipid levels, blood glucose levels, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, and rates of medication use.Depressive patients with CHD are at increased risk of not achieving the lifestyle and risk factor control goals recommended in the 2006 AHA guidelines. Screening should focus on patients after PCI because treating depression can improve outcomes by improving secondary prevention of CHD.

  8. Relational Mindfulness for Psychiatry Residents: a Pilot Course in Empathy Development and Burnout Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paige Greason; Kaplan, Sebastian G; Mokonogho, Josephine

    2018-04-13

    Psychiatry residents face challenges daily that test their capacity to be empathic and attuned to their own self-care. This can have a deleterious impact not only on the residents but also on patient-care. Training to manage the challenges of the work and cultivate stronger patient relationships is needed but often missing in medical education. This study aimed to pilot an empathy training course based in relational mindfulness and assess the impact on burnout and empathy. Seven first-year psychiatry residents (PGY-1) at an academic medical center in a mid-size city in the southeast participated in an eight-week pilot program created by the authors that integrated relational mindfulness and empathy training. Data were gathered from the seven PGY-1s on measures of burnout and empathy and on their experience of the training. The PGY-1s demonstrated a downward trend in means on all three burnout subscales and significant improvement on the measure of empathy (f = 8.98; p = .02). Overall, the PGY-1s reported an increased awareness of their cognitive and emotional experiences and stated that the skills learned in the program increased their ability to care for themselves, their patients, and their families. Training in intrapersonal and interpersonal attunement is often overlooked in medical training, leading to resident burnout and negative patient outcomes. An empathy course based in relational mindfulness may be a viable strategy for programs looking to attend to their residents' emotional health and bridge the empathy training gap.

  9. Preventive Behavior of Recurrent Kidney Stones and Its Relationship with its Knowledge and Receiving it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Regarding the low rate of knowledge and performance of the subjects as well as the high age of patients suffering from kidney stones and lack of enough education in this group, health staff can be the most important source of knowledge for these people about preventive behaviors of kidney stones recurrence.

  10. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  11. Leadership Roles and Activities Among Alumni Receiving Postdoctoral Fellowship Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David E; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Izmirlian, Grant

    2018-02-28

    This study was conducted in 2016-2017 to better understand formal and informal leadership roles and activities of alumni from postdoctoral research training programs in cancer prevention. Data were obtained from surveys of 254 employed scientists who completed cancer prevention postdoctoral training within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, or at US research institutions through NCI-sponsored National Research Service Award (NRSA) individual postdoctoral fellowship (F32) grants, from 1987 to 2011. Fifteen questions categorized under Organizational Leadership, Research Leadership, Professional Society/Conference Leadership, and Broader Scientific/Health Community Leadership domains were analyzed. About 75% of respondents had at least one organizational leadership role or activity during their careers, and 13-34% reported some type of research, professional society/conference, or broader scientific/health community leadership within the past 5 years. Characteristics independently associated with leadership from regression models were being in earlier postdoctoral cohorts (8 items, range for statistically significant ORs = 2.8 to 10.8) and employment sector (8 items, range for statistically significant ORs = 0.4 to 11.7). Scientists whose race/ethnicity was other than white were less likely to report organizational leadership or management responsibilities (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Here, many alumni from NCI-supported cancer prevention postdoctoral programs were involved in leadership, with postdoctoral cohort and employment sector being the factors most often associated with leadership roles and activities. Currently, there is relatively little research on leadership roles of biomedical scientists in general, or in cancer prevention specifically. This study begins to address this gap and provide a basis for more extensive studies of leadership roles and training of scientists.

  12. The basic data for residents aged 16 years or older who received a comprehensive health check examinations in 2011-2012 as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey after the great East Japan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Satoh, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Akira; Ohtsuru, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Kamiya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To assist in the long-term health management of residents and evaluate health impacts after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Fukushima Prefecture, the Fukushima prefectural government decided to conduct the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This report describes the results for residents aged 16 years or older who received the health check examinations and evaluates the data obtained from 2011 and 2012. The target group consisted of residents aged 16 years or older who had lived in the evacuation zone. The health check examinations were performed on receipt of an application for a health check examination from any of the residents. The examinations, including measurements of height, weight, abdominal circumference/body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, biochemical laboratory findings, and peripheral blood findings, were performed as required. 1) A total of 56,399 (30.9%) and 47,009 (25.4%) residents aged 16 years or older received health checks in 2011 and 2012, respectively. 2) In both years, a number of male and female residents in the 16-39 year age group were found to suffer obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, or liver dysfunction, and the prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia among residents increased with age. Furthermore, the proportion of residents with hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities or renal dysfunction was higher in those aged 40 years or older. 3) The frequencies of obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidemia among residents in 2012 were lower than those in 2011. However, the prevalence of liver dysfunction, hyperuricemia, glucose metabolic abnormalities and renal dysfunction among residents was higher in 2012 than in 2011. These results suggested the number of residents who had lived in the evacuation zone with obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, liver dysfunction, hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities, or renal dysfunction increased with age in all age groups

  13. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deva Jayanthi, D., E-mail: d.devajayanthi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Women' s Christian College, Nagercoil 629001 (India); Maniyan, C.G. [Environmental Assessment Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Perumal, S. [Department of Physics and Research Centre, S.T.Hindu College, Nagercoil 629002 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: {yields} The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. {yields} The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. {yields} As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. {yields} Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. {yields} These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  14. Infection prevention and control standards in assisted living facilities: are residents' needs being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossover, Rachel A; Chi, Carolyn J; Wise, Matthew E; Tran, Alvin H; Chande, Neha D; Perz, Joseph F

    2014-01-01

    Assisted living facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities; 60% require licensed health care professionals to oversee medical care; 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite; 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff; 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department; 18% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to staff; 30% specify requirements to offer or require vaccines to residents. Twelve states identified approximately 1600 outbreaks from 2010 to 2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that ensure safe health care delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Infection Prevention and Control Standards in Assisted Living Facilities: Are Residents Needs Being Met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossover, Rachel; Chi, Carolyn; Wise, Matthew; Tran, Alvin; Chande, Neha; Perz, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) provide housing and care to persons unable to live independently, and who often have increasing medical needs. Disease outbreaks illustrate challenges of maintaining adequate resident protections in these facilities. Objectives Describe current state laws on assisted living admissions criteria, medical oversight, medication administration, vaccination requirements, and standards for infection control training. Methods We abstracted laws and regulations governing assisted living facilities for the 50 states using a structured abstraction tool. Selected characteristics were compared according to the time period in which the regulation took effect. Selected state health departments were queried regarding outbreaks identified in assisted living facilities. Results Of the 50 states, 84% specify health-based admissions criteria to assisted living facilities. 60% require licensed healthcare professionals to oversee medical care. 88% specifically allow subcontracting with outside entities to provide routine medical services onsite, and 64% address medication administration by assisted living facility staff. 54% specify requirements for some form of initial infection control training for all staff; 50% require reporting of disease outbreaks to the health department. 30% offered or required vaccines to staff; 15% of states offered or required vaccines to residents. Eleven states identified approximately 1500 outbreaks from 2010–2013, with influenza or norovirus infections predominating. Conclusions There is wide variation in how assisted living facilities are regulated in the United States. States may wish to consider regulatory changes that assure safe healthcare delivery, and minimize risks of infections, outbreaks of disease, and other forms of harm among assisted living residents. PMID:24239014

  16. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  17. Therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Kento; Yoshida, Rihito; Horai, Aya; Satake, Shinya; Ose, Takayuki; Kitajima, Naoto; Yoneda, Shushi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Amano, Yuji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is an emerging problem in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. This study is designed to clarify the therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. The study subjects were 119 patients with dysphasia who required gastrostomy feeding. They were randomly assigned to the control (without medication), lansoprazole (15 mg, 1/day), and mosapride (5 mg, 3/day) groups. The number of days with fever (≥37.8 °C), vomiting, and antibiotics administration, as well as the occurrence of pneumonia were investigated during the 6-month observation period. The incidence of pneumonia during the observation period was significantly lower in the mosapride group as compared to the control (7/38 vs. 16/40, p = 0.038) and lansoprazole (vs. 20/41, p = 0.005) groups. The mosapride group also showed a significant decrease in days with fever and antibiotics administration as compared to the other groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of hiatal hernia was a significant risk factor and administration of mosapride was a significant preventive factor for pneumonia. Mosapride has a preventive effect on occurrence of pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

  18. [Primary Prevention of Impairments of Mobility Among Nursing Home Residents with Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäufele, M; Hoell, A; Hendlmeier, I; Köhler, L; Weyerer, S

    2015-09-01

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of multidisciplinary guidelines in promoting the mobility of people with dementia in 20 German nursing homes. The study was based on a semi-experimental design [pre-post design with intervention (IG) and control group]. The statistical analyses revealed a significantly slower decline of the ability to walk among the residents of the IG than among the controls. With regard to other outcome measures the results were less clear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Will Maintenance of Oral Hygiene in Nursing Home Residents Prevent Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylotte, Joseph M

    2018-03-01

    This article is an evaluation of the literature on oral hygiene as a risk factor for nursing home-associated pneumonia (NHAP) and with interventions to improve oral hygiene and reduce the incidence of NHAP. The background for this article is that studies that have evaluated interventions to improve oral hygiene and prevent NHAP have conflicting results. To try to understand the reason for these results, the objective was to examine risk factor and intervention studies and determine their methodological validity. Review of studies evaluating oral hygiene status as a risk factor for NHAP found multiple methodological problems, resulting in limited evidence to support this association. Studies of intervention methods, whether finding benefit or not in preventing NHAP, all had methodological limitations. Therefore, it is unclear whether oral hygiene is a risk factor for NHAP and whether improving oral hygiene decreases the incidence of this infection. A recommendation is made that future studies should carefully define the etiology of suspected NHAP using molecular techniques when evaluating methods to prevent this infection because viral pneumonia and aspiration pneumonitis may mimic bacterial pneumonia even though, at times, there may be coinfection with bacteria. In this latter situation, improving oral hygiene may not prevent pneumonia. Therefore, viral infection and pneumonitis with or without bacterial coinfection need to be excluded so that the focus is on prevention of bacterial pneumonia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Communication dated 19 May 2011 received from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency regarding Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 19 May 2011 from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency, attaching the Proposal for the Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants, as described in document GOV/2011/10. As requested by the Resident Representative, the letter and its attachment are circulated herewith for information of all Member States [es

  1. Communication dated 19 May 2011 received from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency regarding Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 19 May 2011 from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency, attaching the Proposal for the Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants, as described in document GOV/2011/10. As requested by the Resident Representative, the letter and its attachment are circulated herewith for information of all Member States

  2. Communication received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the Agency transmitting the text of the Statement of the President of the Russian Federation on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Agency has received a communication dated 30 January 2006 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, attaching a statement by the President of the Russian Federation on the peaceful use of nuclear energy delivered at the meeting of the Interstate Council of the Eurasian Economic Community on 25 January 2006. The communication from the Resident Representative and, as requested therein, its attachment, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  3. Communication dated 12 August 2005 received from the Resident Representative of Yemen to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 12 August 2005 from the Resident Representative of Yemen attaching a letter dated 8 August 2005 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of Yemen in his letter of 12 August 2005, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  4. Testing the effectiveness of in-home behavioral economics strategies to increase vegetable intake, liking, and variety among children residing in households that receive food assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Tashara M; Swenson, Alison; Vickers, Zata; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Redden, Joseph P; Rendahl, Aaron; Reicks, Marla

    2015-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of behavioral economics strategies for increasing vegetable intake, variety, and liking among children residing in homes receiving food assistance. A randomized controlled trial with data collected at baseline, once weekly for 6 weeks, and at study conclusion. Family homes. Families with a child (9-12 years) will be recruited through community organizations and randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 36) or control (n = 10) group. The intervention group will incorporate a new behavioral economics strategy during home dinner meal occasions each week for 6 weeks. Strategies are simple and low-cost. The primary dependent variable will be child's dinner meal vegetable consumption based on weekly reports by caregivers. Fixed independent variables will include the strategy and week of strategy implementation. Secondary dependent variables will include vegetable liking and variety of vegetables consumed based on data collected at baseline and study conclusion. Mean vegetable intake for each strategy across families will be compared using a mixed-model analysis of variance with a random effect for child. In additionally, overall mean changes in vegetable consumption, variety, and liking will be compared between intervention and control groups. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevention and treatment of childhood obesity: care received by a state medicaid population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorick, Suzanne; Peaker, Brandy; Perrin, Eliana M; Schmid, Dorothee; Pennington, Tamerra; Yow, Angie; DuBard, C Annette

    2011-09-01

    Based on chart review for a representative cluster sample of North Carolina Medicaid enrollees aged 3 to 5 years (n = 1951) and 13 to 16 years (n = 1922) years, this study describes prevalence, practice patterns, and comorbidities related to overweight/obese immediately prior to 2007 Expert Recommendations. In total, 16% of children in both age groups were overweight, and 20% (ages 3-5 years) and 25% (ages 13-16 years) were obese. For 3- to 5-year-olds, body mass index percentile was infrequently recorded (22%) or plotted on growth charts (24%), and weight status category was rarely documented (10%). Results were similar for adolescents (21%, 20%, and 12%, respectively). In both groups, documentation of counseling in nutrition or physical activity was rare (16% for ages 3-5 years; 7% for ages 13-16 years). In adolescents, approximately 20% received recommended laboratory screening and overweight/ obesity was significantly associated with chart-documented asthma, back pain, prediabetes, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hypertension, and sleep apnea. Whether improvements in documentation of care followed these new guidelines deserves further research.

  6. Nursing Care Guidelines for prevention of nasal breakdown in neonates receiving nasal CPAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoskey, Lisa

    2008-04-01

    Use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasing as a means of respiratory support for respiratory distress syndrome in many premature neonates across the United States. Nasal CPAP is less invasive and may be as effective as mechanical ventilation in premature infants, and has been shown to cause less lung damage in premature neonates. Because of the increased use of nasal CPAP in neonates, especially younger and more fragile neonates, the presence of nare and nasal septum breakdown may be seen as a complication. Currently, all nasal CPAP systems use a hat and prong or mask type of delivery system. This appears to be effective for many neonates, but for some, it is difficult to appropriately fit the hat and prongs. The result of an inappropriately fitted device can be mild to severe nare and nasal septum damage. This article will discuss the need for nasal CPAP and the mechanics of nasal CPAP, but more importantly, serve to guide caregivers in the appropriate physical assessment and care of a neonate on nasal CPAP with the goal of preventing skin breakdown and nasal damage.

  7. Preventable Hospitalization Rates and Neighborhood Poverty among New York City Residents, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocour, Angelica; Tria, Maryellen

    2016-12-01

    Knowing which demographic groups have higher rates of preventable hospitalizations can help identify geographic areas where improvements in primary care access and quality can be made. This study assessed whether preventable hospitalization rates by neighborhood poverty decreased from 2008 to 2013 and whether the gap between very high and low poverty neighborhoods changed. We examined trends in age-adjusted preventable hospitalization rates and rate ratios by neighborhood poverty overall and by sex using JoinPoint regression. Prevention Quality Indicators (PQIs) developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality were applied to inpatient hospitalization data from the New York State Department of Health's Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. PQIs were classified into composites. From 2008 to 2013, preventable hospitalization rates per 100,000 adults across each poverty group decreased. For very high poverty neighborhoods (ZIP codes with ≥30 % of persons living below the federal poverty level (FPL)), there were significant decreases overall (3430.56 to 2543.10, annual percent change [APC] = -5.91 %), for diabetes (676.15 to 500.83, APC = -5.75 %), respiratory (830.78 to 660.29, APC = -4.85 %), circulatory (995.69 to 701.81, APC = -7.24 %), and acute composites (928.18 to 680.17, APC = -5.62 %). The rate ratios also decreased over time; however, in 2013, the rates for very high poverty neighborhoods were two to four times higher than low poverty neighborhoods (ZIP codes with still exist. These findings underscore the need to ensure adequate access to quality and timely primary care among individuals living in high poverty neighborhoods.

  8. Qualitative assessment of HIV prevention challenges and opportunities among Latino immigrant men in a new receiving city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolwick Grieb, Suzanne M; Desir, Fidel; Flores-Miller, Alejandra; Page, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    Changing demographics in new receiving communities contributes to a lag time between the arrival of new immigrants and the development of appropriate services. This scarcity of services can exacerbate existing disparities in health conditions such as HIV, which disproportionately affects Latinos. Focus groups were conducted in Baltimore with 59 Latino men who had immigrated to the U.S. within the past 10 years to explore the challenges and opportunities to accessing HIV testing and preventative services. Transcripts were analyzed through a modified thematic constant comparison approach. Four thematic categories emerged: information about HIV, HIV fear and stigma, barriers to accessing healthcare, and opportunities for intervention approaches. Information and communication technology provides an opportunity to improve access to HIV testing and prevention services. Individualized interventions, though, must be disseminated in collaboration with community-, structural-, and policy-level interventions that address HIV risk, HIV/AIDS stigma, and healthcare access among Latino immigrants.

  9. Sexual Behavior of Heterosexual Men and Women Receiving Antiretroviral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugwanya, Kenneth K.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Thomas, Katherine K.; Ndase, Patrick; Mugo, Nelly; Katabira, Elly; Ngure, Kenneth; Baeten, Jared M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited data are available to assess sexual behavior by persons using antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. Increased sexual risk taking by persons using effective HIV prevention strategies, like PrEP, could offset HIV prevention benefits. Methods The Partners PrEP Study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of daily oral PrEP among heterosexual HIV-uninfected members of HIV serodiscordant couples, publicly reported efficacy for HIV prevention in July 2011 and participants continued monthly follow-up thereafter. We used regression analyses to compare the frequency of sex unprotected by a condom during the 12 months after compared to before July 2011 to assess whether knowledge of PrEP efficacy for HIV prevention resulted in increased sexual risk behavior. Results We analyzed 56, 132 person-months from 3024 HIV-uninfected subjects (64% male). The average frequency of unprotected sex with the HIV-infected study partner was 59 per 100 person-months pre- versus 53 post-unblinding, reflecting no immediate change or change over time after July 2011 (p=0·66 and 0·25, respectively). There was a statistically significant increase in unprotected sex with outside partners over time after July 2011 but the effect was modest (average of 6.8 unprotected sex acts per year versus 6.2 acts in a predicted counterfactual scenario had unblinding not occurred, p=0·04). Compared to pre-July 2011, there was no significant increase in incident sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy after July 2011. Interpretation The transition from a blinded, placebo-controlled efficacy trial to all participants aware they were receiving active, efficacious PrEP in the Partners PrEP Study provided a “natural experiment” to evaluate sexual risk compensation. PrEP, provided as part of a comprehensive prevention package, may not result in substantial changes in risk-taking sexual behavior for heterosexual couples. PMID:24139639

  10. Counseling Received by Adolescents Undergoing Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision: Moving Toward Age-Equitable Comprehensive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Michelle R; Patel, Eshan U; Dam, Kim H; Packman, Zoe R; Van Lith, Lynn M; Hatzold, Karin; Marcell, Arik V; Mavhu, Webster; Kahabuka, Catherine; Mahlasela, Lusanda; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Seifert Ahanda, Kim; Ncube, Getrude; Lija, Gissenge; Bonnecwe, Collen; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2018-04-03

    The minimum package of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) services, as defined by the World Health Organization, includes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, HIV prevention counseling, screening/treatment for sexually transmitted infections, condom promotion, and the VMMC procedure. The current study aimed to assess whether adolescents received these key elements. Quantitative surveys were conducted among male adolescents aged 10-19 years (n = 1293) seeking VMMC in South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. We used a summative index score of 8 self-reported binary items to measure receipt of important elements of the World Health Organization-recommended HIV minimum package and the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief VMMC recommendations. Counseling sessions were observed for a subset of adolescents (n = 44). To evaluate factors associated with counseling content, we used Poisson regression models with generalized estimating equations and robust variance estimation. Although counseling included VMMC benefits, little attention was paid to risks, including how to identify complications, what to do if they arise, and why avoiding sex and masturbation could prevent complications. Overall, older adolescents (aged 15-19 years) reported receiving more items in the recommended minimum package than younger adolescents (aged 10-14 years; adjusted β, 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], .12-.21; P < .001). Older adolescents were also more likely to report receiving HIV test education and promotion (42.7% vs 29.5%; adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.02) and a condom demonstration with condoms to take home (16.8% vs 4.4%; aPR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.30-4.58). No significant age differences appeared in reports of explanations of VMMC risks and benefits or uptake of HIV testing. These self-reported findings were confirmed during counseling observations. Moving toward age-equitable HIV prevention services during adolescent VMMC likely requires

  11. High Dose Monthly Vitamin D for Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection in Older Long-Term Care Residents: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A.; Blatchford, Patrick; Breese, Keith; Zarrabi, Lida; Linnebur, Sunny A.; Wallace, Jeffrey I.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Determine the efficacy and safety of high dose vitamin D supplementation for ARI prevention in older long-term care residents. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial investigating high dose vs standard dose vitamin D conducted from 2010–2014. Participants were older residents (≥60 years) of Colorado long-term care facilities. Interventions 1) The high dose group received monthly supplement of 100,000 IU vitamin D3; 2) The standard dose group received either a monthly placebo (for participants taking 400–1,000 IU/day as part of usual care) or a monthly supplement of 12,000 IU of vitamin D3 (for participants taking <400 IU/day as part of usual care). Main Outcomes Incidence of ARI during the 12-month intervention. Secondary outcomes included falls/fractures, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones. Results We randomized 107 participants (55 high dose, 52 standard dose) and included all in the final analysis. The high dose group had 0.67 ARIs per person-year compared to 1.11 in the standard dose group (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.60; 95%CI 0.38–0.94; p= 0.02). Falls were more common in the high dose group (1.47 per person-year) compared to 0.63 in the standard dose group (IRR 2.33; 95%CI 1.49–3.63; p<0.001). Fractures were uncommon and similar in both groups (high dose 0.10 vs standard dose 0.19 per person-year; p=0.31). The mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D level during the trial was 32.6 ng/mL in the high dose group and 25.1 ng/mL in the standard dose group. There was no hypercalcemia or kidney stones in either group. Conclusion Monthly high dose vitamin D3 supplementation reduced the incidence of ARI in older long-term care residents but was associated with a higher rate of falls without an increase in fractures. PMID:27861708

  12. High-Dose Monthly Vitamin D for Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection in Older Long-Term Care Residents: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A; Blatchford, Patrick; Breese, Keith; Zarrabi, Lida; Linnebur, Sunny A; Wallace, Jeffrey I; Schwartz, Robert S

    2017-03-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of high-dose vitamin D supplementation for prevention of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in older long-term care residents. Randomized controlled trial investigating high-dose vs standard-dose vitamin D from 2010 to 2014. Colorado long-term care facilities. Long-term care residents aged 60 and older (n = 107). The high-dose group received monthly supplement of vitamin D 3 100,000 IU, the standard-dose group received a monthly placebo (for participants taking 400-1,000 IU/d as part of usual care) or a monthly supplement of 12,000 IU of vitamin D 3 (for participants taking <400 IU/d as part of usual care). The primary outcome was incidence of ARI during the 12-month intervention. Secondary outcomes were falls and fractures, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones. Participants (55 high dose, 52 standard dose) were randomized and included in the final analysis. The high-dose group had 0.67 ARIs per person-year and the standard-dose group had 1.11 (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.94, P = .02). Falls were more common in the high-dose group (1.47 per person-year vs 0.63 in standard-dose group; IRR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.49-3.63, P < .001). Fractures were uncommon and similar in both groups (high dose 0.10 vs standard dose 0.19 per person-year; P = .31). Mean trough 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels during the trial were 32. ng/mL in the high-dose group and 25.1 ng/mL in the standard-dose group. There was no hypercalcemia or kidney stones in either group. Monthly high-dose vitamin D 3 supplementation reduced the incidence of ARI in older long-term care residents but was associated with a higher rate of falls without an increase in fractures. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Propolis in the prevention of oral mucositis in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, M; Facchinetti, G; Biagioli, V; Giannarelli, D; Armento, G; Tonini, G; De Marinis, M G

    2017-11-01

    Chemo-induced oral mucositis (OM) is associated with significant symptoms, treatment delays and increased costs. This pilot randomised controlled trial aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and compliance with propolis in breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, testing preliminary clinical efficacy of propolis in the prevention of OM, and prospectively evaluating the incidence of OM. Sixty patients were randomised to receive either a dry extract of propolis with 8%-12% of galangin plus mouth rinsing with sodium bicarbonate (experimental arm), or mouth rinsing with sodium bicarbonate (control arm). OM was evaluated with the NCI-CTCAE v4.0 after 5, 10, 15 and 21 days of treatment. Compliance with, tolerability of propolis and adverse events were recorded. The incidence of OM was also prospectively evaluated for 6 months. Two patients (6.7%) manifested a suspected skin reaction to propolis. No patient in the experimental arm developed OM > G1, while in the control arm OM > G1 was 16.7% (p = .02). The incidence of OM ≥ G1 at the end of cycles 2-8 was higher at the second (25%) and fifth cycles (45.8%). Propolis plus bicarbonate was safe, well tolerated and promisingly effective in the prevention of OM in patients with breast cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Predicting Optimal Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine Regimens to Prevent Malaria During Pregnancy for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women Receiving Efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallender, Erika; Vucicevic, Katarina; Jagannathan, Prasanna; Huang, Liusheng; Natureeba, Paul; Kakuru, Abel; Muhindo, Mary; Nakalembe, Mirium; Havlir, Diane; Kamya, Moses; Aweeka, Francesca; Dorsey, Grant; Rosenthal, Philip J; Savic, Radojka M

    2018-03-05

    A monthly treatment course of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) effectively prevents malaria during pregnancy. However, a drug-drug interaction pharmacokinetic (PK) study found that pregnant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women receiving efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) had markedly reduced piperaquine (PQ) exposure. This suggests the need for alternative DHA-PQ chemoprevention regimens in this population. Eighty-three HIV-infected pregnant women who received monthly DHA-PQ and efavirenz contributed longitudinal PK and corrected QT interval (QTc) (n = 25) data. Population PK and PK-QTc models for PQ were developed to consider the benefits (protective PQ coverage) and risks (QTc prolongation) of alternative DHA-PQ chemoprevention regimens. Protective PQ coverage was defined as maintaining a concentration >10 ng/mL for >95% of the chemoprevention period. PQ clearance was 4540 L/day. With monthly DHA-PQ (2880 mg PQ), 96% of women, respectively. All regimens were safe, with ≤2% of women predicted to have ≥30 msec QTc increase. For HIV-infected pregnant women receiving efavirenz, low daily DHA-PQ dosing was predicted to improve protection against parasitemia and reduce risk of toxicity compared to monthly dosing. NCT02282293. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Efficacy of Scalp Cooling in Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigler, Tessa; Isseroff, Devora; Fiederlein, Barbara; Schneider, Sarah; Chuang, Ellen; Vahdat, Linda; Moore, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is a distressing adverse effect of many chemotherapy agents. The TC (docetaxel [Taxotere] and cyclophosphamide) chemotherapy regimen is typically associated with complete alopecia. Scalp cooling with cold caps has been reported to minimize or prevent CIA. We conducted a prospective study to assess efficacy of scalp cooling in preventing CIA among women receiving adjuvant TC chemotherapy for breast cancer. Women at the Weill Cornell Breast Center who independently elected to use scalp cooling with cold caps during adjuvant TC chemotherapy were asked to participate. Degree of hair loss was assessed by a single practitioner using Dean's alopecia scale (grade 1/excellent [ 75% hair loss]), by digital photographs, and by patient self-report of hair thinning or the need to wear a wig/head covering, or both. Assessments were made before each chemotherapy treatment and at follow-up visits between 3 weeks and 3 months after completion of chemotherapy. Of 20 evaluable patients, 10% reported a need to wear a wig/head covering at the follow-up visit. Dean's alopecia score was excellent for 65% of patients, good for 25% of patients, and moderate or poor for 10% of patients. The majority of patients reported hair thinning after every chemotherapy cycle. No patient discontinued therapy because of an intolerance to cold caps. Scalp cooling with cold caps appears to be effective in preventing CIA among the majority of women undergoing treatment with TC chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Should This Patient Receive Prophylactic Medication to Prevent Delirium?: Grand Rounds Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tess, Anjala V; Mattison, Melissa L P; Leo, Joshua R; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2018-04-03

    In 2015, the American Geriatrics Society released recommendations for prevention and management of postoperative delirium, based on a systematic literature review and evaluation of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches by an expert panel. The guidelines recommend an interdisciplinary focus on nonpharmacologic measures (reorientation, medication management, early mobility, nutrition, and gastointestinal motility) for prevention and consideration of this strategy for acute management. They also recommend optimizing nonopioid medication as a means to manage pain and avoiding benzodiazepines other than to treat substance withdrawal. The authors concluded that evidence to recommend antipsychotics for prevention of delirium is insufficient but that these drugs may be considered for short-term treatment in the setting of imminent harm to the patient or caregivers or severe distress due to agitation. Patients should be given the lowest possible dose for the shortest duration when other nonpharmacologic measures have failed. In this Beyond the Guidelines, a psychiatrist and a geriatrician debate whether Mr. W, a 79-year-old man at high risk for postoperative delirium, should receive prophylactic antipsychotics with his next surgery. They review risk factors, appropriate evaluation, and potential benefits and harms of the various medications often used in this setting.

  17. Communication dated 19 January 2009 received from the Resident Representative of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on behalf of the Council of Ambassadors of Arab States Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 19 January 2009 from the Resident Representative of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in Vienna on behalf of the Council of Ambassadors of Arab States Members of the Agency. The communication, as requested therein, is circulated herewith for information of all Member States

  18. Hospitalization for urinary tract infections and the quality of preventive health care received by people with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Ouyang, Lijing; Thibadeau, Judy; Grosse, Scott D; Campbell, Vincent A; Joseph, David

    2009-07-01

    The preventive health care needs of people with disabilities often go unmet, resulting in medical complications that may require hospitalization. Such complications could be due, in part, to difficulty accessing care or the quality of ambulatory care services received. To use hospitalizations for urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a marker of the potential quality of ambulatory care services received by people affected by spina bifida. MarketScan inpatient and outpatient medical claims data for 2000 through 2003 were used to identify hospitalizations for UTI, which is an ambulatory care sensitive condition, for people affected by spina bifida and to calculate inpatient discharge rates, average lengths of stay, and average medical care expenditures for such hospitalizations. People affected by spina bifida averaged 0.5 hospitalizations per year, and there were 22.8 inpatient admissions with UTI per 1000 persons with spina bifida during the period 2000-2003, in comparison to an average of 0.44 admission with UTI per 1000 persons for those without spina bifida. If the number of UTI hospitalizations among people affected by spina bifida were reduced by 50%, expenditures could be reduced by $4.4 million per 1000 patients. Consensus on the evaluation and management of bacteriuria could enhance clinical care and reduce the disparity in UTI discharge rates among people affected by spina bifida compared to those without spina bifida. National evidence-based guidelines are needed.

  19. Prevention of Subsequent Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Using Catheter Locks in High-Risk Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jacob B; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Okano, Akiko; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Bonnes, Sara L; Kelly, Darlene G; Mundi, Manpreet S; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-05-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a serious complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) and ethanol lock therapy (ELT) can be used to prevent CRBSI episodes in high-risk patients. Following institutional review board approval, all patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic HPN program from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2013, with catheter locking were eligible to be included. Patients without research authorization and ELT were estimated in all patients. A total of 63 patients were enrolled during the study period. Of 59 eligible patients, 29 (49%) were female, and 30 (51%) were male. The median duration of HPN was 3.66 (interquartile range, 0.75-8.19) years. The mean age ± SD at initiation of HPN was 49.89 ± 14.07 years. A total of 51 patients were instilled with ALT, and 8 patients were instilled with ELT during their course of HPN. A total of 313 CRBSI episodes occurred in these patients, 264 before locking and 49 after locking ( P ELT can reduce the overall rate of infections per 1000 catheter days. ALT or ELT can be used in appropriate clinical setting for patients receiving HPN.

  20. Communication dated 29 May 2006 received from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 29 May 2006 from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic attaching a letter dated 28 May 2006 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic in his letter of 29 May 2006, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  1. Communication dated 25 June 2008 received from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom to the Agency concerning a letter and offer of 12 June 2008 delivered to the Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 25 June 2008 from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom, on behalf of the Resident Representatives of China, France, Germany, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, and the Secretary General and High Representative of the European Union, attaching the text of a letter and offer of 12 June 2008 delivered to the authorities of the Islamic Republic of Iran by Mr. Javier Solana, together with a summary of remarks made by Mr. Solana on 14 June 2008. The communication and, as requested therein, its attachments, are herewith circulated for information

  2. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  3. Morbidity from malaria in children in the year after they had received intermittent preventive treatment of malaria: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou T Konaté

    Full Text Available Interventions that reduce exposure to malaria infection may lead to delayed malaria morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children (IPTc was associated with an increase in the incidence of malaria after cessation of the intervention.An individually randomised, trial of IPTc, comparing three courses of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (SP plus amodiaquine (AQ with placebos was implemented in children aged 3-59 months during the 2008 malaria transmission season in Burkina Faso. All children in the trial were given a long lasting insecticide treated net; 1509 children received SP+AQ and 1505 received placebos. Passive surveillance for malaria was maintained until the end of the subsequent malaria transmission season in 2009, and active surveillance for malaria infection, anaemia and malnutrition was conducted.On thousand, four hundred and sixteen children (93.8% and 1399 children (93.0% initially enrolled in the intervention and control arms of the trial respectively were followed during the 2009 malaria transmission season. During the period July 2009 to November 2009, incidence rates of clinical malaria were 3.84 (95%CI; 3.67-4.02 and 3.45 (95%CI; 3.29-3.62 episodes per child during the follow up period in children who had previously received IPT or placebos, indicating a small increase in risk for children in the former intervention arm (IRR = 1.12; 95%CI 1.04-1.20 (P = 0.003. Children who had received SP+AQ had a lower prevalence of malaria infection (adjusted PR: 0.88 95%CI: 0.79-0.98 (P = 0.04 but they had a higher parasite density (P = 0.001 if they were infected. There was no evidence that the risks of moderately severe anaemia (Hb<8 g/dL, wasting, stunting, or of being underweight in children differed between treatment arms.IPT with SP+AQ was associated with a small increase in the incidence of clinical malaria in the subsequent malaria transmission season

  4. The Importance of Efficacy: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Examine Factors Related to Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in Medicaid Receiving Preventive Dental Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Chi, Donald L.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Carter, Knute D.; Field, Kathryn; Damiano, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Early preventive dental visits are vital to the oral health of children. Yet many children, especially preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid, do not receive early visits. This study attempts to uncover factors that can be used to encourage parents to seek preventive dental care for preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid. The extended…

  5. Communication dated 27 January 1994 received from the resident representative of Kuwait to the International Atomic Energy Agency referring to document INFCIRC/425

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1995 from the Resident Representative of Kuwait to the IAEA in connection with the letter of 27 December 1993 from the Alternate to the Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA concerning the news report on the nuclear radiation detection in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army in Kuwait. In the attachment it is reproduced the statement of the Director of the Department for Protection Against Radiation from the Kuwait Ministry of Public Health

  6. THE BASIC DATA FOR RESIDENTS AGED 15 YEARS OR YOUNGER WHO RECEIVED A COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CHECK IN 2011-2012 AS A PART OF THE FUKUSHIMA HEALTH MANAGEMENT SURVEY AFTER THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Satoh, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Akira; Ohtsuru, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Kamiya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    To assist in the long-term health management of residents and evaluate the health impacts after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Fukushima Prefecture, the Fukushima prefectural government decided to implement the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This report describes the results for residents aged 15 years or younger who received health checks and evaluates the data obtained from 2011 and 2012. The target group consisted of residents aged 15 years or younger who had lived in the evacuation zone. The health checks were performed on receipt of an application from any of the residents. The checks, which included the measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, biochemical laboratory findings, and peripheral blood findings, were performed as required. 1) A total of 17,934 (64.5%) and 11,780 (43.5%) residents aged 15 years or younger received health checks in 2011 and 2012, respectively. 2) In both years, a number of male and female residents in the 7-15 year age group were found to suffer from obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, or liver dysfunction. Furthermore, pediatric aged 15 years or younger were commonly observed to suffer from hypertension or glucose metabolic abnormalities. 3) A comparison of data from 2012 and 2011 demonstrated that both males and females frequently showed increased body height and decreased body weight in 2012. The prevalence of hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities, or high γ-GTP values in males and females in the 7-15 year age group in 2012 was lower than that in 2011. However, the prevalence of hyperuricemia among residents in the 7-15 year age group was higher in 2012 than in 2011. These results suggested that some residents aged 15 years or under who had lived in the evacuation zone had developed obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, liver dysfunction, hypertension, or glucose metabolic abnormalities. Therefore, we think that it is necessary to continue the health

  7. Antibiotic resistance in faecal bacteria isolated from horses receiving virginiamycin for the prevention of pasture-associated laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies-Gow, N J; Young, N J

    2011-09-28

    Enterococcus faecium, a major cause of potentially life-threatening hospital-acquired human infections, can be resistant to several antimicrobials, such that streptogramin quinupristin-dalfopristin (Q/D) is one of the few antibiotics still effective. Consequently use of the streptogramin virginiamycin as an animal growth promoter was banned in the EU in 1999 as some believed this contributed to the emergence of Q/D resistant E. faecium. Virginiamycin is advocated for preventing equine pasture-associated laminitis, but its effect on equine faecal bacterial Q/D resistance has not been determined. Faecal samples were obtained from horses receiving virginiamycin, horses co-grazing and horses not exposed to virginiamycin. Streptogramin resistant E. faecium were cultured from 70% (21/30) of animals treated with virginiamycin, 75% (18/24) of co-grazing animals and 69% (11/16) of animals not exposed. ermB and vatD genes were detected using real time PCR in 63% and 66% of animals treated with virginiamycin, 75% and 71% of co-grazing animals and 63% and 69% of animals not exposed. Antimicrobial resistance genes were present only in samples which had cultured Q/D resistant E. faecium. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to antimicrobial resistance. The gene load of vatD was significantly (p=0.04) greater in unexposed animals compared to those treated with virginiamycin. The use of virginiamycin to prevent pasture-associated laminitis does not appear to be related to an increased Q/D resistance frequency. However, in view of the high frequency of resistance within all groups, the horse is a reservoir of Q/D resistant genes and clones that potentially could be transferred transiently to humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication of 30 September 1996 received from the resident representatives of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Slovenia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 29 august 1996 received on 4 September 1996 by the Director General of IAEA from the Resident Representatives of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Slovenia regarding certain references to 'Yugoslavia' and 'the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)' in the Annual Report for 1995 in connection with Agency membership and participation in international treaties which was distributed in document GC(40)/INF/10. The text of the Director General's reply dated 17 September 1996 to that letter, and the text of a new letter dated 30 September 1996 received on 9 October 1996 by the Director General from the same Resident Representatives referring to the Director General's letter of 17 September are also included

  9. Communication dated 13 March 2009 received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the IAEA on the Russian initiative to establish a guaranteed reserve of low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 13 March 2009 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, forwarding a statement delivered on 5 March 2009 by the Governor for the Russian Federation on the Board of Governors, Ambassador G.V. Berdennikov concerning the Russian initiative to establish a guaranteed reserve of low enriched uranium. As requested in that communication, the statement is circulated herewith for the information of Member States

  10. Does using the interRAI Palliative Care instrument reduce the needs and symptoms of nursing home residents receiving palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether using the interRAI Palliative Care instrument (the interRAI PC) in nursing homes is associated with reduced needs and symptoms in residents nearing the end of their lives. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest study using the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS) was conducted to compare the needs and symptoms of residents nearing the end of their lives in the control and intervention nursing homes. Care professionals at the intervention nursing homes filled out the interRAI PC over the course of a year for all residents aged 65 years and older who were nearing the end of their lives. This intervention was not implemented in the control nursing homes. At baseline, POS scores in the intervention nursing homes were lower (more favorable) than in the control nursing homes on the items "pain", "other symptoms", "family anxiety", and the total POS score. Posttest POS scores for "wasted time" were higher (less favorable) than pretest scores in the intervention nursing homes. In the intervention nursing homes where care professionals did not have prior experience with the interRAI Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF) assessment instrument (n = 8/15), total POS scores were lower (more favorable) at posttest. One year after introducing the interRAI PC, no reduction in residents' needs and symptoms were detected in the intervention nursing homes. However, reductions in needs and symptoms were found in the subgroup of intervention nursing homes without prior experience with the interRAI LTCF instrument. This may suggest that the use of an interRAI instrument other than the interRAI PC specifically can improve care. Future research should aim at replicating this research with a long-term design in order to evaluate the effect of integrating the use of the interRAI PC in the day-to-day practices at nursing homes.

  11. Phase III trial of casopitant, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Apornwirat, Wichit; Shaharyar, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this phase III trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of regimens containing casopitant, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting during the first cycle in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemo...

  12. Vitamin D and Calcium supplementation prevents severe falls in elderly community dwelling residents: a pragmatic population-based 3-year intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Roj; Mosekilde, Leif; Foldspang, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: We evaluated the effect of two programs for the prevention of falls leading to acute hospital admission in a population of elderly community-dwelling Danish residents. Methods: This was a factorial, pragmatic, intervention study. We included 9605 community-dwelling city......, or no intervention. Results: The Calcium and Vitamin D program was followed by 50.3% and the Environmental and Health Program by 46.4%. According to a multivariate analysis including age, marital status and intervention program, female residents who followed the Calcium and Vitamin D Program had a 12% risk reduction...... in severe falls (RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.79-0.98; pfalls leading to acute hospitalization in communitydwelling elderly females in a northern European region known to be deficient in vitamin D....

  13. Effect of low-dose proton pump inhibitor on preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in chronic kidney disease patients receiving aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Baik, Gwang Ho; Park, Ji Won; Kang, Ho Suk; Moon, Sung Hoon; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-03-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) leads to significant morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study determined the efficacy of using a low-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to reduce the risk of non-variceal UGIB in CKD patients receiving aspirin. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 500 CKD patients who received aspirin between January 2008 and March 2013. Cumulative incidence analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method was performed to analyze the rate of non-variceal UGIB and association with the administration of low-dose PPI. Of the 500 patients, 191 received low-dose PPI. Over the follow-up period, which lasted 1067 person-years, three patients in the low-dose PPI group (8.9 per 1000 person-years) and 19 patients in the non-PPI group (25.9 per 1000 person-years) developed non-variceal UGIB, respectively (P = 0.113). Low-dose PPI use did not decrease the risk of UGIB in CKD patients, including patients who did not receive dialysis (P = 0.127). However, according to the subgroup analysis of 230 patients who received dialysis, the low-dose PPI group (14.4 per 1000 person-years) demonstrated significantly reduced incidence and risk of non-variceal UGIB in comparison with the non-PPI group (53.8 per 1000 person-years) (P = 0.032). Prophylactic low-dose PPI can reduce the risk of non-variceal UGIB in dialysis patients receiving aspirin. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic Testing for Adults in a State Medicaid Program Receiving Antipsychotics: Remaining Barriers to Achieving Population Health Prevention Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrato, Elaine H; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Brewer, Sarah E; Dickinson, L Miriam; Thomas, Deborah S K; Miller, Benjamin F; Dearing, James; Druss, Benjamin G; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid quality indicators track diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease screening in adults receiving antipsychotics and/or those with serious mental illness. To inform performance improvement interventions by evaluating the relative importance of patient, prescriber, and practice factors affecting metabolic testing. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Missouri Medicaid administrative claims data (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012) linked with prescriber market data. The analysis included 9316 adults (age, 18-64 years) who were starting antipsychotic medication. Secondary analysis included the subset of adults (n = 1813) for whom prescriber knowledge, attitudes, and behavior survey data were available. Generalized estimating equations were performed to identify factors associated with failure to receive annual testing during antipsychotic treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6 encounters vs none; 0.33 [0.28-0.39]). Analysis incorporating prescriber practice information found lower failure to receive glucose testing if the patient received care at a CMHC (0.74 [0.64-0.85]) or if the initiating prescriber was a primary care practitioner (0.81 [0.66-1.00]). However, the initiating prescriber specialty-setting was not associated with lipid testing. Compared with prior reports, progress has been made to improve diabetes screening, but lipid screening remains particularly underutilized. Medicaid performance improvement initiatives should target all prescriber settings and not just behavioral health.

  16. Changes in Prescribing Symptomatic and Preventive Medications in the Last Year of Life in Older Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Helene G.; Taxis, Katja; Pont, Lisa G.

    2018-01-01

    Background At the end of life goals of care change from disease prevention to symptomatic control, however little is known about the patterns of medication prescribing at this stage. Objectives To explore changes in prescribing of symptomatic and preventive medication in the last year of life in

  17. The Short-Term Effectiveness of a Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training Program in a College Setting with Residence Life Advisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Tanya L.; Witt, Jody

    2009-01-01

    Although the college years prove to be a vulnerable time for students and a critical period for suicide prevention, few school-based prevention strategies have been empirically evaluated. The current study examined the short-term effects of Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR), a gatekeeper training program that teaches how to recognize warning…

  18. Sexual behaviour of heterosexual men and women receiving antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugwanya, Kenneth K; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Thomas, Katherine K; Ndase, Patrick; Mugo, Nelly; Katabira, Elly; Ngure, Kenneth; Baeten, Jared M

    2013-12-01

    Scarce data are available to assess sexual behaviour of individuals using antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention. Increased sexual risk taking by individuals using effective HIV prevention strategies, like pre-exposure prophylaxis, could offset the benefits of HIV prevention. We studied whether the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis in HIV-uninfected men and women in HIV-serodiscordant couples was associated with increased sexual risk behaviour. We undertook a longitudinal analysis of data from the Partners PrEP Study, a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV-uninfected partners of heterosexual HIV-serodiscordant couples (n=3163, ≥18 years of age). Efficacy for HIV prevention was publicly reported in July 2011, and participants continued monthly follow-up thereafter. We used regression analyses to compare the frequency of sex-unprotected by a condom-during the 12 months after compared with the 12 months before July 2011, to assess whether knowledge of pre-exposure prophylaxis efficacy for HIV prevention caused increased sexual risk behaviour. We analysed 56 132 person-months from 3024 HIV-uninfected individuals (64% male). The average frequency of unprotected sex with the HIV-infected study partner was 59 per 100 person-months before unmasking versus 53 after unmasking; we recorded no immediate change (p=0·66) or change over time (p=0·25) after July, 2011. We identified a significant increase in unprotected sex with outside partners after July, 2011, but the effect was small (average of 6·8 unprotected sex acts per year vs 6·2 acts in a predicted counterfactual scenario had patients remained masked, p=0·04). Compared with before July, 2011, we noted no significant increase in incident sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy after July, 2011. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, provided as part of a comprehensive prevention package, might not result in substantial changes in risk

  19. Quality of Life in Young Adult Patients with a Cardiogenetic Condition Receiving an ICD for Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, Agnes J; Vermeer, Alexa M; Smets, Ellen M; Dekker, Lukas R; Wilde, Arthur A; Van Langen, Irene M; Christiaans, Imke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-07-01

    Prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy prevents sudden cardiac death (SCD) among young adults with cardiogenetic conditions, but might reduce quality of life (QoL) due to potential device complications, ongoing medical appointments, and lifestyle restrictions. We investigated QoL in the first year after ICD implantation for the primary prevention of SCD and compared QoL scores with population norms. Consecutive patients with cardiogenetic conditions (aged 18-50 years) referred to the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam to receive ICD therapy for the primary prevention of SCD between 2007 and 2009 were eligible. Patients completed questions about QoL (Short-Form 36 Health Survey; SF-36), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; CES-D), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; STAI), and the impact of receiving ICD therapy on lifestyle and work, shortly before ICD implantation and after 2 months, 6 months, and 12 months. Thirty-five of 47 eligible patients participated. QoL was significantly reduced shortly before and 2 months after ICD implantation but improved over time and was comparable with population norms at 6 months and 12 months after ICD implantation. Yet, only about half of the patients believed they had a normal life like everyone else, and 28% had lost or changed their job due to their cardiogenetic condition and ICD therapy. Receiving a diagnosis of a cardiogenetic condition and subsequent ICD implantation was accompanied with a temporarily reduced QoL and a significant negative impact on professional life. Clinicians should inform their patients of the possible QoL consequences when deciding about ICD implantation in primary prevention of SCD in cardiogenetic conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Preventive practices of the residents over 25 years of age in Monterrey and its metropolitan area (Mexico)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Elizondo, M F; Villarreal-Ríos, E; Salinas-Martínez, A M; Núñez-Rocha, G M

    2004-01-01

    Chronic and degenerative disorders are the leading causes of morbidity-mortality in Mexico, as a result of which the Health Sector has implemented preventive and suitable detection measures. The use of the health services is a dynamic behavior on the part of the population. In order for people to use these preventive measures, the barriers to accessing these services must be lessened. Hence, the objective of this study was that of ascertaining the use of the services for the detection of diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cervical-uterine and breast cancer and tetanus and diphtheria toxoide vaccinations. The sample size was that of 254 individuals age 25 and over living in Monterrey or in the greater Monterrey metropolitan area. Those having employed preventive measures during the year immediately prior to the study were taken into account with regard to the use of preventive measures. The analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. Over 60% of the population was female, the average age being 42.3 + 14 years of age, three fourths of the population being on the social security rolls. A total 37% mentioned having undergone the diabetes test, and 44.5 the test for high blood pressure, while 31.1% had been vaccinated with the tetanus and diphtheria toxoide. Regarding specifically female checkups, 34.3% of all females had undergone the corresponding cervical-uterine cancer test, 29.5% having been screened for breast cancer. No relationship was found to exist between the use of measures and family histories and the perception of the importance of the checks. The use of preventive measures fall below some international standards. Individuals exposed to the risk must be sought in order to fittingly detect any chronic disorder.

  1. Predictors of homeless services re-entry within a sample of adults receiving Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly; Vaclavik, Danielle; Watson, Dennis P; Wilka, Eric

    2017-05-01

    Local and national evaluations of the federal Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) have demonstrated a high rate of placement of program participants in permanent housing. However, there is a paucity of research on the long-term outcomes of HPRP, and research on rehousing and prevention interventions for single adults experiencing homelessness is particularly limited. Using Homeless Management Information System data from 2009 to 2015, this study examined risk of return to homeless services among 370 permanently housed and 71 nonpermanently housed single adult HPRP participants in Indianapolis, Indiana. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were conducted to analyze time-to-service re-entry for the full sample, and the homelessness prevention and rapid rehousing participants separately. With an average follow-up of 4.5 years after HPRP exit, 9.5% of the permanently housed HPRP participants and 16.9% of those nonpermanently housed returned to homeless services. By assistance type, 5.4% of permanently housed and 15.8% of nonpermanently housed homelessness prevention recipients re-entered services, and 12.8% of permanently housed and 18.2% of nonpermanently housed rapid rehousing recipients re-entered during the follow-up period. Overall, veterans, individuals receiving rapid rehousing services, and those whose income did not increase during HPRP had significantly greater risk of returning to homeless services. Veterans were at significantly greater risk of re-entry when prevention and rehousing were examined separately. Findings suggest a need for future controlled studies of prevention and rehousing interventions for single adults, aiming to identify unique service needs among veterans and those currently experiencing homelessness in need of rehousing to inform program refinement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Low HIV incidence in pregnant and postpartum women receiving a community-based combination HIV prevention intervention in a high HIV incidence setting in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fatti

    Full Text Available Young Southern African women have the highest HIV incidence globally. Pregnancy doubles the risk of HIV acquisition further, and maternal HIV acquisition contributes significantly to the paediatric HIV burden. Little data on combination HIV prevention interventions during pregnancy and lactation are available. We measured HIV incidence amongst pregnant and postpartum women receiving a community-based combination HIV prevention intervention in a high HIV incidence setting in South Africa.A cohort study that included HIV-uninfected pregnant women was performed. Lay community-based workers provided individualized HIV prevention counselling and performed three-monthly home and clinic-based individual and couples HIV testing. Male partners were referred for circumcision, sexually transmitted infections or HIV treatment as appropriate. Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox's regression were used to estimate HIV incidence and factors associated with HIV acquisition.The 1356 women included (median age 22.5 years received 5289 HIV tests. Eleven new HIV infections were detected over 828.3 person-years (PY of follow-up, with an HIV incidence rate of 1.33 infections/100 PY (95% CI: 0.74-2.40. Antenatally, the HIV incidence rate was 1.49 infections/100 PY (95% CI: 0.64-2.93 and postnatally the HIV incidence rate was 1.03 infections/100 PY (95% CI: 0.33-3.19. 53% of male partners received HIV testing and 66% of eligible partners received referral for circumcision. Women within known serodiscordant couples, and women with newly diagnosed HIV-infected partners, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 32.7 (95% CI: 3.8-282.2 and aHR = 126.4 (95% CI: 33.8-472.2 had substantially increased HIV acquisition, respectively. Women with circumcised partners had a reduced risk of incident HIV infection, aHR = 0.22 (95% CI: 0.03-1.86.Maternal HIV incidence was substantially lower than previous regional studies. Community-based combination HIV prevention interventions may reduce high

  3. Preliminary studies of radiation port in children receiving cranial irradiation for preventing central nervous system (CNS) disease of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Takeyoshi; Sato, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Yuri; Sunami, Shosuke; Komori, Isao; Oda, Hideaki; Shima, Yukichi; Arimizu, Noboru; Nakajima, Hironori

    1986-01-01

    For preventing CNS leukemia in children with ALL, simple whole skull irradiation that included only retro-orbital spaces and not anterior part of the cribriform plate and first two cervical vertebrae had been given until March 1982 to patients who had remission after drug therapy. Since March 1982, however, such patients have received new modified cranial irradiation of Pinkel's method of preventive CNS therapy to include the cribriform plate. Pinkel's method usually includes first two cervical vertebrae in radiation port, but sometimes his method of radiation fails to reach the brain and the meninges on the anterior parts of the lamina cribrosa. In this study, a comparison of CNS-relapes ratio between these two methods of preventive CNS therapy was carried out. The frequency of CNS leukemia was remarkably high in patients given the simple whole skull irradiation. Of 18 patients, 7 developed CNS leukemia. Among these 7, 5 patients (71 %) had occurence of CNS-relapse within 1 year 7 months with the other one patient, making a total of 86 %, having CNS-relapse within 1 year 11 months. On the other hand, 17 of 39 patients who received new modified cranial irradiation were followed up for more than 1 year 9 months, and all patient had no CNS-relapse to date. This result showed that the irradiation of whole circulation areas of cerebrospinal fluid of the brain and the spine at first two cervical vertebra levels had great importance in preventing CNS-relapse after achievement of drug-induced remission. (author)

  4. [Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care: prevention is better than cure, but not always cheaper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; van den Hout, Wilbert B

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care facilities is based on general principals of cost-effectiveness research; these have been developed primarily from the perspective of relatively healthy adults in curative medicine. These principals are, however, inadequate when evaluating interventions for the fragile elderly in long-term care, both in terms of the value attached to the health of patients and to the specific decision-making context of the institution. Here we discuss the pitfalls of cost-effectiveness research in long-term care facilities, illustrated by two prevention interventions for prevalent conditions in nursing homes: pressure ulcers and urinary tract infections. These turned out to be effective, but not cost-effective.

  5. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with mefloquine in HIV-infected women receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis: a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for malaria prevention in HIV-negative pregnant women, but it is contraindicated in HIV-infected women taking daily cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp because of potential added risk of adverse effects associated with taking two antifolate drugs simultaneously. We studied the safety and efficacy of mefloquine (MQ in women receiving CTXp and long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLITNs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 1,071 HIV-infected women from Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania were randomized to receive either three doses of IPTp-MQ (15 mg/kg or placebo given at least one month apart; all received CTXp and a LLITN. IPTp-MQ was associated with reduced rates of maternal parasitemia (risk ratio [RR], 0.47 [95% CI 0.27-0.82]; p=0.008, placental malaria (RR, 0.52 [95% CI 0.29-0.90]; p=0.021, and reduced incidence of non-obstetric hospital admissions (RR, 0.59 [95% CI 0.37-0.95]; p=0.031 in the intention to treat (ITT analysis. There were no differences in the prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Drug tolerability was poorer in the MQ group compared to the control group (29.6% referred dizziness and 23.9% vomiting after the first IPTp-MQ administration. HIV viral load at delivery was higher in the MQ group compared to the control group (p=0.048 in the ATP analysis. The frequency of perinatal mother to child transmission of HIV was increased in women who received MQ (RR, 1.95 [95% CI 1.14-3.33]; p=0.015. The main limitation of the latter finding relates to the exploratory nature of this part of the analysis. CONCLUSIONS: An effective antimalarial added to CTXp and LLITNs in HIV-infected pregnant women can improve malaria prevention, as well as maternal health through reduction in hospital admissions. However, MQ was not well tolerated, limiting its potential for IPTp and indicating the need to find alternatives with

  6. Penicillin Dried Blood Spot Assay for Use in Patients Receiving Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin G and Other Penicillin Preparations To Prevent Rheumatic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Coward, Jonathan; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Marshall, Lewis; Davis, Timothy M E; Batty, Kevin T; Manning, Laurens

    2017-08-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains an important global health challenge. Administration of benzathine penicillin (BPG) every 3 to 4 weeks is recommended as a secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent episodes of acute rheumatic fever and subsequent RHD. Following intramuscular injection, BPG is hydrolyzed to penicillin G (benzylpenicillin). However, little is known of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of BPG in pediatric populations at high risk of RHD or of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship between penicillin exposure and clinically relevant outcomes. Dried blood spot (DBS) assays can facilitate PK studies in situations where frequent venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy assay for penicillin G in plasma and DBS was developed and validated. Application of the DBS assay for PK studies was confirmed using samples from adult patients receiving penicillin as part of an infection management plan. The limit of quantification for penicillin G in DBS was 0.005 mg/liter. Penicillin G is stable in DBS for approximately 12 h at room temperature (22°C), 6 days at 4°C, and >1 month at -20°C. Plasma and DBS penicillin G concentrations for patients receiving BPG and penicillin G given via bolus doses correlated well and had comparable time-concentration profiles. There was poor correlation for patients receiving penicillin via continuous infusions, perhaps as a result of the presence of residual penicillin in the peripherally inserted central catheter, from which the plasma samples were collected. The present DBS penicillin G assay can be used as a surrogate for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK data for studies of BPG and other penicillin preparations developed to prevent rheumatic fever and RHD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Effectiveness of a community-based positive prevention intervention for people living with HIV who are not receiving antiretroviral treatment: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Avina; Luchters, Stanley; Musenge, Eustasius; Okal, Jerry; Chersich, Matthew; Tun, Waimar; Mall, Sabine; Kingola, Nzioki; Kalibala, Sam

    2013-03-01

    We report effectiveness of an HIV-prevention intervention delivered by community health workers (CHWs) in Mombasa, Kenya, to PLHIV who have not initiated or who have discontinued ART-an often difficult-to-reach population because they fall outside the ambit of health care and prevention services. A 2-arm cohort study assessed a structured risk-reduction intervention involving at least 4 one-to-one counseling sessions and personalized support. The control group received standard prevention services. CHWs recruited treatment-naïve people living with HIV (PLHIV) or those who had previously taken antiretroviral drugs. Data were analyzed using a Propensity Score Matched (PSM)-sample to control for baseline differences between the groups. 634 PLHIV were recruited and followed for 6 months. Median age was 35 years, and 74.3% were female. Participants in the intervention group reported reduced risky sexual behaviors both at endline compared with baseline and compared with the control group. At endline, in the PSM analysis, participants in the intervention arm were less likely than participants in the control group to report unprotected sex with a spouse (Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03-0.24), and they reported fewer unprotected sex acts (12.3% versus 46.0%, respectively; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.09-0.29; P<0.001). Further, 92.4% of participants in the intervention group reported zero unsafe sex acts (with partners of negative or unknown HIV status) compared with 70.8% in the control group (P<0.001), and more participants in the intervention arm were receiving ART (34.3% versus 12.7%, respectively; P<0.001). CHWs effectively reached PLHIV who had never received or who had discontinued ART, and they delivered a risk-reduction intervention that led to declines in reported sexual risk behaviors, as well as to increases in ART uptake. A scaled-up intervention warrants consideration.

  8. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Books Received. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 118-118 Books Received. Books Received · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 120-120 Books Received. Books Received.

  9. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  10. Fluid hydration to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis in average- to high-risk patients receiving prophylactic rectal NSAIDs (FLUYT trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Xavier J N M; da Costa, David W; Fockens, Paul; Mulder, Chris J J; Timmer, Robin; Kievit, Wietske; Zegers, Marieke; Bruno, Marco J; Besselink, Marc G H; Vleggaar, Frank P; van der Hulst, Rene W M; Poen, Alexander C; Heine, Gerbrand D N; Venneman, Niels G; Kolkman, Jeroen J; Baak, Lubbertus C; Römkens, Tessa E H; van Dijk, Sven M; Hallensleben, Nora D L; van de Vrie, Wim; Seerden, Tom C J; Tan, Adriaan C I T L; Voorburg, Annet M C J; Poley, Jan-Werner; Witteman, Ben J; Bhalla, Abha; Hadithi, Muhammed; Thijs, Willem J; Schwartz, Matthijs P; Vrolijk, Jan Maarten; Verdonk, Robert C; van Delft, Foke; Keulemans, Yolande; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, Joost P H; van Geenen, Erwin J M

    2018-04-02

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of ERCP and may run a severe course. Evidence suggests that vigorous periprocedural hydration can prevent PEP, but studies to date have significant methodological drawbacks. Importantly, evidence for its added value in patients already receiving prophylactic rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is lacking and the cost-effectiveness of the approach has not been investigated. We hypothesize that combination therapy of rectal NSAIDs and periprocedural hydration would significantly lower the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis compared to rectal NSAIDs alone in moderate- to high-risk patients undergoing ERCP. The FLUYT trial is a multicenter, parallel group, open label, superiority randomized controlled trial. A total of 826 moderate- to high-risk patients undergoing ERCP that receive prophylactic rectal NSAIDs will be randomized to a control group (no fluids or normal saline with a maximum of 1.5 mL/kg/h and 3 L/24 h) or intervention group (lactated Ringer's solution with 20 mL/kg over 60 min at start of ERCP, followed by 3 mL/kg/h for 8 h thereafter). The primary endpoint is the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Secondary endpoints include PEP severity, hydration-related complications, and cost-effectiveness. The FLUYT trial design, including hydration schedule, fluid type, and sample size, maximize its power of identifying a potential difference in post-ERCP pancreatitis incidence in patients receiving prophylactic rectal NSAIDs. EudraCT: 2015-000829-37 . Registered on 18 February 2015. 13659155 . Registered on 18 May 2015.

  11. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  12. Malaria morbidity in children in the year after they had received intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in Mali: a randomized control trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alassane Dicko

    Full Text Available Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in children (IPTc is a promising strategy for malaria control. A study conducted in Mali in 2008 showed that administration of three courses of IPTc with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and amodiaquine (AQ at monthly intervals reduced clinical malaria, severe malaria and malaria infection by >80% in children under 5 years of age. Here we report the results of a follow-on study undertaken to establish whether children who had received IPTc would be at increased risk of malaria during the subsequent malaria transmission season.Morbidity from malaria and the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia were measured in children who had previously received IPTc with SP and AQ using similar surveillance methods to those employed during the previous intervention period.1396 of 1508 children (93% who had previously received IPTc and 1406 of 1508 children (93% who had previously received placebos were followed up during the high malaria transmission season of the year following the intervention. Incidence rates of clinical malaria during the post-intervention transmission season (July-November 2009 were 1.87 (95% CI 1.76-1.99 and 1.73 (95% CI; 1.62-1.85 episodes per child year in the previous intervention and placebo groups respectively; incidence rate ratio (IRR 1.09 (95% CI 0.99-1.21 (P = 0.08. The prevalence of malaria infection was similar in the two groups, 7.4% versus 7.5%, prevalence ratio (PR of 0.99 (95% CI 0.73-1.33 (P = 0.95. At the end of post-intervention malaria transmission season, the prevalence of anaemia, defined as a haemoglobin concentration<11g/dL, was similar in the two groups (56.2% versus 55.6%; PR = 1.01 [95% CI 0.91-1.12] (P = 0.84.IPTc with SP+AQ was not associated with an increase in incidence of malaria episodes, prevalence of malaria infection or anaemia in the subsequent malaria transmission season.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00738946.

  13. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  14. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  15. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  16. Skills of internal medicine residents in disclosing medical errors: a study using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Lynfa; McIlroy, Jodi; Levinson, Wendy

    2009-12-01

    To determine internal medicine (IM) residents' ability to disclose a medical error using standardized patients (SPs) and to survey residents' experiences of disclosure. In 2005, 42 second-year IM residents at the University of Toronto participated in the study. Each resident disclosed one medical error (insulin overdose) to an SP. The SP and a physician observer scored performance using a rating scale (1 = not performed, 2 = performed somewhat, and 3 = performed well) that measures error disclosure on five specific component skills and that provides an overall assessment score (scored on a five-point scale, 5 = high). Residents also completed a questionnaire. The mean scores on the five components were explanation of medical facts (2.60), honesty (2.31), empathy (2.47), future error prevention (1.99), and general communication skills (2.47). The residents' mean overall disclosure score was 3.53. Although 27 of 42 residents (64%) reported previous experience in disclosing an error to a patient during their training, only 7 (27%) of these residents reported receiving any feedback about their performance. Of 41 residents, 21 (51%) had received some prior training in disclosure, and 38 (93%) thought additional training would be useful and relevant. Disclosing medical error is now a standard practice. Experience with medical error begins early in training, and preparing trainees to discuss these errors is essential. Areas exist for improvement in residents' disclosure abilities, particularly regarding the prevention of future errors. Curricula to increase residents' skills and comfort in disclosure need to be implemented. Most residents would welcome further training.

  17. Utilization of bone densitometry for prediction and administration of bisphosphonates to prevent osteoporosis in patients with prostate cancer without bone metastases receiving antiandrogen therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, Abby; Khan, Muhammad A; Gujja, Swetha; Govindarajan, Rangaswmy

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer subjects with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse who are treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are recommended to have baseline and serial bone densitometry and receive bisphosphonates. The purpose of this community population study was to assess the utilization of bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer. A cohort study of men aged 65 years or older with non-metastatic incident diagnoses of prostate cancer was obtained from the Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER)-linked Medicare claims between 2004 and 2008. Claims were used to assess prescribed treatment of ADT, bone densitometry, and bisphosphonates. A total of 30,846 incident prostate cancer cases receiving ADT and aged 65 years or older had no bone metastases; 87.3% (n=26,935) on ADT did not receive either bone densitometry or bisphosphonate therapy. Three percent (n=931) of the cases on ADT received bisphosphonate therapy without ever receiving bone densitometry, 8.8% (n=2,702) of the cases on ADT received bone densitometry without receiving intravenous bisphosphonates, while nearly 1% (0.90%, n=278) of the cases on ADT received both bone densitometry and bisphosphonates. Analysis showed treatment differed by patient characteristics. Contrary to the recommendations, bone densitometry and bisphosphonate therapy are underutilized in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer

  18. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  19. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  20. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Books Received. Challenge and Thrill of Pre-College. Mathematics. V Krishnamurthy et al. New Age International. 1996, Rs.220. Mathematics for Science. S M Uppal and H M Humphreys. New Age International. 1996, Rs.17S. Physics for Engineers. M R Srinivasan. New Age Publications. 1996. Statement about ownership ...

  1. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  2. Breaking Bad News - Perceptions of Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeta, M G; Krishnakumar, P

    2017-08-15

    The present study evaluated the perceptions and practice of 92 final year pediatric residents with regard to breaking bad news. Only 16% of residents had received any training in communication skills. Majority (65%) of the residents were not comfortable while breaking bad news.

  3. Suicidal Thoughts Among Medical Residents with Burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Frank; Dillingh, Gea; Bakker, Arnold; Prins, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recent research showed that medical residents have a high risk for developing burnout. The present study investigates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship with suicidal thoughts among medical residents. Methods: All Dutch medical residents (n = 5126) received a self-report

  4. Mutations altering the N-terminal receiver domain of NRI (NtrC) That prevent dephosphorylation by the NRII-PII complex in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioszak, Augen A; Ninfa, Alexander J

    2004-09-01

    The phosphorylated form of NRI is the transcriptional activator of nitrogen-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. NRI approximately P displays a slow autophosphatase activity and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the complex of the NRII and PII signal transduction proteins. Here we describe the isolation of two mutations, causing the alterations DeltaD10 and K104Q in the receiver domain of NRI, that were selected as conferring resistance to dephosphorylation by the NRII-PII complex. The mutations, which alter highly conserved residues near the D54 site of phosphorylation in the NRI receiver domain, resulted in elevated expression of nitrogen-regulated genes under nitrogen-rich conditions. The altered NRI receiver domains were phosphorylated by NRII in vitro but were defective in dephosphorylation. The DeltaD10 receiver domain retained normal autophosphatase activity but was resistant to dephosphorylation by the NRII-PII complex. The K104Q receiver domain lacked both the autophosphatase activity and the ability to be dephosphorylated by the NRII-PII complex. The properties of these altered proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the NRII-PII complex is not a true phosphatase but rather collaborates with NRI approximately P to bring about its dephosphorylation.

  5. Reductions in Transmission Risk Behaviors in HIV-Positive Clients Receiving Prevention Case Management Services: Findings from a Community Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiorowicz, Mari; Llanas, Michelle R.; DiFranceisco, Wayne; Benotsch, Eric G.; Brondino, Michael J.; Catz, Sheryl L.; Hoxie, Neil J.; Reiser, William J.; Vergeront, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Prevention case management (PCM) for HIV-infected persons is an HIV risk reduction intervention designed to assist clients who are aware of their HIV infection and who continue to engage in risk transmission behaviors. PCM combines individual risk reduction counseling with case management to address the psychosocial factors affecting HIV…

  6. Investigating the Effects of Mass Media Exposure on the Uptake of Preventive Measures by Hong Kong Residents during the 2015 MERS Outbreak: The Mediating Role of Interpersonal Communication and the Perception of Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Ramona; Schulz, Peter J; Chen, Ling

    2018-01-01

    In 2015, South Korea experienced the largest outbreak to date of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) outside the Middle East. Fears related to a potential spread of the disease led to an increased alert level as well as heightened media coverage in the neighboring Hong Kong. A cross-sectional survey (N = 533) among residents of Hong Kong was conducted to assess the relationships between the effects of outbreak-related mass media coverage, interpersonal communication, the perceived level of concern in one's close environment, and the uptake of preventive measures. A serial multiple mediator model finds that interpersonal communication and higher perceived concern indirectly influence the effects of media coverage on the engagement in preventive actions. These results expand previous research on the mediating role of interpersonal communication and support assumptions about a modified two-step flow of communication in the context of a public health emergency.

  7. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  8. Communication received from the Resident Representatives of the Russian Federation and the United States of America to the IAEA enclosing the text of a declaration on nuclear energy and nonproliferation joint actions, and the text of a joint statement by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, Sergey Lavrov, and U.S. Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 10 July 2007 from the Resident Representatives of the Russian Federation and the United States of America with the attachments of a Declaration on Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Joint Actions published by the Russian Federation and the United States of America on 3 July 2007; and the text of a Joint Statement by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. As requested in that communication, the letter and its attachments are circulated for the information of Member States

  9. Supporting At-Risk Youth and Their Families to Manage and Prevent Diabetes: Developing a National Partnership of Medical Residency Programs and High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefter, Liana; Morioka-Douglas, Nancy; Srivastava, Ashini; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2016-01-01

    The Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaches Program (SYDCP) is a school based health program in which Family Medicine residents train healthy at-risk adolescents to become diabetes self-management coaches for family members with diabetes. This study evaluates the impact of the SYDCP when disseminated to remote sites. Additionally, this study aims to assess perceived benefit of enhanced curriculum. From 2012-2015, 10 high schools and one summer camp in the US and Canada and five residency programs were selected to participate. Physicians and other health providers implemented the SYDCP with racial/ethnic-minority students from low-income communities. Student coaches completed pre- and posttest surveys which included knowledge, health behavior, and psychosocial asset questions (i.e., worth and resilience), as well as open-ended feedback questions. T-test pre-post comparisons were used to determine differences in knowledge and psychosocial assets, and open and axial coding methods were used to analyze qualitative data. A total of 216 participating high school students completed both pre-and posttests, and 96 nonparticipating students also completed pre- and posttests. Student coaches improved from pre- to posttest significantly on knowledge (pknowledge gain, pride in helping family members, improved relationships and connectedness with family members, and lifestyle improvements. Overall, when disseminated, this program can increase health knowledge and some psychosocial assets of at-risk youth and holds promise to empower these youth with health literacy and encourage them to adopt healthy behaviors.

  10. N08C9 (Alliance): A Phase 3 Randomized Study of Sulfasalazine Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Acute Diarrhea in Patients Receiving Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Robert C., E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petereit, Daniel G. [Rapid City Regional Oncology Group, Rapid City, South Dakota (United States); Sloan, Jeff A.; Liu, Heshan [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martenson, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Bearden, James D. [Upstate Carolina Community Clinical Oncology Program, Spartanburg, South Carolina (United States); Sapiente, Ronald [Carle Cancer Center CCOP, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Seeger, Grant R. [Altru Health Systems, Grand Forks, North Dakota (United States); Mowat, Rex B. [Toledo Community Hospital Oncology Program CCOP, Toledo, Ohio (United States); Liem, Ben [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Iott, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Loprinzi, Charles L. [Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To provide confirmatory evidence on the use of sulfasalazine to reduce enteritis during pelvic radiation therapy (RT), following 2 prior single-institution trials suggestive that benefit existed. Methods and Materials: A multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial was designed to assess the efficacy of sulfasalazine versus placebo in the treatment of RT-related enteritis during RT including the posterior pelvis (45.0-53.5 Gy) and conducted through a multicenter national cooperative research alliance. Patients received 1000 mg of sulfasalazine or placebo orally twice daily during and for 4 weeks after RT. The primary endpoint was maximum severity of diarrhea (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0). Toxicity and bowel function were assessed by providers through a self-administered bowel function questionnaire taken weekly during RT and for 6 weeks afterward. Results: Eighty-seven patients were enrolled in the trial between April 29, 2011, and May 13, 2013, with evenly distributed baseline factors. At the time of a planned interim toxicity analysis, more patients with grade ≥3 diarrhea received sulfasalazine than received placebo (29% vs 11%, P=.04). A futility analysis showed that trial continuation would be unlikely to yield a positive result, and a research board recommended halting study treatment. Final analysis of the primary endpoint showed no significant difference in maximum diarrhea severity between the sulfasalazine and placebo arms (P=.41). Conclusions: Sulfasalazine does not reduce enteritis during pelvic RT and may be associated with a higher risk of adverse events than placebo. This trial illustrates the importance of confirmatory phase 3 trials in the evaluation of symptom-control agents.

  11. N08C9 (Alliance): A Phase 3 Randomized Study of Sulfasalazine Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Acute Diarrhea in Patients Receiving Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Liu, Heshan; Martenson, James A.; Bearden, James D.; Sapiente, Ronald; Seeger, Grant R.; Mowat, Rex B.; Liem, Ben; Iott, Matthew J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide confirmatory evidence on the use of sulfasalazine to reduce enteritis during pelvic radiation therapy (RT), following 2 prior single-institution trials suggestive that benefit existed. Methods and Materials: A multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial was designed to assess the efficacy of sulfasalazine versus placebo in the treatment of RT-related enteritis during RT including the posterior pelvis (45.0-53.5 Gy) and conducted through a multicenter national cooperative research alliance. Patients received 1000 mg of sulfasalazine or placebo orally twice daily during and for 4 weeks after RT. The primary endpoint was maximum severity of diarrhea (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0). Toxicity and bowel function were assessed by providers through a self-administered bowel function questionnaire taken weekly during RT and for 6 weeks afterward. Results: Eighty-seven patients were enrolled in the trial between April 29, 2011, and May 13, 2013, with evenly distributed baseline factors. At the time of a planned interim toxicity analysis, more patients with grade ≥3 diarrhea received sulfasalazine than received placebo (29% vs 11%, P=.04). A futility analysis showed that trial continuation would be unlikely to yield a positive result, and a research board recommended halting study treatment. Final analysis of the primary endpoint showed no significant difference in maximum diarrhea severity between the sulfasalazine and placebo arms (P=.41). Conclusions: Sulfasalazine does not reduce enteritis during pelvic RT and may be associated with a higher risk of adverse events than placebo. This trial illustrates the importance of confirmatory phase 3 trials in the evaluation of symptom-control agents.

  12. Comparative effectiveness of senna to prevent problematic constipation in pediatric oncology patients receiving opioids: a multicenter study of clinically detailed administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Freedman, Jason; Kang, Tammy; Womer, James W; Dai, Dingwei; Faerber, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often receive prolonged courses of opioids, which can result in constipation. Comparing patients who received senna matched with similar patients who received other oral bowel medications, determine the subsequent risk of "problematic constipation," assessed as the occurrence of the surrogate markers of receiving an enema, escalation of oral bowel medications, and abdominal radiographic imaging. This was a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized pediatric oncology patients less than 21 years of age in 78 children's and adult hospitals between 2006 and 2011 who were started on seven consecutive days or more of opioid therapy and were started on an oral bowel medication within the first two days of opioid therapy. Clinically detailed administrative data were used from the Pediatric Health Information System and the Premier Perspective Database. After performing propensity score matching of similar patients who started senna and who started a different oral bowel medication, Cox regression modeling was used to compare the subsequent hazard of the surrogate markers. The final matched sample of 586 patients averaged 11.5 years of age (range 0-20 years); 41.8% (n = 245) had blood cancer, 50.3% (n = 295) had solid tumor cancer, and 7.9% (n = 46) had brain cancer. Initiating senna therapy within two days of starting the prolonged opioid course, compared with initiating another oral bowel medication, was significantly associated with a lower hazard during the ensuing five days for receipt of an enema (hazard ratio [HR], 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11-0.91) or undergoing abdominal radiographic imaging (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.55-0.98), was marginally associated with a lower hazard of oral bowel medicine escalation (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.59-1.03), and overall was significantly associated with a lower hazard of the composite end point of problematic constipation (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56-0.88). Initiating senna therapy, compared with other oral bowel

  13. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Expanding Capacity for Suicide Prevention: The ALIVE @ Purdue Train-the-Trainers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Miles, Nathan; Werden, Donald; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. One effective strategy for suicide prevention is gatekeeper training. Gatekeeper training has been described as a prevention strategy that improves detection and referral of at-risk individuals. Purdue recognized that only some of the resident assistants (RAs) were receiving this…

  15. Formación e información en la gestión de la prevención de riesgos laborales para los médicos internos residentes The role of formation and information in the management of labour risks prevention for the internal residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fe Gamo

    2011-06-01

    incorporation in our Prevention Service and to determine how it is reflected in their formation in labour risks prevention. Subjects and methods. The population of study is constituted by 83 residents who entered in the year 2005, 2006 and 2007, they realized the recognition of beginning in our Service, and we send the questionnaire. There was realized a descriptive analysis by the information obtained of the clinical-labour history and the above mentioned survey. The possible relations were compared, by means of bivariant analysis, between the different variables. The prevalence estimation of the different studied variables was made by 95% confidence intervals. For the comparison of proportions the square chi was in use. Results. There was obtained an effective sample of 45 residents who answered the survey (54% of the population of study, with a sample mistake of ±10% for p > 0.05. They think that the quantity and quality of received formation is scanty in the different formative stages, very usefully (specially that of the recognition of beginning and they would want to have received more. Conclusions. The obtained information has served us as source of information to detect needs of specific formation for this group and needs of improvement in the content and distribution of our labor history where we observe discrepancies with recounted in the survey.

  16. The efficacy of a nutrition education intervention to prevent risk of malnutrition for dependent elderly patients receiving Home Care: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrés, Sílvia; García-Barco, Montse; Basora, Josep; Martínez, Teresa; Pedret, Roser; Arija, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of a nutrition education intervention included in the Home Care Program for caregivers to prevent the increasing risk of malnutrition of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Randomized controlled multicenter trial of 6 months of duration and 12 months follow-up. 10 Primary Care Centers, Spain. Patients enrolled in the Home Care Program between January 2010 and March 2012, who were dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and had caregivers (n=190). The nurses conducted initial educational intervention sessions for caregivers and then monitored at home every month for 6 months. The nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment test (primary outcome), diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters (albumin, prealbumin, hemoglobin and cholesterol). Other descriptive and outcome measures were recorded: current medical history, Activities of daily living (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), and mood status (Yesavage test). All the measures were recorded in a schedule of 0-6-12 months. 173 individuals participated after exclusions (intervention n=101; control n=72). Mean age was 87.8±8.9years, 68.2% were women. Difference were found between the groups for Mini Nutritional Assessment test score change (repeated measures ANOVA, F=10.1; Pintervention improved the Mini Nutritional Assessment test score of the participants in the intervention group. The egg consumption (F=4.1; P=0.018), protein intake (F=3.0; P=0.050), polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (F=5.3; P=0.006), folate (F=3.3; P=0.041) and vitamin E (F=6.4; P=0.002) showed significant group×time interactions. A nutrition education intervention for caregivers halted the tendency of nutritional decline, and reduced the risk of malnutrition of older dependent patients. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01360775. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Entropy of cardiac repolarization predicts ventricular arrhythmias and mortality in patients receiving an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMazumder, Deeptankar; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dorante, Miguel; Dey, Swati; Mukhopadhyay, Bhasha; Zhang, Yiyi; Moorman, J Randall; Cheng, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Guallar, Eliseo; Jones, Steven R; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2016-12-01

    The need for a readily available, inexpensive, non-invasive method for improved risk stratification of heart failure (HF) patients is paramount. Prior studies have proposed that distinct fluctuation patterns underlying the variability of physiological signals have unique prognostic value. We tested this hypothesis in an extensively phenotyped cohort of HF patients using EntropyX QT , a novel non-linear measure of cardiac repolarization dynamics. In a prospective, multicentre, observational study of 852 patients in sinus rhythm undergoing clinically indicated primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation (2003-10), exposures included demographics, history, physical examination, medications, laboratory results, serum biomarkers, ejection fraction, conventional electrocardiographic (ECG) analyses of heart rate and QT variability, and EntropyX QT . The primary outcome was first 'appropriate' ICD shock for ventricular arrhythmias. The secondary outcome was composite events (appropriate ICD shock and all-cause mortality). After exclusions, the cohort (n = 816) had a mean age of 60 ± 13 years, 28% women, 36% African Americans, 56% ischaemic cardiomyopathy, and 29 ± 16% Seattle HF risk score (SHFS) 5-year predicted mortality. Over 45 ± 24 months, there were 134 appropriate shocks and 166 deaths. After adjusting for 30 exposures, the hazard ratios (comparing the 5th to 1st quintile of EntropyX QT ) for primary and secondary outcomes were 3.29 (95% CI 1.74-6.21) and 2.28 (1.53-3.41), respectively. Addition of EntropyX QT to a model comprised of the exposures or SHFS significantly increased net reclassification and the ROC curve area. EntropyX QT measured during ICD implantation strongly and independently predicts appropriate shock and all-cause mortality over follow-up. EntropyX QT complements conventional risk predictors and has the potential for broad clinical application. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All

  18. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  19. The Efficacy of an American Indian Culturally-Based Risk Prevention Program for Upper Elementary School Youth Residing on the Northern Plains Reservations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usera, John J

    2017-04-01

    Culturally-based risk behavior prevention programs for American Indian elementary school children are sparse. Thus a group of American Indian educators collaborated in the creation of a program that helps children make healthy decisions based on their cultural and traditional value system. In this paper the effectiveness of Lakota Circles of Hope (LCH), an elementary school culturally-based prevention program was studied and evaluated. Three cohorts of fourth and fifth graders participated in a mixed methods quasi-experimental evaluative research design that included focus groups and surveys prior to and following the intervention. Five research questions regarding the program's impact on students' self-esteem and self-efficacy, Lakota identity, communication, conflict resolution and risk behaviors were addressed in this study. Participants were compared to non-participants in three American Indian reservation school sites. Educators completed a survey to record their observations and feedback regarding the implementation of the program within their respective school sites. The study provides preliminary evidence that, when delivered with fidelity, LCH contributes to statistically significant changes in risk behaviors, Lakota identity, respect for others, and adult and parent communication. A two-way multivariate analysis of variance with post hoc analysis of data collected from the LCH participants (N = 1392) were used to substantiate a significant increase in respect for others and a decrease in risk behaviors which included alcohol, tobacco, and substance use at the 0.10 alpha level. Significant positive improvements in parent and adult communication and an increased Lakota identity at the 0.01 alpha level were obtained. There were no significant differences in self-esteem and conflict resolution from pre to post intervention and in comparison with non LCH participating students.

  20. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized phase III trial of APF530 versus palonosetron in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a subset of patients with breast cancer receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccia, Ralph; O’Boyle, Erin; Cooper, William

    2016-01-01

    APF530 provides controlled, sustained-release granisetron for preventing acute (0–24 h) and delayed (24–120 h) chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). In a phase III trial, APF530 was noninferior to palonosetron in preventing acute CINV following single-dose moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV in MEC (MEC and HEC defined by Hesketh criteria). This exploratory subanalysis was conducted in the breast cancer subpopulation. Patients were randomized to subcutaneous APF530 250 or 500 mg (granisetron 5 or 10 mg) or intravenous palonosetron 0.25 mg during cycle 1. Palonosetron patients were randomized to APF530 for cycles 2 to 4. The primary efficacy end point was complete response (CR, no emesis or rescue medication) in cycle 1. Among breast cancer patients (n = 423 MEC, n = 185 HEC), > 70 % received anthracycline-containing regimens in each emetogenicity subgroup. There were no significant between-group differences in CRs in cycle 1 for acute (APF530 250 mg: MEC 71 %, HEC 77 %; 500 mg: MEC 73 %, HEC 73 %; palonosetron: MEC 68 %, HEC 66 %) and delayed (APF530 250 mg: MEC 46 %, HEC 58 %; 500 mg: MEC 48 %, HEC 63 %; palonosetron: MEC 52 %, HEC 52 %) CINV. There were no significant differences in within-cycle CRs between APF530 doses for acute and delayed CINV in MEC or HEC in cycles 2 to 4; CRs trended higher in later cycles, with no notable differences in adverse events between breast cancer and overall populations. APF530 effectively prevented acute and delayed CINV over 4 chemotherapy cycles in breast cancer patients receiving MEC or HEC. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00343460 (June 22, 2006)

  2. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  3. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  4. Who receives oral nutritional supplements in nursing homes? Results from the nutritionDay project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Melanie; Themessl-Huber, Michael; Schindler, Karin; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Hiesmayr, Michael; Volkert, Dorothee

    2017-10-01

    Oral nutritional supplements (ONS) can be helpful for nursing home (NH) residents to prevent or treat malnutrition. Presently little is known about the use of ONS in NHs and the factors associated with its use. Thus, the aim of this analysis was to describe the use of ONS in NHs participating in the nutritionDay project and to determine characteristics of NH residents receiving ONS. Data from nutritionDay (nD), a cross-sectional multicenter study with standardized questionnaires on resident and NH level were analyzed. NH residents participating between 2007 and 2014 aged 65 years or older were included. Unit characteristics (2 variables), general residents' characteristics (18), residents' nutritional status (3) and residents' nutrition (4) were of interest as potential predictors of the use of ONS (no vs yes). Univariate binary logistic regression (LR) analyses were performed for all variables, and significant predictors (p nutrition (29.05 [14.85-56.81]; however only 1.1% of all participants) and fortified diet (11.91 [8.52-16.64]; 5.7%). The odds ratio of receiving ONS was 3.26 ([2.86-3.71]; 18.3%) for residents being classified as at risk of malnutrition and 4.56 ([3.86-5.40]; 10.0%) for malnourished residents according to NH staff. Low BMI and weight loss in the last year increased the odds of receiving ONS by 2.34 ([1.93-2.84]; 16.0%) and 1.38 ([1.23-1.54]; 32.8%), respectively. Furthermore, increasing age, cognitive and functional impairment, low food intake on nD, neurological disease and cancer were associated with an increased likelihood of the use of ONS. In NH units with a nutritional expert (67.1%) and units performing a nutritional assessment at least once a month (71.6%), the odds of receiving ONS were also significantly increased (1.89 [1.71-2.10] and 1.17 [1.06-1.29]). In NHs who participated in the nutritionDay, ONS are used for residents with poor nutritional and functional status and often in combination with other nutritional interventions

  5. Errors by paediatric residents in calculating drug doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C; Koren, T; Koren, G

    1998-07-01

    Errors in calculating drug doses in infants and small children can cause morbidity and mortality, especially with agents exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window. A previous study from this institution has detected potential life threatening errors in calculations performed by trainees while writing prescriptions. To verify whether the true incidence of trainees' errors in prescribing can be explained by impaired calculation skills in written tests. A tertiary paediatric hospital; educational rounds for core paediatric residents. Two anonymous written tests, which included calculations of doses similar to those performed at the paediatric bedside; one was conducted in 1993 and one in 1995. Thirty four paediatric residents participated in 1993 and 30 in 1995. A substantial number of trainees in both years committed at least one error. In general, there was no correlation between the length of training (0 to 4 years) and likelihood of making a mistake. Three trainees in 1993 and four in 1995 committed 10-fold errors. These seven residents committed significantly more errors than the rest of the group in each of the tests separately. All seven were in their first two years of training, and six were in their first year of residency. A substantial proportion of paediatric trainees make mistakes while calculating drug doses under optimal test conditions. Some trainees commit 10-fold errors, which may be life threatening. The results of these anonymous tests suggest that testing of calculations skills should be mandatory, and appropriate remedial steps should follow to prevent paediatric patients receiving wrong drug dosages.

  6. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonist Cannot Prevent Recurrent Peptic Ulcers in Patients With Atherosclerotic Diseases Who Receive Platelet ADP Receptor Antagonist Monotherapy: A Randomized-Controlled, Double-Blind, and Double-Dummy Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ping-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tsay, Feng-Woei; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Liu, Chun-Peng; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Wang, Huay-Min; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Kao, Sung-Shuo

    2017-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitor can effectively prevent recurrent peptic ulcers among atherosclerotic patients receiving clopidogrel monotherapy. However, the interaction between proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel has raised concerns over the safety of combined use of the two medicines in clinical practice. The aims of this randomized-controlled, double-blind and double-dummy trial were to investigate the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2RA) in the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcer in patients undergoing thienopyridine monotherapy. From January 2012 to 2016, long-termed thienopyridine users with a peptic ulcer history who did not have peptic ulcers at initial endoscopy were randomly assigned to receive either famotidine (40 mg, before bedtime) or placebo (before bedtime) for 6 months. Follow-up endoscopy was performed at the end of the 6th month and whenever dyspepsia, hematemesis, or melena occurred. The cumulative incidence of recurrent peptic ulcer during the 6-month period was 7.0% in famotidine group (n=114) and 11.4% in the placebo group (n=114). The two patient groups had comparable cumulative incidence of peptic ulcer (difference, 4.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), -11.7 to 2.9%; P=0.239). Additionally, there was no difference in the cumulative incidence of ulcer bleeding (2.6% vs. 1.8%; difference, 0.8%; 95% CI, -0.6 to 2.4%, P=1.000) between famotidine and placebo groups. However, the former had a lower incidence of gastroduodenal erosion than the latter (21.1% vs. 36.8%; difference, 15.7%; 95% CI, -27.3 to -4.1%; P=0.013). Famotidine cannot decrease the incidence of peptic ulcer or ulcer bleeding in thienopyridine users with atherosclerotic disease and a history of peptic ulcer.

  7. Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Trial of Risedronate for the Prevention of Bone Mineral Density Loss in Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy Plus Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Lukka, Himu; Cheung, Patrick; Corbett, Tom; Briones-Urbina, Rosario; Vieth, Reinhold; Ehrlich, Lisa; Kiss, Alex; Danjoux, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment to radiation therapy (RT) for the management of locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Long-term ADT decreases bone mineral density (BMD) and increases the risk of osteoporosis. The objective of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of risedronate for the prevention of BMD loss in nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. Methods and Materials: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. All had T scores > −2.5 on dual energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline. Patients were randomized 1:1 between risedronate and placebo for 2 years. The primary endpoints were the percent changes in the BMD of the lumbar spine at 1 and 2 years from baseline, measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Analyses of the changes in BMD and bone turnover biomarkers were carried out by comparing mean values of the intrapatient changes between the 2 arms, using standard t tests. Results: One hundred four patients were accrued between 2004 and 2007, with 52 in each arm. Mean age was 66.8 and 67.5 years for the placebo and risedronate, respectively. At 1 and 2 years, mean (±SE) BMD of the lumbar spine decreased by 5.77% ± 4.66% and 13.55% ± 6.33%, respectively, in the placebo, compared with 0.12% ± 1.29% at 1 year (P=.2485) and 0.85% ± 1.56% (P=.0583) at 2 years in the risedronate. The placebo had a significant increase in serum bone turnover biomarkers compared with the risedronate. Conclusions: Weekly oral risedronate prevented BMD loss at 2 years and resulted in significant suppression of bone turnover biomarkers for 24 months for patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT

  8. Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Trial of Risedronate for the Prevention of Bone Mineral Density Loss in Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy Plus Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Lukka, Himu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center, McMaster University, Hamilton (Canada); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Corbett, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juravinski Cancer Center, McMaster University, Hamilton (Canada); Briones-Urbina, Rosario [Department of Medicine, Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Vieth, Reinhold [Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ehrlich, Lisa [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto (Canada); Kiss, Alex [Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Danjoux, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.danjoux@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment to radiation therapy (RT) for the management of locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Long-term ADT decreases bone mineral density (BMD) and increases the risk of osteoporosis. The objective of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of risedronate for the prevention of BMD loss in nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. Methods and Materials: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT. All had T scores > −2.5 on dual energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline. Patients were randomized 1:1 between risedronate and placebo for 2 years. The primary endpoints were the percent changes in the BMD of the lumbar spine at 1 and 2 years from baseline, measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Analyses of the changes in BMD and bone turnover biomarkers were carried out by comparing mean values of the intrapatient changes between the 2 arms, using standard t tests. Results: One hundred four patients were accrued between 2004 and 2007, with 52 in each arm. Mean age was 66.8 and 67.5 years for the placebo and risedronate, respectively. At 1 and 2 years, mean (±SE) BMD of the lumbar spine decreased by 5.77% ± 4.66% and 13.55% ± 6.33%, respectively, in the placebo, compared with 0.12% ± 1.29% at 1 year (P=.2485) and 0.85% ± 1.56% (P=.0583) at 2 years in the risedronate. The placebo had a significant increase in serum bone turnover biomarkers compared with the risedronate. Conclusions: Weekly oral risedronate prevented BMD loss at 2 years and resulted in significant suppression of bone turnover biomarkers for 24 months for patients receiving RT plus 2 to 3 years of ADT.

  9. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Yousef; Ayed, Adel

    2013-01-19

    In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training.

  10. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  11. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  12. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  13. A post-partum single-dose TDF/FTC tail does not prevent the selection of NNRTI resistance in women receiving pre-partum ZDV and intrapartum single-dose nevirapine to prevent mother-to- child HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Reshmi; Paredes, Roger; Parboosing, Raveen; Moodley, Pravi; Singh, Lavanya; Naidoo, Anneta; Gordon, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    Although the rates of vertical transmission of HIV in the developing world have improved to around 3% in countries like South Africa, resistance to antiretrovirals (ARV) used in Prevention of Mother-to-Child transmission (pMTCT) strategies may thwart such outcomes and affect the efficacy of future ARV regimens in mothers and children. This study conducted in Durban, South Africa, between 2010 and 2013 found a high rate of nevirapine (NVP) resistance among women receiving Zidovudine (AZT) from 14 weeks gestation, single dose nevirapine (sd NVP) at the onset of labor and a single dose of coformulated Tenofovir/Emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) postpartum. Using Sanger sequencing, high and intermediate levels of nevirapine (NVP) resistance were detected in 15/44 (34%) and in 1/44 (2%) of women tested, respectively. Most subjects selected the K103N mutation (22% (10/45) of all patients and 66% (10/15) of those with high-level NVP resistance). Such rate of NVP resistance is comparable to studies where only sd NVP was used. In conclusion, a post-partum single-dose TDF/FTC tail does not prevent the selection of NNRTI resistance in women receiving pre-partum ZDV and intrapartum sd NVP to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Solar thermal energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karl W. (Inventor); Dustin, Miles O. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A plurality of heat pipes in a shell receive concentrated solar energy and transfer the energy to a heat activated system. To provide for even distribution of the energy despite uneven impingement of solar energy on the heat pipes, absence of solar energy at times, or failure of one or more of the heat pipes, energy storage means are disposed on the heat pipes which extend through a heat pipe thermal coupling means into the heat activated device. To enhance energy transfer to the heat activated device, the heat pipe coupling cavity means may be provided with extensions into the device. For use with a Stirling engine having passages for working gas, heat transfer members may be positioned to contact the gas and the heat pipes. The shell may be divided into sections by transverse walls. To prevent cavity working fluid from collecting in the extensions, a porous body is positioned in the cavity.

  15. Transmitter-receiver system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, E.; Van Kampen, E.J.; Chu, Q.P.

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a transmitter-receiver system comprising at least three transmitters and at least a first receiver and a second receiver, wherein the receivers are connected to a computing device that is arranged to analyse signals that said receivers receive from said transmitters and to

  16. Estudio de conformidad con la formación recibida por los residentes del Hospital Universitario Príncipe de Asturias de 2007 a 2009 A study of conformity with the training received by resident physicians at the Hospital Universitario Príncipe de Asturias between 2007 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Gómez-Carrasco

    2012-03-01

    directed. Subjects and methods. Since June 2007, the residents filled a survey which includes 37 closed questions, and an one open question. In this questionnaire we expect their opinion about aspects in the education received in the past year. We analyzed the questionnaires of three years (total 266 surveys were analyzed. Results. Medical guards and emergency area were perceived as an important problem, as a place for improvement. Other relevant areas for improvement were the training for residents' ability for effective bibliographic researches, and greater involvement in research activities. Conclusions. Studies like these should be used to implement efficient actions aimed to detect problems and to improve deficiencies in residents' training. It has to be a reference point for following the learning evolution process in our center. Failure to make such studies it will be difficult to know the progress or deficiencies, from the learner standpoint, that take place in a particular area of training of specialists in health sciences.

  17. Personal Therapy in Psychiatry Residency Training: A National Survey of Canadian Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Halli, Priyanka; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2016-02-01

    The authors collected nationally representative data on Canadian residents' experiences with and perspectives on personal psychotherapy in their psychiatric training. A 43-item questionnaire was distributed electronically to all current psychiatry residents in Canada (N = 839). Four hundred residents from every program across Canada returned the survey (response rate 47.7%). The prevalence of personal therapy at any time was 55.3%, with 42.8% receiving personal therapy during residency. Of residents who undertook personal psychotherapy, 59.3% engaged in weekly therapy, 74.1% received psychodynamic psychotherapy, and 81.5% participated in long-term therapy (>1 year). Personal growth, self-understanding, and professional development were the most common reasons for engaging in personal therapy; however, one-third of residents did so to alleviate symptoms of depression, anxiety, or other mental health concerns. Time was the most important factor impeding residents from personal therapy; only 8.8% found stigma to act as a barrier. The vast majority of residents rated their experience with personal therapy as having a positive or very positive impact on their personal life (84.8%) and overall development as psychiatrists (81.8%). For 64% of respondents, personal therapy had an important or very important role in psychiatry residency training. Residents who received personal therapy rated themselves as better able to understand what happens moment by moment during therapy sessions, detect and deal with patients' emotional reactions, and constructively use their personal reactions to patients. Interest in personal therapy remains strong among psychiatry trainees in Canada. Residents who engaged in psychotherapy endorsed greater confidence in psychotherapy and rated their psychotherapy skills more favorably than those who had never been in the patient role, supporting the view of personal therapy as an important adjunct to psychotherapy training during residency.

  18. Communication received from South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    The document reproduces the press release with a statement by Dr. J.W.L. de Villiers, Executive Chairman of the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Limited, issued on 31 January 1984 and included in the letter received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of South Africa to the Agency on 31 January 1984. This statement refers to the transfer of nuclear material equipment and technology by South Africa to other countries and the Non-Proliferation Treaty

  19. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. General Surgery Resident Satisfaction on Cardiothoracic Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiez, Alisha; Bevins, Jack; Plaska, Andrew; Rosin, Vadim; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2016-01-01

    General surgery residents' exposure to cardiothoracic (CT) surgery rotations has decreased, which may affect resident satisfaction. We surveyed general surgery graduates to assess the relationships among rotation satisfaction, CT disease exposure, rotation length, mentorship, and mistreatment. A survey assessing CT curriculum, exposure, mentorship, and satisfaction was forwarded to general surgery graduates from 17 residency programs. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to assess statistical significance of ordinal level data. Statistical significance was defined as p surgery residency programs who graduated between the years of 1999 to 2014. A total of 94 responses were completed and received. Receiving adequate exposure to CT procedures and disease management was significantly associated with higher satisfaction ratings for all procedures, particularly thoracotomy incisions (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase II, Open Label, Randomized Comparative Trial of Ondansetron Alone versus the Combination of Ondansetron and Aprepitant for the Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Receiving Regimens Containing High-Dose Cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talha Badar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aprepitant is a P/neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist approved for the prevention of CINV in moderate emetic risk chemotherapy. We explored its effectiveness in patients with leukemia receiving cytarabine-based chemotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to ondansetron (OND 8 mg IV 30 minutes before cytarabine followed by 24 mg IV continuous infusion daily until 6–12 hours after the last dose of chemotherapy alone or with aprepitant (APREP oral 125 mg 6–12 hrs before chemotherapy and 80 mg daily until 1 day after the last dose of chemotherapy. Results. Forty-nine patients were enrolled in each arm; 42 in OND and 41 in OND + APREP arm were evaluable for efficacy. The ORR with OND + APREP was 80% compared to 67% with OND alone (P=0.11. On days 6 and 7, higher proportion of patients treated with OND + APREP were free from nausea (74%, 74% versus 68%, 67%; P=0.27 and 0.18, resp.. Requirement of rescue medications on days 2 and 3 was fewer in OND + APREP arm 7% and 5% compared to 21% and 16% in the OND arm, respectively (P=0.06 and P=0.07. Conclusions. There was a trend for overall improvement in emesis with ondansetron plus aprepitant. The potential benefit of this approach with specific chemotherapy combinations remains to be determined.

  2. Perception of preventive care and readiness for lifestyle change in rural and urban patients in Poland: a questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciek Godycki-Cwirko

    2017-12-01

    Patient importance scores for prevention were associated with residence and gender. The villagers attached less importance to prevention. They also declared less willingness to change their lifestyle. Women had higher scores regarding prevention than men. More rural respondents would like to receive individual counselling from their GP regarding eating habits, physical activity, body weight, giving up smoking and safe alcohol use. Urban respondents were more likely to expect leaflets from their GPs on normalizing body weight.

  3. Motherhood during residency training: challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Allyn; Gold, Michelle; Jensen, Phyllis; Jedrzkiewicz, Michelle

    2005-07-01

    To determine what factors enable or impede women in a Canadian family medicine residency program from combining motherhood with residency training. To determine how policies can support these women, given that in recent decades the number of female family medicine residents has increased. Qualitative study using in-person interviews. McMaster University Family Medicine Residency Program. Twenty-one of 27 family medicine residents taking maternity leave between 1994 and 1999. Semistructured interviews. The research team reviewed transcripts of audiotaped interviews for emerging themes; consensus was reached on content and meaning. NVIVO software was used for data analysis. Long hours, unpredictable work demands, guilt because absences from work increase workload for colleagues, and residents' high expectations of themselves cause pregnant residents severe stress. This stress continues upon return to work; finding adequate child care is an added stress. Residents report receiving less support from colleagues and supervisors upon return to work; they associate this with no longer being visibly pregnant. Physically demanding training rotations put additional strain on pregnant residents and those newly returned to work. Flexibility in scheduling rotations can help accommodate needs at home. Providing breaks, privacy, and refrigerators at work can help maintain breastfeeding. Allowing residents to remain involved in academic and clinical work during maternity leave helps maintain clinical skills, build new knowledge, and promote peer support. Pregnancy during residency training is common and becoming more common. Training programs can successfully enhance the experience of motherhood during residency by providing flexibility at work to facilitate a healthy balance among the competing demands of family, work, and student life.

  4. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  5. Receiver Test Selection Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    The DOT requests that GPS manufacturers submit receivers for test in the following TWG categories: - Aviation (non-certified), cellular, general location/navigation, high precision, timing, networks, and space-based receivers - Each receiver should b...

  6. Mortality, Morbidity, and Developmental Outcomes in Infants Born to Women Who Received Either Mefloquine or Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Sevene, Esperança; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Kakolwa, Mwaka A; Vala, Anifa; Accrombessi, Manfred; Briand, Valérie; Aponte, John J; Manego Zoleko, Rella; Adegnika, Ayôla A; Cot, Michel; Kremsner, Peter G; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Ramharter, Michael; Macete, Eusébio; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) on the health of sub-Saharan African infants. We have evaluated the safety of IPTp with mefloquine (MQ) compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for important infant health and developmental outcomes. In the context of a multicenter randomized controlled trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of IPTp with MQ compared to SP in pregnancy carried out in four sub-Saharan countries (Mozambique, Benin, Gabon, and Tanzania), 4,247 newborns, 2,815 born to women who received MQ and 1,432 born to women who received SP for IPTp, were followed up until 12 mo of age. Anthropometric parameters and psychomotor development were assessed at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age, and the incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were determined until 12 mo of age. No significant differences were found in the proportion of infants with stunting, underweight, wasting, and severe acute malnutrition at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age between infants born to women who were on IPTp with MQ versus SP. Except for three items evaluated at 9 mo of age, no significant differences were observed in the psychomotor development milestones assessed. Incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were similar between the two groups. Information on the outcomes at 12 mo of age was unavailable in 26% of the infants, 761 (27%) from the MQ group and 377 (26%) from the SP group. Reasons for not completing the study were death (4% of total study population), study withdrawal (6%), migration (8%), and loss to follow-up (9%). No significant differences were found between IPTp with MQ and SP administered in pregnancy on infant mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes. The poorer performance on certain psychomotor development milestones at 9 mo of age in children born to women in the MQ group compared to those in the SP group may deserve further

  7. Global health education in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havryliuk, Tatiana; Bentley, Suzanne; Hahn, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Interest in global health and international electives is growing among Emergency Medicine (EM) residents in the United States (US). The majority of EM residency programs offer opportunities for international electives. The degree of participation among residents and type of support provided by the residency program, however, remains unclear. To explore the current state of global health education among EM residents who participate in international electives. A 12-question survey was e-mailed to the program directors of the 192 EM residency programs in the US. The survey included questions about the number of residents participating in international electives and the types of preparation, project requirements, supervision, and feedback participating residents receive. The response rate was 53% with 102 responses. Seventy-five of 102 (74%) programs reported that at least one resident participated in an international elective in the 2010-2011 academic year. Forty-three programs (42%) report no available funding to support any resident on an international elective. Residents receive no preparation for international work in 41 programs (40%). Only 25 programs (26%) required their residents to conduct a project while abroad. Forty-nine programs (48%) reported no formal debriefing session, and no formal feedback was collected from returning residents in 57 of 102 (59%) programs. The majority of EM residencies have residents participating in international electives. However, the programs report variable preparation, requirements, and resident supervision. These results suggest a need for an expanded and more structured approach to international electives undertaken by EM residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1-124) applications, 16 (1-54) invitations, 11 (1-28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20-$12,000) and 26 (1-90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables, primary care was associated with significantly

  9. Long-term survival of a randomized phase III trial of head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation therapy with or without low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Héliton S; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; de Assis Ramos, Gabriela; Dias, Fernando L; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2017-08-01

    The impact of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in patients treated with exclusive chemoradiation therapy remains unknown. This study evaluated the overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of these patients. Overall, disease-free and progression-free survival of 94 patients diagnosed with oropharynx, nasopharynx, and hypopharynx cancer, who participated on a phase III study, was evaluated from 2007 to 2015. The patients were subjected to conventional radiotherapy plus cisplatin every 3weeks. LLLT was applied with an InGaAlP diode (660nm-100mW-1J-4J/cm 2 ). With a median follow-up of 41.3months (range 0.7-101.9), patients receiving LLLT had a statistically significant better complete response to treatment than those in the placebo group (LG=89.1%; PG=67.4%; p=0.013). Patients subjected to LLLT also displayed increase in progression-free survival than those in the placebo group (61.7% vs. 40.4%; p=0.030; HR:1:93; CI 95%: 1.07-3.5) and had a tendency for better overall survival (57.4% vs. 40.4%; p=0.90; HR:1.64; CI 95%: 0.92-2.91). This is the first study to suggest that LLLT may improve survival of head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Further studies, with a larger sample, are necessary to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of two educational interventions regarding prevention of early childhood caries on self-reported practice of parents of 2-5-year-old children receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Razeghi

    2017-02-01

    (pamphlet and pamphlet along with reminder on self-reported practice of parents of 2-5-years-old children receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia was assessed. Thirty seven couples of children and mothers in two groups were randomly selected. Before and three months after interventions, a standard questionnaire regarding self-reported practice of mothers on prevention of early childhood caries was completed by respondents. Moreover, oral examination including Simplified oral hygiene index (S-OHI, dmft, and white spot lesions were rerecorded at the beginning and three months after interventions. At this time in one of the groups reminder phone calls were made every month. Finally, the answers were scored and data were statistically analyzed to be compared in pre- and post-test. Results: Comparing each of the groups before and after interventions showed that in both groups there were significant differences in mothers’ perception of perceived ability to make child brush his teeth twice a day (P=0.001, and child’s tooth brushing frequency more than once a day (P=0.03. S-OHI had no significant difference after the intervention between two groups. But each group had a significant decrease three months after intervention (P=0.003. Also the mean number of white spots showed a significant decrease before and after intervention in each groups. Regarding mothers’ self-reported practice no significant difference was observed between two groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Using pamphlets along with or without reminder as educational measures had similar enhancing effects on the mothers’ self-reported practice on oral health of children within three months.

  11. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  12. Improving the Quality of Postgraduate Education in Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine for Junior Residents: An Exploratory Survey Conducted in Five Institutions in the Tohoku Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shin; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Kaneko, Soichiro; Tabata, Masao; Sato, Shinya; Ishikawa, Keiichi; Suzuki, Saya; Arita, Ryutaro; Saito, Natsumi; Kamiya, Tetsuharu; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Ikeno, Yuka; Tanaka, Junichi; Ohsawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Akiko; Numata, Takehiro; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Abe, Michiaki; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Ishii, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine has been widely applied in general medicine in Japan. In 2001, the model core curriculum for Japanese medical education was revised to include Kampo medicine. Since 2007, all 80 Japanese medical schools have incorporated it within their programs. However, postgraduate training or instruction of Kampo medicine has not been recognized as a goal for the clinical training of junior residents by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare; little is known about postgraduate Kampo medicine education. This exploratory study investigated attitudes about Kampo medicine among junior residents in Japanese postgraduate training programs. A questionnaire survey was administered to junior residents at five institutions in the Tohoku area of Japan. Questions evaluated residents' experiences of prescribing Kampo medicines and their expectations for postgraduate Kampo education and training. As a result, 121 residents responded (response rate = 74%). About 96% of participants had previously received Kampo medicine education at their pre-graduate medical schools and 64% had prescribed Kampo medications. Specifically, daikenchuto was prescribed to prevent ileus and constipation after abdominal surgery and yokukansan was prescribed to treat delirium in the elderly. Residents received on-the-job instruction by attending doctors. Over 70% of participants indicated that there was a need for postgraduate Kampo medicine education opportunities and expected lectures and instruction on how to use it to treat common diseases. In conclusion, we have revealed that junior residents require Kampo medicine education in Japanese postgraduate training programs. The programs for comprehensive pre-graduate and postgraduate Kampo education are expected.

  13. Are neurology residents interested in headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    The years of residency are the pillars of the subsequent practice in every medical specialty. The aim of our study is to evaluate the current situation, degree of involvement, main interests, and perceived quality of the training received by Spanish residents of neurology, specifically in the area of headache. A self-administered survey was designed by the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) and was sent via e-mail to all residents who were members of the Society as of May 2015. Fifty-three residents completed the survey (N = 426, 12.4%): 6% were first year residents, 25.5% second year, 23.5% third year, and 45% fourth year residents, all from 13 different Spanish autonomous communities. The areas of greatest interest are, in this order: Vascular neurology, headache, and epilepsy. Of them, 85% believe that the area of headache is undervalued. More than half of residents (52.8%) do not rotate in specific Headache Units and only 35.8% complete their training dominating anaesthetic block and toxin infiltration techniques. Of them, 81.1% believe that research is scarce or absent; 69.8% have never made a poster/presentation, 79.3% have not published and only 15% collaborate on research projects in this area. Lastly, 40% believe that they have not received adequate training. Headache is among the areas that interest our residents the most; however, we believe that we must improve their training both at a patient healthcare level and as researchers. Thus, increasing the number of available courses, creating educational web pages, involving residents in research, and making a rotation in a specialised unit mandatory are among the fundamental objectives of the GECSEN. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. An opioid overdose curriculum for medical residents: Impact on naloxone prescribing, knowledge, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jessica Lee; Rapoport, Alison B; Rowley, Christopher F; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Stead, Wendy

    2018-02-12

    Despite escalating opioid overdose death rates, addiction medicine is underrepresented in residency curricula. Providing naloxone to at-risk patients, relatives, and first responders reduces overdose deaths, but rates of naloxone prescribing remain low. The goal of this study is to examine the impact of a brief curricular intervention for internal medicine residents on naloxone prescribing rates, knowledge, and attitudes. Internal medicine residents (n = 160) at an urban, tertiary care medical center received two one-hour didactic sessions addressing overdose prevention, including intranasal naloxone. The number of naloxone prescriptions generated by residents was compared to faculty, who received no similar intervention, in the 3-month periods before and after the curriculum. Resident knowledge and attitudes, as assessed by pre- and post-intervention surveys, were compared. The resident naloxone prescribing rate increased from 420 to 1,270 per 100,000 inpatient discharges (p = 0.01) and from 0 to 370 per 100,000 ambulatory visits (p<0.001) post-intervention. Similar increases were not observed amongst inpatient faculty, whose prescribing rate decreased from 1,150 to 880 per 100,000 discharges (p = 0.08), or among outpatient faculty, whose rate increased from 30 to 180 per 100,000 ambulatory visits (p < 0.001) but was lower than the post-intervention resident rate (p = 0.01). Residents demonstrated high baseline knowledge about naloxone, but just 13% agreed that they were adequately trained to prescribe pre-intervention. Post-intervention, residents were more likely to agree that they were adequately trained to prescribe (Likert mean 2.5 vs. 3.9, p<0.001), to agree that treating addiction is rewarding (Likert mean 2.9 vs. 3.3, p = 0.03), and to attain a perfect score on the knowledge composite (57% vs. 33%, p = 0.05). A brief curricular intervention improved resident knowledge and attitudes regarding intranasal naloxone for opioid overdose reversal and

  15. Immunization status of residents in pediatrics at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bernardi Viviani Silveira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination of health care workers is an efficient way to reduce the risk of occupational infection and to prevent nosocomial transmission to vulnerable patients. Despite this, achieving high immunization rates among those professionals is a challenge. We assessed the immunization status of Residents in Pediatrics at the Federal University of São Paulo from June to December 2008. Their immunization records were checked and evaluated according to the Brazilian Immunization Schedule for health care workers. Considering all required vaccines, only 3.1% of the 64 Residents were up-to-date with their immunizations. Influenza was the vaccine with the lowest uptake (3.1% and measles and rubella were diseases with the highest evidence of immunity (62.5% each. Only 37.5% of Residents had received three hepatitis B vaccine doses with a subsequent serology confirming seroconversion. Moreover, the vast majority of Residents in Pediatrics who were not up-to-date were unaware of the fact. Both medical schools and Pediatric Residence programs should not only offer information but also check vaccination records in an effort to keep their healthcare workers´ vaccinations up-to-date.

  16. Evaluation of stress experienced by pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hung M; Young, Shardae D

    2017-04-15

    Results of a study of stress and negative affect levels in postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residents are presented. A cross-sectional approach was used. Pharmacy residency program directors received e-mailed invitation letters requesting that they ask their residents to participate in an online survey in 2011. The main study outcomes included evaluation of resident scores on the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10) and the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist-Revised (MAACL-R) anxiety, depression, hostility, and dysphoria subscales. Of the 524 pharmacy residents included in the study, 75.4% were female, 41.2% were under 26 years of age, and 41% reported working more than 60 hours per week. There were no significant differences between PGY1 and PGY2 residents in stress levels, as assessed with the PSS10 (mean ± S.D. score, 19.05 ± 5.96 versus 19.09 ± 5.77). MAACL-R scores for hostility were, on average, higher among PGY2 residents (mean ± S.D., 50.83 ± 10.02) than among PGY1 residents (48.62 ± 8.96), while there were no significant differences in anxiety, depression, and dysphoria levels. Relative to residents who worked 60 or fewer hours per week, those who worked more than 60 hours had higher perceived stress levels as well as higher depression, hostility, and dysphoria scores. Pharmacy residents exhibited high levels of perceived stress, especially those who worked more than 60 hours per week. Perceived stress was highly correlated to negative affect levels. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  18. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  19. A Phase II single-arm trial of palonosetron for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in malignant glioma patients receiving multidose irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affronti ML

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lou Affronti,1–3 Sarah Woodring,1,2 Katherine B Peters,1,4 James E Herndon II,5 Frances McSherry,5 Patrick N Healy,5 Annick Desjardins,1,4 James J Vredenburgh,6 Henry S Friedman1,2 1The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, South Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Duke University Health System, 3Duke University School of Nursing, 4Department of Neurology, 5Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Health System, Durham, NC, 6Saint Francis Cancer Center, Hartford, CT, USA Purpose: Given that the prognosis of recurrent malignant glioma (MG remains poor, improving quality of life (QoL through symptom management is important. Meta-analyses establishing antiemetic guidelines have demonstrated the superiority of palonosetron (PAL over older 5-hydroxytryptamine 3-receptor antagonists in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV prevention, but excluded patients with gliomas. Irinotecan plus bevacizumab is a treatment frequently used in MG, but is associated with low (55% CINV complete response (CR; no emesis or use of rescue antiemetic with commonly prescribed ondansetron. A single-arm Phase II trial was conducted in MG patients to determine the efficacy of intravenous PAL (0.25 mg and dexamethasone (DEX; 10 mg received in conjunction with biweekly irinotecan–bevacizumab treatment. The primary end point was the proportion of subjects achieving acute CINV CR (no emesis or antiemetic ≤24 hours postchemotherapy. Secondary end points included delayed CINV CR (days 2–5, overall CINV CR (days 1–5, and QoL, fatigue, and toxicity.Materials and methods: A two-stage design of 160 patients was planned to differentiate between CINV CR of 55% and 65% after each dose of PAL–DEX. Validated surveys assessed fatigue and QoL.Results: A total of 63 patients were enrolled, after which enrollment was terminated due to slow accrual; 52 patients were evaluable for the primary outcome

  20. Drug target residence time: a misleading concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmer, Rutger H A

    2018-01-01

    Since the importance of drug target residence time was first highlighted more 10 years ago, slow binding kinetics has received much attention in the drug discovery literature, and indeed within pharmaceutical research. However, the residence concept as presented in most papers is supported by rather misleading simulations and arguments, and by examples where compounds are taken out of their pharmacokinetic context. Moreover, fast association is typically more desirable than slow, and advantages of long residence time, notably a potential disconnect between pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK), would be partially or completely offset by slow on-rate. Therefore, plain potency is likely a better predictor of drug development success than is residence time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  2. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  3. First-Year Residents Outperform Third-Year Residents after Simulation-Based Education in Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Corbridge, Thomas C.; Schroedl, Clara J.; Wilcox, Jane E.; Cohen, Elaine R.; McGaghie, William C.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prior research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents’ critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training to third-year residents who received clinical training alone. Methods During their first three months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally-trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. Results Simulator-trained first-year residents (n=40) scored significantly higher compared to traditionally-trained third-year residents (n=27) on the bedside assessment, 91.3% (95% CI 88.2% to 94.3%) vs. 80.9% (95% CI 76.8% to 85.0%), P = simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency than third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical ICU rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients. PMID:23222546

  4. Solar heat receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  5. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MOTIVATION METHODSAPPLIED TO HAVE THE KRASNOYARSK REGION RESIDENTS CHANGE THEIR LIFESTYLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yurevna Kutumova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sociological research carried showed that provision of educational information is the main method of motivating people to change their lifestyle and break harmful habits. The mass media are in the first position in the rating as the most effective public awareness development means and healthcare professional advice goes second.A patient usually receives such advice when visiting a healthcare institution to be given diagnosis or treatment or in the course of health assessment or scheduled preventive medical examination. 45% of the Krasnoyarsk Region smokers considered changing their lifestyle and quitting smoking, 36,9% of the residents made such attempt and 8,4% broke the harmful habit after watching television features and under the influence of outdoor advertising. Information that was received from a doctor about risks of developing major no communicable diseases (cardiovascular, oncology, respiratory due to smoking motivated only 36, 9% of the population to change the lifestyle, which mostly included young people aged 18-24. For 63,6% of the region residents there was no positive effect of health professional advice received during a visit to a healthcare institution for a certain purpose. Thus, the received results testify to the bigger importance of educational promotion of mass media in motivation to change of a way of life and refusal of smoking, in comparison with information received from health workers.

  6. Ontario Radiation Oncology Residents' Needs in the First Postgraduate Year-Residents' Perspective Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Warner, Eiran; Zhang Liying; Kane, Gabrielle; Ackerman, Ida; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Agboola, Olusegun; Metz, Catherine de; Rodrigues, George; Voruganti, Sachi; Rappolt, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess radiation oncology residents' needs and satisfaction in their first postgraduate year (PGY-1) in the province of Ontario. Methods and Materials: Of 62 radiation oncology residents, 58 who had completed their PGY-1 and were either enrolled or had graduated in 2006 were invited to participate in a 31-item survey. The questionnaire explored PGY-1 residents' needs and satisfaction in four domains: clinical workload, faculty/learning environment, stress level, and discrimination/harassment. The Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to determine relationships between covariate items and summary scores. Results: Of 58 eligible residents, 44 (75%) responded. Eighty-four percent of residents felt that their ward and call duties were appropriate. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they often felt isolated from their radiation oncology program. Only 77% agreed that they received adequate feedback, and 40% received sufficient counseling regarding career planning. More than 93% of respondents thought that faculty members had contributed significantly to their learning experience. Approximately 50% of residents experienced excessive stress and inadequate time for leisure or for reading the medical literature. Less than 10% of residents indicated that they had been harassed or experienced discrimination. Eighty-three percent agreed or strongly agreed that their PGY-1 experience had been outstanding. Conclusions: Most Ontario residents were satisfied with their PGY-1 training program. More counseling by radiation oncology faculty members should be offered to help residents with career planning. The residents might also benefit from more exposure to 'radiation oncology' and an introduction to stress management strategies

  7. Frequency and determinants of residents' narrative feedback on the teaching performance of faculty: narratives in numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeuw, Renée M.; Overeem, Karlijn; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Physicians involved in residency training often receive feedback from residents on their teaching. Research shows that learners value narrative feedback, but knowledge of the frequency and determinants of narrative feedback in teaching performance evaluation is lacking. This study aims to

  8. Equipping Residents to Address Alcohol and Drug Abuse: The National SBIRT Residency Training Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Meyers, Jessica Adams; Seale, J. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background The Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) service for unhealthy alcohol use has been shown to be one of the most cost-effective medical preventive services and has been associated with long-term reductions in alcohol use and health care utilization. Recent studies also indicate that SBIRT reduces illicit drug use. In 2008 and 2009, the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration funded 17 grantees to develop and implement medical residency training programs that teach residents how to provide SBIRT services for individuals with alcohol and drug misuse conditions. This paper presents the curricular activities associated with this initiative. Methods We used an online survey delivery application (Qualtrics) to e-mail a survey instrument developed by the project directors of 4 SBIRT residency programs to each residency grantee's director. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative data. Results All 17 (100%) grantees responded. Respondents encompassed residency programs in emergency medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, surgery, and preventive medicine. Thirteen of 17 (76%) grantee programs used both online and in-person approaches to deliver the curriculum. All 17 grantees incorporated motivational interviewing and validated screening instruments in the curriculum. As of June 2011, 2867 residents had been trained, and project directors reported all residents were incorporating SBIRT into their practices. Consistently mentioned challenges in implementing an SBIRT curriculum included finding time in residents' schedules for the modules and the need for trained faculty to verify resident competence. Conclusions The SBIRT initiative has resulted in rapid development of educational programs and a cohort of residents who utilize SBIRT in practice. Skills verification, program dissemination, and sustainability after grant funding ends remain ongoing challenges. PMID:23451308

  9. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  10. Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E. Fay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults over 65 years of age and younger adults with certain medical conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC state insufficient evidence to recommend routine pneumococcal vaccination during pregnancy, but the vaccine is indicated for pregnant women with certain medical conditions. We designed this project to gauge obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN resident knowledge of maternal pneumococcal vaccination. Methods. We administered a 22-question survey to OB/GYN residents about maternal pneumococcal vaccination. We performed descriptive analysis for each question. Results. 238 OB/GYN residents responded. Overall, 69.3% of residents reported receiving vaccination education and 86.0% reported having ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. Most residents knew that asplenia (78.2%, pulmonary disease (77.3%, and HIV/AIDS (69.4% are indications for vaccination but less knew that cardiovascular disease (45.0%, diabetes (35.8%, asthma (42.8%, nephrotic syndrome (19.7%, and renal failure (33.6% are also indications for vaccination. Conclusion. OB/GYN residents are taught about vaccines and have ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. However, knowledge of indications for pneumococcal vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. Likely, the opportunity to vaccinate at-risk pregnant patients is being missed.

  11. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  12. Low complexity MIMO receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Lin; Yu, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems can increase the spectral efficiency in wireless communications. However, the interference becomes the major drawback that leads to high computational complexity at both transmitter and receiver. In particular, the complexity of MIMO receivers can be prohibitively high. As an efficient mathematical tool to devise low complexity approaches that mitigate the interference in MIMO systems, lattice reduction (LR) has been widely studied and employed over the last decade. The co-authors of this book are world's leading experts on MIMO receivers, and here they share the key findings of their research over years. They detail a range of key techniques for receiver design as multiple transmitted and received signals are available. The authors first introduce the principle of signal detection and the LR in mathematical aspects. They then move on to discuss the use of LR in low complexity MIMO receiver design with respect to different aspects, including uncoded MIMO detection...

  13. Resident-as-teacher in family medicine: a CERA survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Achkar, Morhaf; Davies, M Kelly; Busha, Michael E; Oh, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Teaching has been increasingly recognized as a primary responsibility of residents. Residents enjoy teaching, and their majority report interest in the continuation of teaching activities after graduation. Resident-as-teacher programs have emerged nationally as a means of enhancing teaching skills. This study examined the current use of residents-as-teachers programs in family medicine residencies through a national survey of family medicine residency program directors. This survey project was part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Education Research Alliance (CERA) 2014 survey to family medicine program directors that was conducted between February 2014 and May 2014. The response rate of the survey was 49.6% (224/451). The majority (85.8%) of residency programs offer residents formal instruction in teaching skills. The vast majority (95.6%) of programs mandated the training. The average total hours of teaching instruction residents receive while in residency training was 7.72. The residents are asked to formally evaluate the teaching instruction in 68.1% of the programs. Less than a quarter (22.6%) of residency programs offer the teaching instruction in collaboration with other programs. "Retreat, workshop, and seminars" were identified as the main form of instruction by 33.7% of programs. In 83.3% of programs not offering instruction, lack of resources was identified as the primary barrier. The majority of family medicine residency programs provide resident-as-teacher instructions, which reflects increasing recognition of importance of the teaching role of residents. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of such instruction on residents' teaching skills and their attitudes toward teaching.

  14. Delphi Accounts Receivable Module -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Delphi accounts receivable module contains the following data elements, but are not limited to customer information, cash receipts, line of accounting details, bill...

  15. P270: Factors associated with fall rate in psychogeriatric residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, N.M.; de Groot, Maartje H; Hortobágyi, T.; Lamoth, C.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Falls in psychogeriatric residents represent a costly but unresolved safety issue. Identifying fall risk factors and their inter-relationship may help to individualize prevention programs and increase the effectiveness. Therefore, we aimed to examine the relationship between patient

  16. Newborn well-child visits in the home setting: a pilot study in a family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Ashley; Sutter, Mary Beth; Magee, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to pilot a home visit program targeting neonates conducted by family medicine residents. While the literature shows that home visit programs are successful at preventing adverse outcomes for young children, such as improving parenting practices and promoting breastfeeding, no data exist about newborn home visits conducted by resident physicians. Residents conducted newborn home visits precepted by a family medicine faculty member from June 2012--May 2013. Subjects were recruited from the residency continuity practice and randomized to receive two home visits (which replaced two office visits) or routine office-based newborn care. All participants were surveyed using the validated WHOQOL-BREF quality of life scale and a patient satisfaction instrument. Metrics were also obtained from the electronic medical record. Mothers and resident physicians completed an open-ended questionnaire about their experience. All patients, whether receiving office-based or home-based care, rated their care highly. Significant differences were seen in usage of acute care in the first 6 months of life, and mothers in the home visit group trended toward initiating breastfeeding at a higher rate. The home visit group ranked their quality of life higher across all domains when compared to the control group, approaching statistical significance in two domains. Residents providing home visits reported increased connectedness to patients and improved confidence in anticipatory guidance delivery. Home visits are valuable for families with newborns, in terms of minimizing acute care service usage, breastfeeding promotion, and perhaps increasing maternal perceptions of well-being. A home visit program has the potential to enhance resident education and the doctor-patient relationship.

  17. Incorporating population medicine into primary care residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysinger, Wayne S; King, Valerie; Foster, Tina C; Geffken, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Expanded competencies in population health and systems-based medicine have been identified as a need for primary care physicians. Incorporating formal training in preventive medicine is one method of accomplishing this objective. We identified three family medicine residencies that have developed formal integrated pathways for residents to also complete preventive medicine residency requirements during their training period. Although there are differences, each pathway incorporates a structured approach to dual residency training and includes formal curriculum that expands resident competencies in population health and systems-based medicine. A total of 26 graduates have completed the formally combined family and preventive medicine residencies. All are board certified in family medicine, and 22 are board certified in preventive medicine. Graduates work in a variety of academic, quality improvement, community, and international settings utilizing their clinical skills as well as their population medicine competencies. Dual training has been beneficial in job acquisition and satisfaction. Incorporation of formal preventive medicine training into family medicine education is a viable way to use a structured format to expand competencies in population medicine for primary care physicians. This type of training, or modifications of it, should be part of the debate in primary care residency redesign.

  18. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  19. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  20. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  1. [Knowledge of health care ethics in paediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, A; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Quintero Otero, S; Ramil Fraga, C; García Palacios, M V; Hernández Rastrollo, R; Ruiz Extremera, M A

    2014-02-01

    Bioethics has been recently incorporated in to the educational programs of both medical students and medical residents as part of their curriculum. However, its training based on clinical practice is not well structured. To evaluate the knowledge of bioethics in Spanish paediatric residents, and to analyse how this relates to the medical education during graduate and post-graduate training. A questionnaire with 20 multiple choice questions was designed to evaluate the knowledge in basic ethics with potential implications in clinical practice. We evaluated the education received during graduate and post-graduate training, and the main ethical conflicts faced. A total of 210 completed questionnaires were received from medical residents in paediatrics from 20 different Spanish hospitals, of whom 47 of these were first year residents (R1), 49 were second year residents (R2), 57 were third year residents (R3), and the remaining 57 were final year residents (R4). The mean number of correct answers was 16.8 out of 20. No differences were found between residents in different years of training, nor were there any differences between the group that had received specific training in bioethics versus those who had not. Residents were more likely to give wrong answers related with informed consent, the law on the freedom of the patient, principles of quality of life, the case analysis system, and the dimension of distributive justice. Limitation of therapeutic efforts was identified as the main ethical problem faced in clinical practice by Spanish residents in paediatrics. Most of the knowledge of bioethics is acquired during graduate training, and improved very little throughout the period of medical residence. Our results suggest that efforts are required in organising and structuring the education in bioethics during the training of residents in paediatrics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Residents' engagement in everyday activities and its association with thriving in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Sabine; Lindkvist, Marie; Wimo, Anders; Juthberg, Christina; Bergland, Ådel; Edvardsson, David

    2017-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of everyday activity engagement for older people in nursing homes and the extent to which engagement in everyday activities is associated with thriving. Research into residents' engagement in everyday activities in nursing homes has focused primarily on associations with quality of life and prevention and management of neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, the mere absence of symptoms does not necessarily guarantee experiences of well-being. The concept of thriving encapsulates and explores experiences of well-being in relation to the place where a person lives. A cross-sectional survey. A national survey of 172 Swedish nursing homes (2013-2014). Resident (n = 4831) symptoms, activities and thriving were assessed by staff using a study survey based on established questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, simple and multiple linear regression, and linear stepwise multiple regression were performed. The most commonly occurring everyday activities were receiving hugs and physical touch, talking to relatives/friends and receiving visitors, having conversation with staff not related to care and grooming. The least commonly occurring everyday activities were going to the cinema, participating in an educational program, visiting a restaurant and doing everyday chores. Positive associations were found between activity engagement and thriving, where engagement in an activity program, dressing nicely and spending time with someone the resident likes had the strongest positive association with resident thriving. Engagement in everyday activities can support personhood and thriving and can be conceptualized and implemented as nursing interventions to enable residents to thrive in nursing homes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  4. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  5. Efficacy of aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with a moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimen: a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized study in patients with gynecologic cancer receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Sonoda, Kenzo; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Ohgami, Tatsuhiro; Saito, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Shinji; Sakai, Kunihiro; Ichinoe, Akimasa; Ueoka, Yousuke; Hasuo, Yasuyuki; Nishida, Makoto; Masuda, Satohiro; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-06-01

    Substance P contributes to the hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to paclitaxel in a rat model. Aprepitant acts as an inhibitor of the binding of substance P to the neurokinin-1 receptor and, consequently, may reduce the frequency of paclitaxel-induced HSR. While aprepitant has a prophylactic effect against vomiting caused by high-dose cisplatin, the benefits of aprepitant have not been clearly demonstrated in patients receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC) combination chemotherapy. We conducted a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized study in Japanese patients with gynecologic cancer who received TC combination chemotherapy. Patients received aprepitant or placebo together with both a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone prior to chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with HSR, and the secondary endpoints were the proportion of patients with "no vomiting", "no significant nausea", and complete response, respectively. Of the 324 randomized patients, 297 (151 in the aprepitant group; 146 in the placebo group) were evaluated. The percentage of patients with HSR (9.2 vs. 7.5 %, respectively; P = 0.339) was not significantly different between the groups. The percentage of "no vomiting" patients (78.2 vs. 54.8 %; P gynecologic cancer patients receiving TC combination chemotherapy.

  6. Increasing the Number of Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting: the Role of Clinical Pharmacy Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Shadi; Habibi, Maryam; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Karimi Gamishan, Masoumeh; Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Farasatinasab, Maryam; Farsaei, Shadi; Gharekhani, Afshin; Kafi, Hamidreza; Karimzadeh, Iman; Kharazmkia, Ali; Najmeddin, Farhad; Nikvarz, Naemeh; Oghazian, Mohammad Bagher; Rezaee, Haleh; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Tafazzoli, Ali; Shahsavari, Nahid; Fahimi, Fanak

    2014-01-01

    Detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in hospitals provides an important measure of the burden of drug related morbidity on the healthcare system. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is scare and several obstacles to such reporting have been identified formerly. This study aimed to determine the role of clinical pharmacy residents in ADR reporting within a hospital setting. Clinical pharmacy residents were trained to report all suspected ADRs through ADR-reporting yellow cards. The incidence, pattern, seriousness, and preventability of the reported ADRs were analyzed. During the period of 12 months, for 8559 patients, 202 ADR reports were received. The most frequently reported reactions were due to anti-infective agents (38.38%). Rifampin accounted for the highest number of the reported ADRs among anti-infective agents. The gastro-intestinal system was the most frequently affected system (21.56%) of all reactions. Fifty four of the ADRs were reported as serious reactions. Eighteen of the ADRs were classified as preventable. Clinical pharmacy residents' involvement in the ADR reporting program could improve the ADR reporting system. PMID:24734083

  7. Alexandrite Lidar Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilkerson, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...". The chosen vendor, Orca Photonics, In. (Redmond, WA), in close collaboration with USU personnel, built a portable, computerized lidar system that not only is suitable as a receiver for a near IR alexandrite laser, but also contains an independent Nd...

  8. JSSG - SPACED RECEIVER MEASUREMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The height of ionospheric irregularities was measured by several laboratories belonging to the Joint Satellite Studies Group, using spaced receiver techniques. The method of analysis and results obtained are presented. (Author)

  9. Solar energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  10. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  11. Knowledge and attitudes about HIV infection and prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV in an urban, low income community in Durban, South Africa: Perspectives of residents and health care volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoza Haffejee

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Innovative ways to impart knowledge particularly of PMTCT and updated standards of practice are essential. It is important that the community understands how transmission occurs so that prevention can follow.

  12. Surgical resident learning styles: faculty and resident accuracy at identification of preferences and impact on ABSITE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy; Ristig, Kyle; Chu, Quyen D

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of surgical resident duty hour restrictions, there is a need for faculty to utilize novel teaching methods to convey information in a more efficient manner. The current paradigm of surgical training, which has not changed significantly since the time of Halsted, assumes that all residents assimilate information in a similar fashion. However, recent data has shown that learners have preferences for the ways in which they receive and process information. The VARK model categorizes learners as visual (V), aural (A), read/write (R), and kinesthetic (K). The VARK learning style preferences of surgical residents have not been previously evaluated. In this study, the preferred learning styles of general surgery residents were determined, along with faculty and resident perception of resident learning styles. In addition, we hypothesized that American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam (ABSITE) scores are associated with preference for a read/write (R) learning style. The Fleming VARK learning styles inventory was administered to all general surgery residents at a university hospital-based program. Responses on the inventory were scored to determine the preferred learning style for each resident. Faculty members were surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying the preferred learning style of each resident. All residents were also surveyed to determine their accuracy in identifying their peers' VARK preferences. Resident ABSITE scores were examined for association with preferred learning styles. Twenty-nine residents completed the inventory. Most (18 of 29, 62%) had a multimodal preference, although more than a third (11 of 29, 38%) demonstrated a single-modality preference. Seventy-six percent of all residents (22 of 29) had some degree of kinesthetic (K) learning, while under 50% (14 of 29) were aural (A) learners. Although not significant, dominant (R) learners had the highest mean ABSITE scores. Faculty identified residents' learning styles

  13. Assessment of knowledge on cardiovascular disease risk factors by postal survey in residents of Małopolska Voivodeship. Małopolska CArdiovascular PReventive Intervention Study (M-CAPRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Waśniowska

    2017-05-01

    Using a postal questionnaire for the assessment of knowledge of CVD RFs in the population of Małopolska Voivodeship appeared to have serious limitations due to low participation in the study. Despite this, the results of the study indicate that knowledge on CVD RFs is insufficient. Female gender and higher education were related to more prevalent knowledge on RFs. Family history of CVD was related to better knowledge in women only. Male residents of rural areas and small towns had slightly less knowledge on CVD RFs

  14. A multicenter retrospective study of the risk factors associated with medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw after tooth extraction in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy: can primary wound closure and a drug holiday really prevent MRONJ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T; Kawakita, A; Ueda, N; Funahara, R; Tachibana, A; Kobayashi, M; Kondou, E; Takeda, D; Kojima, Y; Sato, S; Yanamoto, S; Komatsubara, H; Umeda, M; Kirita, T; Kurita, H; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2017-08-01

    Root amputation, extraction of a single tooth, bone loss or severe tooth mobility, and an unclosed wound were significantly associated with increased risk of developing medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). We recommend a minimally traumatic extraction technique, removal of any bone edges, and mucosal wound closure as standard procedures in patients receiving bisphosphonates. Osteonecrosis of the jaws can occur following tooth extraction in patients receiving bisphosphonate drugs. Various strategies for minimizing the risk of MRONJ have been advanced, but no studies have comprehensively analyzed the efficacy of factors such as primary wound closure, demographics, and drug holidays in reducing its incidence. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the relationships between these various risk factors after tooth extraction in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy. Risk factors for MRONJ after tooth extraction were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. All patients were investigated with regard to demographics; type and duration of oral bisphosphonate use; whether they underwent a discontinuation of oral bisphosphonates before tooth extraction (drug holiday), and the duration of such discontinuation; and whether any additional surgical procedures (e.g., incision, removal of bone edges, root amputation) were performed. We found that root amputation (OR = 6.64), extraction of a single tooth (OR = 3.70), bone loss or severe tooth mobility (OR = 3.60), and an unclosed wound (OR = 2.51) were significantly associated with increased risk of developing MRONJ. We recommend a minimally traumatic extraction technique, removal of any bone edges, and mucosal wound closure as standard procedures in patients receiving bisphosphonates. We find no evidence supporting the efficacy of a pre-extraction short-term drug holiday from oral bisphosphonates in reducing the risk of MRONJ.

  15. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Pharmacy Resident Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A.B. Cauthon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to utilize an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE for assessment of pharmacy residents. Innovation: Post-graduate year 1 (PGY1 and post-graduate year 2 (PGY2 pharmacy residents completing multiple, local residency programs were invited to participate in an OSCE. A total of eight PGY1 residents and one PGY2 resident completed the OSCE. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP residency program goals were aligned for each case, which were originally developed for a fourth-year pharmacy student OSCE. Station design included outpatient and inpatient settings with patient and physician interactions. Median communication and clinical skills scores were evaluated. Critical Analysis: The OSCE allows for assessment of all residents on common scenarios. Pharmacy residents met competency requirements and demonstrated excellent communication skills. The OSCE was able to evaluate both physician-pharmacist communication and patient-pharmacist communication. Baseline performance related to the ASHP goals and objectives was not completed; however, the OSCE could highlight resident strengths and weaknesses in communication and clinical skills. The OSCE could simulate independent practice, may reduce bias, and could provide an evaluation of the resident by a patient. However, the OSCE incurs higher resource utilization, specifically monetary and time, than other assessment methods. Next Steps: The pilot study results provide a beginning for further study of OSCEs for pharmacy residents. Further study should include surveying the residency directors about use of the OSCE, a comparison of performance between the OSCE and preceptor evaluations of residents on ASHP goals and objectives, and an evaluation of OSCE implementation at different time points within the residency. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in

  16. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 'Chaos' in superregenerative receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercon, Jean-Claude; Badard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The superregenerative principle has been known since the early 1920s. The circuit is extremely simple and extremely sensitive. Today, superheterodyne receivers generally supplant superregenerative receivers in most applications because there are several undesirable characteristics: poor selectivity, reradiation, etc. Superregenerative receivers undergo a revival in recent papers for wireless systems, where low cost and very low power consumption are relevant: house/building meters (such as water, energy, gas counter), personal computer environment (keyboard, mouse), etc. Another drawback is the noise level which is higher than that of a well-designed superheterodyne receiver; without an antenna input signal, the output of the receiver hears in an earphone as a waterfall noise; this sound principally is the inherent input noise amplified and detected by the circuit; however, when the input noise is negligible with respect of an antenna input signal, we are faced to an other source of 'noise' self-generated by the superregenerative working. The main objective of this paper concerns this self-generated noise coming from an exponential growing followed by a re-injection process for which the final state is a function of the phase of the input signal

  18. Interventional Pain Procedures in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Cicone, Caitlin; Chang, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to interventional pain procedures is now a required component of training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Data regarding resident exposure and competency in these procedures remain limited. Objectives were to determine the volume and type of exposure physical medicine and rehabilitation residents have to interventional pain procedures and to obtain faculty-perceived opinions regarding competency of incoming fellows as it pertains to interventional pain management. Online surveys were sent to program directors of physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies and fellowship directors of interventional spine, sports medicine, and pain medicine fellowships. Surveys inquired about educational methods, the volume of procedures in which residents actively participate, and faculty-perceived competency of trainees performing procedures. Thirty-nine residency programs and 27 fellowships responded to the surveys. Of the 39 residencies that responded, there was great variation in the exposure residents receive. Most programs reported that residents have moderate exposure to common procedures such as ultrasound-guided knee injections and lumbar epidural injections. In addition, while most residency program directors report graduates to be "fairly prepared" (33%) to "well prepared" (20.5%) with regard to spine procedures, most fellowship directors (63%) describe incoming fellows to be at the "beginner" level.

  19. Central solar energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  20. Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training: Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Evidenced-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L.; Melczak, Michael; Johnjulio, William; Campopiano, Melinda; Gordon, Adam J.; Costlow, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Medical residents do not receive adequate training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use disorders. The federally funded Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training program (SMaRT) is an evidence-based curriculum with goals of training residents in SBIRT knowledge and skills and…

  1. Wideband CMOS receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates how to design a wideband receiver operating in current mode, in which the noise and non-linearity are reduced, implemented in a low cost single chip, using standard CMOS technology.  The authors present a solution to remove the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) block and connect directly the mixer’s output to a passive second-order continuous-time Σ∆ analog to digital converter (ADC), which operates in current-mode. These techniques enable the reduction of area, power consumption, and cost in modern CMOS receivers.

  2. Perception of preventive care and readiness for lifestyle change in rural and urban patients in Poland: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Panasiuk, Lech; Brotons, Carlos; Bulc, Mateja; Zakowska, Izabela

    2017-12-23

    The idiosyncrasies of rural health demand further research to instigate rural health initiatives and to monitor progress in rural health care. In 2008, a study examined health-related behaviour, perception of importance of preventive interventions, readiness to change lifestyle and willingness to receive support from GPs, according to gender and place of residence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients who visited any of ten randomly-selected general practices in Poland. Four hundred patients were enrolled: 50% from rural areas, 50.3% were females; 23.8% declared a primary level of education (35% rural vs. 12.5% urban) respondents; the median age was 50 years (IQR=18), The predicted means for prevention importance scores for rural residents were 0.623 and for urban residents - 0.682. Place of residence had a significant effect on the importance of prevention (prural vs. 16% urban residents (prural respondents would like to receive individual counselling from their GP regarding eating habits, physical activity, body weight, giving up smoking and safe alcohol use. Urban respondents were more likely to expect leaflets from their GPs on normalizing body weight.

  3. Sender-Receiver Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, R.J.A.P.; Potters, J.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Standard game-theoretic solution concepts do not guarantee meaningful commu- nication in cheap-talk games. In this paper, we define a solution concept which guarantees communication for a large class of games by designing a behavior pro- tocol which the receiver uses to judge messages sent by the

  4. The ethical education of ophthalmology residents: an experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    To demonstrate the effect of ethics education on a resident's ability to answer questions that relate to moral dilemmas and on the clinical evaluations of residents by faculty. The curriculum for the ethics education that was used for this study was designed by the author and consisted of 10 lectures of 1.5 hours each. Five residencies were included in the project. One residency received one lecture, two residencies received three lectures, and two residencies received 10 lectures. To evaluate the moral skills of the residents at the beginning of the course and at the end, the residents were given the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2) developed by James Rest, which involves answering standardized questions about four moral dilemmas. Faculty evaluations were completed before and after the ethics lectures were given. At the beginning of the ethics course, each resident was given a social survey that was designed to assess participation in community, religious, political, and societal activities as well as attitudes about these activities. All residents were also asked demographic information, including their age, gender, and year of residency. The results of the DIT-2 taken before and after the ethics lectures were compared. No correlations were found in faculty evaluations of clinical performance of the residents before and after the course (P = .052). Associations between DIT-2 scores and questions on community and religion in the social survey were noted. The finding that the effect of an ethics course on residents' ability to answer moral dilemmas did not achieve statistical significance should be accepted with the understanding that this was a first attempt at standardization of many variables, especially the format of the curriculum and materials used. The use of faculty evaluations to assess clinical performance needs to be standardized, and the faculty members need additional training to ensure validity of the results. The social survey was also the first attempt

  5. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  6. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  7. Coleadership Among Chief Residents: Exploration of Experiences Across Specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeffrey E

    2015-06-01

    Many departments have multiple chief residents. How these coleaders relate to each other could affect their performance, the residency program, and the department. This article reports on how co-chiefs work together during the chief year, and what may allow them to be more effective coleaders. A phenomenological research design was used to investigate experiences of outgoing chief residents from 13 specialties at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics over a 2-year period from 2012 through 2013. Thematic analysis of semistructured interviews was conducted to investigate commonalities and recommendations. Face-to-face interviews with 19 chief residents from 13 different specialties identified experiences that helped co-chiefs work effectively with each other in orienting new co-chiefs, setting goals and expectations, making decisions, managing interpersonal conflict, leadership styles, communicating, working with program directors, and providing evaluations and feedback. Although the interviewed chief residents received guidance on how to be an effective chief resident, none had been given advice on how to effectively work with a co-chief, and 26% (5 of 19) of the respondents reported having an ineffective working relationship with their co-chief. Chief residents often colead in carrying out their multiple functions. To successfully function in a multichief environment, chief residents may benefit from a formal co-orientation in which they discuss goals and expectations, agree on a decision-making process, understand each other's leadership style, and receive feedback on their efficacy as leaders.

  8. Coleadership Among Chief Residents: Exploration of Experiences Across Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many departments have multiple chief residents. How these coleaders relate to each other could affect their performance, the residency program, and the department. Objective This article reports on how co-chiefs work together during the chief year, and what may allow them to be more effective coleaders. Methods A phenomenological research design was used to investigate experiences of outgoing chief residents from 13 specialties at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics over a 2-year period from 2012 through 2013. Thematic analysis of semistructured interviews was conducted to investigate commonalities and recommendations. Results Face-to-face interviews with 19 chief residents from 13 different specialties identified experiences that helped co-chiefs work effectively with each other in orienting new co-chiefs, setting goals and expectations, making decisions, managing interpersonal conflict, leadership styles, communicating, working with program directors, and providing evaluations and feedback. Although the interviewed chief residents received guidance on how to be an effective chief resident, none had been given advice on how to effectively work with a co-chief, and 26% (5 of 19) of the respondents reported having an ineffective working relationship with their co-chief. Conclusions Chief residents often colead in carrying out their multiple functions. To successfully function in a multichief environment, chief residents may benefit from a formal co-orientation in which they discuss goals and expectations, agree on a decision-making process, understand each other's leadership style, and receive feedback on their efficacy as leaders. PMID:26221435

  9. Resident Preferences for Program Director Role in Wellness Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, Russ C; O'Neal, Richard L; Ewing, Joseph A

    2018-05-01

    Burnout and depression are prevalent among resident physicians, though the supportive role of the program director (PD) is not well defined. To understand the residents' view of the residency program director's role in assessing and promoting resident wellness. A single institution survey of all house staff was conducted in 2017. Rates of burnout and depression were identified via the 2-item Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Patient Health Questionaire-2 (PHQ-2), respectively. Residents then qualified their preferences for various assistance services and for the role of their program directors in assisting them. One-hundred sixty-one of 202 (79.7%) residents completed the survey. The rate of depression was 28%. Rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (2-item MBI) were 44 and 62%, respectively. Only 4% of respondents had used the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in the prior 12 months. Eighty-two percent of residents were in favor of PDs inquiring about wellness regardless of their job performance and only 1% of residents stated the PD should not inquire about wellness at all. Thirty-three percent of residents reported that they would be likely to contact EAP on their own if they felt unwell. Significantly more residents (62%) reported being more likely to contact EAP if recommended by their PD (33 vs 62%, p < 0.001%). Important perceived barriers to seeking assistance were lack of time (65%), lack of knowledge of how to contact EAP (41%), and concerns about appearing weak (35%). Despite a high prevalence of burnout and depression, residents are unlikely to seek help on their own. Program directors have an important role in assessing and promoting the wellness of their residents. The majority of residents wants their PD to inquire about wellness and may be more likely to seek and receive help if recommended and facilitated by their PD.

  10. Correlates of domestic violence experience among recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Iyer, Sandhya R; Kolhe, Ambika R; Dhayarkar, Sampada; Paranjape, Anuradha; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephenson, Rob; Sahay, Seema

    2018-01-01

    The high risk of experiencing domestic violence (DV) among married women in India who reside in slum communities underscores the need for effective, evidence-based, and culturally-tailored primary prevention. To inform such DV primary prevention strategies for this population, we herein aimed to identify correlates of DV experience in early marriage. Utilizing a cross-sectional design, potential correlates of DV experience were explored among a geographically-clustered random sample of 100 recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India. In multivariable regression, DV experience was associated with less educational attainment by the participant's spouse (standardized β = -0.281, p = 0.004), less satisfaction of the spouse's family with the maanpaan (wedding-related gifts provided by the bride's family) they received at the time of marriage (standardized β = -0.298, p<0.001), poorer conflict negotiation skills (standardized β = -0.308, p<0.001), and greater acknowledgement of DV occurrence in family and friends (standardized β = 0.436, p<0.001). These correlates suggest strategies that could be incorporated into future DV primary prevention interventions for this vulnerable population (i.e. promoting completion of formal education of boys alongside girls, mitigating causes of familial dowry harassment, improving conflict negotiation skills, and challenging norms surrounding DV).

  11. Education research: neurology training reassessed. The 2011 American Academy of Neurology Resident Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Maas, Matthew B; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-10-23

    To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training.

  12. [Assessment of a residency training program in endocrinology and nutrition: results of a resident survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Carmen; Moreno-Fernández, Jesús; Palomares-Ortega, Rafael; García-Manzanares, Alvaro; Benito-López, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    In 2006, a new training program was approved for resident physicians in endocrinology and nutrition (EN). A survey was conducted to EN residents to assess their training, their depth of knowledge, and compliance with the new program, as well as potential changes in training, and the results obtained were compared to those from previous surveys. A survey previously conducted in 2000 and 2005 was used for this study. The survey included demographic factors, questions about the different rotations, scientific and practical training, assessment of their training departments and other aspects. Results of the current survey were compared to those of the 2005 survey. The survey was completed by 40 residents. Mandatory rotations are mainly fulfilled, except for neurology. Some rotations removed from the program, such as radiology and nuclear medicine, still are frequently performed and popular among residents, who would include them back into the program. There was a low compliance with practical training in the endocrinology area. Forty percent of residents were not aware of the new program, but 60% thought that it was fulfilled. A total of 82.5% of residents thought that their departments fulfilled the training objectives. Few differences were found in rotations as compared to the data collected in 2005 despite changes in the training program, and there was still a lack of practical training. By contrast, rating of training received from departments and senior physicians was improved as compared to prior surveys. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Report of the Clinical and Functional Primary Outcomes in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Similar Outcomes in Men Receiving Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training 1 and 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arundale, Amelia J H; Cummer, Kathleen; Capin, Jacob J; Zarzycki, Ryan; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-10-01

    Athletes often are cleared to return to activities 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, knee function measures continue to improve up to 2 years after surgery. Interventions beyond standard care may facilitate successful return to preinjury activities and improve functional outcomes. Perturbation training has been used in nonoperative ACL injury and preoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, but has not been examined in postoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, specifically return to sport rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences at 1 and 2 years after ACL reconstruction between the male SAP (strengthening, agility, and secondary prevention) and SAP+PERT (SAP protocol with the addition of perturbation training) groups with respect to (1) quadriceps strength and single-legged hop limb symmetry; (2) patient-reported knee outcome scores; (3) the proportion who achieve self-reported normal knee function; and (4) the time from surgery to passing return to sport criteria. Forty men who had completed ACL reconstruction rehabilitation and met enrollment criteria (3-9 months after ACL reconstruction, > 80% quadriceps strength limb symmetry, no pain, full ROM, minimal effusion) were randomized into the SAP or SAP+PERT groups of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Specialised Post-Operative Return to Sports trial (ACL-SPORTS), a single-blind randomized clinical study of secondary prevention and return to sport. Quadriceps strength, single-legged hopping, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 subjective knee form, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)-sports and recreation, and KOOS-quality-of-life subscales were collected 1 and 2 years after surgery by investigators blind to group. Athletes were categorized as having normal or abnormal knee function at each time point based on IKDC score, and the time until athletes passed strict return

  14. The neighborhood health exchange: developing a community partnership in residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Press, Valerie G; Freed, Benjamin H; Baker, Timothy; Tang, Joyce W; Cohen, Julie C; Laiteerapong, Neda; Alvarez, Kimberly; Schwartz, Mindy; Arora, Vineet M

    2010-09-01

    The current system of residency training focuses on the hospital setting, and resident exposure to the surrounding community is often limited. However, community interaction can play an important role in ambulatory training and in learning systems-based practice, a residency core competency. The goal of the Neighborhood Health Exchange was to develop a community partnership to provide internal medicine residents with an opportunity to interface with community members through a mutually beneficial educational experience. Internal medicine residents received training during their ambulatory block and participated in a voluntary field practicum designed to engage community members in discussions about their health. Community members participated in education sessions led by resident volunteers. Resident volunteers completed a survey on their experiences. All residents stated that the opportunity to lead an exchange was very useful to their overall residency training. Eight exchanges were held with a total of 61 community participants, who completed a 3-question survey following the session. This survey asked about the level of material, the helpfulness of the exchanges, and opportunities for improvement. We received 46 completed surveys from community members: 91% stated that the material was presented "at the right level" and 93% stated that the presentations were somewhat or very helpful. Eighty percent gave positive and encouraging comments about the exchange. Effective community partnerships involve assessing needs of the stakeholders, anticipating leadership turnover, and adapting the Neighborhood Health Exchange model to different groups. Community outreach can also enhance internal medicine ambulatory training experience, provide residents with patient counseling opportunities, and offer a novel method to enhance resident understanding of systems-based practice, especially within the larger community in which their patients live.

  15. Frequency of false positive rapid HIV serologic tests in African men and women receiving PrEP for HIV prevention: implications for programmatic roll-out of biomedical interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Ndase

    Full Text Available Rapid HIV assays are the mainstay of HIV testing globally. Delivery of effective biomedical HIV prevention strategies such as antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP requires periodic HIV testing. Because rapid tests have high (>95% but imperfect specificity, they are expected to generate some false positive results.We assessed the frequency of true and false positive rapid results in the Partners PrEP Study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of PrEP. HIV testing was performed monthly using 2 rapid tests done in parallel with HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA confirmation following all positive rapid tests.A total of 99,009 monthly HIV tests were performed; 98,743 (99.7% were dual-rapid HIV negative. Of the 266 visits with ≥1 positive rapid result, 99 (37.2% had confirmatory positive EIA results (true positives, 155 (58.3% had negative EIA results (false positives, and 12 (4.5% had discordant EIA results. In the active PrEP arms, over two-thirds of visits with positive rapid test results were false positive results (69.2%, 110 of 159, although false positive results occurred at <1% (110/65,945 of total visits.When HIV prevalence or incidence is low due to effective HIV prevention interventions, rapid HIV tests result in a high number of false relative to true positive results, although the absolute number of false results will be low. Program roll-out for effective interventions should plan for quality assurance of HIV testing, mechanisms for confirmatory HIV testing, and counseling strategies for persons with positive rapid test results.

  16. Are All Competencies Equal in the Eyes of Residents? A Multicenter Study of Emergency Medicine Residents' Interest in Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Suzanne; Hu, Kevin; Messman, Anne; Moadel, Tiffany; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Streich, Heather; Noelker, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback, particularly real-time feedback, is critical to resident education. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones were developed in 2012 to enhance resident assessment, and many programs use them to provide focused resident feedback. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EM residents' level of interest in receiving real-time feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study of EM residents. We surveyed participants on their level of interest in receiving real-time on-shift feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Anonymous paper or computerized surveys were distributed to residents at three four-year training programs and three three-year training programs with a total of 223 resident respondents. Residents rated their level of interest in each milestone on a six-point Likert-type response scale. We calculated average level of interest for each of the 23 sub-competencies, for all 223 respondents and separately by postgraduate year (PGY) levels of training. One-way analyses of variance were performed to determine if there were differences in ratings by level of training. The overall survey response rate across all institutions was 82%. Emergency stabilization had the highest mean rating (5.47/6), while technology had the lowest rating (3.24/6). However, we observed no differences between levels of training on any of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Residents seem to ascribe much more value in receiving feedback on domains involving high-risk, challenging procedural skills as compared to low-risk technical and communication skills. Further studies are necessary to determine whether residents' perceived importance of competencies/sub-competencies needs to be considered when developing an assessment or feedback program based on these 23 EM competencies/sub-competencies.

  17. “I’ve never asked one question.” Understanding the barriers among orthopedic surgery residents to screening female patients for intimate partner violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Young, Aynsely; Rotstein, Ori D.; Schemitsch, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. Orthopedic surgery residents may identify IPV among injured patients treated in fracture clinics. Yet, these residents face a number of barriers to recognizing and discussing IPV with patients. We sought to explore orthopedic surgery residents’ knowledge of IPV and their preparedness to screen patients for IPV in academic fracture clinic settings with a view to developing targeted IPV education and training. Methods We conducted focus groups with junior and intermediate residents. Discussions explored residents’ knowledge of and experiences with IPV screening and preparedness for screening and responding to IPV among orthopedic patients. Data were analyzed iteratively using an inductive approach. Results Residents were aware of the issue of abuse generally, but had received no specific information or training on IPV in orthopedics. Residents did not see orthopedics faculty screen patients for IPV or advocate for screening. They did not view IPV screening or intervention as part of the orthopedic surgeon’s role. Residents’ clinical experiences emphasized time management and surgical intervention by effectively “getting through clinic” and “dealing with the surgical problem.” Communication with patients about other health issues was minimal or nonexistent. Conclusion Orthopedic surgery residents are entering a career path where IPV is well documented. They encounter cultural and structural barriers preventing the incorporation of IPV screening into their clinical and educational experiences. Hospitals and academic programs must collaborate in efforts to build capacity for sustainable IPV screening programs among these trainees. PMID:25421078

  18. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  19. Neurosurgical Resident Error: A Survey of U.S. Neurosurgery Residency Training Program Directors' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raghav; Moore, Justin M; Adeeb, Nimer; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Schneider, Anna M; Gandhi, Chirag D; Harsh, Griffith R; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Efforts to address resident errors and to enhance patient safety have included systemic reforms, such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME's) mandated duty-hour restrictions, and specialty-specific initiatives such as the neurosurgery Milestone Project. However, there is currently little data describing the basis for these errors or outlining trends in neurosurgical resident error. An online questionnaire was distributed to program directors of 108 U.S. neurosurgery residency training programs to assess the frequency, most common forms and causes of resident error, the resulting patient outcomes, and the steps taken by residency programs to address these errors. Thirty-one (28.7%) responses were received. Procedural/surgical error was the most commonly observed type of error. Transient injury and no injury to the patient were perceived to be the 2 most frequent outcomes. Inexperience or resident mistake despite adequate training were cited as the most common causes of error. Twenty-three (74.2%) respondents stated that a lower post graduate year level correlated with an increased incidence of errors. There was a trend toward an association between an increased number of residents within a program and the number of errors attributable to a lack of supervision (r = 0.36; P = 0.06). Most (93.5%) program directors do not believe that mandated duty-hour restrictions reduce error frequency. Program directors believe that procedural error is the most commonly observed form of error, with post graduate year level believed to be an important predictor of error frequency. The perceived utility of systemic reforms that aim to reduce the incidence of resident error remains unclear. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Benjamin H; Slovis, Benjamin H; Shah, Anar D; Fant, Abra L; Gisondi, Michael A; Shah, Kaushal H; Lech, Christie A

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe "Occasionally," "Seldom" or "Never" while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  1. Effectiveness of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined crime prevention strategies vis-a-vis perceived residents. feeling of safety in Osogbo Nigeria. The survey was conducted using systematic sampling. Four (4) crime prevention approaches were identified in the study area. Residents. perception of effectiveness of these safety strategies measured ...

  2. Medical education in pediatrics: attitude assessment in health promotion and preventive care Educação médica na residência de pediatria: avaliação de atitudes em promoção e prevenção de saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Aparecida Zardo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate attitudes in childcare and primary care in pediatrics, as well as aspects of training and medical education for residents in pediatrics consistent with the current medical paradigm. METHODS: the subjects were 133 residents of six pediatrics residency services in the city of Porto Alegre, RS. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed consisting of a questionnaire and an attitude measurement scale (Likert scale. Thirty propositions related to the issues of child care and primary care in pediatrics were simultaneously submitted to small groups of residents at their residency settings. RESULTS: women outnumbered men in a ratio of three to one in the residency programs. The majority aimed at a specialty in pediatrics, principally the ones involving high-tech procedures. Choices were influenced by prior training and by professors or tutors, although they stated they would like to work in prevention in the future. As for the scale, 87% had the right attitudes, both positive and negative, according to the Golden standard applied. CONCLUSIONS: the result obtained in this study related to attitude was very satisfactory but future professional choices are a concern to the medical educational system. The authors suggest that studies on attitude be further developed and improved to become a source of input for new strategies in the area of pediatrics education.OBJETIVOS: avaliar atitudes sobre puericultura e cuidados primários em pediatria, bem como aspectos de treinamento e educação médica em residentes de pediatria, em consonância com o paradigma médico atual. MÉTODOS: os sujeitos foram 133 residentes de seis serviços de residência em pediatria da cidade de Porto Alegre. É um estudo transversal, descritivo, no qual os residentes responderam a um questionário e uma escala de mensuração de atitudes (escala de Likert com 30 proposições acerca dos temas acima, aplicados simultaneamente, em pequenos grupos, nos

  3. Ultra-wideband receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  4. 30 CFR 57.13011 - Air receiver tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Boilers § 57.13011 Air receiver tanks. Air receiver tanks shall be equipped with one or more automatic pressure-relief valves. The total relieving capacity of the relief valves shall prevent pressure from exceeding the maximum allowable working pressure in a receiver tank by not more than 10 percent. Air...

  5. Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Diep K Hoang; Staples, J Erin; Sotir, Mark J; Warshauer, David M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2010-04-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a tickborne Flavivirus that causes a rare but potentially life-threatening illness. The first reported case of POWV infection in a Wisconsin resident occurred in 2003. Enhanced surveillance and testing detected 2 additional cases. Patient specimens with a positive or equivocal immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to an arbovirus were sent from commercial laboratories to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene and forwarded to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing. Patients with laboratory confirmed POWV infections were interviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, and epidemiologic information. POWV infections were confirmed in 3 adult Wisconsin residents in 2003, 2006, and 2007; illness onsets occurred during May and June. Two patients were hospitalized and all survived. One patient had a dual infection with POWV and Anaplasma phaghocytophilum. Specimens from all 3 patients were initially reported as positive for IgM antibody to either St Louis encephalitis or California serogroup viruses; POWV-specific antibody was detected during confirmatory testing at the CDC. Each patient had exposures to known or likely tick habitats in different counties within 30 days before illness onset. These are the first diagnosed human POWV infections in Wisconsin. Because all 3 patients were initially identified as having other arboviral infections using commercial screening kits, routine confirmatory testing is essential for proper diagnosis of most arboviral infections. Wisconsin residents should be educated regarding risks of acquiring and ways to prevent POWV infection and other tickborne diseases when spending time outdoors.

  6. A case-control, mono-center, open-label, pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of therapeutic touch in preventing radiation dermatitis in women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Jawaid; Lock, Michael; Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Malec, Jitka; D'Souza, David; Stitt, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a non-invasive commonly used complementary therapy. TT is based on the use of hand movements and detection of energy field congestion to correct imbalances. Improvement in subjective symptoms in a variety of clinical trials has been seen with TT. The effect of TT during radiotherapy for breast cancer is unknown. Women undergoing adjuvant radiation for Stage I/II breast cancer post conservative surgery were recruited for this cohort study. TT treatments were administered three times per week following radiation therapy. Feasibility was defined as an a priori threshold of 15 of 17 patients completing all TT treatments. The preventive effectiveness of TT was evaluated by documenting the 'time to develop' and the 'worst grade of radiation' dermatitis. Toxicity was assessed using NCIC CTC V3 dermatitis scale. Cosmetic rating was performed using the EORTC Breast Cosmetic Rating. The quality of life, mood and energy, and fatigue were assessed by EORTC QLQ C30, POMS, and BFI, respectively. The parameters were assessed at baseline, and serially during treatment. A total of 49 patients entered the study (17 in the TT Cohort and 32 in the Control Cohort). Median age in TT arm was 63 years and in control arm was 59 years. TT was considered feasible as all 17 patients screened completed TT treatment. There were no side effects observed with the TT treatments. In the TT Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade II in nine patients (53%). Median time to develop the worst grade was 22 days. In the Control Cohort, the worst grade of radiation dermatitis was grade III in 1 patient. However, the most common toxicity grade was II in 15 patients (47%). Three patients did not develop any dermatitis. Median time to develop the worst grade in the control group was 31 days. There was no difference between cohorts for the overall EORTC cosmetic score and there was no significant difference in before and after study levels in quality of life, mood

  7. [Association between sleep quality and life function among elderly community residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mika; Kusaga, Mari; Tagaya, Hirokuni; Miyoko, I; Oshima, Asami; Watanabe, Chiho

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the association between sleep quality and life function in an elderly Japanese population. A total of 563 residents of a village in Kumamoto Prefecture aged ≥65 years were asked to fill out a self-administered questionnaire survey from June to July 2010. Sleep quality and life function were respectively evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Basics Check List, which is used to screen elderly individuals at high risk of needing long-term care in the future. As adjustment factors, age, sex, economic situation, residency status, medical history, depression status, and cognitive function were assessed. We examined the relationship between sleep quality and life function using multiple logistic regression analysis, with life function as a dependent variable. Subjects already receiving care or with psychiatric disorders or severe cognitive disturbance were excluded from analysis. Among the subjects (n=395), a significant relationship was found between poor sleep quality and impaired life function in all models. The odds ratio was 1.82 (95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.23) in the final model controlling for all adjustment factors. Our findings here suggest a significant relationship between poor sleep quality and impaired life function among elderly community residents. Given these findings, intervention to improve sleep may help delay or prevent the need for long-term care among elderly individuals.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of high-dose versus standard-dose influenza vaccination on numbers of US nursing home residents admitted to hospital: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenstein, Stefan; Davidson, H Edward; Taljaard, Monica; Ogarek, Jessica; Gozalo, Pedro; Han, Lisa; Mor, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    Immune responses to influenza vaccines decline with age, reducing clinical effectiveness. We compared the effect of the more immunogenic high-dose trivalent influenza vaccine with a standard-dose vaccine to identify the effect on reducing hospital admissions of nursing home residents in the USA. We did a single-blind, pragmatic, comparative effectiveness, cluster-randomised trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Medicare-certified nursing homes in the USA located within 50 miles of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention influenza reporting city were recruited, so long as the facilities were not located in a hospital, had more than 50 long-stay residents, had less than 20% of the population aged under 65 years, and were not already planning to administer the high-dose influenza vaccine to residents. Enrolled nursing homes were randomised to a facility-wide standard of care for the residents of either high dose or standard dose as the vaccine for the 2013-14 influenza season and half of each group were randomly allocated to free vaccines for staff. Individual residents were included in the analysis group if they were aged 65 years or older and were long-stay residents (ie, had been in the facility 90 days or more before commencing the influenza vaccination programme). The analysts and investigators with access to the raw data were masked to study group by coding the groups until after the analyses were complete. The primary outcome was hospital admissions related to pulmonary and influenza-like illness between Nov 1, 2013, and May 31, 2014, identified from Medicare hospital claims available for residents who were without private health insurance (ie, those who were considered Medicare fee-for-service). We obtained data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and enrolled facilities. The analyses used marginal Poisson and Cox proportional hazards regression, accounting for clustering of residents within homes, on an intention-to-treat basis

  9. Factors associated with receiving Pap tests among married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Miao-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors associated with Pap testing among married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin residing in Taiwan, including demographics, knowledge of cervical cancer, knowledge of Pap tests, fatalism, attitudes toward cervical cancer, and barriers to receiving Pap tests. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. Data were collected from July 2012 to January 2013. Participants were recruited through snowball sampling in two communities in Southern Taiwan. A total of 451 married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin aged 30 years and over were invited to participate in the study and 427 participated. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Participants with no children were significantly less likely to have received a Pap test (odds ratio = 0.278, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.135-0.569); each additional point of knowledge about Pap tests increased the likelihood of having a Pap test by 19% (odds ratio = 1.190, 95% CI = 1.093-1.297), and each additional point in barriers to receiving Pap tests decreased the chances of having received a Pap test (odds ratio = 0.714, 95% CI = 0.637-0.800). The results can provide governments with a reference for developing policies for cervical cancer prevention among married immigrant Vietnamese women.

  10. Exposure to and Attitudes Regarding Transgender Education Among Urology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Geolani W; Osbun, Nathan C; Morrison, Shane D; Grant, David W; Merguerian, Paul A

    2016-10-01

    Transgender individuals are underserved within the health care system but might increasingly seek urologic care as insurers expand coverage for medical and surgical gender transition. To evaluate urology residents' exposure to transgender patient care and their perceived importance of transgender surgical education. Urology residents from a representative sample of U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional survey from January through March 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic vs clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. In total, 289 urology residents completed the survey (72% response rate). Fifty-four percent of residents reported exposure to transgender patient care, with more residents from Western (74%) and North Central (72%) sections reporting exposure (P ≤ .01). Exposure occurred more frequently through direct patient interaction rather than through didactic education (psychiatric, 23% vs 7%, P importance on gender-confirming surgical training than did their male colleagues (91% vs 70%, P important. Most residents (77%) stated transgender-related surgical training should be offered in fellowships. Urology resident exposure to transgender patient care is regionally dependent. Perceived importance of gender-confirming surgical training varies by sex and geography. A gap exists between the direct transgender patient care urology residencies provide and the didactic transgender education they receive. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resident physicians as human information systems: sources yet seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellen J; DeVoge, Justin Michael; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda A; Borowitz, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    To characterize question types that residents received on overnight shifts and what information sources were used to answer them. Across 30 overnight shifts, questions asked of on-call senior residents, question askers' roles, and residents' responses were documented. External sources were noted. 158 of 397 questions (39.8%) related to the plan of care, 53 (13.4%) to medical knowledge, 48 (12.1%) to taskwork knowledge, and 44 (11.1%) to the current condition of patients. For 351 (88.4%) questions residents provided specific, direct answers or visited the patient. For 16 of these, residents modeled or completed the task. For 216 questions, residents used previous knowledge or their own clinical judgment. Residents solicited external information sources for 118 questions and only a single source for 77 (65.3%) of them. For the 118, most questions concerned either the plan of care or the patient's current condition and were asked by interns and nurses (those with direct patient care responsibilities). Resident physicians serve as an information system and they often specifically answer the question using previous knowledge or their own clinical judgment, suggesting that askers are contacting an appropriately knowledgeable person. However, they do need to access patient information such as the plan of care. They also serve an educator role and answer many knowledge-related questions. As synchronous verbal communications continue to be important pathways for information flow, informaticians need to consider the relationship between such communications and workflow in the development of healthcare support tools.

  12. Survey of emergency medicine resident debt status and financial planning preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaspy, Jeffrey N; Ma, O John; Steele, Mark T; Hall, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Most resident physicians accrue significant financial debt throughout their medical and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to analyze emergency medicine resident debt status, financial planning actions, and educational experiences for financial planning and debt management. A 22-item questionnaire was sent to all 123 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited emergency medicine residency programs in July 2001. Two follow-up mailings were made to increase the response rate. The survey addressed four areas of resident debt and financial planning: 1) accrued debt, 2) moonlighting activity, 3) financial planning/debt management education, and 4) financial planning actions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey responses were obtained from 67.4% (1,707/2,532) of emergency medicine residents in 89 of 123 (72.4%) residency programs. Nearly one half (768/1,707) of respondents have accrued more than 100,000 dollars of debt. Fifty-eight percent (990/1,707) of all residents reported that moonlighting would be necessary to meet their financial needs, and more than 33% (640/1,707) presently moonlight to supplement their income. Nearly one half (832/1,707) of residents actively invested money, of which online trading was the most common method (23.3%). Most residents reported that they received no debt management education during residency (82.1%) or medical school (63.7%). Furthermore, 79.1% (1,351/1,707) of residents reported that they received no financial planning lectures during residency, although 84.2% (1,438/1,707) reported that debt management and financial planning education should be available during residency. Most emergency medicine residency programs do not provide their residents with financial planning education. Most residents have accrued significant debt and believe that more financial planning and debt management education is needed during residency.

  13. Assessing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among otolaryngology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Grundfast, Kenneth M; Levi, Jessica R

    Previous studies have suggested that musculoskeletal symptoms are common among practicing otolaryngologists. Early training can be the ideal time to foster knowledge of ergonomics and develop safe work habits, however, little data exists regarding musculoskeletal symptoms in residents. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize musculoskeletal symptoms in a preliminary sample of otolaryngology residents. A cross-sectional survey incorporating the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was sent to 30 Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residencies to examine musculoskeletal symptoms among residents. A two-sample test of proportions was performed to compare symptoms between male and female residents. In total, 141 respondents (response rate=34.7%) completed the survey. Fifty-five percent of survey respondents were male and 45% were female. Musculoskeletal symptoms were most frequently reported in the neck (82.3%), followed by the lower back (56%), upper back (40.4%), and shoulders (40.4%). The most common symptoms were stiffness in the neck (71.6%), pain in the neck (61.7%), and pain in the lower back (48.2%). In total, 6.4% of residents missed work and 16.3% of residents stopped during an operation at some point due to their symptoms. Most residents (88.3%) believed their musculoskeletal symptoms were attributed to their surgical training. Female residents were significantly more likely to experience neck (p<0.0001) and wrist/hand (p=0.019) discomfort compared to male residents. Musculoskeletal symptoms were common among residents, approaching rates similar to those previously identified in practicing otolaryngologists. Increased emphasis on surgical ergonomics is warranted to improve workplace safety and prevent future injury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Children's Experiences of Support Received from Men in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nomination of a father-figure by all children, even if the man was not their biological father, ascertained that all children receive some support from men. Our data highlight the influence of biological ties, co-residence, family social network, and marriage or father-mother relationship on fathers' involvement with their ...

  15. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  16. Money matters: a resident curriculum for financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Jason S; Berry, Katherine S; Kimbrough, Mary Katherine; Bentley, Frederick R; Clardy, James A; Turnage, Richard H

    2014-12-01

    A 2005 survey reported 87% of surgery program directors believed practice management training should occur during residency. However, only 8% of program directors believed residents received adequate training in practice management [1]. In addition to the gap in practice financial management knowledge, we recognized the need for training in personal finance among residents. A literature review and needs assessment led to the development of a novel curriculum for surgery residents combining principles of practice management and personal finance. An 18-h curriculum was administered over the 2012 academic year to 28 post graduate year 1-5 surgery residents and faculty. A self-assessment survey was given at the onset and conclusion of the curriculum [2]. Pre-tests and post-tests were given to objectively evaluate each twice monthly session's content. Self-perception of learning, interest, and acquired knowledge were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Initial self-assessment data revealed high interest in practice management and personal finance principles but a deficiency in knowledge of and exposure to these topics. Throughout the curriculum, interest increased. Residents believed their knowledge of these topics increased after completing the curriculum, and objective data revealed various impacts on knowledge. Although surgery residents receive less exposure to these topics than residents in other specialties, their need to know is no less. We developed, implemented, and evaluated a curriculum that bridged this gap in surgery education. After the curriculum, residents reported an increase in interest, knowledge, and responsible behavior relating to personal and practice financial management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A psychopharmacology course for psychiatry residents utilizing active-learning and residents-as-teachers to develop life-long learning skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyk, Andrew J; White, Crystal D; Kinghorn, Warren A; Thrall, Grace C

    2013-09-01

    The authors describe the implementation and evaluation of a 1-year psychopharmacology course using residents-as-teachers and active-learning exercises intended to improve understanding of current psychopharmacology and its evidence base, and skills for life-long learning. Weekly classes were devoted to psychotropic medications, treating specific disorders, and use of psychotropics in special patient populations. Each class was divided into three sections: a pharmacology review, a literature review and a faculty-led discussion of clinical questions. Each class included residents as teachers, an audience response system and questions for self-assessment. Resident and faculty presenters evaluated the course weekly and all residents were given a year-end evaluation Resident and faculty evaluations indicated an overall positive response. The residents reported improved perception of knowledge and engagement with this interactive format. The course was well received, demonstrating the viability and value of residents taking a more active role in their own learning.

  18. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  19. The electronic residency application service application can predict accreditation council for graduate medical education competency-based surgical resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, Amy M; Kaji, Amy H; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; de Virgilio, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Program directors often struggle to determine which factors in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application are important in the residency selection process. With the establishment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, it would be important to know whether information available in the ERAS application can predict subsequent competency-based performance of general surgery residents. This study is a retrospective correlation of data points found in the ERAS application with core competency-based clinical rotation evaluations. ACGME competency-based evaluations as well as technical skills assessment from all rotations during residency were collected. The overall competency score was defined as an average of all 6 competencies and technical skills. A total of77 residents from two (one university and one community based university-affiliate) general surgery residency programs were included in the analysis. Receiving honors for many of the third year clerkships and AOA membership were associated with a number of the individual competencies. USMLE scores were predictive only of Medical Knowledge (p = 0.004). Factors associated with higher overall competency were female gender (p = 0.02), AOA (p = 0.06), overall number of honors received (p = 0.04), and honors in Ob/Gyn (p = 0.03) and Pediatrics (p = 0.05). Multivariable analysis showed honors in Ob/Gyn, female gender, older age, and total number of honors to be predictive of a number of individual core competencies. USMLE scores were only predictive of Medical Knowledge. The ERAS application is useful for predicting subsequent competency based performance in surgical residents. Receiving honors in the surgery clerkship, which has traditionally carried weight when evaluating a potential surgery resident, may not be as strong a predictor of future success. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  1. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  2. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  3. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  4. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  5. Smoking cessation counseling by surgical and nonsurgical residents: opportunities for health promotion education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon R; Lai, Hollis; Bédard, Eric L R

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in North America and a major contributor to surgically treated diseases and operative complications. Counseling by residents can be an effective means of helping patients to quit smoking, and with the introduction of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and CanMEDS competency frameworks, health promotion is a required component of residency training. However, past studies have found that smoking cessation counseling by residents, and in particular surgical residents, is lacking. In light of the introduction of health promotion as a core competency in residency training, this study was designed to examine the attitudes and practices of residents at our institution regarding smoking cessation counseling, comparing surgical and nonsurgical residents and seeking to identify barriers to resident counseling. An internet-based questionnaire was distributed to all residents at the University of Alberta in the fall of 2012. Items examined residents׳ attitudes and practices related to smoking cessation counseling and barriers to counseling. Although almost all residents believed that smoking cessation was important and that counseling was part of their job as a resident, far fewer routinely practiced the counseling behaviors examined. Surgical residents were less likely to perform counseling and more likely to think that counseling was not part of their job. Surgical residents were also more likely to identify obstacles to counseling such as a lack of time and formal training. Residents, and surgical residents in particular, are missing opportunities to help their patients quit smoking and improve their health. Given their positive attitudes toward counseling, it may be possible to improve their counseling practices through simple means. By identifying obstacles to counseling and tools that may increase residents׳ tendency to perform counseling, this study can help to guide training programs

  6. Menopause education: needs assessment of American obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Ducie, Jennifer A; Altman, Kristiina; Khafagy, Ayatallah M; Shen, Wen

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to understand the current teaching of menopause medicine in American obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A Web-based survey was e-mailed to all American obstetrics and gynecology residency directors, with a request that they forward it to their residents. Of 258 residency program directors contacted, 79 (30.6%) confirmed forwarding the survey. In all, 1,799 people received the survey, with 510 completions, for a response rate of 28.3%. Most residents reported that they had limited knowledge and needed to learn more about these aspects of menopause medicine: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (67.1%), hormone therapy (68.1%), nonhormone therapy (79.0%), bone health (66.1%), cardiovascular disease (71.7%), and metabolic syndrome (69.5%). Among fourth-year residents who will be entering clinical practice soon, a large proportion also reported a need to learn more in these areas: pathophysiology of menopause symptoms (45.9%), hormone therapy (54.2%), nonhormone therapy (69.4%), bone health (54.2%), cardiovascular disease (64.3%), and metabolic syndrome (63.8%). When asked to rate the most preferred modalities for learning about menopause, the top choice was supervised clinics (53.2%), followed by case presentations (22.2%), formal lectures (21.3%), small groups (14.7%), Web-based learning (7.8%), and independent reading (5.2%). Only 20.8% of residents reported that their program had a formal menopause medicine learning curriculum, and 16.3% had a defined menopause clinic as part of their residency. It seems that some American residency programs do not fulfill the educational goals of their residents in menopause medicine. A curriculum would be beneficial for increasing knowledge and clinical experience on menopause issues.

  7. Exit Survey of Senior Residents: Cost Conscious but Uninformed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Theodore; Silvestri, Mark T; Dashevsky, Meir; Halim, Andrea; Fogerty, Robert L

    2016-05-01

    Background Cost awareness, to ensure physician stewardship of limited resources, is increasingly recognized as an important skill for physicians. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has made cost awareness part of systems-based practice, a core competency of resident education. However, little is known about resident cost awareness. Objective We sought to assess senior resident self-perceived cost awareness and cost knowledge. Methods In March 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of all emergency medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery pediatrics, and medicine-pediatrics residents in their final year at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The survey examined attitudes toward health care costs and residents' estimates of order prices. We considered resident price estimates to be accurate if they were between 50% and 200% of the Connecticut-specific Medicare price. Results We sent the survey to 84 residents and received 47 completed surveys (56% response rate). Although more than 95% (45 of 47) felt that containing costs is the responsibility of every clinician, and 49% (23 of 47) agreed that cost influenced their decision when ordering, only 4% (2 of 47) agreed that they knew the cost of tests being ordered. No residents accurately estimated the price of a complete blood count with differential, and only 2.1% (1 of 47) were accurate for a basic metabolic panel. The overall accuracy of all resident responses was 25%. Conclusions In our study, many trainees exit residency with self-identified deficiencies in knowledge about costs. The findings show the need for educational approaches to improve cost awareness among trainees.

  8. Results of a Multisite Survey of U.S. Psychiatry Residents on Education in Professionalism and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shaili; Dunn, Laura B.; Warner, Christopher H.; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors assess the perspectives of psychiatry residents about the goals of receiving education in professionalism and ethics, how topics should be taught, and on what ethical principles the curriculum should be based. Method: A written survey was sent to psychiatry residents (N = 249) at seven U.S. residency programs in Spring 2005.…

  9. Simulation-based education with mastery learning improves residents' lumbar puncture skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elaine R.; Caprio, Timothy; McGaghie, William C.; Simuni, Tanya; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) on internal medicine residents' lumbar puncture (LP) skills, assess neurology residents' acquired LP skills from traditional clinical education, and compare the results of SBML to traditional clinical education. Methods: This study was a pretest-posttest design with a comparison group. Fifty-eight postgraduate year (PGY) 1 internal medicine residents received an SBML intervention in LP. Residents completed a baseline skill assessment (pretest) using a 21-item LP checklist. After a 3-hour session featuring deliberate practice and feedback, residents completed a posttest and were expected to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) set by an expert panel. Simulator-trained residents' pretest and posttest scores were compared to assess the impact of the intervention. Thirty-six PGY2, 3, and 4 neurology residents from 3 medical centers completed the same simulated LP assessment without SBML. SBML posttest scores were compared to neurology residents' baseline scores. Results: PGY1 internal medicine residents improved from a mean of 46.3% to 95.7% after SBML (p < 0.001) and all met the MPS at final posttest. The performance of traditionally trained neurology residents was significantly lower than simulator-trained residents (mean 65.4%, p < 0.001) and only 6% met the MPS. Conclusions: Residents who completed SBML showed significant improvement in LP procedural skills. Few neurology residents were competent to perform a simulated LP despite clinical experience with the procedure. PMID:22675080

  10. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  11. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  12. [Experiences of bullying in medical residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-León, Silvia; Jaimes-Medrano, Aurora Leonila; Tafoya-Ramos, Silvia Aracely; Mujica-Amaya, María Luisa; Olmedo-Canchola, Víctor Hugo; Carrasco-Rojas, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Harassment and abuse are forms of persistent intimidating behavior against a person and in medical practice those are accepted and justified at all levels of education and are considered specific to the hospital culture. To identify the frequency of harassment and some factors related to its existence on residents of medical specialties in Mexico City. A linear study was carried out in which a total of 260 interns pertaining to the following medical specialties: surgery, internal medicine, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics participated. The study took place in three general hospitals in Mexico City. Two evaluations with Leymann Inventory of Psychological-Terrorization (LIPT-60) with 6 months between assessments were performed. Comparison between the first and second evaluations did not show differences in any of the harassment measurements obtained. Of all residents, 265 (98.5%) claimed to have experienced some type of harassing behavior against them at least once during the previous 6 months, with a 1.4 (±0.5) average intensity, showing no difference between men and women. Women received a higher grade than men on the communication block scale. Harassing behaviors that obtained the highest average values were evident intimidation and occupational discredit. Among all harassment measurements, the specialty of gynecology and obstetrics showed the highest grade. The hospital influenced the reported harassment. The most common harassing behaviors were occupational discredit, verbal threats, shouting, and mockery. The high frequency of harassment that medical residents experience during their hospital training deserves our attention.

  13. Residency Training at the Front of the West African Ebola Outbreak: Adapting for a Rare Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yin; Archuleta, Sophia; Salmon, Sharon; Fisher, Dale

    2016-02-02

    Medical trainees face multiple barriers to participation in major outbreak responses such as that required for Ebola Virus Disease through 2014-2015 in West Africa. Hurdles include fear of contracting and importing the disease, residency requirements, scheduling conflicts, family obligations and lack of experience and maturity. We describe the successful four-week deployment to Liberia of a first year infectious diseases trainee through the mechanism of the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network of the World Health Organization. The posting received prospective approval from the residency supervisory committees and employing hospital management and was designed with components fulfilling the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. It mirrored conventional training with regards to learning objectives, supervisory framework and assessment methods. Together with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and many other partners, the team joined the infection prevention and control efforts in Monrovia. Contributions were made to a 'ring fencing' infection control approach that was being introduced, including enhancement of triage, training and providing supplies in high priority health-care facilities in the capital and border zones. In addition the fellow produced an electronic database that enabled monitoring infection control standards in health facilities. This successful elective posting illustrates that quality training can be achieved, even in the most challenging environments, with support from the pedagogic and sponsoring institutions. Such experiential learning opportunities benefit both the outbreak response and the trainee, and if scaled up would contribute towards building a global health emergency workforce. More should be done from residency accreditation bodies in facilitating postings in outbreak settings.

  14. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Experiential Leadership Training for Pediatric Chief Residents: Impact on Individuals and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Robert A.; Williams, Patricia D.; Brigham, Timothy P.; Seashore, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen a proliferation of leadership training programs for physicians that teach skills outside the graduate medical education curriculum. Objective To determine the perceived value and impact of an experiential leadership training program for pediatric chief residents on the chief residents and on their programs and institutions. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective study. Surveys were sent to chief residents who completed the Chief Resident Training Program (CRTP) between 1988 and 2003 and to their program directors and department chairs asking about the value of the program, its impact on leadership capabilities, as well as the effect of chief resident training on programs and institutions. Results Ninety-four percent of the chief residents and 94% of program directors and department chairs reported that the CRTP was “very” or “somewhat” relevant, and 92% of the chief residents indicated CRTP had a positive impact on their year as chief resident; and 75% responded it had a positive impact beyond residency. Areas of greatest positive impact included awareness of personality characteristics, ability to manage conflict, giving and receiving feedback, and relationships with others. Fifty-six percent of chief residents reported having held a formal leadership position since chief residency, yet only 28% reported having received additional leadership training. Conclusion The study demonstrates a perceived positive impact on CRTP participants and their programs and institutions in the short and long term. PMID:21975638

  16. Global health training in US obstetrics and gynaecology residency programmes: perspectives of students, residents and programme directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lisa M; Banks, Erika H; Conroy, Erin M; McGinn, Aileen P; Ghartey, Jeny P; Wagner, Sarah A; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2015-12-01

    Benefits of exposure to global health training during medical education are well documented and residents' demand for this training is increasing. Despite this, it is offered by few US obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) residency training programmes. To evaluate interest, perceived importance, predictors of global health interest and barriers to offering global health training among prospective OBGYN residents, current OBGYN residents and US OGBYN residency directors. We designed two questionnaires using Likert scale questions to assess perceived importance of global health training. The first was distributed to current and prospective OBGYN residents interviewing at a US residency programme during 2012-2013. The second questionnaire distributed to US OBGYN programme directors assessed for existing global health programmes and global health training barriers. A composite Global Health Interest/Importance score was tabulated from the Likert scores. Multivariable linear regression was performed to assess for predictors of Global Health Interest/Importance. A total of 159 trainees (77%; 129 prospective OBGYN residents and 30 residents) and 69 (28%) programme directors completed the questionnaires. Median Global Health Interest/Importance score was 7 (IQR 4-9). Prior volunteer experience was predictive of a 5-point increase in Global Health Interest/Importance score (95% CI -0.19 to 9.85; p=0.02). The most commonly cited barriers were cost and time. Interest and perceived importance of global health training in US OBGYN residency programmes is evident among trainees and programme directors; however, significant financial and time barriers prevent many programmes from offering opportunities to their trainees. Prior volunteer experience predicts global health interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Career goals and expectations of men and women pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C M; Oliver, E J; Jeffrey, L P

    1982-11-01

    Personal and professional characteristics of men and women hospital pharmacy residents were studied to identify differences that could affect future hospital pharmacy practice. Residents in 111 ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs received a survey containing questions on demographic information, reasons for selecting a residency, areas of professional interest, postresidency career goals, responsibilities to home and family, and advantages and disadvantages associated with gender. Of 286 residents receiving questionnaires, 226 responded; the percentages of men and women responding corresponded to the ratio of men and women in hospital pharmacy residencies. While men and women expressed educational goals that were not significantly different, more men than women had earned or were in the process of earning advanced degrees. No significant differences were evident between men's and women's plans for marriage and children, but 73% of the women indicated that they would take time out from their practice to raise children, compared with only 9% of the men. The majority of residents did not think their gender affected them in their residency programs, but in professional interactions more men saw gender as an advantage and more women as a disadvantage. Significantly more than women aspired to be hospital pharmacy directors. The results suggest that men are obtaining advanced training closer to the time they graduate from pharmacy school and that in the future women competing for promotions may be older than men competing for comparable positions. Those planning pharmacy staffing should consider the needs of women, and men, who expect to take time out from their careers for family responsibilities and possibly seek part-time positions when they return to the work force.

  18. Resident Assistant Mattering: Do Placement and Community Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, James C.; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    A sense of mattering among college students has been found to have positive outcomes, including lower levels of anxiety and depression as well as increased self-esteem, wellness, happiness, and job satisfaction. However, the feeling of mattering among Resident Assistants (RAs) has received little attention in literature. This quantitative study…

  19. GNSS Software Receiver for UAVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Daniel Madelung; Jakobsen, Jakob; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current activities of GPS/GNSS Software receiver development at DTU Space. GNSS Software receivers have received a great deal of attention in the last two decades and numerous implementations have already been presented. DTU Space has just recently started development of ...... of our own GNSS software-receiver targeted for mini UAV applications, and we will in in this paper present our current progress and briefly discuss the benefits of Software Receivers in relation to our research interests.......This paper describes the current activities of GPS/GNSS Software receiver development at DTU Space. GNSS Software receivers have received a great deal of attention in the last two decades and numerous implementations have already been presented. DTU Space has just recently started development...

  20. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  1. Firearm Anticipatory Guidance Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy J.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Price, Joy A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Most suicides (60%) are committed with firearms, and most (80%) of individuals attempting suicide meet diagnostic criteria for mental illness. This study assessed the prevalence of firearm injury prevention training in psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A three-wave mail survey was sent to the directors of 179 psychiatric…

  2. Depression and cognitive impairment among newly admitted nursing home residents in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Christine M; Rothschild, Anthony J; Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Lapane, Kate L

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment among newly admitted nursing home residents in the USA and to describe the treatment of depression by level of cognitive impairment. We identified 1,088,619 newly admitted older residents between 2011 and 2013 with an active diagnosis of depression documented on the Minimum Data Set 3.0. The prevalence of receiving psychiatric treatment was estimated by cognitive impairment status and depression symptoms. Binary logistic regression using generalized estimating equations provided adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between level of cognitive impairment and receipt of psychiatric treatment, adjusted for clustering of residents within nursing homes and resident characteristics. Twenty-six percent of newly admitted residents had depression; 47% of these residents also had cognitive impairment. Of those who had staff assessments of depression, anhedonia, impaired concentration, psychomotor disturbances, and irritability were more commonly experienced by residents with cognitive impairment than residents without cognitive impairment. Forty-eight percent of all residents with depression did not receive any psychiatric treatment. Approximately one-fifth of residents received a combination of treatment. Residents with severe cognitive impairment were less likely than those with intact cognition to receive psychiatric treatment (adjusted odds ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.98). Many newly admitted residents with an active diagnosis of depression are untreated, potentially missing an important window to improve symptoms. The extent of comorbid cognitive impairment and depression and lack of treatment suggest opportunities for improved quality of care in this increasingly important healthcare setting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  4. Opportunities for Prevention: Assessing Where Low-Income Patients Seek Care for Preventable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar A; Valdmanis, Vivian G; Bernet, Patrick; Moises, James

    2015-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has many aspects that are aimed at improving health care for all Americans, including mandated insurance coverage for individuals, as well as required community health needs assessments (CHNAs), and reporting of investments in community benefit by nonprofit hospitals in order to maintain tax exemptions. Although millions of Americans have gained access to health insurance, many--often the most vulnerable--remain uninsured, and will continue to depend on hospital community benefits for care. Understanding where patients go for care can assist hospitals and communities to develop their CHNA and implementation plans in order to focus resources where the need for prevention is greatest. This study evaluated patient care-seeking behavior among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in Florida in 2008--analyzed in 2013--to assess whether low-income patients accessed specific safety net hospitals for treatment or received care from hospitals that were geographically closer to their residence. This study found evidence that low-income patients went to hospitals that treated more low-income patients, regardless of where they lived. The findings demonstrate that hospitals-especially public safety net hospitals with a tradition of treating low-income patients suffering from CAD-should focus prevention activities where low-income patients reside.

  5. The use of error analysis to assess resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Law, Katherine E; Cohen, Elaine R; Greenberg, Jacob A; Kwan, Calvin; Greenberg, Caprice; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Pugh, Carla M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess validity of a human factors error assessment method for evaluating resident performance during a simulated operative procedure. Seven postgraduate year 4-5 residents had 30 minutes to complete a simulated laparoscopic ventral hernia (LVH) repair on day 1 of a national, advanced laparoscopic course. Faculty provided immediate feedback on operative errors and residents participated in a final product analysis of their repairs. Residents then received didactic and hands-on training regarding several advanced laparoscopic procedures during a lecture session and animate lab. On day 2, residents performed a nonequivalent LVH repair using a simulator. Three investigators reviewed and coded videos of the repairs using previously developed human error classification systems. Residents committed 121 total errors on day 1 compared with 146 on day 2. One of 7 residents successfully completed the LVH repair on day 1 compared with all 7 residents on day 2 (P = .001). The majority of errors (85%) committed on day 2 were technical and occurred during the last 2 steps of the procedure. There were significant differences in error type (P ≤ .001) and level (P = .019) from day 1 to day 2. The proportion of omission errors decreased from day 1 (33%) to day 2 (14%). In addition, there were more technical and commission errors on day 2. The error assessment tool was successful in categorizing performance errors, supporting known-groups validity evidence. Evaluating resident performance through error classification has great potential in facilitating our understanding of operative readiness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Schnapp

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results: A majority of residents (66%, 78/119 reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119 experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119 had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119 reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion: Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  7. [Pediatric palliative care: a national survey of French pediatric residents' knowledge, education, and clinical experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeubvre, C; Viallard, M-L; Schell, M

    2014-08-01

    The need for educational training of healthcare professionals in palliative care is an important issue. Training and practice of pediatric residents in the field of pediatric palliative care (PPC) has never been assessed, although the organization of the medical curriculum in France is currently being revised. This study presents a national survey of pediatric residents, using a computerized anonymous questionnaire. Four different areas were studied: epidemiological data, theoretical and practical knowledge, education, and clinical experience in PPC. The response rate was 39% (n=365/927). Whatever their age or regional location, 25% of residents did not know any details of the French law concerning patients' rights and the end of life. Experience with PPC starts very early since 77% of the first-year pediatric residents experienced at least one child in a palliative care and/or end-of-life situation. During their entire residency, 87% of the residents had experience with PPC and nearly all (96%) end-of-life care. Furthermore, 76% had participated in announcing palliative care (cancer, ICU, etc.) or a serious illness, and 45% had met and discussed with bereaved parents. Furthermore, while 97% of the pediatric residents received training in adult palliative care, mainly before their residency, only 60% received specific PPC training. Ninety-six percent of all French pediatric residents encountered a PPC situation during their residency. That 77% of them had experienced PPC during their first year of residency shows the importance of early training in PPC for pediatric residents. Furthermore, this study points out that there is a significant lack in PPC training since 40% of all residents in the study received no specific PPC training. Progress in education remains insufficient in the dissemination of knowledge on the legal framework and concepts of palliative medicine: while the medical curriculum is being revised, we suggest that training in medical ethics and PPC

  8. 30 CFR 56.13011 - Air receiver tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13011 Air receiver tanks. Air receiver tanks shall be equipped with one or more automatic pressure-relief valves. The total relieving capacity of the relief valves shall prevent pressure from exceeding...

  9. Dish/stirling hybrid-receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehos, Mark S.; Anselmo, Kenneth M.; Moreno, James B.; Andraka, Charles E.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Corey, John; Bohn, Mark S.

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid high-temperature solar receiver is provided which comprises a solar heat-pipe-receiver including a front dome having a solar absorber surface for receiving concentrated solar energy, a heat pipe wick, a rear dome, a sidewall joining the front and the rear dome, and a vapor and a return liquid tube connecting to an engine, and a fossil fuel fired combustion system in radial integration with the sidewall for simultaneous operation with the solar heat pipe receiver, the combustion system comprising an air and fuel pre-mixer, an outer cooling jacket for tangentially introducing and cooling the mixture, a recuperator for preheating the mixture, a burner plenum having an inner and an outer wall, a porous cylindrical metal matrix burner firing radially inward facing a sodium vapor sink, the mixture ignited downstream of the matrix forming combustion products, an exhaust plenum, a fossil-fuel heat-input surface having an outer surface covered with a pin-fin array, the combustion products flowing through the array to give up additional heat to the receiver, and an inner surface covered with an extension of the heat-pipe wick, a pin-fin shroud sealed to the burner and exhaust plenums, an end seal, a flue-gas diversion tube and a flue-gas valve for use at off-design conditions to limit the temperature of the pre-heated air and fuel mixture, preventing pre-ignition.

  10. Understanding the exercise habits of residents and attending physicians: a mixed methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy S; Williams, Casey D; Cronk, Nikole J; Kruse, Robin L; Ringdahl, Erika N; Koopman, Richelle J

    2015-02-01

    Although the benefits of exercise are well known, rates of exercise among residents are much lower than those of attendings or medical students. Little is known about the barriers that prevent residents from exercising regularly. This mixed methodology study identifies and compares these barriers for resident and attending physicians practicing in the same setting. We conducted three focus groups with first-year and senior residents and attending physicians in the University of Missouri Department of Family and Community Medicine from April to August 2013. We also administered a survey inquiring about exercise rates and habits to 110 resident and attending physicians in the same department using both paper and electronic versions. During both inpatient and non-inpatient rotations, residents reported exercising less than attending physicians. No residents exercised more than 150 minutes/week during inpatient rotations compared to 18.42% of attendings. Only 6.9% of residents exercised more than 150 minutes/week during non-inpatient rotations, compared to 25% of attendings. Residents and attendings reported different barriers to regular exercise. Residents reported lack of time for a traditional structured workout as a major barrier, which leads to an adversarial relationship between work and exercise. Residency programs can help residents overcome exercise barriers by reframing exercise expectations to include more frequent but brief periods of exercise during the workday and by developing a supportive exercise culture. Changing worksite environments to support physician exercise may improve physician wellness.

  11. Factors Influencing Intention to Receive Examination of Diabetes Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Lin Hsieh, RN

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Nurses should shoulder the responsibility to increase patients' intention to receive examination of diabetes complications. The results of this study can be used to promote nurses' care efficacy in preventing diabetes complications. They can also provide medical institutions with information to establish prevention and control policies for diabetes complications.

  12. A randomized phase III study evaluating the efficacy of single-dose NEPA, a fixed antiemetic combination of netupitant and palonosetron, versus an aprepitant regimen for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Lu, S; Feng, J; Dechaphunkul, A; Chang, J; Wang, D; Chessari, S; Lanzarotti, C; Jordan, K; Aapro, M

    2018-02-01

    Co-administration of multiple antiemetics that inhibit several molecular pathways involved in emesis is required to optimize chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) control in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). NEPA, a fixed combination of a highly selective NK1 receptor antagonist, netupitant (300 mg), and the pharmacologically distinct 5-HT3RA, palonosetron (PALO 0.50 mg), has shown superior CINV prevention compared with PALO in cisplatin and anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-based settings. This study is the first head-to-head comparison of NEPA versus an aprepitant (APR)/granisetron (GRAN) regimen. This randomized, double-blind phase III study conducted in Asia was designed with the primary objective to demonstrate non-inferiority of a single oral dose of NEPA compared with a 3-day oral APR/GRAN regimen in chemotherapy-naïve patients receiving cisplatin-based HEC. All patients also received oral dexamethasone (DEX) on days 1-4. The primary efficacy endpoint was complete response (CR: no emesis/no rescue medication) during the overall (0-120 h) phase. Non-inferiority was defined as a lower 95% CI greater than the non-inferiority margin set at - 10%. Secondary efficacy endpoints included no emesis, no rescue medication, and no significant nausea (NSN). Treatment groups were comparable for the 828 patients analyzed: predominantly male (71%); mean age 54.5 years; ECOG 0-1 (98%); lung cancer (58%). NEPA demonstrated non-inferiority to APR/GRAN for overall CR [NEPA 73.8% versus APR/GRAN 72.4%, 95% CI (-4.5%, 7.5%)]. No emesis [NEPA 75.0% versus APR/GRAN 74.0%, 95% CI (-4.8%, 6.9%)] and NSN rates [NEPA 75.7% versus APR/GRAN 70.4%, 95% CI (-0.6%, 11.4%)] were similar between groups, but significantly more NEPA patients did not take rescue medication [NEPA 96.6% versus APR/GRAN 93.5%, 95% CI (0.2%, 6.1%)]. NEPA was well tolerated with a similar safety profile to APR/GRAN. In this first study comparing NK1RA regimens and DEX, NEPA

  13. 78 FR 66825 - Political Activity-Federal Employees Residing in Designated Localities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... RIN 3206-AM80 Political Activity--Federal Employees Residing in Designated Localities AGENCY: Office... Federal employees residing in the District of Columbia a partial exemption from the political activity... becoming candidates for partisan political office and from soliciting, accepting, or receiving political...

  14. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  15. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  16. Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training across in- and outpatient clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia; Demaurex, Florence; Luthy, Christophe; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu; De Grave, Willem; Dolmans, Diana; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-05-01

    Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training are important to identify before designing context-specific training programmes, since learrners' perceived needs can influence the effectiveness of training. To explore residents' perceptions of their training needs and training experiences around communication skills, and whether these differ between residents training in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Four focus groups (FG) and a self-administered questionnaire were conducted with residents working in in- and outpatient medical service settings at a Swiss University Hospital. Focus groups explored residents' perceptions of their communication needs, their past training experiences and suggestions for future training programmes in communication skills. Transcripts were analysed in a thematic way using qualitative analytic approaches. All residents from both settings were asked to complete a questionnaire that queried their sociodemographics and amount of prior training in communication skills. In focus groups, outpatient residents felt that communication skills were especially useful in addressing chronic diseases and social issues. In contrast, inpatient residents emphasized the importance of good communication skills for dealing with family conflicts and end-of-life issues. Felt needs reflected residents' differing service priorities: outpatient residents saw the need for skills to structure the consultation and explore patients' perspectives in order to build therapeutic alliances, whereas inpatient residents wanted techniques to help them break bad news, provide information and increase their own well-being. The survey's overall response rate was 56%. Its data showed that outpatient residents received more training in communication skills and more of them than inpatient residents considered communication skills training to be useful (100% vs 74%). Outpatient residents' perceived needs in communication skills were more patient

  17. Qualitative study about the ways teachers react to feedback from resident evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roermund, T. van; Schreurs, M.L.; Mokkink, H.; Bottema, B.; Scherpbier, A.; Weel, C. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, one of the main interventions that are widely expected to contribute to teachers' professional development is confronting teachers with feedback from resident evaluations of their teaching performance. Receiving feedback, however, is a double edged sword. Teachers see

  18. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  19. Deaths from Resident-to-Resident Aggression in Australian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Briony; Bugeja, Lyndal; Pilgrim, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2017-12-01

    To describe the frequency and nature of deaths from resident-to-resident aggression (RRA) in nursing homes in Australia. National population-based retrospective cohort study. Accredited nursing homes in Australia. Residents whose deaths resulted from RRA and were reported to the coroner between July 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013. Cases were identified using the National Coronial Information System, and data on individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal factors were collected through review of the paper-based coroners' files. This research identified 28 deaths from RRA over a 14-year study period (0.004 per 100,000 bed days). Most exhibitors of aggression were male (n = 24, 85.7%), and risk of death from RRA was twice as high for male as for female nursing home residents (relative risk (RR) = 2.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-4.80, P = .05). Almost 90% of residents involved in RRA had a diagnosis of dementia, and three-quarters had a history of behavioral problems, including wandering and aggression. Dyad analysis showed that exhibitors of aggression were often younger and more recently admitted to the nursing home than targets. RRA incidents commonly occurred in communal areas and during the afternoon and involved a "push and fall." Seven (25%) RRA deaths had a coronial inquest; criminal charges were rarely filed. This is the first national study in Australia, and the largest internationally, to examine RRA deaths using medicolegal data. This generates hypotheses for future research on the effect of environmental and organizational factors on the frequency and preventability of RRA. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Rethinking Resident Supervision to Improve Safety: From Hierarchical to Interprofessional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamuz, Michal; Giardina, Traber Davis; Thomas, Eric J.; Menon, Shailaja; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate supervision is a significant contributing factor to medical errors involving trainees but supervision in high-risk settings such as the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is not well studied. Objective We explored how residents in the ICU experienced supervision related to medication safety not only from supervising physicians but also from other professionals. Design, Setting, Measurements Using qualitative methods, we examined in-depth interviews with 17 residents working in ICUs of three tertiary-care hospitals. We analyzed residents' perspectives on receiving and initiating supervision from physicians within the traditional medical hierarchy and from other professionals, including nurses, staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists (“interprofessional supervision”). Results While initiating their own supervision within the traditional hierarchy, residents believed in seeking assistance from fellows and attendings and articulated rules of thumb for doing so; however, they also experienced difficulties. Some residents were concerned that their questions would reflect poorly on them; others were embarrassed by their mistaken decisions. Conversely, residents described receiving interprofessional supervision from nurses and pharmacists, who proactively monitored, intervened in, and guided residents' decisions. Residents relied on nurses and pharmacists for non-judgmental answers to their queries, especially after-hours. To enhance both types of supervision, residents emphasized the importance of improving interpersonal communication skills. Conclusions Residents depended on interprofessional supervision when making decisions regarding medications in the ICU. Improving interprofessional supervision, which thus far has been under-recognized and underemphasized in graduate medical education, can potentially improve medication safety in high-risk settings. PMID:21990173

  1. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  2. Prevention and Control of Bed Bugs in Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the 21st century, as they invade mainly urban areas. We had a 30+ year "vacation" from ... identified by the longer hairs along the lateral edges near the head. A specialist should examine the ...

  3. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Feasibility of Providing Safe Mouth Care and Collecting Oral and Fecal Microbiome Samples from Nursing Home Residents with Dysphagia: Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Rita A; Winstead, Vicki; Azuero, Andres; Ptacek, Travis; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Byrd, Elizabeth; Geisinger, Maria L; Morrow, Casey

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with dysphagia who reside in nursing homes often receive inadequate mouth care and experience poor oral health. From a policy perspective, the combination of absent evidence-based mouth care protocols coupled with insufficient dental coverage create a pool of individuals at great risk for preventable infectious illnesses that contribute to high health care costs. The purpose of the current study was to determine (a) the safety of a mouth care protocol tailored for individuals with dysphagia residing in nursing homes without access to suction equipment, and (b) the feasibility of collecting oral and fecal samples for microbiota analyses. The mouth care protocol resulted in improved oral hygiene without aspiration, and oral and fecal samples were safely collected from participants. Policies supporting ongoing testing of evidence-based mouth care protocols for individuals with dysphagia are important to improve quality, demonstrate efficacy, and save health care costs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 9-15.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Solar advanced internal film receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Cabezas, M. de la

    1990-01-01

    In a Solar Central Internal Film Receiver, the heat absorbing fluid (a molten nitrate salt) flows in a thin film down over the non illuminated side of an absorber panel. Since the molten salt working fluid is not contained in complicated tube manifolds, the receiver design is simples than a conventional tube type-receiver resulting in a lower cost and a more reliable receiver. The Internal Film Receiver can be considered as an alternative to the Direct Absorption Receiver, in the event that the current problems of the last one can not be solved. It also describes here the test facility which will be used for its solar test, and the test plans foreseen. (Author) 17 refs

  6. Communications receivers principles and design

    CERN Document Server

    Rohde, Ulrich L; Zahnd, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This thoroughly updated guide offers comprehensive explanations of the science behind today’s radio receivers along with practical guidance on designing, constructing, and maintaining real-world communications systems. You will explore system planning, antennas and antenna coupling, amplifiers and gain control, filters, mixers, demodulation, digital communication, and the latest software defined radio (SDR) technology. Written by a team of telecommunication experts, Communications Receivers: Principles and Design, Fourth Edition, features technical illustrations, schematic diagrams, and detailed examples. Coverage includes: • Basic radio considerations • Radio receiver characteristics • Receiver system planning • Receiver implementation considerations • RF and baseband techniques for Software-Defined Radios • Transceiver SDR considerations • Antennas and antenna coupling • Mixers • Frequency sources and control • Ancillary receiver circuits • Performance measurement

  7. The impact of a novel resident leadership training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Samir S; Hayley, Barbara; Fagan, Shawn P; Berger, David H; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2004-11-01

    Today's complex health care environment coupled with the 80-hour workweek mandate has required that surgical resident team interactions evolve from a military command-and-control style to a collaborative leadership style. A novel educational curriculum was implemented with objectives of training the residents to have the capacity/ability to create and manage powerful teams through alignment, communication, and integrity integral tools to practicing a collaborative leadership style while working 80 hours per week. Specific strategies were as follows: (1) to focus on quality of patient care and service while receiving a high education-to-service ratio, and (2) to maximize efficiency through time management. This article shows that leadership training as part of a resident curriculum can significantly increase a resident's view of leadership in the areas of alignment, communication, and integrity; tools previously shown in business models to be vital for effective and efficient teams. This curriculum, over the course of the surgical residency, can provide residents with the necessary tools to deliver efficient quality of care while working within the 80-hour workweek mandate in a more collaborative style environment.

  8. High temperature helical tubular receiver for concentrating solar power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Nazmul

    In the field of conventional cleaner power generation technology, concentrating solar power systems have introduced remarkable opportunity. In a solar power tower, solar energy concentrated by the heliostats at a single point produces very high temperature. Falling solid particles or heat transfer fluid passing through that high temperature region absorbs heat to generate electricity. Increasing the residence time will result in more heat gain and increase efficiency. A novel design of solar receiver for both fluid and solid particle is approached in this paper which can increase residence time resulting in higher temperature gain in one cycle compared to conventional receivers. The helical tubular solar receiver placed at the focused sunlight region meets the higher outlet temperature and efficiency. A vertical tubular receiver is modeled and analyzed for single phase flow with molten salt as heat transfer fluid and alloy625 as heat transfer material. The result is compared to a journal paper of similar numerical and experimental setup for validating our modeling. New types of helical tubular solar receivers are modeled and analyzed with heat transfer fluid turbulent flow in single phase, and granular particle and air plug flow in multiphase to observe the temperature rise in one cyclic operation. The Discrete Ordinate radiation model is used for numerical analysis with simulation software Ansys Fluent 15.0. The Eulerian granular multiphase model is used for multiphase flow. Applying the same modeling parameters and boundary conditions, the results of vertical and helical receivers are compared. With a helical receiver, higher temperature gain of heat transfer fluid is achieved in one cycle for both single phase and multiphase flow compared to the vertical receiver. Performance is also observed by varying dimension of helical receiver.

  9. Correlates of unequal access to preventive care in China: a multilevel analysis of national data from the 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi; Liu, Chao-Jie; Pan, Xiong-Fei; Liu, Xiang; Li, Ning-Xiu

    2016-05-12

    Preventive care has an essential role in reducing income-related health inequalities. Despite a general consensus of the need of shifting focus from disease treatment to wellness and prevention, little is known about inequalities in access to preventive care in China. Our study aimed to explore the inequalities in preventive care usage and factors that were associated with such inequalities among Chinese adults. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed using national data from the 2011 Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey. The study sample comprised 13,483 adults who were covered by Basic Social Medical Insurance (BSMI). We analyzed individual socioeconomic status (marital status, education attainment, annual household income per capita, and medical insurance) and contextual factors for their influence on preventive care usage (region of residence and type of community) after controlling for health needs (age, sex, and health condition). Out of the participants, 6.9 % received preventive care services over the past four weeks and 3.9 % went for a general physical examination prior to the survey. We noted regional disparities in the overall use of preventive care and specific use of general physical examination, with residents from central and northeastern regions less likely to use preventive care including general physical examination than in the more affluent eastern region. Lower levels of education and income were associated with reduced use of preventive care. Subscriptions to less generous social medical insurance programs such as Urban Resident-based Medical Insurance Scheme or New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme were associated with decreased specific use of general physical examinations, but not overall use of preventive care. Inequalities in preventive care usage were evident in China, and were associated with health needs and socioeconomic characteristics. Current health insurance arrangements may fail to reduce inequalities relating to

  10. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  11. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  12. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brooks, Audrey J; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Brenner, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Mark, John; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming; Maizes, Victoria

    2018-04-23

    It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents ( N = 203), and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  13. High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Alison; Zhang, Gengsheng

    2006-01-01

    NAVSYS High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver (HAGR) uses a digital beam-steering antenna array to enable up to eight GPS satellites to be tracked, each with up to 10 dBi of additional antenna gain over a conventional receiver solution...

  14. The flipped classroom: a modality for mixed asynchronous and synchronous learning in a residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy P; Bailey, Caleb J; Guptill, Mindi; Thorp, Andrea W; Thomas, Tamara L

    2014-11-01

    A "flipped classroom" educational model exchanges the traditional format of a classroom lecture and homework problem set. We piloted two flipped classroom sessions in our emergency medicine (EM) residency didactic schedule. We aimed to learn about resident and faculty impressions of the sessions, in order to develop them as a regular component of our residency curriculum. We evaluated residents' impression of the asynchronous video component and synchronous classroom component using four Likert items. We used open-ended questions to inquire about resident and faculty impressions of the advantages and disadvantages of the format. For the Likert items evaluating the video lectures, 33/35 residents (94%, 95% CI 80%-99%) responded that the video lecture added to their knowledge about the topic, and 33/35 residents felt that watching the video was a valuable use of their time. For items evaluating the flipped classroom format, 36/38 residents (95%, 95% CI 82%-99%) preferred the format to a traditional lecture on the topic, and 38/38 residents (100%, 95% CI 89%-100%) felt that the small group session was effective in helping them learn about the topic. Most residents preferred to see the format monthly in our curriculum and chose an ideal group size of 5.5 (first session) and 7 (second session). Residents cited the interactivity of the sessions and access to experts as advantages of the format. Faculty felt the ability to assess residents' understanding of concepts and provide feedback were advantages. Our flipped classroom model was positively received by EM residents. Residents preferred a small group size and favored frequent use of the format in our curriculum. The flipped classroom represents one modality that programs may use to incorporate a mixture of asynchronous and interactive synchronous learning and provide additional opportunities to evaluate residents.

  15. Assessing Resident Performance in Screening Mammography: Development of a Quantitative Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Petra J; Rooney, Timothy B; Frazee, Tracy E; Poplack, Steven P

    2018-01-20

    This study aims to provide objective performance data and feedback, including examination volumes, recall rates, and concordance with faculty interpretations, for residents performing independent interpretation of screening mammography examinations. Residents (r) and faculty (f) interpret screening mammograms separately and identify non-callbacks (NCBs) and callbacks (CBs). Residents review all discordant results. The number of concordant interpretations (fCB-rCB and fNCB-rNCB) and discordant interpretations (fCB-rNCB and fNCB-rCB) are entered into a macro-driven spreadsheet. These macros weigh the data dependent on the perceived clinical impact of the resident's decision. Weighted outcomes are combined with volumes to generate a weighted mammography performance score. Rotation-specific goals are assigned for the weighted score, screening volumes, recall rate relative to faculty, and concordance rates. Residents receive one point for achieving each goal. Between July 2013 and May 2017, 18,747 mammography examinations were reviewed by 31 residents, in 71 resident rotations, over 246 resident weeks. Mean resident recall rate was 9.9% and significantly decreased with resident level (R), R2 = 11.3% vs R3 = 9.4%, R4 = 9.2%. Mean resident-faculty discordance rate was 10% and significantly decreased from R2 = 12% to R4 = 9.6%. Weighted performance scores ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 (mean 1.6, standard deviation 0.17), but did not change with rotation experience. Residents had a mean goal achievement score of 2.6 (standard deviation 0.47). This method provides residents with easily accessible case-by-case individualized screening outcome data over the longitudinal period of their residency, and provides an objective method of assessing resident screening mammography performance. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  17. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  18. Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefur, Benjamin J; Shewmaker, Diana M; Lohse, Christine M; Rose, Steven H; Colletti, James E

    2017-11-10

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center. The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other. In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%). A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

  19. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Italy on behalf of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    The document reproduces the text of a Note Verbale dated 20 October 1988 from the Permanent Mission of Spain stating that the Government of Spain has also adopted the common policy declaration adopted on 20 November 1984 by the Ministries for Foreign Affairs of the then ten Members of the European Community (INFCIRC/322) concerning the transfers of nuclear material, equipment and technology between the Member States of the Community

  20. Non-resident Fathers' Social Networks: The Relationship between Social Support and Father Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jason T; Sarver, Christian M

    2012-12-01

    Literature and research examining non-resident fathers' involvement with their chidren has focused primarily on the fathers' relationship with their child's mother. Receiving limited attention in the literature has been the inclusion of examining non-resident fathers' social support networks, the function of these social networks-perceived and received social support, and how these social support networks affect non-resident fathers' involvement with their children. Using data from Wave One of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, this study examined the social support networks non-resident fathers (n = 895) utilized in their involvement with their children. Results of the regression analyses indicate that non-resident fathers' relationship with their child's mother and perceived social support from their social networks contributed positively to their involvement with their children. Policy and practice implications are discussed.

  1. Non-resident Fathers’ Social Networks: The Relationship between Social Support and Father Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jason T.; Sarver, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Literature and research examining non-resident fathers’ involvement with their chidren has focused primarily on the fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother. Receiving limited attention in the literature has been the inclusion of examining non-resident fathers’ social support networks, the function of these social networks—perceived and received social support, and how these social support networks affect non-resident fathers’ involvement with their children. Using data from Wave One of the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study, this study examined the social support networks non-resident fathers (n = 895) utilized in their involvement with their children. Results of the regression analyses indicate that non-resident fathers’ relationship with their child’s mother and perceived social support from their social networks contributed positively to their involvement with their children. Policy and practice implications are discussed. PMID:23288998

  2. Efficacy of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB supplement in management of constipation among nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constipation is a significant problem in the elderly, specifically nursing home and/or extended-care facility residents are reported to suffer from constipation. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as diarrhea and constipation effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this LAB supplement in the management of nursing home residents. Methods Nineteen subjects (8M, 11F; mean age 77.1 ± 10.1 suffering with chronic constipation were assigned to receive LAB (3.0 × 1011 CFU/g twice (to be taken 30 minutes after breakfast and dinner a day for 2 weeks in November 2008. Subjects draw up a questionnaire on defecation habits (frequency of defecation, amount and state of stool, and we collected fecal samples from the subjects both before entering and after ending the trial, to investigate LAB levels and inhibition of harmful enzyme activities. Results were tested with SAS and Student's t-test. Results Analysis of questionnaire showed that there was an increase in the frequency of defecation and amount of stool excreted in defecation habit after LAB treatment, but there were no significant changes. And it also affects the intestinal environment, through significantly increase (p p Conclusion LAB, when added to the standard treatment regimen for nursing home residents with chronic constipation, increased defecation habit such as frequency of defecation, amount and state of stool. So, it may be used as functional probiotics to improve human health by helping to prevent constipation.

  3. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  4. Interest in Providing Multiple Sclerosis Care and Subspecializing in Multiple Sclerosis Among Neurology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie; Kane, Heather L.; Frost, A. Corey; Keating, Michael; Olmsted, Murrey

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although detailed knowledge regarding treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is largely limited to neurologists, shortages in the neurologist workforce, including MS subspecialists, are predicted. Thus, MS patients may have difficulties in gaining access to appropriate care. No systematic evaluation has yet been performed of the number of neurology residents planning to pursue MS subspecialization. This study identifies factors affecting interest in providing MS patient care or MS subspecialization among current neurology residents. Methods: We randomly selected half of all Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education–certified neurology residency programs in the continental United States to receive the neurology resident survey. Completed surveys were received from 218 residents. Results: Residents were significantly more likely to have increased interest in MS care when they participated in MS research, were interested in teaching, and indicated that the “ability to improve patient outcomes and quality of life” was a positive factor influencing their desire to provide MS patient care. Residents who were interested in providing MS care, interested in teaching, and indicated that “research opportunities” was a positive factor for providing MS patient care were significantly more likely to express interest in MS subspecialization. Conclusions: Increasing opportunities to interact with MS patients, learn about MS care, and participate in MS research may increase interest in MS care and subspecialization among neurology residents. Opportunities to educate residents regarding MS patient care may affect residents’ attitudes. PMID:24688352

  5. Impact of high-fidelity transvaginal ultrasound simulation for radiology on residents' performance and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rani; Alhashmi, Ghufran; Ajlan, Amr; Eldeek, Bassem

    2015-02-01

    Because of the intimate and uncomfortable nature of transvaginal ultrasound, training residents to perform this type of examination is a difficult task. As a consequence, residents may receive inadequate training that leads to a lack of the skills and confidence needed to perform this examination. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of using simulation sessions to teach residents how to perform transvaginal ultrasound, enabling them to diagnose obstetric and gynecologic emergencies and helping them survive on-calls alone while keeping their patients safe. We used an experimental study design to compare the confidence levels of 20 senior residents who received clinical training only to those of 25 junior residents who were enrolled in a simulation-based teaching session. We also compared the junior residents' levels of performance and confidence using transvaginal ultrasound before and after the sessions. The performance of transvaginal ultrasound by the junior residents and their confidence levels significantly improved after they attended the simulation sessions. They had higher levels of confidence than the senior residents who did not attend the session. It was also observed that the number of nondiagnostic transvaginal ultrasounds performed by the on-call resident that needed to be repeated the next day had significantly dropped. Simulation-based teaching sessions are an effective method of education, which improve trainees' skills and confidence levels and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Providing rapid feedback to residents on their teaching skills: an educational strategy for contemporary trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Sidlow, Rachel J; Baer, Tamar G; Gershel, Jeffrey C

    2016-03-20

    The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes of contemporary residents toward receiving rapid feedback on their teaching skills from their medical student learners. Participants consisted of 20 residents in their second post-graduate training year. These residents facilitated 44 teaching sessions with medical students within our Resident-as-Teacher program. Structured, written feedback from students was returned to the resident within 3 days following each session. Residents completed a short survey about the utility of the feedback, whether they would make a change to future teaching sessions based on the feedback, and what specifically they might change. The survey utilized a 4-point scale ("Not helpful/likely=1" to "Very helpful/likely=4"), and allowed for one free-text response. Free-text responses were hand-coded and underwent qualitative analysis to identify themes. There were 182 student feedback encounters resulting from 44 teaching sessions. The survey response rate was 73% (32/44). Ninety-four percent of residents rated the rapid feedback as "very helpful," and 91% would "very likely" make a change to subsequent sessions based on student feedback. Residents' proposed changes included modifications to session content and/or their personal teaching style. Residents found that rapid feedback received from medical student learners was highly valuable to them in their roles as teachers. A rapid feedback strategy may facilitate an optimal educational environment for contemporary trainees.

  7. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a... legal representative. (5) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must meet...

  8. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  9. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  10. The resident's view of residency training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D G

    1966-04-09

    In the view of residents in their last year of specialty training, the Fellowship is now becoming the operative standard for obtaining hospital privileges in urban centres and they felt that this implied that the two standards, the Certificate and the Fellowship of the Royal College, were not achieving the purpose for which they were designed. Although 80% of the residents intended to write the Fellowship, few viewed a year in a basic science department or in research as of intrinsic value in terms of their future practice.The examinations of the Royal College were the subject of criticism, most residents feeling that the examinations did not test the knowledge and ability gained in training. Most expressed a desire for ongoing evaluation during the training period.Service responsibilities were generally regarded as too heavy.Despite the criticism of both training and examination, most residents felt that their training had provided them with the experience and background they needed to practise as specialists.

  11. Nursing Home Resident Symptomatology Triggering Transfer: Avoiding Unnecessary Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyce S. Ashcraft

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n=101 had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure most frequently reported. Most frequently reported symptomatology included fatigue, lethargy or weakness, shortness of breath, and change in level of consciousness. Multiple symptomatology was indicative of a wide variety of medical diagnoses. The diagnoses and symptomatology recorded in this paper identify the importance of strategic planning concerning assessment and communication of common nursing home resident symptomatology and the importance of basic nursing and diagnostic procedures for prevention of potentially avoidable hospitalizations.

  12. Improving year-end transfers of care in academic ambulatory clinics: a survey of pediatric resident physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resident primary care continuity clinics, at the end of each academic year, continuity of care is disrupted when patients cared for by the graduating class are redistributed to other residents. Yet, despite the recent focus on the transfers of care between resident physicians in inpatient settings, there has been minimal attention given to patient care transfers in academic ambulatory clinics. We sought to elicit the views of pediatric residents regarding year-end patient handoffs in a pediatric resident continuity clinic.Methods: Residents assigned to a continuity clinic of a large pediatric residency program completed a questionnaire regarding year-end transfers of care.Results: Thirty-one questionnaires were completed out of a total 45 eligible residents (69% response. Eighty seven percent of residents strongly or somewhat agreed that it would be useful to receive a written sign-out for patients with complex medical or social issues, but only 35% felt it would be useful for patients with no significant issues. Residents more frequently reported having access to adequate information regarding their new patients’ medical summary (53% and care plan (47% than patients’ functional abilities (30%, social history (17%, or use of community resources (17%. When rating the importance of receiving adequate sign-out in each those domains, residents gave most importance to the medical summary (87% of residents indicating very or somewhat important and plan of care (84%. Residents gave less importance to receiving sign-out regarding their patients’ functional abilities (71% social history (58%, and community resources (58%. Residents indicated that lack of access to adequate patient information resulted in additional work (80%, delays or omissions in needed care (56%, and disruptions in continuity of care (58%.Conclusions: In a single-site study, residents perceive that they lack adequate information during year-end patient transfers

  13. Solar dynamic heat receiver technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Leigh M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver was designed to meet the requirements specified for electrical power modules on the U.S. Space Station, Freedom. The heat receiver supplies thermal energy to power a heat engine in a closed Brayton cycle using a mixture of helium-xenon gas as the working fluid. The electrical power output of the engine, 25 kW, requires a 100 kW thermal input throughout a 90 minute orbit, including when the spacecraft is eclipsed for up to 36 minutes from the sun. The heat receiver employs an integral thermal energy storage system utilizing the latent heat available through the phase change of a high-temperature salt mixture. A near eutectic mixture of lithium fluoride and calcium difluoride is used as the phase change material. The salt is contained within a felt metal matrix which enhances heat transfer and controls the salt void distribution during solidification. Fabrication of the receiver is complete and it was delivered to NASA for verification testing in a simulated low-Earth-orbit environment. This document reviews the receiver design and describes its fabrication history. The major elements required to operate the receiver during testing are also described.

  14. Long-term outcomes of performing a postdoctoral research fellowship during general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Klingensmith, Mary E; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-04-01

    To determine whether dedicated research time during surgical residency leads to funding following postgraduate training. Unlike other medical specialties, a significant number of general surgery residents spend 1 to 3 years in dedicated laboratory research during their training. The impact this has on obtaining peer reviewed research funding after residency is unknown. Survey of all graduates of an academic general surgery resident program from 1990 to 2005 (n = 105). Seventy-five (71%) of survey recipients responded, of which 66 performed protected research during residency. Fifty-one currently perform research (mean effort, 26%; range, 2%-75%). Twenty-three respondents who performed research during residency (35%) subsequently received independent faculty funding. Thirteen respondents (20%) obtained NIH grants following residency training. The number of papers authored during resident research was associated with obtaining subsequent faculty grant support (9.3 vs. 5.2, P = 0.02). Faculty funding was associated with obtaining independent research support during residency (42% vs. 17%, P = 0.04). NIH-funded respondents spent more combined years in research before and during residency (3.7 vs. 2.8, P = 0.02). Academic surgeons rated research fellowships more relevant to their current job than private practitioners (4.3 vs. 3.4 by Likert scale, P < 0.05). Both groups considered research a worthwhile use of their time during residency (4.5 vs. 4.1, P = not significant). A large number of surgical trainees who perform a research fellowship in the middle of residency subsequently become funded investigators in this single-center survey. The likelihood of obtaining funding after residency is related to productivity and obtaining grant support during residency as well as cumulative years of research prior to obtaining a faculty position.

  15. Leadership Book Club: An Innovative Strategy to Incorporate Leadership Development Into Pharmacy Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Alyssa; Dervay, Katelyn

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To describe an innovative strategy for incorporating leadership training and development across multiple postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residency programs at a single institution. Background: Tampa General Hospital has 7 pharmacy residency positions: 4 postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residents and a single resident for each of the 3 PGY2 programs (critical care, emergency medicine, and solid organ transplant). Administrative topics are incorporated across the PGY1 and PGY2 residency programs, with each PGY2 program having additional administrative topics specific to their specialty area. Summary: What began as an elective administrative topic discussion for the PGY2 emergency medicine resident has evolved over time into a longitudinal leadership book club. The leadership book club is utilized to meet the residency goals and objectives related to leadership development for all 3 PGY2 programs. Each year a single book is identified through the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Leadership Academy book list or by participant suggestion. The book is then divided into 4 sections with corresponding hour-long discussions that occur quarterly throughout the residency year. The residency program directors (RPDs) and co-RPDs lead the initial discussion, and each PGY2 resident leads 1 of the subsequent 3 discussions. Based on resident feedback, the leadership book club is an innovative and effective strategy to incorporate leadership training and development into residency training. Conclusion: It is imperative to foster the development of leadership skills in pharmacy residency programs to prevent a future leadership gap in health system pharmacy. Leadership book club is a unique strategy to incorporate leadership training longitudinally across multiple PGY2 residency programs at a single institution.

  16. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  17. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  18. Improving residents' oral health through staff education in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phu; Dempster, Laura; Limeback, Hardy; Locker, David

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of oral care education among nursing home staff members to improve the oral health of residents. Nursing home support staff members (NHSSMs) in the study group received oral care education at baseline between a pretest and posttest. NHSSMs' oral care knowledge was measured using a 20-item knowledge test at baseline, posteducation, and at a 6-month follow-up. Residents' oral health was assessed at baseline and again at a 6-month follow-up using the Modified Plaque Index (PI) and Modified Gingival Index (GI). Among staff members who received the oral care education (n = 32), posttest knowledge statistically significantly increased from the pretest level (p Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Trends in medical error education: are we failing our residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Corey K; Fischer, Melissa A; Walsh, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for physician education as a key step in medical error prevention. In our 2002 national survey, pediatric resident education about medical error prevention was sporadic. We sought to describe the amount and type of pediatric resident training about medical errors and to assess the change in training since 2002. We surveyed a national sample of 50 pediatric chief residents randomly selected from the 198 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs from August to November 2010. The 31-item telephone survey was developed from the 2002 survey, with the addition of 10 items about electronic learning and resident quality improvement projects. The survey included 4 domains: current patient safety curriculum, chief resident knowledge, learning from medical errors, and demographics. We phoned 55 chief residents and contacted 51. Fifty participated (90% participation rate). Ninety-four percent of chief residents stated that their program had a formalized curriculum to discuss medical errors, compared to only 50% (P medical error should be systemic change. The primary method for educating residents about medical error reported was informal teaching. Ninety-two percent reported never or rarely discussing medical error in an outpatient setting. Seventy-four percent of chief residents reported that they never or rarely learn from an error made by an attending physician, and 50% never or rarely learned from an error made by a fellow resident. Although resident education about medical errors has improved since 2002, opportunities to model learning from mistakes are frequently missed. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Burnout and interventions in pediatric residency: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara F. McKinley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increase in interest in issues related to burnout in medical education and mandates from the national residency accrediting body, available literature is sparse in pediatrics, a medical discipline that requires special empathy and compassion, as well as enhanced communication skills to effectively care for children and their families. Burnout prevalence ranges from 17 to 67.8% of pediatric residents in recent studies. There is little that details the pathogenesis of burnout in these residents and little that compares them with those in other medical disciplines. This comprehensive literature review describes all that is published on burnout and burnout interventions since 2005 in pediatrics and other primary care oriented specialty residents, as well as key papers from pre-2005. This review, with its focus on the available information and evidence-based intervention strategies, identifies four areas for focus for future interventions and directions. It should serve as a useful resource to program directors, medical educators and graduate medical education leadership who are committed to preventing and/or treating burnout in their residents and molding these young physicians to be able to maintain resilience through their careers. This review should also be useful to investigators exploring burnout in other health care professionals.

  1. Tetanus immunity in nursing home residents of Bolu, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Ali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetanus is a serious but vaccine-preventable disease and fatality rate of the disease is high in the neonates and the elderly. The aim of this study was to detect the tetanus antibody prevalence in the over sixty-year age residents of the nursing homes in Bolu. Methods A voluntary-based study was done in the residents of two nursing homes in Bolu, Turkey. Blood samples were taken from 71 volunteers residing in there nursing homes. Tetanus IgG antibodies were measured by a commercial ELISA kit. Results Among overall subjects, only 11 (15.7 % had the protective tetanus antibody titers at the time of the study. Totally, 10 subjects were examined in emergency rooms due to trauma or accidents within the last ten years and, four (40% of them had protective antibody levels. Of the remaining 61 subjects only 7 (11% had protective antibody levels (p Conclusions Tetanus antibody level is below the protective level in the majority of the over-sixty-year-age subjects residing in the nursing homes. Each over sixty-year age person in our country should be vaccinated. Until this is accomplished, at least, nursing home residents should be vaccinated during registration.

  2. Vacuum and forceps training in residency: experience and self-reported competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J; Gilo, N; Foote, M; Gil, K; Lavin, J P

    2007-06-01

    Determine chief residents' experience with vacuum and forceps deliveries and self-perceived competencies with the procedures. Study 1: A written questionnaire was mailed to all fourth year residents in US RRC approved Ob/Gyn programs. Study 2: The study was replicated using a web-based survey the following year. Data were analyzed with chi (2) and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests using SPSS. Surveys were received from 238 residents (20%) in Study 1 and 269 residents in Study 2 (23%, representing 50% of all residency programs). In both studies, residents reported performing significantly less forceps than vacuum deliveries. Virtually all residents wanted to learn to perform both deliveries, indicated attendings were willing to teach both, and felt competent to perform vacuum deliveries (Study 1, 94.5%; Study 2, 98.5%); only half felt competent to perform forceps deliveries (Study 1, 57.6%; Study 2, 55.0%). The majority of residents who felt competent to perform forceps deliveries reported that they would predominately use forceps or both methods of deliveries in their practice (Study 1, 75.8%; Study 2, 64.6%). The majority of residents who reported that they did not feel competent to perform forceps deliveries reported that they would predominately use vacuum deliveries in their practice (Study 1, 86.1%; Study 2, 84.2%). Current training results in a substantial portion of residents graduating who do not feel competent to perform forceps deliveries. Perceived competency affected future operative delivery plans.

  3. A phenomenologic investigation of pediatric residents' experiences being parented and giving parenting advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, A C; Shawler, P M; Blackmon, D L; DeGrace, E W; Wolraich, M L

    2016-09-01

    Factors surrounding pediatricians' parenting advice and training on parenting during residency have not been well studied. The primary purpose of this study was to examine pediatric residents' self-reported experiences giving parenting advice and explore the relationship between parenting advice given and types of parenting residents received as children. Thirteen OUHSC pediatric residents were individually interviewed to examine experiences being parented and giving parenting advice. Phenomenological methods were used to explicate themes and secondary analyses explored relationships of findings based upon Baumrind's parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive). While childhood experiences were not specifically correlated to the parenting advice style of pediatric residents interviewed, virtually all reported relying upon childhood experiences to generate their advice. Those describing authoritative parents reported giving more authoritative advice while others reported more variable advice. Core interview themes related to residents' parenting advice included anxiety about not being a parent, varying advice based on families' needs, and emphasis of positive interactions and consistency. Themes related to how residents were parented included discipline being a learning process for their parents and recalling that their parents always had expectations, yet always loved them. Pediatric residents interviewed reported giving family centered parenting advice with elements of positive interactions and consistency, but interviews highlighted many areas of apprehension residents have around giving parenting advice. Our study suggests that pediatric residents may benefit from more general educational opportunities to develop the content of their parenting advice, including reflecting on any impact from their own upbringing.

  4. HIGH-EFFICIENCY INFRARED RECEIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Esman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research and development show promising use of high-performance solid-state receivers of the electromagnetic radiation. These receivers are based on the low-barrier Schottky diodes. The approach to the design of the receivers on the basis of delta-doped low-barrier Schottky diodes with beam leads without bias is especially actively developing because for uncooled receivers of the microwave radiation these diodes have virtually no competition. The purpose of this work is to improve the main parameters and characteristics that determine the practical relevance of the receivers of mid-infrared electromagnetic radiation at the operating room temperature by modifying the electrodes configuration of the diode and optimizing the distance between them. Proposed original design solution of the integrated receiver of mid-infrared radiation on the basis of the low-barrier Schottky diodes with beam leads allows to effectively adjust its main parameters and characteristics. Simulation of the electromagnetic characteristics of the proposed receiver by using the software package HFSS with the basic algorithm of a finite element method which implemented to calculate the behavior of electromagnetic fields on an arbitrary geometry with a predetermined material properties have shown that when the inner parts of the electrodes of the low-barrier Schottky diode is performed in the concentric elliptical convex-concave shape, it can be reduce the reflection losses to -57.75 dB and the standing wave ratio to 1.003 while increasing the directivity up to 23 at a wavelength of 6.09 μm. At this time, the rounded radii of the inner parts of the anode and cathode electrodes are equal 212 nm and 318 nm respectively and the gap setting between them is 106 nm. These parameters will improve the efficiency of the developed infrared optical-promising and electronic equipment for various purposes intended for work in the mid-infrared wavelength range. 

  5. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  6. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  7. Sustained increase in resident meal time hand hygiene through an interdisciplinary intervention engaging long-term care facility residents and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Marguerite; Harris, Tony; Horn, Terancita; Midamba, Blondelle; Primes, Vickie; Sullivan, Nancy; Shuler, Rosalyn; Zabarsky, Trina F; Deshpande, Abhishek; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-02-01

    Hand hygiene by patients may prevent acquisition and dissemination of health care-associated pathogens, but limited efforts have been made to engage patients in hand hygiene interventions. In a long-term care facility, we found that residents were aware of the importance of hand hygiene, but barriers, such as inaccessible products or difficult to use products, limited compliance. A dramatic and sustained improvement in meal time hand hygiene was achieved through engagement of staff and residents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Performance of medical residents in sterile techniques during central vein catheterization: randomized trial of efficacy of simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouli, Hassan; Jahnes, Katherine; Shapiro, Janet; Rose, Keith; Mathew, Joseph; Gohil, Amit; Han, Qifa; Sotelo, Andre; Jones, James; Aqeel, Adnan; Eden, Edward; Fried, Ethan

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a preventable cause of a potentially lethal ICU infection. The optimal method to teach health-care providers correct sterile techniques during central vein catheterization (CVC) remains unclear. We randomly assigned second- and third-year internal medicine residents trained by a traditional apprenticeship model to simulation-based plus video training or video training alone from December 2007 to January 2008, with a follow-up period to examine CRBSI ending in July 2009. During the follow-up period, a simulation-based training program in sterile techniques during CVC was implemented in the medical ICU (MICU). A surgical ICU (SICU) where no residents received study interventions was used for comparison. The primary outcome measures were median residents' scores in sterile techniques and rates of CRBSI per 1,000 catheter-days. Of the 47 enrolled residents, 24 were randomly assigned to the simulation-based plus video training group and 23 to the video training group. Median baseline scores in both groups were equally poor: 12.5 to 13 (52%-54%) out of maximum score of 24 (P = .95; median difference, 0; 95% CI, 0.2-2.0). After training, median score was significantly higher for the simulation-based plus video training group: 22 (92%) vs 18 (75%) for the video training group (P training in sterile techniques during CVC is superior to traditional training or video training alone and is associated with decreased rate of CRBSI. Simulation-based training in CVC should be routinely used to reduce iatrogenic risk. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00612131; URL: clinicaltrials.gov.

  9. 41 CFR 302-3.221 - If I travel to another place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required to spend time at my actual place of residence to receive reimbursement? 302-3.221 Section 302-3.221 Public Contracts and Property... another place in the U.S. (other than my actual place of residence) am I required to spend time at my...

  10. PPM Receiver Implemented in Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Andrew; Kang, Edward; Lay, Norman; Vilnrotter, Victor; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2010-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a tool for developing optical pulse-position- modulation (PPM) receivers in which photodetector outputs are fed to analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and all subsequent signal processing is performed digitally. The program can be used, for example, to simulate an all-digital version of the PPM receiver described in Parallel Processing of Broad-Band PPM Signals (NPO-40711), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The program can also be translated into a design for digital PPM receiver hardware. The most notable innovation embodied in the software and the underlying PPM-reception concept is a digital processing subsystem that performs synchronization of PPM time slots, even though the digital processing is, itself, asynchronous in the sense that no attempt is made to synchronize it with the incoming optical signal a priori and there is no feedback to analog signal processing subsystems or ADCs. Functions performed by the software receiver include time-slot synchronization, symbol synchronization, coding preprocessing, and diagnostic functions. The program is written in the MATLAB and Simulink software system. The software receiver is highly parameterized and, hence, programmable: for example, slot- and symbol-synchronization filters have programmable bandwidths.

  11. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  12. Are 2 Years Enough? Exploring Technical Skills Acquisition Among General Surgery Residents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elizabeth G; Salles, Gil F

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Recent studies have shown that up to 40% of the General Surgery (GS) residents are not confident with their surgical skills. There is concern that residents are at risk of receiving inadequate training due to the low number of operations they perform. In Brazil, although all GS residents receive by law the Board Certification at the end of their programs, the assessment of their technical skills is not mandatory in Medical Residency programs' training. Consequently, our concern was that current GS medical residency format might be insufficient to create competent and autonomous general surgery residents after 2 years of regular training. Hence, the aim was to assess GS residents' surgical skills in their final months of training to evaluate the present format of GS residency programs in Brazil. Trained surgical faculty members directly observed 11 operations of varying difficulty performed by 2nd-year regular GS residents and by 4th-year residents in the optional Advanced Program in General Surgery. Participants were located at 3 university and 3 nonuniversity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo (Brazil's largest cities). Surgical skills were assessed using an internally developed observation checklist reviewed by subject matter experts. Sixty residents (46 regular 2nd-year trainees and 14 advanced 4th-year trainees) were assessed on performing 499 operations. Only 10 residents (17%), all advanced 4th-year residents, satisfactorily performed all operations and were considered eligible for the Board Certification. Even after excluding the 2 operations of greatest difficulty, only 24 regular 2nd-year residents (52%) satisfactorily performed the other 9 operations. Residents from hospitals with open Emergency Departments performed better than those from hospitals without Emergency Departments. Insights: The results of this pilot study suggest that residents with 2 years of training are not prepared for independent high-level surgical practice. The

  13. Factors associated with physiotherapy provision in a population of elderly nursing home residents; a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribbe Miel W

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physiotherapy (PT plays an important role in improving activities of daily living (ADL functioning and discharge rates, it is unclear how many nursing home residents receive treatment. Furthermore, there is a lack of insight into the determinants that influence the decision for treatment. In this study, we investigated how many nursing home residents receive PT. In addition, we analysed the factors that contribute to the variation in the provision of PT both between nursing homes and between residents. Methods A random sample of 600 elderly residents was taken from a random sample of 15 nursing homes. Residents had to be admitted for rehabilitation or for long-term care. Data were collected through interviews with the nursing home physician and the physiotherapist. Multilevel analysis was used to define the variation in the provision of PT and the factors that are associated with the question whether a resident receives PT or not. Furthermore the amount of PT provided was analysed and the factors that are associated with this. Results On average 69% of the residents received PT. The percentage of patients receiving treatment differed significantly across nursing homes, and especially the number of physiotherapists available, explained this difference between nursing homes. Residents admitted to a somatic ward for rehabilitation, and male residents in general, were most likely to receive PT. Residents who were treated by a physiotherapist received on average 55 minutes (sd 41 treatment a week. Residents admitted for rehabilitation received more PT a week, as were residents with a status after a total hip replacement. Conclusion PT is most likely to be provided to residents on a somatic ward, recently admitted for rehabilitation to a nursing home, which has a relatively large number of physiotherapists. This suggests a potential under-use of PT for long-term residents with cognitive problems. It is recommended that

  14. Factors associated with physiotherapy provision in a population of elderly nursing home residents; a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemrijse, Chantal J; de Boer, Marike E; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Ribbe, Miel W; Dekker, Joost

    2007-04-04

    Although physiotherapy (PT) plays an important role in improving activities of daily living (ADL functioning) and discharge rates, it is unclear how many nursing home residents receive treatment. Furthermore, there is a lack of insight into the determinants that influence the decision for treatment. In this study, we investigated how many nursing home residents receive PT. In addition, we analysed the factors that contribute to the variation in the provision of PT both between nursing homes and between residents. A random sample of 600 elderly residents was taken from a random sample of 15 nursing homes. Residents had to be admitted for rehabilitation or for long-term care. Data were collected through interviews with the nursing home physician and the physiotherapist. Multilevel analysis was used to define the variation in the provision of PT and the factors that are associated with the question whether a resident receives PT or not. Furthermore the amount of PT provided was analysed and the factors that are associated with this. On average 69% of the residents received PT. The percentage of patients receiving treatment differed significantly across nursing homes, and especially the number of physiotherapists available, explained this difference between nursing homes. Residents admitted to a somatic ward for rehabilitation, and male residents in general, were most likely to receive PT. Residents who were treated by a physiotherapist received on average 55 minutes (sd 41) treatment a week. Residents admitted for rehabilitation received more PT a week, as were residents with a status after a total hip replacement. PT is most likely to be provided to residents on a somatic ward, recently admitted for rehabilitation to a nursing home, which has a relatively large number of physiotherapists. This suggests a potential under-use of PT for long-term residents with cognitive problems. It is recommended that physiotherapists reconsider which residents may benefit from

  15. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  16. Repaying in Kind: Examination of the Reciprocity Effect in Faculty and Resident Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J

    Although the reciprocity hypothesis (that trainees have a tendency to modify evaluations based on the grades they receive from instructors) has been documented in other fields, very little work has examined this phenomenon in the surgical residency environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which lenient-grading faculty receive higher evaluations from surgery residents. Evaluation data from 2 consecutive academic years were collected retrospectively at a large university-based General Surgery residency program. Monthly faculty evaluations of residents (15 items) and resident evaluations of faculty (8 items; 1 = never demonstrates, 10 = always demonstrates) were included. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted with SPSS version 22 (IBM; Chicago, IL). A total of 2274 faculty assessments and 1480 resident assessments were included in this study, representing 2 years of evaluations for 32 core faculty members responsible for completing all resident evaluations and 68 PGY1-5 general surgery residents. Faculty (63% men, 13.5 ± 9.8 years out of training) represented 5 different divisions (general surgery, surgical oncology, transplant, trauma critical care, and vascular) within the general surgery department. Faculty received an average of 71.1 ± 33.9 evaluations from residents over the course of 2 years. The average rating of faculty teaching by residents was 9.5 ± 0.4. Residents received an average of 21.8 ± 0.5 evaluations with average ratings of 4.2 ± 0.4. Correlation analyses indicated a positive relationship between the average rating received from residents and the number of years since faculty completed training (r = 0.44, p = 0.01). Additionally, a significant relationship emerged between ratings received from residents and ratings given to residents (r = 0.40, p = 0.04). Regression analyses indicated that when both variables (years since training, ratings given to residents) were included in the model, only ratings

  17. 26 CFR 1.1034-1 - Sale or exchange of residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... money so received, the fair market value of the property (other than money) so received. If, as part of... exchange which is considered as a purchase under this section, the fair market value of the new residence... to the acquisition, construction, reconstruction, and improvements constituting capital expenditures...

  18. Central solar-energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1981-10-27

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan is described. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  19. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational

  20. Communications received from Members regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and Other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Director General has received letters dated 27 May 1993 from the Resident Representatives of Portugal and Spain to the Agency concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material [es

  1. Communications received from Member States regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter of 27 June 1995 from the Resident Representative of Argentina to the Agency concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material

  2. Communication Received from Argentina regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and Other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Director General has received letters dated 27 May 1993 from the Resident Representatives of Portugal and Spain to the Agency concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material [ru

  3. Communication Received from Argentina regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and Other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Director General has received letters dated 27 May 1993 from the Resident Representatives of Portugal and Spain to the Agency concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material

  4. The Flipped Classroom: A Modality for Mixed Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning in a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Young

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A “flipped classroom” educational model exchanges the traditional format of a classroom lecture and homework problem set. We piloted two flipped classroom sessions in our emergency medicine (EM residency didactic schedule. We aimed to learn about resident and faculty impressions of the sessions, in order to develop them as a regular component of our residency curriculum. Methods: We evaluated residents’ impression of the asynchronous video component and synchronous classroom component using four Likert items. We used open-ended questions to inquire about resident and faculty impressions of the advantages and disadvantages of the format. Results: For the Likert items evaluating the video lectures, 33/35 residents (94%, 95% CI 80%-99% responded that the video lecture added to their knowledge about the topic, and 33/35 residents felt that watching the video was a valuable use of their time. For items evaluating the flipped classroom format, 36/38 residents (95%, 95% CI 82%-99% preferred the format to a traditional lecture on the topic, and 38/38 residents (100%, 95% CI 89%-100% felt that the small group session was effective in helping them learn about the topic. Most residents preferred to see the format monthly in our curriculum and chose an ideal group size of 5.5 (first session and 7 (second session. Residents cited the interactivity of the sessions and access to experts as advantages of the format. Faculty felt the ability to assess residents’ understanding of concepts and provide feedback were advantages. Conclusion: Our flipped classroom model was positively received by EM residents. Residents preferred a small group size and favored frequent use of the format in our curriculum. The flipped classroom represents one modality that programs may use to incorporate a mixture of asynchronous and interactive synchronous learning and provide additional opportunities to evaluate residents. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  5. Books Received Information and Announcements ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Books Received. Tradition, Science and Society. 5 Balachandra Roo. Navakarnataka. 1990, Rs.1S. A Textbook of Biology - Volume 2. P KG Nair, K P Achor, M J Hegde and 5 G Prabhu. Himalaya Publishing House. 1996, Rs.1S0. Indus Script - Its Nature and Structure. B V SUbbarayappa. New Era Publications. 1996 ...

  6. Advances in SIS receiver technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerking, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Significant advances in SIS receiver technology since the last Asilomar meeting include: superconductor materials, integrated inductive tuning elements, and planar mounting structures. The effect of these advances is to push the upper frequency operating limit from about 600 to 1500 GHz, and to enhance the feasibility of focal plane arrays of heterodyne receivers. A fundamental high frequency operating limit of SIS mixers is set by the superconducting energy gap. A practical limitation for high frequency operation of SIS junctions is their parasitic capacitance and resistance. The performance of the mixer will be degraded by the Resistor-Capacitor rolloff. Several designs were reported for inductive elements integrated on the same substrate as the SIS junctions to tune out the bulk junction capacitance. Most millimeter SIS-based heterodyne receivers have used waveguide coupling structures. Technology has advanced to the state where programs that have a high probability of success can be defined to produce arrays of SIS receivers for frequencies as high as 1500 GHz.

  7. Madhu Sudan Receives Nevanlinna Prize

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 12. Madhu Sudan Receives Nevanlinna Prize. Meena Mahajan Priti Shankar ... Author Affiliations. Meena Mahajan1 Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangaiore 560 012, India.

  8. Partitioning of a DRM receiver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkotte, P.T.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Smit, L.T.

    In this article we present the results of partitioning the OFDM baseband processing of a DRM receiver into smaller independent processes. Furthermore, we give a short introduction into the relevant parts of the DRM standard. Based on the number of multiplications and additions we can map individual

  9. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  10. Perceptions, attitudes, and satisfaction concerning resident participation in health care among dermatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Almohanna, Hind M; Alkeraye, Salim S; Alsaif, Fahad M; Alrasheed, Saleh K

    2014-01-01

    A limited number of published studies have discussed patient attitudes toward resident physicians' participation in dermatology clinics. A literature search failed to identify any such study in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in dermatology outpatient clinics. A self-administered questionnaire focused on patient attitudes toward dermatology resident participation was distributed randomly to all adult outpatients attending dermatology clinics at a university hospital in Saudi Arabia between July and September 2010. The questionnaire was returned by 742 of 900 patients, for an 82% response rate. The mean patient age was 30.58 ± 11.67 years. Forty-two percent (311 of 742) of the respondents were male. The major reason for visiting the hospital was a medical dermatology consultation (80.4%). Only 35% of the patients self-reported an accurate understanding of the "resident" designation. In total, 86.4% of patients were satisfied with the residents' behavior. Furthermore, 98.4% of the patients were satisfied with the medical care provided by the residents. The patients agreed with resident participation in their health care. The majority of the patients expressed their willingness to provide a medical history and receive counseling from residents (87.6% and 86.3%, respectively). There was no gender-associated effect on the understanding of the resident position or the decision to receive a physical examination by a resident. Dermatology outpatients are satisfied and have positive perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in the dermatology clinic.

  11. Body Lice Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  12. General surgery residents' perception of robot-assisted procedures during surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farivar, Behzad S; Flannagan, Molly; Leitman, I Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the continued expansion of robotically assisted procedures, general surgery residents continue to receive more exposure to this new technology as part of their training. There are currently no guidelines or standardized training requirements for robot-assisted procedures during general surgical residency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this new technology on general surgery training from the residents' perspective. An anonymous, national, web-based survey was conducted on residents enrolled in general surgery training in 2013. The survey was sent to 240 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved general surgery training programs. Overall, 64% of the responding residents were men and had an average age of 29 years. Half of the responses were from postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 residents, and the remainder was from the PGY3 level and above. Overall, 50% of the responses were from university training programs, 32% from university-affiliated programs, and 18% from community-based programs. More than 96% of residents noted the availability of the surgical robot system at their training institution. Overall, 63% of residents indicated that they had participated in robotic surgical cases. Most responded that they had assisted in 10 or fewer robotic cases with the most frequent activities being assisting with robotic trocar placement and docking and undocking the robot. Only 18% reported experience with operating the robotic console. More senior residents (PGY3 and above) were involved in robotic cases compared with junior residents (78% vs 48%, p robotic case. Approximately 64% of residents reported that formal training in robotic surgery was important in residency training and 46% of residents indicated that robotic-assisted cases interfered with resident learning. Only 11% felt that robotic-assisted cases would replace conventional laparoscopic surgery in the future. This study illustrates that although the most residents

  13. Emergency Department Visits by Nursing Home Residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E.; Shah, Manish N.; Allman, Richard M.; Kilgore, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The Emergency Department (ED) is an important source of health care for nursing home residents. The objective of this study was to characterize ED use by nursing home residents in the United States (US). DESIGN Analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey SETTING US Emergency Departments, 2005-2008 PARTICIPANTS Individuals visiting US EDs, stratified by nursing home and non-nursing home residents. INTERVENTIONS None MEASUREMENTS We identified all ED visits by nursing home residents. We contrasted the demographic and clinical characteristics between nursing home residents and non-nursing home residents. We also compared ED resource utilization, length of stay and outcomes. RESULTS During 2005-2008, nursing home residents accounted for 9,104,735 of 475,077,828 US ED visits (1.9%; 95% CI: 1.8-2.1%). The annualized number of ED visits by nursing home residents was 2,276,184. Most nursing home residents were elderly (mean 76.7 years, 95% CI: 75.8-77.5), female (63.3%), and non-Hispanic White (74.8%). Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely have been discharged from the hospital in the prior seven days (adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Nursing home residents were more likely to present with fever (adjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.5-2.4) or hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.5-2.2). Nursing home patients were more likely to receive diagnostic test, imaging and procedures in the ED. Almost half of nursing home residents visiting the ED were admitted to the hospital. Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely to be admitted to the hospital (adjusted OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.1) and to die (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.3). CONCLUSIONS Nursing home residents account for over 2.2 million ED visits annually in the US. Compared with other ED patients, nursing home residents have higher medical acuity and complexity. These

  14. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  15. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  16. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  17. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  18. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  19. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  20. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  1. Clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver and manage residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene; Lombarts, Kiki; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Mann, Karen; Jacobs, Johanna; Scherpbier, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Residents learn by working in a multidisciplinary context, in different locations, with many clinical teachers. Although clinical teachers are collectively responsible for residency training, little is known about the way teaching teams function. We conducted a qualitative study to explore clinical teachers' views on how teaching teams deliver residency training. Data were collected during six focus group interviews in 2010. The analysis revealed seven teamwork themes: (1) clinical teachers were more passionate about clinical expertise than about knowledge of teaching and teamwork; (2) residents needed to be informed about clinical teachers' shared expectations; (3) the role of the programme director in the teaching team needed further clarification; (4) the main topics of discussion in teaching teams were resident performance and the division of teaching tasks; (5) the structural elements of the organisation of residency training were clear; (6) clinical teachers had difficulty giving and receiving feedback and (7) clinical teachers felt under pressure to be accountable for team performance to external parties. The clinical teachers did not consider teamwork to be of any great significance to residency training. Teachers' views of professionalism and their own experiences as residents may explain their non-teamwork directed attitude. Efforts to strengthen teamwork within teaching teams may impact positively on the quality of residency training.

  2. A simulation-based resident-as-teacher program: The impact on teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Sargsyan, Zaven; Heath, Janae K; Kohn, Rachel; Alba, George A; Gordon, James A; Currier, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is charged with improving resident teaching skills. Utilizing simulation in teacher training has unique advantages such as providing a controlled learning environment and opportunities for deliberate practice. We assessed the impact of a simulation-based resident-as-teacher (RaT) program. A RaT program was embedded in an existing 8-case simulation curriculum for 52 internal medicine (IM) interns. Residents participated in a workshop, then served as facilitators in the curriculum and received feedback from faculty. Residents' teaching and feed back skills were measured using a pre- and post-program self-assessment and post-session and post-curriculum evaluations by intern learners. Forty-one second- and third-year residents participated in the study August 2013 to October 2013 at a single center. Pre- and post-program teaching skills were assessed for 34 of 41 resident facilitators (83%) participating in 3.9 sessions on average. Partaking in the program led to improvements in resident facilitators' self-reported teaching and feedback skills across all domains. The most significant improvement was in teaching in a simulated environment (2.81 to 4.16, P model for the development of simulation curricula and RaT programs within IM residencies. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  3. Integration of QR codes into an anesthesia information management system for resident case log management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Weissman, Charles; Levin, Phillip D

    2015-04-01

    Quick response (QR) codes containing anesthesia syllabus data were introduced into an anesthesia information management system. The code was generated automatically at the conclusion of each case and available for resident case logging using a smartphone or tablet. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use and usability/user-friendliness of such system. Resident case logging practices were assessed prior to introducing the QR codes. QR code use and satisfactions amongst residents was reassessed at three and six months. Before QR code introduction only 12/23 (52.2%) residents maintained a case log. Most of the remaining residents (9/23, 39.1%) expected to receive a case list from the anesthesia information management system database at the end of their residency. At three months and six months 17/26 (65.4%) and 15/25 (60.0%) residents, respectively, were using the QR codes. Satisfaction was rated as very good or good. QR codes for residents' case logging with smartphones or tablets were successfully introduced in an anesthesia information management system and used by most residents. QR codes can be successfully implemented into medical practice to support data transfer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An app to enhance resident education in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Wayne D; Bent, John P; Moskowitz, Howard S

    2017-12-07

    Technological change is leading to an evolution in medical education. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of a medical knowledge app, called PulseQD, on resident education within our otolaryngology-head and neck surgery department at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Bronx, NY). A prospective cohort study was conducted within the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery from July 2016 to June 2017. All faculty attendings and residents were asked to participate in the study and were included. A Web and mobile-based app, PulseQD, that allowed for collaborative learning was implemented. Questionnaires were given at the beginning and end of the academic year. Otolaryngology Training Exam (OTE) scores were collected RESULTS: A total of 20 residents and 13 faculty members participated in the study. Residents used online sources of medical information significantly more often than faculty (90% and 54%, respectively, P = 0.0179). Residents and faculty felt that PulseQD offered a valuable perspective on clinically relevant medical information (P = 0.0003), was a great way to test clinical and medical knowledge (P = 0.0001), and improved the sharing and discussing of medical knowledge (P academic year. The implementation of a novel mobile app, PulseQD, was well received by residents and faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Preliminary data suggest that app-based learning may lead to improved performance on knowledge-based assessments. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Instruction in teaching and teaching opportunities for residents in US dermatology programs: Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Susan; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Newman, Lori R; Sullivan, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Dermatology residents routinely teach junior co-residents and medical students. Despite the importance of teaching skills for a successful academic career, no formal teaching instruction programs for dermatology residents have been described to our knowledge, and the extent of teaching opportunities for dermatology residents is unknown. We sought to describe the range of teaching opportunities and instruction available to dermatology residents and to assess the need for additional teaching training from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors nationwide. A questionnaire was administered to 113 US dermatology residency program directors or their designees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze questionnaire item responses. The response rate was 55% (62/113). All program directors reported that their residents teach; 59% (33/56) reported offering trainees teaching instruction; 11% (7/62) of programs offered a short-term series of formal sessions on teaching; and 7% (4/62) offered ongoing, longitudinal training. Most program directors (74%, 40/54) believed that their residents would benefit from more teaching instruction. Response rate and responder bias are potential limitations. Dermatology residents teach in a broad range of settings, over half receive some teaching instruction, and most dermatology residency program directors perceive a need for additional training for residents as teachers. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. International Residency Program Evaluation: Assessing the Reliability and Initial Validity of the ACGME-I Resident Survey in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Halah; Lindeman, Brenessa; Matarelli, Steven A; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2014-09-01

    Educators agree on the importance of assessing the quality of graduate medical education. In the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) resident survey is an important part of the accreditation process, yet some studies have questioned its validity. We assessed the reliability and acceptance of the ACGME-International (ACGME-I) resident survey in the culturally distinct, nonnative English-speaking resident population of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. A total of 158 residents in ACGME-I accredited institutions in Abu Dhabi received an online link to the ACGME-I survey. Reliability analysis was conducted using the Cronbach α. A focus group was then held with a convenience sample of 25 residents from different institutions and specialties to understand potential challenges encountered by survey participants. Completed surveys were received from 116 residents (73.4%). The 39 items in the survey demonstrated high reliability, with a Cronbach α of 0.918. Of the 5 subscales, 4 demonstrated acceptable to very good reliability, ranging from 0.72 to 0.888. The subscale "resources" had lower reliability at 0.584. Removal of a single item increased the Cronbach α to a near-acceptable score of 0.670. Focus group results indicated that the survey met standards for readability, length, and time for completion. The ACGME-I resident survey demonstrates acceptable reliability and validity for measuring the perceptions of residents in an international residency program. The data derived from the survey can offer an important set of metrics for educational quality improvement in the United Arab Emirates.

  7. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  8. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-yr Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judi A; Fitzsimons, Michael G; Pardo, Manuel C; Hawkins, Joy L; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D D; Keyes, Mary A; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J; Naim, Natale Z; Buckley, Jack C; Grogan, Tristan R; Steadman, Randolph H

    2016-07-01

    This multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-yr period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs' Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127 to 275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification (89 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups.

  9. 45 CFR 233.40 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... For purposes of this section: (1) A resident of a State is one: (i) Who is living in the State... resident of the State in which he or she is living other than on a temporary basis. Residence may not depend upon the reason for which the individual entered the State, except insofar as it may bear upon...

  10. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying the...

  11. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  12. Pioneering partnerships: Resident involvement from multiple perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; Abma, T.A.; Boelsma, F.; Woelders, S.

    2013-01-01

    Resident involvement in residential care homes is a challenge due to shortcomings of consumerist and formal approaches such as resident councils. The PARTNER approach aims to involve residents through collective action to improve their community life and wellbeing. The purpose of this article is to

  13. 24 CFR 206.39 - Principal residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal residence. 206.39 Section... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.39 Principal residence. The property must be the principal residence of each mortgagor at closing. For purposes of this section, the...

  14. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of household...

  15. Does Targeted Training Improve Residents' Teaching Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polreis, Sean; D'Eon, Marcel F.; Premkumar, Kalyani; Trinder, Krista; Bonnycastle, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Resident doctors have an important and integral responsibility of teaching a number of individuals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the University of Saskatchewan's resident-as-teacher training course--Teaching Improvement Project Systems (TIPS). Residents who attended the TIPS course from January, 2010 through June,…

  16. Negotiations of Acknowledgement among Middle Class Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Blom

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of communication processes between residents, between residents and people in the broader societal context as well as of media coverage of a fireworks disaster in a Danish suburb. It demonstrates how residents (all members of the Danish middle class) were able...

  17. Communications received from Member States regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Director General has received letters concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material from the following Resident Representatives to the International Atomic Energy Agency: a letter dated 28 February 1994 from the Resident Representative of France; letters dated 1 March 1994 from the Resident Representatives of Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America; and a letter dated 22 March 1994 from the Resident Representative of Romania [es

  18. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills

  19. Understanding resident ratings of teaching in the workplace: a multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Feskens, Remco; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel; Laan, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Providing clinical teachers with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve teaching. Evaluations are mostly based on questionnaires completed by residents. We investigated to what extent characteristics of residents, clinical teachers, and the clinical environment influenced these evaluations, and the relation between residents' scores and their teachers' self-scores. The evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching questionnaire (EFFECT) was used to (self)assess clinical teachers from 12 disciplines (15 departments, four hospitals). Items were scored on a five-point Likert scale. Main outcome measures were residents' mean overall scores (MOSs), specific scale scores (MSSs), and clinical teachers' self-evaluation scores. Multilevel regression analysis was used to identify predictors. Residents' scores and self-evaluations were compared. Residents filled in 1,013 questionnaires, evaluating 230 clinical teachers. We received 160 self-evaluations. 'Planning Teaching' and 'Personal Support' (4.52, SD .61 and 4.53, SD .59) were rated highest, 'Feedback Content' (CanMEDS related) (4.12, SD .71) was rated lowest. Teachers in affiliated hospitals showed highest MOS and MSS. Medical specialty did not influence MOS. Female clinical teachers were rated higher for most MSS, achieving statistical significance. Residents in year 1-2 were most positive about their teachers. Residents' gender did not affect the mean scores, except for role modeling. At group level, self-evaluations and residents' ratings correlated highly (Kendall's τ 0.859). Resident evaluations of clinical teachers are influenced by teacher's gender, year of residency training, type of hospital, and to a lesser extent teachers' gender. Clinical teachers and residents agree on strong and weak points of clinical teaching.

  20. Measuring general surgery residents' communication skills from the patient's perspective using the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausmire, Julie M; Cashen, Constance P; Myerholtz, Linda; Buderer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) has been used and validated to assess Family and Emergency Medicine resident communication skills from the patient's perspective. However, it has not been previously reported as an outcome measure for general surgery residents. The purpose of this study is to establish initial benchmarking data for the use of the CAT as an evaluation tool in an osteopathic general surgery residency program. Results are analyzed quarterly and used by the program director to provide meaningful feedback and targeted goal setting for residents to demonstrate progressive achievement of interpersonal and communication skills with patients. The 14-item paper version of the CAT (developed by Makoul et al. for residency programs) asks patients to anonymously rate surgery residents on discrete communication skills using a 5-point rating scale immediately after the clinical encounter. Results are reported as the percentage of items rated as "excellent" (5) by the patient. The setting is a hospital-affiliated ambulatory urban surgery office staffed by the residency program. Participants are representative of adult patients of both sexes across all ages with diverse ethnic backgrounds. They include preoperative and postoperative patients, as well as those needing diagnostic testing and follow-up. Data have been collected on 17 general surgery residents from a single residency program representing 5 postgraduate year levels and 448 patient encounters since March 2012. The reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool for surgery residents was 0.98. The overall mean percentage of items rated as excellent was 70% (standard deviations = 42%), with a median of 100%. The CAT is a useful tool for measuring 1 facet of resident communication skills-the patient's perception of the physician-patient encounter. The tool provides a unique and personalized outcome measure for identifying communication strengths and improvement opportunities, allowing residents to receive

  1. Expectations of iPad Use in an Internal Medicine Residency Program: Is It Worth the “Hype”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nancy; Chapman, Christopher G; Patel, Bhakti K; Woodruff, James N

    2013-01-01

    Background While early reports highlight the benefits of tablet computing in hospitals, introducing any new technology can result in inflated expectations. Objective The aim of the study is to compare anticipated expectations of Apple iPad use and perceptions after deployment among residents. Methods 115 internal medicine residents received Apple iPads in October 2010. Residents completed matched surveys on anticipated usage and perceptions after distribution 1 month prior and 4 months after deployment. Results In total, 99% (114/115) of residents responded. Prior to deployment, most residents believed that the iPad would improve patient care and efficiency on the wards; however, fewer residents “strongly agreed” after deployment (34% vs 15% for patient care, PiPad for placing orders post call and during admission (71% vs 44% post call, P=.01, and 16% vs 0% admission, P=.04). Previous Apple iOS product owners were also more likely to use the iPad in key areas. Overall, 84% of residents thought the iPad was a good investment for the residency program, and over half of residents (58%) reported that patients commented on the iPad in a positive way. Conclusions While the use of tablets such as the iPad by residents is generally well received, high initial expectations highlight the danger of implementing new technologies. Education on the realistic expectations of iPad benefits may be warranted. PMID:23656727

  2. Expectations of iPad use in an internal medicine residency program: is it worth the "hype"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nancy; Chapman, Christopher G; Patel, Bhakti K; Woodruff, James N; Arora, Vineet M

    2013-05-08

    While early reports highlight the benefits of tablet computing in hospitals, introducing any new technology can result in inflated expectations. The aim of the study is to compare anticipated expectations of Apple iPad use and perceptions after deployment among residents. 115 internal medicine residents received Apple iPads in October 2010. Residents completed matched surveys on anticipated usage and perceptions after distribution 1 month prior and 4 months after deployment. In total, 99% (114/115) of residents responded. Prior to deployment, most residents believed that the iPad would improve patient care and efficiency on the wards; however, fewer residents "strongly agreed" after deployment (34% vs 15% for patient care, PiPad for placing orders post call and during admission (71% vs 44% post call, P=.01, and 16% vs 0% admission, P=.04). Previous Apple iOS product owners were also more likely to use the iPad in key areas. Overall, 84% of residents thought the iPad was a good investment for the residency program, and over half of residents (58%) reported that patients commented on the iPad in a positive way. While the use of tablets such as the iPad by residents is generally well received, high initial expectations highlight the danger of implementing new technologies. Education on the realistic expectations of iPad benefits may be warranted.

  3. A SBIRT Curriculum for Medical Residents: Development of a Performance Feedback Tool to Build Learner Confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Hettema, Jennifer E.; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Manuel, Jennifer K.; Ciccarone, Daniel; Coffa, Diana; Jain, Sharad; Lum, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    A major barrier to actualizing the public health impact potential of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is the suboptimal development and implementation of evidence-based training curricula for healthcare providers. As part of a federal grant to develop and implement SBIRT training in medical residency programs, the authors assessed 95 internal medicine residents before they received SBIRT training to identify self-reported characteristics and behaviors that woul...

  4. Psychiatrists' and Psychiatry Residents' Attitudes Toward Transgender People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nareesa; Fleisher, William; Erickson, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Gender minority groups, such as transgender individuals, frequently encounter stigma, discrimination, and negative mental health outcomes, which can result in contact with mental health professionals. Recent studies suggest that negative attitudes toward transgender individuals are prevalent and measurable within the general population. The Genderism and Transphobia scale (GTS) measures anti-transgender feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. The purpose of this study was to use the GTS to conduct an investigation of psychiatrists' attitudes toward transgender individuals. A cross-sectional survey of n = 142 faculty members and residents from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Manitoba was conducted. Respondents completed an online survey consisting of demographic questions and the GTS. Responses were analyzed descriptively and compared to previously published data on the GTS. There was a trend for psychiatrists and psychiatry residents within this sample to endorse less negative attitudes toward transgender people compared to other published data using a sample of undergraduate students. Descriptive analyses suggest that psychiatrists' and psychiatry residents' GTS scores may be related to gender identity, political ideology, religiosity, and levels of both professional and personal contact. These data evoke optimism regarding psychiatrists' and psychiatry residents' attitudes toward transgender individuals. Additional larger-scale studies comparing this medical specialty group with other specialty groups will further elucidate factors that modify physician attitudes toward this patient population. These findings may contribute to the development of educational strategies to ensure that the transgender population receives medical treatment without stigma or attitudinal compromise.

  5. Simulation improves resident performance in catheter-based intervention: results of a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaer, Rabih A; Derubertis, Brian G; Lin, Stephanie C; Bush, Harry L; Karwowski, John K; Birk, Daniel; Morrissey, Nicholas J; Faries, Peter L; McKinsey, James F; Kent, K Craig

    2006-09-01

    Surgical simulation has been shown to enhance the training of general surgery residents. Since catheter-based techniques have become an important part of the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, we explored whether simulation might impact the acquisition of catheter skills by surgical residents. Twenty general surgery residents received didactic training in the techniques of catheter intervention. Residents were then randomized with 10 receiving additional training with the Procedicus, computer-based, haptic simulator. All 20 residents then participated in 2 consecutive mentored catheter-based interventions for lower extremity occlusive disease in an OR/angiography suite. Resident performance was graded by attending surgeons blinded to the resident's training status, using 18 procedural steps as well as a global rating scale. There were no differences between the 2 resident groups with regard to demographics or scores on a visuospatial test administered at study outset. Overall, residents exposed to simulation scored higher than controls during the first angio/OR intervention: procedural steps (simulation/control) (50 +/- 6 vs. 33 +/- 9, P = 0.0015); global rating scale (30 +/- 7 vs. 19 +/- 5, P = 0.0052). The advantage provided by simulator training persisted with the second intervention (53 +/- 6 vs. 36 +/- 7, P = 0.0006); global rating scale (33 +/- 6 vs. 21 +/- 6, P = 0.0015). Moreover, simulation training, particularly for the second intervention, led to enhancement in almost all of the individual measures of performance. Simulation is a valid tool for instructing surgical residents and fellows in basic endovascular techniques and should be incorporated into surgical training programs. Moreover, simulators may also benefit the large number of vascular surgeons who seek retraining in catheter-based intervention.

  6. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  7. Resident-Led Palliative Care Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Naomi; Cruz, Brian; Leigh, A E

    2016-04-01

    Despite the growth of palliative medicine, 39% of hospitals do not have palliative care teams for consultation or to provide resident education. We examined the impact of resident-led education in palliative care principles on attitudes toward and comfort with palliative medicine and end-of-life care among internal medicine residents. An educational module designed by the authors was presented to other internal medicine residents in the program. Pre- and post-intervention survey data measuring residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care were analyzed. Residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care on a 5-point Likert scale was analyzed. Following the intervention, participants reported improved comfort with general knowledge of palliative medicine (p palliative care and end-of-life care (p curriculum in palliative medicine can improve resident comfort within this still-under-represented area of medicine.

  8. Preventing Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan Fordney

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the beginning counselor with an overview of prevention concepts. Prevention is a relatively new emphasis in community efforts to stem the rising costs of substance abuse and other high-risk behaviors. The paper discusses agent, host, and environmental prevention models and how they relate to causal theories…

  9. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  10. Suicide Response Guidelines for Residency Trainees: A Novel Postvention Response for the Care and Teaching of Psychiatry Residents who Encounter Suicide in Their Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, Paulette T; Santiago, Patcho; Moulton, David; Moran, Scott; Tsai, Albert

    2015-08-01

    Suicide is an event that is almost universally encountered by psychiatrists and psychiatry residents. Because psychiatric patients are at a higher risk for completing suicide than patients of other specialties, psychiatry residents are at risk for experiencing the suicide of a patient during their training. A review of the literature shows that there is continually growing research into the negative emotional effects of patient suicides on psychiatry residents and the need for clear response protocols when a suicide occurs, also known as postvention protocols. However, there are no Graduate Medical Education requirements to specifically train psychiatry residents about this, even with a well-voiced desire by residents to receive this training. In the National Capitol Consortium Psychiatry Residency, encounters with patient suicides by residents in a time of war led us to a place in which interventions were designed and instituted to care for the caregiver, in this case focusing on psychiatry trainees. Our process and product, described here, offers an example of a systematic postvention response. It addresses aspects of what is known in the research base, combined with acknowledgement of the human response and the institutional need for a consistent and objective response.

  11. The Most Common Feedback Themes in Communication Skills Training in an Internal Medicine Residency Program: Lessons from the Resident Audio-Recording Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Papireddy, Muralidhar Reddy; Hingle, Susan T; Ferguson, Jacqueline Anne; Koschmann, Timothy; Sandstrom, Steve

    2017-05-03

    Individualized structured feedback is an integral part of a resident's learning in communication skills. However, it is not clear what feedback residents receive for their communication skills development in real patient care. We will identify the most common feedback topics given to residents regarding communication skills during Internal Medicine residency training. We analyzed Resident Audio-recording Project feedback data from 2008 to 2013 by using a content analysis approach. Using open coding and an iterative categorization process, we identified 15 emerging themes for both positive and negative feedback. The most recurrent feedback topics were Patient education, Thoroughness, Organization, Questioning strategy, and Management. The residents were guided to improve their communication skills regarding Patient education, Thoroughness, Management, and Holistic exploration of patient's problem. Thoroughness and Communication intelligibility were newly identified themes that were rarely discussed in existing frameworks. Assessment rubrics serve as a lens through which we assess the adequacy of the residents' communication skills. Rather than sticking to a specific rubric, we chose to let the rubric evolve through our experience.

  12. Potassium concentration in bone of Beijing residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lianqing

    1994-01-01

    The author presents the measuring results of K concentration in bone ash samples of 65 residents in Beijing area by atomic absorption spectrum. The results indicate that the K concentrations in bone ash is logarithmic normal distribution, ranging level is 0.75-8.44 g/kg ash, the average and standard deviation is respectively 2.40 and 1.52 g/kg ash. The highest concentration (4.88 g/kg ash) appears in infantile stage (< 1y), the lowest concentration (1.59 g/kg ash) appears in young stage (2-5 y). The lower concentration (1.88 g/kg ash) appears in adolescence (11-20 y). The K concentration in wet bone as a percentage of weight is 0.067%. The specific activities of K-40 in bone is about 22 mBq/g wet bone. The total radioactivity of K-40 in whole bone is 220 Bq. The annual absorbed dose is received in adult bone from K-40 is estimated to be 95 μGy

  13. Are Self-study Procedural Teaching Methods Effective? A Pilot Study of a Family Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Brandy; Langner, Shannon; Khodaee, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    A family medicine residency is a unique training environment where residents are exposed to care in multiple settings, across all ages. Procedures are an integral part of family medicine practice. Family medicine residency (FMR) programs are tasked with the job of teaching these skills at a level of intensity and frequency that allows a resident to achieve competency of such skills. In an environment that is limited by work hour restrictions, self-study teaching methods are one way to ensure all residents receive the fundamental knowledge of how to perform procedures. We developed and evaluated the efficacy of a self-study procedure teaching method and procedure evaluation checklist. A self-study procedure teaching intervention was created, consisting of instructional articles and videos on three procedures. To assess the efficacy of the intervention, and the competency of the residents, pre- and postintervention procedure performance sessions were completed. These sessions were reviewed and scored using a standardized procedure performance checklist. All 24 residents participated in the study. Overall, the resident procedure knowledge increased on two of the three procedures studied, and ability to perform procedure according to expert-validated checklist improved significantly on all procedures. A self-study intervention is a simple but effective way to increase and improve procedure training in a way that fits the complex scheduling needs of a residency training program. In addition, this study demonstrates that the procedure performance checklists are a simple and reliable way to increase assessment of resident procedure performance skills in a residency setting.

  14. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  15. CERN physicist receives Einstein Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 29 June the CERN theorist Gabriele Veneziano was awarded the prestigious Albert Einstein Medal for significant contributions to the understanding of string theory. This award is given by the Albert Einstein Society in Bern to individuals whose scientific contributions relate to the work of Einstein. Former recipients include exceptional physicists such as Murray Gell-Mann last year, but also Stephen Hawking and Victor Weisskopf. Gabriele Veneziano, a member of the integrated CERN Theory Team since 1977, led the Theory Division from 1994 to 1997 and has already received many prestigious prizes for his outstanding work, including the Enrico Fermi Prize (see CERN Courier, November 2005), the Dannie Heineman Prize for mathematical physics of the American Physical Society in 2004 (see Bulletin No. 47/2003), and the I. Ya. Pomeranchuk Prize of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow) in 1999.

  16. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  17. How to train radiology residents to diagnose pulmonary embolism using a dedicated MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren Rogberg, Anna; Nyrén, Sven; Westerlund, Eli; Lindholm, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as an alternative to computed tomography angiography (CTA) to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE). In previous studies, only senior radiologists have been evaluated as reviewers. To investigate if radiology residents can be trained to review MRI regarding PE and to determine the learning curve effects. Four residents independently went through a training program consisting of 70 participants that had undergone steady-state free precession MRI. The individuals were randomized into ten training sessions. For each exam, the review time and presence or absence of embolus was recorded. After completing each session, the residents received feedback on diagnostic accuracy compared to a consensus reading by two specialists. The residents were also presented with the corresponding CTA. The review time was nearly halved ( P  = 0.0002) during the training program. Comparing the first three sessions with the last three sessions for all residents, the review time decreased from 5:22 min to 2:51 min. The inter-reader agreement improved for all residents during the training program reaching a clinically acceptable level after seven sessions. Our study suggests that radiology residents can be trained to independently review MRI investigations regarding PE within a short training program. Similar training programs could be more extensively used as effective teaching method for residents.

  18. Attitudes of Nursing Facilities' Staff Toward Pharmacy Students' Interaction with its Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Donna; Gavaza, Paul; Deel, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    All Appalachian College of Pharmacy second-year students undertake the longitudinal geriatric early pharmacy practice experiences (EPPE) 2 course, which involves interacting with geriatric residents in two nursing facilities over two semesters. The study investigated the nursing staff's perceptions about the rotation and the pharmacy students' interaction with nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional study. Academic setting. 63 nursing facility staff. A 10-item attitude survey administered to nursing staff. Nursing staff attitude toward pharmacy students' interaction with geriatric residents during the course. Sixty-three responses were received (84% response rate). Most respondents were female (95.2%), who occasionally interacted with pharmacy students (54.8%) and had worked at the facilities for an average of 6.8 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.7) years. Staff reported that pharmacy students practiced interacting with geriatric residents and nursing facility staff, learned about different medications taken by residents as well as their life as a nursing facility resident. In addition, the student visits improved the mood of residents and staff's understanding of medicines, among others. Staff suggested that students spend more time with their residents in the facility as well as ask more questions of staff. The nursing facility staff generally had favorable attitudes about pharmacy students' visits in their nursing facility. Nursing facility staff noted that the geriatric rotation was a great learning experience for the pharmacy students.

  19. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. WE-G-BRA-05: Simulated Troubleshooting Session for Medical Physics Resident Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X; Wang, S; Chang, S; Burkhardt, K; Schreiber, E; Lawrence, M

    2012-06-01

    Troubleshooting is a difficult to train, but critical skill for a clinical medical physicist. It is unlikely that residents will have opportunities to troubleshoot many real clinical scenarios during a typical 3 month rotation. The ability to analyze and correct abnormal clinical situations is imperative to providing safe radiation therapy care. We have developed a novel strategy to train medical physics residents to gain such important clinical physics skill. Simulated troubleshooting sessions were designed for each rotation, featuring problematic clinical scenarios. The resident was required to troubleshoot each scenario in a given time frame. Using a brachytherapy rotation as an example, the transfer tubes connecting the afterloader to the Tandem and Ovoids (T&O) applicators were purposely inserted incorrectly. The resident was asked to deliver a dummy T&O plan in a reasonable time frame including troubleshooting all problems that may occur. Many simulated troubleshooting situations were presented to the resident. Two residents went through a 3 month brachytherapy rotation, one with and the other without the simulated troubleshooting session. All other rotation activities were the same. At the end of the rotation, an oral exam was given to test how well the residents understood the brachytherapy clinical practice. Both residents were able to pass the exam. However, the resident that received the troubleshooting session performed better'‴a superior understanding of the reasons behind the clinical practice and better troubleshooting skills were demonstrated. To train residents to better handle the clinical situations, it is important to include a simulated troubleshooting session into clinical rotations. Simulated troubleshooting sessions are excellent and necessary supplements to the clinical rotations for the residents to gain practical clinical skills. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Breaking Bad News: A Survey of Radiology Residents' Experiences Communicating Results to Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Anand; Dromi, Sergio; Meeks, Adam; Gomez, Erin; Lee, Bonmyong

    The practice of radiology often includes routine communication of diagnostic test results directly to patients in breast imaging and interventional radiology. There is increasing interest in expanding direct communication throughout radiology. Though these conversations can substantially affect patient well-being, there is limited evidence indicating that radiology residents are specifically taught methods to effectively convey imaging results to patients. Our purpose is to evaluate resident experience communicating imaging results to patients. An IRB-approved study with a total of 11 pilot-tested questions was used. Surveyed programs included radiology residents (PGY2-PGY5) at 2 urban residency programs. Online surveys were administered using SurveyMonkey and e-mailed to residents at both programs (starting November 20, 2015, completed March 31, 2016). Demographics were obtained with survey proportions compared using logistic regression (P < 0.05, statistically significant). A total of 73 residents responded (93.6% response rate) with similar response rates at each institution (P = 0.689). Most were male (71.2%) with 17.8% planning to go into breast imaging (21.9%, interventional radiology (IR)). Furthermore, 83.6% described no training in communicating radiology results to patients; 91.8% of residents communicated results with patients (87.7% diagnostic imaging tests and 57.5% biopsies). Residents most commonly communicated results in person (75.3%) followed by phone (64.4%), and 79.4% agreed or strongly agreed that additional training relaying results would be helpful. A large majority of radiology residents have communicated test results to patients, yet few have received training in how to communicate these results. A large majority of residents expressed interest in obtaining additional communication training. Additional research is required to determine ideal methods to educate residents on communicating test results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Receipt of preventive dental care among special-needs children enrolled in Medicaid: a crisis in need of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2008-10-01

    Although not widely recognized, tooth decay is the most common childhood chronic disease among children ages five to seventeen. Despite higher rates of dental caries and greater needs, low-income minority children enrolled in Medicaid are more likely to go untreated relative to their higher income counterparts. No research has examined this issue for children with special needs. We analyzed Medicaid enrollment and claims data for special-needs children enrolled in the District of Columbia Medicaid program to evaluate receipt of recommended preventive dental care. Use of preventive dental care is abysmally low and has declined over time. Enrollment in managed care rather than fee for service improves the likelihood that special-needs children receive recommended preventive dental services, whereas residing farther from the Metro is an impediment to receipt of dental care.

  3. Prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents in three training hospitals in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fnais, Naif; al-Nasser, Muhammad; Zamakhshary, Mohammad; Abuznadah, Wesam; Dhukair, Shahla Al; Saadeh, Mayssa; Al-Qarni, Ali; Bokhari, Bayan; Alshaeri, Taqreed; Aboalsamh, Nouf; Binahmed, AbdulAziz

    2013-01-01

    Multiple surveys of medical residents have shown a high incidence of harassment and discrimination in academic health centers. Harassment has a negative effects on residents' health and on their ability to function. No previous study has documented the prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents in Saudi Arabia. We aimed in this study to assess the prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents at a tertiary care academic hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Cross-sectional survey conducted at National Guard Hospitals in Riyadh, Jeddah and Al-Ahsa'a from 27 July to 20 August 2010. The survey included questions on the prevalence of harassment of different types, inlcuding verbal, academic, physical and sexual harassment, as well as discrimination on the basis of gender, region of origin or physical appearance. Of 380 residents, 213 (56%) returned a completed questionnaire (123 male, 57.8%). At least one of type of harassment and discrimination was reported by 83.6% of respondents. The most frequently reported forms were verbal harassment and gender discrimination (61.5% and 58.3%, respectively). Sexual harassment was commonly reported (19.3%) and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (P=.0061). Harassment and discrimination of Saudi residents is common with more than three-quarters reporting having had such an experience. Identification of the risk factors is a necessary first step in clarifying this issue and could be used when planning strategies for prevention.

  4. Frequency of prescribing errors by medical residents in various training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Brooke Lynn; Bray, Whitney M; Gomez, Michael R; Condren, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Medication errors are hazardous and costly. Children are at increased risk for medication errors because of weight-based dosing, limited FDA indications, and human calculation errors. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and type of resident prescribing errors in a pediatric clinic and further compare error rates of residents in different training programs. Resident prescription error data from a pediatric clinic was collected for 5 months. Upon detection of an error, residents were notified/given feedback regarding the type of error, ways to remedy errors, and future prevention methods. Data were categorized based on medication involved, error type, and resident training program. The review included 2941 prescriptions, with the overall resident prescribing error rate being 5.88%. The pediatric resident error rate was 4%. Family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics had error rates of 11%, 8%, and 7%, respectively. The prescribing error rate showed a statistically significant difference with pediatrics compared with family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics (P medication error type was overdose, followed by unclear quantity. Among the medication classes, topical agents and antimicrobials were among the top prescribed. Numerous types of medication errors occur in a pediatric clinic. Prescribing errors take place among all medical trainees; however, medication error rates in the pediatric population may vary among resident specialty. Identifying the cause of prescribing errors will allow institutions to create educational programs tailored for safe medication use in children as well as systemwide changes for error reduction.

  5. Tetanus immunization: perception of residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhande Priti P, Beri Shirish G, Patel Hardik R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of tetanus is far easier than its treatment where mortality is very high. Most cases of tetanus occur due to lack of proper vaccination against the disease and incomplete immunization on exposure. Residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital constitute the first contact physicians for patients. Aim: To assess the perception about Tetanus immunization among residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Pune city. Methodology: A pre tested questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge & recommendations about tetanus immunization among randomly selected 157 residents. Results: 73.25% residents were not aware of the number of doses of tetanus vaccine recommended for children under the age of 16 years. Around 50% residents were not aware of the recommended number of doses of tetanus vaccine for adults over the age of 16 years and during pregnancy. Nearly 60% of the residents considered the wound after every injury to be tetanus prone. 75.8% of residents thought burn injuries to be prone to the development of tetanus while 13.4% and 36.9% of the residents did not consider animal bite and human bite to be tetanus prone respectively. 99.4% residents considered tetanus toxoid administration in wound with rusted iron. The knowledge regarding tetanus immunization in relation to the wound categories depending on the immunization status of the patients was very poor amongst the residents. Conclusion: Better awareness and adherence of tetanus prophylaxis recommendations is needed in residents who are the first tier of health care providers in teaching hospitals.

  6. Financial and Time Burdens for Medical Students Interviewing for Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Paul; Melhado, Trisha; Walling, Anne; Groskurth, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Interviewing for residency positions is increasingly stressful for students and challenging for programs. Little information is available about the costs and time invested by students in interviewing or about the key factors in decisions to accept interview offers. Our objective was to assess the time and financial costs of residency interviewing for an entire class at a regional campus and explore factors influencing student decisions to accept interviews. We used a 14-item survey administered electronically immediately following National Resident Matching Program results. The response rate was 75% (49 of 65 students). About half interviewed in primary care specialties. Thirty students (63%) applied to 20 or more programs, and 91% were offered multiple interviews out of state. Seventy percent limited interviews by time and cost. Other important factors included personal "fit," program reputation, and the quality of residents. About 50% of the students spent more than 20 days and $1,000-$5,000 interviewing; 29% reported spending over $5,000. Students used multiple funding sources, predominantly loans and savings. Primary care applicants applied to fewer out-of-state programs, reported fewer interview days and lower expenses, but received more financial support from programs. Students invested considerable time and resources in interviewing, and these factors significantly influenced their decisions about accepting interviews. The other major factors in interview decisions concerned personal comfort with the program, especially the residents. The costs and time reported in this study could be greater than other schools due to the regional campus location or lower due to the high proportion of students interviewing in primary care.

  7. Facilitators and barriers influencing the readiness to receive dental implants in a geriatric institutionalised population-A randomized non-invasive interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Miriam A; Terheyden, Hendrik; Huber, Christian G; Seixas, Azizi A; Schoetzau, Andreas; Schneeberger, Andres R

    2017-09-01

    Although elderly people have many serious dental issues and are in need of prosthesis, few opt for dental implants. The aim of this study was to investigate barriers that prevent elderly people from receiving dental implants. Specifically, we examined (i) whether the message was delivered before or after the interview had an impact, and (ii) whether it did matter who delivered the message. Sixty-six residents from seven residential homes in the Canton of Grisons, Switzerland were included. The sample was randomized to a treatment group that received comprehensive education about dental implants before the interview and a control group that received education after completing the questionnaire. The sample consisted of 54 women (81.8%) and 12 males (18.2%) with an average age of 86.2 years. Education before the interview did not show any impact on the attitude towards dental implants. Main reasons for a negative attitude towards implants were old age and high costs. Participants who received information about implants from their relatives and their own dentist and not from the study dentist were significantly more willing to receive implants. Providing an adequate education about benefits and risks of receiving dental implants does not change the attitude towards dental implants. The source of information/messenger does influence attitudes towards implants. If the person delivering the education and information is a relative or a known medical person, the person's attitude is more likely to change as compared to people receiving the information from an unrelated person. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PNEUMONIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Eržen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in advanced age. Prognosis of the disease depends on premorbid condition and immune competence of the patient, severity of the disease and causative microorganism. In our analysis we wanted to establish clinical, x-ray and microbiological characteristics of pneumonia in nursing home residents, estimate suitability of therapeutic measures and find out risk factors for adverse outcome in this group of patients.Material and methods. This retrospective study includes all nursing home residents hospitalised due to CAP in Hospital Golnik in 2000. Clinical data was/were evaluated according to case history. Microbiological data and laboratory results were gathered from the patients files. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis.Results. 30 patients, 17 women were included, aged 82.5 ± 11.7 years. 60% of patients had at least 2 accompanying diseases, most frequently cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. At admittance 83% of patients presented with severe form of the disease. Dispnea (93%, tachypnea, cough (67% and confusion (47% dominate clinical picture. Patients rarely expectorate, are frequently hypoxemic (93%, have leucocytosis (63%, electrolyte disturbances and elevated urea (67%. According to the microbiologic results most frequent causative agents are Enterobacteriae, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and also some multiresistant bacteria. Amoxycillin with clavulanic acid was the most frequently used antibiotic, followed by macrolides and 3rd generation cephalosporines.9 patients died, mortality rate was 30%. Their average age was 83,4 years, 67% of them had more than 2 accompanying diseases, all of them severe form of the disease, 89% severe respiratory insufficiency and 22% positive hemoculture.Conclusions. Patients are characterised with numerous comorbidities and advanced age. Clinical presentation is unspecific. Mortality is high

  9. Learning environment: assessing resident experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byszewski, Anna; Lochnan, Heather; Johnston, Donna; Seabrook, Christine; Wood, Timothy

    2017-06-01

    Given their essential role in developing professional identity, academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment (LE). We describe the experience of introducing a novel and practical tool in postgraduate programmes. The Learning Environment for Professionalism (LEP) survey, validated in the undergraduate setting, is relatively short, with 11 questions balanced for positive and negative professionalism behaviours. LEP is anonymous and focused on rotation setting, not an individual, and can be used on an iterative basis. We describe how we implemented the LEP, preliminary results, challenges encountered and suggestions for future application. Academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment METHODS: The study was designed to test the feasibility of introducing the LEP in the postgraduate setting, and to establish the validity and the reliability of the survey. Residents in four programmes completed 187 ratings using LEP at the end of one of 11 rotations. The resident response rate was 87 per cent. Programme and rotation ratings were similar but not identical. All items rated positively (favourably), but displays of altruism tended to have lower ratings (meaning less desirable behaviour was witnessed), as were ratings for derogatory comments (again meaning that less desirable behaviour was witnessed). We have shown that the LEP is a feasible and valid tool that can be implemented on an iterative basis to examine the LE. Two LEP questions in particular, regarding derogatory remarks and demonstrating altruism, recorded the lowest scores, and these areas deserve attention at our institution. Implementation in diverse programmes is planned at our teaching hospitals to further assess reliability. This work may influence other postgraduate programmes to introduce this assessment tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  10. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  11. Understanding how residents' preferences for supervisory methods change throughout residency training: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Vega, Francisco; Dolmans, Diana; Donkers, Jeroen; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-10-16

    A major challenge for clinical supervisors is to encourage their residents to be independent without jeopardising patient safety. Residents' preferences according to level of training on this regard have not been completely explored. This study has sought to investigate which teaching methods of the Cognitive Apprenticeship (CA) model junior, intermediate and senior residents preferred and why, and how these preferences differed between groups. We invited 301 residents of all residency programmes of Javeriana University, Bogotá, Colombia, to participate. Each resident was asked to complete a Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCTQ), which, being based on the teaching methods of CA, asked residents to rate the importance to their learning of each teaching method and to indicate which of these they preferred the most and why. A total of 215 residents (71 %) completed the questionnaire. All concurred that all CA teaching methods were important or very important to their learning, regardless of their level of training. However, the reasons for their preferences clearly differed between groups: junior and intermediate residents preferred teaching methods that were more supervisor-directed, such as modelling and coaching, whereas senior residents preferred teaching methods that were more resident-directed, such as exploration and articulation. The results indicate that clinical supervision (CS) should accommodate to residents' varying degrees of development by attuning the configuration of CA teaching methods to each level of residency training. This configuration should initially vest more power in the supervisor, and gradually let the resident take charge, without ever discontinuing CS.

  12. A realistic approach towards hand hygiene for long-term care residents and health care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweon, Steven J; Kirk, Jane

    2011-05-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The World Health Organization's hand hygiene recommendations focus on health care personnel in all health care settings. In the long-term care facility (LTCF) environment, where, for many residents, the LTCF is also their home, the recommendations may not be applicable to commonly encountered LTCF situations. The recommendations also do not address the importance of resident hand hygiene program to promote health and prevent infection. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Communications received from Members regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    On 13 December 1990 the Director General received a letter dated 10 December 1990 from the Resident Representative of Austria to the Agency in the same terms as the letter and its Annex reproduced in document INFCIRC/209/Rev.1. That document deals with communications received from Members regarding the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material [es

  14. Communications received from Members regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    On 13 December 1990 the Director General received a letter dated 10 December 1990 from the Resident Representative of Austria to the Agency in the same terms as the letter and its Annex reproduced in document INFCIRC/209/Rev.1. That document deals with communications received from Members regarding the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material [ru

  15. Communications received from Members regarding the Export of Nuclear Material and of Certain Categories of Equipment and other Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    On 13 December 1990 the Director General received a letter dated 10 December 1990 from the Resident Representative of Austria to the Agency in the same terms as the letter and its Annex reproduced in document INFCIRC/209/Rev.1. That document deals with communications received from Members regarding the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material

  16. Observer Variability and the Performance between Faculties and Residents: US Criteria for Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Chang Suk; Jung, So Lyung

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the interobserver variability and performance in the interpretation of ultrasonographic (US) findings of thyroid nodules. 72 malignant nodules and 61 benign nodules were enrolled as part of this study. Five faculty radiologists and four residents independently performed a retrospective analysis of the US images. The observers received one training session after the first interpretation and then performed a secondary interpretation. Agreement was analyzed by Cohen's kappa statistic. Degree of performance was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Agreement between the faculties was fair-to-good for all criteria; however, between residents, agreement was poor-to-fair. The area under the ROC curves was 0.72, 0.62, and 0.60 for the faculties, senior residents, and junior residents, respectively. There was a significant difference in performance between the faculties and the residents (p < 0.05). There was a significant increase in the agreement for some criteria in the faculties and the senior residents after the training session, but no significant increase in the junior residents. Independent reporting of thyroid US performed by residents is undesirable. A continuous and specialized resident training is essential to enhance the degree of agreement and performance

  17. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  18. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  19. Results of the 2004 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shilpen; Jagsi, Reshma; Wilson, John; Frank, Steven; Thakkar, Vipul V.; Hansen, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to document adequacy of training, career plans after residency, use of the in-service examination, and motivation for choice of radiation oncology as a specialty. Methods and Materials: In 2004, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology residents in the United States. Results: The survey was returned by 297 residents (response rate, 54%). Of the respondents, 29% were female and 71% male. The most popular career choice was joining an established private practice (38%), followed by a permanent academic career (29%). Residents for whom a permanent academic career was not their first choice were asked whether improvements in certain areas would have led them to be more likely to pursue an academic career. The most commonly chosen factors that would have had a strong or moderate influence included higher salary (81%), choice of geographic location (76%), faculty encouragement (68%), and less time commitment (68%). Of respondents in the first 3 years of training, 78% believed that they had received adequate training to proceed to the next level of training. Of those in their fourth year of training, 75% believed that they had received adequate training to enter practice. Conclusions: Multiple factors affect the educational environment of physicians in training. Data describing concerns unique to resident physicians in radiation oncology are limited. The current survey was designed to explore a variety of issues confronting radiation oncology residents. Training programs and the Residency Review Committee should consider these results when developing new policies to improve the educational experiences of residents in radiation oncology

  20. Professionalism Training For Surgical Residents: Documenting the Advantages of a Professionalism Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Mark S; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra; Gillespie, Colleen; Pachter, H Leon

    2016-09-01

    Professionalism education is a vital component of surgical training. This research attempts to determine whether an annual, year-long professionalism curriculum in a large surgical residency can effectively change professionalism attitudes. The ACGME mandated 6 competencies in 2003. The competencies of Professionalism and Interpersonal/Professional Communication Skills had never been formally addressed in surgical resident education in the past. A professionalism curriculum was developed focusing on specific resident professionalism challenges: admitting mistakes, effective communication with colleagues at all levels, delivering the news of an unexpected death, interdisciplinary challenges of working as a team, the cultural challenge of obtaining informed consent through an interpreter, and the stress of surgical practice on you and your family. These professionalism skills were then evaluated with a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Identical OSCE scenarios were administered to 2 cohorts of surgical residents: in 2007 (before instituting the professionalism curriculum in 2008) and again in 2014. Surgical residents were rated by trained Standardized Patients according to a behaviorally anchored professionalism criteria checklist. An analysis of variance was conducted of overall OSCE professionalism scores (% well done) as the dependent variable for the 2 resident cohorts (2007 vs 2014). The 2007 residents received a mean score of 38% of professionalism items "well done" (SD 9%) and the 2014 residents received a mean 59% "well done" (SD 8%). This difference is significant (F = 49.01, P Professionalism education has improved surgical resident understanding, awareness, and practice of professionalism in a statistically significant manner from 2007 to 2014. This documented improvement in OSCE performance reflects the value of a professionalism curriculum in the care of the patients we seek to serve.

  1. Knowledge and attitudes about HIV infection and prevention of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and attitudes about HIV infection and prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV in an urban, low income community in Durban, South Africa: Perspectives of residents and health care volunteers.

  2. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management.

  3. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES 14-HOME...

  4. An examination of mobbing and burnout of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmetaş, Elif; Top, Mehmet; Ergin, Gülpembe

    2011-01-01

    Mobbing and burnout in human resources management are important topics in labor psychology. It is important to research the levels of mobbing and burnout of human resources in the health sector, primarily in doctors. Although there have been some studies on the mobbing and burnout of doctors, there has been a limited number of studies on the relationship between mobbing and burnout in the health sector. This study aims to examine the relationship between mobbing and burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment) levels of resident doctors at a public university research and training hospital in Turkey and to investigate whether mobbing and burnout levels vary significantly according to gender, marital status, medical branch and age. This study was conducted on resident doctors at the Ondokuz Mayıs University Research and Training Hospital between 01.04.2009 and 30.06.2009. Legal permission for the study was received from the Rector's Office of Ondokuz Mayıs University. The Maslach Burnout Inventory for measuring burnout levels in doctors and the Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror for measuring doctors' mobbing levels were the research instruments employed. Sampling was not used in this study. The aim was to administer the research instruments to all the residents (the universe of this study consisted of 510 assistant doctors). 52.94 % of residents responded to all of the questions in these instruments. In the data analysis, a t-test, ANOVA, regression analysis and descriptive statistics were used. At the end of the analyses, it was found that the mean mobbing level of residents is 1.97; the mean emotional exhaustion level of residents is 2.97; the mean level of depersonalization is 2.95; and the mean level of personal accomplishment is 2.94. Mobbing and burnout levels of residents vary significantly in terms of medical branch. This study indicated that there are relationships between mobbing, emotional exhaustion

  5. Lunar Receiving Laboratory Project History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, Susan; Larsen, William

    2004-01-01

    As early as 1959, the Working Group on Lunar Exploration within NASA advocated that 'one of the prime objectives of the first lunar landing mission should be the collection of samples for return to Earth, where they could be subjected to detailed study and analysis.' Within NASA, neither this group nor any other scientists working with the Agency were concerned about back contamination issues. Outside of NASA, back contamination concerns had been raised as early as 1960. Although NASA did not seem to pay any attention to the concerns at that time, the scientific community continued to be interested in the topic. In 1962 and again in 1963, as the Apollo Program loomed large, further discussions were held. These early discussions of back contamination did not make their way into NASA's administration, however, and when Manned Spacecraft Center personnel began to articulate early concepts for the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL), the back contamination issue was not considered. Once this concern became a major focus, however, the LRL's development became increasingly complex. This is the history of that development.

  6. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen ...

  7. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise ...

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 ...

  9. Dealing with female sexuality: training, attitude, and practice of obstetrics and gynecology residents from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Teresa Cristina Souza Barroso; de Souza, Eduardo; da Silva, Ivaldo; Torloni, Maria Regina; Ribeiro, Meireluci Costa; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama

    2015-05-01

    There is little research on how obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residents deal with female sexuality, especially during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to assess the training, attitude, and practice of Ob/Gyn residents about sexuality. A cross-sectional survey of Brazilian Ob/Gyn residents enrolling in an online sexology course was conducted. A questionnaire assessed their training in sexuality during medical school and residency and their attitude and practice on sexual issues during pregnancy. Training, attitude, and practice of Ob/Gyn residents regarding sexuality were the main outcome measures. A total of 197 residents, from 21 different programs, answered the online questionnaire. Mean age was 27.9 ± 2.2, most were female (87%), single (79%), and had graduated in the last 5 years (91%). Almost two-thirds (63%) stated that they did not receive any training at all and 28% reported having only up to 6 hours of training about sexuality in medical school. Approximately half of the respondents (49%) stated that they had received no formal training about sexuality during their residency up to that moment and 29% had received ≤6 hours of training. Over half (56%) never or rarely took a sexual history, 51% stated that they did not feel competent or confident to answer their pregnant patients' questions about sexuality, and 84% attributed their difficulties in dealing with sexual complaints to their lack of specific knowledge on the topic. The vast majority of Brazilian Ob/Gyn residents enrolling in a sexuality course had little previous formal training on this topic in medical school and during their residency programs. Most residents do not take sexual histories of pregnant patients, do not feel confident in answering questions about sexuality in pregnancy, and attribute these difficulties to lack of knowledge. These findings point to a clear need for additional training in sexuality among Brazilian Ob/Gyn residents. © 2015 International Society for

  10. [Heart failure in nursing home residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, M A M J; Hamers, J P H; Brunner-la Rocca, H P; Schols, J M G A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of heart failure (HF) in nursing home residents and to gain insight into the clinical characteristics of residents with heart failure. Multi-centre, observational, cross-sectional study. 501 nursing home residents aged 65 years and over, in a department for chronic somatic diseases or a psychogeriatric department, participated in this study. The diagnosis of HF and the related characteristics were based on data collected from clinical examinations for heart failure (including history, physical examination, ECG, cardiac markers and echocardiography), patient records and questionnaires. A panel of two cardiologists and an internist-geriatrician made the final diagnosis of HF. The prevalence of HF in nursing home residents was 33%. Dyspnoea, oedema and a history of cardiac disease were more common in residents with heart failure. Diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also appeared to be more prevalent in this group. In 54% of the residents with HF, the diagnosis had not previously been made. Diagnosis of HF was not confirmed by the expert panel in 31% of residents with a history of HF. Heart failure does indeed appear to be very prevalent in nursing home residents. Heart failure had not been previously diagnosed in many cases but also a previous diagnosis of heart failure could be disproved in many participants. It is therefore important that the diagnostic process for heart failure in nursing home residents be improved.

  11. Radiology residents' experience with intussusception reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, Cyrus; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Li, Chin-Shang

    2011-06-01

    Residents should be exposed to adequate procedural volume to act independently upon completion of training. Informal inquiry led us to question whether residents encounter enough intussusception reductions to become comfortable with the procedure. We sought to determine radiology residents' exposure to intussusception reductions, and whether their experiences vary by region or institution. U.S. radiology residency program directors were asked to encourage their residents to complete a 12-question online survey describing characteristics of their pediatric radiology department, experiences with intussusception reduction, and confidence in their own ability to perform the procedure. Six hundred sixty-four residents responded during the study period. Of those, 308 (46.4%) had not experienced an intussusception reduction, and 228 (34%) had experienced only one or two. Twenty-two percent of fourth-year residents had never experienced an intussusception reduction, and 21% had experienced only one. Among second- through fourth-year residents, only 99 (18.3%) felt confident that they could competently reduce an intussusception (P Radiology residents have limited opportunity to learn intussusception reduction and therefore lack confidence. Most think they would benefit from additional training with a computer-simulation model.

  12. Internal medicine residency training in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hatice; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Medical school entrance depends on passing a central examination that is given annually by the National Selection and Placement Center. Undergraduate medical education takes 6 years. About 5000 students graduate from medical faculties annually. The central exam necessary for residency training is given by the National Selection and Placement Center. A Specialist Training Regulation regulates residency training. Internal medicine residency training takes 4 years and includes inpatient and outpatient care in wards and rotations. Residents prepare a dissertation that is used in the evaluation of residency competency. At the end of the residency period, residents who have been successful in previous evaluations take an oral exam followed by a written exam, which lead to their certification in internal medicine. Residents' scientific knowledge and skills are assessed by a jury consisting of five people, four from the same department and one from the equivalent department in another training institution. The title of specialist is granted after a certification exam given by training institutions and approved by the Ministry of Health. Internists are mainly employed in state hospitals, which are under the Ministry of Health. Subspecialty areas in internal medicine include gastroenterology, geriatrics, endocrinology, nephrology, hematology, rheumatology, immunology, allergology, and oncology. The training period for a subspecialty is 2 years. A substantial effort is being made all over the country to improve regulations and health care service delivery. These changes will also affect the residency training and manpower planning and employment of internists.

  13. The challenges of residents teaching neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Samuel A; Józefowicz, Ralph F

    2004-07-01

    Teaching is integrated into the daily practice of residents, and it is a skill necessary for practice as well as academics. The settings in which teaching and learning take place are ubiquitous but include classrooms, small groups, bedside rounds, and grand rounds. Given the learning environment of residency, neurology residents should have working knowledge of basic principles of effective teaching to make learning successful. Teaching also reinforces knowledge, and residents will likely be better practitioners if some basic skills of teaching are practiced. Neurology teaching techniques for residents are rarely addressed in the medical literature. Although information regarding teaching principles in medicine exists, there is little information regarding how residents teach. We examine and review some of the more effective methods and appreciated qualities in teachers, with a particular emphasis for the neurology resident. We also review whom neurologists need to teach and the various settings in which teaching may take place. Neurology residents encounter a variety of audiences in a variety of settings that require diverse teaching skills to effectively convey information to other providers as well as patients. The majority of these skills should be learned in residency to establish a foundation for teaching, regardless of future practice settings.

  14. Review of BPA funded sturgeon, resident fish and wildlife projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 19--21, 1991, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. This document list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leader's presentation

  15. Radioactive contamination in monitors received for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Paulo S.; Santos, Gilvan C. dos; Brunelo, Maria Antonieta G.; Paula, Tiago C. de; Pires, Marina A.; Borges, Jose C.

    2013-01-01

    The Calibration Laboratory - LABCAL, from the Research Center for Metrology and Testing - METROBRAS, MRA Comercio de Instrumentos Eletronicos Ltda., began activities in October 2008 and, in August 2009, decided to establish a procedure for monitoring tests, external and internal, of all packages received from customers, containing instruments for calibration. The aim was to investigate possible contamination radioactive on these instruments. On July 2011, this procedure was extended to packagings of personal thermoluminescent dosemeters - TLD, received by the newly created Laboratory Laboratorio de Dosimetria Pessoal - LDP . In the monitoring procedure were used monitors with external probe, type pancake, MRA brand, models GP - 500 and MIR 7028. During the 37 months in which this investigation was conducted, were detected 42 cases of radioactive contamination, with the following characteristics: 1) just one case was personal dosimeter, TLD type; 2) just one case was not from a packing from nuclear medicine service - was from a mining company; 3) contamination occurred on packs and instruments, located and/or widespread; 4) contamination values ranged from slightly above the level of background radiation to about a thousand fold. Although METROBRAS has facilities for decontamination, in most cases, especially those of higher contamination, the procedure followed was to store the contaminated material in a room used for storage of radioactive sources. Periodically, each package and/or instrument was monitored, being released when the radiation level matched the background radiation. Every contamination detected, the client and/or owner of the instrument was informed. The Brazilian National Energy Commission - CNEN, was informed, during your public consultation for reviewing the standard for nuclear medicine services, held in mid-2012, having received from METROBRAS the statistical data available at the time. The high frequency of contamination detected and the high

  16. What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Lindsay; Kassam, Zain; Burke, Andrew; Wasi, Parveen; Neary, John

    2014-12-01

    Residents have a critical role in the education of medical students and have a unique teaching relationship because of their close proximity in professional development and opportunities for direct supervision. Although there is emerging literature on ways to prepare residents to be effective teachers, there is a paucity of data on what medical students believe are the attributes of successful resident teachers. We sought to define the qualities and teaching techniques that learners interested in internal medicine value in resident teachers. We created and administered a resident-as-teacher traits survey to senior medical students from 6 medical schools attending a resident-facilitated clinical conference at McMaster University. The survey collected data on student preferences of techniques employed by resident teachers and qualities of a successful resident teacher. Of 90 student participants, 80 (89%) responded. Respondents found the use of clinical examples (78%, 62 of 80) and repetition of core concepts (71%, 58 of 80) highly useful. In contrast, most respondents did not perceive giving feedback to residents, or receiving feedback from residents, was useful to their learning. With respect to resident qualities, respondents felt that a strong knowledge base (80%, 64 of 80) and tailoring teaching to the learner's level (83%, 66 of 80) was highly important. In contrast, high expectations on the part of resident supervisors were not valued. This multicenter survey provides insight into the perceptions of medical students interested in internal medicine on the techniques and qualities that characterize successful resident teachers. The findings may be useful in the future development of resident-as-teacher curricula.

  17. Recognizing and Treating Malaria in U.S. Residents

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-06-09

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: It's a Small World After All: Dengue and Malaria in U.S. Residents - Recognizing and Treating These Mosquito-borne Diseases. CDC's David Townes discusses clinical presentation, transmission, prevention strategies, new treatments, and malaria resources available to health care providers.  Created: 6/9/2010 by Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health and Emergency Communication System (ECS)/Joint Information Center (JIC); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 6/15/2010.

  18. Early Death from Rabies Despite of Receiving Immunoglobulin and Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Sadeghi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a viral disease with the high rate of mortality, which is non-curable after presenting clinical signs weather in humans or animals. Persons who are bitten by suspicious animals can be protected from rabies, in case of early referring to the health care preventive centers. However, the rate of durability and safety are questionable among those received immunoglobulin and vaccine. Here, it was reported a 57 year-old woman who was bitten by a jackal and died, despite of receiving immunoglobulin and rabies vaccine.  

  19. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  20. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help number 1-800-222-1222 on the ... or empty container of a toxic substance, call Poison Help immediately. More than a million American children ...

  1. Barriers and Facilitators to Effective Feedback: A Qualitative Analysis of Data From Multispecialty Resident Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shalini T; Zegarek, Matthew H; Fromme, H Barrett; Ryan, Michael S; Schumann, Sarah-Anne; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-06-01

    Despite the importance of feedback, the literature suggests that there is inadequate feedback in graduate medical education. We explored barriers and facilitators that residents in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and surgery experience with giving and receiving feedback during their clinical training. Residents from 3 geographically diverse teaching institutions were recruited to participate in focus groups in 2012. Open-ended questions prompted residents to describe their experiences with giving and receiving feedback, and discuss facilitators and barriers. Data were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with a grounded theory approach. A total of 19 residents participated in 1 of 3 focus groups. Five major themes related to feedback were identified: teacher factors, learner factors, feedback process, feedback content, and educational context. Unapproachable attendings, time pressures due to clinical work, and discomfort with giving negative feedback were cited as major barriers in the feedback process. Learner engagement in the process was a major facilitator in the feedback process. Residents provided insights for improving the feedback process based on their dual roles as teachers and learners. Time pressures in the learning environment may be mitigated by efforts to improve the quality of teacher-learner relationships. Forms for collecting written feedback should be augmented by faculty development to ensure meaningful use. Efforts to improve residents' comfort with giving feedback and encouraging learners to engage in the feedback process may foster an environment conducive to increasing feedback.

  2. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Burt, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Gimotty, Phyllis A. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric, E-mail: eric.ojerholm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase i