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Sample records for residents prescribed antipsychotics

  1. Influences on Decision-Making Regarding Antipsychotic Prescribing in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of Qualitative Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran A; Dennehy, Rebecca; Sinnott, Carol; Browne, John; Byrne, Stephen; McSharry, Jennifer; Coughlan, Eoin; Timmons, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Antipsychotic prescribing is prevalent in nursing homes for the management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), despite the known risks and limited effectiveness. Many studies have attempted to understand this continuing phenomenon, using qualitative research methods, and have generated varied and sometimes conflicting findings. To date, the totality of this qualitative evidence has not been systematically collated and synthesized. To synthesize the findings from individual qualitative studies on decision-making and prescribing behaviors for antipsychotics in nursing home residents with dementia, with a view to informing intervention development and quality improvement in this field. A systematic review and synthesis of qualitative evidence was conducted (PROSPERO protocol registration CRD42015029141). Six electronic databases were searched systematically from inception through July 2016 and supplemented by citation, reference, and gray literature searching. Studies were included if they used qualitative methods for both data collection and analysis, and explored antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes for the purpose of managing BPSD. The Critical Appraisal Skills Program assessment tool was used for quality appraisal. A meta-ethnography was conducted to synthesize included studies. The Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research approach was used to assess the confidence in individual review findings. All stages were conducted by at least 2 independent reviewers. Of 1534 unique records identified, 18 met the inclusion criteria. Five key concepts emerged as influencing decision-making: organizational capacity; individual professional capability; communication and collaboration; attitudes; regulations and guidelines. A "line of argument" was synthesized and a conceptual model constructed, comparing this decision-making process to a dysfunctional negative feedback loop. Our synthesis indicates that when all stakeholders

  2. Prevalence and Correlates of “High Dose” Antipsychotic Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: High dose antipsychotic prescribing is common in psychiatric care, despite a lack of its benefit from research evidence. While several studies have explored the prevalence and factors associated with high dose antipsychotic prescribing, no such report has emanated from a developing country like Nigeria.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of “High Dose” Antipsychotic Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of high dose prescriptions. We also noted a change in the patterns of antipsyhotics prescribed at this center. In a previous study on psychotropic drug prescribing at this hospital in 2007,[21] it was found that haloperidol was the most commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug, followed by chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine.

  4. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Antipsychotic Prescribing Guidelines to Nursing Homes: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

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    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Mazor, Kathleen; Lemay, Celeste A; Kanaan, Abir O; Donovan, Jennifer L; Briesacher, Becky A; Peterson, Daniel; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to translate and disseminate evidence-based guidelines about atypical antipsychotic use to nursing homes (NHs). Three-arm, cluster randomized trial. NHs. NHs in the state of Connecticut. Evidence-based guidelines for atypical antipsychotic prescribing were translated into a toolkit targeting NH stakeholders, and 42 NHs were recruited and randomized to one of three toolkit dissemination strategies: mailed toolkit delivery (minimal intensity); mailed toolkit delivery with quarterly audit and feedback reports about facility-level antipsychotic prescribing (moderate intensity); and in-person toolkit delivery with academic detailing, on-site behavioral management training, and quarterly audit and feedback reports (high intensity). Outcomes were evaluated using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Toolkit awareness of 30% (7/23) of leadership of low-intensity NHs, 54% (19/35) of moderate-intensity NHs, and 82% (18/22) of high-intensity NHs reflected adoption and implementation of the intervention. Highest levels of use and knowledge among direct care staff were reported in high-intensity NHs. Antipsychotic prescribing levels declined during the study period, but there were no statistically significant differences between study arms or from secular trends. RE-AIM indicators suggest some success in disseminating the toolkit and differences in reach, adoption, and implementation according to dissemination strategy but no measurable effect on antipsychotic prescribing trends. Further dissemination to external stakeholders such as psychiatry consultants and hospitals may be needed to influence antipsychotic prescribing for NH residents. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

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    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  6. Implications of atypical antipsychotic prescribing in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, Bridgette L; Kram, Shawn J; Brooks, Kelli R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the downstream implications of atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescribing in the intensive care unit (ICU), including discharge prescribing practices, monitoring, and attributable adverse drug events. This retrospective cohort study included patients at least 18 years of age admitted to an ICU that received at least 2 doses of an AAP for documented delirium or avoidance of a deliriogenic medication. Exclusion criteria were documentation of an AAP as a home medication or initiation for a psychiatric indication unrelated to delirium (eg, schizophrenia). During the 8-month study period, 156 patients were included and 133 (85.2%) patients survived to hospital discharge. Of the survivors, AAP therapy was continued for 112 (84.2%) patients upon ICU transfer and for 38 (28.6%) patients upon hospital discharge. A majority of these patients had evidence of delirium resolution or no indication for continuation documented at discharge. Of the 127 patients with an electrocardiogram ordered during AAP therapy, QTc prolongation occurred in 49 (31.4%) patients. An adverse drug event leading to drug discontinuation was documented in 16 (10.2%) patients. Because of significant patient-centered implications, AAPs initiated in the ICU require continued evaluation for indication to avoid prolonged and possibly unnecessary use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antipsychotic prescribing patterns during and after critical illness: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomichek, Jason E; Stollings, Joanna L; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Ely, E Wesley; Girard, Timothy D

    2016-11-24

    Antipsychotics are used to treat delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite unproven efficacy. We hypothesized that atypical antipsychotic treatment in the ICU is a risk factor for antipsychotic prescription at discharge, a practice that might increase risk since long-term use is associated with increased mortality. After excluding patients on antipsychotics prior to admission, we examined antipsychotic use in a prospective cohort of ICU patients with acute respiratory failure and/or shock. We collected data on medication use from medical records and assessed patients for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. Using multivariable logistic regression, we analyzed whether age, delirium duration, atypical antipsychotic use, and discharge disposition (each selected a priori) were independent risk factors for discharge on an antipsychotic. We also examined admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, haloperidol use, and days of benzodiazepine use in post hoc analyses. After excluding 18 patients due to prior antipsychotic use and three who withdrew, we included 500 patients. Among 208 (42%) treated with an antipsychotic, median (interquartile range) age was 59 (49-69) years and APACHE II score was 26 (22-32), characteristics that were similar among antipsychotic nonusers. Antipsychotic users were more likely than nonusers to have had delirium (93% vs. 61%, p antipsychotic users, 172 survived to hospital discharge, and 42 (24%) of these were prescribed an antipsychotic at discharge. Treatment with an atypical antipsychotic was the only independent risk factor for antipsychotic prescription at discharge (odds ratio 17.6, 95% confidence interval 4.9 to 63.3; p antipsychotic. In this study, antipsychotics were used to treat nearly half of all antipsychotic-naïve ICU patients and were prescribed at discharge to 24% of antipsychotic-treated patients. Treatment with an atypical antipsychotic greatly increased the

  8. Does mental health staffing level affect antipsychotic prescribing? Analysis of Italian national statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starace, Fabrizio; Mungai, Francesco; Barbui, Corrado

    2018-01-01

    In mental healthcare, one area of major concern identified by health information systems is variability in antipsychotic prescribing. While most studies have investigated patient- and prescriber-related factors as possible reasons for such variability, no studies have investigated facility-level characteristics. The present study ascertained whether staffing level is associated with antipsychotic prescribing in community mental healthcare. A cross-sectional analysis of data extracted from the Italian national mental health information system was carried out. For each Italian region, it collects data on the availability and use of mental health facilities. The rate of individuals exposed to antipsychotic drugs was tested for evidence of association with the rate of mental health staff availability by means of univariate and multivariate analyses. In Italy there were on average nearly 60 mental health professionals per 100,000 inhabitants, with wide regional variations (range 21 to 100). The average rate of individuals prescribed antipsychotic drugs was 2.33%, with wide regional variations (1.04% to 4.01%). Univariate analysis showed that the rate of individuals prescribed antipsychotic drugs was inversely associated with the rate of mental health professionals available in Italian regions (Kendall's tau -0.438, p = 0.006), with lower rates of antipsychotic prescriptions in regions with higher rates of mental health professionals. After adjustment for possible confounders, the total availability of mental health professionals was still inversely associated with the rate of individuals exposed to antipsychotic drugs. The evidence that staffing level was inversely associated with antipsychotic prescribing indicates that any actions aimed at decreasing variability in antipsychotic prescribing need to take into account aspects related to the organization of the mental health system.

  9. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Trends in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joyce Nolan; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Gross, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of antipsychotic medications in some children and adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. However, recent national data show a dramatic rise in off-label and Food and Drug Administration–approved uses of these medications. Of particular note is a twofold to fivefold increase in the use of antipsychotic medications in preschool children, despite little information on their long-term effects. This article describes the trend in pediatric antipsychotic medication use, possible explanations for the increase, implications for children’s health, and recommendations for pediatric providers who work with parents of children and adolescents who seek or receive antipsychotic medication treatments. PMID:22360933

  10. Consumer satisfaction with antipsychotic medication-monitoring appointments: the role of consumer-prescriber communication patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Catherine M; Hack, Samantha M; Klingaman, Elizabeth A; Brown, Clayton H; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa B; Jahn, Danielle R; Kreyenbuhl, Julie A

    2018-06-01

    The study was designed to explore patterns of prescriber communication behaviors as they relate to consumer satisfaction among a serious mental illness sample. Recordings from 175 antipsychotic medication-monitoring appointments between veterans with psychiatric disorders and their prescribers were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) for communication behavioral patterns. The frequency of prescriber communication behaviors (i.e., facilitation, rapport, procedural, psychosocial, biomedical, and total utterances) did not reliably predict consumer satisfaction. The ratio of prescriber to consumer utterances did predict consumer satisfaction. Consistent with client-centered care theory, antipsychotic medication consumers were more satisfied with their encounters when their prescriber did not dominate the conversation. Therefore, one potential recommendation from these findings could be for medication prescribers to spend more of their time listening to, rather than speaking with, their SMI consumers.

  11. Cognitive behaviour therapy in patients with schizophrenia who are not prescribed antipsychotic medication: a case series.

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    Christodoulides, T; Dudley, R; Brown, S; Turkington, D; Beck, Aaron T

    2008-06-01

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) as an adjunct to medication has been shown to improve symptom management in patients with schizophrenia. However, little is understood about the value of CBT for people who are not prescribed antipsychotic medication. A post hoc case series design was used to examine the outcome data of three participants selected from a randomized controlled trial for CBT for schizophrenia. The participants were included if they had received CBT and were not prescribed antipsychotic medication during active treatment. The three patients improved on outcome measures of psychopathology, depression, or negative symptoms, some to a clinically significant degree. CBT is a feasible treatment for people with schizophrenia who are not prescribed antipsychotic medication. It may be a valuable alternative to medication in treating symptoms of schizophrenia.

  12. Antipsychotic prescribing for behavioral disorders in US youth: physician specialty, insurance coverage, and complex regimens.

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    Burcu, Mehmet; Safer, Daniel J; Zito, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    To assess antipsychotic prescribing patterns according to insurance coverage type and physician specialty in the outpatient treatment of behavioral disorders (BD) in US youth. We used 2003-2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data to compare antipsychotic prescribing in the outpatient treatment of BD in youth (6-19 years) according to insurance coverage (public vs. private) and physician specialty (psychiatrist vs. non-psychiatrist) using population-weighted Chi-square and multivariable analyses. Also, we examined co-prescribing of antipsychotics with other psychotropic medication classes. Subgroup analyses were conducted in BD visits with no other clinician-reported psychiatric diagnosis (non-comorbid BD visits). A large majority (71.0%) of BD visits were provided by non-psychiatrists. However, psychiatrists prescribed antipsychotics far more frequently than non-psychiatrists (24.2% vs. 4.6%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 5.1 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.8-9.2]) in total BD visits as well as in non-comorbid BD visits (18.6% vs. 3.6%; AOR = 5.8 [95% CI, 3.2-10.5]). Antipsychotic prescribing was nearly two-fold greater in visits by publicly insured 6-12 year olds (11.3% vs. 5.8%; AOR = 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1-3.5]) and 13-19 year olds (16.2% vs. 8.9%; AOR = 2.0 [95% CI, 1.1-3.6]) compared with their privately insured counterparts. In more than one-third of antipsychotic-prescribed BD visits, antipsychotics were prescribed concomitantly with ≥2 psychotropic medication classes regardless of age group, insurance coverage, or even in the absence of psychiatric comorbidities. In outpatient visits by youth for BD, antipsychotics were primarily prescribed by psychiatrists, concomitantly, and for the publicly insured. These treatment patterns merit further investigation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Antipsychotic prescribing in care homes before and after launch of a national dementia strategy: an observational study in English institutions over a 4-year period

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    Szczepura, Ala; Owen, David W; Palmer, Thomas; Muhammad, Tariq; Clark, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess associations between the launch of the National Dementia Strategy (NDS) and antipsychotic prescribing in long-term residential care (LTC) in England. Setting and participants Retrospective analysis of prescribing patterns in 616 LTC institutions (31 619 residents) following launch of the NDS, using information from electronic medicines management system. Primary and secondary outcome measures Antipsychotic prescribing point prevalence (PP) for all residents in a cross section of LTC settings over a 4-year period following NDS launch. Secondary outcomes included dosages, length of treatment and use of recommended second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) versus first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Associations between facility-level PP values and institutional characteristics, resident demographics were explored. Variations across geographical areas examined. Prescription net ingredient costs calculated. Results No statistically significant difference was observed in overall prescribing rates over the 4-year period (Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test p=0.60), and there was no significant shift towards newer SGAs (KS test p=0.32). Dosages were above the maximum indicated in only 1.3% of cases, but duration of prescribing was excessive in 69.7% of cases. Care homes in the highest prescribing quintile were more likely to be located in a deprived area (rate ratio (Q5/Q1) RR=5.89, 95% CI 4.35 to 7.99), registered for dementia (RR=3.38, 95% CI 3.06 to 3.73) and those in the lowest quintile were more likely to be served by a single general practitioner (GP) practice (RR=0.48; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.63); pantipsychotics was £65.6 per person resident (2012 prices). Conclusions The NDS in England was not associated with reduced PP levels or the types of antipsychotic prescribing in care homes. Further research is needed to explore why. Clear standards specifying recommended agents, dosages and length of treatment, together with routine monitoring and greater

  14. Evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to limit excessive antipsychotic co-prescribing in schizophrenia out-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter; Lublin, H

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on the frequency of antipsychotic co-prescribing in adult schizophrenia out-patients. METHOD: Controlled quasi-experimental study performed in two Danish municipalities matched for baseline prevalence of antipsychotic po...

  15. Risk of discontinuation of antipsychotic long-acting injections vs. oral antipsychotics in real-life prescribing practice: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, H; Pambrun, E; Tournier, M; Bezin, J; Pariente, A

    2017-05-01

    To compare the risk of discontinuation of ambulatory antipsychotic treatment in persons treated with antipsychotic long-acting injections (LAIs) or by oral antipsychotics (OAPs). The study was performed in a representative sample of persons newly treated with OAPs (n = 6904) affiliated to the French Insurance Healthcare system. The risk of all-cause discontinuation was compared in patients prescribed OAPs (n = 246) vs. matched patients prescribed LAIs (n = 246) using multivariate survival analyses. Confounding by indication was minimized by matching on type of antipsychotic drug and by the high-dimensional propensity score method. Discontinuation was more frequent with OAPs (69%) compared to LAIs (57%) [adjusted relative risk (aRR) = 1.6, 95% CI 1.23-2.07]. Risk of discontinuation was higher for first-generation (FGA) OAPs vs. FGA LAIs (aRR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.22-3.08) as well as for second-generation (SGA) OAPs vs. SGA LAIs (aRR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.15-2.17). Over the 6-month period after discontinuation of LAIs, a new antipsychotic drug was dispensed in 58% of patients, the most frequent pattern being dispensing of the same LAI as that prescribed before discontinuation. Although less frequent than with OAPs, the rate of ambulatory treatment discontinuation was high with LAIs. Prescription of LAIs should be associated with intervention strategies aimed at promoting medication adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. New users of antipsychotic medication: A population-based cohort study of occupational outcome measures in relation to antipsychotic on-label and off-label prescribing practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, L; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with antipsychotic medication is thoroughly investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder but is also widely applied for a diversity of off-label conditions, despite an uncertain risk-benefit ratio. This study examined the relationship between antipsychotic prescribing...... patterns and labor market affiliation, considering both authority approved and off-label prescriptions and the relation to polypharmacy. METHODS: Register-based cohort study using a dataset of 71,254 new antipsychotic users with a psychiatric diagnosis. Labor market affiliation and duration of welfare...... payments were analyzed using linear regression models and duration analysis. The analyses were adjusted for the following confounding variables: age, gender, diagnosis, marital status, length of education, and utilization of mental health care services. RESULTS: The majority of new antipsychotic users...

  17. Evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to limit excessive antipsychotic co-prescribing in schizophrenia out-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter; Lublin, H

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on the frequency of antipsychotic co-prescribing in adult schizophrenia out-patients. METHOD: Controlled quasi-experimental study performed in two Danish municipalities matched for baseline prevalence of antipsychotic...... polypharmacy, socioeconomic status and functional level of patients. The intervention was aimed at psychiatric healthcare providers and consisted of 1 day of didactic lectures, six 3-h educational outreach visits and an electronic reminder during drug prescribing. RESULTS: Between-group use of antipsychotic...... polypharmacy was compared at baseline (intervention group, N = 232/control group, N = 351) and after 1 year of intervention (intervention group, N = 216/control group, N = 386). The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy at follow-up was not significantly different between treatment settings when adjusting...

  18. Risk of death in dual-eligible nursing home residents using typical or atypical antipsychotic agents.

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    Aparasu, Rajender R; Chatterjee, Satabdi; Mehta, Sandhya; Chen, Hua

    2012-11-01

    Antipsychotic use among dual-eligible nursing home residents is a concern for cost and safety considerations. To examine the comparative risk of death in dual-eligible elderly nursing home residents using typical and atypical agents. A retrospective cohort design matched on propensity score was used to examine the risk of death due to antipsychotic use among dual-eligible nursing home residents 65 years or older from four states. New typical and atypical users in nursing homes were followed for 6 months after the exposure without any censoring. The risk of death was modeled using the Cox proportional model and the extended Cox hazard model stratified on matched pairs based on propensity score. The unadjusted mortality rate was 18.42% for atypical antipsychotic users and 24.06% for typical antipsychotic users. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model revealed significant increased risk of death [hazard ratio (HR), 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-1.57] among typical users when compared with atypical users. The extended Cox model, used due to the violation of proportional hazards assumption, revealed that risk of death was nearly twice as great among typical antipsychotic users within 40 days of antipsychotic treatment (HR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.49-2.18) when compared with atypical users. However, moderate increase in risk (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.09-1.42] was observed for 40-180 days of typical antipsychotic exposure. The use of typical antipsychotic agents was associated with highest risk of all-cause mortality within 40 days of typical antipsychotic use when compared with atypical use, and the risk decreased after 40 days among dual-eligible elderly nursing home residents.

  19. Improving the appropriateness of antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes: a mixed-methods process evaluation of an academic detailing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desveaux, L; Saragosa, M; Rogers, J; Bevan, L; Loshak, H; Moser, A; Feldman, S; Regier, L; Jeffs, L; Ivers, N M

    2017-05-26

    Outer Setting, Inner Setting, and Characteristics of Individuals presented barriers to antipsychotic prescribing. Intervention Source, Evidence Strength and Quality, and Adaptability explained participant engagement in the AD intervention; nursing homes that exhibited a Tension for Change and Leadership Engagement reported positive changes in processes and communication. Participants described their experiences with the intervention against the backdrop of a range of factors that influence APM prescribing in nursing homes that exist at the system, facility, provider, and resident levels. In this context, the perceived credibility and flexibility of the intervention were critical features that explained engagement with and potential impact of the intervention. Development of a common language across the team to enable communication was reported as a proximal outcome that may eventually have an effect on APM prescribing rates. Process evaluations may be useful during early stages of evaluation to understand how the intervention is working and how it might work better. Qualitative results suggest the lack of early changes observed in prescribing may reflect the number of upstream factors that need to change for APM rates to decrease. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02604056.

  20. Risk of pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents using typical versus atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparasu, Rajender R; Chatterjee, Satabdi; Chen, Hua

    2013-04-01

    Antipsychotic medications are extensively used in nursing homes for management of behavioral and psychiatric disorders in the elderly. Prior research suggests that pneumonia is one of the common causes of anti psychotic-related mortality in this population. None of the studies compared typical and atypical antipsychotics with respect to pneumonia. To examine the risk of pneumonia with use of typical versus atypical antipsychotics in dual eligible elderly nursing home residents. The study involved a retrospective cohort design matched on propensity score using Medicare and Medicaid Analytical eXtract data from 4 US states. The study population included all elderly dual eligible (Medicaid and Medicare) nursing home residents (aged ≥65 years) who initiated antipsychotics any time between July 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003. The risk of pneumonia during the 6-month follow-up period was modeled using a Cox proportional model and extended Cox hazard model stratified on matched pairs based on propensity score, using atypical agents as the reference category. Analysis of Medicaid-Medicare data revealed that there were 49,904 new antipsychotic (46,293 atypical and 3611 typical) users in the unmatched cohort and 7218 (3609 atypical and 3609 typical) users in the matched cohort. The unadjusted rate of pneumonia was 8.17% (4.61 events per person year) for atypical users and 5.21% (5.21 events per person year) for typical users. HR 1.17, 95% CI 0.83-1.66; and 50-180 days: HR 1.36, 95% CI 0.87-2.14) suggest that there was no significant difference in the risk of pneumonia among typical and atypical users. The study found no differential risk of pneumonia between typical versus atypical antipsychotic use in dual eligible nursing home residents. Given the differential risk of mortality with typical and atypical antipsychotic use in nursing homes, more research is needed to evaluate other contributory factors of mortality with respect to these 2 antipsychotic classes.

  1. Off-label use of second-generation antipsychotic agents among elderly nursing home residents.

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    Kamble, Pravin; Sherer, Jeff; Chen, Hua; Aparasu, Rajender

    2010-02-01

    This study examined off-label and evidence-based use of second-generation antipsychotic agents among elderly nursing home residents and factors associated with off-label use. This study involved a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS). The sample included nursing home residents 65 years and older who received second-generation antipsychotic agents. This study used an indication-based definition of off-label use established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Evidence-based use included FDA-approved indications and indications for which the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality found at least moderate strength of evidence of effectiveness. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the prevalence of off-label and evidence-based use. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the patient and facility factors associated with off-label use of second-generation antipsychotics. According to the 2004 NNHS, 308,990 (23.5%) elderly nursing home residents received at least one second-generation antipsychotic agent. Of those using second-generation antipsychotics, 86.3% received them for off-label indications and 56.9% received them for an evidence-based use. Multivariate analysis found that age (> or =75 years), self-pay for nursing home care, diagnosis of dementia, and residing in a nonprofit nursing home were positively associated with off-label use, whereas receiving Medicaid benefits was negatively associated with such use. Although second-generation antipsychotics were frequently used for off-label indications, most of the usage was evidence based among elderly nursing home residents. However, the high level of non-evidence-based use combined with recent safety and efficacy data suggests an urgent need to address the evidence base for this vulnerable population.

  2. Prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Assam

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    Pinaki Chakravarty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prescribing pattern of antipsychotic drugs in the outpatient department of psychiatry in Silchar Medical College and Hospital (SMCH of Assam. Methods: It is a prospective cross-sectional study which was carried out for three months from August to November 2015 in the outpatient department of psychiatry. All patients irrespective of their ages and sexes were included in this study. Inpatients, referred patients, patients not willing to give consent, patients of epilepsy as well as those cases where diagnoses were not certain were excluded from the study. The prescription patterns of antipsychotic drugs and the occurrences of various psychiatric diseases on both the sexes were studied after taking permission from the Institutional Ethical Committee (SMCH. Results: A total of 112 prescriptions were analysed. The most common disease was found to be schizophrenia. Total drugs prescribed were 265 and average number of drugs per prescription was 2.36. It was seen that out of the 112 prescriptions, monotherapy was practiced in 19.64% (22 compared to polytherapy in 80.35% (90. Out of 265 prescribed drugs atypical antipsychotics were 112 (42.26%, typical antipsychotics 12 (4.52%, antiepileptics 57 (21.50%, antidepressants 29 (10.94%, antiparkinsonian 29 (10.94%, and others 26 (9.81%. Antipsychotics given orally were 122 of which olanzapine was 54 (44.26%, risperidone 40 (32.78%, chlorpromazine ten (8.19%, quetiapine eight (6.55%, aripiprazole five (4.09%, amisulpiride five (4.09% were seen. Injectable antipsychotics were two, of which only haloperidol two (100%. Antipsychotics in combination prescription with same groups were 14 (12.5%, with antidepressants, antipileptics, antiparkinsonian were 88 (78.57% and other agents were ten (8.92%, which included pantoprazole, multivitamins, and benfotiamine. Conclusion: This study shows that atypical antipsychotics are the most common drugs prescribed in patients with psychotic illness and

  3. Differential impact of two risk communications on antipsychotic prescribing to people with dementia in Scotland: segmented regression time series analysis 2001-2011.

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    Guthrie, Bruce; Clark, Stella A; Reynish, Emma L; McCowan, Colin; Morales, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory risk communications are an important method for disseminating drug safety information, but their impact varies. Two significant UK risk communications about antipsychotic use in older people with dementia were issued in 2004 and 2009. These varied considerably in their content and dissemination, allowing examination of their differential impact. Segmented regression time-series analysis 2001-2011 for people aged ≥65 years with dementia in 87 Scottish general practices, examining the impact of two pre-specified risk communications in 2004 and 2009 on antipsychotic and other psychotropic prescribing. The percentage of people with dementia prescribed an antipsychotic was 15.9% in quarter 1 2001 and was rising by an estimated 0.6%/quarter before the 2004 risk communication. The 2004 risk communication was sent directly to all prescribers, and specifically recommended review of all patients prescribed relevant drugs. It was associated with an immediate absolute reduction in antipsychotic prescribing of 5.9% (95% CI -6.6 to -5.2) and a change to a stable level of prescribing subsequently. The 2009 risk communication was disseminated in a limited circulation bulletin, and only specifically recommended avoiding initiation if possible. There was no immediate associated impact, but it was associated with a significant decline in prescribing subsequently which appeared driven by a decline in initiation, with the percentage prescribed an antipsychotic falling from 18.4% in Q1 2009 to 13.5% in Q1 2011. There was no widespread substitution of antipsychotics with other psychotropic drugs. The two risk communications were associated with reductions in antipsychotic use, in ways which were compatible with marked differences in their content and dissemination. Further research is needed to ensure that the content and dissemination of regulatory risk communications is optimal, and to track their impact on intended and unintended outcomes. Although rates are falling

  4. Differential Impact of Two Risk Communications on Antipsychotic Prescribing to People with Dementia in Scotland: Segmented Regression Time Series Analysis 2001–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Bruce; Clark, Stella A.; Reynish, Emma L.; McCowan, Colin; Morales, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulatory risk communications are an important method for disseminating drug safety information, but their impact varies. Two significant UK risk communications about antipsychotic use in older people with dementia were issued in 2004 and 2009. These varied considerably in their content and dissemination, allowing examination of their differential impact. Methods Segmented regression time-series analysis 2001–2011 for people aged ≥65 years with dementia in 87 Scottish general practices, examining the impact of two pre-specified risk communications in 2004 and 2009 on antipsychotic and other psychotropic prescribing. Results The percentage of people with dementia prescribed an antipsychotic was 15.9% in quarter 1 2001 and was rising by an estimated 0.6%/quarter before the 2004 risk communication. The 2004 risk communication was sent directly to all prescribers, and specifically recommended review of all patients prescribed relevant drugs. It was associated with an immediate absolute reduction in antipsychotic prescribing of 5.9% (95% CI −6.6 to −5.2) and a change to a stable level of prescribing subsequently. The 2009 risk communication was disseminated in a limited circulation bulletin, and only specifically recommended avoiding initiation if possible. There was no immediate associated impact, but it was associated with a significant decline in prescribing subsequently which appeared driven by a decline in initiation, with the percentage prescribed an antipsychotic falling from 18.4% in Q1 2009 to 13.5% in Q1 2011. There was no widespread substitution of antipsychotics with other psychotropic drugs. Conclusions The two risk communications were associated with reductions in antipsychotic use, in ways which were compatible with marked differences in their content and dissemination. Further research is needed to ensure that the content and dissemination of regulatory risk communications is optimal, and to track their impact on intended and

  5. Differential impact of two risk communications on antipsychotic prescribing to people with dementia in Scotland: segmented regression time series analysis 2001-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Guthrie

    Full Text Available Regulatory risk communications are an important method for disseminating drug safety information, but their impact varies. Two significant UK risk communications about antipsychotic use in older people with dementia were issued in 2004 and 2009. These varied considerably in their content and dissemination, allowing examination of their differential impact.Segmented regression time-series analysis 2001-2011 for people aged ≥65 years with dementia in 87 Scottish general practices, examining the impact of two pre-specified risk communications in 2004 and 2009 on antipsychotic and other psychotropic prescribing.The percentage of people with dementia prescribed an antipsychotic was 15.9% in quarter 1 2001 and was rising by an estimated 0.6%/quarter before the 2004 risk communication. The 2004 risk communication was sent directly to all prescribers, and specifically recommended review of all patients prescribed relevant drugs. It was associated with an immediate absolute reduction in antipsychotic prescribing of 5.9% (95% CI -6.6 to -5.2 and a change to a stable level of prescribing subsequently. The 2009 risk communication was disseminated in a limited circulation bulletin, and only specifically recommended avoiding initiation if possible. There was no immediate associated impact, but it was associated with a significant decline in prescribing subsequently which appeared driven by a decline in initiation, with the percentage prescribed an antipsychotic falling from 18.4% in Q1 2009 to 13.5% in Q1 2011. There was no widespread substitution of antipsychotics with other psychotropic drugs.The two risk communications were associated with reductions in antipsychotic use, in ways which were compatible with marked differences in their content and dissemination. Further research is needed to ensure that the content and dissemination of regulatory risk communications is optimal, and to track their impact on intended and unintended outcomes. Although rates

  6. Nature and Quality of Antipsychotic Prescribing Practice in UK Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, C.; Flynn, A.; Shingleton-Smith, A.; McIntyre, S.; Bhaumik, S.; Rasmussen, J.; Hardy, S.; Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are perceived to be over-used in the management of behavioural problems in people with an intellectual disability (ID). Published guidelines have set good practice standards for the use of these drugs for behavioural indications. We sought to identify the range of indications for which antipsychotic drugs are prescribed…

  7. What side effects are problematic for patients prescribed antipsychotic medication? The Maudsley Side Effects (MSE) measure for antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, T; Evans, J; Paton, C; Barnes, T R E; Taylor, D; Bentall, R; Dalton, B; Ruffell, T; Rose, D; Vitoratou, S

    2017-10-01

    Capturing service users' perspectives can highlight additional and different concerns to those of clinicians, but there are no up to date, self-report psychometrically sound measures of side effects of antipsychotic medications. Aim To develop a psychometrically sound measure to identify antipsychotic side effects important to service users, the Maudsley Side Effects (MSE) measure. An initial item bank was subjected to a Delphi exercise (n = 9) with psychiatrists and pharmacists, followed by service user focus groups and expert panels (n = 15) to determine item relevance and language. Feasibility and comprehensive psychometric properties were established in two samples (N43 and N50). We investigated whether we could predict the three most important side effects for individuals from their frequency, severity and life impact. MSE is a 53-item measure with good reliability and validity. Poorer mental and physical health, but not psychotic symptoms, was related to side-effect burden. Seventy-nine percent of items were chosen as one of the three most important effects. Severity, impact and distress only predicted 'putting on weight' which was more distressing, more severe and had more life impact in those for whom it was most important. MSE is a self-report questionnaire that identifies reliably the side-effect burden as experienced by patients. Identifying key side effects important to patients can act as a starting point for joint decision making on the type and the dose of medication.

  8. Improving the management of disruptive behavior and reducing antipsychotic medications in nursing facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Arnicar, Robin; Clark, Thomas R; Gerber, Joseph; Haimowitz, Daniel; Kuhlor, Aysha; Scanland, Susan

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the management of disruptive behavior in the nursing facility setting through an interdisciplinary team (IDT) approach to reduce the use of antipsychotic medications in accordance with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services initiative. The process began with a search and review of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, government, and association resources that focused on the management of disruptive behavior in older adults. While data were limited to the past 10 years, the vast majority of data reviewed were within the past 5 years. This information was reviewed and discussed by all of the coauthors who meet in person at the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists as a work group. This group was tasked with identifying strategies through an IDT to improve the management of disruptive behavior and reduce the use of antipsychotic medications in nursing facility residents. In addition, significant follow-up work was accomplished following the live working session. Through an IDT, strategies can be implemented for long-term care residents to prevent and better manage disruptive behavior. These strategies can result in the reduction of the use of antipsychotic medications. The field of long-term care would benefit from further research to identify additional nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for managing disruptive behavior.

  9. Survey of atypical antipsychotic prescribing by Canadian child psychiatrists and developmental pediatricians for patients aged under 18 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doey, Tamison; Handelman, Kenneth; Seabrook, Jamie A; Steele, Margaret

    2007-06-01

    To describe self-reported patterns of prescribing atypical antipsychotics (ATAs) and monitoring practices of child psychiatrists and developmental pediatricians in Canada. We surveyed members of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and members of the Developmental Paediatrics Section of the Canadian Paediatric Society regarding the types and frequencies of ATAs they prescribed, the ages and diagnoses of patients for whom they prescribed these medications, and the types and frequencies of monitoring used. Ninety-four percent of the child psychiatrists (95% CI, 90% to 97%) and 89% of the developmental pediatricians (95% CI, 75% to 96%) prescribed ATAs, most commonly risperidone (69%). Diagnoses included psychotic, mood, anxiety, externalizing, and pervasive developmental disorders. Prescribing for symptoms such as aggression, low frustration tolerance, and affect dysregulation was also common. Twelve percent of all prescriptions were for children under age 9 years. Most clinicians monitored patients, but there were wide variations in the type and frequency of tests performed. Despite the lack of formal indications, ATAs were prescribed by this group of clinicians for many off-label indications in youth under age 18 years, including very young children. Neither evidence-based guidelines nor a consensus on monitoring exist for this age group.

  10. Off-Label Prescribing of Second-Generation Antipsychotics to Elderly Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semla, Todd P; Lee, Austin; Gurrera, Ronald; Bajor, Laura; Li, Mingfei; Miller, Donald R; Smith, Eric G; Wang, Chao; Wan, Yun; Kazis, Lewis E; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether elderly veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dementia are more likely to be prescribed second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) than those with PTSD alone. National serial cross-sectional study. Veterans Health Affairs inpatient and outpatient settings. Veterans aged 65 and older with PTSD (excluding schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) with or without concomitant dementia who received care from the Veterans Health Administration between 2003 and 2010 were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes (N = 93,068; 11.1% with dementia). Trends in SGA prescribing and odds of being prescribed an SGA were determined using a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for clinical, sociodemographic, and geographic covariates. Between 2004 and 2009, SGA prescribing declined annually from 7.0% to 5.1% of elderly veterans with PTSD without dementia and 13.2% to 8.9% in those with dementia; findings over time consistently indicated that veterans with PTSD and dementia had at least twice the odds of being prescribed an SGA as those without PTSD (odds ratios 2.03 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.82-2.26) to 2.33 (95% CI = 2.10-2.58). Although the prescribing of SGAs to elderly veterans with PTSD has decreased, prescribing an SGA to those with dementia remained consistently higher than for those with PTSD alone and is problematic given the high prevalence of medical comorbidities in this aging population coupled with the lack of compelling evidence for effectiveness of SGAs in individuals with dementia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. What is the experience of psychiatry residents learning to prescribe? A qualitative research inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Melinda; Lowe, Marissa; Aillon-Sohl, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how psychiatry residents learn to prescribe is important for the future of psychiatry. Prescribing is a complicated act that involves much more than signing a prescription. During residency, psychiatrists develop seminal attitudes and habits about prescribing. There have been no published studies focusing on psychiatry residents' experience when learning to prescribe. Qualitative methodology lends itself to a deep exploration of the process of learning how to prescribe. We undertook a qualitative study questioning psychiatry residents about their prescribing. Psychiatry residents were recruited from three residency programs and focus groups were conducted at each program. The focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed by a professional service. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and triangulation to increase the rigor of the study. A total of 12 residents participated. Three themes were identified concerning identity development as a psychiatrist, uncertainty and fear about prescribing, and the centrality of collaborating with the patient during the prescribing process. Psychiatry residents struggle with significant anxiety and frustration in their experience of learning to prescribe, suggesting a place for mentors and supervisors to focus.

  12. Antipsychotic long-acting injections: A community-based study from 2007 to 2014 of prescribing trends and characteristics associated with initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, Hélène; Pambrun, Elodie; Tournier, Marie; Bezin, Julien; Pariente, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    To explore the impact of the introduction of newer antipsychotic long-acting injections (LAIs) on trends in LAI prescribing and characteristics associated with initiation of LAIs in naturalistic conditions. The study was performed using reimbursement data from the French Insurance Healthcare system. Prescribing trends were investigated from 2007 to 2014 in 382,572 persons aged 18years and over. Characteristics associated with delay in transition from oral antipsychotic to LAIs were explored in a cohort of 6904 persons newly treated with an oral antipsychotic using multivariate survival analyses. LAI prescribing rates slightly increased over the study period. The likelihood of being prescribed LAIs was stable for FGA LAIs (around 1.8 per 1000) (aOR=0.99, 95%CI 0.98-1.00) and increased for SGA LAIs from 0.5 to 1 per 1000 (aOR=1.11, 95%CI 1.08-1.14). In persons initiating an LAI (n=288), shorter transition from oral antipsychotic to LAI was independently predicted by male gender, younger age, dispensing of an oral SGA and a higher number of oral antipsychotics dispensed over the follow-up. Transition was longer in persons dispensed antidepressants or mood-stabilizers over the follow-up. Male gender, low income and higher number of antipsychotics were associated only with shorter transition to FGA LAIs, while initial prescription by a public practitioner, no mood-stabilizer dispensing and lack of somatic severe chronic condition were associated only with SGA LAIs dispensing. It is of interest to explore whether similar prescribing trends are observed in other countries and to further assess the effectiveness of new LAIs in real-life conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antipsychotic use in nursing homes varies by psychiatric consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Lemay, Celeste; Mazor, Kathleen; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Kanaan, Abir; Donovan, Jennifer; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Briesacher, Becky

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between psychiatric consultation and antipsychotic prescribing in nursing homes (NH) is unknown. To identify the association between psychiatric consultant groups and NH-level antipsychotic prescribing after adjustment for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Nested cross-sectional study of 60 NHs in a cluster randomized trial. We linked facility leadership surveys to October 2009-September 2010 Minimum Data Set, Nursing Home Compare, the US Census, and pharmacy dispensing data. The main exposure is the psychiatric consultant group and the main outcome is NH-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use. We calculated annual means and interquartile ranges of NH-level antipsychotic use for each consultant group and arrayed consultant groups from lowest to highest prevalence. Generalized linear models were used to predict antipsychotic prescribing adjusting for resident case-mix and facility characteristics. Observed versus predicted antipsychotic prescribing levels were compared for each consultant group. Seven psychiatric consultant groups served a range of 3-27 study facilities. Overall mean facility-level antipsychotic prescribing was 19.2%. Mean prevalence of antipsychotic prescribing ranged from 12.2% (SD, 5.8) in the lowest consultant group to 26.4% (SD, 3.6) in the highest group. All facilities served by the highest-ranked consultant group had observed antipsychotic levels exceeding the overall study mean with half exceeding predictions for on-label indications, whereas most facilities served by the lowest-ranked consultant group had observed levels below the overall study and predicted means. Preliminary evidence suggests that psychiatric consultant groups affect NH antipsychotic prescribing independent of resident case-mix and facility characteristics.

  14. Antipsychotic Prescribing to Patients Diagnosed with Dementia Without a Diagnosis of Psychosis in the Context of National Guidance and Drug Safety Warnings: Longitudinal Study in UK General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, S Jill; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Webb, Roger T; Avery, Anthony J; Burns, Alistair; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2017-08-01

    Policy interventions to address inappropriate prescribing of antipsychotic drugs to older people diagnosed with dementia are commonplace. In the UK, warnings were issued by the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in 2004, 2009 and 2012 and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance was published in 2006. It is important to evaluate the impact of such interventions. We analysed routinely collected primary-care data from 111,346 patients attending one of 689 general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink to describe the temporal changes in the prescribing of antipsychotic drugs to patients aged 65 years or over diagnosed with dementia without a concomitant psychosis diagnosis from 2001 to 2014 using an interrupted time series and a before-and-after design. Logistic regression methods were used to quantify the impact of patient and practice level variables on prescribing prevalence. Prescribing of first-generation antipsychotic drugs reduced from 8.9% in 2001 to 1.4% in 2014 (prevalence ratio 2014/2001 adjusted for age, sex and clustering within practices (0.14, 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.16), whereas there was little change for second-generation antipsychotic drugs (1.01, confidence interval 0.94-1.17). Between 2004 and 2012, several policy interventions coincided with a pattern of ups and downs, whereas the 2006 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance was followed by a gradual longer term reduction. Since 2013, the decreasing trend in second-generation antipsychotic drug prescribing has plateaued largely driven by the increasing prescribing of risperidone. Increased surveillance and evaluation of drug safety warnings and guidance are needed to improve the impact of future interventions.

  15. Quality of prescribing of antipsychotic medication for people with intellectual disability under the care of UK mental health services: a cross-sectional audit of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Carol; Bhatti, Sumera; Purandare, Kiran; Roy, Ashok; Barnes, Tre

    2016-12-05

    To determine the prevalence and quality of antipsychotic prescribing for people with intellectual disability (ID). A clinical audit of prescribing practice in the context of a quality improvement programme. Practice standards for audit were derived from relevant, evidence-based guidelines, including NICE. Data were mainly collected from the clinical records, but to determine the clinical rationale for using antipsychotic medication in individual cases, prescribers could also be directly questioned. 54 mental health services in the UK, which were predominantly NHS Trusts. Information on prescribing was collected for 5654 people with ID. Almost two-thirds (64%) of the total sample was prescribed antipsychotic medication, of whom almost half (49%) had a schizophrenia spectrum or affective disorder diagnosis, while a further third (36%) exhibited behaviours recognised by NICE as potentially legitimate targets for such treatment such as violence, aggression or self-injury. With respect to screening for potential side effects within the past year, 41% had a documented measure of body weight (range across participating services 18-100%), 32% blood pressure (0-100%) and 37% blood glucose and blood lipids (0-100%). These data from mental health services across the UK suggest that antipsychotic medications are not widely used outside of licensed and/or evidence-based indications in people with ID. However, screening for side effects in those patients on continuing antipsychotic medication was inconsistent across the participating services and the possibility that a small number of these services failed to meet basic standards of care cannot be excluded. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Frequency of prescribing errors by medical residents in various training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Brooke Lynn; Bray, Whitney M; Gomez, Michael R; Condren, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Medication errors are hazardous and costly. Children are at increased risk for medication errors because of weight-based dosing, limited FDA indications, and human calculation errors. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and type of resident prescribing errors in a pediatric clinic and further compare error rates of residents in different training programs. Resident prescription error data from a pediatric clinic was collected for 5 months. Upon detection of an error, residents were notified/given feedback regarding the type of error, ways to remedy errors, and future prevention methods. Data were categorized based on medication involved, error type, and resident training program. The review included 2941 prescriptions, with the overall resident prescribing error rate being 5.88%. The pediatric resident error rate was 4%. Family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics had error rates of 11%, 8%, and 7%, respectively. The prescribing error rate showed a statistically significant difference with pediatrics compared with family medicine, internal medicine, and medicine/pediatrics (P medication error type was overdose, followed by unclear quantity. Among the medication classes, topical agents and antimicrobials were among the top prescribed. Numerous types of medication errors occur in a pediatric clinic. Prescribing errors take place among all medical trainees; however, medication error rates in the pediatric population may vary among resident specialty. Identifying the cause of prescribing errors will allow institutions to create educational programs tailored for safe medication use in children as well as systemwide changes for error reduction.

  17. Brand Name Statin Prescribing in a Resident Ambulatory Practice: Implications for Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskina, Kira L; Pesko, Michael F; Gossey, J Travis; Caesar, Erica Phillips; Bishop, Tara F

    2014-09-01

    Several national initiatives aim to teach high-value care to residents. While there is a growing body of literature on cost impact of physicians' therapeutic decisions, few studies have assessed factors that influence residents' prescribing practices. We studied factors associated with intensive health care utilization among internal medicine residents, using brand name statin prescribing as a proxy for higher-cost care. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of statin prescriptions by residents at an urban academic internal medicine program, using electronic health record data between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011. For 319 encounters by 90 residents, patients were given a brand name statin in 50% of cases. When categorized into quintiles, the bottom quintile of residents prescribed brand name statins in 2% of encounters, while the top quintile prescribed brand name statins in 98% of encounters. After adjusting for potential confounders, including patient characteristics and supervising attending, being in the primary care track was associated with lower odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; P  =  .02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16-0.86), and graduating from a medical school with an above-average hospital care intensity index was associated with higher odds of prescribing brand name statins (OR, 1.70; P  =  .049; 95% CI, 1.003-2.88). We found considerable variation in brand name statin prescribing by residents. Medical school attended and residency program type were associated with resident prescribing behavior. Future interventions should raise awareness of these patterns in an effort to teach high-value, cost-conscious care to all residents.

  18. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and practices about prescribing fixed dose combinations among resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimit Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs improve patient compliance and decrease pill burden. However, irrational prescribing of FDCs is a major health concern. As resident doctors are primarily involved in patient management at tertiary care hospitals, knowledge about prescribing FDCs is of paramount importance. Objective: To evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice, regarding use of FDCs by resident doctors at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among resident doctors working at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, a tertiary care teaching hospital. One hundred resident doctors from the departments of medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, surgery, paediatrics, skin and psychiatry, who gave their informed consent, were enrolled. A prevalidated questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitude and prescribing practice of fixed dose combinations was filled up. Data was analyzed with suitable statistical tests. Results: Out of the 100 residents recruited for the study, 34, 33 and 33 residents were selected from the 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd year respectively. The resident doctors were not aware about all of the advantages and disadvantages of FDCs. On an average, only 31% of the residents (lowest 16% among 1 st year residents had knowledge about the Essential Medicine List (EML. Knowledge about rationality of given FDCs was lacking in 81% of the residents. Only 47% could name a single banned FDC in India. Common sources of information about FDCs were medical representatives, colleagues/peers, the Monthly Index of Medical Specialities (MIMS and Continuous Medical Education (CMEs. A majority of residents (96% agreed that FDCs should be allowed to be marketed. The residents opined that most commonly prescribed FDCs were of antimicrobial drugs, amongst which amoxicillin + clavulanic acid was the most frequent. Conclusion: There is need to improve knowledge about rationality, EML, usage and banned FDCs in post graduate

  19. An opioid overdose curriculum for medical residents: Impact on naloxone prescribing, knowledge, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jessica Lee; Rapoport, Alison B; Rowley, Christopher F; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Stead, Wendy

    2018-02-12

    Despite escalating opioid overdose death rates, addiction medicine is underrepresented in residency curricula. Providing naloxone to at-risk patients, relatives, and first responders reduces overdose deaths, but rates of naloxone prescribing remain low. The goal of this study is to examine the impact of a brief curricular intervention for internal medicine residents on naloxone prescribing rates, knowledge, and attitudes. Internal medicine residents (n = 160) at an urban, tertiary care medical center received two one-hour didactic sessions addressing overdose prevention, including intranasal naloxone. The number of naloxone prescriptions generated by residents was compared to faculty, who received no similar intervention, in the 3-month periods before and after the curriculum. Resident knowledge and attitudes, as assessed by pre- and post-intervention surveys, were compared. The resident naloxone prescribing rate increased from 420 to 1,270 per 100,000 inpatient discharges (p = 0.01) and from 0 to 370 per 100,000 ambulatory visits (p<0.001) post-intervention. Similar increases were not observed amongst inpatient faculty, whose prescribing rate decreased from 1,150 to 880 per 100,000 discharges (p = 0.08), or among outpatient faculty, whose rate increased from 30 to 180 per 100,000 ambulatory visits (p < 0.001) but was lower than the post-intervention resident rate (p = 0.01). Residents demonstrated high baseline knowledge about naloxone, but just 13% agreed that they were adequately trained to prescribe pre-intervention. Post-intervention, residents were more likely to agree that they were adequately trained to prescribe (Likert mean 2.5 vs. 3.9, p<0.001), to agree that treating addiction is rewarding (Likert mean 2.9 vs. 3.3, p = 0.03), and to attain a perfect score on the knowledge composite (57% vs. 33%, p = 0.05). A brief curricular intervention improved resident knowledge and attitudes regarding intranasal naloxone for opioid overdose reversal and

  20. Influence of a systems-based approach to prescribing errors in a pediatric resident clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condren, Michelle; Honey, Brooke L; Carter, Sandra M; Ngo, Nelson; Landsaw, Jeremy; Bryant, Cheryl; Gillaspy, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    To measure the difference in prescribing error rates between 2 clinics, 1 with a system in place to reduce errors and 1 with no such system; to determine variables that affect the likelihood of prescription errors. This was a retrospective study at 2 university-based general pediatric clinics utilizing the same electronic medical record (EMR) system. Clinic 1 employed pharmacists who provided daily prescription review, provider feedback and education, and EMR customization to decrease errors. Clinic 2 had no systems in place for reducing prescribing errors. Prescriptions written by resident physicians over 2 months were identified and reviewed. A total of 1361 prescriptions were reviewed, 40.7% from clinic 1 and 59.3% from clinic 2. Errors were found in 201 prescriptions (14.8%). Clinics 1 and 2 had error rates of 11% and 17.5%, respectively (P = .0012). The odds of a prescription error at clinic 2 were 1.7 times the odds of a prescription error at clinic 1. Logistic regression identified clinic, nonpediatric resident, liquid dose forms, and younger patient age as significant predictors of prescription errors. Half of the errors could have been prevented with consistent use of a custom medication list within the EMR. We found 37% fewer prescribing errors in a clinic with systems in place for prescribing error detection and prevention. Pediatric clinics should explore systematic procedures for identifying, resolving, and providing education about prescribing errors to reduce patient risk. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The prescribing pattern of a new antipsychotic: A descriptive study of aripiprazole for psychiatric in-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M.; Manniche, C.; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2008-01-01

    In June 2004, aripiprazole was marketed as a second-generation antipsychotic with an entire new mechanism of action. The objective of this descriptive study is to examine the day-to-day prescriptions of aripiprazole to an unselected population of psychiatric in-patients. From 1 February to 1 May...

  2. Analysis of clinical characteristics and antipsychotic medication prescribing practices of first-episode schizophrenia in Israel: a naturalistic prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Bar, Faina; Keret, Noa; Lapidus, Raya; Kosov, Nikolai; Chelben, Joseph; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the clinical presentation and treatment of first-episode psychosis is important in order to exclude effects of age, chronic illness, long-term treatment and institutionalization. The aim of this descriptive study was to investigate the management practices of first-episode schizophrenia in a cohort of patients in Israel and to document use of the various "typical" or "atypical" antipsychotic agents. Fifty-one consecutive patients (26 M, 25 F) with first-episode psychosis were recruited for study participation and were administered either typical or atypical antipsychotic medications in a naturalistic manner. While an approximately equal number of subjects received typical and atypical medications at illness onset, a prominent shift to atypical antipsychotic treatment occurred over the study course; 18 subjects had medication class shifts: 17 from typical to atypical, and one from atypical to typical. Negative symptoms did not affect length of hospitalization, but were associated with aggression. Higher depression rates were noted in patients with long hospitalizations who received typical antipsychotic medications. Immigrants were admitted at an age approximately four years older than native-born Israelis. The prominent shift from "typical" to "atypical" antipsychotic medications may indicate sensitivity of first-episode psychotic patients to side-effects of "typical" medications and prominence of use of atypical medications in this patient subpopulation be it due to improved efficacy over time or successful marketing. Unique cultural and population characteristics may contribute to the manifestation of first-episode psychosis and suggest the importance of more effective outreach to the immigrant population in order to manage an apparent treatment delay.

  3. Empiric Antibiotic Prescribing Decisions Among Medical Residents: The Role of the Antibiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Gregory B; Vilches-Tran, Rowena A; Elman, Miriam R; Bearden, David T; Taylor, Jerusha E; Gorman, Paul N; McGregor, Jessina C

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess general medical residents' familiarity with antibiograms using a self-administered survey DESIGN Cross-sectional, single-center survey PARTICIPANTS Residents in internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics at an academic medical center METHODS Participants were administered an anonymous survey at our institution during regularly scheduled educational conferences between January and May 2012. Questions collected data regarding demographics, professional training; further open-ended questions assessed knowledge and use of antibiograms regarding possible pathogens, antibiotic regimens, and prescribing resources for 2 clinical vignettes; a series of directed, closed-ended questions followed. Bivariate analyses to compare responses between residency programs were performed. RESULTS Of 122 surveys distributed, 106 residents (87%) responded; internal medicine residents accounted for 69% of responses. More than 20% of residents could not accurately identify pathogens to target with empiric therapy or select therapy with an appropriate spectrum of activity in response to the clinical vignettes; correct identification of potential pathogens was not associated with selecting appropriate therapy. Only 12% of respondents identified antibiograms as a resource when prescribing empiric antibiotic therapy for scenarios in the vignettes, with most selecting the UpToDate online clinical decision support resource or The Sanford Guide. When directly questioned, 89% reported awareness of institutional antibiograms, but only 70% felt comfortable using them and only 44% knew how to access them. CONCLUSIONS When selecting empiric antibiotics, many residents are not comfortable using antibiograms as part of treatment decisions. Efforts to improve antibiotic use may benefit from residents being given additional education on both infectious diseases pharmacotherapy and antibiogram utilization. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;1-6.

  4. Fall and Fracture Risk in Nursing Home Residents With Moderate-to-Severe Behavioral Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Initiating Antidepressants or Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jung; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Lucas, Judith A; Brandt, Nicole

    2017-05-01

    Both antidepressants and antipsychotics are used in older adults with behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Despite the prevalent use of these agents, little is known about their comparative risks for falls and fractures. Using 2007-2009 Medicare claims data linked to Minimum Data Set 2.0, we identified new users of antidepressants and antipsychotics among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias who had moderate-to-severe behavioral symptoms. Separate discrete-time survival models were used to estimate risks of falls, fractures, and a composite of both among antidepressant group versus antipsychotic group. Compared to antipsychotic users, antidepressant users experienced significantly higher risk for fractures (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-1.66). The overall risk of falls or fractures remained significant in the antidepressant versus antipsychotic group (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.32). Antidepressants are associated with higher fall and fracture risk compared to antipsychotics in the management of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias who experience moderate-to-severe behavioral symptoms. Clinicians need to assess the ongoing risks/benefits of antidepressants for these symptoms especially in light of the increasingly prevalent use of these agents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Influencing controlled substance prescribing: attending and resident physician use of a state prescription monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Lance; Skeel Williams, Kristi; Knox, Michele; Coates, John

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of attending physician awareness and utilization of a state prescription monitoring program on resident physician behavior. Twenty-five attending physicians and 70 residents in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry completed an 11-item questionnaire assessing awareness and utilization of a state prescription drug monitoring program. Residents who used the system had, on average, a higher proportion of supervising attendings using the system; residents required to utilize the system had the highest proportion of attendings using the system. Overall, almost 90% of the physicians who utilized the system did so due to concerns surrounding prescription drug abuse. Over one third of attending physicians reported increasing the quantity or amount of medication prescribed after utilizing the system, while no residents reported similar outcomes. Through the behavioral influence of supervising attending physicians, residents were significantly more likely to utilize the system. If system utilization is desired, attendings should use the system and require resident participation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Antipsychotic Use in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Julia; Sherman, Chelsea; Velkers, Clive; Maxwell, Colleen; Gill, Sudeep; Rochon, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotics are necessary for many older adults to treat major mental illnesses or reduce distressing psychiatric symptoms. Current controversy exists over the role of antipsychotics in the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in persons with dementia. Although some NPS may be appropriately and safely treated with antipsychotics, a fine balance must be achieved between the benefits of these medications, which are often modest, and adverse events, which may have significant consequences. Approximately one-third of all persons with dementia are currently prescribed antipsychotic medications, and there is significant variation in the use of antipsychotics across care settings and providers. Reducing the inappropriate or unnecessary use of antipsychotics among persons with dementia has been the focus of increasing attention owing to better awareness of the potential problems associated with these medications. Several approaches can be used to curb the use of antipsychotics among persons with dementia, including policy or regulatory changes, public reporting, and educational outreach. Recently, there has been encouraging evidence of a downward trend in the use of antipsychotics in many long-term care settings, although prescribing rates are still higher than what is likely optimal. Although reducing the inappropriate use of antipsychotics is a complex task, psychiatrists can play an important role via the provision of clinical care and research evidence, contributing to improved care of persons with dementia in Canada and elsewhere. PMID:28212496

  7. Inappropriate Fentanyl Prescribing Among Nursing Home Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Kevin M; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos; Dore, David D; Segal, Jodi B; Zullo, Andrew R; Alexander, G Caleb

    2017-02-01

    We quantified transdermal fentanyl prescribing in elderly nursing home residents without prior opioid use or persistent pain, and the association of individual and facility traits with opioid-naïve prescribing. Cross-sectional study. Linked Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments; Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) records; and Medicare Part D claims. From a cross-section of all long-stay US nursing home residents in 2008 with an MDS assessment and Medicare Part D enrollment, we identified individuals (≥65 years old) who initiated transdermal fentanyl, excluding those with Alzheimer disease, severe cognitive impairment, cancer, or receipt of hospice care. We used Medicare Part D to select beneficiaries initiating transdermal fentanyl in 2008 and determined whether they were "opioid-naïve," defined as no opioid dispensing during the previous 60 days. We obtained resident and facility characteristics from MDS and OSCAR records and defined persistent pain as moderate-to-severe, daily pain on consecutive MDS assessments at least 90 days apart. We estimated associations of patient and facility attributes and opioid-naïve fentanyl initiation using multilevel mixed effects logistic regression modeling. Among 17,052 residents initiating transdermal fentanyl, 6190 (36.3%) were opioid-naïve and 15,659 (91.8%) did not have persistent pain. In the regression analysis with adjustments, residents who were older (ages ≥95 odds ratio [OR] 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-1.95) or more cognitively impaired (moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment, OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.73-2.29) were more likely to initiate transdermal fentanyl without prior opioid use. Most nursing home residents initiating transdermal fentanyl did not have persistent pain and many were opioid-naïve. Changes in prescribing practices may be necessary to ensure Food and Drug Administration warnings are followed, particularly for vulnerable subgroups, such as the cognitively impaired

  8. "The Lesser of Two Evils" Versus "Medicines not Smarties": Constructing Antipsychotics in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dilbagh; Almutairi, Saleh; Donyai, Parastou

    2017-11-21

    Because antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, they should only be prescribed in dementia in limited circumstances. But antipsychotics are prescribed to a large proportion of residents in formal care settings despite guidance and warnings to the contrary, justifying a study into how professionals define and in turn create realities about antipsychotic usage in dementia. Twenty-eight professionals with a role in the care and management of patients with dementia in care homes were recruited and interviewed in this qualitative study. A gap in the literature about the social construction of antipsychotics in dementia prompted the use of critical discourse analysis methodology. Antipsychotics were portrayed in 2 distinct ways; as "the lesser of two evils' they were conceptualized as the less harmful or unpleasant of 2 bad choices and as "medicines not Smarties" (a brand of sweets/candy) they were conceptualized as prescribed too frequently and indiscriminately. The first resource could be used to defend the prescribing of antipsychotics and uphold the prescribers' privilege to do so whereas the second enabled the speaker to reject their own wilful involvement in overprescribing. When prescribers draw on "the lesser of two evils" paradigm to sanction the overprescribing of antipsychotics, implicit assumptions about these medications as being the best of bad choices should be recognized and challenged. Future studies should target specific normative beliefs about antipsychotic prescribing consequences, to change the lexicon of common knowledge which perpetuates bad practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Comparison of Unlicensed and Off-Label Use of Antipsychotics Prescribed to Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients for Treatment of Mental and Behavioral Disorders with Different Guidelines: The China Food and Drug Administration Versus the FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuqing; Hu, Jinqing; Sun, Bin; Deng, Shuhua; Wen, Yuguan; Chen, Weijia; Qiu, Chang; Shang, Dewei; Zhang, Ming

    2018-01-16

    This study aims to compare the prevalence of unlicensed and off-label use of antipsychotics among child and adolescent psychiatric outpatients with guidelines proposed by the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and to identify factors associated with inconsistencies between the two regulations. A retrospective analysis of 29,326 drug prescriptions for child and adolescent outpatients from the Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University was conducted. Antipsychotics were classified as "unlicensed" or "off-label use" according to the latest pediatric license information registered by the CFDA and the FDA or the package inserts of antipsychotics authorized by the CFDA or the FDA for the treatment of pediatric mental and behavioral disorders, respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors associated with inconsistencies between the two regulations. The total unlicensed use, according to the CFDA analysis, was higher than that found in the FDA analysis (74.14% vs. 22.04%, p disorders were associated with inconsistent unlicensed use. Antipsychotic drug classes, age group, number of prescribed psychotropic drugs, gender, diagnosis of schizophrenia and schizotypal and delusional disorders, diagnosis of mood [affective] disorders, diagnosis of mental retardation, and diagnosis of psychological development disorders were associated with inconsistent off-label use. The difference in prevalence of total unlicensed and off-label use of antipsychotics between the two regulations was statistically significant. This inconsistency could be partly attributed to differences in pediatric license information and package inserts of antipsychotics. The results indicate a need for further clinical pediatric studies and better harmonization between agencies regarding antipsychotic used in pediatrics.

  10. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...... initial antipsychotic prescribing patterns and associated use of mental health care services. METHOD: Population-based cohort study linking the following Danish national registers: the Central Psychiatric Research Register, the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and Statistics Denmark. RESULTS...

  11. Reasons to Prescribe Antipsychotics for the Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia: A Survey in Dutch Nursing Homes Among Physicians, Nurses, and Family Caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornege-Blokland, E.; Kleijer, B.C.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; van Marum, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Despite serious safety concerns, prescription rates of antipsychotics for the treatment of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia remain high, especially in nursing homes. This high prevalence of antipsychotic use cannot be explained by the modest success rate reported in

  12. Psychotropic prescribing in HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... symptoms may occur in the context of fluctuating attention, sleep/wake disturbance and poor orientation. Anti-psychotics. Importantly, with regard to prescribing antipsychotics, HIV-positive patients may be more susceptible to extra-pyramidal side-effects (EPSEs), neuroleptic malignant syndrome and tardive.

  13. Atypical antipsychotics in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck Carol Paton Rafael Euba Cait Goddard, S

    2001-01-01

    Although their primary purpose is to treat psychosis, antipsychotics are commonly prescribed for the elderly to treat the behavioural disturbances and agitation associated with dementia. Such use is controversial. Atypical antipsychotics cause fewer extrapyramidal sideeffects than the older drugs in younger adults, but the evidence base for their efficacy and tolerability in the elderly is poor. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of atypical antipsychotic prescribing for the elderly, the indications for use and documented side-effects. The medication cards of all patients from 19 Trusts, occupying a psychiatric bed for the over 65s, were screened during one week in March 2000. Data were collected by pharmacists from the clinical notes. Half of those prescribed an antipsychotic received an atypical, and risperidone was the one most commonly prescribed. Half the sample had a diagnosis of dementia. Documented side-effects from the atypical were uncommon. Atypicals are frequently prescribed as first-line antipsychotics for behavioural problems associated with dementia, despite the poor evidence base for their efficacy and safety in this population. Undermonitoring of side-effects may remain a problem.

  14. Prescribing pattern of psychotropic drugs in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.B.; Zuidema, S.U.; Jonghe, J.F. de; Verhey, F.R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goal of this study is to determine patterns of psychotropic drug use (PDU), the association with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), and the variability across dementia types in nursing home residents with dementia. In addition, PDU was analyzed across multiple indications. METHODS:

  15. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics | Zullino | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The newer atypical antipsychotics are prescribed because of their enhanced safety profiles and their larger pharmacological profile in comparison to the conventional antipsychotics. This has led to broad off-label utilisation. The aim of the present survey was to study the prescribing practice of hospital psychiatrists ...

  16. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics…

  17. Initiation of antipsychotic treatment by general practitioners. A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Geartsje; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hak, Eelko; Kahn, René S; Burger, Huibert

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Antipsychotics are approved treatment for severe conditions and have serious side effects. Antipsychotics are often prescribed off-label. Although a substantial proportion of antipsychotics are prescribed in primary care, it is largely unknown what motivates the

  18. Changes in Prescribing Symptomatic and Preventive Medications in the Last Year of Life in Older Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Helene G.; Taxis, Katja; Pont, Lisa G.

    2018-01-01

    Background At the end of life goals of care change from disease prevention to symptomatic control, however little is known about the patterns of medication prescribing at this stage. Objectives To explore changes in prescribing of symptomatic and preventive medication in the last year of life in

  19. Antipsychotic-induced somnolence in mothers with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2012-03-01

    Although it is known that many antipsychotic drugs, at the doses prescribed for schizophrenia, are sedative and cause daytime drowsiness, the effect of potentially diminished vigilance on parenting parameters has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to advise clinicians about sedative load in mothers who are prescribed antipsychotic medication. A Medline search was conducted into the sedative effects of antipsychotics, with the following search terms: sleep; sedation; somnolence; wakefulness; antipsychotics; schizophrenia, parenting, maternal behavior, and custody. The results showed that antipsychotic drugs differ in their propensity to induce sedation and do so via their effects on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. It is important to note that mothers with schizophrenia risk losing custody of their infants if they are perceived as potentially neglectful because of excessive daytime sleepiness. Clinicians must choose antipsychotic medications carefully and monitor for sedative effects whenever the patient has important responsibilities that require the maintenance of vigilance.

  20. Effects of Controlled Discontinuation of Long-Term Used Antipsychotics on Weight and Metabolic Parameters in Individuals With Intellectual Disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kuijper, Gerda; Mulder, Hans; Evenhuis, Heleen; Visser, Frank; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    Antipsychotics are frequently prescribed agents in individuals with intellectual disability, often for behavioral symptoms. Efficacy of antipsychotics for this is ambiguous, so discontinuation should be considered. Weight gain and metabolic dysregulation are well-known adverse effects of

  1. Geographic Distribution of Antipsychotic Use in Medicare Part D Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Anthony

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine if there is a geographic variation in antipsychotic prescribing in Medicare recipients in 10 US divisions. Methods: Data was collected in the Microsoft Excel format from the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Part D Prescriber Public Use File for 2013 CMS data. Antipsychotics were sorted and downloaded into separate excel formats. The states were separated into the 10 geographic according to the US Census Bureau to identify prescribing trends. The primary endpoint was to determine the difference in the rates of CMS Medicare Part D utilizers who had antipsychotic prescriptions in each of the 10 geographic divisions. 
The rate of antipsychotic prescribing was calculated by determining the number of prescription claims for each antipsychotic for the division and dividing by the number of people utilizing Medicare Part D in each division. Data was converted to SPSS (version19, Armonk, NY for further analysis. ANOVA was used to compare the differences. Results: Approximately 35 million claims were included in the data set. Antipsychotics comprised 4.75% of the total spending on medications for Medicare Part D. New England was found to have the highest rate of claims at 0.83. No statistically significant differences in the rate of antipsychotic prescribing across geographic regions was observed; however, a statistically significant difference was observed for total claims (P<0.001 and total antipsychotic costs (P<0.017 across regions. Conclusion: Additional studies need to be conducted to determine if there is a difference in antipsychotic prescribing in the United States. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties

  2. Antipsychotic prescription patterns and treatment costs of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antipsychotic drugs most commonly prescribed for schizophrenia patients in Peshawar, Pakistan and to analyze the treatment costs associated with these drugs. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were recruited from outpatient psychiatry departments in Peshawar, ...

  3. Antipsychotic prescription patterns and treatment costs of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antipsychotic drugs most commonly prescribed for schizophrenia patients in. Peshawar, Pakistan and to analyze the treatment costs associated with these drugs. Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were recruited from outpatient psychiatry departments in Peshawar, ...

  4. Antipsychotic Medication and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Their Knowledge and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Rachel; Withers, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are the most frequently prescribed psychotropic medication for people with intellectual disabilities. Many people are prescribed this medication for "challenging behaviours" without having had a formal diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder. Antipsychotics have been reported to have severe side-effect profiles, which can…

  5. Antipsychotic prescription and mortality in hospitalized older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Deborah; Marengoni, Alessandra; Nobili, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Mauro; Pasina, Luca; Franchi, Carlotta; Djade, Codjo D; Corrao, Salvatore; Salerno, Francesco; Marcucci, Maura; Romanelli, Giuseppe; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2017-11-01

    Recent scientific reports have shown that older persons treated with antipsychotics for dementia-related behavioural symptoms have increased mortality. However, the impact of these drugs prescribed during hospitalization has rarely been assessed. We aimed to investigate whether antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of mortality during hospitalization and at 3-month follow-up in elderly inpatients. We analyzed data gathered during two waves (2010 and 2012) by the REPOSI (Registro Politerapie Società Italiana Medicina Interna). All new prescriptions of antipsychotic drugs during hospitalization, whether maintained or discontinued at discharge, were collected, and logistic regression models were used to analyze their association with in-hospital and 3-month mortality. Covariates were age, sex, the Short Blessed Test (SBT) score, and the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. Among 2703 patients included in the study, 135 (5%) received new prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs. The most frequently prescribed antipsychotic during hospitalization and eventually maintained at discharge was haloperidol (38% and 36% of cases, respectively). Patients newly prescribed with antipsychotics were older and had a higher Cumulative Illness Rating Scale comorbidity index both at admission and at discharge compared to those who did not receive a prescription. Of those prescribed antipsychotics, 71% had an SBT score ≥10 (indicative of dementia), 12% had an SBT score of 5-9 (indicative of questionable dementia); and 17% had an SBT score antipsychotic drugs (14.3% vs 9.4%; P = 0.109), but in multivariate analysis only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were significantly related to mortality during hospitalization. At 3-month follow-up, only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were associated with mortality. We found that the prescription of antipsychotic drugs during hospitalization was not associated with in-hospital or follow-up mortality. Short

  6. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS USE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Potočnik-Dajčman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Classical antipsychotics – neuroleptics are one of the most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs in child psychiatry. Atypical antipsychotics are used for the same indications – psychotic (schizophrenia as well as unpsychotic disorders (pervasive developmental disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders and tics disorders. It is surprising that the studies on their use with regard to this age group are rather rare. They are carried out on a small number of samples and only exceptionally double blind. This article summarizes published clinical experience with atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents. A short overview of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and side effects is given. Schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders are major indications for use of atypical antipsychotics in children and adolescents, but they have also been successfully used for other disorders such as aggressive behaviour, tics and anorexia nervosa.Conclusions. With better side-effect profile, some of the atypical antipsychotics are expected to be doctrinally recognised as the first-line treatment for childhood schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders. However, more long-term studies carried out on a larger sample are needed. Atypical antipsychotics are already used in everyday practice as first-line treatment of childhood and adolescents schizophrenia.

  7. The antipsychotic story: changes in prescriptions and overdose without better safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Nicholas A.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Morbidity and mortality from drug overdose has decreased over three decades. This is credited to safer drugs and therefore better outcomes in overdose. We aimed to investigate changing prescriptions of antipsychotic medications and associated changes in antipsychotic overdoses over a 26‐year period. Methods All antipsychotic poisoning presentations to a tertiary referral toxicology unit between 1987 and 2012 were reviewed. Data were collected prospectively on demographics, ingestion information, clinical effects, complications and treatment. Rates of antipsychotic drug use in Australia were obtained from Australian government publications for 1990–2011 and linked to overdose admissions by postcode. Results There were 3180 antipsychotic overdoses: 1235 first generation antipsychotics, 1695 ‘atypical’ second generation antipsychotics and 250 lithium overdoses. Over 26 years, antipsychotic overdoses increased 1.8‐fold, with first generation antipsychotics decreasing to one‐fifth of their peak (≈80/year to 16) and second generation antipsychotics increasing to double this (≈160/year), olanzapine and quetiapine accounting for 78%. All antipsychotic overdoses had a median length of stay of 18.6 h, 15.7% admitted to intensive care unit, 10.4% ventilated and 0.13% died in hospital, which was the same for first generation compared to second generation antipsychotics. There was a 2.3‐fold increase in antipsychotic prescriptions over the same period; first generation antipsychotics declined whereas there was a dramatic rise in second generation antipsychotics, mainly olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone (79%). Conclusion Over 26 years there was an increase in antipsychotic prescribing associated with an increase in antipsychotic overdoses. Although the type of antipsychotics changed, the morbidity and mortality remained the same, so that antipsychotics are an increasing proportion of overdose admissions. PMID:26945707

  8. [Prolactin, antipsychotics and breast cancer: is there a connection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, T; Detraux, J; De Hert, M

    The use of antipsychotics can result in elevated prolactin levels or hyperprolactinemia. An increasing number of studies suggests that prolactin plays a role in mammary carcinogenesis, leading to concerns about a possible relationship between antipsychotics and breast cancer. To provide an overview of recent literature regarding the relationship between prolactin, antipsychotics and breast cancer and an association between schizophrenia and breast cancer. We used PubMed to search for English- or Dutch-language articles concerning breast cancer risk (factors), prolactin, antipsychotics and schizophrenia. Studies have not shown any causal link between antipsychotics and the development of breastcancer. Moreover, antipsychotic medication seems to have no influence on locally produced prolactin - which some experts believe plays a role in the tumor genesis - and certain antipsychotics actually provide protection against breast cancer. There are conflicting reports on the prevalence of breast cancer among patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, research has revealed that several well-known risk factors for breast cancer (such as an unhealthy lifestyle) are more prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. There is no conclusive evidence that antipsychotic medication that raises prolactin levels increases the risk of breast cancer. Nevertheless, clinicians should always be cautious about prescribing antipsychotics for breast cancer patients. In our view, clinicians should always treat breast cancer risk factors as efficiently as possible, particularly when attending to patients who have schizophrenia.

  9. Prescribing of psychotropic medications to the elderly population of a Canadian province: a retrospective study using administrative databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Alessi-Severini

    2013-09-01

    year prior the prescription, were predictors of non-optimal prescribing (e.g., high dose antipsychotics. During the period 2002/3 and 2007/8, amongst new users of SGAs, 10.2% received high doses. Those receiving high dose antipsychotics did not show high levels of polypharmacy. Conclusions. Despite encouraging trends, the use of psychotropic medications remains high in elderly individuals, especially in residents of nursing homes. Clinicians caring for such patients need to carefully assess risks and benefits.

  10. Atypical antipsychotic use and outcomes in an urban maternal mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatters Friedman, Susan; Moller-Olsen, Charmian; Prakash, Chandni; North, Abigail

    2016-08-01

    Objective Despite many women suffering from psychosis in their childbearing years, limited data exist about the use of atypical antipsychotic agents in pregnancy. Atypical antipsychotic agents are often used to treat bipolar disorder, instead of lithium or valproate because of the known teratogenicity of those agents. As well, atypical antipsychotics are often prescribed in anxiety disorders and depression. This study sought to describe pregnancy outcomes for women prescribed atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy. Methods This retrospective review included all cases treated by Auckland Maternal Mental Health services in which atypical antipsychotic agents were utilized during pregnancy over three years. Results Over the three years, 45 pregnant women were prescribed atypical antipsychotic agents, most commonly quetiapine or olanzapine. Two-fifths (40%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorder and almost one-third (31%) with a psychotic disorder. Two-thirds (64%) were prescribed multiple psychotropic medications during their pregnancy. Instrumental delivery rates were elevated at 38%. A minority (13%) of the women developed gestational diabetes mellitus. Although 7% of infants were born premature, all were born after 35 weeks. Two major malformations were noted, similar to baseline community rates. Conclusions This naturalistic study adds to the limited literature about treatment with atypical antipsychotic agents in pregnancy, though not adequately powered to detect small differences in malformations or obstetrical outcomes. It also highlights the myriad of indications for which pregnant women are prescribed atypical antipsychotics, and the multiple other risk factors seen in this population.

  11. Antipsychotic use in elderly patients and the risk of pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambassi, Giovanni; Sultana, Janet; Trifirò, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotics are frequently and increasingly prescribed off-label for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with dementia, despite their modest efficacy. Instead, the safety profile of antipsychotics has been questioned repeatedly in recent years with various concerns, including death. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials found that one of the major causes of death associated with atypical antipsychotics use was pneumonia. Only few observational studies, however, have investigated the risk of pneumonia in elderly patients, especially among those receiving conventional antipsychotics. The aim of this editorial is to synthesize the current evidence from observational studies regarding the risk of pneumonia in elderly patients receiving either conventional or atypical antipsychotics. The studies conducted so far document that the risk of pneumonia is two- to threefold increased in a dose-dependent fashion with both classes compared to nonuse, with a possibly higher risk attributable to atypical antipsychotics. The risk seems to peak at the beginning of treatment (e.g., 7 - 30 days), and dissipates over time for both conventional and atypical antipsychotics. The risk-benefit ratio suggests that there will be 1 excess hospitalization for pneumonia for every 2 - 5 patients receiving any clinical improvement in symptoms. Considering the modest improvement in terms of efficacy, the risks associated with antipsychotics in elderly patients may outweigh their benefit.

  12. Severe tardive dystonia on low dose short duration exposure to atypical antipsychotics: Factors explored

    OpenAIRE

    Nilanjan C Chandra; Shabina A Sheth; Ritambhara Y Mehta; Kamlesh R Dave

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medications, more with typical antipsychotics, that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Studies show that newer atypical antipsychotics have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report a case of 20-year-old male with hyperthymic temperament and borderline intellectual functioning, who developed severe TD after low dose sh...

  13. Use of second-generation antipsychotic agents for sleep and sedation: a provider survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Eric D A; Sernyak, Michael; Rosenheck, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that second-generation antipsychotic agents are increasingly used to treat sleep problems. This study sought to quantify the proportion of new prescriptions for second-generation antipsychotic agents started for sleep/sedation and the correlates of such use. A cross-sectional survey of provider decision making at the time second-generation antipsychotic agents were prescribed, documenting the reasons for the medication, patient demographics, psychiatric and medical diagnoses, patient health characteristics, and provider background. A single Veterans Affairs Medical Center over a 20-month period. Prescribers of second-generation antipsychotic agents. N/A. Seven hundred seven (32.2%) of 2,613 surveys indicated sleep/sedation was at least one reason for using a second-generation anti-psychotic agent, whereas for 266 (12.1%) it was the only reason. Quetiapine was most frequently prescribed overall as well as for sleep/sedation (47.0% and 73.6% respectively). Second-generation antipsychotic agent use for sleep/sedation was unrelated to sociodemographic characteristics, least likely in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and most likely as a newly started second-generation antipsychotic agent. Sleep/sedation is a common reason given for new prescriptions of second-generation antipsychotic agents. Quetiapine is most frequently used for this purpose. A greater understanding of why providers use second-generation antipsychotic agents rather than safer and less costly alternatives for sleep problems may advance the development of interventions to reduce adverse effects.

  14. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vasilyeva

    Full Text Available Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines, particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results.A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs.After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use, risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively. At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05.In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  15. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Irina; Biscontri, Robert G; Enns, Murray W; Metge, Colleen J; Alessi-Severini, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine) have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines), particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results. A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs. After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use), risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively). At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05. In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  16. Antipsychotic-induced Hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheyla Dogan Bulut

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin provides the growth of the mammary gland during pregnancy and synthesis and preparation of breast milk for lactation. Antipsychotics and antidepressants that are frequently used in psychiatry, cause hyperprolactinemia. The prevalent opinion is that especially typical antipsychotics increase prolactin levels primarily by blocking D2 receptors in the anterior pituitary. The effects of atypical antipsychotics on hyperprolactinemia vary. Hyperprolactinemia causes galactorrhea, gynecomastia, sexual dysfunction, infertility, acne, hirsutism in women, weight gain, obesity and mood changes in addition to menstrual irregularities such as oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea and amenorrhea. In the long term, hyperprolactinemia may cause reduction in bone density and osteoporosis. Hyperprolactinemia as a side effect of antipsychotics drugs and its treatment will be reviewed in this article. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 109-124

  17. Conformance to schizophrenia treatment guidelines in North West-Bank, Palestine: focus on antipsychotic dosing and polytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of the prescribing patterns of antipsychotic drugs can improve therapeutic outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prescribing pattern of antipsychotics and its conformance to international treatment guidelines. Methods A cross sectional study at primary psychiatric centers was carried out. Patients’ medical files were used to obtain demographic, medication and clinical information. International guidelines for schizophrenia were used to create conformance indicators. All statistical analyses were conducted using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results 250 patients were included in this study. A total of 406 antipsychotic agents were used; 348 (85.7%) were first generation antipsychotics (FGA). The prevalence of antipsychotic combination was 50.4% (n=126). There was no significant difference in positive (p=0.3), negative (p=0.06) and psychopathology (p=0.5) scores of schizophrenia symptoms among patients on monotherapy versus those on antipsychotic combination. Furthermore, no significant difference was observed in the annual cost of antipsychotic monotherapy versus combination therapy. One hundred and five patients (42%) were using optimum dose of (300 – 600 mg CPZeq) while the remaining were using sub or supra therapeutic doses. Analysis showed that use of depot, use of anticholinergic agents and increasing amount of total CPZeq were significant factors associated with antipsychotic combination. Conclusions This study indicated that antipsychotic prescribing was not in conformance with international guidelines with respect to maintenance dose and combination therapy. Type of antipsychotic treatment regimen, combination versus monotherapy, was not associated with better clinical or economic outcome. PMID:23816223

  18. Differences in BMI between Mexican and Colombian patients receiving antipsychotics: results from the International Study of Latinos on Antipsychotics (ISLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Bernardo; Camacho, Alvaro; Parra, Katherine; de la Espriella, Ricardo; Rico, Victor; Lozano, Severiano; Troncoso, Mirna; Castilla-Puentes, Ruby C; Cook, Benjamin L; Jimenez, Daniel E

    2018-03-07

    The objective of this study is to examine the association of country of residence with body mass index (BMI) between Mexican and Colombian patients exposed to antipsychotics. We hypothesize that there will be a significant association between country of residence and BMI and that Mexican patients will have higher BMI than their Colombian counterparts. The International Study of Latinos on Antipsychotics (ISLA) is a multisite, international, cross sectional study of adult Latino patients exposed to antipsychotics in two Latin American Countries (i.e. Mexico and Colombia). Data were collected from a total of 205 patients (149 from Mexico and 56 from Colombia). The sites in Mexico included outpatient clinics in Mexicali, Monterrey and Tijuana. In Colombia, data were collected from outpatient clinics in Bogotá. For this study we included patients attending outpatient psychiatric community clinics that received at least one antipsychotic (new and old generation) for the last 3 months. A linear regression model was used to determine the association of country of residence with BMI for participants exposed to an antipsychotic. After controlling for demographics, behaviors, biological and comorbid psychiatric variables, there was a significant difference between Colombia vs. Mexico in the BMI of patients exposed to antipsychotics (β = 4.9; p Mexico and Colombia may reflect differences in prevalence of overweight/obesity at the population level in the respective countries, and highlights the involvement of other risk factors, which may include genetics.

  19. Association of antipsychotic polypharmacy with health service cost: a register-based cost analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Sørensen, Jan; Lublin, Henrik Kai Francis

    2012-01-01

    (2007: 25% higher costs; 2008: 17% higher costs) when adjusting for potential confounders and risk factors. A subgroup analysis suggested that the excessive costs associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy were partly accounted for by the functional level of the patients. CONCLUSION: The results......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of antipsychotic polypharmacy in schizophrenia with cost of primary and secondary health service use. METHOD: Comparative analysis of health service cost for patients prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy versus antipsychotic monotherapy. Resource...... utilisation and costs were described using central Danish registers for a 2 year period (2007-2008). We included patients attached to one of two Danish psychiatric referral centres in 1 January 2008 and/or 1 January 2009. Their prescribed treatment with either antipsychotic polypharmacy or monotherapy...

  20. Incident users of antipsychotic agents and future use of cholesterol-lowering drugs: an observational, pharmacoepidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrede, Silje; Tvete, Ingunn F; Tanum, Lars; Steen, Vidar M; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic agents have serious metabolic adverse effects, among them dyslipidemia, which may necessitate secondary prophylaxis with cholesterol-lowering drugs. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), particularly clozapine and olanzapine, are known to confer a higher risk of metabolic adverse effects than first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs). However, little is known regarding the real-life number of antipsychotic-treated patients receiving statins. By extracting data from the Norwegian prescription database, all patients 18-69 years old that started treatment with an antipsychotic during 2004-2012 formed the basis for analysis (n = 301,713). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of FGA and SGA users prescribed with cholesterol-lowering agent during the same period. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate the risk of redeeming a cholesterol-lowering drug for formerly antipsychotic drug-naive patients (n = 147,218). Statin prescription rates in patients receiving antipsychotic agents were lower (5.3%) than comparable rates in studies covering the general population (34%) and lower than would be expected based on the recognized negative impact of antipsychotics on serum lipids. Statin prescription rates were affected by patient age, antipsychotic dose, and the number of antipsychotic agents prescribed, but rates were only 5% elevated in patients receiving SGAs compared to patients receiving FGAs (P = .048). Our results may support the notion that patients treated with antipsychotic agents receive suboptimal care with regard to metabolic adverse effects. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Antipsychotic Drug Side Effects for Persons with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are the most frequently prescribed of the psychotropic drugs among the intellectually disabled (ID) population. Given their widespread use, efforts to systematically assess and report side effects are warranted. Specific scaling methods such as the "Matson Evaluation of Side Effects" ("MEDS"), the "Abnormal Inventory Movement…

  2. Multiple Antipsychotic Medication Use in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Horn, Paul S; McDougle, Christopher J; Erickson, Craig A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of multiple antipsychotic medications in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by reviewing the longitudinal medication management of 1100 patients consecutively treated for behavioral symptoms associated with ASD at a tertiary care specialty clinic. We identified all patients with ASD treated with daily doses of two or more antipsychotics for at least two visits at our clinic. For each patient meeting inclusion criteria, diagnostic and demographic data were collected. To evaluate clinical need and effectiveness of antipsychotic medications in this sample, we reviewed symptoms targeted with each antipsychotic medication and concomitant medications prescribed. Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale ratings had been completed at the time of each visit, and the duration of treatment with antipsychotic medications was determined. To evaluate the safety and tolerability of antipsychotic medication use in ASD, we reviewed reported adverse effects and calculated body mass index (BMI) change with treatment. Seventy patients met the inclusion criteria (6.4% of our sample). The majority of patients were moderately to severely ill Caucasian males, as determined by baseline mean CGI-S of 4.7 (SD = 0.8), and were diagnosed with autistic disorder and comorbid intellectual disability. The mean age was 15.1 years (SD = 10.9), the primary targeted symptoms were agitation/irritability, physical aggression, and self-injury. The majority of patients remained on two or more antipsychotics for >1 year. In this population, patients demonstrated greater symptomatic improvement and generally tolerated treatment without significant adverse effects. The use of two or more antipsychotic medications may be increasingly common in patients with ASD. This retrospective study demonstrates that this treatment approach may be of some clinical benefit, and is generally well

  3. Atypical antipsychotics: trends in analysis and sample preparation of various biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragou, Domniki; Dotsika, Spyridoula; Sarafidou, Parthena; Samanidou, Victoria; Njau, Samuel; Kovatsi, Leda

    2012-05-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly popular and increasingly prescribed. In some countries, they can even be obtained over-the-counter, without a prescription, making their abuse quite easy. Although atypical antipsychotics are thought to be safer than typical antipsychotics, they still have severe side effects. Intoxications are not rare and some of them have a fatal outcome. Drug interactions involving atypical antipsychotics complicate patient management in clinical settings and the determination of the cause of death in fatalities. In view of the above, analytical strategies that can efficiently isolate atypical antipsychotics from a variety of biological samples and quantify them accurately, sensitively and reliably, are of utmost importance both for the clinical, as well as for the forensic toxicologist. In this review, we will present and discuss novel analytical strategies that have been developed from 2004 to the present day for the determination of atypical antipsychotics in various biological samples.

  4. Antipsychotic treatment is associated with risk of atrial fibrillation: A nationwide nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ruey-Hsing; Lo, Li-Wei; Liou, Ying-Jay; Shu, Jiah-Hwang; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liang, Ying; Huang, Chin-Chou; Huang, Po-Hsun; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Chan, Wan-Leong; Leu, Hsin-Bang

    2017-01-15

    Antipsychotic agents are well known for their arrhythmigenic effect on ventricular arrhythmia. Though a few case reports observed the occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after antipsychotic exposure, information about their implication in AF is limited. Based on the National Health Insurance Database in Taiwan, we conducted a nested case-control study to investigate the relationship between antipsychotics and AF. From 2001 to 2010, a total of 34,053 cases of AF and 34,919 matched controls were enrolled. Antipsychotic exposure was measured and binding affinity to neurotransmitter receptors was calculated. Both medical and psychiatric comorbidities were identified and adjusted in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Current antipsychotic use was associated with a 17% increased risk of AF relative to nonusers (adjusted OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.10-1.26). A dose-dependent relationship of antipsychotic exposure and AF risk was observed (P for trend Antipsychotics with higher binding affinity to muscarinic M2 receptors were associated with a higher incidence of AF. In subgroup analysis, subjects with preexisting hypertension, diabetes, or coronary artery diseases were at greater risk of developing AF following antipsychotic exposure. Antipsychotic exposure was associated with increased risk of AF, especially for agents with higher cardiac muscarinic receptor binding affinity. Physicians should monitor the occurrence of new-onset AF, and strictly control underlying medical risk factors while prescribing antipsychotic agents to high-risk populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antipsychotic treatments for the elderly: efficacy and safety of aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izchak Kohen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Izchak Kohen1, Paula E Lester2, Sum Lam31Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Zucker-Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; 2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA; 3Division of Pharmacy and Geriatrics, St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Queens, NY, USAAbstract: Delusions, hallucinations and other psychotic symptoms can accompany a number of conditions in late life. As such, elderly patients are commonly prescribed antipsychotic medications for the treatment of psychosis in both acute and chronic conditions. Those conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and dementia. Elderly patients are at an increased risk of adverse events from antipsychotic medications because of age-related pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes as well as polypharmacy. Drug selection should be individualized to the patient’s previous history of antipsychotic use, current medical conditions, potential drug interactions, and potential side effects of the antipsychotic. Specifically, metabolic side effects should be closely monitored in this population. This paper provides a review of aripiprazole, a newer second generation antipsychotic agent, for its use in a variety of psychiatric disorders in the elderly including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, dementia, Parkinson’s disease and depression. We will review the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aripiprazole as well as dosing, diagnostic indications, efficacy studies, and tolerability including its metabolic profile. We will also detail patient focused perspectives including quality of life, patient satisfaction and adherence.Keywords: aripiprazole, antipsychotics, elderly, adverse drug reaction

  6. Antipsychotic polypharmacy and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Li, Yan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians, but their prescribing patterns have not been studied. This study examined the frequency as well as demographic and clinical correlates of antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 623 community-dwelling patients from 18 randomly selected primary care services were interviewed. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, including number of hospitalizations, antipsychotic drug-induced side effects, and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. The rate of APP prescription was 31% (193/623). Of the patients on APP, 89.6% received 2 antipsychotics, 10.4% received 3 or more antipsychotics. Clozapine (35.6%) was the most commonly prescribed second generation antipsychotic (SGA), while perphenazine (17.8%) was the most commonly prescribed first generation antipsychotic (FGA). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on APP were more likely to receive SGAs and anticholinergics, had fewer hospitalizations, younger age of onset, and higher doses of antipsychotics. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the QOL domains. Approximately a third of Chinese patients with schizophrenia in primary care receive APP. Further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of APP and its alternatives is warranted.

  7. Long-Term Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in the VA Health System: Patient Characteristics and Treatment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyenbuhl, Julie A.; Valenstein, Marcia; McCarthy, John F.; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Frederic C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although antipsychotic polypharmacy is being prescribed with increasing frequency, few studies have described patient characteristics and treatment patterns associated with long-term use of this treatment strategy. Methods By using data from the National Psychosis Registry of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 5,826 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who received long-term antipsychotic polypharmacy (simultaneous treatment with two or more antipsychotics for 90 or more days) during fiscal year 2000 and 39,745 patients who received long-term antipsychotic monotherapy were identified. By using multivariate regression models, patient demographic and clinical characteristics, antipsychotic dosages, and use of antiparkinson and adjunctive psychotropic medications were compared between the two groups. Results Patients were more likely to receive antipsychotic polypharmacy if they were younger, were unmarried, had a military service–connected disability, had schizophrenia rather than schizoaffective disorder, or had greater use of inpatient and outpatient mental health services. Patients were less likely to receive antipsychotic polypharmacy if they were African American, had concurrent diagnoses of depression or substance use disorder, or had greater medical comorbidity. For most antipsychotics, dosages prescribed for patients receiving polypharmacy were the same or modestly higher than those prescribed for patients receiving monotherapy. Patients given prescriptions for polypharmacy were more likely to receive antiparkinson medications, antianxiety agents, and mood stabilizers and equally likely to receive concurrent treatment with antidepressants. Conclusions Long-term antipsychotic polypharmacy appears to be reserved for more severely ill patients with psychotic symptoms rather than mood symptoms. These patients may experience increased adverse effects as a result of excess antipsychotic exposure. PMID:17412850

  8. Nphenylacetamides: Potential Antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Arylpiperazines have been recognized as the largest and most diverse class of compounds exerting actions on the central nervous system with strong affinity for serotonin and dopamine receptors. We here report the synthesis of some novel arylpiperazines and their evaluation for possible antipsychotic properties.

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors in chronic treatment with antipsychotic agents used in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundet-Tudurí, Xavier; Iglesias-Rodal, Manuel; Olmos-Domínguez, Carmen; Bernard-Antoranz, M Lluïsa; Fernández-San Martín, M Isabel; Amado-Guirado, Ester

    2013-12-01

    To compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and vascular events, between patients treated and untreated with antipsychotic drugs. A cross-sectional study was done in Barcelona. We compared patients attended in Primary Health Care Centres, treated with or without antipsychotics between 2008 and 2010. Anthropometric measurements, clinical variables, and CVRF were assessed. Adult and elderly patients, typical and atypical antipsychotics, were studied separately. 14,087 patients had been prescribed antipsychotics (63.4% atypical), the most common being risperidone. We selected 13,724 patients with the same age and gender but not treated (total of 27,811 patients). Patients receiving antipsychotic had higher prevalence of obesity (16.9% vs. 11.9%), smoking (22.2% vs. 11.1%), diabetes mellitus (16% vs. 11.9%), and dyslipidemia (32.8% vs. 25.8%) (p antipsychotic, differences were not observed depending typical or atypical ones. Patients treated with antipsychotic drugs had a greater prevalence of several CVRF (diabetes mellitus, obesity, and smoking). The presence of stroke was higher in those treated with antipsychotics. No relevant differences were observed between patients receiving typical or atypical antipsychotics.

  10. Association of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care With the Use of Antipsychotics and Other Psychotropics in Long-term Care in the United States From 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maust, Donovan T; Kim, H Myra; Chiang, Claire; Kales, Helen C

    2018-03-17

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes (hereafter referred to as the partnership) was established to improve the quality of care for patients with dementia, measured by the rate of antipsychotic prescribing. To determine the association of the partnership with trends in prescribing of antipsychotic and other psychotropic medication among older adults in long-term care. This interrupted time-series analysis of a 20% Medicare sample from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2014, was conducted among 637 426 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries in long-term care with Part D coverage. Data analysis was conducted from May 1, 2017, to January 9, 2018. Quarterly prevalence of use of antipsychotic and nonantipsychotic psychotropic medications (antidepressants, mood stabilizers [eg, valproic acid and carbamazepine], benzodiazepines, and other anxiolytics or sedative-hypnotics). Among the 637 426 individuals in the study (446 538 women and 190 888 men; mean [SD] age at entering nursing home, 79.3 [12.1] years), psychotropic use was declining before initiation of the partnership with the exception of mood stabilizers. In the first quarter of 2009, a total of 31 056 of 145 841 patients (21.3%) were prescribed antipsychotics, which declined at a quarterly rate of -0.53% (95% CI, -0.63% to -0.44%; P partnership. At that point, the quarterly rate of decline decreased to -0.29% (95% CI, -0.39% to -0.20%; P partnership and then accelerated after initiation of the partnership (rate, 0.22%; 95% CI, 0.18%-0.25%; P partnership, but the decrease slowed (rate change, 0.34%; 95% CI, 0.18%-0.50%; P partnership did not accelerate this decrease. However, the use of mood stabilizers, possibly as a substitute for antipsychotics, increased and accelerated after initiation of the partnership in both long-term care residents overall and in those with dementia. Measuring use of antipsychotics alone may be an

  11. Risk of serious cardiac events in older adults using antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2011-04-01

    Antipsychotic agents can lead to severe cardiovascular adverse events due to multiple mechanisms involving electrophysiologic and metabolic effects. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated the risk of serious cardiovascular-related events in typical and atypical antipsychotic users. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of serious cardiac events in older adults taking typical antipsychotics with those taking atypical antipsychotics. Prescription and medical information were derived from the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims database. The study involved a retrospective cohort of older adults (≥50 years) taking atypical or typical antipsychotics from July 1, 2000, to December 31, 2007. The primary outcome measure was hospitalization or emergency room visit due to serious cardiac events, including thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and ventricular arrhythmias within 1 year after the index date. The 2 groups were matched on a propensity score to minimize the baseline differences between the groups. Survival analysis was conducted on the matched cohort to assess the risk of serious cardiovascular events in typical versus atypical users. A total of 5580 patients were selected in each antipsychotic users group after propensity score matching. Serious cardiac events were found in 666 (11.9 %) atypical antipsychotic users and 698 (12.4%) typical antipsychotic users. Survival analysis revealed that typical antipsychotic users were at increased risk of serious cardiovascular events compared with atypical antipsychotic users (hazard ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.04-1.40) after controlling for other factors. Moderate increases in risk of serious cardiac events are associated with older adults using typical antipsychotic agents compared with atypical users. Health care professionals should carefully evaluate the benefit/risk ratio of antipsychotic agents before prescribing these agents to a vulnerable population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals

  12. Tardive dyskinesia in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics: case series and brief review of etiologic and treatment considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungjin Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD is a disfiguring side-effect of antipsychotic medications that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Newer atypical antipsychotics are felt by many to have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report five cases of patients taking atypical antipsychotics who developed TD, review the risk of TD, its potential etiologic mechanisms, and treatment options available. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to continue to be diligent in obtaining informed consent and monitoring for the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics.

  13. Use of antipsychotic and antidepressant within the Psychiatric Disease Centre, Regional Health Service of Ferrara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Stefano; Bianchini, Erica; Scanavacca, Paola

    2011-12-20

    This study aimed at describing the type and dosage of psychopharmaceuticals dispensed to patients with psychiatric disorders and to assess the percentage of patients treated with antipsychotics and antidepressants, the associated therapies, treatment adherence, and dosages used in individuals registered at the Psychiatric Disease Center (PDC), Regional Health Service of Ferrara. The analysis focused on therapeutic programmes presented to the Department of Pharmacy of the University Hospital of Ferrara of 892 patients treated by the PDC (catchment area of 134605 inhabitants). All diagnoses were made according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9). The analysis focused on prescriptions from September 2007 to June 2009. Data on adherence to prescribed therapy have were processed by analysis of variance. Among the patients 63% were treated with antipsychotics and 40% with antidepressants. Among patients receiving antipsychotics 92% used second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) whereas the remaining 8% used first generation antipsychotics (FGAs). Antipsychotic doses were lower than Daily Defined Dose (DDDs), and SGAs were often given with anticholinergics to decrease side effects. Mean adherence to antipsychotic therapy was 64%. Among antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most often prescribed, 55%. Dosages of these were within the limits indicated by the technical datasheet but higher than DDDs. Only 26% of patients underwent monotherapy. In antidepressants polytherapy, medication was associated with another antidepressant, 6% or with an antipsychotic, 51%. Mean adherence to the antidepressant therapy was 64%. Patients treated with antipsychotics tend to use doses lower than DDDs. The opposite tendency was noted in patients treated with antidepressants. Only a small percentage of patients (14%) modified their neuroleptic therapy by increasing the dosage. On the contrary, patients treated with antidepressants mainly

  14. Antipsychotic drugs and risks of myocardial infarction: a self-controlled case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Ruth; Smeeth, Liam; Anaya-Izquierdo, Karim; Timmis, Adam; Denaxas, Spiros C; Farrington, C Paddy; Whitaker, Heather; Hemingway, Harry; Douglas, Ian

    2015-04-21

    Antipsychotics increase the risk of stroke. Their effect on myocardial infarction remains uncertain because people prescribed and not prescribed antipsychotic drugs differ in their underlying vascular risk making between-person comparisons difficult to interpret. The aim of our study was to investigate this association using the self-controlled case series design that eliminates between-person confounding effects. All the patients with a first recorded myocardial infarction and prescription for an antipsychotic identified in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project were selected for the self-controlled case series. The incidence ratio of myocardial infarction during risk periods following the initiation of antipsychotic use relative to unexposed periods was estimated within individuals. A classical case-control study was undertaken for comparative purposes comparing antipsychotic exposure among cases and matched controls. We identified 1546 exposed cases for the self-controlled case series and found evidence of an association during the first 30 days after the first prescription of an antipsychotic, for first-generation agents [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-3.99] and second-generation agents (IRR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.18-5.32). Similar results were found for the case-control study for new users of first- (OR: 3.19, 95% CI: 1.9-5.37) and second-generation agents (OR: 2.55, 95% CI: 0.93-7.01) within 30 days of their myocardial infarction. We found an increased risk of myocardial infarction in the period following the initiation of antipsychotics that was not attributable to differences between people prescribed and not prescribed antipsychotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Diabetic control and atypical antipsychotics: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Romina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction People with schizophrenia are at increased risk of developing metabolic disturbances. This risk may be further exacerbated by the use of antipsychotic agents. Research is still ongoing to determine the metabolic impact of antipsychotics on glucose regulation. In this case report we review some of the possible mechanisms of action of antipsychotic medication on glucose regulation. Case presentation We present the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia who developed type 2 diabetes mellitus whilst on treatment with second generation antipsychotics (SGA. His diabetes was controlled by a combination of antidiabetic drugs that were associated with his psychotropic treatment. Due to deterioration in his mental state, the patient was admitted on two occasions to a psychiatric unit during which his prescribed medication (olanzapine and risperidone was discontinued and changed to aripiprazole. On both occasions, the patient suffered hypoglycaemic episodes and his antidiabetic treatment had to be adjusted accordingly. The patient did not require any antidiabetic treatment whilst on aripiprazole during the follow up period. Conclusion Clinicians face regular dilemmas in trying to find the right balance between achieving control over a patient's mental illness and reducing any adverse effects associated with the prescribed medication. In patients receiving concomitant antidiabetic therapy, caution should be exercised when changing from one SGA to another. Whilst more longitudinal data are required, a trial of alternative SGAs, including aripiprazole in those developing type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance may be a worthwhile therapeutic option.

  16. Use of atypical antipsychotics in nursing homes and pharmaceutical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Camilla B; Donovan, Jennifer L; Field, Terry S; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Harrold, Leslie R; Kanaan, Abir O; Lemay, Celeste A; Mazor, Kathleen M; Tjia, Jennifer; Briesacher, Becky A

    2015-02-01

    To describe the current extent and type of pharmaceutical marketing in nursing homes (NHs) in one state and to provide preliminary evidence for the potential influence of pharmaceutical marketing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in NHs. Nested mixed-methods, cross-sectional study of NHs in a cluster randomized trial. Forty-one NHs in Connecticut. NH administrators, directors of nursing, and medical directors (n = 93, response rate 75.6%). Quantitative data, including prescription drug dispensing data (September 2009-August 2010) linked with Nursing Home Compare data (April 2011), were used to determine facility-level prevalence of atypical antipsychotic use, facility-level characteristics, NH staffing, and NH quality. Qualitative data, including semistructured interviews and surveys of NH leaders conducted in the first quarter of 2011, were used to determine encounters with pharmaceutical marketing. Leadership at 46.3% of NHs (n = 19) reported pharmaceutical marketing encounters, consisting of educational training, written and Internet-based materials, and sponsored training. No association was detected between level of atypical antipsychotic prescribing and reports of any pharmaceutical marketing by at least one NH leader. NH leaders frequently encounter pharmaceutical marketing through a variety of ways, although the impact on atypical antipsychotic prescribing is unclear. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in Children and Adolescents at Discharge from Psychiatric Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, Shannon N.; Keeshin, Brooks R.; Wehry, Anna M.; Blom, Thomas; Sorter, Michael T.; DelBello, Melissa P.; Strawn, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective Antipsychotic polypharmacy—the use of more than one second-generation antipsychotic—has increased in children and adolescents and may be associated with increased adverse effects, nonadherence, and greater costs. Thus, we sought to examine the demographic and clinical characteristics of psychiatrically hospitalized children and adolescents who were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy and to identify predictors of this prescribing pattern. Design Retrospective medical record review. Setting Large, acute care, urban, children's hospital, inpatient psychiatric unit. Patients One thousand four hundred twenty-seven children and adolescents who were consecutively admitted and discharged between September 2010 and May 2011. Measurements and Main Results At discharge, 840 (58.9%) of the 1427 patients were prescribed one or more antipsychotics, 99.3% of whom received second-generation antipsychotics. Of these 840 patients, 724 (86.2%) were treated with antipsychotic monotherapy, and 116 (13.8%) were treated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. Positive correlations with antipsychotic polypharmacy were observed for placement or custody outside the biological family; a greater number of previous psychiatric admissions; longer hospitalizations; admission for violence/aggression or psychosis; and intellectual disability, psychotic, disruptive behavior, or developmental disorder diagnoses. Negative correlations with antipsychotic polypharmacy included admission for suicidal ideation/attempt or depression, and mood disorder diagnoses. Significant predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy included admission for violence or aggression (odds ratio [OR] 2.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-5.61]), greater number of previous admissions (OR 1.21 [95% CI 1.10-1.33]), and longer hospitalizations (OR 1.08 [95% CI 1.04-1.12]). In addition, diagnoses of intellectual disability (OR 2.62 [95% CI 1.52-4.52]), psychotic disorders (OR 5.60 [95% CI 2.29-13.68]), and

  18. Does a history of suicide attempt predict higher antipsychotic dosage in schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettige, Nuwan C; Kennedy, James L; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Antipsychotic dosage is generally adjusted by physicians depending on the stability of the patient and the response to that particular drug. Our hypothesis is that patients with previous suicide attempt are prescribed higher doses of antipsychotics. We examined the dosage and patterns of antipsychotic use in regard to past suicidal behaviour. For this study, 304 subjects with schizophrenia spectrum disorders between the ages of 18 and 75 were recruited. A cross-sectional assessment was used for this study, in which data were collected from each patient through an interview and self-report questionnaires. The percentages of the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS) maximum recommended daily dose were applied to standardize antipsychotic dosages across different treatments. We compared the standardized dosage of antipsychotics in schizophrenics with previous suicide attempts and those who have never attempted suicide. Applying the ANCOVA, our preliminary results show no significant difference (P = 0.467) in antipsychotic dosage in the attempters and non-attempters. The prescribed clozapine dosage fails to show a significant relationship with suicidal history (P >0.05). In summary, our analysis does not show antipsychotic dosage adjustment based on past suicide attempt, after controlling for the current suicidal ideation and hopelessness.

  19. Association between the use of anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs and safety and receptor drug-binding profiles of antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerden, Pål; Slørdal, Lars; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2009-12-01

    The use of anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs is almost exclusively confined to treating antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). We investigated the prevalence of concomitant prescription of anticholinergics as a proxy for antipsychotic-induced EPS and compared variance in prevalence with differences in the assumed mechanisms of action of antipsychotics on central nervous system (CNS) transmitter systems (i.e., receptor drug-binding profiles). We paid special attention to potential differences between typical and atypical antipsychotics. Data were drawn from the Norwegian Prescription Database on sales of antipsychotic and anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs to a total of 57,130 outpatients in 2004. We assessed concomitant dispensations of antipsychotic and anticholinergic drugs and correlated the prevalence of concomitantly prescribed anticholinergics to previously assessed receptor-binding profiles of antipsychotics. The concurrent use of anticholinergics varied between 0.4% and 26.0% for patients using a single antipsychotic agent. The prevalence of anticholinergic comedication was more than twice as high in patients using two or more antipsychotic drugs. Four typical antipsychotics (fluphenazine, zuclopenthixol, haloperidol, and perphenazine) were associated with higher concomitant use of anticholinergics than the rest. For the remaining 14 antipsychotic agents, the difference between typical and atypical antipsychotics was neither pronounced nor systematic. A high degree of D2-receptor antagonism and a high 5-HT2A/D2-receptor-affinity ratio coincided with the use of anticholinergics. The liability of antipsychotic drugs to cause EPS seemed to vary considerably and largely independently of the distinction between typical and atypical antipsychotics.

  20. Lean Methodology Reduces Inappropriate Use of Antipsychotics for Agitation at a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Joshana K; Depaolo, Antonio; Khushalani, Sunil; Walters, J Ken; Roca, Robert; Zisselman, Marc; Borleis, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    To Evaluate the Effects of Applying Lean Methodology-Improving Quality Increasing Efficiency by Eliminating Waste and Reducing Costs-An Approach To Decrease the Prescribing Frequency of Antipsychotics for The Indication of Agitation. Historically Controlled Study. Bheppard Pratt Health System is the Largest Private Provider of Psychiatric Care in Maryland With a Total Bed Capacity of 300. There Were 4 337 Patient Days From November 1 2012 to October 31 2013 on the Dementia Unit. All Patients Admitted on the Dementia Unit Were 65 Years of Age and Older with a Primary Diagnosis of Dementia. our Multidisciplinary Team Used Lean Methodology to Identify the Root Causes and Interventions Necessary to Reduce Inappropriate Antipsychotic Use. The Primary Outcome Was Rate of Inappropriately Indicating Agitation as the Rationale When Prescribing Antipsychotic Medications. There Was a 90% (P Agitation. The Lean Methodology Interventions Led To A 90% (P Agitation and a 10% Rate Reduction in Overall Antipsychotic Prescribing. Key Words: Agitation Alzheimer's Antipsychotics Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia Centers For Medicare & Medicaid Services Dementia Root-cause Analysis. BPSD = Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia CATIE-AD = Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness in Alzheimer's Disease EMR = Electronic Medical Records GAO = Government Accountability Office GNCIS = Geriatric Neuropsychiatric Clinical Indicator Scale.

  1. Metabolic Signature of Antipsychotics Used in the Treatment of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAP) are prescribed to patients with autism spectrum disorders with symptoms of aggression or agitation, stereotypic behavior...human preadipocytes which were induced to differentiate in culture. Cells were incubated with the drugs for 72 hrs, and after media replacement...conditioned media were collected for 4 hrs and analyzed for glycerol by a colorimetric assay. As evident in Fig 4, Olanzapine caused dose-dependent

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiezhong; Huang, Xu-Feng; Shao, Renfu; Chen, Chen; Deng, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are widely prescribed to control various mental disorders. As mental disorders are chronic diseases, these drugs are often used over a life-time. However, APDs can cause serious glucometabolic side-effects including type 2 diabetes and hyperglycaemic emergency, leading to medication non-compliance. At present, there is no effective approach to overcome these side-effects. Understanding the mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes should be helpful in prevention and treat...

  3. Antipsychotic drug prescription rates among Dutch nursing homes : the influence of patient characteristics and the dementia special care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, M. J. G.; Wetzels, R. B.; Bor, H.; Zuidema, S. U.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the differences in antipsychotic drug prescription rates in residents with dementia in dementia special care units (SCUs) of Dutch nursing homes, considering the differences in patient characteristics. Method: As part of the Waalbed-II study, the data on antipsychotic drug use

  4. Time Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ane; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    : To investigate time trends in use of antipsychotics and other psychotropic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: The study included longitudinal data on all Danish residents ≥65 years. The study population was defined on January 1 of each year from 2000-2012. Data included prescriptions, discharge diagnoses......, and somatic and psychiatric comorbidities. Multivariate time trend analyses of psychotropic drug use in patients with dementia within 4-year age bands were performed. RESULTS: Overall, among patients with dementia the prevalence of antipsychotic drug use decreased from 31.3% in 2000 to 20.4% in 2012...... increased as the annual median number of defined daily doses (DDD) increased from 33.3 to 42.0 DDD. CONCLUSIONS: The changing patterns of psychotropic drug use may be caused by warnings against use of antipsychotics. Further research is needed to explore the implications for patient safety....

  5. Antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and risk of violent crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Seena; Zetterqvist, Johan; Larsson, Henrik; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2014-09-27

    Antipsychotics and mood stabilisers are prescribed widely to patients with psychiatric disorders worldwide. Despite clear evidence for their efficacy in relapse prevention and symptom relief, their effect on some adverse outcomes, including the perpetration of violent crime, is unclear. We aimed to establish the effect of antipsychotics and mood stabilisers on the rate of violent crime committed by patients with psychiatric disorders in Sweden. We used linked Swedish national registers to study 82,647 patients who were prescribed antipsychotics or mood stabilisers, their psychiatric diagnoses, and subsequent criminal convictions in 2006-09. We did within-individual analyses to compare the rate of violent criminality during the time that patients were prescribed these medications versus the rate for the same patients while they were not receiving the drugs to adjust for all confounders that remained constant within each participant during follow-up. The primary outcome was the occurrence of violent crime, according to Sweden's national crime register. In 2006-09, 40,937 men in Sweden were prescribed antipsychotics or mood stabilisers, of whom 2657 (6·5%) were convicted of a violent crime during the study period. In the same period, 41,710 women were prescribed these drugs, of whom 604 (1·4 %) had convictions for violent crime. Compared with periods when participants were not on medication, violent crime fell by 45% in patients receiving antipsychotics (hazard ratio [HR] 0·55, 95% CI 0·47-0·64) and by 24% in patients prescribed mood stabilisers (0·76, 0·62-0·93). However, we identified potentially important differences by diagnosis-mood stabilisers were associated with a reduced rate of violent crime only in patients with bipolar disorder. The rate of violence reduction for antipsychotics remained between 22% and 29% in sensitivity analyses that used different outcomes (any crime, drug-related crime, less severe crime, and violent arrest), and was stronger in

  6. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  7. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    the knowledge base in the healthcare field is shifting. Drawing on in-depth interviews about diagnosing and prescribing, the article demonstrates how the problem of antimicrobial resistance is understood and engaged with by Danish general practitioners. When general practitioners speak of managing “non...

  8. Prescribing procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George H.

    1979-01-01

    In his everyday work the family physician sees many patients whose problems have been diagnosed but for whom postponement of an active treatment plan is indicated. The physician must therefore prescribe procrastination in a carefully planned way. I describe some ideas and practical methods for doing this. PMID:529244

  9. Antipsychotic Prescriptions Among Adults With Major Depressive Disorder in Office-Based Outpatient Settings: National Trends From 2006 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Mohamed, Somaia; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2018-02-13

    A recent moderately long-term study found an antipsychotic to be more effective than an antidepressant as the next-step treatment of unresponsive major depressive disorder (MDD). It is thus timely to examine recent trends in the pharmacoepidemiology of antipsychotic treatment of MDD. Data from the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, nationally representative samples of office-based outpatient visits in adults with MDD (ICD-9-CM codes 296.20-296.26 and 296.30-296.36) (n = 4,044 unweighted), were used to estimate rates of antipsychotic prescribing over these 10 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified demographic and clinical factors independently associated with antipsychotic use in MDD. Antipsychotic prescribing for MDD increased from 18.5% in 2006-2007 to 24.9% in 2008-2009 and then declined to 18.9% in 2014-2015. Visits with adults 75 years or older showed the greatest decline from 27.0% in 2006-2007 to 10.7% in 2014-2015 (OR for overall trend = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.95). The most commonly prescribed antipsychotic agents were aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone. Antipsychotic prescription was associated with being black or Hispanic, having Medicare among adults under 65 years or Medicaid as a primary source of payment, and receiving mental health counseling, 3 or more concomitant medications, and diagnosis of cannabis use disorder (P < .01). Antipsychotics, prescribed for about one-fifth of adults with MDD, increased and then declined from 2006 to 2015, reflecting, first, FDA approval and then concern about adverse effects in the elderly. Future research should track evolving trends following the publication of evidence of greater long-term effectiveness of antipsychotic than antidepressant next-step therapy in adults with MDD. © Copyright 2018 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. Antipsychotic treatment dosing profile in patients with schizophrenia evaluated with electronic monitoring (MEMS®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco J; Ramallo-Fariña, Yolanda; Bosch, Esperanza; Mayans, Teresa; Rodríguez, Carlos J; Caravaca, Ana

    2013-05-01

    Although the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) device offers accurate information on treatment dosing profile, such profile has never been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Enhancing our knowledge on this issue would help in developing intervention strategies to improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment in these patients. 74 outpatients with schizophrenia were monitored with the MEMS device for a 3-month period, for evaluation of antipsychotic treatment dosing profile, possible influence of medication schedule-related variables, adherence to treatment--considering dose intake within prescribed timeframes--and possible Hawthorne's effect of using the MEMS device. Dose-omission gaps occurred in 18.7% of monitoring days, most frequently during weekends, almost significantly. Almost one-third of prescribed doses were taken out of prescribed time. Neither the prescribed number of daily doses nor the indicated time of the day for dose intake (breakfast, dinner), were associated with correct antipsychotic dosing. Excess-dose was rare in general, and more frequent out of prescribed dose timeframe. No Hawthorne's effect was found for the MEMS device. Adherence reached only 35% according to a definition that included dose intake within prescribed timeframes. Antipsychotic treatment dosing was considerably irregular among patients with schizophrenia. Strategies to reduce dose-omission gaps and increase dosing within prescribed timeframes seem to be necessary. Gaining knowledge on precise oral antipsychotic dosing profiles or the influence of schedule-related variables may be useful to design strategies towards enhancing adherence. There appears to be no Hawthorne's effect associated with the use of MEMS devices in outpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD.

  12. Pharmacological treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Newton-Howes, Giles; Clarke, Mike J

    2017-01-24

    Antipsychotic-related constipation is a common and serious adverse effect, especially for people taking clozapine. Clozapine has been shown to impede gastrointestinal motility, leading to constipation, and has been reported in up to 60% of patients receiving clozapine. In rare cases, complications can be fatal. Appropriate laxatives should be prescribed to treat constipation in people taking antipsychotics, but there is a lack of guidance on the comparative effectiveness and harms of different agents in this population. An understanding of the effectiveness and safety of treatment for antipsychotic-related constipation is important for clinicians and patients alike. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatment (versus placebo or compared against another treatment) for antipsychotic-related constipation (defined as constipated patients of any age, who are treated with antipsychotics, regardless of dose, in which constipation is considered to be an antipsychotic-related side effect). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (15 June 2015), which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, PubMed, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials, grey literature, and conference proceedings. There are no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in this register. We also handsearched bibliographies and contacted relevant authors for additional information. We included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of pharmacological treatments in patients with antipsychotic-related constipation. Pharmacological treatments included laxatives and other medicines that could reasonably be used to combat constipation in this population (e.g. anticholinergic agents, like bethanecol). Two review authors independently extracted data from all included studies and assessed trials for risk of bias. A third author reviewed

  13. Geographical Variation in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Elderly Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakarias, Johanne Købstrup; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Nørgaard, Ane

    2016-01-01

    of behavioral symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential geographical variances in use of antipsychotic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: A registry-based cross-sectional study in the entire elderly population of Denmark (≥65 years) conducted in 2012. Data included place of residence, prescriptions filled......, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Antipsychotic drug use among elderly with (n = 34,536) and without (n = 931,203) a dementia diagnosis was compared across the five regions and 98 municipalities in Denmark, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: In 2012, the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use was 20...

  14. Rationalising prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadmann, Sarah; Bang, Lia Evi

    2015-01-01

    with chronic care management in Denmark. We demonstrate how attempts to rationalise prescribing by informing GPs about drug effects, adverse effects and price do not satisfy GPs' knowledge needs. We argue that, for GPs, 'rational' prescribing cannot be understood in separation from the processes that enable...... patients to use medication. Therefore, GPs do much more to obtain knowledge about medications than seek advice on 'rational pharmacotherapy'. For instance, GPs also seek opportunities to acquaint themselves with the material objects of medication and medical devices. We conceptualise the knowledge needs...... of GPs as a need for practice-relevant knowledge and argue that industry sales representatives are granted opportunity to access general practice because they understand this need of GPs....

  15. Clinical Decision-Making in the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Focus on Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Samalin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify clinician characteristics associated with higher prescription rates of long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics, as well as the sources that influence medical decision-making regarding the treatment of schizophrenia. We surveyed 202 psychiatrists during six regional French conferences (Bordeaux, Lyon, Marseille, Nice, Paris, and Strasbourg. Data on the characteristics of practice, prescription rates of antipsychotic, and information sources about their clinical decisions were collected. Most psychiatrists used second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs, and preferentially an oral formulation, in the treatment of schizophrenia. LAI SGAs were prescribed to 30.4% of schizophrenic patients. The duration and type of practice did not influence the class or formulation of antipsychotics used. The clinicians following the higher percentage of schizophrenic patients were associated with a higher use of LAI antipsychotics and a lower use of oral SGAs. Personal experience, government regulatory approval, and guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia were the three main contributing factors guiding clinicians’ decision-making regarding the treatment of schizophrenia. The more clinicians follow schizophrenic patients, the more they use LAI antipsychotics. The development of specialized programs with top specialists should lead to better use of LAI antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  16. Should psychiatrists be more cautious about the long-term prophylactic use of antipsychotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Robin M; Quattrone, Diego; Natesan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    over the cumulative effects of antipsychotics on physical health and brain structure. Although controversy remains concerning some of the data, the wise psychiatrist should regularly review the benefit to each patient of continuing prophylactic antipsychotics against the risk of side-effects and loss......Patients who recover from an acute episode of psychosis are frequently prescribed prophylactic antipsychotics for many years, especially if they are diagnosed as having schizophrenia. However, there is a dearth of evidence concerning the long-term effectiveness of this practice, and growing concern...... of effectiveness through the development of supersensitivity of the dopamine D2 receptor. Psychiatrists should work with their patients to slowly reduce the antipsychotic to the lowest dose that prevents the return of distressing symptoms. Up to 40% of those whose psychosis remits after a first episode should...

  17. Risk of falls and fractures in older adults using antipsychotic agents: a propensity-matched retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael L; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2010-10-01

    .22). However, duration of therapy with any antipsychotic medication for >90 days was significantly (HR 1.81; CI 1.35, 2.43) associated with increased risk of falls/fractures compared with antipsychotic agents and typical antipsychotic agents with regards to the likelihood of falls/fractures in a large cohort of older adults. However, there is a need to be cautious while prescribing atypical and typical antipsychotics in older adults for long periods of time.

  18. The association between antipsychotic agents and the risk of myocardial infarction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Ruth; Douglas, Ian; Smeeth, Liam

    2011-12-01

    Patient populations that are prescribed antipsychotic agents have higher cardiovascular mortality rates. The risk of myocardial infarction is influenced by various factors that are more prevalent in patients with a mental illness. The aim of this review was to determine whether the use of antipsychotic agents is associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction in adults. Using multiple sources, all studies of antipsychotic agents using myocardial infarction as primary or secondary outcome measures were considered for inclusion. Study populations were adult subjects who had been prescribed an antipsychotic agent at least once in their medical history. It total, five studies were identified. Four studies with small numbers of events reported a moderate to strong effect of typical antipsychotic agents on the risk of myocardial infarction. The largest study had a favourable internal validity compared with all other studies and reported no association between the risk of myocardial infarction and current use of either atypical (relative risk 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88, 1.09) or typical antipsychotic agents (relative risk 0.99, 95% CI 0.96, 1.03). Clinical and methodological heterogeneity between the studies in this review led to an inconclusive answer to the question whether the use of antipsychotics is associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction in adults. Whilst results conflicted, the largest study did not find an association between the use of antipsychotic agents and an increased risk of myocardial infarction. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Second-Generation Antipsychotic Medications in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; Gerhard, Tobias; Huang, Cecilia; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Bobo, William V.; Crystal, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Scant information exists to guide pharmacological treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. We examine variation across commonly prescribed second-generation antipsychotic medications in medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission among children and adolescents clinically diagnosed with schizophrenia. A 45-state Medicaid claims file (2001–2005) was analyzed focusing on outpatients, aged 6–17 years, diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder prior to starting a new episode of antipsychotic monotherapy with risperidone (n = 805), olanzapine (n = 382), quetiapine (n = 260), aripiprazole (n = 173), or ziprasidone (n = 125). Cox proportional hazard regressions estimated adjusted hazard ratios of 180-day antipsychotic medication discontinuation and 180-day psychiatric hospitalization for patients treated with each medication. During the first 180 days following antipsychotic initiation, most youth treated with quetiapine (70.7%), ziprasidone (73.3%), olanzapine (73.7%), risperidone (74.7%), and aripirazole (76.5%) discontinued their medication (χ2 = 1.69, df = 4, P = .79). Compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazards of antipsychotic discontinuation did not significantly differ for any of the 4-comparator medications. The percentages of youth receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment while receiving their initial antipsychotic medication ranged from 7.19% (aripiprazole) to 9.89% (quetiapine) (χ2 = 0.79, df = 4, P = .94). As compared with risperidone, the adjusted hazard ratio of psychiatric hospital admission was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.57–1.61) for olanzapine, 1.03 (95% CI: 0.59–1.81) for quetiapine, 0.85 (95% CI: 0.43–1.70) for aripiprazole, and 1.22 (95% CI: 0.60–2.51) for ziprasidone. The results suggest that rapid antipsychotic medication discontinuation and psychiatric hospital admission are common in the community treatment of early-onset schizophrenia. No significant differences were detected in risk of either adverse outcome

  20. Antipsychotic prescription in children and adolescents: an analysis of data from a German statutory health insurance company from 2005 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Christian J; Lempp, Thomas; Glaeske, Gerd; Hoffmann, Falk

    2014-01-17

    Despite sparse documentation of their long-term therapeutic effects and side effects, antipsychotic drugs have come to be prescribed more frequently for children and adolescents in recent years, both in the USA and in Europe. No current data are available about antipsychotic prescriptions for this age group in Germany. Data from the largest statutory health insurance fund in Germany (BARMER GEK) were studied to identify antipsychotic prescriptions for children and adolescents (age 0-19 years) from 2005 to 2012 and analyze them with respect to age, sex, drug prescribed, prescribing medical specialty, and any observable secular trends. The percentage of children and adolescents receiving a prescription for an antipsychotic drug rose from 0.23% in 2005 to 0.32% in 2012. In particular, atypical antipsychotic drugs were prescribed more frequently over time (from 0.10% in 2005 to 0.24% in 2012). The rise in antipsychotic prescriptions was particularly marked among 10- to 14-year-olds (from 0.24% to 0.43%) and among 15- to 19-year-olds (from 0.34% to 0.54%). The prescribing physicians were mostly either child and adolescent psychiatrists or pediatricians; the most commonly prescribed drugs were risperidone and pipamperone. Risperidone was most commonly prescribed for patients with hyperkinetic disorders and conduct disorders. In Germany as in other industrialized countries, antipsychotic drugs have come to be prescribed more frequently for children and adolescents in ecent years. The German figures, while still lower than those from North America, are in the middle range of figures from European countries. The causes of the increase should be critically examined; if appropriate, the introduction of prescribing guidelines of a more restrictive nature could be considered.

  1. Original research paper. Switching antipsychotics: Results of 16-month non-interventional, prospective, observational clinical research of inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Cvetka Bačar; Pišlar, Mitja; Šen, Metka; Tavčar, Rok; Mrhar, Aleš

    2017-03-01

    The study aims to identify prescribing and switching patterns of antipsychotics in clinical practice. A 16-month, prospective study was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija, Slovenia. Inpatients (N = 311) with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were observed. The causes for switching antipsychotics and switching strategies were analyzed. Analyzing a total of 3954 prescriptions, the collected data confirmed that treatment strategies in this psychiatric hospital are very complex. It was found that 37 percent of inpatients had at least one switch. Moreover, switches that included three or more antipsychotics were detected. The most common causes for switching antipsychotics were adverse reactions and inefficacy or lack of efficacy. Among switching options, abrupt switch was recorded several times. As some patients are receiving several antipsychotics at the same time, it is possible that unusual switching occurs in clinical practice. It seems that the choice of switching strategy is also affected by the cause and urgency for switching an antipsychotic.

  2. Movement side effects of antipsychotic drugs in adults with and without intellectual disability: UK population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Rory; Horsfall, Laura; Strydom, André; Osborn, David; Walters, Kate; Hassiotis, Angela

    2017-08-03

    To measure the incidence of movement side effects of antipsychotic drugs in adults with intellectual disability and compare rates with adults without intellectual disability. Cohort study using data from The Health Improvement Network. UK primary care. Adults with intellectual disability prescribed antipsychotic drugs matched to a control group of adults without intellectual disability prescribed antipsychotic drugs. New records of movement side effect including acute dystonias, akathisia, parkinsonism, tardive dyskinaesia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. 9013 adults with intellectual disability and a control cohort of 34 242 adults without intellectual disability together contributed 148 709 person-years data. The overall incidence of recorded movement side effects was 275 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 256 to 296) in the intellectual disability group and 248 per 10 000 person-years (95% CI 237 to 260) in the control group. The incidence of any recorded movement side effect was significantly greater in people with intellectual disability compared with those without (incidence rate ratio 1.30, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.42, pintellectual disability-prescribed antipsychotic drugs (incidence rate ratio 3.03, 95% CI 1.26 to 7.30, p=0.013). Differences in rates of movement side effects between the groups were not due to differences in the proportions prescribed first and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. This study provides evidence to substantiate the long-held assumption that people with intellectual disability are more susceptible to movement side effects of antipsychotic drugs. Assessment for movement side effects should be integral to antipsychotic drug monitoring in people with intellectual disability. Regular medication review is essential to ensure optimal prescribing in this group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  3. Intranasal delivery of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katare, Yogesh K; Piazza, Justin E; Bhandari, Jayant; Daya, Ritesh P; Akilan, Kosalan; Simpson, Madeline J; Hoare, Todd; Mishra, Ram K

    2017-06-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat psychotic disorders that afflict millions globally and cause tremendous emotional, economic and healthcare burdens. However, the potential of intranasal delivery to improve brain-specific targeting remains unrealized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and methods used for brain targeting via the intranasal (IN) route as well as the potential advantages of improving this type of delivery. We extensively review experimental studies relevant to intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychosis and mental illnesses. We also review clinical studies in which intranasal delivery of peptides, like oxytocin (7 studies) and desmopressin (1), were used as an adjuvant to antipsychotic treatment with promising results. Experimental animal studies (17) investigating intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs have revealed successful targeting to the brain as suggested by pharmacokinetic parameters and behavioral effects. To improve delivery to the brain, nanotechnology-based carriers like nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been used in several studies. However, human studies assessing intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs are lacking, and the potential toxicity of nanoformulations used in animal studies has not been explored. A brief discussion of future directions anticipates that if limitations of low aqueous solubility of antipsychotic drugs can be overcome and non-toxic formulations used, IN delivery (particularly targeting specific tissues within the brain) will gain more importance moving forward given the inherent benefits of IN delivery in comparison to other methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Geographical variation in antipsychotic drug use in elderly patients with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakarias, Johanne Købstrup; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Nørgaard, Ane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia has decreased in the past decade due to safety regulations; however use is still high. Geographical variation may indicate discrepancies in clinical practice and lack of adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management...... of behavioral symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential geographical variances in use of antipsychotic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: A registry-based cross-sectional study in the entire elderly population of Denmark (≥65 years) conducted in 2012. Data included place of residence, prescriptions filled......, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Antipsychotic drug use among elderly with (n = 34,536) and without (n = 931,203) a dementia diagnosis was compared across the five regions and 98 municipalities in Denmark, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: In 2012, the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use was 20...

  5. Geographical Variation in Antipsychotic Drug Use in Elderly Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakarias, Johanne Købstrup; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Nørgaard, Ane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of antipsychotics in elderly patients with dementia has decreased in the past decade due to safety regulations; however use is still high. Geographical variation may indicate discrepancies in clinical practice and lack of adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management...... of behavioral symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential geographical variances in use of antipsychotic drugs in dementia care. METHODS: A registry-based cross-sectional study in the entire elderly population of Denmark (≥65 years) conducted in 2012. Data included place of residence, prescriptions filled......, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Antipsychotic drug use among elderly with (n = 34,536) and without (n = 931,203) a dementia diagnosis was compared across the five regions and 98 municipalities in Denmark, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: In 2012, the national prevalence of antipsychotic drug use was 20...

  6. New users of antipsychotic medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, L; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    payments were analyzed using linear regression models and duration analysis. The analyses were adjusted for the following confounding variables: age, gender, diagnosis, marital status, length of education, and utilization of mental health care services. RESULTS: The majority of new antipsychotic users...... patterns and labor market affiliation, considering both authority approved and off-label prescriptions and the relation to polypharmacy. METHODS: Register-based cohort study using a dataset of 71,254 new antipsychotic users with a psychiatric diagnosis. Labor market affiliation and duration of welfare...

  7. Antipsychotic medications and dental caries in newly diagnosed schizophrenia: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Wen, Yen-Hsia; Hsieh, Kun-Pin; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard

    2016-11-30

    We investigated the association between antipsychotic medications and the risk of dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. We enroled a nationwide cohort of patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia within 1 year of dental caries development. Exposure to antipsychotics and other medications was categorised according to their type and duration, and the association between exposure and dental caries was assessed through logistic regressions. Of the 3610 patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia, 2149 (59.5%) exhibited an incidence of treated dental caries. Logistic regression analysis identified a younger age, female sex, high income, a 2-year history of dental caries, and exposure to first-generation antipsychotics, and antihypertensives as independent risk factors for treated dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. Hyposalivation, the adverse effect of first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives, was associated with an increased risk of treated dental caries. However, hypersalivation from first-generation antipsychotics for dental caries was associated with a protective factor. These findings suggest that clinicians should pay attention to the aforementioned risk factors for dental caries in patients with schizophrenia, particularly while prescribing first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives to such patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cocaine use in individuals with schizophrenia: impact on doses of discharge antipsychotic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Satyajit; Ngana, Ikenna; Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of cocaine use disorder in schizophrenia, the impact of cocaine on antipsychotic requirement has not been studied in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cocaine on doses of antipsychotic medication prescribed during periods of acute exacerbation of psychotic symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. We reviewed the medical records of individuals with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Student t tests and linear regression were used to compare doses of discharge antipsychotic medications (in chlorpromazine equivalents) between individuals with schizophrenia with cocaine positive urine drug test results (n = 180; age 42.71 ± 10.03 years) and individuals with schizophrenia with negative urine drug test results (n = 3194; age 38.49 ± 12.86 years). Unadjusted analysis revealed that individuals with schizophrenia who tested positive for cocaine were discharged on lower doses of antipsychotic medication compared with those who tested negative (449.88 ± 2.12 vs 515.47 ± 2.16; P = 0.021). However, after adjusting for age, sex, race, and length of stay, the 2 groups did not differ on doses of discharge antipsychotic medication (geometric mean difference 7.41; CI: 7.62-12.30; P = 0.703). Our preliminary result suggests that cocaine use does not impact significantly on the doses of antipsychotic medication prescribed during periods of acute exacerbation of psychosis in schizophrenia and individuals with schizophrenia with comorbid cocaine use disorder may require similar doses of antipsychotic medication as those without cocaine use disorder.

  9. Is paliperidone palmitate more effective than other long-acting injectable antipsychotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R; Chesney, E; Taylor, M; Taylor, D; McGuire, P

    2017-10-17

    Paliperidone palmitate is one of the most widely prescribed long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics in the UK. However, it is relatively expensive and there are few data comparing its effectiveness to that of other LAI antipsychotics. We sought to address this issue by analyzing a large anonymized electronic health record (EHR) dataset from patients treated with LAI antipsychotics. EHR data were obtained from 1281 patients in the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) who started treatment with a LAI antipsychotic between 1 April 2011 and 31 January 2015. The number of days spent as a psychiatric inpatient and the number of admissions to a psychiatric hospital were analyzed in each of the 3 years before and after LAI prescription. Patients treated with paliperidone palmitate (n = 430; 33.6%) had a greater number of inpatient days and a greater number of admissions in the year prior to treatment than those treated with other LAI antipsychotics. Nevertheless, in the 3 years after initiation there were no significant differences between paliperidone and the other LAI antipsychotics in the number of days as an inpatient (B coefficient 5.4 days, 95% confidence interval (CI) -57.3 to 68.2, p = 0.86) or number of hospital admissions (Incidence rate ratio 1.07, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.83, p = 0.82). Paliperidone palmitate was more likely to be prescribed in patients with more frequent and lengthy hospital admissions prior to initiation. However, the absence of differences in outcomes after initiation indicates that paliperidone palmitate was not more effective than other cheaper LAI antipsychotics.

  10. Can a digital medicine system improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Ostuzzi, G

    2018-06-01

    A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice.

  11. Some novelties and recommendations by swithing antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nika Aleksandra Kravos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical outcome of patients with severe mental disorders treated with antipsychotics depends on individual response to therapy, adverse events, physical health, maintaining of physical health and of the patient’s, interpersonal (patient - therapist, health and environmental features. Replacement of antipsychotics is a common therapeutic measure. The response depends on mostly unknown genetic factors, physiological particularities of the patient and its variations. This article summarizes the most important and the most recent pharmacological properties and consequences of cross-action of antipsychotics. It specifies the basic rules and ways of replacing antipsychotic drugs in different clinical situations, and summarizes alerts, recommendations and suggestions when changing antipsychotics.

  12. [Prevention and treatment of tardive dyskinesia caused by antipsychotic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurie, A-S; Sauvanaud, F; Limosin, F

    2016-06-01

    explain the occurrence of TD in some patients: hypersensitivity of D2 neuronal receptor or neurotoxicity associated with oxidative stress mechanisms. We also summarize the current guidelines for prevention and treatment of TD. Three successive curative strategies are suggested in the literature. First, the clinician can adapt the current antipsychotic treatment (switch to a new generation antipsychotic, diminution or cessation of antipsychotic drugs). If this first intervention is not pertinent or ineffective, the clinician can prescribe an antikinetic therapeutic agent, such as tetrabenazine, or an antioxidant. Review of the published studies does not show proof of efficacy of cholinergic or anticholinergic drugs, benzodiazepine or other GABAergic drugs, nor for amantadine. Non-medication therapeutics such as ECT and TMS are discussed, but the level of proof is insufficient to promote them as a curative treatment for TD. In case of high resistance and discomfort for the patient, a neurosurgical intervention should be discussed. These curative interventions are limited, emphasising the importance of TD prevention, by limiting the prescription and doses of antipsychotics, regularly evaluating their side effects and informing the patient of TD's risk. We propose to practitioners a synthesised update of literature concerning a frequent iatrogenic effect of antipsychotics. Nevertheless, no solid guidelines have as yet been established, and further clinical studies are expected in order to better understand this frequent and discomforting side effect. Copyright © 2015 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sárvári, Anitta K., E-mail: anittasarvari@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Veréb, Zoltán, E-mail: jzvereb@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Uray, Iván P., E-mail: ipuray@mdanderson.org [Clinical Cancer Prevention Department, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fésüs, László, E-mail: fesus@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); MTA DE Apoptosis, Genomics and Stem Cell Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Balajthy, Zoltán, E-mail: balajthy@med.unideb.hu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  14. Attitudes toward antipsychotic treatment among patients with bipolar disorders and their clinicians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Faith DiBiasi,2 Susan N Legacy3 1Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 3US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Princeton, NJ, USA Introduction: Antipsychotics are recommended as first-line therapy for acute mania and maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder; however, published literature suggests their real-world use remains limited. Understanding attitudes toward these medications may help identify barriers and inform personalized therapy. This literature review evaluated patient and clinician attitudes toward the use of antipsychotics for treating bipolar disorder. Materials and methods: A systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS Previews identified English language articles published between January 1, 2000, and June 15, 2016, that reported attitudinal data from patients, health care professionals, or caregivers; treatment decision-making; or patient characteristics that predicted antipsychotic use for bipolar disorder. Results were analyzed descriptively. Results: Of the 209 references identified, 11 met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. These articles provided attitudinal information from 1,418 patients with bipolar disorder and 1,282 treating clinicians. Patients’ attitudes toward antipsychotics were generally positive. Longer duration of clinical stability was associated with positive attitudes. Implementation of psychoeducational and adherence enhancement strategies could improve patient attitudes. Limited data suggest clinicians’ perceptions of antipsychotic efficacy and tolerability may have the greatest impact on their prescribing patterns. Because the current real-world evidence base is inadequate, clinician attitudes

  15. Atypical antipsychotics induce both proinflammatory and adipogenic gene expression in human adipocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sárvári, Anitta K.; Veréb, Zoltán; Uray, Iván P.; Fésüs, László; Balajthy, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Antipsychotics modulate the expression of adipogenic genes in human adipocytes. • Secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL8 and MCP-1 is induced by antipsychotics. • Adipocyte-dependent inflammatory abnormality could develop during chronic treatment. • Infiltrated macrophages would further enhance proinflammatory cytokine production. - Abstract: Schizophrenia requires lifelong treatment, potentially causing systemic changes in metabolic homeostasis. In the clinical setting, antipsychotic treatment may differentially lead to weight gain among individual patients, although the molecular determinants of such adverse effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression levels of critical regulatory genes of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism and proinflammatory genes during the differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). These cells were isolated from patients with body mass indices <25 and treated with the second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine, ziprasidone, clozapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and risperidone and the first-generation antipsychotic haloperidol. We found that antipsychotics exhibited a marked effect on key genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle, signal transduction, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, differentiation markers and metabolic enzymes. In particular, we observed an induction of the transcription factor NF-KB1 and NF-KB1 target genes in adipocytes in response to these drugs, including the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1. In addition, enhanced secretion of both IL8 and MCP-1 was observed in the supernatant of these cell cultures. In addition to their remarkable stimulatory effects on proinflammatory gene transcription, three of the most frequently prescribed antipsychotic drugs, clozapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole, also induced the expression of essential adipocyte differentiation genes and the adipocyte hormones leptin

  16. Antipsychotic use in children and adolescents: a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Calvo-Escalona, Rosa; Morer, Astrid; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Martínez-Cantarero, Ma Carmen; Andrés, Patrícia; Alda, José A; Sánchez, Bernardo; Arango, Celso; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the initial treatment with antipsychotics (APs) and its changes during the first year of treatment in patients visited in specialized child and adolescent psychiatry departments. Participants were 265 patients, aged 4 to 17 years, who attended consecutively at 4 different centers and were naive of AP or quasi-naive (less than 30 days since the beginning of AP treatment). Type of AP, dosage, and concomitant medication were registered at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after beginning the treatment with AP. At baseline, the patients' mean age was 14.4 (2.9) years, and 145 (54.7%) patients were males. Antipsychotics were more prescribed in the following: schizophrenia spectrum disorders (30.2%), disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) (18.9%), bipolar disorders (14.3%), depressive disorders (12.8%), and eating disorders (11.7%). A total of 93.2% of the patients were on an off-label indication of AP. Risperidone was the AP most prescribed in all the assessments, but differences were observed in the type of AP according to diagnosis. Thus, risperidone was significantly most prescribed in patients with DBD and olanzapine was most prescribed in patients with eating disorders. Olanzapine and quetiapine were the second-generation APs (SGAs) most prescribed after risperidone, and haloperidol was the most prescribed first-generation AP. Up to 8.3% of patients during the follow-up were on AP polypharmacy. Almost 16% patients had a change in its AP treatment during the follow-up, and the main switch was from one SGA to another. Second-generation APs were the APs most prescribed in our sample and approximately 93% of the patients used AP off-label. Risperidone was the most common AP used above all in patients with DBD, whereas olanzapine was most prescribed in patients with eating disorders. Antipsychotic polypharmacy and switch rates were low during the follow-up.

  17. Metabolic Testing for Adults in a State Medicaid Program Receiving Antipsychotics: Remaining Barriers to Achieving Population Health Prevention Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrato, Elaine H; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Brewer, Sarah E; Dickinson, L Miriam; Thomas, Deborah S K; Miller, Benjamin F; Dearing, James; Druss, Benjamin G; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid quality indicators track diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease screening in adults receiving antipsychotics and/or those with serious mental illness. To inform performance improvement interventions by evaluating the relative importance of patient, prescriber, and practice factors affecting metabolic testing. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Missouri Medicaid administrative claims data (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012) linked with prescriber market data. The analysis included 9316 adults (age, 18-64 years) who were starting antipsychotic medication. Secondary analysis included the subset of adults (n = 1813) for whom prescriber knowledge, attitudes, and behavior survey data were available. Generalized estimating equations were performed to identify factors associated with failure to receive annual testing during antipsychotic treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6 encounters vs none; 0.33 [0.28-0.39]). Analysis incorporating prescriber practice information found lower failure to receive glucose testing if the patient received care at a CMHC (0.74 [0.64-0.85]) or if the initiating prescriber was a primary care practitioner (0.81 [0.66-1.00]). However, the initiating prescriber specialty-setting was not associated with lipid testing. Compared with prior reports, progress has been made to improve diabetes screening, but lipid screening remains particularly underutilized. Medicaid performance improvement initiatives should target all prescriber settings and not just behavioral health.

  18. Beliefs about antipsychotic versus hypoglycemic medications among individuals with serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Jennifer M; Medoff, Deborah R; Dixon, Lisa B; Kreyenbuhl, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the beliefs held by individuals with coexisting serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes regarding the necessity and risks of taking antipsychotic versus hypoglycemic medications. We also investigated whether nonadherent patients differed from adherent patients in their beliefs about medications. Forty-four individuals with type 2 diabetes and serious mental illness who were prescribed hypoglycemic and antipsychotic medications completed a cross-sectional assessment of medication beliefs and adherence for both medication types. Patients perceived a greater need for hypoglycemic versus antipsychotic medications; however, their beliefs were not associated with nonadherence to either medication type. These results suggest that individuals with coexisting serious mental illness and type 2 diabetes have stronger convictions regarding the necessity of their diabetes medication for maintaining their health.

  19. Use of Sedatives, Antidepressants and Antipsychotic Medicine among Seventh-day Adventists and Baptists in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Johansen, Christoffer; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2017-01-01

    to less use of prescribed antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics by members of these religious societies than by the general population. In a cohort study, we examined records of all drugs redeemed by 3121 SDA and 2888 Baptists and 29,817 age- and gender-matched members of the general population...... between 1995 and 2010 in the Danish Prescription Register and compared the prevalence and incidence of use of antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics. The prevalence of antidepressant use by women was lower in 1998 but no different from that in controls in 2003 and 2008; the prevalence...... of antidepressant use by men was higher in both 1998 and 2008 than in the Danish population. The incidence of antidepressant use was lower for female members in 1996–2000, but no difference was observed in the other periods. The prevalence and incidence of use of sedatives and antipsychotics did not consistently...

  20. Psychiatrists' Attitude and Use of Second-generation Antipsychotics for the Treatment of Schizophrenia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C K; Su, H H; Sun, I W

    2017-09-01

    This survey aimed to understand the attitude of psychiatrists and their use of commonly prescribed second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) for the treatment of schizophrenia in Taiwan. It also attempted to identify the factors that might influence their preference for selecting SGAs. Psychiatrists were interviewed face-to-face using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed various issues involved in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, including the reasons for selecting SGAs, psychiatrists' level of satisfaction with commonly prescribed SGAs, and their current use of SGAs in clinical practice. Gender and age of the psychiatrists, and practice setting were not related to SGA selection. The selection of a SGA might be influenced by characteristics of the psychiatrist, properties of the drugs, and the healthcare insurance system. Most psychiatrists agreed that the performance of brand-name drugs was superior to that of generic drugs. Better symptom control, improvement in cognition, and higher tolerability were among the major factors considered by psychiatrists in Taiwan when prescribing antipsychotics. Selection of a SGA in Taiwan is potentially influenced by the characteristics of the psychiatrist, properties of the drug, and the healthcare insurance system. Efficacy and tolerability were among the major determining factors when prescribing antipsychotics for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia.

  1. Novel versus conventional antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R C

    1996-01-01

    Novel antipsychotic agents differ from conventional ones in several key characteristics, including effectiveness, adverse reactions, and receptor-binding profile. Most of the newer agents have an affinity for the serotonin 5HT2 receptor that is at least 10 times greater than that for the dopamine D2 receptor. This increased affinity for the serotonin receptor may be responsible for another distinguishing characteristic of novel antipsychotic agents--decreased frequency of extrapyramidal side effects. These side effects, which include pseudoparkinsonism, acute dystonias, and akathisia, frequently are the reason for noncompliance with conventional drug therapy. The newer drugs are often effective in patients resistant to treatment with conventional agents. They also appear to reduce the negative symptoms of schizophrenia in many patients.

  2. Inappropriate prescribing in the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Drug therapy is necessary to treat acute illness, maintain current health and prevent further decline. However, optimizing drug therapy for older patients is challenging and sometimes, drug therapy can do more harm than good. Drug utilization review tools can highlight instances of potentially inappropriate prescribing to those involved in elderly pharmacotherapy, i.e. doctors, nurses and pharmacists. We aim to provide a review of the literature on potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and also to review the explicit criteria that have been designed to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing in the elderly. METHODS: We performed an electronic search of the PUBMED database for articles published between 1991 and 2006 and a manual search through major journals for articles referenced in those located through PUBMED. Search terms were elderly, inappropriate prescribing, prescriptions, prevalence, Beers criteria, health outcomes and Europe. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older people is highly prevalent in the United States and Europe, ranging from 12% in community-dwelling elderly to 40% in nursing home residents. Inappropriate prescribing is associated with adverse drug events. Limited data exists on health outcomes from use of inappropriate medications. There are no prospective randomized controlled studies that test the tangible clinical benefit to patients of using drug utilization review tools. Existing drug utilization review tools have been designed on the basis of North American and Canadian drug formularies and may not be appropriate for use in European countries because of the differences in national drug formularies and prescribing attitudes. CONCLUSION: Given the high prevalence of inappropriate prescribing despite the widespread use of drug-utilization review tools, prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to identify useful interventions. Drug

  3. Comparative safety of atypical antipsychotics and the risk of pneumonia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya; Pulungan, Zulkarnain; Jones, Barton T; Teigland, Christie

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have documented increased risk of pneumonia with antipsychotic use in the elderly; however, differential risk across individual atypical antipsychotics remains unaddressed. This study examines the effect of individual atypical antipsychotics on risk of pneumonia in elderly patients. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large claims database. The study population included new users of atypical antipsychotics (≥65 years). The multiple propensity-score adjusted survival model was used to examine risk of pneumonia within a 1-year follow-up period. A total of 92 234 patients newly prescribed atypical antipsychotic medication were identified. Of these, 41 780 (45.30%) were quetiapine users, 31 048 (33.66%) risperidone users, 11 375 (12.33%) olanzapine users, 6790 (7.36%) aripiprazole users, and 1241 (1.35%) ziprasidone users. Within the 1-year follow-up period, 12 411 (13.46%) patients taking atypical antipsychotics had a diagnosis of pneumonia. The multiple propensity-score-adjusted survival model revealed increased risk of pneumonia with the use of risperidone (hazard ratios (HR) 1.14, 95%CI 1.10-1.18) and olanzapine (HR 1.10, 95%CI 1.04-1.16) compared with the use of quetiapine. This large population-based study suggests that use of risperidone and olanzapine increases risk of pneumonia compared with use of quetiapine in elderly patients. This study provides new information on the comparative risk of pneumonia associated with different atypical antipsychotics in the elderly to support optimal treatment decisions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Antipsychotic-associated weight gain: management strategies and impact on treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayabandara M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Madhubhashinee Dayabandara, Raveen Hanwella, Suhashini Ratnatunga, Sudarshi Seneviratne, Chathurie Suraweera, Varuni A de Silva Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka Abstract: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is a major management problem for clinicians. It has been shown that weight gain and obesity lead to increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life and poor drug compliance. This narrative review discusses the propensity of various antipsychotics to cause weight gain, the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions available to counteract this effect and its impact on adherence. Most antipsychotics cause weight gain. The risk appears to be highest with olanzapine and clozapine. Weight increases rapidly in the initial period after starting antipsychotics. Patients continue to gain weight in the long term. Children appear to be particularly vulnerable to antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Tailoring antipsychotics according to the needs of the individual and close monitoring of weight and other metabolic parameters are the best preventive strategies at the outset. Switching to an agent with lesser tendency to cause weight gain is an option, but carries the risk of relapse of the illness. Nonpharmacologic interventions of dietary counseling, exercise programs and cognitive and behavioral strategies appear to be equally effective in individual and group therapy formats. Both nonpharmacologic prevention and intervention strategies have shown modest effects on weight. Multiple compounds have been investigated as add-on medications to cause weight loss. Metformin has the best evidence in this respect. Burden of side effects needs to be considered when prescribing weight loss medications. There is no strong evidence to recommend routine prescription of add-on medication for weight reduction. Heterogeneity of study methodologies and other

  5. Pharmacoepidemiology of Antipsychotic Use in Youth with ADHD: Trends and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L.; Saito, Ema; Gerhard, Tobias; Winterstein, Almut; Olfson, Mark; Kane, John M.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2014-01-01

    Although concern has been raised about antipsychotic prescribing to youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the available database is limited to individual studies. Therefore, in order to provide a synthesis of prevalences and time trends, we conducted a systematic review and pooled analysis of pharmaco-epidemiologic data on antipsychotic use in ADHD youth. Of 1806 hits, 21 studies (N) were retained that reported analyzable data for three separate populations: 1) antipsychotic-treated youth (N=15, n=341,586); 2) ADHD youth (N=9, n=6,192,368), and 3) general population youth (N=5, n=14,284,916). Altogether, 30.5±18.5% of antipsychotic-treated youth had ADHD. In longitudinal studies, this percentage increased over time (1998-2007) from 21.7±7.1% to 27.7±7.7%, ratio=1.3±0.4. Furthermore, 11.5±17.5% of ADHD youth received antipsychotics. In longitudinal studies, this percentage also increased (1998-2006) from 5.5±2.6% to 11.4±6.7%, ratio=2.1±0.6. Finally, 0.12±0.07% of youth in the general population were diagnosed with ADHD and received antipsychotics. Again, in longitudinal studies, this percentage increased over time (1993-2007): 0.13±0.09% to 0.44±0.49%, ratio=3.1±2.2. Taken together, these data indicate that antipsychotics are used by a clinically relevant and increasing number of youth with ADHD. Reasons for and risk/benefit ratios of this practice with little evidence base require further investigation. PMID:23881713

  6. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  7. Do we need to consider ethno-cultural variation in the use of atypical antipsychotics for Asian patients with major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changsu; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-05-01

    Asian and western countries differ in the prevalence, symptom manifestation, diagnostic procedures, patient recognition and treatments of major depressive disorder (MDD), according to a number of studies. Ethnic differences in pharmacological profiles are also important in the prescription of certain antipsychotic medications because they may impact treatment outcomes and adverse events. Differential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antipsychotics may be practically useful in the control of specific depressive symptoms. Furthermore, patient compliance with prescribed medications has been found to be different across races and ethnicities. Therefore, this article explores practical clinical issues for the use of atypical antipsychotics in patients with MDD, focusing on ethno-cultural differences.

  8. The Effects of Prior Authorization Policies on Medicaid-Enrolled Children's Use of Antipsychotic Medications: Evidence from Two Mid-Atlantic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman-Westin, Emily; Okeke, Edward; Scharf, Deborah M.; Sorbero, Mark; Chen, Qingxian; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Finnerty, Molly; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of prior authorization policies on the receipt of antipsychotic medication for Medicaid-enrolled children. Methods: Using de-identified administrative Medicaid data from two large, neighboring, mid-Atlantic states from November 2007 through June 2011, we identified subjects antipsychotics, from the broader group of children and adolescents receiving behavioral health services or any psychotropic medication. Prior authorization for antipsychotics was required for children in State A antipsychotic prescriptions were filled for Medicaid-enrolled children and adolescents. Results: The impact of prior authorization policies on antipsychotic medication use varied by age: Among 6–12 year old children, the impact of the prior authorization policy on antipsychotic medication prescribing was a modest but statistically significant decrease of 0.47% after adjusting for other factors; there was no effect of the prior authorization among children 0–5 years. Conclusions: Prior authorization policies had a modest but statistically significant effect on antipsychotic use in 6–12 year old children, but had no impact in younger children. Future research is needed to understand the utilization and clinical effects of prior authorization and other policies and interventions designed to influence antipsychotic use in children. PMID:25144909

  9. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    seldom received a combination of an atypical and a conventional antipsychotic, whereas a lesser number of patients with off- label indications received atypical antipsychotics less often than those of the two comparison groups (p<0.05). Stepwise logistic regression revealed that patients with a psychotic disorder were more ...

  10. Constrictive Pericarditis Associated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-chin Jean Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful surgical intervention in a case of constrictive pericarditis after long-term use of atypical antipsychotics. Pericarditis developed in our patient with a longstanding history of schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics. Pericardiectomy was undertaken, and the patient's presenting symptom of shortness of breath resolved subsequently with an uneventful postoperative course.

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  12. Newer antipsychotics and upcoming molecules for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melvin; Amrutheshwar, Radhika; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip; Kattimani, Shivanand; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-08-01

    The management of schizophrenia has seen significant strides over the last few decades, due to the increasing availability of a number of antipsychotics. Yet, the diminished efficacy in relation to the negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, and the disturbing adverse reactions associated with the current antipsychotics, reflect the need for better molecules targeting unexplored pathways. To review the salient features of the recently approved antipsychotics; namely, iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and blonanserin. We discuss the advantages, limitations and place in modern pharmacotherapy of each of these drugs. In addition, we briefly highlight the new targets that are being explored. Promising strategies include modulation of the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways, as well as cholinergic systems. Although regulatory bodies have approved only a handful of antipsychotics in recent years, the wide spectrum of targets that are being explored could eventually bring out antipsychotics with improved efficacy and acceptability, as well as the potential to revolutionize psychiatric practice.

  13. Choice of observational study design impacts on measurement of antipsychotic risks in the elderly: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics are frequently and increasingly prescribed to treat the behavioural symptoms associated with dementia despite their modest efficacy. Evidence regarding the potential adverse events of antipsychotics is limited and little is known about the longer-term safety of these medicines in the elderly. The aim of this review was to determine the impact of the choice of observational study design and methods used to control for confounding on the measurement of antipsychotic risks in elderly patients. Methods We searched PUBMED and the Cochrane controlled trials register for double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and published observational studies of antipsychotics. Results Forty four studies were identified for the endpoints; death, cerebrovascular events, hip fracture and pneumonia. RCTs found a 20% to 30% increased risk of death, or an absolute increase of 1extra death per 100 patients with atypical antipsychotics compared to non-use. Cohort and instrumental variable analyses estimated between 2 to 7 extra deaths per 100 patients with conventional compared to atypical antipsychotics. RCTs found a 2 to 3 times increased risk of all cerebrovascular events with atypical antipsychotics compared to placebo and no association with serious stroke that required hospitalisation. Observational studies using cohort and self-controlled case-series designs reported similar results; no association where the endpoint was stroke causing hospitalisation and a doubling of risk when minor stroke was included. No RCTs were available for the outcome of hip fracture or pneumonia. Observational studies reported a 20% to 40% increased risk of hip fracture with both antipsychotic classes compared to non-use. The risk of pneumonia was a 2 to 3 times greater with both classes compared to non-use while a self-controlled case-series study estimated a 60% increased risk. Conventional antipsychotics were associated with a 50% greater hip fracture risk

  14. Association between Antipsychotic Drugs and Mortality in Older Persons with Alzheimer's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yaoming; Yin, Song; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2016-03-31

    Antipsychotic drugs have been inconsistently associated with death risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Herein we review and quantitatively summarize the evidence from epidemiological studies. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Cochrane Library Register of Controlled Trials through 20 December 2015. The DerSimonian and Laird random effect model was adopted as the pooling method. Twelve studies from nine articles with 11,463 participants were included. The pooled RR of observational studies was 1.36 (95% CI, 0.83-2.24; I2 = 94.9%) for antipsychotic drugs users versus individuals who were not exposed to antipsychotic drugs. When the three studies that were key contributors to the high heterogeneity were excluded, the pooled RR was 2.08 (95% CI 1.39 to 3.13). The result of one double-blind randomized clinical trial indicated that antipsychotic drugs nearly doubled the risk of death in AD patients. In conclusion, there is no evidence of absence of association between antipsychotic drugs' use with death risk of AD patients. Careful assessments of potential benefits and risks should be made before prescribing antipsychotics for treatment of psychosis symptoms and behavioral problems of AD patients.

  15. Learning from prescribing errors

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, B

    2002-01-01

    

 The importance of learning from medical error has recently received increasing emphasis. This paper focuses on prescribing errors and argues that, while learning from prescribing errors is a laudable goal, there are currently barriers that can prevent this occurring. Learning from errors can take place on an individual level, at a team level, and across an organisation. Barriers to learning from prescribing errors include the non-discovery of many prescribing errors, lack of feedback to th...

  16. Development of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Drug Prescription: Non-Interventional Naturalistic Description of the Antipsychotic Prescription Patterns in 4345 Outpatients and Future Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofian Berrouiguet

    Full Text Available The emergence of electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSS is able to significantly improve management pharmacological treatments. We developed a web application available on smartphones in order to help clinicians monitor prescription and further propose CDSS.A web application (www.MEmind.net was developed to assess patients and collect data regarding gender, age, diagnosis and treatment. We analyzed antipsychotic prescriptions in 4345 patients attended in five Psychiatric Community Mental Health Centers from June 2014 to October 2014. The web-application reported average daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics, prescribed daily dose (PDD, and the PDD to defined daily dose (DDD ratio.The MEmind web-application reported that antipsychotics were used in 1116 patients out of the total sample, mostly in 486 (44% patients with schizophrenia related disorders but also in other diagnoses. Second generation antipsychotics (quetiapine, aripiprazole and long-acting paliperidone were preferably employed. Low doses were more frequently used than high doses. Long acting paliperidone and ziprasidone however, were the only two antipsychotics used at excessive dosing. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was used in 287 (26% patients with classic depot drugs, clotiapine, amisulpride and clozapine.In this study we describe the first step of the development of a web application that is able to make polypharmacy, high dose usage and off label usage of antipsychotics visible to clinicians. Current development of the MEmind web application may help to improve prescription security via momentary feedback of prescription and clinical decision support system.

  17. Stimulant and atypical antipsychotic medications for children placed in foster homes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Oriana Linares

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the use of prescribed psychoactive medications in a prospective cohort of children shortly after they entered foster homes; and to identify demographics, maltreatment history, psychiatric diagnoses including ADHD comorbidity, and level of aggression that contribute to prescribed use of stimulant and atypical antipsychotic medication over time.The sample included N = 252 children (nested in 95 sibling groups followed for three years up to 4 yearly waves.Nearly all (89% met criteria for at least one of eight psychiatric diagnoses and 31% (75/252 used one or more prescribed psychoactive medications. Over half (55% were diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; of these 38% used stimulants and 36% used atypical antipsychotics. Of the 75 medicated children, 19% received ≥3 different classes of drugs over the course of the study. Stimulants (69% and atypical antipsychotics (65% were the most frequently used drugs among medicated children. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR showed that male gender (AOR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5-9.3, African American vs Latino ethnicity (AOR = 5.4; 95% CI = 2.1-14.2, ADHD regardless of Oppositional Defiant (ODD or Conduct (CD comorbidity (AOR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.3-27.5, ODD or CD (AOR = 11.1, 95% CI = 2.1-58.6, and Separation Anxiety (AOR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0-4.0 psychiatric disorders were associated with the use of prescribed stimulants; while male gender (AOR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-9.3, African American vs Latino (AOR = 5.1, 95% CI = 1.2-9.2 or Mixed/Other ethnicity (AOR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.9-13.7, ADHD regardless of ODD or CD comorbidity (AOR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.2-28.7, ODD or CD (AOR = 13.9, 95% CI = 3.3-58.5, Major Depression/Dysthymia (AOR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.1-6.7 psychiatric disorders, and history of sexual abuse (AOR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.3-18.4 were associated with the use of

  18. Bipolar Disorder in Nursing Homes: Impact on Antipsychotic Use, Diagnosis Patterns, and New Diagnoses in People with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Ryan M; Letuchy, Elena M

    2018-01-01

    Nursing home quality measures include the proportion of residents who receive antipsychotics. Residents with bipolar disorder are included even though antipsychotics are FDA-approved for this indication. We evaluated how including residents with bipolar disorder impacted the antipsychotic use quality measure for long-stay residents. We evaluated the agreement of minimum data set (MDS) bipolar disorder diagnoses with Medicare data, whether dementia was diagnosed before bipolar disorder, and how less-specific bipolar disorder diagnoses impacted findings. Cross-sectional study. Nursing homes in Iowa. 21,955 long-stay nursing home residents in the first quarter of 2014. We identified antipsychotic use and bipolar disorder using MDS data. We compared MDS bipolar disorder diagnoses with Chronic Conditions Warehouse (CCW) "ever" bipolar disorder indicators, and prior year claims. We compared CCW condition onset dates to identify bipolar disorder diagnosed after dementia. The mean (SD) proportion receiving antipsychotics was 19.6% (11.1%) with bipolar disorder and 18.3% (10.8%) without. The positive predictive value (PPV) of MDS bipolar disorder diagnoses was 80.2% versus CCW lifetime indicators, and 74.6% versus claims. PPV decreased by 27.1% when "bipolar disorder, unspecified" and "other bipolar disorders" diagnoses were excluded. Nearly three-quarters of residents with bipolar disorder had dementia. Over half of those with dementia had dementia first per CCW records. This proportion was lower among those with more specific bipolar disorder diagnoses or MDS bipolar disorder indicators. Bipolar disorder in nursing home residents is often first diagnosed after dementia using nonspecific diagnoses. This practice deserves further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Benzodiazepine prescribing in children under 15 years of age receiving free medical care on the General Medical Services scheme in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K

    2015-06-01

    To examine the prevalence and secular trends in benzodiazepine (BZD) prescribing in the Irish paediatric population. In addition, we examine coprescribing of antiepileptic, antipsychotic, antidepressant and psychostimulants in children receiving BZD drugs and compare BZD prescribing in Ireland to that in other European countries.

  20. Supplementary nurse prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alison; Bradley, Eleanor; Nolan, Peter

    To explore the attitudes of multidisciplinary team members to nurse prescribing and to establish its perceived advantages and disadvantages. Five focus groups were conducted with a range of healthcare professionals in one trust. A total of 46 participants took part in the study A structured schedule was used during each discussion to elicit group members' views on supplementary nurse prescribing. The data were analysed thematically and key themes and concepts were identified. These are summarised under five main headings: what is supplementary prescribing?; why introduce supplementary prescribing?; perceived benefits of supplementary prescribing; concerns about supplementary prescribing; and skills necessary for supplementary prescribing. Analysis of the data suggests that although teams were generally supportive of nurse prescribing they are largely confused about what is being recommended and why. There was concern about how nurse prescribing will be implemented and its potential to disrupt team functioning. A considerable amount of preparation will be required to ensure that nurse prescribers have the organisational and team support to adapt to their new roles.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness undergoing psychiatric rehabilitation receiving high dose antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Bapu V

    2012-07-01

    To review evidence of chronic antipsychotic medication and the association with metabolic syndrome in mentally ill patients. This evidence was used to analyse a cohort of patients with severe mental illness and to deduce a correlation between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and their dose regimens. Twenty-four male patients undergoing Psychiatric rehabilitation underwent a review of current medication and assessment of risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Assessment criteria was based upon National Cholesterol Education Programme expert panel on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) (NCEP ATP III) criteria, incorporating waist circumference, raised triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein, raised blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. PubMed, Nature and Science Direct databases have been used to compile the medical and scientific background on metabolic syndrome and antipsychotic medication and the effect on patients particularly on high dose. Out of 24 patients, 10 patients (41.7%) were receiving high dose antipsychotics (HDA) and four were on maximum dosage limits of 100%. 8.3% (2/24) patients were receiving only one first generation antipsychotics (FGA), 37.5% (9/24) patients were receiving only one second generation antipsychotic (SGA), 45.8% patients (11/24) were receiving two or more SGA only, and only one patient was receiving two or more FGA. One patient was receiving a combination of FGA and SGA. PRN ("as needed") therapy was not included in this study as their usage was limited. Clozapine was mostly prescribed in these patients (10/24, 41.6%). Four out of the 24 patients refused blood tests therefore were excluded from the following results. In the patients evaluated, 55% (11/20) had confirmed metabolic syndrome. In these patients with metabolic syndrome, 45.4% (5/11) were on HDA and 27.3% (3/11) were on maximum British National Formulary (BNF) limits of 100% of dosage. Four out

  2. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Gaviria

    Full Text Available The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes.To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain.A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized database of 1,765 patients with schizophrenia treated between 2011 and 2013.The most used antipsychotic was risperidone, identified in 463 (26.3% patients, followed by olanzapine in 249 (14.1%, paliperidone in 225 (12.7%, zuclopenthixol in 201 (11.4%, quetiapine in 141 (8%, aripiprazole in 100 (5.7%, and clozapine in 100 (5.7%. Almost 8 out of 10 patients (79.3% were treated with atypical or second-generation antipsychotics. Long-acting injectable (LAI formulations were used in 44.8% of patients. Antipsychotics were generally prescribed in their recommended doses, with clozapine, ziprasidone, LAI paliperidone, and LAI risperidone being prescribed at the higher end of their therapeutic ranges. Almost 7 out of 10 patients (69.6% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy, and 81.4% were on psychiatric medications aside from antipsychotics. Being prescribed quetiapine (OR 14.24, 95% CI 4.94-40.97, LAI (OR 9.99, 95% CI 6.45-15.45, psychiatric co-medications (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.72-6.64, and paliperidone (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.23-7.92 were all associated with an increased likelihood of polypharmacy. Being prescribed risperidone (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.35-0.83 and older age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99 were related to a low polypharmacy probability.Polypharmacy is the most common pattern of antipsychotic use in this region of Spain. Use of atypical antipsychotics is extensive. Most patients receive psychiatric co-medications such as anxiolytics or antidepressants. Polypharmacy is associated with the use of quetiapine or

  3. Antipsychotic Drugs on Maternal Behavior in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and amisulpride, all disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior i...

  4. Evaluation of human D-amino acid oxidase inhibition by anti-psychotic drugs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishikura, Miho; Hakariya, Hitomi; Iwasa, Sumiko; Yoshio, Takashi; Ichiba, Hideaki; Yorita, Kazuko; Fukui, Kiyoshi; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    It is of importance to determine whether antipsychotic drugs currently prescribed for schizophrenia exert D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)-inhibitory effects. We first investigated whether human (h)DAO can metabolize D-kynurenine (D-KYN) to produce the fluorescent compound kynurenic acid (KYNA) by using high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and fluorescence spectrometry. After confirmation of KYNA production from D-KYN by hDAO, 8 first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs, and 6 drugs often prescribed concomitantly, were assayed for hDAO-inhibitory effects by using in vitro fluorometric methods with D-KYN as the substrate. DAO inhibitors 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid and 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-5-carboxylic acid inhibited KYNA production in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the second-generation antipsychotics blonanserin and risperidone were found to possess relatively strong hDAO-inhibitory effects in vitro (5.29 ± 0.47 μM and 4.70 ± 0.17 μM, respectively). With regard to blonanserin and risperidone, DAO-inhibitory effects should be taken into consideration in the context of their in vivo pharmacotherapeutic efficacy.

  5. Assessment of inpatient psychiatric readmission risk among patients discharged on an antipsychotic polypharmacy regimen: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskailo, Esad; Malkoc, Aldin; McCurry, Dustin B; Venter, Jacob; Drachman, David; Ramos, Gilbert M

    2017-11-01

    Patients are frequently prescribed multiple antipsychotic medications, leading to higher healthcare costs and increased risk for side effects. The efficacy of multiple versus single antipsychotics to prevent acute relapse, measured by incidence of inpatient readmission, is investigated in Arizona, USA. A retrospective chart review compared socio-demographic and clinical data from 1,010 patients discharged on a single and 377 discharged on multiple antipsychotic medications. Case management records were reviewed for readmission within one year of discharge. Younger age, diagnosis of Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder, prescription of mood stabilizer, shorter length of stay, and discharge to residential treatment or crisis recovery unit were associated with multiple antipsychotics at discharge. Readmission rates of the single (13.7%) versus multiple (15.9%) antipsychotic groups were not statistically different (p=0.286). Logistic regression analysis established that only age (younger) and the prescription of a mood stabilizer at discharge were significant predictors for increased risk for readmission (p=0.010 and p=0.049, respectively). A Cox survival analysis supported these findings. Concomitant antipsychotic polypharmacy at discharge did not reduce readmission risk over a one-year period. Given the increased risk of side effects and financial costs of polypharmacy, this study did not provide evidence to support this practice. Strikingly, only two variables predicted readmission risk, younger age and prescription of mood stabilizer. Although practitioners should follow practice guidelines more closely to prevent unnecessary exposure to potentially lethal side effects of antipsychotic polypharmacy, further studies are needed to better identify patients at high risk for readmission. Copyright © 2017 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  6. Long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenia and influence of substance and drug abuse on the disease outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, F-M; Coveñas, Rafael

    2017-10-20

    Many schizophrenic patients with a long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs do not regularly adhere to the prescribed pharmacotherapy. Antipsychotic drugs constitute a palliative, but not a curative treatment, and the long-term effect of these drugs is not secure. Patients tend to consume nicotine and alcohol, as well as some patients consume drugs such as cannabis and amphetamines. The objective of this mini-review is to examine the reasons for the high tendency of schizophrenic patients to consume alcohol, nicotine and drugs and in addition to suggest measures to reduce the abuse of substances and drugs. The effects of substances such as alcohol and nicotine and drugs such as cannabis and amphetamines on the disease outcome will be mentioned. Previous reviews on the psychotic disorders and the pharmacological treatment were used to examine the effects of substances and drugs on schizophrenic symptoms and to investigate appropriate measures to improve medication adherence and the renouncement of consuming substances and drugs. A possible coherence between the function of single susceptibility genes and the alteration of neurotransmitters is mentioned. The mechanism of action of the most important second-generation antipsychotic drugs and their indications are described. The tendency of schizophrenic patients to consume alcohol and nicotine and in addition the effect of both substances to possibly worsen psychotic symptoms are pointed out. The effect of nicotinergic agonists to support smoking cessation is described. The different compounds of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabidiol (a psychotomimetic) and cannabidiol (exerts antipsychotic actions), are mentioned. Because a reduced adherence to the pharmacotherapy is frequently combined with the abuse of substances, additional drugs, psychoeducation and the administration of long-acting injectable antipsychotic drugs could reduce the abuse of substances and drugs; these strategies could help to maintain the

  7. Antipsychotics for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-06-02

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue. It affects approximately 2% of the general population. Up to 70% of patients with fibromyalgia meet the criteria for a depressive or anxiety disorder. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life. Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving health-related quality of life. Antipsychotics might reduce fibromyalgia and associated mental health symptoms. To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of antipsychotics in fibromyalgia in adults. We searched CENTRAL (2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE and EMBASE to 20 May 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews and two clinical trial registries. We also contacted trial authors. We selected controlled trials of at least four weeks duration of any formulation of antipsychotics used for the treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. We extracted the data from all included studies and two review authors independently assessed study risks of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. We derived first tier evidence from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for drop-outs, at least 200 participants in the comparison, eight to 12 weeks duration, parallel design), second tier evidence from data that failed to meet one or more of these criteria and that we considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers in the comparison, and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that we considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. We rated the

  8. Adjunctive antipsychotic in the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder - A retrospective naturalistic case note study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Khan, Akif A; Fineberg, Naomi A

    2015-06-01

    A retrospective naturalistic case note study to determine the frequency, co-morbidity and treatment-response of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). Records from 280 patients attending a highly specialised obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)/BDD service were analysed. The clinical outcome was measured either through scoring of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) for OCD/BDD, or textual analysis of case notes for evidence of symptomatic improvement, treatment tolerability, and premature disengagement. A total of 32 patients (11.43%) were diagnosed with BDD. Of these, 28 (87.5%) had at least one co-morbidity. All patients were offered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Adjunctive low-dose antipsychotic was prescribed for 21 (66%) patients. Overall, 18/32 (56%) responded, and 7/32 (22%) disengaged prematurely. Patients offered antipsychotic, SSRI and CBT (n = 21) were compared with those offered SSRI and CBT only (n = 11). The treatment was well-tolerated. Whereas there was no significant inter-group difference in the clinical response rate, premature disengagement occurred less frequently in the antipsychotic-treated patients (9.5% versus 45%; Fisher's Exact Test P = 0.0318). BDD frequently presents with co-morbidity, treatment-resistance and premature disengagement. Adjunctive antipsychotic was associated with significantly better treatment adherence, but responder rates did not differ significantly, possibly related to the small sample-size. A well-powered randomised controlled study is warranted, to determine clinical outcomes with adjunctive antipsychotic in BDD.

  9. Antipsychotic monotherapy and polypharmacy in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correll Christoph

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic monotherapy is recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with schizophrenia. Simultaneous treatment with multiple antipsychotics (polypharmacy is suggested by some expert consensus guidelines as the last resort after exhausting monotherapy alternatives. This study assessed the annual rate and duration of antipsychotic monotherapy and its inverse, antipsychotic polypharmacy, among schizophrenia patients initiated on commonly used atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods Data were drawn from a large prospective naturalistic study of patients treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, conducted 7/1997–9/2003. Analyses focused on patients (N = 796 who were initiated during the study on olanzapine (N = 405, quetiapine (N = 115, or risperidone (N = 276. The percentage of patients with monotherapy on the index antipsychotic over the 1-year post initiation, and the cumulative number of days on monotherapy were calculated for all patients and for each of the 3 atypical antipsychotic treatment groups. Analyses employed repeated measures generalized linear models and non-parametric bootstrap re-sampling, controlling for patient characteristics. Results During the 1-year period, only a third (35.7% of the patients were treated predominately with monotherapy (>300 days. Most patients (57.7% had at least one prolonged period of antipsychotic polypharmacy (>60 consecutive days. Patients averaged 195.5 days on monotherapy, 155.7 days on polypharmacy, and 13.9 days without antipsychotic therapy. Olanzapine-initiated patients were significantly more likely to be on monotherapy with the initiating antipsychotic during the 1-year post initiation compared to risperidone (p = .043 or quetiapine (p = .002. The number of monotherapy days was significantly greater for olanzapine than quetiapine (p Conclusion Despite guidelines recommending the use of polypharmacy only as a last resort, the use of antipsychotic

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of brand-name and generic antipsychotic drugs for treating patients with schizophrenia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this nationwide population-based study is to compare the long-term effectiveness of brand-name antipsychotics with generic antipsychotics for treating schizophrenia. We identified patients with schizophrenia who were prescribed antipsychotics from a random sample of one million records from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database, observed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2012. Only those with no prior use of antipsychotics for at least 180days were included. We selected patients who were prescribed brand-name risperidone (N=404), generic risperidone (N=145), brand-name sulpiride (N=334), or generic sulpiride (N=991). The effectiveness of the treatments researched in this study consisted of average daily doses, rates of treatment discontinuation, augmentation therapy, and psychiatric hospitalization. We found that compared to patients treated with generic risperidone, those treated with brand-name risperidone required lower daily doses (2.14mg vs. 2.61mg). However, the two groups demonstrated similar rates of treatment discontinuation, augmentation, and psychiatric hospitalization. On the other hand, in comparison with patients prescribed generic sulpiride, those treated with brand-name sulpiride not only required lower daily doses (302.72mg vs. 340.71mg) but also had lower psychiatric admission rates (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.24, 95% confidence interval: 0.10-0.56). In conclusion, for both risperidone and sulpiride, higher daily doses of the respective generic drugs were prescribed than with brand-name drugs in clinical settings. Furthermore, the brand-name sulpiride is more effective at preventing patients from hospitalization than generic sulpiride. These findings can serve as an important reference for clinical practices and healthcare economics for treating schizophrenic patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of atypical antipsychotic use among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirica, Vanja; Pliszka, Steven R; Betts, Keith A; Hodgkins, Paul; Samuelson, Thomas M; Xie, Jipan; Erder, M Haim; Dammerman, Ryan S; Robertson, Brigitte; Wu, Eric Q

    2014-09-01

    To compare treatment patterns, resource utilization, and costs to US third-party payers of stimulant-treated adolescent attentiondeficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients who switched to or augmented with atypical antipsychotics (AAPs; not FDA-indicated for ADHD) with those who switched to or augmented with nonantipsychotic medications. Retrospective cohort study conducted using a US commercial medical/pharmacy claims database. Adolescent patients with an ADHD diagnosis and ≥ 1 stimulant medication claim between January 2005 and December 2009 were identified. Patients were classified into the AAP or non-antipsychotic cohorts based on subsequent claims for AAPs or non-antipsychotic medications, respectively. Patients with psychiatric diagnoses for which AAPs are often prescribed were excluded. Patients were matched 1:1 from the AAP to the non-antipsychotic cohort using propensity score matching. Treatment patterns, resource utilization, and costs in the 12 months after AAP or non-antipsychotic initiation were compared using Cox models, Poisson regression, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. After propensity score matching, a total of 849 adolescents were included in each of the matched cohorts. Patients in the AAP cohort had a significantly higher rate of medication augmentation (27.7% vs 15.5%; hazard ratio = 2.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90-3.46; P < .001) than patients in the non-antipsychotic cohort. The AAP cohort also had significantly higher incidences of inpatient admissions (0.13 vs 0.05; incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.73-3.48; P < .001), emergency department visits (0.39 vs 0.31; IRR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.08-1.49; P = .004), and outpatient visits (14.82 vs 13.19; IRR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.10-1.15; P < .001), and incurred significantly higher mean annual medical ($3622 vs $3311; P = .002), drug ($4314 vs $2884; P < .001), and total healthcare ($7936 vs $6195; P < .001) costs. Stimulant-treated adolescents with ADHD who

  12. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... (approximately) showed no significant change compared to control or no overall positive findings. We identified 79 eligible studies which described 96 separate interventions to change prescribing behaviour. Of these interventions, 49 (51%, 41%-61%) showed a positive significant change compared to the control...

  13. Association of cannabis use with hospital admission and antipsychotic treatment failure in first episode psychosis: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin; Jackson, Richard; Ball, Michael; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cannabis use is associated with increased risk of relapse, as indexed by number of hospital admissions, and whether antipsychotic treatment failure, as indexed by number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, may mediate this effect in a large data set of patients with first episode psychosis (FEP). Design Observational study with exploratory mediation analysis. Setting Anonymised electronic mental health record data from the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Participants 2026 people presenting to early intervention services with FEP. Exposure Cannabis use at presentation, identified using natural language processing. Main outcome measures admission to psychiatric hospital and clozapine prescription up to 5 years following presentation. Mediator Number of unique antipsychotics prescribed. Results Cannabis use was present in 46.3% of the sample at first presentation and was particularly common in patients who were 16–25, male and single. It was associated with increased frequency of hospital admission (incidence rate ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.80), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (OR 1.55, 1.16 to 2.08) and greater number of days spent in hospital (β coefficient 35.1 days, 12.1 to 58.1). The number of unique antipsychotics prescribed, mediated increased frequency of hospital admission (natural indirect effect 1.09, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.18; total effect 1.50, 1.21 to 1.87), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (natural indirect effect (NIE) 1.27, 1.03 to 1.58; total effect (TE) 1.76, 0.81 to 3.84) and greater number of days spent in hospital (NIE 17.9, 2.4 to 33.4; TE 34.8, 11.6 to 58.1). Conclusions Cannabis use in patients with FEP was associated with an increased likelihood of hospital admission. This was linked to the prescription of several different antipsychotic drugs, indicating clinical judgement of antipsychotic treatment failure. Together, this suggests that cannabis use might be

  14. Do we need another atypical antipsychotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried

    2008-08-01

    Atypical antipsychotics were a great advance in the treatment of schizophrenia. But, there is still no atypical antipsychotic with an exceptional efficacy and safety profile for all patients. Clinicians are required to draw on their experiential knowledge to examine suitable options for individual patients. Following its suspension in 1998, the safety and efficacy of sertindole have been investigated in several post-marketing studies based in clinical settings. These have provided the safety data to support the reintroduction of sertindole, as well as specific examples demonstrating that certain patients, in particular, may benefit from a switch from other atypical antipsychotics to sertindole. Sertindole's individual and mostly favourable profile of treatment-emergent effects and safety allows for flexibility in treating patients. The propensity of sertindole to cause anticholinergic effects, which can be particularly troublesome, is small and, more recently, there have been suggestions that sertindole may have beneficial effects on cognition.

  15. Weight change after an atypical antipsychotic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, L Douglas; Renner, Bernard T; Bengtson, Michael A; Wilcox, Brian M; Acholonu, Wilfred W

    2003-10-01

    Atypical antipsychotics successfully treat schizophrenia and other conditions, with a lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects than other agents used in treatment of these disorders. However, some atypical antipsychotics are associated with weight gain. To quantify the impact on weight and identify atypical antipsychotics causing the least amount of weight gain among patients switched from risperidone to olanzapine and olanzapine to risperidone. Patients included in the study (n = 86) were > or =18 years and had received > or =2 prescriptions for risperidone or olanzapine for > or =60 days, switched to the other atypical antipsychotic, and were dispensed > or =2 prescriptions for at least 60 days after the index date. Age, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were retrospectively abstracted from automated databases containing patient-specific prescription and vital sign information. At the time of their switch, the average patient age was 53.2 years (range 25-83). The average weight change in patients switched to olanzapine (n = 47) was +2.3 kg (p = 0.01) and the BMI change was +0.8 kg/m(2) (p = 0.02). The average percent body weight change was +2.8% and the BMI change was +3.0%. The average weight change after patients switched to risperidone (n = 39) was -0.45 kg (p = 0.69) and BMI change was -0.2 kg/m2 (p = 0.64). The average percentage weight change was -0.4% and BMI change was -0.5%. Practitioners' concern regarding weight changes after switching atypical antipsychotics seems warranted and patients should be provided consistent, ongoing weight monitoring. Further investigations should examine whether weight changes associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment further jeopardize this already at-risk population for severe comorbid conditions such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes.

  16. When Medication Is Prescribed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

  17. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics in rats as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain in human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouzet, B; Mow, T; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2003-01-01

    compounds in an animal model of weight gain. With the aim of evaluating whether the rat can be used as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, we have investigated the effect of chronic treatment (3 weeks) with one antipsychotic drug inducing weight gain in clinic (olanzapine) and one antipsychotic...

  18. Clinical and Economic Outcomes of Interventions to Reduce Antipsychotic and Benzodiazepine Use Within Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Daniel J; Bindoff, Ivan K; Clinnick, Lisa M; Peterson, Gregory M; Westbury, Juanita L

    2018-02-01

    Antipsychotic and benzodiazepine medications are widely used in nursing homes despite only modest efficacy and the risk of severe adverse effects. Numerous interventions have been implemented to reduce their use. However, the outcomes for the residents and staff and the economic impact on the healthcare system remain relatively understudied. The aim was to examine the clinical and economic outcomes reported within interventions to reduce antipsychotic and/or benzodiazepine use in nursing homes. Databases searched included PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Scopus, and ProQuest. We focussed on interventions with professional (e.g. education) and/or organisational (e.g. formation of multidisciplinary teams) components. Data were extracted from the papers that included clinical and/or economic outcomes. Two authors independently reviewed articles for eligibility and quality. Fourteen studies reported on clinical outcomes for the residents: 13 antipsychotic reduction studies and one study focussing exclusively on benzodiazepine reduction. There was substantial heterogeneity in the types of outcomes reported and the method of reporting. Change in behavioural and psychological symptoms was the most commonly reported outcome throughout the antipsychotic reduction interventions (n = 12 studies) and remained stable or improved in ten of 12 studies. Whilst improvements were seen in emotional responsiveness, measures of sleep, cognitive function, and subjective health score remained unchanged upon benzodiazepine reduction. No interventions included an economic analysis. Efforts should be made to improve the consistency in reporting of clinical outcomes within interventions to reduce antipsychotic and/or benzodiazepine medications. Additionally, the economic impact of these interventions should be considered. Nonetheless, evidence suggests that interventions that reduce antipsychotic use are unlikely to have deleterious clinical effects. The clinical and economic effects of

  19. Antipsychotic Use and Risk of Hospitalization or Death Due to Pneumonia in Persons With and Those Without Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Koponen, Marjaana; Tanskanen, Antti; Lavikainen, Piia; Sund, Reijo; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Taipale, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    The use of antipsychotic agents has been associated with increased pneumonia risk, but although people with dementia are particularly susceptible to pneumonia, only one small study has assessed the risk of pneumonia in relation to the use of antipsychotic agents among people with Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated whether the incident use of antipsychotic agents, or specific antipsychotic agents, are related to a higher risk of hospitalization or death due to pneumonia in the Medication and Alzheimer Disease (MEDALZ) cohort. The cohort includes all individuals with AD who received a clinically verified AD diagnosis in Finland in 2005 to 2011 (N = 60,584; incident pneumonia, n = 12,225). A matched comparison cohort without AD (N = 60,584; incident pneumonia, n = 6,195) was used to compare the magnitude of risk. Results were adjusted for a propensity score derived from comorbidities, concomitant medications, and sociodemographic characteristics. Sensitivity analyses with case-crossover design were conducted. The use of antipsychotic agents was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.90-2.13) in the AD cohort and a somewhat higher risk in the non-AD cohort (adjusted HR, 3.43; 95% CI, 2.99-3.93). Similar results were observed with case-crossover analyses (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.75-2.34 in the AD cohort and OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.77-3.79 in the non-AD cohort). The three most commonly used antipsychotic agents (quetiapine, risperidone, haloperidol) had similar associations with pneumonia risk. Regardless of applied study design, treatment duration, or the choice of drug, the use of antipsychotic agents was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia. With observational data, we cannot fully rule out a shared causality between pneumonia and the use of antipsychotic agents, but the risk to benefit balance should be considered when antipsychotic agents are prescribed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest

  20. Developing a metformin prescribing tool for use in adults with mental illness to reduce medication-related weight gain and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cassie; Myles, Hannah; Galletly, Cherrie

    2017-08-01

    There is considerable evidence that metformin reduces weight gain associated with antipsychotic medication. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use metformin prescribing tool in order to enable clinicians to prescribe metformin safely and confidently. The authors undertook a survey of clinicians and reviewed the published literature and existing guidelines concerning the use of metformin to reduce weight gain in adults with mental illness. A metformin prescribing tool was devised based on the literature, national cardiovascular and diabetes guidelines and Australian metformin prescribing recommendations. The metformin prescribing tool guides clinicians through the considerations required for appropriate selection of the target patient population and safe prescription of metformin. A novel, easy-to-use, one-page reference has been developed for busy clinicians that can be laminated and displayed in consulting rooms and psychiatric inpatient units to address weight gain and obesity associated with antipsychotic medications in people with mental illness.

  1. Treatment recommendations for extrapyramidal side effects associated with second-generation antipsychotic use in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Doja, Asif; Belanger, Stacey; Patten, Scott

    2011-11-01

    Antipsychotic use in children is increasing. The purpose of the present article was to provide guidance to clinicians on the clinical management of extrapyramidal side effects of second-generation antipsychotics. Published literature, key informant interviews, and discussions with panel members and stakeholder partners were used to identify key clinical areas of guidance and preferences on format for the present recommendations. Draft recommendations were presented to a guideline panel. Members of the guideline panel evaluated the information gathered from the systematic review of the literature and used a nominal group process to reach a consensus on treatment recommendations. A description of the neurological abnormalities commonly seen with antipsychotic medications is provided, as well as recommendations on how to examine and quantify these abnormalities. A stepwise approach to the management of neurological abnormalities is provided. Several different types of extrapyramidal symptoms can be seen secondary to antipsychotic use in children including neuroleptic-induced acute dystonia, neuroleptic-induced akathisia, neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism, neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia, tardive dystonia and tardive akathisia, and withdrawal dyskinesias. The overwhelming majority of evidence on the treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders comes from adult patients with schizophrenia. Given the scarcity of paediatric data, recommendations were made with reference to both the adult and paediatric literature. Given the limitations in the generalizability of data from adult subjects to children, these recommendations should be considered on the basis of expert opinion, rather than evidence based. Clinicians must be aware of the potential of second-generation antipsychotics to induce neurological side effects, and should exercise a high degree of vigilance when prescribing these medications.

  2. Off-label utilization of antipsychotics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    As part of a pharmacovigilance/pharmacoepidemiology program, all drugs given on 5 reference days (1999 – 2001) in the 98- bed psychiatric ... Key words: Antipsychotic drugs; Off-label use; Prescription habits; Psychotic disorders; Affective disorders ..... Laux G, Baier D. Quality-monitoring of psychotropic drug therapy in.

  3. Antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... factors associated with antipsychotic medication non-adherence among schizophrenia patients .... treatment. Results. Socio-demographic characteristics of schizophrenia patients. Out of the total 423 recruited patients, 412 filled in the questionnaire ... involving chewing parts of the fresh green leaves.

  4. Improving metabolic monitoring in patients maintained on antipsychotics in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Esther Sl; Subramaniam, Sivasangari; Koay, Jun Min; Bharathy, Arokiamary; Vasudevan, Umadevi; Panickulam, Joseph J; Ng, InnTiong; Arif, Nor Hayati; Russell, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the monitoring of metabolic parameters among outpatients maintained on antipsychotic medications in a general hospital setting in Malaysia and to assess the impact of a local monitoring protocol. By performing a baseline audit of files from a random sample of 300 patients prescribed antipsychotic medications for at least 1 year; we determined the frequency of metabolic monitoring. The findings informed the design of a new local protocol, on which clinical staff was briefed. We re-evaluated metabolic monitoring immediately after implementation, in a small sample of new referrals and current patients. We explored staff perceptions of the initiative with a follow-up focus group, 6 months post-implementation. The baseline audit revealed a sub-optimal frequency of metabolic parameter recording. Re-audit, following implementation of the new protocol, revealed improved monitoring but persisting deficits. Dialogue with the clinical staff led to further protocol modification, clearer definition of staff roles and use of a standard recording template. Focus group findings revealed positive perceptions of the initiative, but persisting implementation barriers, including cultural issues surrounding waist circumference measurement. Responding to challenges in achieving improved routine metabolic monitoring of patients maintained on antipsychotics required on-going dialogue with the clinical staff, in order to address both service pressures and cultural concerns. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  5. Electronic prescribing reduces prescribing error in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Rahman, Nisar-Ur; Ahmad, Mahmood; Debray, Marcel; Yliperttula, Marjo; Declèves, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    To examine the incidence of prescribing errors in a main public hospital in Pakistan and to assess the impact of introducing electronic prescribing system on the reduction of their incidence. Medication errors are persistent in today's healthcare system. The impact of electronic prescribing on reducing errors has not been tested in developing world. Prospective review of medication and discharge medication charts before and after the introduction of an electronic inpatient record and prescribing system. Inpatient records (n = 3300) and 1100 discharge medication sheets were reviewed for prescribing errors before and after the installation of electronic prescribing system in 11 wards. Medications (13,328 and 14,064) were prescribed for inpatients, among which 3008 and 1147 prescribing errors were identified, giving an overall error rate of 22·6% and 8·2% throughout paper-based and electronic prescribing, respectively. Medications (2480 and 2790) were prescribed for discharge patients, among which 418 and 123 errors were detected, giving an overall error rate of 16·9% and 4·4% during paper-based and electronic prescribing, respectively. Electronic prescribing has a significant effect on the reduction of prescribing errors. Prescribing errors are commonplace in Pakistan public hospitals. The study evaluated the impact of introducing electronic inpatient records and electronic prescribing in the reduction of prescribing errors in a public hospital in Pakistan. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... (approximately) showed no significant change compared to control or no overall positive findings. We identified 79 eligible studies which described 96 separate interventions to change prescribing behaviour. Of these interventions, 49 (51%, 41%-61%) showed a positive significant change compared to the control...... or inconclusive. Positive studies (+) were those that demonstrated a statistically significant change in the majority of outcomes measured at level of p change in the opposite direction and inconclusive studies...

  7. Discovery of potential antipsychotic agents possessing pro-cognitive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameh, Jelveh; McFarland, Krista; Ohlsson, Jorgen; Ek, Fredrik; Piu, Fabrice; Burstein, Ethan S; Tabatabaei, Ali; Olsson, Roger; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Bonhaus, Douglas W

    2012-03-01

    Current antipsychotic drug therapies for schizophrenia have limited efficacy and are notably ineffective at addressing the cognitive deficits associated with this disorder. The present study was designed to develop effective antipsychotic agents that would also ameliorate the cognitive deficits associated with this disease. In vitro studies comprised of binding and functional assays were utilized to identify compounds with the receptor profile that could provide both antipsychotic and pro-cognitive features. Antipsychotic and cognitive models assessing in vivo activity of these compounds included locomotor activity assays and novel object recognition assays. We developed a series of potential antipsychotic agents with a novel receptor activity profile comprised of muscarinic M(1) receptor agonism in addition to dopamine D(2) antagonism and serotonin 5-HT(2A) inverse agonism. Like other antipsychotic agents, these compounds reverse both amphetamine and dizocilpine-induced hyperactivity in animals. In addition, unlike other antipsychotic drugs, these compounds demonstrate pro-cognitive actions in the novel object recognition assay. The dual attributes of antipsychotic and pro-cognitive actions distinguish these compounds from other antipsychotic drugs and suggest that these compounds are prototype molecules in the development of novel pro-cognitive antipsychotic agents.

  8. Antipsychotic reduction and/or cessation and antipsychotics as specific treatments for tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Hanna; Rathbone, John; Agarwal, Vivek; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2018-02-06

    Since the 1950s antipsychotic medication has been extensively used to treat people with chronic mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. These drugs, however, have also been associated with a wide range of adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Various strategies have been examined to reduce a person's cumulative exposure to antipsychotics. These strategies include dose reduction, intermittent dosing strategies such as drug holidays, and antipsychotic cessation. To determine whether a reduction or cessation of antipsychotic drugs is associated with a reduction in TD for people with schizophrenia (or other chronic mental illnesses) who have existing TD. Our secondary objective was to determine whether the use of specific antipsychotics for similar groups of people could be a treatment for TD that was already established. We updated previous searches of Cochrane Schizophrenia's study-based Register of Trials including the registers of clinical trials (16 July 2015 and 26 April 2017). We searched references of all identified studies for further trial citations. We also contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included reports if they assessed people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illnesses who had established antipsychotic-induced TD, and had been randomly allocated to (a) antipsychotic maintenance versus antipsychotic cessation (placebo or no intervention), (b) antipsychotic maintenance versus antipsychotic reduction (including intermittent strategies), (c) specific antipsychotics for the treatment of TD versus placebo or no intervention, and (d) specific antipsychotics versus other antipsychotics or versus any other drugs for the treatment of TD. We independently extracted data from these trials and estimated risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assumed that people who

  9. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  10. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  11. Role of Long-Acting Injectable Second-Generation Antipsychotics in the Treatment of First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Přikryl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 80% of patients with the first-episode schizophrenia reach symptomatic remission after antipsychotic therapy. However, within two years most of them relapse, mainly due to low levels of insight into the illness and nonadherence to their oral medication. Therefore, although the formal data available is limited, many experts recommend prescribing long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics (mostly risperidone or alternatively paliperidone in the early stages of schizophrenia, particularly in patients who have benefited from the original oral molecule in the past and agree to receive long-term injectable treatment. Early application of long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics can significantly reduce the risk of relapse in the future and thus improve not only the social and working potential of patients with schizophrenia but also their quality of life.

  12. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhar Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Methods Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Results Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%, the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93% or for their patients (n = 546, 94%. The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475 of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404 stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48. Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240 and patient (30.9%; n = 224. Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p Conclusions Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  13. The impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on prescribing for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, Ben; Bell, Caroline; Frampton, Christopher; Hamilton, Greg; McKean, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on the mental health of the local population by examining prescribing patterns of psychotropic medication. Dispensing data from community pharmacies for antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics and sedatives/hypnotics are routinely recorded in a national database. The close relationship between prescribing and dispensing provides the opportunity to assess prescribing trends for Canterbury compared to national data and therefore examines the longitudinal impact of the earthquakes on prescribing patterns. Short-term increases in the use of anxiolytics and sedatives/hypnotics were observed after the most devastating February 2011 earthquake, but this effect was not sustained. There were no observable effects of the earthquakes on antidepressant or antipsychotic dispensing. Short-term increases in dispensing were only observed for the classes of anxiolytics and sedatives/hypnotics. No sustained changes in dispensing occurred. These findings suggest that long-term detrimental effects on the mental health of the Canterbury population were either not present or have not resulted in increased prescribing of psychotropic medication. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  14. Antipsychotic medication for early episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, John; Kao, Dennis; Soydan, Haluk; Adams, Clive E

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term treatment with antipsychotic medications in early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders is common, but both short and long-term effects on the illness are unclear. There have been numerous suggestions that people with early episodes of schizophrenia appear to respond differently than those with multiple prior episodes. The number of episodes may moderate response to drug treatment. Objectives To assess the effects of antipsychotic medication treatment on people with early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group register (July 2007) as well as references of included studies. We contacted authors of studies for further data. Selection criteria Studies with a majority of first and second episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders comparing initial antipsychotic medication treatment with placebo, milieu, or psychosocial treatment. Data collection and analysis Working independently, we critically appraised records from 681 studies, of which five studies met inclusion criteria. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. For continuous data, we calculated mean difference (MD). We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results Five studies (combined total n=998) met inclusion criteria. Four studies (n=724) provided leaving the study early data and results suggested that individuals treated with a typical antipsychotic medication are less likely to leave the study early than those treated with placebo (Chlorpromazine: 3 RCTs n=353, RR 0.4 CI 0.3 to 0.5, NNT 3.2, Fluphenaxine: 1 RCT n=240, RR 0.5 CI 0.3 to 0.8, NNT 5; Thioridazine: 1 RCT n=236, RR 0.44 CI 0.3 to 0.7, NNT 4.3, Trifulperazine: 1 RCT n=94, RR 0.96 CI 0.3 to 3.6). Two studies contributed data to assessment of adverse effects and present a general pattern of more frequent side effects among individuals treated with typical antipsychotic medications

  15. A computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Zhao-Yuan; Wang, Jiu-Qiang; Qi, Ke-Ke; Wang, Kai

    2018-03-01

    Currently, numerous antipsychotic agents have been developed in the area of pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanism underlying multi targets of antipsychotics were yet to be explored. In this study we performed a computational network analysis based on targets of antipsychotic agents. We retrieved a total of 96 targets from 56 antipsychotic agents. By expression enrichment analysis, we identified that the expressions of antipsychotic target genes were significantly enriched in liver, brain, blood and corpus striatum. By protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, a PPI network with 77 significantly interconnected target genes was generated. By historeceptomics analysis, significant brain region specific target-drug interactions were identified in targets of dopamine receptors (DRD1-Olanzapine in caudate nucleus and pons (P-valueantipsychotic targets and insights for molecular mechanism of antipsychotic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CARDIOTOXICITY ANTIPSYCHOTICS: MORPHO-ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Volkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the morphological and functional heart disorders in patients with different duration of antipsychotic treatment. Material and methods. Medical documents of 78 deceased schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs were studied. The patients were split into 4 groups depending on duration of neuroleptic treatment: group 1 — <10 years, group 2 — 11-20 years; group 3 — 21-30 years, group 4 — >30 years. ECG-disorders and left ventricular morphometric data were analyzed. Сorrelation analysis of myocardium morphological changes and electrophysiological disorders was performed. Results. The dependence of morphometric myocardium changes on the treatment duration was found: increase in stromal-parenchymal ratio (from 9.9±4.1% to 80.0±10.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of atrophied cardiomyocytes (from 8.0±3.8% to 45.1±12.6% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of degenerative cardiomyocytes (from 5.2±3.1% to 35.2±12.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively. Increased incidence of extrasystole detection (from 2.2% to 11.2% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, as well as left anterior fascicular block (from 1.1% to 25.9% in groups 1 and 2, respectively and left ventricle hypertrophy (from 2.2% to 18.5% in groups 1 and 4, respectively were found. A strong positive correlation (r=0.88–0.99 was revealed between antipsychotic treatment duration and ECG disorders, as well as between morphological myocardium state and ECG disorders. Conclusion. Awareness about the neuroleptic-depended ECG changes is necessary for early diagnosis, secondary prevention and correction of existing heart disorders due to cardiotoxic side effects of antipsychotic drugs.

  17. CARDIOTOXICITY ANTIPSYCHOTICS: MORPHO-ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Volkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the morphological and functional heart disorders in patients with different duration of antipsychotic treatment. Material and methods. Medical documents of 78 deceased schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs were studied. The patients were split into 4 groups depending on duration of neuroleptic treatment: group 1 — <10 years, group 2 — 11-20 years; group 3 — 21-30 years, group 4 — >30 years. ECG-disorders and left ventricular morphometric data were analyzed. Сorrelation analysis of myocardium morphological changes and electrophysiological disorders was performed. Results. The dependence of morphometric myocardium changes on the treatment duration was found: increase in stromal-parenchymal ratio (from 9.9±4.1% to 80.0±10.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of atrophied cardiomyocytes (from 8.0±3.8% to 45.1±12.6% in groups 1 and 4, respectively, in specific volume of degenerative cardiomyocytes (from 5.2±3.1% to 35.2±12.1% in groups 1 and 4, respectively. Increased incidence of extrasystole detection (from 2.2% to 11.2% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, as well as left anterior fascicular block (from 1.1% to 25.9% in groups 1 and 2, respectively and left ventricle hypertrophy (from 2.2% to 18.5% in groups 1 and 4, respectively were found. A strong positive correlation (r=0.88–0.99 was revealed between antipsychotic treatment duration and ECG disorders, as well as between morphological myocardium state and ECG disorders. Conclusion. Awareness about the neuroleptic-depended ECG changes is necessary for early diagnosis, secondary prevention and correction of existing heart disorders due to cardiotoxic side effects of antipsychotic drugs.

  18. Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Somnolence: Incidence, Mechanisms, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Sun, Hongwei; Wang, Zuowei; Ren, Ming; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2016-09-01

    Somnolence is a common side effect of antipsychotics. To assess the incidence of this side effect, we performed a MEDLINE search for randomized, double-blinded, placebo- or active-controlled studies of adult patients treated with antipsychotics for schizophrenia, mania, bipolar depression, or bipolar disorder. We extracted rates of somnolence from original publications and pooled them based on the dose of each antipsychotic in the same psychiatric condition, then estimated the absolute risk increase (ARI) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of an antipsychotic relative to placebo or an active comparator in the same psychiatric condition. According to the ARI in acute schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and bipolar depression, antipsychotics can be classified as high somnolence (clozapine), moderate somnolence (olanzapine, perphenazine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone), and low somnolence (aripiprazole, asenapine, haloperidol, lurasidone, paliperidone, cariprazine). The risk of somnolence with blonanserin, brexpiprazole, chlorpromazine, iloperidone, sertindole, and zotepine needs further investigation. The rates of somnolence were positively correlated to dose and duration for some antipsychotics, but not for others. Many factors, including antipsychotic per se, the method used to measure somnolence, patient population, study design, and dosing schedule, might affect the incidence of antipsychotic-induced somnolence. The mechanisms of antipsychotic-induced somnolence are likely multifactorial, although the blockade of histamine 1 receptors and α1 receptors may play a major role. The management of antipsychotic-induced somnolence should include sleep hygiene education, choosing an antipsychotic with a lower risk for somnolence, starting at a lower dose with a slower titration based on psychiatric diagnoses, adjusting doses when necessary, and minimizing concurrent somnolence-prone agents. Since most cases of somnolence were mild to moderate, allowing tolerance to

  19. Efficacy and safety of blonanserin versus other antipsychotics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Anant D. Patil

    2013-01-01

    Although many atypical antipsychotics are available, there is a need of an atypical antipsychotic effective in all symptom domains of schizophrenia and well tolerated especially for side effects like extrapyramidal side effects, weight gain and blood prolactin elevation. Blonanserin is an atypical antipsychotic which blocks dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptors. Its efficacy and safety has been studied in patients with schizophrenia and delirium. Blonanserin is found to be effective and w...

  20. Serum prolactin levels and sexual dysfunctions in antipsychotic medication, such as risperidone : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegtering, H; Lambers, PA; Prakken, G; ten Brink, C

    Classical antipsychotic drugs increase the level of serum prolactin. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine barely increases prolactin levels. An open naturalistic study in the University Hospital of Groningen suggests that treatment with risperidone in comparison to classical antipsychotics seems to

  1. Risk of Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Older Patients with Diabetes Using Antipsychotic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Kris; van der Linden, Paul D; Souverein, Patrick C; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Toine; Knol, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antipsychotics may disrupt metabolic regulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The risk of hypoglycemia in older users of antipsychotics with diabetes is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the use of antipsychotic drugs and hypoglycemia requiring

  2. Chronic treatment with antipsychotics in rats as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain in human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouzet, B; Mow, T; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2003-01-01

    not inducing weight gain in clinic (haloperidol), on food and water intake and body weight gain in rats. We included both female and male rats in this study. To reduce spontaneous high food intake in rats, and to be able to evaluate the treatment effect on a potential increase of food intake or metabolic......Several clinical reports have demonstrated that most antipsychotics of the new generation, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol, induce weight gain in schizophrenic patients. Since weight gain induces serious health complications in humans, it is crucial to test upcoming antipsychotic...... compounds in an animal model of weight gain. With the aim of evaluating whether the rat can be used as a model for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, we have investigated the effect of chronic treatment (3 weeks) with one antipsychotic drug inducing weight gain in clinic (olanzapine) and one antipsychotic...

  3. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; El-Sayeh, Hany George G; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (March 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral aripiprazole with oral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes four trials with 1404 participants on two out of eight possible comparisons - aripiprazole versus olanzapine and aripiprazole versus risperidone. The overall number of participants leaving the studies early was considerable (38.5%), limiting the validity of the findings, but with no significant differences between groups. Aripiprazole was less efficacious than olanzapine in terms of the general mental state (PANSS total score: n=794, 2 RCTs, MD 4.96 CI 1.85 to 8.06), but it was associated with fewer side

  4. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  5. The effects of gestational use of antidepressants and antipsychotics on neonatal outcomes for women with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayne, Jacqueline; Nguyen, Thinh; Bennett, Kellie; Allen, Suzanna; Hauck, Yvonne; Liira, Helena

    2017-10-01

    Psychotropic medication use occurs in 8% of pregnancies, with rates increasing, and often multiple medications prescribed. This study aims to determine if the use of psychotropic medication, in a cohort of women with severe mental illness, increases rates of special care nursery admission and reports differences between antidepressant and antipsychotic medication use either alone or in combination. A retrospective database analysis from a cohort with severe mental illness in pregnancy identified 268 pregnant women who were grouped according to medication type. Demographic, obstetric and neonatal variables were analysed using t-tests, χ 2 , analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis for special care nursery admission. The medication groups consisted of: women taking no psychotropic medications (n = 67); those taking antipsychotics (n = 87); those taking antidepressants (n = 55); those taking and a combination of antidepressants/antipsychotics (n = 59). Rates of special care nursery admission in women who took psychotropic medication (41.3%) were elevated compared to those who did not (26.9%) (P = 0.035), and were significantly raised when compared to the general population (P medication groups. A significant adjusted odds ratio of 2.79 (95% CI 1.286-6.049) was found for special care nursery and psychiatric admission during pregnancy but not for psychotropic medication. Rates of special care nursery admission are elevated in neonates of women with severe mental illness taking psychotropic medication, but were not different for monotherapy or polytherapy when prescribing antidepressants or antipsychotic medication. Additional vulnerability occurs in the neonates of women with a mental illness and paediatric presence at delivery is recommended. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  6. Pattern of drugs prescribed for community-residing middle-aged and older adults from the outskirts of Brasília Padrão de medicamentos prescritos para indivíduos de meia-idade e idosos de uma comunidade residente na periferia de Brasília

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio de Tolêdo Nóbrega

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the medication prescribed for a group of middle-aged and older adults that reside in the outskirts of Brasilia and practice physical exercises regularly at a local University. This analysis considered qualitative and quantitative aspects of the medications prescribed to subjects aged 54 to 81 years-old, including their appropriateness and compliance to the Brazilian essential drug list. The units of analysis consisted in each single medication and each individual subject. Among the one hundred twenty-one individuals interviewed, 19.7% declared not to take any medicine whereas the remaining 80.3% revealed to use an average of 3.2 drugs. Among all drugs consumed, 98.1% consisted of physician prescribed medications, being antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory and analgesic products the most frequent therapeutic classes. Consumption of drugs that should be generally avoided by elderly was found not to vary significantly according to age strata, having nonetheless increased (P O escopo deste estudo consistiu em avaliar a medicação prescrita para um grupo composto por indivíduos de meia-idade e idosos que reside na periferia de Brasília e pratica exercícios físicos regulares em uma Universidade local. Este estudo considerou aspectos qualitativos e quantitativos das medicações prescritas para indivíduos com idades entre 54 e 81 anos, incluindo sua adequação e sua concordância com a Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais (RENAME. As unidades de análise consistiram em cada medicamento e em cada indivíduo. Entre os cento e vinte e um indivíduos investigados, 19,7% declararam não fazer uso de medicamento, enquanto os demais 80,3% revelaram fazer uso de média de 3,2 medicamentos. Entre os medicamentos sendo consumidos, 98,1% eram prescritos por médicos, sendo anti-hipertensivos, antiinflamatórios e analgésicos as classes terapêuticas mais freqüentes. O consumo de medicamentos que devem

  7. Decreasing Prescribing Errors During Pediatric Emergencies: A Randomized Simulation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, Guylaine; Levy, Arielle; Bailey, Benoit; Cummins-McManus, Barbara; Lebel, Denis; Gravel, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate whether a clinical aid providing precalculated medication doses decreases prescribing errors among residents during pediatric simulated cardiopulmonary arrest and anaphylaxis. A crossover randomized trial was conducted in a tertiary care hospital simulation center with residents rotating in the pediatric emergency department. The intervention was a reference book providing weight-based precalculated doses. The control group used a card providing milligram-per-kilogram doses. The primary outcome was the presence of a prescribing error, defined as a dose varying by ≥20% from the recommended dose or by incorrect route. Residents were involved in 2 sets of paired scenarios and were their own control group. Primary analysis was the difference in mean prescribing error proportions between both groups. Forty residents prescribed 1507 medications or defibrillations during 160 scenarios. The numbers of prescribing errors per 100 bolus medications or defibrillations were 5.1 (39 out of 762) and 7.5 (56 out of 745) for the intervention and control, respectively, a difference of 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.1 to 5.0). However, the intervention was highly associated with lower risk of 10-fold error for bolus medications (odds ratio 0.27; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.70). For medications administered by infusion, prescribing errors occurred in 3 out of 76 (4%) scenarios in the intervention group and 13 out of 76 (22.4%) in the control group, a difference of 13% (95% CI, 3 to 23). A clinical aid providing precalculated medication doses was not associated with a decrease in overall prescribing error rates but was highly associated with a lower risk of 10-fold error for bolus medications and for medications administered by continuous infusion. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Prescribing trends in bipolar disorder: cohort study in the United Kingdom THIN primary care database 1995-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Hayes

    Full Text Available To determine changes in prescribing patterns in primary care of antipsychotic and mood stabiliser medication in a representative sample of patients with bipolar disorder in the United Kingdom over a fifteen year period and association with socio-demographic factors.We identified 4700 patients in the Health Improvement Network (THIN primary care database, who had received treatment for bipolar disorder between 1995 and 2009. The proportion of time for which each individual was prescribed a particular medication was studied, along with variation by sex, age and social depravation status (quintiles of Townsend scores. The number of drugs an individual was taking within a particular year was also examined.In 1995, 40.6% of patients with bipolar disorder were prescribed a psychotropic medication at least twice. By 2009 this had increased to 78.5% of patients. Valproate registered with the greatest increase in use (22.7% followed by olanzapine (15.7% and quetiapine (9.9%. There were differences by age and sex; with young (18-30 year old women having the biggest increase in proportion of time on medication. There were no differences by social deprivation status. By 2009, 34.2% of women of childbearing age were treated with valproate.Lithium use overall remained relatively constant, whilst second generation antipsychotic and valproate use increased dramatically. Changes in prescribing practice preceded published trial evidence, especially with the use of second generation antipsychotics, perhaps with inferences being made from treatment of schizophrenia and use of first generation antipsychotics. Women of childbearing age were prescribed valproate frequently, against best advice.

  9. Prolactin-Elevating Antipsychotics and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klil-Drori, Adi J; Yin, Hui; Abenhaim, Haim A; du Fort, Guillaume Galbaud; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    The use of antipsychotics may increase the risk of endometrial cancer through elevation of prolactin levels. We investigated the association between antipsychotics that are known to cause prolactin elevation and the risk of endometrial cancer. In data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink, all women who were newly treated with antipsychotics from 1990-2013 were identified and followed until 2014. Within this cohort of antipsychotic users, a nested case-control analysis was conducted. Main exposure was nonsporadic use of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics, and the active comparator was prolactin-sparing antipsychotics. Cases were women newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer (ICD-10) matched with up to 20 controls on age, calendar year of cohort entry, linkability to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository, and duration of follow-up. Conditional logistic regression models were used to determine the association of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics and endometrial cancer compared with prolactin-sparing antipsychotics. All analyses were adjusted for relevant potential confounders, including smoking, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. The cohort included 65,930 women. During 366,112 person-years of follow-up, there were 139 cases of endometrial cancer (incidence rate: 38/100,000 person-years), which were matched to 1,603 controls. Compared with the use of prolactin-sparing antipsychotics, the use of prolactin-elevating antipsychotics was not associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.48). These findings remained similar with different durations of use (≤ 1 year, aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 0.64-1.78, and > 1 year, aOR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.58-1.54) and were robust to various sensitivity analyses. Prolactin-elevating antipsychotics were not associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  11. [Atypical antipsychotics and sexual dysfunction: five case-reports associated with risperidone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefliger, T; Bonsack, C

    2006-01-01

    of potential negative consequences (ie increased risk of osteoporosis or neoplasia, worsening of psychopathology) (34). When hyperprolactinemia is symptomatic, lowering of the dose of the antipsychotic, or switching to a prolactin-sparing agent (olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and clozapine) is recommended. Before this, women with amenorrhea secondary to antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia should be advised that menses may resume. Especially after long-standing amenorrhea they may assume being menopaused, hence may believe birth control measures are no longer required. The prevalence of antipsychotic-induced sexual and reproductive function side-effects is high. Clinicians should be aware of them, because they are often badly tolerated, are associated with a low satisfaction and may therefore result in low adherence with treatment. This implies for the clinician to overtly discuss with the patient of his sexuality and the potential negative impact of antipsychotic treatment on it. The recognition of these problems allows the searching together for a solution. The described cases indicate that solving the problem is often possible, provided that individual preferences and subjective impact are taken in account. Antipsychotic treatment is often prescribed for very long periods. A better knowledge of - and attention to - the associated side effects, particularly on the sexual and reproductive functions, is necessary in order to reduce some potentially negative long-term effects and to improve the adherence to treatment of our patients.

  12. Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes - Risperidone compared with low- and high-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, [No Value; de Boer, A; Herings, RMC; Roos, RAC; Jansen, PAF; Leufkens, HGM

    Aim: To compare the risk of extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) between patients using risperidone and those using low-potency conventional antipsychotic drugs (APDs) in outpatient clinical practice, as measured by the use of anticholinergic medication. We tried to replicate results from previous

  13. Antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes arrhythmia risk and mortality in older adults ‐ a Swedish nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Julius; Jonasdottir Bergman, Gudrun; Borg, Natalia; Salmi, Peter; Fastbom, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to examine mortality risk associated with use of antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes (TdP) risk in elderly. Methods A matched case–control register study was conducted in people 65 years and older dying outside hospital from 2008–2013 (n = 286 092) and matched controls (n = 1 430 460). The association between prescription of antidepressants and antipsychotics with various TdP risk according to CredibleMeds (www.crediblemeds.org) and all‐cause mortality was studied by multivariate conditional logistic regression adjusted for comorbidity and several other confounders. Results Use of antidepressants classified with known or possible TdP risk, was associated with higher adjusted risk for mortality (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.51, 1.56 and OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.61, 1.67, respectively) compared with antidepressants classified with conditional TdP risk (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.22, 1.28) or without TdP classification (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.94, 1.05). Antipsychotics classified with known TdP risk were associated with higher risk (OR 4.57, 95% CI 4.37, 4.78) than antipsychotics with possible risk (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.52, 2.64) or without TdP classification (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.03, 2.65). The following risk ranking was observed for commonly used antidepressants: mirtazapine > citalopram > sertraline > amitriptyline and for antipsychotics: haloperidol > risperidone >olanzapine > quetiapine. Conclusion The CredibleMeds system predicted drug‐associated risk for mortality in the elderly at the risk class level. Among antipsychotics, haloperidol, and among antidepressants, mirtazapine and citalopram, were associated with the highest risks. The results suggest that the TdP risk with antidepressants and antipsychotics should be taken into consideration when prescribing to the elderly. PMID:26574175

  14. Antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes arrhythmia risk and mortality in older adults - a Swedish nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Bengt; Collin, Julius; Jonasdottir Bergman, Gudrun; Borg, Natalia; Salmi, Peter; Fastbom, Johan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine mortality risk associated with use of antidepressants and antipsychotics classified with torsades de pointes (TdP) risk in elderly. A matched case-control register study was conducted in people 65 years and older dying outside hospital from 2008-2013 (n = 286,092) and matched controls (n = 1,430,460). The association between prescription of antidepressants and antipsychotics with various TdP risk according to CredibleMeds (www.crediblemeds.org) and all-cause mortality was studied by multivariate conditional logistic regression adjusted for comorbidity and several other confounders. Use of antidepressants classified with known or possible TdP risk, was associated with higher adjusted risk for mortality (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.51, 1.56 and OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.61, 1.67, respectively) compared with antidepressants classified with conditional TdP risk (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.22, 1.28) or without TdP classification (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.94, 1.05). Antipsychotics classified with known TdP risk were associated with higher risk (OR 4.57, 95% CI 4.37, 4.78) than antipsychotics with possible risk (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.52, 2.64) or without TdP classification (OR 2.14, 95% CI 2.03, 2.65). The following risk ranking was observed for commonly used antidepressants: mirtazapine > citalopram > sertraline > amitriptyline and for antipsychotics: haloperidol > risperidone >olanzapine > quetiapine. The CredibleMeds system predicted drug-associated risk for mortality in the elderly at the risk class level. Among antipsychotics, haloperidol, and among antidepressants, mirtazapine and citalopram, were associated with the highest risks. The results suggest that the TdP risk with antidepressants and antipsychotics should be taken into consideration when prescribing to the elderly. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Economic evaluations of novel antipsychotic medications: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Teresa J; Sullivan, Greer; Feng, Weiwei; Owen, Richard R; Thrush, Carol R

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence that novel antipsychotic medications offer a cost advantage compared to traditional antipsychotic medications. Literature for this review was identified through a computerized search of Medline, Healthstar and Psyc-INFO databases inclusive from January 1989 to January 2002. Articles included in the review were required to include cost evaluation and to be published in peer-reviewed journals. Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria. All five studies that used experimental designs found that second-generation antipsychotic medications were associated with a cost advantage or were cost-neutral, and, in some cases, improved quality of life. Of the ten studies using a pre-post design, four found an increase in total costs, six reported a decrease in total costs, and four reported increased effectiveness with use of a second-generation antipsychotic. All seven of the simulation studies reported a cost advantage for novel antipsychotics for specific patient populations under certain conditions. The majority of studies found that novel antipsychotics are at least cost-neutral and may offer cost advantages compared to traditional agents. Some studies also reported greater improvement in effectiveness and quality of life when novel antipsychotics were compared to traditional antipsychotic medications. However, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions given the small sample sizes and limited study designs available in this literature.

  16. Adherence of mentally stable patients to antipsychotic medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study indicated that participants shared same viewpoints related to aspects of adherence to antipsychotic treatment; the mentally stable patients have knowledge related to the causes of mental illness; poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment results from the health seeking behaviour of the patients.

  17. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, J.; Vardar, S; Cicek, R.; Bos, H. J.; Hoekstra, P. J.; de Vries, T. W.; Hak, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. Methods:

  18. Treatment of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Antipsychotic Medication: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Antonia; Baretic, Maja; Osvatic, Martina Matovinovic; Filipcic, Igor; Jovanovic, Nikolina; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic

    2017-10-01

    The second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation, which may be associated with the use of SGAs. This study aims to review published reports of patients with schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug-associated DKA, focusing on the effective management of both conditions. Using a predefined search strategy, we searched PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to July 2016. The search terms were related to "diabetic ketoacidosis" and "antipsychotic medication." Case reports, case series, and reviews of case series written in English language were included in the review. Sixty-five reports were analyzed. In most patients who developed antipsychotic-associated DKA, 1 or more suspected antipsychotic medications were discontinued. In 5 cases, a rechallenge test was trialed, and in only 1 case, it resulted in the elevation of blood glucose. The majority was subsequently treated with a different SGA in combination with insulin/oral hypoglycemic agents; although approximately a third of patients had a complete resolution of symptoms or could control diabetes with diet only at the point of discharge. Patients taking antipsychotic medications should be regularly screened for insulin resistance and educated about potential complications of antipsychotic medications. This will allow clinicians to individualize treatment decisions and reduce iatrogenic contribution to morbidity and mortality. To achieve best treatment outcomes, antipsychotic-induced DKA should be treated jointly by psychiatry and endocrinology teams.

  19. Determination of antipsychotic drug in human serum by radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinchang; Jiang Yimin

    1989-01-01

    Serum antipsychotic drug in 50 psychosis cases were measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and the values were compared in parallel with that by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results showed that the RRA values were lower than the RIA values, but both assays gave significant correlation between the serum drug level and antipsychotic dose

  20. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication Use in Nursing Home Residents : A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Scheper, Jessica; Koning, Hedi; Brouwer, Chris; Twisk, Jos W.; van der Meer, Helene; Boersma, Froukje; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Taxis, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate prescribing is a well-known clinical problem in nursing home residents, but few interventions have focused on reducing inappropriate medication use. Objective: To examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate medication use and to improve prescribing in nursing home

  1. Discontinuing Inappropriate Medication in Nursing Home Residents (DIM-NHR study): A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, H.; Scheper, J.; Koning, H.; Brouwer, C.; Twisk, J.; Van Der Meer, H.; Boersma, F.; Zuidema, S.; Taxis, K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Inappropriate prescribing is a prevalent problem in nursing home residents that is associated with cognitive and physical impairment. Few interventions have been shown to reduce inappropriate prescribing. The aim was therefore to examine successful discontinuation of inappropriate

  2. Sertindole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Lewis, Ruth; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and, if so, how much the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sertindole compared with other second generation antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) and ClinicalTrials.gov (February 2009). Selection criteria We included all randomised trials comparing oral sertindole with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes two short-term low-quality randomised trials (total n=508) both comparing sertindole with risperidone. One third of participants left the studies early (2 RCTs, n=504, RR 1.23 CI 0.94 to 1.60). There was no difference in efficacy (2 RCTs, n=493, WMD PANSS total change from baseline 1.98 CI −8.24 to 12.20). Compared with relatively high doses of risperidone (between 4 and 12 mg/day), sertindole produced significantly less akathisia and parkinsonism (1 RCT, n=321, RR 0.24 CI 0.09 to 0.69, NNT 14, CI 8 to 100). Sertindole produced more cardiac effects (2 RCTs, n=508, RR QTc prolongation 4.86 CI 1.94 to 12.18), weight change (2 RCTs, n=328, WMD 0.99 CI 0.12 to 1.86) and male sexual dysfunction (2 RCTs, n=437, RR 2.90 CI 1.32 to 6.35, NNH 13 CI 8 to 33

  3. [ADD psychosis: treatment with antipsychotics and methylphenidate?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, J D; Kooij, J J S

    2012-01-01

    Two patients with a psychotic disorder who also met the diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD were treated with antipsychotics and methylphenidate. The first patient remained stable for many years with this combination treatment, whereas the second became psychotic several months after he had increased the dose of methylphenidate and had started to use cocaine. In the light of these two case studies, we have reviewed the literature on ADD psychosis, and we formulate recommendations regarding the specialised treatment needed for this uncommon disorder.

  4. Improvement of Brain Reward Abnormalities by Antipsychotic Monotherapy in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT Schizophrenic symptoms are linked to a dysfunction of dopamine neurotransmission and the brain reward system. However, it remains unclear whether antipsychotic treatment, which blocks dopamine transmission, improves, alters, or even worsens the reward-related abnormalities. OBJECTIVE...... To investigate changes in reward-related brain activations in schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic monotherapy with a dopamine D2/D3 antagonist. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort study. SETTING Psychiatric inpatients and outpatients in the Capital Region of Denmark. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-three antipsychotic...... with the antipsychotic compound amisulpride. Controls were followed up without treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Task-related blood oxygen level-dependent activations as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after antipsychotic treatment. RESULTS At baseline, patients, as compared with controls...

  5. Validation of a claims-based antipsychotic polypharmacy measure†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman-Westin, Emily; Kealey, Edith; Gupta, Nitin; Chen, Qingxian; Gerhard, Tobias; Crystal, Stephen; Olfson, Mark; Finnerty, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the metabolic and neurologic side effects of antipsychotics and concerns about the increased risks associated with concomitant use, antipsychotic polypharmacy is a quality concern. This study assessed the operating characteristics of a Medicaid claims-based measure of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods A random sample from 10 public mental health clinics and 312 patients met criteria for this study. Medical record extractors were blind to measure status. We examined the prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) in Medicaid claims, testing nine different definitions of antipsychotic polypharmacy, including >14, >60, or >90 days concurrent use of ≥2 antipsychotic agents, each with allowable gaps of up to 0, 14, or 32 days in days’ supply of antipsychotic medications. Results All Medicaid claims measure definitions tested had excellent specificity and PPV (>91%). Good to excellent sensitivity was dependent upon use of a 32-day gap allowance, particularly as duration of concurrent antipsychotic use increased. The proposed claims-based measure (90-day concurrent use of ≥2 or more antipsychotics, allowing for a 32-day gap) had excellent specificity (99.1%, 95%CI: 98.2–99.6) and PPV (90.9%, 95%CI: 83.1–95.7) with good sensitivity (79.4%, 95%CI: 70.4–86.6). The overall level of concordance between claims and medical record-based categorization of antipsychotic polypharmacy was high (96.4%, n = 301/312 clients, Cohen's K = 84.7, 95%CI: 75.9–93.5). Discrepant cases were reviewed, and implications are discussed. Conclusions Administrative claims data can be used to construct valid measures of antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:24664793

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiezhong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs (APDs are widely prescribed to control various mental disorders. As mental disorders are chronic diseases, these drugs are often used over a life-time. However, APDs can cause serious glucometabolic side-effects including type 2 diabetes and hyperglycaemic emergency, leading to medication non-compliance. At present, there is no effective approach to overcome these side-effects. Understanding the mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes should be helpful in prevention and treatment of these side-effects of APDs and thus improve the clinical outcomes of APDs. In this review, the potential mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes are summarized so that novel approaches can be considered to relieve APD-induced diabetes. APD-induced diabetes could be mediated by multiple mechanisms: (1 APDs can inhibit the insulin signaling pathway in the target cells such as muscle cells, hepatocytes and adipocytes to cause insulin resistance; (2 APD-induced obesity can result in high levels of free fatty acids (FFA and inflammation, which can also cause insulin resistance. (3 APDs can cause direct damage to β-cells, leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of β-cells. A recent theory considers that both β-cell damage and insulin resistance are necessary factors for the development of diabetes. In high-fat diet-induced diabetes, the compensatory ability of β-cells is gradually damaged, while APDs cause direct β-cell damage, accounting for the severe form of APD-induced diabetes. Based on these mechanisms, effective prevention of APD-induced diabetes may need an integrated approach to combat various effects of APDs on multiple pathways.

  7. How Hyperprolactinemia Affects Sexual Function in Patients Under Antipsychotic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Abadal, Elena; Del Cacho, Núria; Saenz-Navarrete, Gerard; Arranz, Belen; Cambra, Rosa-Maria; Cuadras, Daniel; Rodante, Demián; Fehér, Csaba; Roca, Mercedes; Barneda, Vanessa; Usall, Judith

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) and sexual dysfunction (SED) in a sample of patients being prescribed a dose-stable antipsychotic medication, and to evaluate sex differences in the prevalence of HPRL and SED and their relationship. A cross-sectional study was carried out including patients between 18 and 55 years of age with a psychotic spectrum diagnosis who were attending community mental health services or hospitalized in medium and long stay units. Positive and Negative Syndrome scale, Calgary depression scale for schizophrenia, Personal and Social Performance scale, and Changes in Sexual Functioning questionnaire-short form were administered. Not later than 3 months, a determination of prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estrogen (only in women) and testosterone was performed. A final sample of 101 patients (30 women and 71 men) was recruited. Seventy-two patients (71.3%) showed HPRL. Sexual dysfunction was significantly higher in HPRL patients than in non-HPRL patients (79.17% vs 51.72%) (P = 0.006), and mean prolactin values were significantly higher in case of SED (P = 0.020). No sex differences were found in prevalence of HPRL or SED. Low Personal and Social Performance scale scores and HPRL were factors independently associated with SED, whereas alcohol use was an independent protector factor. In our study, SED was significantly related to HPRL without showing sex differences. Prevalence of HPRL and SED observed was higher than that in previous studies, which should be taken into consideration because these have been associated with higher morbimortality, and noncompliance and relapse, respectively.

  8. Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Altés Anna

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care. Methods Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively. The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%. In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%. A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines. Conclusion This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona.

  9. Antipsychotic treatment in child and adolescent first-episode psychosis: a longitudinal naturalistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Parellada, Mara; Soutullo, César A; Baeza, Immaculada; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Graell, Montserrat; Paya, Beatriz; Moreno, Dolores; de la Serna, Elena; Arango, Celso

    2008-08-01

    The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a naturalistic longitudinal study of early-onset first psychotic episodes. This report describes the antipsychotic treatment during the first year and compares the most frequently used agents after 6 months. Participants were 110 patients, aged 9-17 years, with a first psychotic episode attended consecutively at six different centers. The Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI), Disability Assessment Schedule (DAS), and Global Assessment of Function (GAF) scales were administered at baseline and at 6 months and the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effects Rating Scale only at 6 months. Diagnoses at baseline were 38.2% psychotic disorder not otherwise specified, 39.1% schizophrenia-type disorder, 11.8% depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms, and 10.9% bipolar disorder, manic episode with psychotic symptoms. The most frequently used antipsychotic agents were risperidone (n = 50), quetiapine (n = 18), and olanzapine (n = 16). Patients who were prescribed olanzapine or quetiapine had more negative and general symptoms. Using the baseline score as covariate, no significant differences were found in the reductions on any scale in patients treated with risperidone, quetiapine, or olanzapine for 6 months. Weight increase was greater with olanzapine than with risperidone (p = 0.020) or quetiapine (p = 0.040). More neurological side effects appeared with risperidone than with olanzapine (p = 0.022). All side effects were mild or moderate. Second-generation antipsychotics, especially risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine, are the most used in our context in first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. These three obtain similar clinical improvement, but differ in their side effects.

  10. Pharmacoeconomic comparison of ziprasidone with other atypical oral antipsychotic agents in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fagiolini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively investigate – by means of computer simulations – the economic cost and clinical outcomes of five atypical oral antipsychotic agents (ziprasidone, olanzapina, risperidone, paliperidone and aripiprazolo.Methods: a cyclical stochastic model representing patient evolution, taking into account main adverse reactions (akathisia, weight gain and extra-pyramidal ARs, drug efficacy on psychosis stabilization and probability of relapse, was developed. Ten different scenarios were compared, each starting with one of the considered antipsychotics, prescribed either at home or in a hospital setting. Switching to another medication was allowed until no untried drugs were available, in which case clozapine treatment or admission to a Psychiatric Therapeutic Rehabilitation Center were irreversibly assigned. Model inputs were probabilities of ARs, probabilities of stabilization and probabilities of destabilization (assumed equal for all; as well as costs attributable to drugs, hospitalization, outpatient care and costs adverse reactions in terms of concomitant medications. Sources for the inputs were the trials reported in the most recent literature (from the year 2000, selected based on the homogeneity of the observational period and antipsychotic dosage used.Results: in each scenario, the hospitalization cost represented the highest component of the overall cost (approximately 67%. Assuming equal drug effectiveness, ziprasidone fared better than all other considered competitors, showing the lowest average annual costs per patient (and also the lowest average annual hospitalization costs as well as the largest numbers of controlled months without adverse reactions, independently of the initial setting. Conclusions: the most important determinant of total cost appears to be hospitalization, whose cost is about 600% higher than the medications cost. Medication effectiveness and tolerability remain however of utmost importance for

  11. Amisulpride versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; da Mota Neto, Joaquim I Silveira; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (atypical) antipsychotics have become first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether, and if so how much, the effects of the various second generation antipsychotics differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examine how the efficacy and tolerability of amisulpride differs from that of other second generation antipsychotics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of amisulpride compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We updated this search in July 2012 and added 47 new trials to the awaiting classification section. Selection criteria We included randomised, at least single-blind, trials comparing oral amisulpride with oral forms of aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For continuous data we calculated weighted mean differences (MD), for dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. Main results The review currently includes ten short to medium term trials with 1549 participants on three comparisons: amisulpride versus olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. The overall attrition rate was considerable (34.7%) with no significant difference between groups. Amisulpride was similarly effective as olanzapine and risperidone and more effective than ziprasidone (leaving the study early due to inefficacy: n=123, 1 RCT, RR 0.21 CI 0.05 to 0.94, NNT 8 CI 5 to 50

  12. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Divac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest, high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability.

  13. Antipsychotic treatment: experiences of fully recovered service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornestad, Jone; Davidson, Larry; Joa, Inge; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Langeveld, Johannes; Veseth, Marius; Melle, Ingrid; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Bronnick, Kolbjorn

    2017-06-01

    There is lack of long-term controlled studies evaluating treatment effects of antipsychotic medication. A complete investigation should include the service user perspective. To investigate experiences of clinically recovered service users of antipsychotic medications during and after a first episode of psychosis. We used a thematic analytic approach within an interpretative-phenomenological framework. 20 clinically recovered service users were interviewed. Themes: (1) Antipsychotic drugs reduce mental chaos during the acute phase, (2) Non-stigmatizing environments were perceived to increase chances of successful use, (3) Antipsychotic drugs beyond the acute phase - considered to compromise the contribution of individual effort in recovery, (4) Prolonged use - perceived to reduce likelihood of functional recovery, (5) Antipsychotic medication was considered as a supplement to trustful relationships. Acute phase antipsychotic treatment was mostly perceived as advantageous by this sample, who was in clinical recovery. However, costs were often seen as outweighing benefits beyond the acute stage. Findings clearly emphasize the need for a collaborative approach to be integrated across all phases of care. This study underscores the need to investigate sub-group differences with regard to long-term antipsychotic treatment.

  14. Predictors of switching antipsychotic medications in the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stauffer Virginia L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify patient characteristics and early changes in patients' clinical status that best predict subsequent switching of antipsychotic agents in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. Methods This post-hoc analysis used data from a one-year randomized, open-label, multisite study of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted after the first eight weeks. Baseline patient characteristics were assessed using standard psychiatric measures and reviews of medical records. The prediction model included baseline sociodemographics, comorbid psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions, body weight, clinical and functional variables, as well as change scores on standard efficacy and tolerability measures during the first two weeks of treatment. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the best predictors of switching from the initially assigned antipsychotic medication. Results About one-third of patients (29.5%, 191/648 switched antipsychotics before the end of the one-year study. There were six variables identified as the best predictors of switching: lack of antipsychotic use in the prior year, pre-existing depression, female gender, lack of substance use disorder, worsening of akathisia (as measured by the Barnes Akathisia Scale, and worsening of symptoms of depression/anxiety (subscale score on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale during the first two weeks of antipsychotic therapy. Conclusions Switching antipsychotics appears to be prevalent in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia and can be predicted by a small and distinct set of variables. Interestingly, worsening of anxiety and depressive symptoms and of akathisia following two weeks of treatment were among the more robust predictors of subsequent switching of antipsychotics.

  15. Predictors of switching antipsychotic medications in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhuis, Allen W; Faries, Douglas E; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Stauffer, Virginia L; Kinon, Bruce J

    2010-09-28

    To identify patient characteristics and early changes in patients' clinical status that best predict subsequent switching of antipsychotic agents in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. This post-hoc analysis used data from a one-year randomized, open-label, multisite study of antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted after the first eight weeks. Baseline patient characteristics were assessed using standard psychiatric measures and reviews of medical records. The prediction model included baseline sociodemographics, comorbid psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions, body weight, clinical and functional variables, as well as change scores on standard efficacy and tolerability measures during the first two weeks of treatment. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the best predictors of switching from the initially assigned antipsychotic medication. About one-third of patients (29.5%, 191/648) switched antipsychotics before the end of the one-year study. There were six variables identified as the best predictors of switching: lack of antipsychotic use in the prior year, pre-existing depression, female gender, lack of substance use disorder, worsening of akathisia (as measured by the Barnes Akathisia Scale), and worsening of symptoms of depression/anxiety (subscale score on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) during the first two weeks of antipsychotic therapy. Switching antipsychotics appears to be prevalent in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia and can be predicted by a small and distinct set of variables. Interestingly, worsening of anxiety and depressive symptoms and of akathisia following two weeks of treatment were among the more robust predictors of subsequent switching of antipsychotics.

  16. Antipsychotic-associated psoriatic rash - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujor, Camelia-Eugenia; Vang, Torkel; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antipsychotics are a heterogeneous group of drugs. Although, antipsychotics have been used for years, unexpected side effects may still occur. With this case report we focus on a possible association between psoriasis and antipsychotics. Data on the patient's course of psychiatric...... disease, onset of psoriasis and its evolution were extracted from the patient's medical files. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 21-year-old female diagnosed with schizophrenia. She was initially treated with quetiapine, and later switched to aripiprazole due to weight gain. After initiation...

  17. Use of second-generation antipsychotics in the acute inpatient management of schizophrenia in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhadhari S

    2015-04-01

    guidelines. Upon discharge, 93.9% of patients were prescribed SGAs as maintenance therapy, and 84.8% were prescribed the same medication(s as during hospitalization. Conclusion: Current clinical practice in the Middle East differs from guideline recommendations. Patients frequently received antipsychotics in combination therapy, by various methods of administration, and at doses above and below the recommended guidelines for the management of their acute psychotic episodes. Keywords: schizophrenia, Middle East, second-generation antipsychotic, acute psychotic episode, treatment guidelines

  18. Evaluation of the Individual Safe Correction of Antipsychotic Agent Polypharmacy in Japanese Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: Validation of Safe Corrections for Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and the High-Dose Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, Tsuruhei; Inagaki, Ataru; Inada, Toshiya; Yoshio, Takashi; Yoshimura, Reiji; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polypharmacy for schizophrenia treatment is not justified by the available clinical evidence. We evaluated a treatment reduction approach that reduces the dose and number of antipsychotic medications simultaneously prescribed to patients. Methods: In a randomized open study of the Safe Correction of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and High-Dose Prescriptions program funded by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, we evaluated a drug reduction method consisting of a dose reduction intervention performed on 163 patients with schizophrenia for twelve or 24 weeks. One antipsychotic medication was removed each week from each patient’s treatment regimen by reducing the dose by 0 to 50 chlorpromazine equivalents. Data on health-related indices of quality of life, clinical symptoms, and risk of side effects were analyzed using a two-way repeated-measures mixed linear model. Results: Despite a 23% reduction in antipsychotic dose, no differences in outcomes were observed between the dose reduction and observation groups (effect size = 0.001 – 0.085, P = .24–.97), despite high statistical power (1-β = 0.48–0.97). The findings are limited by the nonuniformity of the participants’ treatment history, duration, and dose reduction amount. Dose reduction protocol patients exhibited no difference in psychotic symptoms or adverse events compared with the observation group. Conclusions: Importantly, the low dropout rate in our study (6.9% of participants withdrew because of patient factors and 23.8% for all secondary reasons) indicates that our “slowly” method is well tolerated. We hope that this approach will result in therapeutic improvements. PMID:25522380

  19. Temperature behaviour studies on antipsychotic drug Olanzapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicle Erdamar, Işık Yeşim

    2017-12-01

    The antipsychotic drug Olanzapine in powder form was 60Co gamma irradiated to investigate in various temperature value. The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrum of the irradiated Olanzapine, characterized by g = 2.0030, exhibits an intensity distribution 1:2:1. The room temperature EPR spectra of gamma irradiated Olanzapine was recorded in DMSO solution at frozen state. Temperature behavior of Olanzapine discussed by means of similarities and differences of EPR parameters. Kinetic decay features of radicals induced by gamma irradiation of Olanzapine were also studied. EPR experiments indicated that Olanzapine contained stable free radical species after irradiation and the intensity of the signal is increasing with the absorbed doses suggesting increasing radical concentration in the system.

  20. Prolactin-related adverse events and change in prolactin levels in pediatric patients given antipsychotics for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyts, Eric; Zoratti, Michael J; Toor, Kabirraaj; Wu, Ping; Kanji, Salmaan; Rabheru, Kiran; Mills, Edward J; Thorlund, Kristian

    2016-11-09

    Second-generation antipsychotics are commonly prescribed for pediatric patients with schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders despite their lack of approval for use in children. Although considered a safer alternative to first-generation antipsychotics, there is evidence to suggest that second-generation antipsychotics may be associated with some adverse events as well as an increase in prolactin levels. The purpose of this review is to examine the risk of prolactin-related adverse events in pediatric patients using antipsychotics and to quantify changes in prolactin for this population. Literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and PsycINFO databases, supplemented with review of select gray literature to identify both randomized controlled trials and observational studies on pediatric patients prescribed antipsychotic medications for schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Using a narrative approach, data on adverse events were recorded and changes from baseline in prolactin were pooled, where possible, from the randomized trials. Change from baseline in prolactin was evaluated for each treatment, as well as in comparison to placebo and to other treatments. Where data was available, these changes were evaluated separately for male and female patients. Six randomized controlled trials and five observational studies, all examining the effects of second-generation antipsychotics, were selected. Literature reporting the effects of risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole, olanzapine, and paliperidone was identified, with varying doses. Prolactin-related adverse events were sparsely reported across studies. In evidence gathered from randomized controlled trials, risperidone, olanzapine, and two doses of paliperidone (3-5 mg/day and 6-12 mg/day) were associated with increased prolactin levels compared to baseline. With the exception of paliperidone, similar trends were observed in males

  1. New atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia: iloperidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Caccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Silvio Caccia,1 Luca Pasina,2 Alessandro Nobili21Laboratory of Drug Metabolism, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy; 2Laboratory of Quality, Assessment of Geriatric Therapies and Services, “Mario Negri” Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, ItalyAbstract: The optimal treatment of schizophrenia poses a challenge to develop more effective treatments and safer drugs, to overcome poor compliance, discontinuation and frequent switching with available antipsychotics. Iloperidone is a new dopamine type 2/serotonin type 2A (D2/5-HT2A antagonist structurally related to risperidone, expected to give better efficacy with less extrapyramidal symptoms than D2 receptor antagonist antipsychotics. In double-blind phase III trials iloperidone reduced the symptoms of schizophrenia at oral doses from 12 to 24 mg. It was more effective than placebo in reducing positive and negative syndrome total score and Brief Psychiatric Rating scale scores; it was as effective as haloperidol and risperidone in post-hoc analysis. Its long-term efficacy was equivalent to that of haloperidol. The most common adverse events were dizziness, dry mouth, dyspepsia and somnolence, with few extrapyramidal symptoms and metabolic changes in short- and long-term studies in adults. Akathisia was rare, but prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc interval was comparable to haloperidol and ziprasidone, which is of particular concern. Further comparative studies are needed to clarify the benefit/risk profile of iloperidone and its role in the treatment of schizophrenia.Keywords: iloperidone, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety

  2. Hyperprolactinemia with Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlan L. Rosenbloom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing use of antipsychotic drugs in pediatric and psychiatry practice for a wide range of behavioral and affective disorders. These drugs have prominent side effects of interest to pediatric endocrinologists, including weight gain and associated metabolic risk factors and hyperprolactinemia. The drugs block dopamine action, thus disinhibiting prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia is especially prominent with first-generation antipsychotics such as haloperidol and the second-generation drugs, most commonly risperidone, with some patients developing gynecomastia or galactorrhea or, as a result of prolactin inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone from the hypothalamus, amenorrhea. With concern about the long-term effects of antipsychotics on bone mass and pituitary tumor formation, it is prudent to monitor serum prolactin levels in antipsychotic drug-treated pediatric patients and consider treatment with an agent less likely to induce hyperprolactinemia.

  3. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  4. Paliperidone palmitate versus oral antipsychotics in recently diagnosed schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Andreas; Aadamsoo, Kaire; Altamura, A Carlo; Franco, Manuel; Gorwood, Philip; Neznanov, Nikolaj G; Schronen, Juan; Ucok, Alp; Zink, Mathias; Janik, Adam; Cherubin, Pierre; Lahaye, Marjolein; Hargarter, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Relapse and acute exacerbation are common in schizophrenia and may impact treatment response and outcome. Evidence is conflicting in respect to superiority of long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapies versus oral antipsychotics in relapse prevention. This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of paliperidone palmitate versus oral antipsychotics for relapse prevention. Eligible patients with a recent diagnosis of schizophrenia (within 1-5 years) were randomized 1:1 to paliperidone palmitate (n=376) or oral antipsychotic monotherapy (n=388) and entered a 2-week initial acute oral treatment phase. Patients who met predefined response criteria were eligible to enter the 24-month rater-blinded core treatment phase. Patients were evaluated for relapse, symptoms, functioning, quality of life, treatment satisfaction, and tolerability. In the core treatment phase, time to relapse was significantly longer in the paliperidone palmitate (n=352) compared with the oral antipsychotics arm (n=363): 85% of patients were relapse-free at 469 versus 249 days (P=0.019). Significantly fewer patients receiving paliperidone palmitate met the relapse criteria (52 [14.8%] versus 76 [20.9%, oral antipsychotics]; P=0.032), representing a 29.4% relative risk reduction. For paliperidone palmitate, a significantly greater improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score on Day 8 (P=0.021) and a trend at endpoint (P=0.075) were observed. Functioning improvements were comparable between treatment arms. No new safety signals were identified. The observed time to relapse superiority of paliperidone palmitate over oral antipsychotics provides further evidence for the value of long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapies in the treatment of schizophrenia, including during the early stages of illness. Copyright © 2015 Janssen Pharmaceutica NV. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication

    OpenAIRE

    van der Schans, J.; Vardar, S.; ?i?ek, R.; Bos, H. J.; Hoekstra, P. J.; de Vries, T. W.; Hak, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using the University Groningen pharmacy database linked to academic achievement scores at the end of primary school (Dutch Cito-test) obtained from Statistics Ne...

  6. Atypical antipsychotic therapy in Parkinson's disease psychosis: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Mei; Sperry, Laura; Malhado?Chang, Norika; Duffy, Alexandra; Wheelock, Vicki; Farias, Sarah; O'Connor, Kevin; Olichney, John; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP) is a frequent complication of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) with significant impact on quality of life and association with poorer outcomes. Atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are often used for the treatment of PDP; however, their use is often complicated by adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this study, we present patients with PDP who were treated with the most commonly used atypical antipsychotic agents and review their respect...

  7. Metabolic Signature of Antipsychotics used in the Treatment of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    obsessive-4 compulsive and eating disorders [8]. Conventional antipsychotics, e.g., chloropromazine, haloperidol 5 and perphenazine, act primarily as...group. 11 Extrapyramidal Side Effects : movement disorders such as akinesia (decreased voluntary movement), 12 pseudoparkinsonism and akathisia...Endocrine manifestations of eating disorders . J.Clin.Endocrinol.Metab 96, 333-343 60. Jin,H. et al. (2008) Impact of atypical antipsychotic therapy on

  8. Obstetric and Neonatal Outcomes After Antipsychotic Medication Exposure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Catherine G.; Blackwell, Katherine A.; Bartley, Christine; Hay, Madeleine; Yonkers, Kimberly A.; Bloch, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antipsychotic medications are used by increasing numbers of women of reproductive age. The safety of these medications during pregnancy has not been well-described. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of the adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes associated with exposure to antipsychotics during pregnancy. Data Sources PubMed, Reprotox, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify potential studies for inclusion. Methods of Study Selection Case-control or cohort studies estimating adverse birth outcomes associated with antipsychotic exposure during pregnancy were included. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were used for dichotomous outcomes and weighted mean differences (WMD) were used for infant birth weight and gestational age. Thirteen cohort studies, including 6,289 antipsychotic-exposed and 1,618,039 unexposed pregnancies were included. Tabulation, Integration, and Results Antipsychotic exposure was associated with an increased risk of major malformations (Absolute Risk Difference = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00 – 0.05, p=0.04, Z = 2.06), heart defects (Absolute Risk Difference =0.01, 95% CI 0.00 – 0.01, pantipsychotic medications. Antipsychotic exposure was not associated with risk of large for gestational age births, stillbirth, and spontaneous abortion. Although antipsychotic exposure during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes, this association does not necessarily imply causation. This analysis was limited by the small number of included studies and limited adjustment in studies for possible confounders. Conclusion Women requiring antipsychotic treatment during pregnancy appear at higher risk of adverse birth outcomes, regardless of causation, and may benefit from close monitoring and minimization of other potential risk factors during pregnancy. PMID:25932852

  9. Peripheral Amino Acid Levels in Schizophrenia and Antipsychotic Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Emanuela; Messina, Giovanni; Viggiano, Alessandro; Borlido, Carol; Viggiano, Andrea; Monda, Marcellino

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal levels of amino acids have been reported in patients with schizophrenia and have also been investigated as a biomarker to monitor antipsychotic treatment, however results have been inconsistent. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the evidence in the literature of whether amino acid levels can be a biomarker and predict the treatment outcome in schizophrenia. The current review does not support amino acid concentration as a useful biomarker for monitoring antipsychotic ...

  10. ANTIPSYCHOTIC TREATMENT - SIDE-EFFECT AND/OR METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ružić, Klementina; Grahovac, Tanja; Žarković Palijan, Tija; Petranović, Duška; Šepić-Grahovac, Dubravka

    2011-01-01

    According to current medical opinion chronic mental diseases such as schizophrenia require life-long treatment. The choice of antipsychotics is an important treatment factor, since their side-effects often influence patients' compliance with treatment. Severe side-effects may cause the patients to reject such treatment, the latter being their right. In case a psychiatrist does not agree with the patient's decision to interrupt his antipsychotic treatment regardless its serious side-e...

  11. Propensity score estimation to address calendar time-specific channeling in comparative effectiveness research of second generation antipsychotics.

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    Stacie B Dusetzina

    Full Text Available Channeling occurs when a medication and its potential comparators are selectively prescribed based on differences in underlying patient characteristics. Drug safety advisories can provide new information regarding the relative safety or effectiveness of a drug product which might increase selective prescribing. In particular, when reported adverse effects vary among drugs within a therapeutic class, clinicians may channel patients toward or away from a drug based on the patient's underlying risk for an adverse outcome. If channeling is not identified and appropriately managed it might lead to confounding in observational comparative effectiveness studies.To demonstrate channeling among new users of second generation antipsychotics following a Food and Drug Administration safety advisory and to evaluate the impact of channeling on cardiovascular risk estimates over time.Florida Medicaid data from 2001-2006.Retrospective cohort of adults initiating second generation antipsychotics. We used propensity scores to match olanzapine initiators with other second generation antipsychotic initiators. To evaluate channeling away from olanzapine following an FDA safety advisory, we estimated calendar time-specific propensity scores. We compare the performance of these calendar time-specific propensity scores with conventionally-estimated propensity scores on estimates of cardiovascular risk.Increased channeling away from olanzapine was evident for some, but not all, cardiovascular risk factors and corresponded with the timing of the FDA advisory. Covariate balance was optimized within period and across all periods when using the calendar time-specific propensity score. Hazard ratio estimates for cardiovascular outcomes did not differ across models (Conventional PS: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.81-3.18 versus calendar time-specific PS: 0.93, 95%CI: 0.77-3.04.Changes in channeling over time was evident for several covariates but had limited impact on cardiovascular risk

  12. Permanent resident

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    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  13. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  14. Social context and health consequences of the antipsychotics introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Kenneth C

    2005-01-01

    From the vantage point of fifty years after the introduction of antipsychotics to clinical practice, this article examines the social context and health consequences of their introduction. Historical review of literature sources with commentary. The availability of antipsychotics over nearly half a century has powerfully influenced concepts of mental illness, dominant models of care versus control, health outcomes and side effect burdens. The large demand and economic success of antipsychotic medications is an important driver for research and development as well as sophistication in marketing. Regulatory agencies, funders and clinicians are faced with a moving target as indications for use of antipsychotics move well beyond the traditional core of schizophrenia and acute mania into depression, anxiety, behavioral disturbance with dementia and some forms of personality disturbance. The history of antipsychotics and mental illness is arguably being written as forcefully now, in an environment of rapid scientific change, as was the case in the 1960s era of rapid social change when chlorpromazine prompted a shift of emphasis from asylum to community. Psychosis is a challenge to how we interpret and approach our inner experiences and societal structures. Accordingly, it is not surprising that the history of antipsychotic drugs resonates with a lively interplay of social, health and economic issues and an ongoing quest to comprehend mental phenomena and their variants.

  15. Antipsychotic Prescriptions for Children Aged 5 Years or Younger

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    Ana Lòpez-De Fede

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antipsychotics in very young children is of concern given the lack of empirical evidence in their efficacy and long-term impact on children’s health. This study examined the prescription of antipsychotics among children aged ≤5 years enrolled in a state Medicaid program. Secondary data analysis was conducted using the Medicaid administrative data of a southeastern state. Using SAS 9.3, descriptive statistics were performed to examine socio-demographic characteristics, psychiatric diagnoses, off-label use, receipt of medications from multiple psychotropic drug classes, and receipt of non-pharmacologic psychiatric services among children aged ≤5 years who received antipsychotic prescriptions in calendar year (CY 2011. A total of 112 children in the target age group received antipsychotics in CY 2011, the most common prescription being risperidone. The most common listed psychiatric diagnosis was attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two in five children received antipsychotics for off-label use. Three in four children also received medications from at least one other psychotropic drug class. More than half did not receive adjunct psychiatric services. State-level policies offering specific guidance and recommendations for antipsychotic use among very young children are urgently needed. Future research is warranted to examine long-term impact of such practices on children’s growth and development.

  16. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuardi A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD, a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  17. Aripiprazole versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Priya; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; El-Sayeh, Hany George; Leucht, Stefan

    2013-02-28

    In most western industrialised countries, second generation (atypical) antipsychotics are recommended as first line drug treatments for people with schizophrenia. In this review we specifically examine how the efficacy and tolerability of one such agent - aripiprazole - differs from that of other comparable second generation antipsychotics. To evaluate the effects of aripiprazole compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2011), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information. We included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing aripiprazole (oral) with oral and parenteral forms of amisulpride, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. Where possible, we calculated illustrative comparative risks for primary outcomes. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. We assessed risk of bias for each included study. We included 12 trials involving 6389 patients. Aripiprazole was compared to olanzapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. All trials were sponsored by an interested drug manufacturer. The overall number of participants leaving studies early was 30% to 40%, limiting validity (no differences between groups).When compared with olanzapine no differences were apparent for global state (no clinically important change: n = 703, 1 RCT, RR short-term 1.00 95% CI 0.81 to 1.22; n = 317, 1 RCT, RR medium-term 1.08 95% CI 0.95 to 1.22) but mental state tended

  18. Quetiapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Schwarz, Sandra; Srisurapanont, Manit; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second generation (’atypical’) antipsychotic drugs have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. It is not clear how the effects of the various second generation antipsychotic drugs differ. Objectives To evaluate the effects of quetiapine compared with other second generation antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007), inspected references of all identified studies, and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies, drug approval agencies and authors of trials for additional information. Selection criteria We included all randomised control trials comparing oral quetiapine with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 21 randomised control trials (RCTs) with 4101 participants. These trials provided data on four comparisons - quetiapine versus clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone or ziprasidone. A major limitation to all findings is the high number of participants leaving studies prematurely (57.6%) and the substantial risk of biases in studies. Efficacy data favoured olanzapine and risperidone compared with quetiapine (PANSS total score versus olanzapine:10 RCTs, n=1449, WMD 3.66 CI 1.93 to 5.39; versus risperidone: 9 RCTs, n=1953, WMD 3.09 CI 1.01 to 5.16), but clinical meaning is unclear

  19. Zotepine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Selvizhi; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan; Komossa, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background In many parts of the world, particularly in industrialised countries, second generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs have become first line treatment for people suffering from schizophrenia. The question as to whether the effects of various second generation antipsychotic drugs differ is a matter of debate. Objectives To evaluate the effects of zotepine compared with other second generation antipsychotic drugs for people suffering from schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2009), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. Selection criteria We included only randomised clinical controlled trials that compared zotepine with any forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole or ziprasidone in people suffering from only schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses. Data collection and analysis SS and KK extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results We included three studies (total n=289; 2 RCTs zotepine vs clozapine; 1 RCT zotepine vs clozapine vs risperidone (at 4 mg, 8 mg doses) vs remoxipride. All studies were of limited methodological quality. When zotepine was compared with clozapine, it was clozapine that was found to be more effective in terms of global state (n=59, 1 RCT, RR No clinically significant response 8.23 CI 1.14 to 59.17). Mental state scores also favoured clozapine (n=59, 1 RCT, MD average score (BPRS total, high = poor) 6.00 CI 2.17 to 9.83) and there was less use of antiparkinson medication in the clozapine group (n=116, 2 RCTs, RR 20.96 CI 2.89 to 151.90). In the

  20. Dilemma of prescribing aripiprazole under the Taiwan health insurance program: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Chien Hsu,1,2 Yu-Ching Chou,3 Hsin-An Chang,1,2,4 Yu-Chen Kao,1,2,5 San-Yuan Huang,1,2 Nian-Sheng Tzeng1,2,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2School of Medicine, 3School of Public Health, 4Student Counseling Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Song-Shan Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Objectives: Refractory major depressive disorder (MDD is a serious problem leading to a heavy economic burden. Antipsychotic augmentation treatment with aripiprazole and quetiapine is approved for MDD patients and can achieve a high remission rate. This study aimed to examine how psychiatrists in Taiwan choose medications and how that choice is influenced by health insurance payments and administrative policy.Design: Descriptive study.Outcome measures: Eight questions about the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason to choose aripiprazole.Intervention: We designed an augmentation strategy questionnaire for psychiatrists whose patients had a poor response to antidepressants, and handed it out during the annual meeting of the Taiwanese Society of Psychiatry in October 2012. It included eight questions addressing the choice of treatment strategy and atypical antipsychotics, and the reason whether or not to choose aripiprazole as the augmentation antipsychotic.Results: Choosing antipsychotic augmentation therapy or switching to other antidepressant strategies for MDD patients with an inadequate response to antidepressants was common with a similar probability (76.1% vs 76.4%. The most frequently used antipsychotics were aripiprazole and quetiapine, however a substantial number of psychiatrists chose olanzapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The major reason for not choosing aripiprazole was cost (52.1%, followed by insurance official policy audit and deletion in the claims review system (30.1%.Conclusion: The prescribing

  1. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics.

  2. Prescribed burning weather in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney W. Sando

    1969-01-01

    Describes the weather patterns in northern Minnesota as related to prescribed burning. The prevailing wind direction, average wind speed, most persistent wind direction, and average Buildup Index are considered in making recommendations.

  3. Neurological Adverse Effects of Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Amador, Margarita; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Moreno, Carmen; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Alda, José A; Muñoz, Daniel; Andrés Nestares, Patricia; Cantarero, Carmen Martínez; Arango, Celso

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate demographic, clinical, and treatment factors that may impact on neurological adverse effects in naive and quasi-naive children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. This was a 1-year, multicenter, observational study of a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population receiving antipsychotic treatment. Two subanalyses were run using the subsample of subjects taking the 3 most used antipsychotics and the subsample of antipsychotic-naive subjects. Total dyskinesia score (DyskinesiaS) and total Parkinson score (ParkinsonS) were calculated from the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center Involuntary Movement Scale, total UKU-Cognition score was calculated from the UKU Side Effect Rating Scale. Risk factors for tardive dyskinesias (TDs) defined after Schooler-Kaine criteria were studied using a logistic regression. Two hundred sixty-five subjects (mean age, 14.4 [SD, 2.9] years) with different Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I disorders were recruited. DyskinesiaS (P < 0.001) and ParkinsonS (P < 0.001) increased at 1-year follow-up. Risperidone was associated with higher increases in DyskinesiaS compared with quetiapine (P < 0.001). Higher increases in ParkinsonS were found with risperidone (P < 0.001) and olanzapine (P = 0.02) compared with quetiapine. Total UKU-Cognition Score decreased at follow-up. Findings were also significant when analyzing antipsychotic-naive subjects. Fifteen subjects (5.8%) fulfilled Schooler-Kane criteria for TD at follow-up. Younger age, history of psychotic symptoms, and higher cumulative exposure time were associated with TD at follow-up. Antipsychotics increased neurological adverse effects in a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population and should be carefully monitored. Risperidone presented higher scores in symptoms of dyskinesia and parkinsonism. Quetiapine was the antipsychotic with less neurological adverse effects. Younger subjects, psychosis, and

  4. Unresolved Issues for Utilization of Atypical Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Jeon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics (AAP are the prevailing form of schizophrenia treatment today due to their low side effects and superior efficacy. Nevertheless, some issues still need to be addressed. First, there are still a large number of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS, which has led to a growing trend to resort to AAP polypharmacy with few side effects. Most clinical treatment guidelines recommend clozapine monotherapy in TRS, but around one third of schizophrenic patients fail to respond to clozapine. For these patients, with clozapine-resistant schizophrenia AAP polypharmacy is a common strategy with a continually growing evidence base. Second, AAP generally have great risks for developing metabolic syndrome, such as weight gain, abnormality in glucose, and lipid metabolism. These metabolic side effects have become huge stumbling blocks in today’s schizophrenia treatment that aims to improve patients’ quality of life as well as symptoms. The exact reasons why this particular syndrome occurs in patients treated with AAP is as yet unclear though factors such as interaction of AAP with neurotransmitter receptors, genetic pholymorphisms, type of AAPs, length of AAP use, and life style of schizophrenic patients that may contribute to its development. The present article aimed to review the evidence underlying these key issues and provide the most reasonable interpretations to expand the overall scope of antipsychotics usage.

  5. A comparison of psychotropic medication prescribing patterns in East of England prisons and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Lamiece; Senior, Jane; Frisher, Martin; Edge, Dawn; Shaw, Jenny

    2014-04-01

    While the prevalence of mental illness is higher in prisons than in the community, less is known about comparative rates of psychotropic medicine prescribing. This is the first study in a decade to determine the prevalence and patterns of psychotropic medication prescribing in prisons. It is also the first study to comprehensively adjust for age when making comparisons with the general population. Four East of England prisons, housing a total of 2222 men and 341 women were recruited to the study. On census days, clinical records were used to identify and collect data on all prisoners with current, valid prescriptions for hypnotic, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antimanic, antidepressant and/or stimulant medication, as listed in chapters 4.1 to 4.4 of the British National Formulary. Data on 280,168 patients were obtained for comparison purposes from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. After adjusting for age, rates of psychotropic prescribing in prison were 5.5 and 5.9 times higher than in community-based men and women, respectively. We also found marked differences in the individual psychotropic drugs prescribed in prison and community settings. Further work is necessary to determine whether psychotropic prescribing patterns in prison reflect an appropriate balance between managing mental illness, physical health risks and medication misuse.

  6. The antipsychotic olanzapine interacts with the gut microbiome to cause weight gain in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Morgan

    Full Text Available The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine is effective in reducing psychotic symptoms but can cause extreme weight gain in human patients. We investigated the role of the gut microbiota in this adverse drug effect using a mouse model. First, we used germ-free C57BL/6J mice to demonstrate that gut bacteria are necessary and sufficient for weight gain caused by oral delivery of olanzapine. Second, we surveyed fecal microbiota before, during, and after treatment and found that olanzapine potentiated a shift towards an "obesogenic" bacterial profile. Finally, we demonstrated that olanzapine has antimicrobial activity in vitro against resident enteric bacterial strains. These results collectively provide strong evidence for a mechanism underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain in mouse and a hypothesis for clinical translation in human patients.

  7. A pilot randomised controlled trial of community-led ANtipsychotic Drug REduction for Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Rachel; Randell, Elizabeth; Gillespie, David; Wood, Fiona; Felce, David; Romeo, Renee; Angel, Lianna; Espinasse, Aude; Hood, Kerry; Davies, Amy; Meek, Andrea; Addison, Katy; Jones, Glyn; Deslandes, Paul; Allen, David; Knapp, Martin; Thapar, Ajay; Kerr, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Data suggest that approximately 50,000 adults with learning disabilities (LDs) in England and Wales are currently prescribed antipsychotic medication. Illness in this population is common, including significant rates of challenging behaviour and mental illness, but there is particular concern over the use of antipsychotics prescribed for reasons other than the treatment of psychosis. Control of challenging behaviour is the primary reason why such medications are prescribed despite the absence of good evidence for any therapeutic effect for this purpose. To assess the feasibility of recruitment and retention and to explore non-efficacy-based barriers to a blinded antipsychotic medication withdrawal programme for adults with LDs without psychosis compared with treatment as usual. A secondary objective was to compare trial arms regarding clinical outcomes. A two-arm individually randomised double-blind placebo-controlled drug reduction trial. Recruitment was through community learning disability teams (CLDTs) in south Wales and south-west England. Adults with LDs who are prescribed risperidone for treatment of challenging behaviour with no known current psychosis or previous recurrence of psychosis following prior drug reduction. A double-blind drug reduction programme leading to full withdrawal within 6 months. Treatment in the intervention group was gradually reduced over a 6-month period and then maintained at the same level for a further 3 months, still under blind conditions. In the control group, the baseline level of medication was maintained throughout the 9-month period. The blind was broken at 9 months, following final data collection. Feasibility outcomes were (1) the number and proportion of general practices/CLDTs that progressed from initial approach to recruitment of participants and (2) the number and proportion of recruited participants who progressed through the various stages of the study. Trial arms were also compared regarding clinical outcomes

  8. Can antipsychotics improve social cognition in patients with schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna; Mortimer, Ann

    2013-05-01

    Social cognition is described as the higher mental processes that are engaged while people store, process, and use social information to make sense of themselves and others. Aspects of social cognition include emotion perception, social cue interpretation, attribution style, and theory of mind, all of which appear disordered in schizophrenia. Such social cognitive deficits are believed to be important predictors of functional outcome in schizophrenia, therefore they may represent a crucial treatment target. Few studies have evaluated the influence of antipsychotic treatment on these deficits. The purpose of this review is to examine the relationship between antipsychotic treatment and social cognition, whether antipsychotics improve social cognitive function, and if so to explore differential medication effects. Comprehensive searches of PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PUBMED were conducted to identify relevant published manuscripts. Fifteen relevant papers published in English were found, describing original studies. On the basis of this review, we have drawn the following conclusions: first, the results do not engender optimism for the possibility that antipsychotic drugs can specifically facilitate social recovery. Second, the actions of antipsychotics on social cognition are inconclusive, due to lack of standardization across research groups, leading to inconsistencies between study designs, methods used, and medication dosages. Third, large-scale longitudinal investigations are needed to explore the unclear relationships between social cognition, symptoms, and functional outcome. Other non-pharmacological treatments focusing on training patients in the social cognitive areas may hold more promise.

  9. Risk of venous thromboembolism during treatment with antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masopust, Jiří; Malý, Radovan; Vališ, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The evidence to date on the relation between the risk of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) and antipsychotic agents derives primarily from observational and case history studies. While an increased risk of VTE has been associated with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic agents, particularly clozapine, there appears to be a growing number of reports on the occurrence of this adverse reaction during the use of second-generation antipsychotics, such as risperidone and olanzapine. The highest risk of pathological blood clotting emerges during the first 3 months after initiation of treatment with the product. Potential etiopathogenetic factors leading to VTE during treatment with antipsychotic agents include sedation, obesity, elevation of antiphospholipid antibodies, increased platelet activation and aggregation, hyperhomocysteinemia, and hyperprolactinemia. Diagnoses of schizophrenia and/or bipolar affective disorder, as well as hospitalization or stress with sympathetic activation and elevation of catecholamine levels, have been reported as known prothrombogenic factors. The present article contains the new version of the guideline for the prevention of VTE in psychiatric patients with limited mobility. Further prospective studies are necessary to elucidate the biological mechanisms of the relations between antipsychotic agents and VTE. © 2012 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2012 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  10. Antipsychotic medication and prefrontal cortex activation : A review of neuroimaging findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith J.; Knegtering, Henderikus; Klein, Hans C.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Aleman, Andre

    Decreased prefrontal activation (hypofrontality) in schizophrenia is thought to underlie negative symptoms and cognitive impairments, and may contribute to poor social outcome. Hypofrontality does not always improve during treatment with antipsychotics. We hypothesized that antipsychotics, which

  11. Consumers' questions about antipsychotic medication : revealing safety concerns and the silent voices of young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersink, Rianne A; Taxis, Katja; McGuire, Treasure M; van Driel, Mieke L

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about consumer information needs regarding antipsychotic medicines. Medicines call centre (MCC)-derived data are underutilised; and could provide insight into issues of importance to consumers. This study aimed to explore consumers' information needs about antipsychotic

  12. Association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and antipsychotic drug-induced hyperprolactinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, L.M.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Ivanova, S.A.; Freidin, M.B.; Cohen, D.; Boiko, A.S.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Touw, D.J.; Semke, A.V.; Wilffert, B.; Bokhan, N.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Regular therapy for schizophrenia includes main tenance antipsychotic treatment. Unfortunately, antipsychotics also have a spectrum of side effects, including metabolic, endocrine, cardiovascular, and movement disorders. One of the common side effects of these drugs is hyperprolactinemia

  13. Association between P-glycoprotein polymorphisms and antipsychotic drug-induced hyperprolactinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geers, Lisanne; Pozhidaev, Ivan V; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Cohen, Dan; Boiko, Anastasia S; Osmanova, Diana Z; Fedorenko, Olga Yu; Touw, Daniël; Semke, Arkadiy V.; Wilffert, Berend; Bokhan, Nikolay A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Regular therapy for schizophrenia includes maintenance antipsychotic treatment. Unfortunately, antipsychotics also have a spectrum of side effects, including metabolic, endocrine, cardiovascular, and movement disorders. One of the common side effects of these drugs is hyperprolactinemia

  14. Antibiotic prescribing in primary care by international medical graduates and graduates from Swedish medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, Thomas; Brudin, Lars; Mölstad, Sigvard

    2015-06-01

    Studies of antibiotic prescribing related to diagnosis comparing prescribers trained abroad with those trained in Sweden are lacking. To determine whether general practices (GPs) and GP residents trained abroad had different prescribing patterns for antibiotics for common infections than those trained in Sweden using retrospective data from electronic patient records from primary health care in Kalmar County, Sweden. Consultations with an infection diagnosis, both with and without the prescription of antibiotics to 67 GPs and residents trained in Western Europe outside Sweden and other countries, were compared with a matched control group trained in Sweden. For 1 year, 44101 consultations of patients with an infection diagnosis and 16276 prescriptions of antibiotics were registered. Foreign-trained physicians had 20% more visits compared with physicians trained in Sweden. The prescription of antibiotics per visit and physician in the respective groups, and independent of diagnosis, did not significantly differ between groups, when scaled down from number of consultations to number of prescribing physicians. There were minor and non-significant differences in antibiotic prescribing comparing GPs and residents trained abroad and in Sweden, most likely the result of an adaptation to Swedish conditions. Nevertheless, no group prescribed antibiotics in accordance to national guidelines. The results suggest that interventions are needed to reduce irrational antibiotic prescribing patterns, targeting all physicians working in Swedish primary health care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antipsychotic drugs rapidly induce dopamine neuron depolarization block in a developmental rat model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, Ornella; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Gill, Kathryn M.; Grace, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated administration of antipsychotic drugs to normal rats has been shown to induce a state of dopamine neuron inactivation known as depolarization block, which correlates with the ability of the drugs to exhibit antipsychotic efficacy and extrapyramidal side-effects in schizophrenia patients. Nonetheless, in normal rats depolarization block requires weeks of antipsychotic drug administration, whereas schizophrenia patients exhibit initial effects soon after initiating antipsychotic drug t...

  16. ELECTORAL PRESCRIBERS. WHO ARE THEY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is an extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decides becomes a central concern. Prescribers, supposed to have a big influence on the electoral market, are a component of the microenvironment political organizations. These are people who occupy important positions that can influence the behavior of others. In the political environment, prescribers are known under the name of "opinion formers", "opinion leaders", "mediators" (Beciu, 2009 or "influencers" (Keller and Berry, 2003 Weimann, 1994. This paper aims to review the central opinions on what is the influence prescribers, opinion makers on voting behavior, voting and decisions on whether and how they act?

  17. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how......) and the Danish Microbiology Database (performed microbiological testing). We will assess and quantify the use of microbiological testing prior to antibiotic prescription. Furthermore we will investigate associations between GP characteristics, use of microbiological investigations and description patterns...

  18. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with

  19. Spanish consensus on the risks and detection of antipsychotic drug-related hyperprolactinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Ángel L; Arango, Celso; Bernardo, Miguel; Carrasco, José L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Cruz, Juan J; Del Pino, Javier; García Escudero, Miguel A; García Rizo, Clemente; González-Pinto, Ana; Hernández, Ana I; Martín Carrasco, Manuel; Mayoral Cleries, Fermin; Mayoral van Son, Jaqueline; Mories, M Teresa; Pachiarotti, Isabella; Ros, Salvador; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic hyperprolactinaemia (IHPRL) has been more frequently related to some antipsychotic drugs that provoke an intense blockade of dopamine D2 receptors. There is a wide variation in clinical practice, and perhaps some more awareness between clinicians is needed. Due to the high frequency of chronic treatment in severe mental patients, careful attention is recommended on the physical risk. IHPRL symptoms could be underestimated without routine examination. An intense scientific literature search was performed in order to draw up a multidisciplinary consensus, including different specialists of psychiatry, endocrinology, oncology and internal medicine, and looking for a consensus about clinical risk and detection of IHPRL following evidence-based medicine criteria levels (EBM I- IV). Short-term symptoms include amenorrhea, galactorrhoea, and sexual dysfunction with decrease of libido and erectile difficulties related to hypogonadism. Medium and long-term symptoms related to oestrogens are observed, including a decrease bone mass density, hypogonadism, early menopause, some types of cancer risk increase (breast and endometrial), cardiovascular risk increase, immune system disorders, lipids, and cognitive dysfunction. Prolactin level, gonadal hormones and vitamin D should be checked in all patients receiving antipsychotics at baseline although early symptoms (amenorrhea-galactorrhoea) may not be observed due to the risk of underestimating other delayed symptoms that may appear in the medium term. Routine examination of sexual dysfunction is recommended due to possible poor patient tolerance and low compliance. Special care is required in children and adolescents, as well as patients with PRL levels >50ng/ml (moderate hyperprolactinaemia). A possible prolactinoma should be investigated in patients with PRL levels >150ng/ml, with special attention to patients with breast/endometrial cancer history. Densitometry should be prescribed for males >50 years old

  20. Diabetic ketoacidosis associated with antipsychotic drugs: case reports and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Antonia; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Baretic, Maja; Osvatic, Martina Matovinovic

    2017-06-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation linked to the use of SGAs. The aims of this article are to present patients with a history of psychotic disorders and of severe metabolic diabetic ketoacidosis, possibly associated with the use of antipsychotics, and to review the current literature on the topic of antipsychotic-induced DKA. PubMed/Medline and EBSCO databases were searched using the keywords: diabetic ketoacidosis, antipsychotics, atypical antipsychotics, second generation antipsychotics, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, paliperidone, amisulpride and haloperidol. Case reports, case series and reviews of case series were included in the review. The majority of patients who developed DKA following treatment with antipsychotics were treated with olanzapine and clozapine in monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics. DKA mostly occurred in the first six months of antipsychotic treatment. Other risk factors included insulin resistance prior to antipsychotic treatment, male gender and middle age. Clinicians should consider the risk of DKA when starting treatment with SGAs. Preventive measures for patients with psychotic disorders using antipsychotics should include regular assessment of risk factors and screening for diabetes before and after administering antipsychotics, especially in the first months of treatment. Whenever possible, polypharmacy should be avoided.

  1. Psychologists' right to prescribe – should prescribing privileges be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current changes in legislation regarding prescription rights increase the possibility of non-medical practitioners being authorised to presctibe medication. There has been ongoing debate about granting psychologists in South Africa a limited right to prescribe (RTP) psychotropic medication. The main reasons advanced for ...

  2. An explorative study of school performance and antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schans, J; Vardar, S; Çiçek, R; Bos, H J; Hoekstra, P J; de Vries, T W; Hak, E

    2016-09-21

    Antipsychotic therapy can reduce severe symptoms of psychiatric disorders, however, data on school performance among children on such treatment are lacking. The objective was to explore school performance among children using antipsychotic drugs at the end of primary education. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the University Groningen pharmacy database linked to academic achievement scores at the end of primary school (Dutch Cito-test) obtained from Statistics Netherlands. Mean Cito-test scores and standard deviations were obtained for children on antipsychotic therapy and reference children, and statistically compared using analyses of covariance. In addition, differences in subgroups as boys versus girls, ethnicity, household income, and late starters (start date within 12 months of the Cito-test) versus early starters (start date > 12 months before the Cito-test) were tested. In all, data from 7994 children could be linked to Cito-test scores. At the time of the Cito-test, 45 (0.6 %) were on treatment with antipsychotics. Children using antipsychotics scored on average 3.6 points lower than the reference peer group (534.5 ± 9.5). Scores were different across gender and levels of household income (p starters were significantly higher than starters within 12 months (533.7 ± 1.7 vs. 524.1 ± 2.6). This first exploration showed that children on antipsychotic treatment have lower school performance compared to the reference peer group at the end of primary school. This was most noticeable for girls, but early starters were less affected than later starters. Due to the observational cross-sectional nature of this study, no causality can be inferred, but the results indicate that school performance should be closely monitored and causes of underperformance despite treatment warrants more research.

  3. [Antipsychotic Treatment of the Adult Patient in the Acute Phase of Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; de la Hoz, Ana María; Arenas, Álvaro; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    drug with more risk of abandoning due to adverse effects, followed by clozapine. Amisulpride, haloperidol and ziprasidone had favourable results as regards weight increase in several comparisons. Aripiprazole and paliperidone obtained a higher number of favourable results as regards sedation, and all the atypical drugs (except paliperidone) had a lower risk than the use of anti-parkinsonian drugs. Of the evidence from observational studies, it was found that, in subjects with risk factors for diabetes, such as age, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, the initial treatment and current treatment with olanzapine, as well as current treatment with clozapine, may promote the development of this disease. Although it is imperative to prescribe an antipsychotic for treatment of the acute phase, the selection of the drug depends on the particular clinical condition of each patient and their collateral effects profile. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  5. THE ROLE OF ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC DECREASING AGGRESIVENESS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvita Novia Anggraini Maria

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatry disorder accompanying by alteration of mind-set, perception,  thought, and behavior. Symptom of schizophrenia can be positive symptom and negative symptom. The positive symptom often became a fear for the others, that is aggresiveness as violance, suicide, ang homicide. Aggresiveness divided in five category, that is impulsivity, affective instability, anxiety/hyperarousal, cognitive disorganization, predatory/planned aggression. Pharmacology theraphy is a choice in decreasing aggresiveness in schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotic theraphy indicate higher effectivity and fewer side effect than conventional antipsychotic.

  6. Can authorities appreciably enhance the prescribing of oral generic risperidone to conserve resources? Findings from across Europe and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Generic atypical antipsychotic drugs offer health authorities opportunities for considerable savings. However, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are complex diseases that require tailored treatments. Consequently, generally there have been limited demand-side measures by health authorities to encourage the preferential prescribing of generics. This is unlike the situation with hypertension, hypercholaesterolaemia or acid-related stomach disorders. The objectives of this study were to compare the effect of the limited demand-side measures in Western European countries and regions on the subsequent prescribing of risperidone following generics; to utilise the findings to provide future guidance to health authorities; and where possible, to investigate the utilisation of generic versus originator risperidone and the prices for generic risperidone. Methods Principally, this was a segmented regression analysis of retrospective time-series data of the effect of the various initiatives in Belgium, Ireland, Scotland and Sweden following the introduction of generic risperidone. The study included patients prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic drug up to 20 months before and up to 20 months after generic risperidone. In addition, retrospective observational studies were carried out in Austria and Spain (Catalonia) from 2005 to 2011 as well as one English primary care organisation (Bury Primary Care Trust (PCT)). Results There was a consistent steady reduction in risperidone as a percentage of total selected atypical antipsychotic utilisation following generics. A similar pattern was seen in Austria and Spain, with stable utilisation in one English PCT. However, there was considerable variation in the utilisation of generic risperidone, ranging from 98% of total risperidone in Scotland to only 14% in Ireland. Similarly, the price of generic risperidone varied considerably. In Scotland, generic risperidone was only 16% of pre-patent loss prices versus 72

  7. Can authorities appreciably enhance the prescribing of oral generic risperidone to conserve resources? Findings from across Europe and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godman, Brian; Petzold, Max; Bennett, Kathleen; Bennie, Marion; Bucsics, Anna; Finlayson, Alexander E; Martin, Andrew; Persson, Marie; Piessnegger, Jutta; Raschi, Emanuel; Simoens, Steven; Zara, Corinne; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-06-13

    Generic atypical antipsychotic drugs offer health authorities opportunities for considerable savings. However, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are complex diseases that require tailored treatments. Consequently, generally there have been limited demand-side measures by health authorities to encourage the preferential prescribing of generics. This is unlike the situation with hypertension, hypercholaesterolaemia or acid-related stomach disorders.The objectives of this study were to compare the effect of the limited demand-side measures in Western European countries and regions on the subsequent prescribing of risperidone following generics; to utilise the findings to provide future guidance to health authorities; and where possible, to investigate the utilisation of generic versus originator risperidone and the prices for generic risperidone. Principally, this was a segmented regression analysis of retrospective time-series data of the effect of the various initiatives in Belgium, Ireland, Scotland and Sweden following the introduction of generic risperidone. The study included patients prescribed at least one atypical antipsychotic drug up to 20 months before and up to 20 months after generic risperidone. In addition, retrospective observational studies were carried out in Austria and Spain (Catalonia) from 2005 to 2011 as well as one English primary care organisation (Bury Primary Care Trust (PCT)). There was a consistent steady reduction in risperidone as a percentage of total selected atypical antipsychotic utilisation following generics. A similar pattern was seen in Austria and Spain, with stable utilisation in one English PCT. However, there was considerable variation in the utilisation of generic risperidone, ranging from 98% of total risperidone in Scotland to only 14% in Ireland. Similarly, the price of generic risperidone varied considerably. In Scotland, generic risperidone was only 16% of pre-patent loss prices versus 72% in Ireland. Consistent

  8. Automation bias in electronic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, David; Magrabi, Farah; Raban, Magdalena Z; Pont, L G; Baysari, Melissa T; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-03-16

    Clinical decision support (CDS) in e-prescribing can improve safety by alerting potential errors, but introduces new sources of risk. Automation bias (AB) occurs when users over-rely on CDS, reducing vigilance in information seeking and processing. Evidence of AB has been found in other clinical tasks, but has not yet been tested with e-prescribing. This study tests for the presence of AB in e-prescribing and the impact of task complexity and interruptions on AB. One hundred and twenty students in the final two years of a medical degree prescribed medicines for nine clinical scenarios using a simulated e-prescribing system. Quality of CDS (correct, incorrect and no CDS) and task complexity (low, low + interruption and high) were varied between conditions. Omission errors (failure to detect prescribing errors) and commission errors (acceptance of false positive alerts) were measured. Compared to scenarios with no CDS, correct CDS reduced omission errors by 38.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 46.6% (p < .0001, n = 70), and 39.2% (p < .0001, n = 120) for low, low + interrupt and high complexity scenarios respectively. Incorrect CDS increased omission errors by 33.3% (p < .0001, n = 120), 24.5% (p < .009, n = 82), and 26.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Participants made commission errors, 65.8% (p < .0001, n = 120), 53.5% (p < .0001, n = 82), and 51.7% (p < .0001, n = 120). Task complexity and interruptions had no impact on AB. This study found evidence of AB omission and commission errors in e-prescribing. Verification of CDS alerts is key to avoiding AB errors. However, interventions focused on this have had limited success to date. Clinicians should remain vigilant to the risks of CDS failures and verify CDS.

  9. Peers experience of delivering a problem-solving programme to enhance antipsychotic medication adherence for individuals with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, G; Kerr, D; McCann, T

    2015-08-01

    No research has been conducted into the experience of peer support in improving adherence with oral antipsychotic medication for consumers with schizophrenia. Altruism influences peers to participate in peer support. Engagement in peer support can be challenging and rewarding for peers, and helps improve their own confidence and well-being. Many consumers with schizophrenia are reluctant to take their prescribed antipsychotic medications; however, non-adherence can lead to relapse. The aim of this study was to evaluate peers' perspectives of their participation in a problem-solving peer support programme to enhance adherence in consumers who are reluctant to take antipsychotic medication. Peers contacted consumers by a weekly telephone call for 8 weeks, and used a problem-solving approach to inform their discussion about medication adherence. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were used to evaluate peers' perspectives of their involvement in the programme. Three main themes were abstracted from the data: motivation to participate in the study, experience of peer support programme, and rewards and challenges of the peer experience. Helping others was an important motivator for peers in agreeing to participate in the study. Telephone delivery was a convenient way to deliver the peer support programme. However, at times, it was difficult to contact consumers by telephone and this caused some frustration. Despite these difficulties, peers recognized that being involved in the programme increased their confidence and made them feel worthwhile. The findings have implications for the use of peer support as an adjunct intervention to promote medication adherence in consumers with schizophrenia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  11. Prescribing practices in hospice patients with adult failure to thrive or debility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Leah; Holmes, Holly M; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2014-04-01

    Despite being a common admitting diagnosis, there is very little published literature on medication management in hospice patients admitted with a diagnosis of failure to thrive or debility. The purpose of this study was to describe medication prescribing practices in hospice patients with either of these primary diagnoses by characterizing prescribed medications by name and by pharmaceutical class, and determining whether the patient or the hospice organization provided each medication. A retrospective review of a patient information database compiled by a national hospice organization was conducted. Patients were included in this retrospective study if they were admitted to hospice care with a primary diagnosis of failure to thrive or debility, and if they were admitted on or after 1 January 2010, and discharged by death on or before 31 December 2010. Overall 293 patients and 6181 medication entries were evaluated. The most commonly prescribed drugs were acetaminophen, lorazepam, morphine, atropine, prochlorperazine, haloperidol, docusate, aspirin, and bisacodyl. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological classes were opioid and non-opioid analgesics, anxiolytics, anticholinergics, antihypertensives, laxatives, antidepressants, and supplements. The hospice organization provided over 90% of prescriptions for analgesics, antipsychotics, anticholinergics, and anxiolytics, and these medications were discontinued before death in less than 5% of patients. Recognized clinical components of failure to thrive syndrome include cognitive impairment, malnutrition, and depression. The hospice organization provided 80% of antidepressants, but infrequently provided appetite stimulants and drugs treating dementia. The most commonly provided drugs were those used for symptoms associated with most end-stage diseases.

  12. Antidepressant prescribing patterns in the nursing home: second-generation issues revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shruti; Schoenbachler, Ben; Streim, Joel; Meeks, Suzanne

    2012-05-01

    The object of this study was to provide an updated evaluation of the quality of antidepressant management and prescribing patterns in nursing homes in the context of organizational and resident factors. Pearson correlation and chi-square analyses were conducted using information gathered from random nursing home charts. Nursing home facilities in and around the Louisville, KY, metropolitan area (n = 10). Chart reviews were randomly chosen for 20% of long term care resident records in participating homes (n = 209). Demographic information, documentation of depression diagnoses, and antidepressant prescribing patterns were evaluated using the Quality of Depression Management and Antidepressant Prescribing rating scale and information found in the Minimum Data Set 2.0. Of the sample, 59.8% was prescribed antidepressants at the time of the chart review; 205 chart reviews indicated the absence or presence of a depression diagnosis. For those with documented depression diagnoses (n = 126), nearly one-quarter were not prescribed antidepressants. Of 79 chart reviews indicating no depression diagnosis, nearly a third were receiving an antidepressant. Documentation related to changes in dosing, the presence or absence of side effects, or reasons for continuation were suboptimal. Discrepancy between antidepressant prescribing and the presence/absence of depression diagnoses continue to exist for nursing home residents. The quality of antidepressant documentation in nursing home charts continues to be inadequate. Future research should aim to explore possible solutions to these discrepancies and deficiencies in documentation. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quinoline- and isoquinoline-sulfonamide analogs of aripiprazole: novel antipsychotic agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Pawel; Partyka, Anna; Marciniec, Krzysztof; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Pawlowski, Maciej; Wesolowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of typical antipsychotics over six decades ago signaled an important milestone in psychiatry. However, second-generation antipsychotics ameliorated the positive symptoms of schizophrenia but displayed limited effectiveness for the negative and cognitive symptoms. In addition, while the newer antipsychotics produced fewer motor side effects, the atypical antipsychotics still induced weight gain and endocrinopathies. In recent years, a third generation of antipsychotics was identified. Aripiprazole was the first approved drug acting as a D2 partial agonist/functionally selective ligand. This review presents the state of the development of novel antipsychotic dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic agents, supported by an overview of the compounds evaluated under advanced preclinical and clinical development (e.g., cariprazine and brexpiprazole). In line with the recent trends in the development of modern atypical antipsychotics, we present our strategic development of long-chain arylpiperazine-derived quinoline- and isoquinoline-sulfonamide displaying a multireceptor binding profile and partial D2 receptor agonism.

  14. Antipsychotic drug use and community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Trifirò (Gianluca)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAntipsychotics are generally distinguished as atypical and typical agents, which are indicated in the treatment of acute and chronic psychoses and other psychiatric disorders. In April 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the increased risk of all-cause

  15. Prevalence of concurrent use of antipsychotic drugs and herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of herbal medicines with conventional medicines is on the rise. Therefore, drug-herb interactions have become an important issue in drug safety and efficacy in clinical practice. A cross-sectional prospective study using a structured questionnaire was carried out on patients using antipsychotic drugs attending the ...

  16. Prescription pattern and cost analysis of antipsychotics in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypicals, are very expensive and unaffordable to the majority of patients in the study setting. This indicates the need for measures to reduce cost of newer psychotropic drugs, to increase their availability and use for enhanced quality of life of mentally ill patients in Nigeria. Keywords; :prescription pattern, antipsychotics, ...

  17. Antipsychotic drug use and risk of pneumonia in elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, Wilma; Van Marum, Rob J.; Jansen, Paul A. F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between antipsychotic drug use and risk of pneumonia in elderly people. DESIGN: A nested case-control analysis. SETTING: Data were used from the PHARMO database, which collates information from community pharmacies and hospital discharge records.

  18. Imaging as tool to investigate psychoses and antipsychotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Jan; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2012-01-01

    The results of imaging studies have played an important role in the formulation of hypotheses regarding the etiology of psychosis and schizophrenia, as well as in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antipsychotics. Since this volume is primarily directed to molecular aspects of

  19. Seclusion and the use of antipsychotics in hospitalized psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolker, JJ; Hugenholtz, GWK; Heerdink, ER; Nijman, HLI; Leufkens, HGM; Nolen, WA

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the incidence of seclusion, identify possible determinants of seclusion and to gain insight into the use of antipsychotics before and after seclusion in acutely admitted patients. In The Netherlands, special treatment methods including seclusion and

  20. Corrected QT changes during antipsychotic treatment of children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Gjessing; Juul, Klaus; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    covering 9 antipsychotics and including 5,423 patients with QTc data (mean age = 12.8 ± 3.6 years, female = 32.1%). Treatments included aripiprazole: studies = 14; n = 814; haloperidol: studies = 1; n = 15; molindone: studies = 3; n = 125; olanzapine: studies = 5; n = 212; paliperidone: studies = 3; n...

  1. Antipsychotic Effect of the Leaves of Stachytarpheta Cayennensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antipsychotic effect of the extracts of the leaves of Stachytarpheta cayennensis was examined following ethnomedicinal claims for its use in the management of mental illness in Nigeria, Ghana and other tropical parts of the globe. The apomorphine and amphetamine-induced stereotyped behavior models were used in ...

  2. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  3. The Harms of Antipsychotic Drugs: Evidence from Key Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J; Furberg, Curt D

    2017-01-01

    This safety assessment provides a detailed analysis of key studies and focuses on the six most widely used antipsychotic drugs. Lines of evidence include mechanisms of action, short-term treatment of psychosis, relapse prevention, early intervention in schizophrenia, long-term comparisons between first- and second-generation agents, and flexible treatment algorithms. Despite the diversity of study settings, several common features were seen. All the agents obstruct normal signaling through widely dispersed dopamine D 2 receptors. Treatment failure or psychosis relapse was the most frequent outcome in most key studies, ranging from 38 to 93%. High discontinuation rates caused most trials to fail to demonstrate a substantial treatment benefit, or difference from an active comparator. Assessment of harm to the extrapyramidal motor system was confounded because of extensive neurological impairment from previous antipsychotic drug treatment measured at baseline, abrupt discontinuation effects, and high rates of concomitant medications to manage drug adverse effects. Claims that second-generation antipsychotic drugs have safety advantages over classical neuroleptic drugs and prevent relapse were not supported in these key studies. The extent of injury to and impairment of multiple body systems caused by antipsychotic drugs shows the need for a scientific, clinical, and regulatory reappraisal of the appropriate use of these agents.

  4. Antipsychotic effect of aqueous stem bark extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of antipsychotic efect of the aqueous stem bark extract of Amblygonocarpus andongensis was carried out on amphetamine induced psychosis in 42 Wister albino rats weighingbetween 105 and 3052g using two indices feeding and locomotor activity. Twelve out of the 42 rats were divided into two groups; six per ...

  5. Metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics in bipolar youth: comparison with other psychotic and nonpsychotic diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carmen; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Alvarez, Mar; Baeza, Inmaculada; Alda, Jose A; Martínez-Cantarero, Carmen; Parellada, Mara; Sánchez, Bernardo; de la Serna, Elena; Giráldez, Marisa; Arango, Celso

    2010-03-01

    Despite known metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) on children and adolescents, comparative effects in youth with different diagnoses remain underreported. We compared differences in metabolic changes three months after starting treatment with SGAs in youth with bipolar disorder and with other psychotic and nonpsychotic disorders. Weight and metabolic differences among diagnostic groups before and three months after starting treatment with SGAs were compared in a naturalistic cohort of children and adolescents (14.9 +/- 3.0 years) diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 31), other psychotic disorders (n = 29), and other nonpsychotic disorders (n = 30), with no (35.6%) or very little (6.6 +/- 9.0 days) previous exposure to antipsychotics. Composite measurements of significant weight gain [weight increase > or = 5% at three months or increase > or = 0.5 in body mass index (BMI) z-score] and 'risk for adverse health outcome' (> or = 95(th) BMI percentile, or > or = 85(th) BMI percentile plus presence of one other obesity-related complication) were included. SGAs (risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine) were prescribed in comparable proportion among groups. Baseline weight and metabolic indices were not significantly different among diagnoses. Three months after starting treatment with SGAs, more than 70% patients had significant weight gain, BMI z-score increased in all diagnostic groups (p or = 1 obesity-related complication at follow-up. There are early weight gain and metabolic changes across diagnoses in youth treated with SGAs.

  6. Influence of population and general practice characteristics on prescribing of minor tranquilisers in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner AC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of generalised anxiety disorders is widespread in Great Britain. Previous small-scale research has shown variations in minor tranquiliser prescribing, identifying several potential predictors of prescribing volume. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between general practice minor tranquiliser prescribing rates and practice population and general practice characteristics for all general practices in England.Methods: Multiple regression analysis of minor tranquiliser prescribing volumes during 2004/2005 for 8,291 English general practices with general practice and population variables obtained from the General Medical Services (GMS statistics, Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF, 2001 Census and 2004 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD. Results: The highest rates of minor tranquiliser prescribing were in areas with the greatest local deprivation while general practices situated in areas with larger proportions of residents of black ethnic origin had lower rates of prescribing. Other predictors of increased prescribing were general practices with older general practitioners and general practices with older registered practice populations.Conclusion: Our findings show that there is wide variation of minor tranquilisers prescribing across England which has implications regarding access to treatment and inequity of service provision. Future research should determine the barriers to equitable prescribing amongst general practices serving larger populations of black ethnic origin.

  7. Impact of a Metabolic Screening Bundle on Rates of Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Psychiatry Resident Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechers, Ilse R.; Viron, Mark; Stoklosa, Joseph; Freudenreich, Oliver; Henderson, David C.; Weiss, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although it is widely acknowledged that second-generation antipsychotics are associated with cardiometabolic side effects, rates of metabolic screening have remained low. The authors created a quality-improvement (QI) intervention in an academic medical center outpatient psychiatry resident clinic with the aim of improving rates of…

  8. Antipsychotic poisoning in young children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Balit, Corrine R; Kilham, Henry A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the spectrum and severity of effects of unintentional antipsychotic poisoning in children. A computerised literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005) and EMBASE (1980 to February 2005) was undertaken. The Internet was searched using URL: www.google.com. The proceedings of the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology (NACCT) and the European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists (EAPCCT) were hand searched. All cases of unintentional antipsychotic (all classes) poisoning in children aged 0-6 years were included. The data extracted included the age, weight, antipsychotic, dose, clinical effects, treatment and outcomes. The toxic dose was estimated as the lowest dose causing objective adverse effects.Sixty-eight reports were identified. Few contained all of the required information. Most of the case series included multiple antipsychotics with limited information on individual drugs or all ages with limited paediatric information. For most antipsychotics the ingestion of one tablet caused symptoms that were sometimes severe and usually lasted from 1 to 3 days. Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) were often delayed for up to 12-24 hours. Chlorpromazine caused CNS depression, hypotension and miosis; EPS and cardiac effects were rare, and the toxic dose was estimated to be 15 mg/kg. Haloperidol caused drowsiness (rarely coma) and over one-half of patients had neuromuscular effects (mainly EPS), with a toxic dose estimated at 0.15 mg/kg. Thioridazine caused CNS depression and potentially cardiac effects, with a toxic dose of 1.4 mg/kg. Atypical antipsychotics caused significant CNS depression (except risperidone); EPS were less common. Toxic doses were clozapine 2.5 mg/kg, olanzapine 0.5 mg/kg and aripiprazole 3 mg/kg. EPS responded to anticholinergic drug treatment. In summary, unintentional antipsychotic ingestion in children can cause severe effects that last 1-3 days, often with one tablet. Children

  9. Differential effects of antipsychotic drugs on insight in first episode schizophrenia: Data from the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnenborg, G H M; Timmerman, M E; Derks, E M; Fleischhacker, W W; Kahn, R S; Aleman, A

    2015-06-01

    Although antipsychotics are widely prescribed, their effect of on improving poor illness insight in schizophrenia has seldom been investigated and therefore remains uncertain. This paper examines the effects of low dose haloperidol, amisulpride, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on insight in first-episode schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophreniform disorder. The effects of five antipsychotic drugs in first episode psychosis on insight were compared in a large scale open randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 European countries: the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST). Patients with at least minimal impairments in insight were included in the present study (n=455). Insight was assessed with item G12 of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), administered at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The use of antipsychotics was associated with clear improvements in insight over and above improvements in other symptoms. This effect was most pronounced in the first three months of treatment, with quetiapine being significantly less effective than other drugs. Effects of spontaneous improvement cannot be ruled out due to the lack of a placebo control group, although such a large spontaneous improvement of insight would seem unlikely. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-antipsychotic catecholaminergic drugs for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayeh, Hany G; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-01-18

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disabling movement disorder associated with the prolonged use of antipsychotic medication. Several strategies have been examined in the treatment of TD. Currently, however, there is no clear evidence of the effectiveness of these drugs in TD and they have been associated with many side effects. One particular strategy would be to use pharmaceutical agents which are known to influence the catecholaminergic system at various junctures. 1. To determine the effects of any of the following drugs for antipsychotic-induced TD in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illnesses.i. Drugs which influence the noradrenergic system.ii. Dopamine receptor agonists.iii. Dopamine receptor antagonists.iv. Dopamine-depletor drugs.v. Drugs that increase the production or release of dopamine.2. To examine whether any improvement occurred with short periods of intervention (less than 6 weeks) and, if this did occur, whether this effect was maintained at longer periods of follow-up.3. To examine if there was a differential effect for the various compounds.4. To examine whether the use of non-antipsychotic catecholaminergic drugs are most effective in those with more recent onset TD (less than five years). We retrieved 712 references from searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2015 and April 2017). We also inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. We selected studies if they were randomised controlled trials focusing on people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illnesses and antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. We compared the use of catecholaminergic interventions versus placebo, no intervention, or any other intervention for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. We independently extracted data from these trials and we estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assumed that people

  11. [Treatment of Adult Schizophrenic Patients With Depot Antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila-Guerra, Mauricio; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the indications of long-acting antipsychotic injection and what its effectiveness and safety in adult patients with schizophrenia during the treatment maintenance phase. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The literature review shows that the evidence has moderate to low quality. 8 articles were used. The risk of relapse was lower with depot risperidone and paliperidone palmitate when compared with placebo. For the risk of hospitalizations comparing depot antipsychotics (APD) versus oral AP, the result is inconclusive. Globally the second-generation APD had a lower risk of discontinuation when compared with placebo. The second generation AP had higher risk of extrapyramidal syndromes than placebo, as in the use of antiparkinsonian. The comparison of second-generation AP injections versus placebo showed an increased risk of early weight gain. The use of depot antipsychotics in the maintenance phase of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is recommended if there is no adherence to oral antipsychotics as the patient's preference. It is not recommended depot antipsychotics in the acute phase of schizophrenia in adults. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Establishment of the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee S; Viguera, Adele C; McInerney, Kathryn A; Kwiatkowski, Molly A; Murphy, Shannon K; Lemon, Elizabeth L; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are widely used by reproductive-age women to treat a spectrum of psychiatric illnesses. Despite widespread use of this class of agents in women of childbearing potential, reproductive safety data across these medicines remain limited. The National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics (NPRAA) at Massachusetts General Hospital was established in 2008 to address this knowledge gap. Data are prospectively collected from pregnant women, ages 18-45 years, using 3 phone interviews conducted at the following times: (1) proximate to the time of enrollment, (2) 7 months' gestation, and (3) 2-3 months postpartum. Subjects include pregnant women with histories of fetal exposure to second-generation antipsychotics and a comparison group of nonexposed pregnant women. Medical record release authorization is obtained for obstetric, labor and delivery, and newborn pediatric (up to 6 months of age) records. Information regarding the presence of major malformations is abstracted from the medical records along with other data regarding neonatal and maternal health outcomes. Identified cases of congenital malformations are sent to a dysmorphologist blinded to drug exposure for final adjudication. As of May 2014, 428 subjects have enrolled in the NPRAA. Efforts continue to increase enrollment for the purpose of enhancing the capacity to define risk estimates of in utero exposure to atypical antipsychotics. The NPRAA gathers prospective data regarding risk for critical outcomes following use of atypical antipsychotics during pregnancy. The NPRAA offers a systematic way to collect reproductive safety information that informs the care of women who use these agents to sustain psychiatric well-being. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01246765. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  13. [Clinically relevant drug interactions with new generation antidepressants and antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Anne

    2009-06-01

    Because antidepressants and antipsychotics are commonly described in combination with drugs used to treat comorbid psychiatric or somatic disorders (e.g. anxiolytics, mood stabilizers, cardiovascular drugs, antimicrobial agents), they may be involved in drug interactions. Furthermore, agents such as lithium and atypical antipsychotics may be used to augment the antidepressant response in cases of refractory depression. Based on their mechanisms, drug-drug interactions can be classified either as pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature. The well-documented risk of potentially harmful pharmacodynamic drug interactions with first-generation anti-depressants, e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), with regard to the induction of the serotonin syndrome, has contributed to a gradual decline in their use in clinical practise. Second- and third-generation antidepressants have gradually replaced tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and MAOIs, mainly because of their improved tolerability and safety profile. The second- and third-generation antidepressants include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and other compounds with different mechanisms of action. These drugs and also the majority of antipsychotics are metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system. Therefore, the use of these compounds may be associated with clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions with other medications. The knowledge about the CYP metabolism of drugs may be used to guide the selection of an antidepressant or an anti-psychotic with a low drug-drug interaction potential for an individual patient. The aim of the present article is to review drug-interaction potentials with specific focus on second-generation antidepressants (SSRIs), newer antidepressants (SNRIs: venlafaxine and duloxetine; bupropion, mirtazapine, trazodone), novel atypical antidepressants (agomelatine), as well as new generation

  14. Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993–1998 within a computerised general practitioner database. Methods Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993–1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients Results Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. Conclusions This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

  15. Which prosthetic foot to prescribe?

    OpenAIRE

    De Asha, AR; Barnett, CT; Struchkov, V; Buckley, JG

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: \\ud Clinicians typically use findings from cohort studies to objectively inform judgements regarding the potential (dis)advantages of prescribing a new prosthetic device. However, before finalising prescription a clinician will typically ask a patient to 'try out' a change of prosthetic device while the patient is at the clinic. Observed differences in gait when using the new device should be the result of the device’s mechanical function, but could also conceivably be due to pa...

  16. Off-label psychotropic prescribing for young persons in medium security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, C; Stubbs, J

    2010-10-01

    Psychotropic drug prescribing for children and adolescents is frequently off-label and has increased over time and can be controversial. Psychotropic prescribing in two large UK medium secure units for young people has been studied. A total of 89 patients were included, 64% being aged less than 18 years. A total of 137 of 202 (67.8%) of prescriptions were off-label. The most common reasons for a prescription being off-label were the indication (N = 103) and the patient's age (N = 41). The main classes of drugs involved were antipsychotics (N = 59), antiepileptics as mood stabilisers (N = 22), anticholinergics and hyoscine (N = 15) and antidepressants (N = 11). Aggression (N = 48) and post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 30) were the most common off-label indications. Some antidepressant prescriptions were contrary to advice of the Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM). Meta-analyses or randomised controlled trials supported 27% of off-label prescriptions, with lesser quality studies supporting a further 29.2% and expert opinion 38.7%, whereas for 5.1% no evidence could be found. Prescribers tended to over-estimate the level of evidence from clinical trials or extrapolated from findings in adults. They often quoted their own experience rather than expert sources to justify their prescribing practice. It is important that prescribers are fully aware of the quality of experimental data and the risk-benefit ratio when prescribing off-label for young persons. If the evidence base is limited, it is particularly important to provide information about the risks and benefits of the treatment to the patient/relatives. A second opinion may be helpful. Both target symptoms and side effects should be monitored and regularly reviewed.

  17. Effects of prenatal exposure to antipsychotic risperidone on developmental neurotoxicity, apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral sequelae in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K P; Singh, Manoj Kr; Singh, Manish

    2016-08-01

    A tremendous increase has been documented in the recent past in prescribing second generation atypical antipsychotic drugs (AAPDs) to the pregnant women with psychosis, considering their reproductive and teratogenic safety. Among AAPDs, risperidone (RIS) ranked third after olanzapine (OLZ) and quetiapine (QUE) used during pregnancy, as OLZ is associated to substantial weight gain in adults and offspring. Although teratogenic safety of RIS has been established, its potential role in developmental neurotoxicity and related neurobehavioral impairments in adolescents has not been documented so far. Therefore, present study has been undertaken to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to risperidone (RIS) on developmental neurotoxicity and apoptotic neurodegeneration in neocortical region of fetal brain; and related functional sequelae in young rat offspring. The pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to RIS at 0.8, 1.0 and 2.0mg/kg, at equivalent therapeutic doses, orally from GD 6 to 21. Half of the pregnant rats were sacrificed and their brains were collected, weighed, and processed for neurohistopathological and apoptotic neurodegenerative evaluation. The remaining dams were allowed to deliver naturally, and their offspring were reared up to 10 weeks for neurobehavioral study. Prenatal exposure to RIS induced significant stunting of fetal body and brain weight, substantial reduction in the thickness of neocortical layers and apoptotic neurodegeneration in fetal brains, and delayed postnatal development and growth of the offspring; as well as long- lasting impact on anxiety like impaired behavioral responses on explorative mazes. Therefore, health care providers should be careful in prescribing atypical antipsychotics in general and RIS in particular, to the pregnant psychotic population. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring and managing metabolic effects of antipsychotics: a cluster randomized trial of an intervention combining evidence-based quality improvement and external facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Richard R; Drummond, Karen L; Viverito, Kristen M; Marchant, Kathy; Pope, Sandra K; Smith, Jeffrey L; Landes, Reid D

    2013-10-08

    Treatment of psychotic disorders consists primarily of second generation antipsychotics, which are associated with metabolic side effects such as overweight/obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines recommend timely assessment and management of these conditions; however, research studies show deficits and delays in metabolic monitoring and management for these patients. This protocol article describes the project 'Monitoring and Management for Metabolic Side Effects of Antipsychotics,' which is testing an approach to implement recommendations for these practices. This project employs a cluster randomized clinical trial design to test effectiveness of an evidence-based quality improvement plus facilitation intervention. Eligible study sites were VA Medical Centers with ≥300 patients started on a new antipsychotic prescription in a six-month period. A total of 12 sites, matched in pairs based on scores on an organizational practice survey, were then randomized within pairs to intervention or control conditions.Study participants include VA employees involved in metabolic monitoring and management of patients treated with antipsychotics at participating sites. The intervention involves researchers partnering with clinical stakeholders to facilitate tailoring of local implementation strategies to address barriers to metabolic side-effect monitoring and management. The intervention includes a Design Phase (initial site visit and subsequent development of a local implementation plan); Implementation Phase (guided by an experienced external facilitator); and a Sustainability Phase. Evaluation includes developmental, implementation-focused, progress-focused and interpretative formative evaluation components, as well as summative evaluation. Evaluation methods include surveys, qualitative data collection from provider participants, and quantitative data analysis of data for all patients prescribed a new antipsychotic medication at a

  19. The effects of antipsychotic drugs on depression level in patients with schizophrenia: clozapine vs. other atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Ertekin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depressive symptoms may occur in all stages of schizophrenia disorder. Clozapine is the only antipsychotic that has been demonstrated superior efficacy in schizophrenia and suicidal ideation. The aim of this study is to evaluate depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine and to compare with treated with other atypical antipsychotics.Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out on patients with schizophrenia according to DSM-IV-TR between December 2012 and May 2013. All participants were evaluated for demographic characteristics and points of Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Positive, Negative Syndrome Scale, and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia.Results: A total 23.6% (n = 13 patients treated with clozapine, while 76.4% (n = 42 patients were treated with other antipsychotic drugs. 23.1% (n = 3 of patients taking clozapine were women, 76.9% (n = 10 were male. The mean age of patients treated with clozapine was 43.0 ± 11.2. The level of depression of patients treated with clozapine was 15.4% (n = 2. No statistically significant difference was found between patients between treated with clozapine and other antipsychotics regarding age, sex, marital status, education years, work history, age at onset of disease, depression and history of suicide attemptConclusion: As a result of this study it is found that clozapine did not effect on the level of depression in patients with schizophrenia, and depression level of patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine had no difference from  patients treated  with other antipsychotics.

  20. Assessing Residents' Confidence in the Context of Pharmacotherapy Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Garlow, Steven J; Haroon, Ebrahim; Hermida, Adriana P; Young, John Q; Dunlop, Boadie W

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to determine whether residents' confidence initiating medications increased with the number of times they prescribed individual medications and to quantify the relationship between prescription frequency and gains in confidence. From July 2011 to June 2014, PGY-3 residents completed a survey of confidence levels at their psychopharmacology clinic orientation and then again 12 months later. The Emory Healthcare electronic medical record was used to identify all medications prescribed by each resident during their 12-month rotation and the frequency of these prescriptions. Confidence in initiating treatment with all medicines/medication classes increased over the 12-month period. For three of the medication classes for which residents indicated they were least confident at orientation, the number of prescriptions written during the year was significantly associated with an increase in confidence. Measuring resident confidence is a relevant and achievable outcome and provides data for educators regarding the amount of experience needed to increase confidence.

  1. Medicare Provider Data - Part D Prescriber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescriber Public Use File (PUF) provides information on prescription drugs prescribed by individual physicians and other health care providers and paid...

  2. Trends in the access to and the use of antipsychotic medications and psychotropic co-treatments in Asian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y-T; Ungvari, G S; Correll, C U; Chiu, H F K; Shinfuku, N

    2016-02-01

    To date, antipsychotics remain the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and related disorders although other psychotropic medications and non-pharmaceutical interventions have been used adjunctively in some patients and settings. Regular surveys on access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications in clinical practice are an important and efficient way of examining the use and time trends of treatments in a given population and region. Unlike developed Western countries, Asian countries have not fully undergone deinstitutionalisation of the severely and chronically mentally ill, and community-based mental health services are still under-developed. As a result, a large number of psychiatric patients still receive treatments in psychiatric hospitals. Moreover, there have been very limited studies examining access to and prescription patterns of psychotropic medications for schizophrenia patients in Asian countries. In this paper, we focus on the only international project on the use of psychotropic medications in schizophrenia patients in selected East and Southeast Asian countries/territories summarising its major findings. Most of the first- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs) are available in Asian countries, but the access to psychotropic medications is largely affected by socio-cultural and historical contexts, health insurance schemes, health care policy, medication cost and consumers' preference across different countries/territories. Overall, the proportional use of FGAs, high dose antipsychotic treatment and antipsychotic polypharmacy have decreased, while the use of SGAs and antidepressants have increased and the utilisation of benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers has remained relatively stable over time. However, within these general trends, there is great inter-country variation regarding the psychotropic prescribing patterns and trends in Asian schizophrenia patients that also seems to differ from data in many Western

  3. Antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial of tapering antipsychotic co-treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Tiihonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable disparity between clinical practice and recommendations based on meta-analyses of antipsychotic polypharmacy in clozapine resistant schizophrenia. For this reason, we investigated the clinical response to reducing the use olanzapine that had been previously added on clozapine treatment among seriously ill hospitalized patients. In a randomized controlled trial with crossover design, we studied volunteer patients (N = 15 who had olanzapine added on to clozapine in a state mental hospital. Clozapine monotherapy was just as effective as clozapine-olanzapine therapy, according to results from Clinical Global Impression Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning as primary outcome measures. Polypharmacy is widely used in treating schizophrenia, and usually, add-on medications are started because of worsening of the clinical state. A major confounding feature of these add-ons is whether observed improvements are caused by the medication or explained by the natural fluctuating course of the disorder. The present study, in spite of its small size, indicates the necessity of reconsidering the value of polypharmacy in treating schizophrenia.

  4. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Its Relation to Metabolic Syndrome in Patients With Schizophrenia: An Egyptian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly El-Gabry, Dina M; Abdel Aziz, Karim; Okasha, Tarek; Azzam, Hanan; Okasha, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between antipsychotic polypharmacy and metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia. Some studies suggest that antipsychotic polypharmacy may be associated with greater metabolic risk, whereas other studies suggest that this is uncertain. To date, there have been no studies in Egypt or the Arab world that have investigated this relationship. We sought to compare subjects with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy and monotherapy as regards metabolic outcomes and to investigate medication-related factors associated with metabolic syndrome. We recruited 118 subjects with schizophrenia and compared between those receiving antipsychotic polypharmacy (86 subjects) and monotherapy (32 subjects) as regards demographic, clinical, metabolic, and antipsychotic medication characteristics. We examined the effect of antipsychotic-related factors an outcome of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our sample was 38.1%. Except for gender, there was no statistically significant difference as regards demographic and clinical characteristics, rates of metabolic syndrome, or for individual metabolic parameters. We found a statistically significant difference (P antipsychotics (oral and depot) and a number of individual antipsychotic medications. Using logistic regression, receiving haloperidol depot was the only antipsychotic-related factor predictive for metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome does not differ in schizophrenia whether patients are receiving polypharmacy and monotherapy nor do they differ for individual metabolic parameters. Most antipsychotic-related characteristics did not predict for metabolic syndrome.

  5. Antipsychotic-induced sensitization and tolerance: Behavioral characteristics, developmental impacts, and neurobiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance refer to the increased and decreased drug effects due to past drug use, respectively. Both effects reflect the long-term impacts of antipsychotic treatment on the brain and result from the brain's adaptive response to the foreign property of the drug. In this review, clinical evidence of the behavioral aspect of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is selectively reviewed, followed by an overview of preclinical literature that examines these behavioral characteristics and the related pharmacological and nonpharmacological factors. Next, recent work on the developmental impacts of adolescent antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is presented and recent research that delineates the neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance is summarized. A theoretical framework based on "drug learning and memory" principles is proposed to account for the phenomena of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. It is maintained that antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance follow basic principles of learning or acquisition ("induction") and memory ("expression"). The induction and expression of both effects reflect the consequences of associative and nonassociative processing and are strongly influenced by various pharmacological, environmental, and behavioral factors. Drug-induced neuroplasticity, such as functional changes of striatal dopamine D2 and prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors and their mediated signaling pathways, in principle, is responsible for antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance. Understanding the behavioral characteristics and neurobiological underpinnings of antipsychotic sensitization and tolerance has greatly enhanced our understanding of mechanisms of antipsychotic action, and may have important implications for future drug discovery and clinical practice. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Effect of age, family history of diabetes, and antipsychotic drug treatment on risk of diabetes in people with psychosis: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2015-12-01

    Psychosis is associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. A positive synergy between antipsychotic drug effects and a pre-existing liability to diabetes mellitus might explain the especially high relative risk of diabetes mellitus in young adults with psychosis. We aimed to assess the individual and joint effect of age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and currently prescribed antipsychotic drug treatment on risk for diabetes mellitus. In this study, we used data from the 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis-an observational study done at seven sites in five Australian states. We included data from 1155 people with psychosis aged 18-64 years who were in contact with psychiatric services and who gave a fasting blood sample to test for current diabetes mellitus. Using logistic regression, we modelled the association of diabetes mellitus with age, family history of diabetes mellitus, and current antipsychotic drug treatment. We compared model fit with and without two-way and three-way interaction terms and used likelihood ratio tests to establish which terms to include in the final model. After adjustment for older age, which was an independent risk factor, compared with not taking antipsychotic drugs, antipsychotic drug treatment was associated with diabetes mellitus only in those without a family history of diabetes mellitus (clozapine adjusted odds ratio [OR] 7·22, 95% CI 1·62-32·20, p=0·01; quetiapine 5·91, 1·33-26·30, p=0·02; aripiprazole 5·06, 0·86-29·64, p=0·07; risperidone 4·17, 0·90-19·24, p=0·07; and olanzapine 2·23, 0·45-11·06, p=0·32). Antipsychotic drug treatment was not associated with additional risk of diabetes mellitus in those with a family history (clozapine adjusted OR 1·51, 95% CI 0·64-3·54, p=0·34; quetiapine 1·09, 0·49-2·43, p=0·82; aripiprazole 0·43, 0·12-1·49, p=0·18; risperidone 1·12, 0·48-2·63, p=0·79; and olanzapine 0·67, 0·26-1·71, p=0·39). People with psychosis are at

  7. Morbid Obesity and Use of Second Generation Antipsychotics among Adolescents in Foster Care: Evidence from Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Benjamin T; Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S

    2016-08-01

    Many adolescents enter foster care with high body mass index (BMI), and patterns of treatment further exacerbate the risk of morbid obesity. A principal risk factor for such exacerbation is the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We examine the association between receiving a morbid obesity diagnosis and SGA prescriptions among adolescents in foster care. We analyzed claims from 36 states' Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) files for 2000 through 2003. Obesity diagnoses were ascertained through a primary or secondary diagnosis claim of morbid obesity. Covariates included gender, race/ethnicity. age, insurance status, state obesity rate, and state fixed effects. We calculated relative risks of a diagnosis based upon four SGAs (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone) associated with obesity and a polypharmacy indicator. Of the 1,261,806 foster care adolescent-years in the MAX files, 6,517 were diagnosed with morbid obesity, an annual prevalence of 0.5%. The risk of a morbid obesity diagnosis is much higher for female and non-white adolescents. The risk increases with age. Quetiapine and clozapine increased the risk of a morbid obesity diagnosis more than 2.5 times, and two or more psychotropic drugs (polypharmacy) increased the risk fivefold. Adolescents in foster care are much more likely to be on SGA medications, and therefore may be more susceptible to weight gain and obesity. Given that SGA prescribing for younger populations has only expanded since these data were released, our study may actually understate the magnitude of the problem. Care is needed when prescribing SGAs for foster care adolescents.

  8. Inappropriate prescribing: criteria, detection and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-06-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is highly prevalent in older people and is a major healthcare concern because of its association with negative healthcare outcomes including adverse drug events, related morbidity and hospitalization. With changing population demographics resulting in increasing proportions of older people worldwide, improving the quality and safety of prescribing in older people poses a global challenge. To date a number of different strategies have been used to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people. Over the last two decades, a number of criteria have been published to assist prescribers in detecting inappropriate prescribing, the majority of which have been explicit sets of criteria, though some are implicit. The majority of these prescribing indicators pertain to overprescribing and misprescribing, with only a minority focussing on the underprescribing of indicated medicines. Additional interventions to optimize prescribing in older people include comprehensive geriatric assessment, clinical pharmacist review, and education of prescribers as well as computerized prescribing with clinical decision support systems. In this review, we describe the inappropriate prescribing detection tools or criteria most frequently cited in the literature and examine their role in preventing inappropriate prescribing and other related healthcare outcomes. We also discuss other measures commonly used in the detection and prevention of inappropriate prescribing in older people and the evidence supporting their use and their application in everyday clinical practice.

  9. Assessment of Rational Prescribing of Antihypertensive Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The average number of drugs prescribed per encounter was 2.9. Encounters with injections were 0.5%. The percentage of drugs prescribed by generic name was 31.6%. All the drugs prescribed were from the National Essential Drugs List. Calcium antagonists were the most frequently used group of drugs (41.3%), ...

  10. Disclosure of industry payments to prescribers: industry payments might be a factor impacting generic drug prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jingjing; Hansen, Richard A; Surry, Daniel; Howard, Jennifer; Kiptanui, Zippora; Harris, Ilene

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical companies paid at least $3.91bn to prescribers in 2013, yet evidence indicating whether industry payments shift prescribing away from generics is limited. This study examined the association between amount of industry payments to prescribers and generic drug prescribing rates among Medicare Part D prescribers. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted among 770 095 Medicare Part D prescribers after linking the 2013 national Open Payments data with 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment data. The exposure variable was the categorized amount of total industry payments to prescribers (i.e., meals, travel, research, and ownership). The outcome was prescriber's annual generic drug prescribing rate. Multivariable generalized linear regression models were used to examine the association between the amount of industry payments and prescriber's annual generic drug prescribing rates, controlling for prescriber's demographic and practice characteristics. In this sample, over one-third (38.0%) of Medicare Part D prescribers received industry payments in 2013. The mean annual generic drug prescribing rate was highest among prescribers receiving no payments and lowest among those receiving more than $500 of industry payments (77.5% vs. 71.3%, respectively; p industry payments was independently associated with prescribers' generic drug prescribing rate; higher payments corresponded with lower generic drug prescribing rates. Other prescriber characteristics associated with higher annual generic drug prescribing rate included male sex, non-northeast region, specialty, and patient volume. Receipt of industry payments was associated with a decreased rate of generic drug prescribing. How this affects patient care and total medical costs warrants further study. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. High-Risk Prescribing to Medicaid Enrollees Receiving Opioid Analgesics: Individual- and County-Level Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Sara E; Sorbero, Mark J; Jones, Christopher M; Dick, Andrew W; Stein, Bradley D

    2018-01-05

    Prescription opioid overdoses have increased dramatically in recent years, with the highest rates among Medicaid enrollees. High-risk prescribing includes practices associated with overdoses and a range of additional opioid-related problems. To identify individual- and county-level factors associated with high-risk prescribing among Medicaid enrollees receiving opioids. In a four-states, cross-sectional claims data study, Medicaid enrollees 18-64 years old with a new opioid analgesic treatment episode 2007-2009 were identified. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with high-risk prescribing, defined as high-dose opioid prescribing (morphine equivalent daily dose ≥100 mg for >6 days), opioid overlap, opioid-benzodiazepine overlap. High-risk prescribing occurred in 39.4% of episodes. Older age, rural county of residence, white race, and major depression diagnosis were associated with higher rates of all types of high-risk prescribing. Individuals with prior opioid, alcohol, and hypnotic/sedative use disorder diagnoses had lower odds of high-dose opioid prescribing but higher odds of opioid overlap and opioid-benzodiazepine overlap than individuals without such disorders. High-dose opioid prescribing in Massachusetts was less common than in California, Illinois, and New York, whereas the rate of benzodiazepine overlap in Massachusetts was more common than in other states. Conclusions/Importance: High-risk prescribing was common and associated with several important demographic, clinical, and community factors. Findings can be used to inform targeted interventions designed to reduce such prescribing, and given state variation observed, further research is needed to better understand the effects of state policies on high-risk prescribing.

  12. Pharmacogenetic tests for antipsychotic medications: clinical implications and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Seenae; Lee, Adam M.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing antipsychotic pharmacotherapy is often challenging due to significant variability in effectiveness and tolerability. Genetic factors influencing pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may contribute to some of this variability. Research studies have characterized these pharmacogenetic relationships, and some genetic markers are now available as clinical tests. These advances in pharmacogenetics research and test availability have great potential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life in psychiatric patients. For clinicians considering using pharmacogenetics, it is important to understand the clinical implications and also the limitations of markers included in currently available tests. This review focuses on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic gene variants that are currently available in commercial genetic testing panels. Associations of these variants with clinical efficacy and adverse effects, as well as other clinical implications, in antipsychotic pharmacotherapy are discussed. PMID:27757066

  13. Anti-osteoporosis drug prescribing after hip fracture in the UK: 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, C; Gibson-Smith, D; Elders, P J M; Welsing, P M J; Leufkens, H G M; Harvey, N C; Bijlsma, J W J; van Staa, T-P; de Vries, F

    2015-07-01

    The probability of initiating with anti-osteoporosis therapy increased from 7 % in 2000 to 46 % in 2010. This improvement was greater for patients over the age of 75 years. Men, those overweight, having dementia or exposed to antipsychotics, sedatives/hypnotics or opioid analgesics were significantly less likely to receive anti-osteoporosis drugs. The objective of this study was to examine trends and determinants of anti-osteoporosis drug prescribing after hip fracture in the UK between 2000 and 2010. Data were extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink for patients ≥50 years who had a first hip fracture between 2000 and 2010 and who did not currently (≤6 months prior) receive anti-osteoporosis drugs (bisphosphonates, strontium ranelate, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and raloxifene) (n = 27,542). The cumulative incidence probability of being prescribed anti-osteoporosis drugs within 1 year after hip fracture was estimated by Kaplan-Meier life-table analyses. Determinants for treatment initiation were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. The probability of being prescribed any anti-osteoporosis drug after hip fracture increased from 7 % in 2000 to 46 % in 2010. This trend was more marked in patients ≥75 years. The increase in prescribing of anti-osteoporosis drugs was complemented by a similar increase in vitamin D/calcium provision. Cumulative incidence of receiving anti-osteoporosis therapy was greater at any given point in time in women (8 % in 2000, 51 % in 2010) compared to men (4 % in 2000, 34 % in 2010). In addition to male gender, multivariable Cox regression identified reduced likelihood of receiving anti-osteoporosis drugs for those being overweight, having dementia and exposed to psychotropic drugs (antipsychotics, sedatives/hypnotics) or opioid analgesics. Although the prescribing of anti-osteoporosis drugs after hip fracture has increased substantially since 2000, the overall rate remained inadequate, particularly in

  14. [Cost-effectiveness of Antipsychotics in the Maintenance Treatment of Schizophrenia in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitian Reyes, Hoover; Arciniegas Barrera, Jair Alberto; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Assess the cost-effectiveness of the antipsychotics for treatment of schizophrenia. A five-year Markov model was built form patients with schizophrenia on the stage of maintenance. Costs were taken from the perspective of the Colombian health care system (Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud). The effectiveness was measured in years of life under the same maintenance plan. The Markov model indicated clozapine as the as the most cost-effective alternative between the first line antipsychotics and haloperidol is it when comparing other antipsychotics. Clozapine it's the cost-effectiveness strategy among the first line of antipsychotics and haloperidol is it among the other antipsychotics. Strategies prioritizing the use of cost-effective antipsychotics could improve the resources allocation in the Colombian health care system. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Antipsychotic drug treatment for patients with schizophrenia: theoretical background, clinical considerations and patients preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2009-01-01

      The cornerstone in treatment of psychosis is antipsychotic drugs. Treatment options have increased over the years; newer antipsychotic drugs with a proposed efficacy regarding negative and cognitive symptoms, but also a shift in side-effects from neurological side-effects to metabolic side-effe...... treatment. The clinically relevant aspects of antipsychotic drug treatment are reviewed; mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, clinical considerations in treatment, switching antipsychotic drugs, polypharmacy, safety and patient preference.  ......-effects have arisen as the new challenge. The basis of successful pharmacological treatment is a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of action, the desired effects and side-effects of antipsychotic drugs, a good relationship with the patient and a thorough monitoring of the patient before and during...

  16. QTc interval in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic treatment as monotherapy or polypharmacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliott, Anja Friis; Johan Mørk, Thibault; Højlund, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Antipsychotics are associated with a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, torsades de pointes, which, in the worst case, can lead to sudden cardiac death. The QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc) is used as a clinical proxy for torsades de pointes. The QTc interval can be prolonged...... by antipsychotic monotherapy, but it is unknown if the QTc interval is prolonged further with antipsychotic polypharmaceutical treatment. Therefore, this study investigated the associations between QTc interval and antipsychotic monotherapy and antipsychotic polypharmaceutical treatment in schizophrenia......-up until June of 2015. Data were collected from clinical interviews and clinical case records. Results: Electrocardiograms were available for 65 patients, and 6% had QTc prolongation. We observed no difference in average QTc interval for the whole sample of patients receiving no antipsychotics...

  17. [Maintenance Treatment With Antipsychotics for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness and security of the antipsychotics available for the management of adult patients with schizophrenia in the maintenance phase. To develop recommendations of treatment for the maintenance phase of the disease. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. 18 studies were included to evaluate the effectiveness and / or safety of different antipsychotic drugs first and second generation. Overall, antipsychotics (AP) showed superiority over placebo in relapse rate over 12 months (RR 0.59 95% CI 0.42, 0.82) and hospitalization rate over 24 months of follow-up (RR 0.38 95% 0.27, 0.55); its use is associated with increased risk of treatment dropout (RR 0.53 95% CI 0.46, 0.61) and adverse events such as weight gain, dystonia, extrapyramidal symptoms and sedation. There was no difference in the outcome of re hospitalizations, comparisons on quality of life, negative symptoms or weight gain between AP first and second generation. Continuous or standard dose regimens appear to be superior to intermittent or low doses in reducing the risk of abandonment of treatment regimes. Adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should receive maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. The medication of choice will depend on the management of the acute phase, the patient's tolerance to it and the presentation of adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleepwalking, a possible side effect of antipsychotic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-03-01

    Two case examples and a review of the sleep literature illustrate the potential of antipsychotic medication to trigger sleepwalking episodes in the context of schizophrenia. Causative hypotheses are briefly reviewed, as well as risk factors, differential diagnosis, and management. Sleepwalking may contribute to delusions, aggression, and accidental suicide. It is important to investigate sleep disorders in schizophrenia. They are not rare and may contribute to behavior that increases the stigma and isolation of individuals with schizophrenia.

  19. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.) blonanserin (b.i.d.)

  20. Could cannabidiol be used as an alternative to antipsychotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that affects close to 1% of the population. Individuals with this disorder often present signs such as hallucination, anxiety, reduced attention, and social withdrawal. Although antipsychotic drugs remain the cornerstone of schizophrenia treatment, they are associated with severe side effects. Recently, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for pharmacotherapy that is involved in a wide range of disorders, including schizophrenia. Since its discovery, a lot of effort has been devoted to the study of compounds that can modulate its activity for therapeutic purposes. Among them, cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, shows great promise for the treatment of psychosis, and is associated with fewer extrapyramidal side effects than conventional antipsychotic drugs. The overarching goal of this review is to provide current available knowledge on the role of the dopamine system and the ECS in schizophrenia, and to discuss key findings from animal studies and clinical trials investigating the antipsychotic potential of CBD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia: the role of computerized neuropsychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, Semion; Reznik, Ilya; Grinspan, Haim; Weizman, Abraham; Kotler, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    The present study analyzes the role of neurocognitive assessment instruments in the detection of the contribution of antipsychotic treatment to cognitive functioning. Recently, a panel of experts suggested six main domains (working memory; attention/vigilance; verbal/visual learning and memory; reasoning and problem solving; speed of processing) implicated in schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, which serve as a theoretical base for creation of real-time computerized neurocognitive batteries. The high sensitivity of computerized neuropsychological testing is based on their ability to adopt the reaction time (RT) paradigm for the assessment of brain function in a real-time regime. This testing is highly relevant for the monitoring of the cognitive effects of antipsychotics. Computerized assessment assists in the identification of state- and trait-related cognitive impairments. The optimal real-time computerized neurocognitive battery should composite balance between broad and narrow coverage of cognitive domains relevant to the beneficial effects of antipsychotics and will enable better planning of treatment and rehabilitation programs.

  2. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication by Community-Based Patients With Schizophrenia in China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Zhang, Wufang; Ma, Ning; Guan, Lili; Law, Samuel F; Yu, Xin; Ma, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Nonadherence to antipsychotic medication is a major health concern. Identification of risk factors associated with nonadherence is a useful initial step toward designing an effective intervention. This study compared the characteristics of medication-adherent and -nonadherent outpatients with schizophrenia in a Chinese community setting. In a naturalistic, multicenter, and cross-sectional design, 601 outpatients with schizophrenia served by the National Continuing Management and Intervention Program for Psychoses (the "686 program") were surveyed from June 2013 to January 2014 in four Chinese cities. On the basis of self-reported behavior, the patients were divided into medication-adherent and -nonadherent groups. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify potential risk factors associated with nonadherence. The analyses included 554 patients, 20% of whom were considered to be nonadherent. Compared with the adherent group, the nonadherent group had a longer period of untreated psychosis (odds ratio [OR]=1.09), lower body mass index (OR=.94), higher rate of rural residency (OR=2.01), and lower monthly household income per capita (OR=.94/100 renminbi) (ppresentation of symptoms, duration of illness, and type of antipsychotic medication) did not differ significantly between the groups. Medication-adherent and -nonadherent groups differed significantly in some social and treatment characteristics. These findings may be useful in informing the development of strategies for reducing medication nonadherence.

  3. A comparison of prescribing and non-prescribing nurses in the management of people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay, Molly; Carey, Nicola; Gage, Heather; Stenner, Karen; Williams, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study were to compare nurse prescribers and non-prescribers managing people with diabetes in general practice regarding: (a) patient characteristics; (b) activities and processes of care; (c) patient outcomes (self-management, clinical indicators, satisfaction) and (d) resource implications and costs. Over 28,000 nurses in the UK can prescribe the same medicines as doctors provided that it is in their level of experience and competence. Over 30%, mostly in general practice, prescribe medicines for patients with diabetes. A comparative case study. Nurses managing care of people with Type 2 diabetes were recruited in twelve general practices in England; six could prescribe, six could not. Patients, recruited by nurses, were followed up for 6 months (2011-2012). The patient sample comprised 131 in prescriber sites, 83 in non-prescriber sites. Patients of prescribers had been diagnosed and cared for by the nurse longer than those of non-prescribers. There were no differences in reported self-care activities or HbA1c test results between the patients of prescribers and non-prescribers. Mean HbA1c decreased significantly in both groups over 6 months. Patients of prescribers were more satisfied. Consultation duration was longer for prescribers (by average of 7·7 minutes). Non-prescribing nurses sought support from other healthcare professionals more frequently. Most prescribing nurses were on a higher salary band than non-prescribers. Clinical outcomes of patients managed by prescribing and non-prescribing diabetes nurses are similar. Prescribing nurses had longer relationships with their patients and longer consultations, possibly contributing to higher satisfaction with care. Employment costs of prescribing nurses are potentially higher. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Antipsychotic Selection for Acute Agitation and Time to Repeat Use in a Psychiatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Seth; Dopheide, Julie

    2016-11-01

    Early recognition and treatment of agitated patients is essential to avoid violence in the psychiatric emergency department (ED). Antipsychotics have established efficacy in managing agitation, yet little is known about how the choice of initial antipsychotic impacts time to repeat use and length of stay (LOS) in the psychiatric ED. To describe the impact of initial antipsychotic selection on time to repeat use and LOS in the psychiatric ED. A chart review identified 388 cases in which patients were administered an antipsychotic for agitation in the psychiatric ED between July 1 and August 31, 2014. Time to repeat use and LOS were compared for intramuscular (IM) haloperidol, other IM antipsychotics, and oral second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) using the Kruskal-Wallis or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Of the 388 cases, 31% (n=122) required repeat medications. Mean time to repeat use for IM haloperidol was 20.1±18.4 hours, which was not significantly different from mean time to repeat use in the groups receiving other IM antipsychotics or oral SGAs (P=0.35). The mean LOS was 29.7±28.7 hours for IM haloperidol, 30.3±36.9 hours for other IM antipsychotics, and 22.6±28.0 hours for oral SGAs. Significant differences in LOS between repeat and nonrepeat users of IM haloperidol and other IM antipsychotics were observed, but not among those who received oral SGAs. Mean time to repeat use ranged from 14 to 20 hours with IM haloperidol, other IM antipsychotics, and oral SGAs without significant differences in time to repeat use in the 3 different groups. Repeat users of IM antipsychotics had a significantly longer LOS in the ED compared with nonrepeat users of IM antipsychotics. However, patients who were initially administered oral SGAs did not have longer LOS in the ED even if a repeat dose was given.

  5. Trends in antipsychotic prescriptions for Japanese outpatients during 2006-2012: a descriptive epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, Kenji; Sato, Izumi; Nishiyama, Chika; Tanaka-Mizuno, Sachiko; Doi, Yuko; Arai, Masaru; Fujii, Yosuke; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Yusuke; Furukawa, Toshi A; Kawakami, Koji

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the trends in antipsychotic prescriptions for outpatients in Japan, where a community-based approach to mental healthcare is emphasized. This descriptive epidemiological study used claims data from 1038 community pharmacies across Japan. Outpatients who were ≥18 years old and receiving their initial antipsychotic prescription during 2006-2012 were evaluated. The annual trends were reported for monotherapies, polypharmacy, antipsychotic doses, and the concurrent prescription of psychotropic medications. The 152 592 outpatients included 101 133 (66%) adults (18-64 years old) and 51 459 (34%) older adults (≥65 years old). Among the adults, second-generation antipsychotic monotherapy prescriptions increased from 49% in 2006 to 71% in 2012, first-generation antipsychotic monotherapy prescriptions decreased from 29 to 14%, and antipsychotic polypharmacy decreased from 23 to 15%, respectively. Among the older adults, second-generation antipsychotic monotherapy prescriptions increased from 64 to 82%, first-generation antipsychotic monotherapy prescriptions decreased from 29 to 12%, and antipsychotic polypharmacy decreased from 7 to 6%, respectively. During the study period, >80% of the adults and >90% of the older adults received antipsychotics at risperidone-equivalent doses of antipsychotics for 70, 33, 20, 20, and 0.3% of the adults and for 43, 16, 19, 8, and 16% of the older adults, respectively. The present study evaluated large-scale claims-based datasets and found that high-dose prescriptions and antipsychotic polypharmacy among Japanese outpatients were not as prevalent as has been previously thought. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  7. Effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs against hostility in patients with schizophrenia in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volavka, Jan; Czobor, Pál; Citrome, Leslie; Van Dorn, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behavior can be a dangerous complication of schizophrenia. Hostility is related to aggression. This study aimed to compare the effects of olanzapine, perphenazine, risperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone on hostility in schizophrenia. We used the data that were acquired in the 18-month Phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) study. We analyzed the scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) hostility item in a subset of 614 patients who showed at least minimal hostility (a score ≥ 2) at baseline. The primary analysis of hostility indicated an effect of difference between treatments (F(4,1487) = 7.78, P schizophrenia enrolled in the European First-Episode Schizophrenia Trial (EUFEST) trial, where olanzapine demonstrated advantages compared with haloperidol, quetiapine, and amisulpride. Olanzapine demonstrated advantages in terms of a specific antihostility effect over the other antipsychotics tested in Phase 1 of the CATIE trial.

  8. Inappropriate prescribing in geriatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Patrick J

    2012-02-03

    Inappropriate prescribing in older people is a common condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Medication use increases with age, and this, in conjunction with an increasing disease burden, is associated with adverse drug reactions. This review outlines why older people are more likely to develop adverse drug reactions and how common the problem is. The use of different tools to identify and measure the problem is reviewed. Common syndromes seen in older adults (eg, falling, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance) are considered, and recent evidence in relation to medication use for these conditions is reviewed. Finally, we present a brief summary of significant developments in the recent literature for those caring for older people.

  9. Intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome associated with use of antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masato; Sano, Ichiya; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Fujihara, Etsuko; Tanito, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    We report 3 cases of intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (IFIS) during cataract surgery in patients without a history of selective α1-blocker use but with a long-term history of antipsychotic drug use. We reviewed previously reported cases of antipsychotic drug-associated IFIS cases. Observational case series. In case 1, bilateral IFIS developed in a 39-year-old man with chronic angle-closure glaucoma. He had used several classes of antipsychotic drugs to treat schizophrenia, including the first-generation antipsychotic drugs haloperidol and chlorpromazine, the dopamine system stabilizer aripiprazole, the dopamine serotonin antagonists olanzapine and quetiapine, and the serotonin dopamine antagonists risperidone and blonanserin for 7 years. In case 2, a 63-year-old woman with schizophrenia had used aripiprazole, quetiapine, and risperidone for more than 10 years. In case 3, a 65-year-old woman with an organic mental disorder had used haloperidol for more than 10 years. At least 5 cases of antipsychotic drug-induced IFIS have been reported in the literature. Any class of antipsychotic drugs can cause IFIS. Although antipsychotic drug-induced IFIS can be mild, surgeons should be alert to the possibility of IFIS when they treat patients with current and past use of antipsychotic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy in a Treatment-Refractory Schizophrenia Population Receiving Adjunctive Treatment With Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Hageman, Ida; Bauer, Jeanett

    2013-01-01

    Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).......Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is frequent, but its pattern is unknown in treatment-refractory schizophrenia-spectrum patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)....

  11. Hepatic insulin resistance in antipsychotic naive schizophrenic patients: stable isotope studies of glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Lonneke J. M.; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Blumer, Regje M. E.; Allick, Gideon; Venema, Henk W.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Becker, Hiske; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J. M.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to measure insulin sensitivity and body composition in antipsychotic-naive patients with DSM IV schizophrenia and/or schizoaffective disorder compared with matched controls. DESIGN: Seven antipsychotic medication-naive patients fulfilling the DSM IV A criteria for

  12. Acute Antipsychotic Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    for ziprasidone and unclear for asenapine. Adverse reaction profiles varied substantially among the investigated antipsychotics and were largely consistent with prior findings in adults. Protocol registration information-Antipsychotic Treatment for Children With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: Network Meta......-Analysis of Randomised Trials; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/; CRD42013006676....

  13. Determinants of the nurses' and nursing assistants' request for antipsychotics for people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I M; van Manen, Jeannette G; IJzerman, Maarten J; Bisseling, Marloes; Drossaert, Constance H C; Zuidema, Sytse U

    Background: Although physicians are responsible for writing the antipsychotic prescriptions for patients with dementia, the initiative is often taken by nurses or nursing assistants. To reduce antipsychotics uses, one needs to understand the reasons for nurses and nursing assistants to request them.

  14. Determinants of the nurses’ and nursing assistants’ request for antipsychotics for people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah; van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Bisseling, Marloes; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Zuidema, Sytse U.

    2017-01-01

    Although physicians are responsible for writing the antipsychotic prescriptions for patients with dementia, the initiative is often taken by nurses or nursing assistants. To reduce antipsychotics uses, one needs to understand the reasons for nurses and nursing assistants to request them. This study

  15. Brief Report: Metformin for Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K.; Adams, Ryan; Pedapati, Ernest V.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Fox, Emma; Buck, Catherine; Erickson, Craig A.

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotic treatment in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is becoming increasingly common, placing individuals at risk for antipsychotic-induced weight gain and associated complications. Metformin hydrochloride, a biguanide medication FDA-approved for treatment of type-2 diabetes in youth, may hold promise for treatment of…

  16. Hippocampal and caudate volume reductions in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Glenthøj, Birte; Rasmussen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    enlargement and hippocampal and caudate volume reductions are morphological traits of antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia. METHODS: We obtained high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans for 38 antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia patients and 43 matched...

  17. Exploring regional variation in antipsychotic coprescribing practice: a Danish questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Allerup, Peter N.; Nordentoft, Merete

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacologic treatment of schizophrenia is characterized by excessive use of antipsychotic polypharmacy, which reflects a gap between evidence and practice. The aim of the present study was to investigate regional differences in treatment setting characteristics and in physician and nurse...... attitudes toward antipsychotic polypharmacy and clinical guidelines....

  18. Representation of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Randomised Controlled Trials on Antipsychotic Treatment for Behavioural Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifes, A.; Stolker, J. J.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Nijman, H. L. I.; Heerdink, E. R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Behavioural problems are common in people with intellectual disability (ID) and are often treated with antipsychotics. Aim: To establish the frequency and characteristics of people with ID included in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems, and to investigate the quality of these RCTs.…

  19. Loxapine for Reversal of Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Disturbances: A Chart Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Andridge, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Loxapine substitution is a promising option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who develop antipsychotic-induced metabolic illness. We performed a chart review of 15 adolescents and adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for ASD, all with antipsychotic-associated weight gain, who received low dose loxapine in an attempt to taper or…

  20. Trends in Antipsychotic Drug Use by Very Young, Privately Insured Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; Crystal, Stephen; Huang, Cecilia; Gerhard, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study describes recent trends and patterns in antipsychotic treatment of privately insured children aged 2 through 5 years. Method: A trend analysis is presented of antipsychotic medication use (1999-2001 versus 2007) stratified by patient characteristics. Data are analyzed from a large administrative database of privately insured…

  1. Antipsychotic Use and Metabolic Monitoring in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Served in a Medicaid Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lisa M.; Damron, Mackenzie; Jones, Kyle B.; Weedon, Dean; Carbone, Paul S.; Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes antipsychotic use and metabolic monitoring rates among individuals with developmental disabilities enrolled in a subspecialty medical home (N = 826). Four hundred ninety-nine participants (60.4%) were taking antipsychotics, which was associated with male gender (p = 0.01), intellectual disability with and without autism…

  2. The efficacy of antipsychotics for prolonged delirium with renal dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asano S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Satoko Asano, Yasuto Kunii, Hiroshi Hoshino, Yusuke Osakabe, Tetsuya Shiga, Shuntaro Itagaki, Itaru Miura, Hirooki Yabe Department of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan Aim: Delirium is commonly encountered in daily clinical practice. To identify predictors influencing outcomes, we retrospectively examined the characteristics of inpatients with delirium who required psychiatric medication during hospitalization.Methods: We extracted all new inpatients (n=523 consulted for psychiatric symptoms at Fukushima Medical University Hospital between October 2011 and September 2013. We selected 203 inpatients with delirium diagnosed by psychiatrists. We analyzed data from 177 inpatients with delirium who received psychiatric medication. We defined an “early improvement group” in which delirium resolved in ≤3 days after starting psychiatric medication, and a “prolonged group” with delirium lasting for >3 days. Among the 83 inpatients with renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, we defined an “early improvement group with renal dysfunction” in which delirium resolved in ≤3 days after starting psychiatric medication and a “prolonged group with renal dysfunction” with delirium lasting for >3 days. We then examined differences between groups for different categorical variables.Results: Dose of antipsychotic medication at end point was significantly lower in the prolonged group with renal dysfunction than in the early improvement group with renal dysfunction.Conclusion: The results suggest that maintaining a sufficient dose of antipsychotics from an early stage may prevent prolongation of delirium even in inpatients with renal dysfunction. Keywords: antipsychotic, prolonged delirium, chronic kidney disease, pharmacokinetics 

  3. Disruption of conditioned reward association by typical and atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, C L; Elmer, G I

    2010-07-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are broadly classified into typical and atypical compounds; they vary in their pharmacological profile however a common component is their antagonist effects at the D2 dopamine receptors (DRD2). Unfortunately, diminished DRD2 activation is generally thought to be associated with the severity of neuroleptic-induced anhedonia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and typical antipsychotic haloperidol in a paradigm that reflects the learned transfer of incentive motivational properties to previously neutral stimuli, namely autoshaping. In order to provide a dosing comparison to a therapeutically relevant endpoint, both drugs were tested against amphetamine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition as well. In the autoshaping task, rats were exposed to repeated pairings of stimuli that were differentially predictive of reward delivery. Conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue (sign-tracking) and to the reward (goal-tracking) increased during repeated pairings in the vehicle treated rats. Haloperidol and olanzapine completely abolished this behavior at relatively low doses (100microg/kg). This same dose was the threshold dose for each drug to antagonize the sensorimotor gating deficits produced by amphetamine. At lower doses (3-30microg/kg) both drugs produced a dose-dependent decrease in conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue. There was no difference between drugs at this dose range which indicates that olanzapine disrupts autoshaping at a significantly lower proposed DRD2 receptor occupancy. Interestingly, neither drug disrupted conditioned approach to the reward at the same dose range that disrupted conditioned approach to the reward-predictive cue. Thus, haloperidol and olanzapine, at doses well below what is considered therapeutically relevant, disrupts the attribution of incentive motivational value to previously neutral cues. Drug effects on this dimension of reward

  4. Correlates and predictors of antipsychotic drug polypharmacy in real-life settings: Results from a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandain, Leo; Thibaut, Florence; Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Falissard, Bruno; Abenhaim, Lucien; Nordon, Clementine

    2018-02-01

    Reasons for using antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) in routine clinical practice, despite a potentially unfavorable risk-benefit ratio, are poorly understood. This research aimed to determine (1) if severe courses of schizophrenia were associated with APP and (2) if a schizophrenia-related acute event would predict a switch to APP in the short term. Observational prospective data (at baseline and 6months) were drawn from a French nationwide cohort ("Cohorte Générale Schizophrénie"), which included 1859 inpatients and outpatients with schizophrenia. APP was defined as the prescription of ≥2 antipsychotic drugs (there being different active substances). Early-onset schizophrenia, legal guardianship, higher lifetime maximal severity of illness and comorbid antisocial personality were used as proxies for severe courses of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia-related acute events included hospitalization and recent suicide attempts. Logistic regression models were used to determine (1) whether the use of APP at baseline (vs. monotherapy) was associated with a severe course of schizophrenia or not, independent of acute events, and (2) if a switch to APP at 6months (vs. remaining on monotherapy) was associated with acute events, independent of severe courses of schizophrenia. Increased odds of APP use at baseline were independently associated with legal guardianship (OR=1.6; 95%CI=1.3, 2.0) and higher lifetime maximum severity of illness (OR=1.3; 95%CI=1.2, 1.5). A switch to APP at 6months was predicted by a hospitalization occurring since baseline (OR=6.1; 95%CI=3.9, 9.4). In routine clinical practice, APP is more likely prescribed to patients with severe courses of illness, possibly indicating the difficulty to manage these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Once-monthly paliperidone palmitate compared with conventional and atypical daily oral antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Correll, Christoph U; Mao, Lian; Starr, H Lynn; Alphs, Larry

    2016-12-01

    This analysis of the Paliperidone Palmitate Research in Demonstrating Effectiveness (PRIDE) study (NCT01157351) compared outcomes after administration of once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP) vs conventional oral antipsychotics (COAs) or atypical oral antipsychotics (AOAs). PRIDE was a 15-month study of 444 individuals with schizophrenia and a history of incarceration. They were randomly assigned to PP or to 1 of 7 commonly prescribed OAs. Primary endpoint was time to first treatment failure (TF). Event-free probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method; treatment group differences (PP vs COAs, PP vs AOAs, and PP vs oral paliperidone/risperidone) were assessed using a log-rank test. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Compared with PP, risk for first TF was 34% higher with COAs (HR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.80-2.25), 41% higher with AOAs (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.06-1.88), and 39% higher with paliperidone/risperidone (HR: 1.39; 95% CI: 0.97-1.99). Incidences of extrapyramidal symptom-related adverse events (AEs) were 45.7%, 13.7%, and 10.6% in the COA, AOA, and oral paliperidone/risperidone groups vs 23.9% in the PP group. Incidences of prolactin-related AEs were 5.7%, 3.8%, and 3.5% vs 23.5%, and incidences of ≥7% weight increase were 11.4%, 14.9%, and 16.0% vs 32.4%. Results suggest a lower risk of TF but a higher rate of some AEs after treatment with PP vs COAs, AOAs, and paliperidone/risperidone. Deselection of specific OAs and low patient-compliance rates with OAs likely biased the safety results.

  6. Antipsychotic treatment for children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, D

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Antipsychotic treatment in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) lacks a rich evidence base, and efforts to rank different drugs concerning their efficacy have not proven any particular drug superior. In contrast to the literature regarding adult-onset schizophrenia (AOS), comparative...... allocate children and adolescents presenting with schizophrenia or a related non-affective psychotic condition to an intervention group or to a control group. Two reviewers will-independently and in duplicate-screen titles and abstracts, complete full text reviews to determine eligibility, and subsequently...

  7. Assessing QT interval prolongation and its associated risks with antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Graff, Claus; Kanters, Jørgen K.

    2011-01-01

    manifesting antipsychotic-associated TdP and subsequently SCD have well established risk factors for SCD, i.e. older age, female gender, hypokalaemia and cardiovascular disease. QT interval prolongation is the most widely used surrogate marker for assessing the risk of TdP but it is considered somewhat...... imprecise, partly because QT interval changes are subject to measurement error. In particular, drug-induced T-wave changes (e.g. flattening of the T-wave) may complicate the measurement of the QT interval. Furthermore, the QT interval depends on the heart rate and a corrected QT (QTc) interval is often used...

  8. The comparison of glucose and lipid metabolism parameters in drug-naïve, antipsychotic-treated, and antipsychotic discontinuation patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Wu,1,2 Zeping Huang,3 Hongying Han,2 Zhiyong Zhong,2 Zhaoyu Gan,2 Xiaofeng Guo,1 Feici Diao,2 Zili Han,2 Jingping Zhao1 1Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China; 2Psychiatry Department, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3Ultrasound Department, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Background: Although many studies have reported that glucose and lipid metabolism disorders are a significant side effect associated with the use of antipsychotic drugs, the characteristics of glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in patients with schizophrenia who are taking antipsychotic drugs remain poorly understood, and the possible effects that antipsychotic discontinuation may have on glucose and lipid metabolism remain unclear. Methods: The sample consisted of 131 Chinese patients with schizophrenia, including 70 first-episode, drug-naïve patients; 33 patients who had received continuous antipsychotic drug treatment for ≥1 year prior to the beginning of the study; and 28 patients who had discontinued antipsychotic drug treatment for ≥3 months prior to the beginning of study. We compared the glucose and lipid metabolic parameter levels among the three groups of patients with schizophrenia. All assessments were performed upon hospital admission. Results: The characteristics of glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in Chinese patients with schizophrenia who are taking antipsychotic drugs included significant augmentation of the body mass index and waist circumference, significantly higher levels of fasting plasma insulin and insulin resistance, and significantly lower plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Antipsychotic discontinuation

  9. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  10. Metabolic and Endocrine Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Tahiroglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available omorbid psychiatric disorders, frequent hospitalization, multiple outpatient treatment, prior history of hypertension, obesity and lipid dysregulation are associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome in children. Side effects of antipsychotic drugs and their management have recently become a major subject of research due to enhanced antipsychotic drug usage in child and adolescents. Prevention strategies are usually preferred to secondary or tertiary strategies in the management of metabolic syndrome associated with antipsychotic drugs. Clinicians should present multidisciplinary approach to endocrine and metabolic side effects due to antipsychotic use in pediatric patient groups and avoid multiple drug use in such patients. In this paper, we briefly reviewed metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotic drugs in child and adolescent population, possible mechanisms of susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and pharmacological and non pharmacological treatment approach to prevention of weight gain.

  11. Antipsychotic efficacy in psychosis with co-morbid cannabis misuse: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin P; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of cannabis use in patients with psychotic mental illness is known to be high and is suspected to exacerbate symptoms and worsen prognosis. We aimed to evaluate evidence of antipsychotic efficacy in reducing the burden of psychotic symptoms and cannabis use in individuals with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. A systematic review was conducted of antipsychotic treatment in those with psychotic mental illness and co-morbid cannabis use. Quality of evidence for each study and outcomes were rated using the 'GRADE' approach. Twenty-two studies were identified: 13 experimental and 9 observational, including a total sample of 1543 patients, 761 of whom had a diagnosed cannabis use disorder. The most frequent antipsychotics compared were risperidone, olanzapine and clozapine with olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol. No clear differences between antipsychotics were demonstrated. Future studies are needed to confirm whether clozapine is superior to other antipsychotics in reducing cannabis use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Risk of falls and fractures in older adults using atypical antipsychotic agents: a propensity score-adjusted, retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Satabdi; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael L; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2012-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotic agents are extensively prescribed in the elderly to treat various behavioral and psychiatric disorders. Past literature has documented an increased risk of falls and factures with the use of risperidone and olanzapine compared with nonuse. However, none of the studies assessed the comparative safety profiles of atypical agents with respect to falls and fractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the risk of falls and fractures associated with the use of risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine in community-dwelling adults aged ≥50 years. The study involved a propensity score-adjusted approach in new users of risperidone, olanzapine, or quetiapine anytime between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2008, using data from the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims database. Patients were followed up until a hospitalization/emergency department visit for fall/fracture or the end of the study period, whichever occurred earlier. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to evaluate the comparative risk of falls/fractures. The covariates in the final model included propensity scores and their interaction terms. There were 12,145 new users of atypical agents in the study population (5083 risperidone, 4377 olanzapine, and 2685 quetiapine). A total of 417 cases of falls/fractures with at least 1 hospitalization/ emergency department visit after the use of the antipsychotic agents were identified. The number of falls for risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine were 179 (3.56%), 123 (2.84%), and 115 (4.34%), respectively. After adjusting for propensity scores, the Cox proportional hazards model showed that there was no statistically significant difference with use of risperidone (hazard ratio = 1.10 [95% CI, 0.86-1.39]) or quetiapine (hazard ratio = 1.12 [95% CI, 0.86-1.46]) compared with olanzapine (reference group) in the risk of falls or fractures. The study found no significant difference across the individual atypical agents in the risk of falls

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Inappropriate Medications Prescribing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data analysis involved use of World Health Organization (WHO) prescribing indicators, Updated 2002 Beer's criteria and DRUG-REAX® system software package of MICROMEDEX (R) Healthcare Series to assess the prescribing pattern, identify potentially inappropriate medications and potential drug-drug interactions, ...

  14. Antibiotic prescribing patterns among healthcare professionals at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Countries have come to place heavy reliance on antibiotics, a phenomena that has contributed to widespread resistant bacteria. Unless antibiotic prescribing patterns are kept in check, the spread of resistant bacteria will lead to a proliferation of dreadful diseases. In this study, antibiotic prescribing patterns at Van Velden ...

  15. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. 2. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. 3. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. 4. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. 5. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically.

  16. Physicians-in-training are not prepared to prescribe medical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, Anastasia B; Quan, Tiffany; Dufault, Carolyn; Awad, Michael; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2017-11-01

    While medical marijuana use is legal in more than half of U.S. states, evidence is limited about the preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe medical marijuana. We asked whether current medical school and graduate medical educational training prepare physicians to prescribe medical marijuana. We conducted a national survey of U.S. medical school curriculum deans, a similar survey of residents and fellows at Washington University in St. Louis, and a query of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Curriculum Inventory database for keywords associated with medical marijuana. Surveys were obtained from 101 curriculum deans, and 258 residents and fellows. 145 schools were included in the curriculum search. The majority of deans (66.7%) reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, and 25.0% reported that their graduates were not at all prepared to answer questions about medical marijuana. The vast majority of residents and fellows (89.5%) felt not at all prepared to prescribe medical marijuana, while 35.3% felt not at all prepared to answer questions, and 84.9% reported receiving no education in medical school or residency on medical marijuana. Finally, only 9% of medical school curriculums document in the AAMC Curriculum Inventory database content on medical marijuana. Our study highlights a fundamental mismatch between the state-level legalization of medical marijuana and the lack of preparation of physicians-in-training to prescribe it. With even more states on the cusp of legalizing medical marijuana, physician training should adapt to encompass this new reality of medical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prescribing patterns for inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Slovenia: Results of 16-month prospective, non-interventional clinical research.

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    Bole, Cvetka Bačar; Pišlar, Mitja; Mrhar, Aleš; Tavčar, Rok

    2017-06-01

    In Slovenia, there has been no evidence about the prescribing patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorders. The research aims to analyze drug utilization patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorder that are coded as F20-F29 according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 th revision (schizophrenia spectrum disorders). Prospective research was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija. The medical records of the inpatients admitted over a 12-month period were collected from the beginning to the end of their hospitalization. A total of 311 inpatients with 446 hospitalizations were included, producing a total of 3954 medication prescriptions. Medications prescribed pro re nata (the use of as needed) were also taken into account. Antipsychotics (N=1149, 43% of prescriptions) were the most often prescribed medications, followed by anxiolytics, antiparkinsonians, antidepressants, mood stabilizers and cardiovascular drugs. A total of 256 (82%) inpatients received at least one pro re nata medication. It was observed that the studied population was treated with one antipsychotic on 27 percent of prescriptions. Inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were exposed to a large number of different drugs. They were not received only psychotropic drugs but also other medications. With the knowledge about medications the implementation of clinical pharmacy services to the psychiatrists would significantly improve medication of inpatients with psychotic disorders and polypharmacotherapy.

  18. Pneumonia following antipsychotic prescriptions in electronic health records: a patient safety concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Kristina; Bate, Andrew; Meyboom, Ronald HB; Edwards, I Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Background In screening the Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS) Health Disease Analyzer database of GP records from the UK, an increased registration of pneumonia subsequent to the prescription of some antipsychotic medicines was identified. Aim To investigate the temporal pattern between antipsychotic prescriptions and pneumonia with respect to age, type of pneumonia and other chest infections, and antipsychotic class. Design of study Self-controlled cohort analysis. Setting Electronic health records from the UK IMS Health Disease Analyzer database. Method Three groups of pneumonia-related International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 terms and prescriptions of atypical and conventional antipsychotic medicines were studied. Separate analyses were carried out for patients aged a65 years. The observed rate of pneumonia terms registered in different time periods in connection to antipsychotic prescriptions was contrasted to the overall rate of pneumonia terms relative to prescriptions of other drugs in the same dataset. Results In patients aged ≥65 years, an increased registration of a group of terms defined as ‘acute chest infections’, after atypical antipsychotic prescriptions, was identified. The corresponding increase after conventional antipsychotic prescriptions was much smaler. Bronchopneumonia had a striking increase after both atypical and conventional antipsychotic prescriptions, and was commonly recorded with fatal outcome. Few registrations of hypostatic pneumonia were noted. Patients aged atypical antipsychotic prescriptions in older people seen in this outpatient study, together with the higher risk shown in a previous study on hospitalised patients, suggests a causal relationship. This is of importance since bronchopneumonia seems highly linked to fatal outcome. In the absence of a mechanism, further investigation of the role of antipsychotics in older people is needed. PMID:20883613

  19. Time to discontinuation of atypical versus typical antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swartz Marvin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate over whether atypical antipsychotics are more effective than typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. This naturalistic study compares atypical and typical antipsychotics on time to all-cause medication discontinuation, a recognized index of medication effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods We used data from a large, 3-year, observational, non-randomized, multisite study of schizophrenia, conducted in the U.S. between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Patients who were initiated on oral atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, or ziprasidone or oral typical antipsychotics (low, medium, or high potency were compared on time to all-cause medication discontinuation for 1 year following initiation. Treatment group comparisons were based on treatment episodes using 3 statistical approaches (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox Proportional Hazards regression model, and propensity score-adjusted bootstrap resampling methods. To further assess the robustness of the findings, sensitivity analyses were performed, including the use of (a only 1 medication episode for each patient, the one with which the patient was treated first, and (b all medication episodes, including those simultaneously initiated on more than 1 antipsychotic. Results Mean time to all-cause medication discontinuation was longer on atypical (N = 1132, 256.3 days compared to typical antipsychotics (N = 534, 197.2 days; p Conclusion In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, time to medication discontinuation for any cause appears significantly longer for atypical than typical antipsychotics regardless of the typical antipsychotic potency level. Findings were primarily driven by clozapine and olanzapine, and to a lesser extent by risperidone. Furthermore, only clozapine and olanzapine therapy showed consistently and significantly longer treatment duration compared to perphenazine, a medium

  20. Dosage and duration of antipsychotic treatment in demented outpatients with agitation or psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Shan, Jia-Chi; Chiang, Huey-Ling; Sheu, Yi-Han; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2015-02-01

    The USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warnings regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with dementia in 2003 and 2005. We aimed to study the dose and duration of antipsychotic treatment in dementia, and to examine whether physicians' prescription behaviors changed after the FDA warnings. Medical charts of outpatients who had Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or mixed dementia were reviewed. Patients must have achieved a clinically stable state for at least 4 weeks after receiving antipsychotic treatment for agitation or psychosis. Demographics, clinical correlates, and duration of antipsychotic treatment were compared among different antipsychotic groups. Because the quetiapine group had the largest sample size, the optimal dose and duration of quetiapine treatment were compared among three time periods (before 2003, 2003-2005, after 2005). Stable state was achieved in 215 patients (80 had Alzheimer's disease, 117 vascular dementia, and 18 mixed dementia). Most patients (177) took quetiapine, 25 took risperidone, and 13 took sulpiride. The whole sample had a long total duration of antipsychotic treatment (median 525 days, mean 707 days). The median dose and total duration of antipsychotic treatment were 1.0mg/day and 238 days for risperidone, 100mg/day and 390 days for sulpiride, and 25mg/day and 611 days for quetiapine, respectively. The optimal dose and total duration of quetiapine treatment decreased significantly after FDA warning in 2005, although the duration remained long. The optimal doses of antipsychotics were not higher than those of western reports, but the total duration of antipsychotic treatment was quite long. Although our study suggests the prescription dosage and duration of antipsychotic treatment decreased significantly after FDA warning in 2005, the duration of treatment was still long. Given the serious safety concerns, more effort should be made to avoid unnecessary and prolonged prescription. Copyright © 2012

  1. The effect of financial incentives on adherence to antipsychotic depot medication: does it change over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlickova, Hana; Bremner, Stephen A; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    A recent cluster-randomized controlled trial found that offering financial incentives improves adherence to long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs). The present study investigates whether the impact of incentives diminishes over time and whether the improvement in adherence is linked to the amount of incentives offered. Seventy-three teams with 141 patients with psychotic disorders (using ICD-10) were randomized to the intervention or control group. Over 1 year, patients in the intervention group received £15 (US $23) for each LAI, while control patients received treatment as usual. Adherence levels, ie, the percentage of prescribed LAIs that were received, were calculated for quarterly intervals. The amount of incentives offered was calculated from the treatment cycle at baseline. Multilevel models were used to examine the time course of the effect of incentives and the effect of the amount of incentives offered on adherence. Adherence increased in both the intervention and the control group over time by an average of 4.2% per quarterly interval (95% CI, 2.8%-5.6%; P time and treatment group. Further, a higher total amount of incentives was associated with poorer adherence (βbootstrapped = -0.11; 95% CIbootstrapped, -0.20 to -0.01; P = .023). A substantial effect of financial incentives on adherence to LAIs occurs within the first 3 months of the intervention and is sustained over 1 year. A higher total amount of incentives does not increase the effect. ISRCTN.com identifier: ISRCTN77769281 and UKCRN.org identifier: 7033. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. Lipidomics reveals early metabolic changes in subjects with schizophrenia: effects of atypical antipsychotics.

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    Joseph McEvoy

    Full Text Available There is a critical need for mapping early metabolic changes in schizophrenia to capture failures in regulation of biochemical pathways and networks. This information could provide valuable insights about disease mechanisms, trajectory of disease progression, and diagnostic biomarkers. We used a lipidomics platform to measure individual lipid species in 20 drug-naïve patients with a first episode of schizophrenia (FE group, 20 patients with chronic schizophrenia that had not adhered to prescribed medications (RE group, and 29 race-matched control subjects without schizophrenia. Lipid metabolic profiles were evaluated and compared between study groups and within groups before and after treatment with atypical antipsychotics, risperidone and aripiprazole. Finally, we mapped lipid profiles to n3 and n6 fatty acid synthesis pathways to elucidate which enzymes might be affected by disease and treatment. Compared to controls, the FE group showed significant down-regulation of several n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, including 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 within the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipid classes. Differences between FE and controls were only observed in the n3 class PUFAs; no differences where noted in n6 class PUFAs. The RE group was not significantly different from controls, although some compositional differences within PUFAs were noted. Drug treatment was able to correct the aberrant PUFA levels noted in FE patients, but changes in re patients were not corrective. Treatment caused increases in both n3 and n6 class lipids. These results supported the hypothesis that phospholipid n3 fatty acid deficits are present early in the course of schizophrenia and tend not to persist throughout its course. These changes in lipid metabolism could indicate a metabolic vulnerability in patients with schizophrenia that occurs early in development of the disease.

  3. Interventions to optimise prescribing for older people in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, David P; Raynor, David K; Hughes, Carmel; Barber, Nick; Chen, Timothy F; Spoor, Pat

    2013-02-28

    There is a substantial body of evidence that prescribing for care home residents is suboptimal and requires improvement. Consequently, there is a need to identify effective interventions to optimise prescribing and resident outcomes in this context. The objective of the review was to determine the effect of interventions to optimise prescribing for older people living in care homes. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012); MEDLINE OvidSP (1980 on); EMBASE, OvidSP (1980 on); Ageline, EBSCO (1966 on); CINAHL, EBSCO (1980 on); International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, OvidSP (1980 on); PsycINFO, OvidSP (1980 on); conference proceedings in Web of Science, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - SSH & Science, ISI Web of Knowledge (1990 on); grey literature sources and trial registries; and contacted authors of relevant studies. We also reviewed the references lists of included studies and related reviews (search period November 2012). We included randomised controlled trials evaluating interventions aimed at optimising prescribing for older people (aged 65 years or older) living in institutionalised care facilities. Studies were included if they measured one or more of the following primary outcomes, adverse drug events; hospital admissions;mortality; or secondary outcomes, quality of life (using validated instrument); medication-related problems; medication appropriateness (using validated instrument); medicine costs. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts, assessed studies for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. A narrative summary of results was presented. The eight included studies involved 7653 residents in 262 (range 1 to 85) care homes in six countries. Six studies were cluster

  4. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic syndrome and atypical antipsychotics: Possibility of prediction and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch Pato, Clara M; Molina Rodríguez, Vicente; Franch Valverde, Juan I

    Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are associated with high morbidity and mortality, due to inherent health factors, genetic factors, and factors related to psychopharmacological treatment. Antipsychotics, like other drugs, have side-effects that can substantially affect the physical health of patients, with substantive differences in the side-effect profile and in the patients in which these side-effects occur. To understand and identify these risk groups could help to prevent the occurrence of the undesired effects. A prospective study, with 24 months follow-up, was conducted in order to analyse the physical health of severe mental patients under maintenance treatment with atypical antipsychotics, as well as to determine any predictive parameters at anthropometric and/or analytical level for good/bad outcome of metabolic syndrome in these patients. There were no significant changes in the physical and biochemical parameters individually analysed throughout the different visits. The baseline abdominal circumference (lambda Wilks P=.013) and baseline HDL-cholesterol levels (lambda Wilks P=.000) were the parameters that seem to be more relevant above the rest of the metabolic syndrome constituents diagnosis criteria as predictors in the long-term. In the search for predictive factors of metabolic syndrome, HDL-cholesterol and abdominal circumference at the time of inclusion were selected, as such that the worst the baseline results were, the higher probability of long-term improvement. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The therapeutic relationship and adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie McCabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous research has shown that a better therapeutic relationship (TR predicts more positive attitudes towards antipsychotic medication, but did not address whether it is also linked with actual adherence. This study investigated whether the TR is associated with adherence to antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: 134 clinicians and 507 of their patients with schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder participated in a European multi-centre study. A logistic regression model examined how the TR as rated by patients and by clinicians is associated with medication adherence, adjusting for clinician clustering and symptom severity. RESULTS: Patient and clinician ratings of the TR were weakly inter-correlated (r(s = 0.13, p = 0.004, but each was independently linked with better adherence. After adjusting for patient rated TR and symptom severity, each unit increase in clinician rated TR was associated with an increase of the odds ratio of good compliance by 65.9% (95% CI: 34.6% to 104.5%. After adjusting for clinician rated TR and symptom severity, for each unit increase in patient rated TR the odds ratio of good compliance was increased by 20.8% (95% CI: 4.4% to 39.8%. CONCLUSIONS: A better TR is associated with better adherence to medication among patients with schizophrenia. Patients' and clinicians' perspectives of the TR are both important, but may reflect distinct aspects.

  7. Hypothermia due to Antipsychotic Medication: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherryl Zonnenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHypothermia is a rare, but potentially fatal adverse effect of antipsychotic drug (APD use. Although the opposite condition, hyperthermia, has been researched extensively in the context of the malignant antipsychotic syndrome, little is known about hypothermia due to APDs.ObjectiveThis study aimed to review the literature on hypothermia in the context of APD use, and formulate implications for research and clinical care.MethodsA systematic search was made in PubMed and Ovid Medline.ResultsThe literature search yielded 433 articles, including 57 original case descriptions of hypothermia developed during APD use with non-toxic plasma levels. All cases together indicate that the risk of developing hypothermia is highest during the 7 days following initiation, or increase in dosage, of APDs, especially in the presence of additional predisposing factors, such as advanced age, exposure to cold, adjuvant use of benzodiazepines, and (subclinical hypothyroidism. In addition, data derived from drug-monitoring agencies suggest that the prevalence of APD-related hypothermia is at least 10 times higher than suggested by the literature.ConclusionWe conclude that health-care professionals need to monitor the body temperature of patients starting with (an increased dose of APDs for a duration of 7–10 days to prevent hypothermia, especially in the presence of multiple risk factors. Moreover, systematic studies are needed to establish the actual prevalence of APD-related hypothermia as well as the relative risk for individual APDs.

  8. Atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia

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    Hrdlicka M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Michal Hrdlicka, Iva Dudova Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs have been successfully used in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS. This review summarizes the randomized, double-blind, controlled studies of AAPs in EOS, including clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. No significant differences in efficacy between AAPs were found, with the exception of clozapine and ziprasidone. Clozapine demonstrated superior efficacy in treatment-resistant patients with EOS, whereas ziprasidone failed to demonstrate efficacy in the treatment of EOS. Our review also focuses on the onset of action and weight gain associated with AAPs. The data on onset of action of AAPs in pediatric psychiatry are scanty and inconsistent. Olanzapine appears to cause the most significant weight gain in patients with EOS, while ziprasidone and aripiprazole seem to cause the least. Keywords: early-onset schizophrenia, atypical antipsychotics, efficacy, onset of action, weight gain

  9. Why do psychiatric patients stop antipsychotic medication? A systematic review of reasons for nonadherence to medication in patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Sajatovic, Martha; Hatch, Ainslie; Kramata, Pavel; Docherty, John P

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication reduces the severity of serious mental illness (SMI) and improves patient outcomes only when medicines were taken as prescribed. Nonadherence to the treatment of SMI increases the risk of relapse and hospitalization and reduces the quality of life. It is necessary to understand the factors influencing nonadherence to medication in order to identify appropriate interventions. This systematic review assessed the published evidence on modifiable reasons for nonadherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with SMI. Articles published between January 1, 2005, and September 10, 2015, were searched on MEDLINE through PubMed. Abstracts were independently screened by 2 randomly assigned authors for inclusion, and disagreement was resolved by another author. Selected full-text articles were divided among all authors for review. A qualitative analysis of data from 36 articles identified 11 categories of reasons for nonadherence. Poor insight was identified as a reason for nonadherence in 55.6% (20/36) of studies, followed by substance abuse (36.1%, 13/36), a negative attitude toward medication (30.5%, 11/36), medication side effects (27.8%, 10/36), and cognitive impairments (13.4%, 7/36). A key reason directly associated with intentional nonadherence was a negative attitude toward medication, a mediator of effects of insight and therapeutic alliance. Substance abuse was the only reason consistently associated with unintentional nonadherence, regardless of type and stage of SMI. Although adherence research is inherently biased because of numerous methodological limitations and specific reasons under investigation, reasons for nonadherence consistently identified as significant across studies likely reflect valid existing associations with important clinical implications. This systematic review suggests that a negative attitude toward medication and substance abuse are consistent reasons for nonadherence to antipsychotic medication among people

  10. Dried Blood Spots Combined With Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of the Antipsychotics Risperidone, Aripiprazole, Pipamperone, and Their Major Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Camille; Kloosterboer, Sanne M; van der Nagel, Bart C H; Wijma, Rixt A; Dierckx, Bram; Dieleman, Gwen C; van Gelder, Teun; Koch, Birgit C P

    2017-08-01

    Risperidone, aripiprazole, and pipamperone are antipsychotic drugs frequently prescribed for the treatment of comorbid behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorders. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) could be useful to decrease side effects and to improve patient outcome. Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection seems to be an attractive technique to develop TDM of these drugs in a pediatric population. The aim of this work was to develop and validate a DBS assay suitable for TDM and home sampling. Risperidone, 9-OH risperidone, aripiprazole, dehydroaripiprazole, and pipamperone were extracted from DBS and analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a C18 reversed-phase column with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate/formic acid in water or methanol. The suitability of DBS for TDM was assessed by studying the influence of specific parameters: extraction solution, EDTA carryover, hematocrit, punching location, spot volume, and hemolysis. The assay was validated with respect to conventional guidelines for bioanalytical methods. The method was linear, specific without any critical matrix effect, and with a mean recovery around 90%. Accuracy and imprecision were within the acceptance criteria in samples with hematocrit values from 30% to 45%. EDTA or hemolysis did not skew the results, and no punching carryover was observed. No significant influence of the spot volume or the punch location was observed. The antipsychotics were all stable in DBS stored 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4 or -80°C. The method was successfully applied to quantify the 3 antipsychotics and their metabolites in patient samples. A UHPLC-MS/MS method has been successfully validated for the simultaneous quantification of risperidone, 9-OH risperidone, aripiprazole, dehydroaripiprazole, and pipamperone in DBS. The assay provided good analytical performances for TDM and clinical research applications.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Financial Incentives to Promote Adherence to Depot Antipsychotic Medication: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Henderson

    Full Text Available Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis can promote adherence to depot antipsychotic medication, but the cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been examined.Economic evaluation within a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial. 141 patients under the care of 73 teams (clusters were randomised to intervention or control; 138 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizo-affective disorder or bipolar disorder participated. Intervention participants received £15 per depot injection over 12 months, additional to usual acute, mental and community primary health services. The control group received usual health services. Main outcome measures: incremental cost per 20% increase in adherence to depot antipsychotic medication; incremental cost of 'good' adherence (defined as taking at least 95% of the prescribed number of depot medications over the intervention period.Economic and outcome data for baseline and 12-month follow-up were available for 117 participants. The adjusted difference in adherence between groups was 12.2% (73.4% control vs. 85.6% intervention; the adjusted costs difference was £598 (95% CI -£4,533, £5,730. The extra cost per patient to increase adherence to depot medications by 20% was £982 (95% CI -£8,020, £14,000. The extra cost per patient of achieving 'good' adherence was £2,950 (CI -£19,400, £27,800. Probability of cost-effectiveness exceeded 97.5% at willingness-to-pay values of £14,000 for a 20% increase in adherence and £27,800 for good adherence.Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis is cost-effective in promoting adherence to depot antipsychotic medication. Direct healthcare costs (including costs of the financial incentive are unlikely to be increased by this intervention.ISRCTN.com 77769281.

  12. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  13. Vitamin E for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Weiser, Karla; Maayan, Nicola; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-01-17

    Antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medication is used extensively to treat people with chronic mental illnesses. Its use, however, is associated with adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Vitamin E has been proposed as a treatment to prevent or decrease TD. The primary objective was to determine the clinical effects of vitamin E in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness who had developed antipsychotic-induced TD.The secondary objectives were:1. to examine whether the effect of vitamin E was maintained as duration of follow-up increased;2. to test the hypothesis that the use of vitamin E is most effective for those with early onset TD (less than five years) SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2015 and April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included reports if they were controlled trials dealing with people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia who remained on their antipsychotic medication and had been randomly allocated to either vitamin E or to a placebo, no intervention, or any other intervention. We independently extracted data from these trials and we estimated risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We assessed risk of bias and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. The review now includes 13 poorly reported randomised trials (total 478 people), all participants were adults with chronic psychiatric disorders, mostly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic-induced TD. There was no clear difference between vitamin E and placebo for the outcome of TD: not improved to a clinically important extent (6 RCTs, N = 264, RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.01, low-quality evidence

  14. Are antipsychotics or antidepressants needed for psychotic depression? A systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing antidepressant or antipsychotic monotherapy with combination treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Arusha; Correll, Christoph U

    2012-04-01

    To perform a meta-analysis of antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment versus antidepressant or antipsychotic monotherapy for psychotic depression. We performed an electronic search (from inception of databases until February 28, 2011) in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, without language or time restrictions. Search terms were (psychosis OR psychotic OR hallucinations OR hallucinating OR delusions OR delusional) AND (depression OR depressed OR major depressive disorder) AND (random OR randomized OR randomly). Eight randomized, placebo-controlled acute-phase studies in adults (N = 762) with standardized criteria-defined psychotic depression (including Research Diagnostic Criteria, DSM-III, DSM-IV, or ICD-10) were meta-analyzed, yielding 10 comparisons. Antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment was compared in 5 trials with 6 treatment arms (n = 337) with antidepressant monotherapy and in 4 trials with 4 treatment arms (n = 447) with antipsychotic monotherapy. Primary outcome was study-defined inefficacy; secondary outcomes included all-cause discontinuation, specific psychopathology ratings, and side effects. Using random effects models, we calculated relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), number-needed-to-treat/harm (NNT/NNH), and effect size (ES). Antidepressant-antipsychotic cotreatment outperformed antidepressant monotherapy regarding less study-defined inefficacy (no. of comparisons = 6; n = 378; RR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59-0.98; P = .03; heterogeneity [I2] = 34%) (NNT = 7; 95% CI, 4-20; P = .009) and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scores (no. of comparisons = 4; n = 289; ES = -0.25; 95% CI, -0.49 to -0.02; P = .03; I2 = 0%), with trend-level superiority for depression ratings (no. of comparisons = 5; n = 324; ES = -0.20; 95% CI, -0.44 to 0.03; P = .09; I2 = 10%), but not regarding psychosis ratings (no. of comparisons = 3; n = 161; ES = -0.24; 95% CI, -0.85 to 0.38; P = .45; I2 = 70%). Antidepressant-antipsychotic

  15. Neuropharmacology and mental health nurse prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skingsley, David; Bradley, Eleanor J; Nolan, Peter

    2006-08-01

    To outline the development and content of a 'top-up' neuropharmacology module for mental health nurse prescribers and consider how much pharmacology training is required to ensure effective mental health prescribing practice. Debate about the content of prescribing training courses has persisted within the United Kingdom since the mid-1980s. In early 2003 supplementary prescribing was introduced and gave mental health nurses the opportunity to become prescribers. The challenge of the nurse prescribing curriculum for universities is that they have only a short time to provide nurses from a range of backgrounds with enough knowledge to ensure that they meet agreed levels of competency for safe prescribing. There is growing concern within mental health care that the prescribing of medication in mental health services falls short of what would be deemed good practice. Over the past two decades, nurse training has increasingly adopted a psychosocial approach to nursing care raising concerns that, although nurses attending prescribing training may be able to communicate effectively with service users, they may lack the basic knowledge of biology and pharmacology to make effective decisions about medication. Following the completion of a general nurse prescribing course, mental health nurses who attended were asked to identify their specific needs during the evaluation phase. Although they had covered basic pharmacological principles in their training, they stated that they needed more specific information about drugs used in mental health; particularly how to select appropriate drug treatments for mental health conditions. This paper describes how the nurses were involved in the design of a specific module which would enable them to transfer their theoretical leaning to practice and in so doing increase their confidence in their new roles. The findings of this study suggest that the understanding and confidence of mental health nurse prescribers about the drugs they

  16. Prescribing Errors Involving Medication Dosage Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesar, Timothy S

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Prescribing errors involving medication dose formulations have been reported to occur frequently in hospitals. No systematic evaluations of the characteristics of errors related to medication dosage formulation have been performed. OBJECTIVE To quantify the characteristics, frequency, and potential adverse patient effects of prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms . DESIGN Evaluation of all detected medication prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms in a 631-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type, frequency, and potential for adverse effects of prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms. RESULTS A total of 1,115 clinically significant prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms were detected during the 60-month study period. The annual number of detected errors increased throughout the study period. Detailed analysis of the 402 errors detected during the last 16 months of the study demonstrated the most common errors to be: failure to specify controlled release formulation (total of 280 cases; 69.7%) both when prescribing using the brand name (148 cases; 36.8%) and when prescribing using the generic name (132 cases; 32.8%); and prescribing controlled delivery formulations to be administered per tube (48 cases; 11.9%). The potential for adverse patient outcome was rated as potentially “fatal or severe” in 3 cases (0.7%), and “serious” in 49 cases (12.2%). Errors most commonly involved cardiovascular agents (208 cases; 51.7%). CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized patients are at risk for adverse outcomes due to prescribing errors related to inappropriate use of medication dosage forms. This information should be considered in the development of strategies to prevent adverse patient outcomes resulting from such errors. PMID:12213138

  17. A solid grounding: prescribing skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Deborah; Darbyshire, Daniel; Gordon, Morris; Agius, Steven; Baker, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Prescribing is an error-prone process for all doctors, from those who are newly qualified through to those at consultant level. Newly qualified doctors write the majority of in-patient prescriptions and therefore represent an opportunity for safety improvement. Attention to prescribing as a patient-safety issue and potential educational interventions to help improve the situation have been published, but offer little to inform educators why and how any interventions may succeed. In order to identify areas of good practice, and to provide evidence of areas requiring further investigation and innovation, we aimed to ascertain the full range of prescribing practices for final-year medical students and newly qualified doctors across a large geopolitical region of the UK. A questionnaire methodology was used. One questionnaire was sent to those responsible for final-year education, and a further, different questionnaire was sent to those responsible for the training of newly qualified doctors, asking about prescribing education in their locality. Questionnaires were sent to 15 hospitals in total. Prescribing is an error-prone process for all doctors Twelve hospitals contributed to final-year medical student data: a response rate of 80 per cent. A variety of methods, including student assistantship, pharmacist-led skills sessions and practical assessment, were offered to varying degrees. Free-text responses identified opportunities for different prescribing education and support. All 15 hospitals provided data on doctors' education, with interventions including e-learning, assessment and support from ward-based pharmacists. Current education focuses on the technical and knowledge-based paradigm of prescribing. Human factors and the impact of electronic prescribing should play a part in future developments in prescribing education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nurse practitioner prescribing: an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Fong,1,2 Thomas Buckley,2 Andrew Cashin3 1St George Hospital, Kogarah, 2Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia Background: Internationally, the delivery of care provided by nurses and midwives has undergone a significant change due to a variety of interrelated factors, including economic circumstances, a diminishing number of medical providers, the unavailability of adequate health care services in underserved and rural areas, and growing specialization among the professions. One solution to the challenges of care delivery has been the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs and the authorization of NPs to prescribe medicines. Aim: The aim of this paper was to review the current international literature related to NP prescribing and compare the findings to the Australian context. The review focuses on literature from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods: Databases were searched from January 2000 to January 2015. The following keywords: “nurse practitioner”, “advanced nurse”, “advanced practice nurse”, “prescri*”, “Australia”, “United States America”, “UK”, “New Zealand”, “Canada”, “Europe”, “drug prescri*”, “prescri* authority”, and “prescri* legislation” were used. Findings: NPs tend to prescribe in differing contexts of practice to provide care in underserved populations and require good systems literacy to practice across complex systems. The key themes identified internationally related to NP prescribing relate to barriers to prescribing, confidence in prescribing, and the unique role of NPs in prescribing medicines, eg, the high prevalence of prescribing pain medicines in several countries, including Australia. Conclusion: Across all countries reviewed, there appears a need for further research into the organizational and

  19. Experiences of women in secure care who have been prescribed clozapine for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Geoffrey L; Frogley, Catherine; Mason, Fiona; Anagnostakis, Katina; Picchioni, Marco M

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic medicine which can cause significant side-effects. It is often prescribed off-license in severe cases of borderline personality disorder contrary to national treatment guidelines. Little is known about the experiences of those who take clozapine for borderline personality disorder. We explored the lived-experience of women in secure inpatient care who were prescribed clozapine for borderline personality disorder. Adult females ( N  = 20) participated in audio-taped semi-structured interviews. Transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. The central themes related to evaluation, wellbeing, understanding and self-management; for many, their subjective wellbeing on clozapine was preferred to prior levels of functioning and symptomatology, sometimes profoundly so. The negative and potentially adverse effects of clozapine were explained as regrettable but relatively unimportant. When psychological interventions are, at least initially, ineffective then clozapine treatment is likely to be evaluated positively by a group of women with borderline personality disorder in secure care despite the potential disadvantages.

  20. Cannabidiol as a potential new type of an antipsychotic. A critical review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin Rohleder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is urgent need for the development of mechanistically different and less side-effect prone antipsychotic compounds. The endocannabinoid system has been suggested to represent a potential new target in this indication. While the chronic use of cannabis itself has been considered a risk factor contributing to the development of schizophrenia, triggered by the phytocannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9 THC, cannabidiol, the second most important phytocannabinoid, appears to have no psychotomimetic potential. Although results from animal studies are inconsistent to a certain extent and seem to depend on behavioral paradigms, treatment duration and experimental conditions applied, cannabidiol has shown antipsychotic properties in rodents and rhesus monkeys. After some individual treatment attempts, the first randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial had been conducted and demonstrated that cannabidiol exerts antipsychotic properties in acute schizophrenia comparable to the antipsychotic drug amisulpride accompanied by a superior, placebo-like side effect profile. As the clinical improvement by cannabidiol was significantly associated with elevated anandamide levels, it appears likely that its antipsychotic action is based on mechanisms associated with increased anandamide concentrations. However, a plethora of mechanisms of action has been suggested, but their potential relevance for the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol needs still to be investigated. The clarification of these mechanisms as well as the establishment of cannabidiol’s antipsychotic efficacy and its hopefully benign side-effect profile remains the subject of a number of previously started clinical trials.

  1. Cannabidiol as a Potential New Type of an Antipsychotic. A Critical Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Cathrin; Müller, Juliane K.; Lange, Bettina; Leweke, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is urgent need for the development of mechanistically different and less side-effect prone antipsychotic compounds. The endocannabinoid system has been suggested to represent a potential new target in this indication. While the chronic use of cannabis itself has been considered a risk factor contributing to the development of schizophrenia, triggered by the phytocannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), cannabidiol, the second most important phytocannabinoid, appears to have no psychotomimetic potential. Although, results from animal studies are inconsistent to a certain extent and seem to depend on behavioral paradigms, treatment duration and experimental conditions applied, cannabidiol has shown antipsychotic properties in both rodents and rhesus monkeys. After some individual treatment attempts, the first randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial demonstrated that in acute schizophrenia cannabidiol exerts antipsychotic properties comparable to the antipsychotic drug amisulpride while being accompanied by a superior, placebo-like side effect profile. As the clinical improvement by cannabidiol was significantly associated with elevated anandamide levels, it appears likely that its antipsychotic action is based on mechanisms associated with increased anandamide concentrations. Although, a plethora of mechanisms of action has been suggested, their potential relevance for the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol still needs to be investigated. The clarification of these mechanisms as well as the establishment of cannabidiol’s antipsychotic efficacy and its hopefully benign side-effect profile remains the subject of a number of previously started clinical trials. PMID:27877130

  2. Survey of antipsychotic medication curriculum content in Australian university nursing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Paul; Stomski, Norman J; McAllister, Margaret; Wynaden, Dianne; Hungerford, Catherine; Usher, Kim; Maude, Phil; Crowther, Andrew; Batterbee, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Antipsychotic medication has long been one of the first-line interventions for people with serious mental illness, with outcomes including reductions in symptoms and relapse rates. More recently, however, questions have been raised about the efficacy of antipsychotic medications, especially in light of their side-effect profile. Such questions have implications for the nurses administering antipsychotic medications, particularly in relation to their knowledge of the antipsychotic medication, its efficacy, and side-effect profile. Also important is the education of nursing students about antipsychotic medications, their use, and management. The present study reports findings of research that explored current curriculum content concerning psychopharmacological treatment in Australian undergraduate and postgraduate nursing programmes. Using a survey design, the research examined the content and modes of delivery of this content to gauge how well students are prepared for administering antipsychotic medication to people with serious mental illness. Findings of the research suggested the need for improvement in preparing nursing students to administer antipsychotic medication, including indications, contraindications, as well as recognition and management of side-effects. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in institutionalised older patients in Spain: the STOPP-START criteria compared with the Beers criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aims of this study were to identify potentially inappropriate prescribing using the Beers and STOPP criteria. The START criteria were applied to detect prescription omission in the geriatric population. We compared the utility of these criteria in institutionalised older people.Methods: Descriptive study reviewing the medication and clinical records of 81 residents (aged 65 years and more by pharmacists in a nursing home in the Lleida region (Spain.Results: The mean patients’ age was 84 (SD=8 years, with an average of 5 drugs per resident (total prescriptions: 416 medicines. The Beers criteria identified potentially inappropriate medication use in 25% of patients and 48% of patients used at least 1 inappropriate medication according to STOPP criteria. The most frequent potentially inappropriate medications for both criteria were long-acting benzodiazepines and NSAIDs. START detected 58 potential prescribing omissions in 44% of patients. Calcium-vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis was the most frequent rule (15%, but omissions corresponding to the cardiovascular system implied 23% of patients.Conclusion: The STOPP-START criteria reveal that potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP is a highly prevalent problem among Spanish nursing home residents, and a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the number of medicines prescribed and the number of PIP detected in this study. The STOPP criteria detect a larger number of PI medications in this geriatric population than the Beers criteria. The prescribing omissions detected by the START criteria are relevant and require intervention. Pharmacists’ review of medications may help identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and, through an interdisciplinary approach, working with physicians may improve prescribing practices among geriatric residents of nursing homes.

  4. Efficacy and safety of atypical antipsychotic drugs (quetiapine, risperidone, aripiprazole and paliperidone compared with placebo or typical antipsychotic drugs for treating refractory schizophrenia: overview of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Melnik

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: According to some cohort studies, the prevalence of refractory schizophrenia (RS is 20-40%. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of aripiprazole, paliperidone, quetiapine and risperidone for treating RS. METHODS: This was a critical appraisal of Cochrane reviews published in the Cochrane Library, supplemented with reference to more recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs on RS. The following databases were searched: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline (1966-2009, Controlled Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (2009, Issue 2, Embase (Excerpta Medica (1980-2009, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (Lilacs (1982-2009. There was no language restriction. Randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses evaluating atypical antipsychotics for treating RS were included. RESULTS: Seven Cochrane systematic reviews and 10 additional RCTs were included in this review. The data generally showed minor differences between the atypical antipsychotics evaluated and typical antipsychotics, regarding improvement in disease symptoms, despite better adherence to treatment with atypical antipsychotics. Risperidone was specifically evaluated in patients with RS in one of the systematic reviews included, with favorable outcomes, but without definitive superiority compared with other drugs of proven efficacy, like amisulpride, clozapine and olanzapine. CONCLUSIONS: The findings underscore the difficulty in treating these patients, with high dropout rates and treatment patterns of modest improvement in assessments of effectiveness. Atypical antipsychotics have advantages over typical antipsychotics mainly through their better safety profile, which leads to better adherence to treatment. A combination of antipsychotics may also be an option for some refractory patients.

  5. Postprandial prolactin suppression appears absent in antipsychotic-treated male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Klara; Broberg, Brian V; Bak, Nikolaj; Madsen, Anna; Mortensen, Henrik B; Søgaard, Birgitte; Szecsi, Pal B; Knop, Filip K; Lublin, Henrik; Ebdrup, Bjørn H

    2015-10-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a common side-effect of antipsychotic treatment. Antipsychotics and hyperprolactinemia are both considered risk factors of metabolic disturbances and diabetes. Investigations on prolactin response to meal ingestion in antipsychotic-treated patients are missing. In a case-control design, 49 antipsychotic-treated, clinically stable, non-diabetic, schizophrenia spectrum male patients were compared with 93 healthy male controls by age (33.1, SD 7.4 vs. 32.9, SD 6.6 years), body mass index (26.2, SD 4.6 vs. 26.1, SD 3.9 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (96.4, SD 13.0 vs. 96.7, SD 11.9 cm). Serum-prolactin was measured in the morning and 90 min after ingestion of a standardized liquid meal (2268 kJ). Fasting prolactin levels varied considerably, and mean fasting prolactin levels did not significantly differ between patients and controls (12.33, SD 11.58 vs. 10.06, SD 8.67 ng/ml, p = 0.623). In the controls, postprandial serum prolactin was significantly reduced (Δ -2.53, SD 9.75 ng/ml, p = 0.016). In antipsychotic-treated patients postprandial serum prolactin tended to increase (Δ 2.62, SD 10.96 ng/ml, p = 0.081). Analyses of subgroups based on the prolactinogenic liability of their antipsychotic treatment indicated 22 to 65% higher postprandial prolactin levels with high and intermediate prolactinogenic antipsychotics. A physiological postprandial suppression of serum prolactin appears absent in antipsychotic-treated males. Marked variability in fasting prolactin levels may reflect individual variations in the diurnal cycle. Uniform acquisition procedures accounting for diurnal variation and food intake may enhance reliability of prolactin levels in antipsychotic-treated male patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Antipsychotic medications and stroke in schizophrenia: A case-crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yin Chen

    Full Text Available The association between antipsychotic use and the risk of stroke in schizophrenic patients is controversial. We sought to study the association in a nationwide cohort with schizophrenia.Using a retrospective cohort of patients with schizophrenia (N = 31,976 derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 802 new-onset cases of stroke were identified within 10 years of follow-up (from 2000 through 2010. We designed a case-crossover study using 14-day windows to explore the risk factors of stroke and the association between antipsychotic drugs and the risk of stroke. We analyzed the risks of individual antipsychotics on various subgroups of stroke including ischemic, hemorrhagic, and other strokes, and the risks based on the antipsychotic receptor-binding profile of each drug.Use of any second-generation antipsychotic was associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted risk ratio = 1.45, P = .009 within 14 days while the use of any first-generation antipsychotic was not. Intriguingly, the use of any second-generation antipsychotic was associated with ischemic stroke but not hemorrhagic stroke. The antipsychotic receptor-binding profile analysis showed that the antihistamine 1 receptor was significantly associated with ischemic stroke (adjusted risk ratio = 1.72, P = .037, and the sensitivity analysis based on the 7-day window of exposure validated the association (adjusted risk ratio = 1.87, P = .015.Use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs appeared to be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke in the patients studied, possibly mediated by high affinity for histamine-1 receptor blockade. Further research regarding the underlying biological mechanism and drug safety is suggested.

  7. Impact of regulatory measures on antipsychotics drug consumption in Castilla y León, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Arias, L H; Treceño Lobato, C; Pérez García, S; García Ortega, P; Sáinz Gil, M; Sanz Fadrique, R; Carvajal García-Pando, A

    2016-12-01

    Antipsychotics are currently used to treat different diseases; even some off-labelled conditions are treated with this medication. Consumption and cost of antipsychotic drugs sharply increased in Spain after second-generation drugs were marketed; several regulatory measures were adopted to curb this trend. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of these measures upon the use and cost of antipsychotics. Study of drug use (SDU) from 1995 to 2012. Consumption and cost data were obtained from the CONCYLIA database; this database contains the retail community pharmacies sales of medicinal products reimbursed by the National Health System in Castilla y León (Spain). Data are presented as defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID) and day treatment cost (DTC). First-generation antipsychotics prescriptions gradually decreased from 3.0 to 1.8 DID; meanwhile, prescriptions for second-generation antipsychotics considerably increased from 0.3 to 9.9 DID. The use of risperidone dropped after the marketing of its structural derivative paliperidone with a similar efficacy but with a substantially higher cost per day. In 2011 and thereafter, patients in Spain began to pay a part of the medications cost, but this did not decrease antipsychotics consumption. Global cost of antipsychotics only began to fall after measures were adopted to lower the price of medicines because of the economic collapse in Spain after May 2010. Several health policy measures have tried to reduce antipsychotics consumption in Spain, special ways of dispensing, marketing of generic drugs and special economic measures for patients. These measures eventually failed to avoid the increase in antipsychotics use. The cost only dropped when lowering prescription drug prices took place. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical and economic ramifications of switching antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faries, Douglas E; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Nyhuis, Allen W; Kinon, Bruce J

    2009-09-02

    Switching between antipsychotic medications is common in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, data on clinical and economic outcomes from antipsychotic switching, in particular acute care service use, is fairly limited. The goal of this research was to assess the clinical and economic ramifications of switching antipsychotics during outpatient management of schizophrenia. Data from a 1-year randomized, open-label cost-effectiveness study involving typical and atypical antipsychotics were assessed. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted. The risk of crisis-related events, use of acute-care services, and the time to the initial use of such services were determined in outpatients who switched antipsychotics compared with those who continued with their initial medications. Health care resource utilization data were abstracted from medical records and other sources (e.g., patient self-report), and direct costs were estimated using previously published benchmarks. Almost one-third of patients (29.3%) underwent a switch from their initial antipsychotic agent, with an average duration of 100 days before such treatment alterations. Compared with their counterparts who remained on their initial therapies, individuals who switched antipsychotics experienced a significantly higher risk of acute-care services, including hospitalization (p = .013) and crisis services (p = .011). Patients undergoing medication switches also used acute-care services significantly sooner (p = .004) and accrued an additional $3,000 (a 25% increase) in annual total health care costs per patient, most of which was due to acute-care expenditures. Switching antipsychotic medications was found to be associated with considerably poorer clinical and economic outcomes, as reflected by, more frequent and more rapid use of acute-care services compared with persons remaining on their initial treatments. Trial ID 2325 in LillyTrials.com (also accessible via

  9. Clinical and economic ramifications of switching antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyhuis Allen W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switching between antipsychotic medications is common in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, data on clinical and economic outcomes from antipsychotic switching, in particular acute care service use, is fairly limited. The goal of this research was to assess the clinical and economic ramifications of switching antipsychotics during outpatient management of schizophrenia. Methods Data from a 1-year randomized, open-label cost-effectiveness study involving typical and atypical antipsychotics were assessed. The study protocol permitted switching of antipsychotics when clinically warranted. The risk of crisis-related events, use of acute-care services, and the time to the initial use of such services were determined in outpatients who switched antipsychotics compared with those who continued with their initial medications. Health care resource utilization data were abstracted from medical records and other sources (e.g., patient self-report, and direct costs were estimated using previously published benchmarks. Results Almost one-third of patients (29.3% underwent a switch from their initial antipsychotic agent, with an average duration of 100 days before such treatment alterations. Compared with their counterparts who remained on their initial therapies, individuals who switched antipsychotics experienced a significantly higher risk of acute-care services, including hospitalization (p = .013 and crisis services (p = .011. Patients undergoing medication switches also used acute-care services significantly sooner (p = .004 and accrued an additional $3,000 (a 25% increase in annual total health care costs per patient, most of which was due to acute-care expenditures. Conclusion Switching antipsychotic medications was found to be associated with considerably poorer clinical and economic outcomes, as reflected by, more frequent and more rapid use of acute-care services compared with persons remaining on their initial treatments

  10. Challenges and opportunities for the development of new antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forray, Carlos; Buller, Raimund

    2017-11-01

    In spite of the significant impact that the serendipitous discovery of drugs with antipsychotic properties had on the care of patients with psychotic disorders, there are significant challenges when aiming at therapeutic goals such as remission, recovery, improved health-related quality of life and functioning. The efficacy and effectiveness of existing antipsychotic drugs fail to address the full spectrum of symptoms and functional deficits that currently prevent patients with psychotic disorders from achieving fulfilling lives. The study of the pharmacological mechanism of action has increased our knowledge on molecular targets and brain circuits related to the antipsychotic properties of this drug class. However, our understanding of how these molecular targets and brain circuits relate to other aspects of disease pathophysiology like cognitive impairment and negative symptoms is incomplete although these are significant clinical unmet needs. Currently, there is still an important knowledge gap between psychopathology and pathophysiology in schizophrenia research. This may have contributed to some recent costly failures of large clinical development programs for drugs targeted at glutamatergic function and nicotinic receptors. The lack of success of these pharmacological approaches to achieve clinical validation raises important questions concerning the underlying hypothesis that guided the choice of molecular targets, and about the predictive validity of translational models that supported the rationale for testing these drugs in clinical studies. From a clinical perspective there is a need to more strongly consider the disease heterogeneity linked to the use of the current diagnostic classification of subjects and to the validity of the psychopathological constructs and assessments that are used to assess clinical outcomes. A paradigm shift in the development of drugs for schizophrenia is needed. This will require among other addressing: the shortcomings of a

  11. Nonadherence with antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: challenges and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad PM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter M Haddad,1,2 Cecilia Brain,3,4 Jan Scott5,6 1Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, University of Manchester, Manchester, 2Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 4Nå Ut-teamet, Psychosis Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; 5Academic Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, 6Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK Abstract: Nonadherence with medication occurs in all chronic medical disorders. It is a particular challenge in schizophrenia due to the illness's association with social isolation, stigma, and comorbid substance misuse, plus the effect of symptom domains on adherence, including positive and negative symptoms, lack of insight, depression, and cognitive impairment. Nonadherence lies on a spectrum, is often covert, and is underestimated by clinicians, but affects more than one third of patients with schizophrenia per annum. It increases the risk of relapse, rehospitalization, and self-harm, increases inpatient costs, and lowers quality of life. It results from multiple patient, clinician, illness, medication, and service factors, but a useful distinction is between intentional and unintentional nonadherence. There is no gold standard approach to the measurement of adherence as all methods have pros and cons. Interventions to improve adherence include psychoeducation and other psychosocial interventions, antipsychotic long-acting injections, electronic reminders, service-based interventions, and financial incentives. These overlap, all have some evidence of effectiveness, and the intervention adopted should be tailored to the individual. Psychosocial interventions that utilize combined approaches seem more effective than unidimensional approaches. There is increasing interest in electronic reminders

  12. Medicare Part D Prescriber Interactive Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has prepared a public data set, the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Part D Prescriber Public...

  13. Design of materials with prescribed nonlinear properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    We systematically design materials using topology optimization to achieve prescribed nonlinear properties under finite deformation. Instead of a formal homogenization procedure, a numerical experiment is proposed to evaluate the material performance in longitudinal and transverse tensile tests...

  14. The social act of electronic medication prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Prescribing medication is embedded in social norms and cultures. In modern Western health care professionals and policy makers have attempted to rationalize medicine by addressing cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and therapeutic treatments and the development of

  15. A comparison of electronic monitoring vs. clinician rating of antipsychotic adherence in outpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Matthew; Fisher, Robert; Whatley, Katrina; Holland, Rhiannon; Varghese, Femina; Carmody, Thomas; Magouirk, Brianne; Rush, A John

    2005-02-28

    Antipsychotic non-adherence rates of outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder was assessed by electronic monitoring and clinician rating. Antipsychotic adherence was determined monthly over 3 consecutive months with (1) the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) cap and (2) the Clinician Rating Scale. Non-adherence was defined as daily adherence of <70% during any one of three monthly evaluations for MEMS and ratings of antipsychotic non-adherence.

  16. Evaluating residents in the nuclear medicine residency training program: an educational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, T.N.; San Luis, T.O.L.; Leus, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The comprehensive evaluation of medical residents in a residency-training program includes the use of educational tools to measure the attainment of competencies in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains as prescribed in the training curriculum. Attention is almost always focused on the testing of cognitive domain of the learners with limited attention given on the psychomotor and affective parameters, which are in fact, together with the cognitive domain, integral to the students' learning behaviour. This paper aims to review the principles of test construction, including the perspectives on the roles, types and purpose of tests in the domains of learning (cognitive, psychomotor and affective) as well as the use of Non-Test materials for measuring affective learning outcomes and the construction of Performance Tests and Portfolio Assessment tools which are all essential for the effective and efficient evaluation of residents in a Nuclear Medicine Training Program. (author)

  17. Nurse prescribing ethics and medical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J

    This article suggests that nurse prescribers require an awareness of key concepts in ethics, such as deontology and utilitarianism to reflect on current debates and contribute to them. The principles of biomedical ethics have also been influential in the development of professional codes of conduct. Attention is drawn to the importance of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry's code of practice for the pharmaceutical industry in regulating marketing aimed at prescribers.

  18. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2014-01-01

    The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients Soerensen AL1,2, Nielsen LP3,4, Poulsen BK3, Lisby M3,5, Mainz J6,7 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Denmark; 2University College of Northern Denmark; 3...... need to improve the quality in prescribing for psychiatric patients....

  19. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2014-01-01

    The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric PatientsSoerensen AL1,2, Nielsen LP3,4, Poulsen BK3, Lisby M3,5, Mainz J6,7 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Denmark; 2University College of Northern Denmark; 3...... need to improve the quality in prescribing for psychiatric patients....

  20. Pharmaco-epistemology for the prescribing geriatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Couteur, David G; Kendig, Hal

    2008-03-01

    Clinicians are becoming more reliant on their interpretation of clinical trial information to guide prescribing rather than their clinical skills. Thus to improve prescribing, it is increasingly important for clinicians to have an appreciation of epistemology (the science of knowledge and its interpretation) and the broader social context of knowledge. The insights of epistemologists can be useful in understanding the different ways in which clinical trials data are interpreted.

  1. The Impact of Antipsychotic Drugs on Long-term Care, Nursing Home Admission and Death among Dementia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerius, Michael; Johnell, Kristina; Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Eriksdotter, Maria; Haenisch, Britta; Doblhammer, Gabriele

    2017-12-08

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia are commonly treated with antipsychotic drugs (APDs), which have been associated with adverse health effects. We examine the effect of APDs on long-term care (LTC), nursing home admission (NH), and death of dementia patients. We used health claims data of the largest German health insurer from 2004 to 2010 and followed newly-diagnosed dementia patients aged 60 years and older into LTC, NH, and until death. Cox proportional hazards models were estimated to explore whether the risk of these outcomes differed between patients receiving haloperidol, melperone, risperidone, or quetiapine. In a cohort of 6,930 dementia patients who were initially free of LTC dependency, APD users generally faced a two-fold increased risk of LTC relative to non-users. Quetiapine was the exception, showing a comparatively lower risk (HR=1.64; CI=1.35-1.98). Among 9,950 dementia patients initially living in private homes, the risk of moving into a NH was generally increased by about 50% among APD users relative to non-users. Risk of death (N=10,921) was significantly higher for haloperidol-, melperone-, and risperidone- but not for quetiapine users (HR=0.91; CI=0.78-1.08). The excess mortality associated with haloperidol and melperone was greater among patients living in private households. In our study, APDs appeared to accelerate adverse health outcomes in German dementia patients. Differentiating between the effect of antipsychotic drug use among dementia patients residing in private households and in nursing homes, we found that excess mortality for haloperidol and melperone users was higher in private settings. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  2. Drug Utilization and Inappropriate Prescribing in Centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Nisha C; Dregan, Alex; Jackson, Stephen; Gulliford, Martin C

    2016-05-01

    To use primary care electronic health records (EHRs) to evaluate prescriptions and inappropriate prescribing in men and women at age 100. Population-based cohort study. Primary care database in the United Kingdom, 1990 to 2013. Individuals reaching the age of 100 between 1990 and 2013 (N = 11,084; n = 8,982 women, n = 2,102 men). Main drug classes prescribed and potentially inappropriate prescribing according to the 2012 American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria. At the age of 100, 73% of individuals (79% of women, 54% of men) had received one or more prescription drugs, with a median of 7 (interquartile range 0-12) prescription items. The most frequently prescribed drug classes were cardiovascular (53%), central nervous system (CNS) (53%), and gastrointestinal (47%). Overall, 32% of participants (28% of men, 32% of women) who received drug prescriptions may have received one or more potentially inappropriate prescriptions, with temazepam and amitriptyline being the most frequent. CNS prescriptions were potentially inappropriate in 23% of individuals, and anticholinergic prescriptions were potentially inappropriate in 18% of individuals. The majority of centenarians are prescribed one or more drug therapies, and the prescription may be inappropriate for up to one-third of these individuals. Research using EHRs offers opportunities to understand prescribing trends and improve pharmacological care of the oldest adults. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Cleaning, resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Raquel U; Kishan, Divya; Walton, Aaron L; Sneath, Emmy; Cheah, Thomas; Butwilowsky, Judith; Friedman, N Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Residents of residential aged care facilities (RACFs) are at risk of colonization and infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic prescribing is often inappropriate and not based on culture-proven infection. We describe low levels of resident colonization and environmental contamination with resistant gram-negative bacteria in RACFs, but high levels of empirical antibiotic use not guided by microbiologic culture. This research highlights the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and environmental cleaning in aged care facilities. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Raloxifene Plus Antipsychotics Versus Placebo Plus Antipsychotics in Severely Ill Decompensated Postmenopausal Women With Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mark; Levi, Linda; Burshtein, Shimon; Hagin, Michal; Matei, Valentin P; Podea, Delia; Micluția, Ioana; Tiugan, Alexandru; Păcală, Bogdan; Grecu, Iosif Gabos; Noy, Adam; Zamora, Daisy; Davis, John M

    2017-07-01

    Several single-center studies have found raloxifene, an estrogen agonist, to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of schizophrenia in stable patients as augmentation of antipsychotics. This multicenter study assessed whether raloxifene plus antipsychotic treatment, in comparison to placebo plus antipsychotics, improves symptoms or cognition in severely ill decompensated schizophrenia patients. In this 16-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 200 severely ill, decompensated postmenopausal women who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from January 2011 to December 2012 and were randomized to receive either raloxifene 120 mg/d plus antipsychotics or placebo plus antipsychotics. The primary outcome measure was Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score at the end of the trial. The placebo plus antipsychotics group experienced statistically significant improvement in PANSS total score (P plus antipsychotics group, using mixed models for repeated measures, with results favoring placebo by 4.5 points (95% CI, 2.3-6.7). These results were clearly outside the 95% confidence interval. This negative effect was more pronounced in patients who had more frequent relapses and in those with baseline PANSS scores of 100 or higher. There were no differences between groups in Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity scores or Composite Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia scores at 16 weeks (P > .3). Baseline follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol levels did not alter the drug-placebo differences. Individuals in the active treatment arm showed worse outcome than those in the placebo arm, most likely as a result of chance variation, but the results unequivocally show no benefit of antipsychotics plus raloxifene versus antipsychotics plus placebo in this large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in postmenopausal women. These data do not support the use of raloxifene in

  5. Safety, tolerability, and risks associated with first- and second-generation antipsychotics: a state-of-the-art clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmi M

    2017-06-01

    -generation antipsychotics (SGAs ushered in a progressive shift from the paternalistic management of SMI symptoms to a patient-centered approach, which emphasized targets important to patients – psychosocial functioning, quality of life, and recovery. These drugs are no longer limited to specific Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM categories. Evidence indicates that SGAs show an improved safety and tolerability profile compared with FGAs. The incidence of treatment-emergent extrapyramidal side effects is lower, and there is less impairment of cognitive function and treatment-related negative symptoms. However, treatment with SGAs has been associated with a wide range of untoward effects, among which treatment-emergent weight gain and metabolic abnormalities are of notable concern. The present clinical review aims to summarize the safety and tolerability profile of selected FGAs and SGAs and to link treatment-related adverse effects to the pharmacodynamic profile of each drug. Evidence, predominantly derived from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical trials of the drugs amisulpride, aripiprazole, asenapine, brexpiprazole, cariprazine, clozapine, iloperidone, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, CPZ, haloperidol, loxapine, and perphenazine, is summarized. In addition, the safety and tolerability profiles of antipsychotics are discussed in the context of the “behavioral toxicity” conceptual framework, which considers the longitudinal course and the clinical and therapeutic consequences of treatment-emergent side effects. In SMI, SGAs with safer metabolic profiles should ideally be prescribed first. However, alongside with safety, efficacy should also be considered on a patient-tailored basis. Keywords: antipsychotics, side effects, tolerability, safety, psychosis, psychiatry

  6. Adjunctive Atypical Antipsychotic Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Depression, Quality of Life, and Safety Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmans, Glen I.; Berman, Margit I.; Linardatos, Eftihia; Rosenlicht, Nicholas Z.; Perry, Angela; Tsai, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Atypical antipsychotic medications are widely prescribed for the adjunctive treatment of depression, yet their total risk–benefit profile is not well understood. We thus conducted a systematic review of the efficacy and safety profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of depression. Methods and Findings We included randomized trials comparing adjunctive antipsychotic medication to placebo for treatment-resistant depression in adults. Our literature search (conducted in December 2011 and updated on December 14, 2012) identified 14 short-term trials of aripiprazole, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC), quetiapine, and risperidone. When possible, we supplemented published literature with data from manufacturers' clinical trial registries and US Food and Drug Administration New Drug Applications. Study duration ranged from 4 to 12 wk. All four drugs had statistically significant effects on remission, as follows: aripiprazole (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.48–2.73), OFC (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.01–2.0), quetiapine (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.33–2.42), and risperidone (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.31–4.30). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 19 for OFC and nine for each other drug. All drugs with the exception of OFC also had statistically significant effects on response rates, as follows: aripiprazole (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.58–2.72; NNT, 7), OFC (OR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.87–1.93), quetiapine (OR, 1.53, 95% CI, 1.17–2.0; NNT, 10), and risperidone (OR, 1.83, 95% CI, 1.16–2.88; NNT, 8). All four drugs showed statistically significant effects on clinician-rated depression severity measures (Hedges' g ranged from 0.26 to 0.48; mean difference of 2.69 points on the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale across drugs). On measures of functioning and quality of life, these medications produced either no benefit or a very small benefit, except for risperidone, which had a small-to-moderate effect on quality of life (g

  7. Importance of intervention timing in the effectiveness of antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yia-Ping; Yang, Yu-Yin; Wan, Fang-Jung; Tung, Che-Se

    2018-02-02

    The use of early pharmacological intervention in treating young patients with schizophrenia is a debating issue for psychiatrists. However, on the basis of developmental theory, early antipsychotic intervention can be beneficial in terms of protecting neurons from further deterioration. This study investigated whether the initiation of second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) treatment at a younger age can effectively reverse schizophrenia-relevant behavioral and neurochemical features, namely acoustic prepulse inhibition (PPI) and accumbal dopamine (DA) efflux, respectively. Risperidone (RIS, 1mg/kg/day) or olanzapine (OLA, 2.5mg/kg/day) was administered for 6weeks in rats subjected to isolation rearing (IR) in adolescence or young adulthood. Behavioral testing was performed at 3 and 5 (for locomotor activity) and 2 and 4 (for PPI) weeks after the initiation of the pharmacological regimen. An additional PPI test was performed 6weeks after the initiation of the pharmacological regimen to assess the acute add-on effect of RIS or OLA. Dopamine (DA) efflux of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated through in vivo microdialysis at the end of the study, for measuring both the baseline levels after the chronic regimen and the responsiveness to acute add-on RIS or OLA treatment. Our results demonstrated that the effects of SGAs on PPI and accumbal DA efflux were dissociated. Specifically, RIS intervention was more beneficial for adolescent than young adult IR rats in restoring their PPI deficit, whereas OLA was age-independently effective in stimulating the accumbal DA efflux. Both PPI and accumbal DA could be employed to reflect IR-induced abnormalities, in which accumbal DA appeared to be more suitable in depicting the long-term effect of IR, whereas PPI might be a more accurate biological index for revealing the advantages of early RIS intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Atypical antipsychotics for disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Jik H; Merry, Sally N; Hetrick, Sarah E; Stasiak, Karolina

    2017-08-09

    This is an update of the original Cochrane Review, last published in 2012 (Loy 2012). Children and youths with disruptive behaviour disorders may present to health services, where they may be treated with atypical antipsychotics. There is increasing usage of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of disruptive behaviour disorders. To evaluate the effect and safety of atypical antipsychotics, compared to placebo, for treating disruptive behaviour disorders in children and youths. The aim was to evaluate each drug separately rather than the class effect, on the grounds that each atypical antipsychotic has different pharmacologic binding profile (Stahl 2013) and that this is clinically more useful. In January 2017, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and two trials registers. Randomised controlled trials of atypical antipsychotics versus placebo in children and youths aged up to and including 18 years, with a diagnosis of disruptive behaviour disorders, including comorbid ADHD. The primary outcomes were aggression, conduct problems and adverse events (i.e. weight gain/changes and metabolic parameters). The secondary outcomes were general functioning, noncompliance, other adverse events, social functioning, family functioning, parent satisfaction and school functioning. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors (JL and KS) independently collected, evaluated and extracted data. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence. We performed meta-analyses for each of our primary outcomes, except for metabolic parameters, due to inadequate outcome data. We included 10 trials (spanning 2000 to 2014), involving a total of 896 children and youths aged five to 18 years. Bar two trials, all came from an outpatient setting. Eight trials assessed risperidone, one assessed quetiapine and one assessed ziprasidone. Nine trials assessed acute efficacy (over four to 10 weeks); one of which combined

  9. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  10. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia. We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior.

  11. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor...... antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson's disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which five subtypes (M1–M5) exist. Muscarinic M4 receptors are found at high concentrations in motor parts...... of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  12. The atypical anti-psychotic clozapine decreases bone mass in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jessica L; Smith, Greg; Watson, Maureen; Lin, Jian-Ming; Callon, Karen; Gamble, Greg; Cheng, Anthony; Vickers, Mark H; Shepherd, Peter R; Cornish, Jillian; Grey, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Fracture risk is increased in patients with schizophrenia, who often receive long-term therapy with anti-psychotic drugs. The mechanisms by which skeletal fragility is increased in patients with psychosis include increased risk of falling, but direct skeletal toxicity of anti-psychotic drugs is a possibility that has not been investigated. We examined the skeletal effects, in vivo and in vitro, of a typical anti-psychotic drug, haloperidol, which primarily inhibits dopaminergic signaling, and an atypical anti-psychotic drug, clozapine, which predominantly inhibits serotonergic signaling. In growing rats, 42 days of clozapine treatment reduced whole body bone mineral density by 15% (Pactions to reduce osteoblast growth and function. Long-term administration of clozapine may therefore negatively affect bone health, and clinical studies to investigate this possibility are warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Do Atypical Antipsychotics Have Antisuicidal Effects? A Hypothesis-Generating Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Forte, Alberto; Erbuto, Denise; Serafini, Gianluca; Fiorillo, Andrea; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Modern antipsychotic drugs are employed increasingly in the treatment of mood disorders as well as psychoses, stimulating interest in their possible contributions to altering suicidal risk. Clozapine remains the only treatment with an FDA-recognized indication for reducing suicidal risk (in schizophrenia). We carried out a systematic, computerized search for reports of studies involving antipsychotic drug treatment and suicidal behaviors. A total of 19 reports provide data with preliminary support for potential suicide risk-reducing effects of olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, and asenapine in addition to clozapine, and provide some support for antipsychotic drug treatment in general. These preliminary findings encourage further testing of antipsychotics for effects on suicidal behavior, making use of explicit, pre-planned assessments of suicidal behavior. PMID:27727180

  14. Does a GLP-1 receptor agonist change glucose tolerance in patients treated with antipsychotic medications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Rask; Vedtofte, Louise; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic disturbances, obesity and life-shortening cardiovascular morbidity are major clinical problems among patients with antipsychotic treatment. Especially two of the most efficacious antipsychotics, clozapine and olanzapine, cause weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Addition......BACKGROUND: Metabolic disturbances, obesity and life-shortening cardiovascular morbidity are major clinical problems among patients with antipsychotic treatment. Especially two of the most efficacious antipsychotics, clozapine and olanzapine, cause weight gain and metabolic disturbances...... treatment with either clozapine or olanzapine. Outcomes: The primary endpoint is the change in glucose tolerance from baseline (measured by area under the curve for the plasma glucose excursion following a 4 h 75 g oral glucose tolerance test) to follow-up at week 16. The secondary endpoints include changes...

  15. Cumulative dosages of antipsychotic drugs are associated with increased mortality rate in patients with Alzheimer's dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R E; Lolk, A; Valentin, J B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We wished to investigate the effects of cumulative dosages of antipsychotic drug in Alzheimer's dementia, when controlling for known risk factors, including current antipsychotic exposure, on all-cause mortality. METHOD: We utilized a nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort...... study design with mortality as outcome in individual patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia. RESULTS: We included a total of 45 894 patients and followed them for 3 803 996 person-years in total, presenting 27 894 deaths in the study population. Cumulative antipsychotic exposure increased...... or equal to 730 DDDs: HR 1.06, 95% CI (0.95-1.18), P = 0.322, when controlling for proxy markers of severity, somatic and mental comorbid disorders. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study of 45 894 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia, we found that cumulative dosages of antipsychotic drugs...

  16. Antipsychotic agents in the treatment of anorexia nervosa: neuropsychopharmacologic rationale and evidence from controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewerton, Timothy D

    2012-08-01

    The search for an effective psychopharmacologic strategy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) has been elusive for decades and has run the gamut from reserpine to typical antipsychotics, to lithium, to tetrahydrocannabinol, to growth hormone, to anticonvulsants, to antidepressants, to atypical antipsychotics. Only recently has there arisen a potential "diamond in the rough" in the form of the atypical antipsychotic agent, olanzapine, which, in four randomized clinical trials, has shown superiority to placebo (two studies), chlorpromazine (one study), and aripiprazole (one study) in terms of weight gain and/or reduction in obsessional symptoms. The pharmacologic profile of olanzapine and other antipsychotic medications is discussed in light of the known pathophysiology of AN involving serotonin and dopamine systems, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  17. Minimizing weight gain for patients taking antipsychotic medications: The potential role for early use of metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Victoria; Dasher, Robert; Gitlin, Michael; Parsi, Mehrban

    2017-05-01

    Patients taking antipsychotic medications are at high risk for weight gain, which in turn leads to poor health outcomes, nonadherence with treatment, and low self-esteem. We reviewed published studies of pharmacologic interventions aimed at minimizing antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Treatments initiated prior to onset of weight gain were compared with those that started once weight gain already had occurred. Although data are limited, adjunctive medications for weight management appear to be more effective when initiated at or near the time when patients are first exposed to antipsychotic medications. Interventions initiated later in the course of treatment-typically after weight gain already has occurred-rarely help patients return to their pretreatment weight. The most commonly used adjunctive intervention has been metformin. Certain patients benefit from initiating metformin early in their exposure to second-generation antipsychotic agents. In particular, young, healthy patients beginning olanzapine or clozapine probably will experience less weight gain if they concomitantly initiate metformin.

  18. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek

    2016-01-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without...... adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need...... as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  19. Emergency Department Visits Involving Misuse and Abuse of the Antipsychotic Quetiapine: Results from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Mattson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case reports in medical literature suggest that the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine, a medication not previously considered to have abuse potential, is now being subject to misuse and abuse (MUA; ie, taken when not prescribed for them or used in a way other than instructed by their health professional. Here we present systematic, nationally representative data from the 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN for prevalence of emergency department (ED visits among the U.S. general population involving quetiapine and related to MUA, suicide attempts, and adverse reactions. Nationally, quetiapine-related ED visits increased 90% between 2005 and 2011, from 35,581 ED visits to 67,497. DAWN data indicate that when used without medical supervision for recreational/self-medication purposes, quetiapine poses health risks for its users, especially among polydrug users and women. These findings suggest that the medical and public health communities should increase vigilance concerning this drug and its potential for MUA.

  20. Repurposing antipsychotic drugs into antifungal agents: Synergistic combinations of azoles and bromperidol derivatives in the treatment of various fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Selina Y L; Garzan, Atefeh; Dennis, Emily K; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2017-10-20

    As the number of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients continues to rise, invasive fungal infections, such as invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis, threaten the life of millions of patients every year. The azole antifungals are currently the most prescribed drugs clinically that display broad-spectrum antifungal activity and excellent oral bioavailability. Yet, the azole antifungals have their own limitations and are unable to meet the challenges associated with increasing fungal infections and the accompanied development of resistance against azoles. Exploring combination therapy that involves the current azoles and another drug has been shown to be a promising strategy. Haloperidol and its derivative, bromperidol, were originally discovered as antipsychotics. Herein, we synthesize and report a series of bromperidol derivatives and their synergistic antifungal interactions in combination with a variety of current azole antifungals against a wide panel of fungal pathogens. We further select two representative combinations and confirm the antifungal synergy by performing time-kill assays. Furthermore, we evaluate the ability of selected combinations to destroy fungal biofilm. Finally, we perform mammalian cytotoxicity assays with the representative combinations against three mammalian cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in Danish psychiatric outpatients treated with antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Breum, Leif; Glümrr, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is increasing worldwide and is suggested to be higher among psychiatric patients, especially those on antipsychotic treatment.......The incidence of the metabolic syndrome, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is increasing worldwide and is suggested to be higher among psychiatric patients, especially those on antipsychotic treatment....

  2. Asenapine, blonanserin, iloperidone, lurasidone, and sertindole: distinctive clinical characteristics of 5 novel atypical antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic, and devastating mental illness with a substantial impact on psychological, physical, social, and economical areas of an individual and society. To treat such critical mental illness, a number of first-generation (typical) and second-generation (atypical) antipsychotics are currently available in the market. Despite such treatment options, most of patients with schizophrenia have a poor treatment outcome and become treatment resistant, causing continual deterioration on positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms, resulting in impairment of socio-occupational functioning. Hence, additional novel antipsychotics with better efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles are needed to enable clinicians to diversify treatment options to improve treatment of schizophrenia. Recently, the 3 antipsychotics, including iloperidone (2009), asenapine (2009), and lurasidone (2010), have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Two other atypical antipsychotics, including sertindole and blonanserin, are approved and used outside the United States for treatment of schizophrenia. Sertindole, after it has been voluntarily suspended by the manufacturer in 1998 due to its potential risk in causing cardiovascular-related death, was relaunched to the European market in 2005. More recently, blonanserin was approved in Japan (2008) and in Korea (2009) for the management of schizophrenia. Individual antipsychotic may have differential pros and cons compared with other antipsychotic in terms of efficacy, safety, tolerability, restoration of functional capacity, and economic aspect reflecting relapse prevention. The purpose of this review was to provide distinctive clinical characteristics and up-to-date of clinical trial data of the 5 novel atypical antipsychotics for the management of schizophrenia, which may deliver clinicians better understanding in the use of such atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia in clinical

  3. Atypical antipsychotic drugs selectively increase neurotensin efflux in dopamine terminal regions

    OpenAIRE

    Radke, James M.; Owens, Michael J.; Ritchie, James C.; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    1998-01-01

    Typical antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and chlorpromazine, increase synthesis of the neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) in both the striatum and the nucleus accumbens, whereas atypical antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and olanzapine, do so only in the nucleus accumbens. By using in vivo microdialysis, we now report that acute administration of haloperidol, clozapine, or olanzapine failed to alter the release of NT in either the striatum or nucleus accumbens. In contrast, chronic ad...

  4. Antipsychotics for delirium in the general hospital setting in consecutive 2453 inpatients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Ken; Odawara, Toshinari; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shiganami, Takafumi; Tsuchida, Kazuo; Oshima, Yoshio; Uchimura, Naohisa; Akaho, Rie; Watanabe, Akira; Taira, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuji; Hashimoto, Naoko; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    Attention to risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium has been paid. A clinical question was whether risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium would exceed efficacy of those even in the general hospital setting. A prospective observational study proceeded over a 1-year period at 33 general hospitals, where at least one psychiatrist worked full time. Subjects were patients who developed delirium during their admission due to acute somatic diseases or surgery, and who received antipsychotics for delirium. The primary outcome was rates and kinds of serious adverse events. Among 2834 patients who developed delirium, 2453 patients received antipsychotics, such as risperidone (34%), quetiapine (32%), and parenteral haloperidol (20%), for delirium. Out of 2453 patients, 22 serious adverse events (0.9%) were reported. Aspiration pneumonia was the most frequent (17 patients, 0.7%), followed by cardiovascular events (4 patients, 0.2%) and venous thromboembolism (1 patient, 0.0%). There was no patient with a fracture or intracranial injury due to a fall. No one died because of antipsychotic side effects. The mean Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale score was 2.02 (SD 1.09). Delirium was resolved within 1 week in more than half of the patients (54%). In the general hospital setting under management including fine dosage adjustment and early detection of side effects, risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium might be low, in contrast to antipsychotics for dementia in the nursing home or outpatient settings. A point may be not how to avoid using antipsychotics but how to monitor their risk. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Combined treatment with atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants in treatment-resistant depression: preclinical and clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóż, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of adding atypical antipsychotic drugs to ongoing treatments with antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in ameliorating drug-resistant depression. The aim of this paper was to summarize some preclinical evidence describing the mechanism responsible for the therapeutic action of combined treatment with antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics and also some clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of the augmentation strategy for improving antidepressant-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics. This analysis is based on five microdialysis studies and nine behavioral studies assessing the impact of combined atypical antipsychotic and antidepressant treatments on extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats and on antidepressant-induced effects, respectively. In addition, clinical data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of augmentation strategies for treatment-resistant depression using atypical antipsychotics were included. Combined treatment of rats with all studied atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, clozapine and quetiapine) and antidepressants (citalopram, fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) increased the extracellular level of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex compared to a respective drug given alone; in addition, a combination of olanzapine or quetiapine plus fluoxetine or fluvoxamine increased the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics administered in a low dose enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of antidepressants, with (among other mechanisms) the serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and adrenergic α2 receptors likely playing an important role in their action. The results support the conclusion that atypical antipsychotics may be effective as adjunctive therapy in treatment-resistant depression; however, their adverse effect profile may be

  6. Role of 5-HT2C receptor gene variants in antipsychotic-induced weight gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandl EJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Tessa JM Wallace, Clement C Zai, Eva J Brandl, Daniel J MüllerNeurogenetics Section, Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medication that can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and non-compliance in patients. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been studied for association with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in an attempt to find genetic predictors of this side effect. An ability to predict this side effect could lead to personalized treatment plans for predisposed individuals, which could significantly decrease the prevalence and severity of weight gain. Variations in the serotonin receptor 2c gene (HTR2C have emerged as promising candidates for prediction of antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Specifically, the well-studied -759C/T promoter polymorphism has been associated with weight gain in diverse populations, although some studies have reported no association. This discrepancy is likely due to heterogeneity in study design with respect to ethnicity, treatment duration, and other variables. Notably, the association between HTR2C and antipsychotic-induced weight gain appears strongest in short-term studies on patients with limited or no previous antipsychotic treatment. Other, less extensively studied promoter polymorphisms (-697C/G, -997G/A, and -1165A/G have also emerged as potential predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Conversely, the well-studied intronic polymorphism Cys23Ser does not appear to be associated. With further research on both HTR2C and other genetic and environmental predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain, a predictive test could one day be created to screen patients and provide preventative or alternative treatment for those who are predisposed to this serious side effect.Keywords: HTR2C, pharmacogenomics, promoter polymorphism

  7. Temporal and Spatial Transcriptional Fingerprints by Antipsychotic or Propsychotic Drugs in Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Kensuke; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Maruyama, Minoru; Imaichi, Sachiko; Habata, Yugo; Mori, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Various types of antipsychotics have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia since the accidental discovery of the antipsychotic activity of chlorpromazine. Although all clinically effective antipsychotic agents have common properties to interact with the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) activation, their precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. Antipsychotics are well known to induce transcriptional changes of immediate early genes (IEGs), raising the possibility that gene expressions play an essential role to improve psychiatric symptoms. Here, we report that while different classes of antipsychotics have complex pharmacological profiles against D2R, they share common transcriptome fingerprint (TFP) profile of IEGs in the murine brain in vivo by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our data showed that various types of antipsychotics with a profound interaction of D2R including haloperidol (antagonist), olanzapine (antagonist), and aripiprazole (partial agonist) all share common spatial TFPs closely homologous to those of D2R antagonist sulpiride, and elicited greater transcriptional responses in the striatum than in the nucleus accumbens. Meanwhile, D2R agonist quinpirole and propsychotic NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP) exhibited the contrasting TFP profiles. Clozapine and propsychotic drug methamphetamine (MAP) displayed peculiar TFPs that reflect their unique pharmacological property. Our results suggest that transcriptional responses are conserved across various types of antipsychotics clinically effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia and also show that temporal and spatial TFPs may reflect the pharmacological features of the drugs. Thus, we propose that a TFP approach is beneficial to evaluate novel drug candidates for antipsychotic development. PMID:25693194

  8. Mechanisms underlying psychosis and antipsychotic treatment response in schizophrenia: insights from PET and SPECT imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Howes, OD; Egerton, A; Allan, V; McGuire, P; Stokes, P; Kapur, S

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging studies have generated important in vivo insights into the etiology of schizophrenia and treatment response. This article first reviews the PET and SPECT evidence implicating dopaminergic dysfunction, especially presynaptic dysregulation, as a mechanism for psychosis. Second, it summarises the neurochemical imaging studies of antipsychotic action, focussing on D2/3 receptors. These studies show that all currently licensed antipsychotic drugs block striatal D2/3 receptors in ...

  9. Control of invasive weeds with prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTomaso, Joseph M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Allen, Edith B.; Minnich, Ralph; Rice, Peter M.; Kyser, Guy B.

    2006-01-01

    Prescribed burning has primarily been used as a tool for the control of invasive late-season annual broadleaf and grass species, particularly yellow starthistle, medusahead, barb goatgrass, and several bromes. However, timely burning of a few invasive biennial broadleaves (e.g., sweetclover and garlic mustard), perennial grasses (e.g., bluegrasses and smooth brome), and woody species (e.g., brooms and Chinese tallow tree) also has been successful. In many cases, the effectiveness of prescribed burning can be enhanced when incorporated into an integrated vegetation management program. Although there are some excellent examples of successful use of prescribed burning for the control of invasive species, a limited number of species have been evaluated. In addition, few studies have measured the impact of prescribed burning on the long-term changes in plant communities, impacts to endangered plant species, effects on wildlife and insect populations, and alterations in soil biology, including nutrition, mycorrhizae, and hydrology. In this review, we evaluate the current state of knowledge on prescribed burning as a tool for invasive weed management.

  10. Antipsychotic medication and remission of psychotic symptoms 10years after a first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wils, Regitze Sølling; Gotfredsen, Ditte Resendal; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Austin, Stephen F; Albert, Nikolai; Secher, Rikke Gry; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Several national guidelines recommend continuous use of antipsychotic medication after a psychotic episode in order to minimize the risk of relapse. However some studies have identified a subgroup of patients who obtain remission of psychotic symptoms while not being on antipsychotic medication for a period of time. This study investigated the long-term outcome and characteristics of patients in remission of psychotic symptoms with no use of antipsychotic medication at the 10-year follow-up. The study was a cohort study including 496 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (ICD 10: F20 and F22-29). Patients were included in the Danish OPUS Trial and followed up 10years after inclusion, where patient data was collected on socio-demographic factors, psychopathology, level of functioning and medication. 61% of the patients from the original cohort attended the 10-year follow up and 30% of these had remission of psychotic symptoms at the time of the 10-year follow up with no current use of antipsychotic medication. This outcome was associated with female gender, high GAF-F score, participation in the labour market and absence of substance abuse. Our results describe a subgroup of patients who obtained remission while not being on antipsychotic medication at the 10-year follow-up. The finding calls for further investigation on a more individualized approach to long-term treatment with antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adverse drug reactions due to antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Kate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are commonly used to manage mental and behavioral problems in geriatric patients. This is, however, accompanied by the risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs, impacting the safety with which the drug can be used. In this article, we provide an overview of the factors associated with the ADRs due to psychotropic medication in the elderly, and the ADRs associated with the use of antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the geriatric population. For this, literature searches were conducted through MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar using keyword terms: Geriatric, elderly, safety, adverse events, ADRs, antipsychotic, names of individual antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, sedative, hypnotic, zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone. Research data indicate that antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, thromboembolism, cerebrovascular and cardiac events, pneumonia, fractures, and increased mortality. Among antipsychotics, aripiprazole seems to have fewer ADRs while other antipsychotics (typical and atypicals have reports of troublesome side effect profiles. Sedative-hypnotics are associated with a risk of falls, fractures, cognitive impairment, and may increase the risk of developing dementia with long-term use. The risk of these complications is present with both benzodiazepines and medications such as zolpidem and zopiclone.

  12. Adjunctive Treatment of Acute Mania with Risperidone versus Typical Antipsychotics: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hsiu Tsai

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have directly compared atypical antipsychotics (e.g. risperidone with typical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy in patients hospitalized for acute mania, especially during a lengthy hospital stay. Our retrospective, case-controlled study is a chart review of 64 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, defined bipolar I disorder (current episode, mania. Patients were divided into two groups according to the adjunctive medications used: the risperidone group (mood stabilizers plus risperidone and the control group (mood stabilizers plus typical antipsychotics. Outcome at discharge, medications, adverse drug effects, and length of hospital stay were compared between groups, controlling for gender, age, number of prior admissions, and duration of illness. Results indicated no statistically significant differences between groups in the controlled factors, Global Assessment of Functioning and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores, and adverse drug events. Patients in the risperidone group used significantly lower doses of trihexyphenidyl than those in the control group (p < 0.05. Patients treated with risperidone had a shorter hospital stay than those treated with typical antipsychotics (p < 0.01. In conclusion, antipsychotics are effective as adjunctive agents in the treatment of acute mania. The use of risperidone, in particular, decreases the need for anticholinergics and may lead to a shorter hospital stay compared with typical antipsychotics.

  13. Atypical antipsychotic medications to control symptoms of delirium in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, Susan Beckwitt; Jacobson, Julienne; Munzig, Elizabeth; Tavaré, C Jane

    2012-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have been documented to be effective in the management of delirium in adults, but despite considerable need, their use has been less studied in pediatric patients. A retrospective chart review was done to describe the use of atypical antipsychotics in controlling symptoms of delirium in children and adolescents. Pharmacy records at Children's Hospital Los Angeles were reviewed to identify patients to whom antipsychotic agents were dispensed over a 24-month period. Psychiatric inpatient consultations during the same 24-month period were reviewed. Patients 1-18 years old diagnosed with delirium given antipsychotics constituted the study population. Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R98) scores were retrospectively calculated, when possible, at time antipsychotic was started to confirm the initial diagnosis of delirium and evaluate symptom severity, and again when antipsychotic was stopped, to assess symptom response. Olanzapine (n=78), risperidone (n=13), and quetiapine (n=19) were used during the 2 years of the study. Mean patient age, length of treatment, and response were comparable for the three medications. For patients with two DRS-R98 scores available (n=75/110), mean DRS-R98 scores decreased significantly (pdelirium symptoms in pediatric patients while underlying etiology was addressed.

  14. Tardive dyskinesia from atypical antipsychotic agents in patients with mood disorders in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Jeremy; Gugger, James J; Tasleem, Hina

    2013-09-25

    There is a paucity of information on the risks and clinical characteristics of tardive dyskinesia with atypical antipsychotic agents in patients with mood and anxiety disorders in clinical practice. The authors retrospectively screened the charts of 268 patients with a mood or anxiety disorder treated with atypical antipsychotic agents from a psychiatric practice. Fifteen patients who developed tardive dyskinesia were identified and further data was collected on these patients. Tardive dyskinesia occurred in 5.9% of patients after exposure to an atypical antipsychotic agent for a mean of 28.7 months (range: 1-83). The average dosage of the offending agent in chlorpromazine equivalents was 350 mg/day (range: 67-969). All patients experienced oral-buccal-lingual stereotypy, which was frequently severe in nature, but completely resolved in all but one patient. Most patients (90.9%) who consented to a second trial of an atypical antipsychotic did not experience a relapse of TD. All patients were treated in a clinical practice setting by a single psychiatrist, which may limit the generalizability of the findings. The observed rate of TD represents a real world estimate of the risk of TD with atypical antipsychotic agents in patients with mood disorders. Fortunately, with early recognition symptoms appear to be reversible and further treatment with another atypical antipsychotic does not necessarily lead to relapse. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antipsychotic Drug Effects in Schizophrenia: A Review of Longitudinal fMRI Investigations and Neural Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, C.C.; Jaramillo, A.; Wilcox, C.E.; Hamilton, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The evidence that antipsychotics improve brain function and reduce symptoms in schizophrenia is unmistakable, but how antipsychotics change brain function is poorly understood, especially within neuronal systems. In this review, we investigated the hypothesized normalization of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level dependent signal in the context of antipsychotic treatment. First, we conducted a systematic PubMed search to identify eight fMRI investigations that met the following inclusion criteria: case-control, longitudinal design; pre- and post-treatment contrasts with a healthy comparison group; and antipsychotic-free or antipsychotic-naïve patients with schizophrenia at the start of the investigation. We hypothesized that aberrant activation patterns or connectivity between patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparisons at the first imaging assessment would no longer be apparent or “normalize” at the second imaging assessment. The included studies differed by analysis method and fMRI task but demonstrated normalization of fMRI activation or connectivity during the treatment interval. Second, we reviewed putative mechanisms from animal studies that support normalization of the BOLD signal in schizophrenia. We provided several neuronal-based interpretations of these changes of the BOLD signal that may be attributable to long-term antipsychotic administration. PMID:23157635

  16. Antipsychotic utilization in the intensive care unit and in transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; Herzig, Shoshana J; Howell, Michael D; Le, Stephen H; Mathew, Chris; Kats, Julia S; Stevens, Jennifer P

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the rate at which newly initiated antipsychotic therapy is continued on discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) and describe risk factors for continuation post-ICU discharge. This is a retrospective cohort study of all patients receiving an antipsychotic in the ICUs of a large academic medical center from January 1, 2005, to October 31, 2011. Medical record review was conducted to ascertain whether a patient was newly started on antipsychotic therapy and whether therapy was continued post-ICU discharge. A total of 39,248 ICU admissions over the 7-year period were evaluated. Of these, 4468 (11%) were exposed to antipsychotic therapy, of which 3119 (8%) were newly initiated. In the newly initiated cohort, 642 (21%) were continued on therapy on discharge from the hospital. Type of drug (use of quetiapine vs no use of quetiapine: odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-4.0; P antipsychotics on discharge despite adjustment for clinical factors. Antipsychotic use is common in the ICU setting, and a significant number of newly initiated patients have therapy continued upon discharge from the hospital. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hospitalization and cost after switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonlue T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuanthon Boonlue,1,2 Suphat Subongkot,1,2 Piyameth Dilokthornsakul,3,4 Ronnachai Kongsakon,5 Oraluck Pattanaprateep,6 Orabhorn Suanchang,7 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk3,8–10 1Clinical Pharmacy Division, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 2The College of Pharmacotherapy of Thailand, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 3Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand; 4Center for Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, CO, USA; 5Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 6Department of Health Informatics, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, 7Department of Pharmacy, Somdet Chaopraya Institute of Psychiatry, Bangkok, Thailand; 8School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 9School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 10School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Background: Several clinical practice guidelines suggest using atypical over typical antipsychotics in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, cost-containment policy urged restricting usage of atypical antipsychotics and switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate clinical and economic impacts of switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand. Methods: From October 2010 through September 2013, a retrospective cohort study was performed utilizing electronic database of two tertiary hospitals. Schizophrenia patients aged 18 years or older and being treated with atypical antipsychotics were included. Patients were classified as atypical antipsychotic switching group if they switched to typical antipsychotics after 180 days of continual

  18. Auditing GPs' prescribing habits : Cardiovascular prescribing frequently continues medication initiated by specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.S; van Diepen, N.M; de Jong-van den Berg, L T W

    Objective: To determine to what extent general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing behaviour is a result of repeat prescribing of medication which has been initiated by specialists. Method: During a 4-week period, pharmacists identified GPs' prescriptions for a large group of cardiovascular drugs.

  19. The use of prescribed and non-prescribed medication by Dutch children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van; Lindert, H. van

    2002-01-01

    Background: Most research on the use of medication focuses on adults. Children, however, use medication too, most of which is prescribed by GP's. Children also use non-prescribed medication (f.e. bought in the drugstore), but the extent to which is not known. Moreover, it is not known to what extent

  20. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  1. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  2. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  3. e-Learning initiatives to support prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Simon; Mucklow, John

    2012-01-01

    Preparing medical students to prescribe is a major challenge of undergraduate education. They must develop an understanding of clinical pharmacology and acquire knowledge about drugs and therapeutics, as well as the skills to prescribe for individual patients in the face of multiple variables. The task of delivering the learning required to achieve these attributes relies upon limited numbers of teachers, who have increasingly busy clinical commitments. There is evidence that training is currently insufficient to meet the demands of the workplace. e-Learning provides an opportunity to improve the learning experience. The advantages for teachers are improved distribution of learning content, ease of update, standardization and tracking of learner activities. The advantages for learners are ease of access, greater interactivity and individual choice concerning the pace and mix of learning. Important disadvantages are the considerable resource required to develop e-Learning projects and difficulties in simulating some aspects of the real world prescribing experience. Pre-requisites for developing an e-Learning programme to support prescribing include academic expertise, institutional support, learning technology services and an effective virtual learning environment. e-Learning content might range from complex interactive learning sessions through to static web pages with links. It is now possible to simulate and provide feedback on prescribing decisions and this will improve with advances in virtual reality. Other content might include a student formulary, self-assessment exercises (e.g. calculations), a glossary and an on-line library. There is some evidence for the effectiveness of e-Learning but better research is required into its potential impact on prescribing. PMID:22509885

  4. Prescribing trends for sodium valproate in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sinéad; Bennett, Kathleen; Doherty, Colin P

    2016-03-01

    This study was undertaken to describe prescribing practice for the anti-convulsant drug (AED) Sodium Valproate (VPA) in an Irish population of woman of childbearing age during the period of the emergence of new data showing a high rate of developmental abnormalities in offspring of women who took VPA during pregnancy. All prescriptions dispensed from community pharmacies in Ireland between 2008 and 2013 inclusive were examined for women aged 16-44 years from all three drug reimbursement schemes in Ireland. Numbers of prescriptions and women on AEDs were identified, as was the rural/urban distribution of the drug along with co-prescribing of folic acid and the oral contraceptive pill. All data analysis was conducted using SAS v9.3. The rate of prescribing of VPA in Ireland declined slightly from 3.5/1000 per eligible population in 2008 to 3.14/1000 in 2013. While rates of prescribing fell for epilepsy, there appeared to be a rise in prescription for other indications of VPA. In 2013, co-prescription of folic acid or oral contraceptives was relatively low across all community schemes. Finally, an address distant from academic specialist centers predicted a higher exposure to VPA. Recently the European Medicine's Agency suggested that alternatives to VPA be considered before prescribing to women of childbearing age. Despite this, the rate of VPA prescribing in Ireland appears to be increasing for indications other than epilepsy. It may be necessary to improve the dissemination of information about the potential negative effects of VPA in this population. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  6. A Helping Hand: Individually Prescribed Instruction (IPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard W. Andrews

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Individually Prescribed Instruction (IPI is an approach to teaching that emphasizes the diagnosis of learning problems and the provision of prescriptive assignments to assist individual students overcome their difficulties.  When this strategy is employed effectively, the teaching environment is highly adaptive.  The teacher matches the students' abilities to alternate ways of learning, and also provides remedial assistance and positive reinforcement.  Individually Prescribed Instruction has been shown to be effective across the school curriculum.  This writer reviews the success of this strategy for assisting students overcome learning problems, and proposes a model for its implementation in music instruction.

  7. Antimalarial prescribing patterns in state hospitals and selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    slowdown of progression to resistance could be achieved by improving prescribing practice, drug quality, and patient compliance. Objective: To determine the antimalarial prescribing pattern and to assess rational prescribing of chloroquine by prescribers in government hospitals and parastatals in Lagos State. Methods: ...

  8. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics: focus on olanzapine pamoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP Lindenmayer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available JP LindenmayerDepartment of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York NY, USAAbstract: Medication non-adherence in patients with schizophrenia continues to be a significant problem and threatens successful treatment outcomes. Medication non-adherence is often associated with negative consequences, including symptom exacerbation, more frequent emergency room visits, re-hospitalizations and relapse. Long-acting injectable (LAI forms of antipsychotics allow for rapid identification of non-adherence, obviate the need for the patient to take the medication on a daily basis and increase adherence to some significant degree. Eli Lilly has developed a long-acting depot formulation of olanzapine, olanzapine pamoate, which has recently been approved by the FDA for the US market, and which will be reviewed here. Olanzapine LAI appears to be an effective antipsychotic at dosages of 210 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and 405 mg every 4 weeks in patients with acute schizophrenia, and at 150 mg every 2 weeks, 300 mg every 2 weeks and at 405 mg every 4 weeks for the maintenance treatment of stable patients. Oral supplementation appears not to be needed, particularly not at the onset of treatment with the LAI as is necessary with risperidone LAI. Its efficacy is in general comparable to the efficacy seen with oral olanzapine at a corresponding dose. The side effect profile is also comparable to the side effects observed with oral olanzapine, including lower rates of extrapyramidal symptoms, prolactin elevation and cardiovascular side effects, but significant metabolic effects. The latter include significant weight gain, lipid abnormalities and glucose dysregulation. While the injection site adverse events are overall mild, the most significant serious adverse event is the post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS. While rare, this syndrome results from inadvertent intravascular injection of olanzapine LAI and can cause a range of

  9. Rise in psychotropic drug prescri