WorldWideScience

Sample records for resident rights states

  1. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a... legal representative. (5) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must meet...

  2. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  3. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  4. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  5. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  6. Medication Refusal: Resident Rights, Administration Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Danielle R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2017-12-01

    Occasionally, residents actively or passively refuse to take medications. Residents may refuse medication for a number of reasons, including religious beliefs, dietary restrictions, misunderstandings, cognitive impairment, desire to self-harm, or simple inconvenience. This action creates a unique situation for pharmacists and long-term facility staff, especially if patients have dementia. Residents have the legal right to refuse medications, and long-term care facilities need to employ a process to resolve disagreement between the health care team that recommends the medication and the resident who refuses it. In some cases, simple interventions like selecting a different medication or scheduling medications in a different time can address and resolve the resident's objection. If the medical team and the resident cannot resolve their disagreement, often an ethics consultation is helpful. Documenting the resident's refusal to take any or all medications, the health care team's actions and any other outcomes are important. Residents' beliefs may change over time, and the health care team needs to be prepared to revisit the issue as necessary.

  7. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to Medicaid benefits, in writing, at the time of admission to the nursing facility or, when the resident becomes eligible for Medicaid of— (A) The items and services that are included in nursing facility... eligibility for Medicaid or SSI. (6) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...

  8. The OECD Model Tax Convention. Explaining the OECD's legitimation strategies and why states adhere to the principle of exclusive rights to tax royalties in the state of residence

    OpenAIRE

    Klausen, Guro

    2014-01-01

    Although taxation matters are generally accepted to be an issue of national concern, increasing attention is paid to international efforts at conforming and standardising taxation systems internationally. In a global economy where national borders are becoming less important for economic activity, this shift in focus is only appropriate. In order to deal with double taxation as a barrier to trade and investment, taxation treaties are negotiated between states to allow for predictable taxation...

  9. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... set forth in § 431.52 of this chapter. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section—Institution has... intent, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with the intention to remain...), the State of residence is the State where the individual is— (i) Living with the intention to remain...

  10. Exclusive Rights and State Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive rights are granted in order to regulate markets as one of several possible tools of public intervention. The article considers the role of State aid law in the regulation of exclusive rights. Whereas the right of Member States to organise markets as monopolies and the choice of provider...

  11. Radiology residents as teachers: Current status of teaching skills training in United States residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Radiology residents often teach medical students and other residents. Workshops developed with the goal of improving resident teaching skills are becoming increasingly common in various fields of medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and structure of resident-teacher training opportunities within radiology programs in the United States. Program directors with membership in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology (APDR) were surveyed to determine views on a panel of topics related to resident-teacher training programs. A total of 114 (56%) of 205 APDR members completed an online survey. Approximately one-third (32%) stated that their program provided instruction to residents on teaching skills. The majority of these programs (72%) were established within the last 5 years. Residents provided teaching to medical students (94%) and radiology residents (90%). The vast majority of program directors agreed that it is important for residents to teach (98%) and that these teaching experiences helped residents become better radiologists (85%). Ninety-four percent of program directors felt that the teaching skills of their residents could be improved, and 85% felt that residents would benefit from instruction on teaching methods. Only one-third of program directors felt their program adequately recognized teaching provided by residents. Program directors identified residents as being active contributors to teaching in most programs. Although teaching was viewed as an important skill to develop, few programs had instituted a resident-teacher curriculum. Program directors felt that residents would benefit from structured training to enhance teaching skills. Future studies are needed to determine how best to provide teaching skills training for radiology trainees. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Precarious Residents: Migration Control, Membership and the Rights of Non-Citizens

    OpenAIRE

    Gibney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the situation of a subgroup of non-citizens found in virtually all contemporary states, what I call “precarious residents”. Precarious residents can be defined as non-citizens living in the state that possess few social, political or economic rights, are highly vulnerable to deportation, and have little or no option for making secure their immigration status. The archetypal precarious resident is the undocumented (or unlawful) migrant. However, there are many other barely ...

  13. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Definition. For purposes of this section—Institution has the same meaning as Institution and Medical... intention to remain there permanently or for an indefinite period. (2) For any individual not residing in an... of residence is the State where the individual is— (i) Living with the intention to remain there...

  14. The Right Way to Teach Left-Handed Residents: Strategies for Training by Right Handers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Wise, Eric S; Kavic, Stephen M

    Left-handed (LH) residents remain underrepresented among surgical trainees, and there are few available data on how best to train them. The challenge is amplified when pairing a LH resident with a right-handed (RH) mentor. This report provides recommendations on how to improve the training of LH surgeons in a safe and effective manner. A comprehensive literature review was performed using different databases and search engines to identify all articles relevant to the training of LH residents. A total of 40 articles highlighted the challenges for LH surgical residents and RH mentors. Our recommendations are based on the following 4 themes: identifying inherent differences in left vs. RH residents, providing guidance to RH mentors training LH residents, adapting the RH environment to the LH surgeon, and maximizing safety during training. An organized approach needs to be taken in training the LH resident. Changes should be instituted at program-wide and national levels to ensure that the training experience of the sinistral surgical resident is optimized. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Residency training in the United States: What foreign medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FMGs) planning to pursue post-graduate residency training in the United States of America (USA). While the number of residency training positions is shrinking, and the number of United States graduates has steadily declined over the past ...

  16. 8 CFR 316.5 - Residence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence in the United States. 316.5... REQUIREMENTS FOR NATURALIZATION § 316.5 Residence in the United States. (a) General. Unless otherwise specified, for purposes of this chapter, including § 316.2 (a)(3), (a)(5), and (a)(6), an alien's residence is...

  17. Results of the 2013-2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Burt, Lindsay M; Mancini, Brandon R; Morris, Zachary S; Walker, Amanda J; Miller, Seth M; Bhavsar, Shripal; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kim, Miranda B; Kharofa, Jordan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to survey radiation oncology chief residents to define their residency experience and readiness for independent practice. During the academic years 2013 to 2014 and 2014 to 2015, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted an electronic survey of post-graduate year-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 3 months of training. Descriptive statistics are reported. Sixty-six chief residents completed the survey in 2013 to 2014 (53% response rate), and 69 completed the survey in 2014 to 2015 (64% response rate). Forty to 85% percent of residents reported inadequate exposure to high-dose rate and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Nearly all residents in both years (>90%) reported adequate clinical experience for the following disease sites: breast, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and lung. However, as few as 56% reported adequate experience in lymphoma or pediatric malignancies. More than 90% of residents had participated in retrospective research projects, with 20% conducting resident-led prospective clinical trials and 50% conducting basic science or translational projects. Most chief residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week in the clinical/hospital setting and performing fewer than 15 hours per week tasks that were considered to have little or no educational value. There was more than 80% compliance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour limits. Fifty-five percent of graduating residents intended to join an established private practice group, compared to 25% who headed for academia. Residents perceive the job market to be more competitive than previous years. This first update of the ARRO chief resident survey since the 2007 to 2008 academic year documents US radiation oncology residents' experiences and conditions over a 2-year period. This analysis may serve as a valuable tool for those seeking to

  18. Inclusive Democracy: Franchise Limitations on Non-Resident Citizens as an Unjust Restriction of Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Fraser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Public International Law and Policy Group (PILPG advises parties in peace negotiations, on drafting post-conflict constitutions, and assists in prosecuting war criminals. As part of this work, PILPG assists States in establishing and implementing electoral systems that meet international standards for democratic elections, and undertakes election monitoring. Free and fair elections are crucial for the legitimacy of democratic States and are protected by human rights law. The present article focuses on the issue of the franchise and on the restrictions permitted under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR. Specifically, this article addresses franchise restrictions on non-resident citizens across ECHR member States. Setting out the protections for the franchise in Article 3 of Protocol No. 1 ECHR, this article analyses the permissible limitations on those rights according to the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR. The article presents a comparative analysis of other voting rights cases, such as the limitations on prisoners’ franchise. After considering whether residency-based limitations pursue legitimate and proportionate aims, it questions whether blanket restrictions disenfranchising non-resident citizens should be permissible today. The article concludes by advocating the importance of an inclusive franchise for the legitimacy of democratic systems as well as the protection of individual rights, and inviting the ECtHR to revisit its jurisprudence on this topic.

  19. Voting rights for alien residents--who wants it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, K R

    1985-01-01

    Foreign nationals permanently domiciled in Sweden have been entitled since 1975 to vote and to municipal and county council elections. This article examines some of the major issues associated with international migration and disenfranchisement of migrants created by a contradiction between economic and political rationale. The alien population of Sweden remained small for a long time, but during the 1960s it rose 1st to 300,000 and later to 400,000 persons. Since 1970, aliens have constituted roughly 5% of the total national population of 8.3 million. Surveys following the 3 elections held in Sweden so far have shown immigrants to be quite well informed concerning election procedures and the parties. In contrast to single males, women with children tend to be highly stable, because of favorable social security for women, particularly for women with children. Participation elections among women (55%) is higher than among men (49%), and married women (58%) are usually the highest participants. Class-voting is still rather strong in Sweden; the percentage difference in preference for Socialist parties between working-class and middle-class was as high 55% in 1960. Long term trends in the distribution of party-preference among immigrants are determined to a large extent by the policy on immigration regulation and political asylum for refugees and exiles. Another selectivity is due to the differential remigration rate. A 1976 study showed that although local franchise of immigrants is now the law of the land, some Swedes are still against the granting of voting rights and electability to immigrants. On the whole, there is clearly a psychological environment conducive, at least in Stockholm, to the task of putting local franchise reform into real practice.

  20. Rights, solidarity and the animal welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harfeld, Jes

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that aspects of the animal rights view can be constructively modulated through a communitarian approach and come to promote animal welfare through the social contexts of expanded caring communities. The Nordic welfare state is presented as a conceivable caring community within...... which animals could be viewed and treated appropriately as co-citizens with solidarity based rights and duties....

  1. Precautionary rights and duties of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study concerns the definition and implementation of the precautionary principle under general, or customary, international law. A search for patterns and common denominators in state practice resulted in the following definitions of a right and a duty which states are deemed to have under

  2. Resident Selection Beyond the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Scott E; Graves, Matt

    2017-06-01

    The resident application process has matured over the decades to become an efficient system. An unforeseen consequence of this efficiency is the massive number of applications that each orthopaedic surgery residency program must sort through to arrive at a manageable rank list. The most widely used filter in today's application cycle is an applicant's performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1. Although no evidence exists to prove that this examination is predictive of any of the potentially defining characteristics of a successful resident, orthopaedic surgery programs historically have had few alternative options. A growing body of literature suggests that a more focused investigation of an applicant's inherent personality traits, as evidenced by his or her past accomplishments, as well as a structured use of questionnaires as part of the application process may improve the ability of orthopaedic surgery residency programs to predict who will be a successful resident.

  3. Human rights, State Violence and Political Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Larsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates Hannah Arendt’s and Giorgio Agamben’s critiques of human rights and argues that the two thinkers share a blind spot with regard to the radical potentials of human rights. The problem is that they do not break with two fixed imaginaries which still haunt liberal democracies: (1 the historical essentialist understanding of human rights and (2 nation-states and individuals as the principal loci for political rights, power, and action. Based on the work of Jacques Rancière, Costas Douzinas, and Étienne Balibar this article argues that human rights can be thought of as a constituent part of a radical political praxis and resistance movement. If human rights are thought of as a praxis of “right-ing” (Douzinas or a “dissensus” (Rancière, which both contest the current “distribution of the sensible,” a new “cosmopolitics of human rights” can be imagined where human rights are conceived as a borderline concept (Balibar.

  4. THE INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS AND THE STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA TITA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of man’s individual rights appeared a long time ago as a means of the individual’s protection in relationship with the others. Living in a society, man interacts with other people, and these relations are regulated by certain rules. Once the state was formed, these rules become increasingly powerful while the concept of freedom is differently acknowledged.What actually lay at the basis of individual rights’ development was the concept of natural right which appeared in ancient Greece, and which can be traced throughout history like Ariadne’s thread, guiding different thoughtschools. Human’s fundamental rights are sanctioned only after being put down in the constitutions of different states, and once regional and international protection instruments are created. Nevertheless, in countries controlled by totalitarian regimes, human rights were infringed, the individual having to obey the collective community.These regimes having collapsed, individual rights underwent a change for the better, but they also came to a standstill due to 9/11 or Ground Zero. After this event, and in the context of the fight against terrorism, individual freedom was limited in the name of freedom itself, and individual rights are currently regressing as to the possibility of being exercised.

  5. State duties of protection and fundamental rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Starck

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Duties of protection are duties of the state to protect certain legal interests of its citizens. They cover the interests of life, health, freedom and property and also protect some other interests and certain constitutionally recognised institutions. State duties of protection must be considered in connection with fundamental rights. The foundations of modern constitutionalism and attendant procedures are essential to develop guidelines for a constructive critique of the jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court. This is done with reference to the recent history of France, Germany and England. The historical excursus reveals that a single theory underlies the variety of constitutional states. The development of the constitutional state gave rise to the significance of the preservation of freedom through the maintenance of law and the separation of powers. This has given rise to various legal devices, based also in part on experience with moderate rule and earlier theories of the imperium limitatum.A textual analysis of the German Basic Law is undertaken to determine whether and how the duties of protection are expressly created. Furthermore, the duties that have been discovered in the Basic Law by the Federal Constitutional Court are considered. These duties include the protection of human life and health, personal freedom, the right to autonomous development of one's personality, freedom of science, research and teaching, marriage and the family, children, mothers, professional freedom, property and the protection of German nationals against foreign states. Finally the justification of such duties and the constitutional control of the manner of protection are considered.In a final section a critique of relevant constitutional jurisprudence is undertaken. It is argued that claims to protection cannot be directly binding law. They presuppose legislation. If statutory protection is connected with infringements of third-party fundamental rights

  6. Past residence outside of the United States is associated with diet quality in adults currently residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenfeld, Cara L; Poudrier, Jill; Waters, Nigel; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate healthy dietary factors in relation to prior residence outside the United States (US) among university-affiliated individuals currently residing in the US. Current diet information was collected via a 4-day food record and residential history data were collected by in-person interview for 114 individuals. Residence outside of the US at any point during the interviewee's life was associated with higher diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2005: 50.0 vs. 46.8) and lower added sugar intake (25.8 vs. 34.9 g/d). Concordance of residence as a child (≤12 years of age) and within the prior 5 years was more strongly associated with higher HEI-2005 score (52.7) than if childhood was outside of the US and recent within the US (47.1), compared with individuals who have only resided within the US (46.9). Results were similar when also accounting for self-reported current residence as permanent residence. Current diet quality, food groups, and nutrient intakes differed depending on where in the world region individuals resided as a child. Restricting the analyzes to a subgroup of individuals of younger age and similar education attenuated associations. Lower added sugar intake and higher overall diet quality were most consistently associated with residence outside of the US, and recent residence outside of the US may be more strongly associated than childhood residence. Some of these differences may be explained by demographic or socioeconomic factors. Future studies could evaluate explanatory factors for these observations, including detailed socioeconomic factors, exposure to diverse foods, and accessibility of processed foods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Assessing black progress: voting and citizenship rights, residency and housing, education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, R

    1986-01-01

    Farley discusses progress US blacks have made in the areas of voting and citizenship rights, residency and housing, and education. A major goal of the civil rights movement was to permit blacks to influence the electoral process in the same manner as whites. Most important in this regard was the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the proportion of southern blacks casting ballots increased sharply since the early 1960s. The Civil Rights Act of 1875 outlawed racial segregation in public accommodations, but by the turn of the century, Jim Crow laws in southern states called for segregation in most public places. Common customs and government policy in the North resulted in similar segregation of blacks from whites. The Montgomery bus boycott and similar protests in dozens of other cities led to enactment of Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which proscribed such racial practices. By the late 1960s, blacks in all regions could use the same public accommodations as whites. In most metropolitan areas, de facto racial segregation persisted long after the laws were changed. Supreme Court decisions and local open-housing ordinances supported the right of blacks to live where they could afford. However the major change was the Fair Housing Act of 1968, which outlawed racial discrimination in the sale or rental of most housing units. The separation of blacks from whites did not end in the 1970s. Today, in areas which have large black populations, there are many central city neighborhoods and a few in the suburbs which are either all-black or are becoming exclusively black enclaves. Most other neighborhoods have no more than token black populations. Another major effort of civil rights organizations has been the upgrading of housing quality for blacks. By 1980, only 6% of the homes and apartments occupied by blacks lacked complete plumbing facilities (down from 50% in 1940). Unlike the modest changes in residential segregation, racial differences in housing quality have been

  8. Right, Ethicity and State in Hegel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Cesaroni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to give an account of Hegel’s conception of right as a mutual implication of ethical and political life against the backdrop of the modern theories of right, based on the construction of a sovereign will authorized by the procedure of representation and on the notion of a threefold division of the powers of the State. After having clarified Hegel’s definition of State as the actuality of the ethical Idea, I will provide a stepwise reconstruction of the inner logic of the constitution (Verfassung, as it is articulated in its three main moments: the power of the monarch (singularity, the civil society (particularity, and the legislative power (universality. Specifically, I will argue that, from the Outlines of the Philosophy of Right (1820 to the Enciclopedia of 1827 and 1830, passing through the course of 1824/25, Hegel’s texts show the discontinuous development of a broad and original notion of government (Regierung, which, in the §541 of the Enciclopedia of 1830, culminates in the identification of government with the political State. Thus, the traditional distinction of powers ends up being transformed into the articulation of three ruling agencies, which are actively present in every sphere of the constitution, without, however, pretending to reduce or eliminate any of them.

  9. The First State Dream Act: In-State Resident Tuition and Immigration in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Texas became the first state to pass an in-state resident tuition policy that benefits undocumented immigrant students, a majority of whom are of Latino/a origin. This analysis estimates the effect of the Texas in-state resident tuition policy on students likely to be undocumented. Using a differences-in-differences strategy and two…

  10. Higher USA State Resident Neuroticism Is Associated With Lower State Volunteering Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Stewart J H

    2017-12-01

    Highly neurotic persons have dispositional characteristics that tend to precipitate social anxiety that discourages formal volunteering. With the 50 American states as analytical units, Study 1 found that state resident neuroticism correlated highly ( r = -.55) with state volunteering rates and accounted for another 26.8% of the volunteering rate variance with selected state demographics controlled. Study 2 replicated Study 1 during another period and extended the association to college student, senior, secular, and religious volunteering rates. Study 3 showed state resident percentages engaged in other social behaviors involving more familiarity and fewer demands than formal volunteering related to state volunteering rates but not to neuroticism. In Study 4, state resident neuroticism largely accounted statistically for relations between state volunteering rates and state population density, collectivism, social capital, Republican preference, and well-being. This research is the first to show that state resident neuroticism is a potent predictor of state volunteering rates.

  11. CT training of nuclear medicine residents in the United States, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Metter, Darlene; Oates, M Elizabeth; Guiberteau, Milton J

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the ACGME Nuclear Medicine (NM) Residency Review Committee revised the NM program requirements, which increased CT training for NM residents. This article examines the effect of this revision. Requests were e-mailed to all NM program directors asking that their residents be given the opportunity to complete an online survey regarding their CT training. Subsequently, an identical online survey regarding CT training was e-mailed directly to all members of the NM Residents Organization of the American College of NM asking that they complete the survey regarding their CT training if they had not already done so. Resident responses, compared with those from a similar 2011 survey, indicate a perception that CT training and CT expertise gained in ACGME-accredited NM programs have improved. However, some NM residents are not provided with the opportunity to develop critical skills in interpreting and dictating CT scans during their time on dedicated CT services. The survey indicates that experience gained during NM residency in head and neck/neuroradiology, emergency, and musculoskeletal CT is marginal at best. A slight majority felt that CT training should be further increased. Compared with a 2011 survey of NM residents and the 2011 implementation of expanded CT training requirements, a follow-up survey seems to indicate improvement in CT training for most NM residents. Nevertheless, an opportunity clearly remains to further improve the breadth and depth of CT skills during NM residency. However, whether such an improvement will result in a reversal of multiyear downward trends in the number of NM residents and training programs in the United States is not clear. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The State of Communication Education in Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kate L; Rosenbaum, Marcy E

    2016-06-01

    Communication skills are essential to medical training and have lasting effects on patient satisfaction and adherence rates. However, relatively little is reported in the literature identifying how communication is taught in the context of residency education. Our goal was to determine current practices in communication curricula across family medicine residency programs. Behavioral scientists and program directors in US family medicine residencies were surveyed via email and professional organization listservs. Questions included whether programs use a standardized communication model, methods used for teaching communication, hours devoted to teaching communication, as well as strengths and areas for improvement in their program. Analysis identified response frequencies and ranges complemented by analysis of narrative comments. A total of 204 programs out of 458 family medicine residency training sites responded (45%), with 48 out of 50 US states represented. The majority of respondents were behavioral scientists. Seventy-five percent of programs identified using a standard communication model; Mauksch's patient-centered observation model (34%) was most often used. Training programs generally dedicated more time to experiential teaching methods (video review, work with simulated patients, role plays, small groups, and direct observation of patient encounters) than to lectures (62% of time and 24% of time, respectively). The amount of time dedicated to communication education varied across programs (average of 25 hours per year). Respondent comments suggest that time dedicated to communication education and having a formal curriculum in place are most valued by educators. This study provides a picture of how communication skills teaching is conducted in US family medicine residency programs. These findings can provide a comparative reference and rationale for residency programs seeking to evaluate their current approaches to communication skills teaching and

  13. Right to Basic Education and State Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The right to education is an internationally recognized right. As part of the global movement for Education for All in the past two decades, the right to basic education has emerged in international law, and it carries international obligations--political and legal--on account of collective commitments by the international community for its…

  14. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  15. American State Gun Law Strength and State Resident Differences in Neuroticism Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart J. H. McCann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Relations between state gun law strength and state-aggregated levels of Republican leaning, gun ownership, and resident Big Five neuroticism (based on 619,397 residents nationally were determined in a state-level analysis of the 50 American states using multiple regression strategies with state socioeconomic status, white population percent, and urban population percent statistically controlled. In a standard hierarchical model with state gun law strength as the criterion, the three demographic variables accounted for 44.4% of the variance and the Big Five accounted for another 21.9%. When the Big Five entered stepwise after the demographics, neuroticism was the sole significant personality predictor, accounting for another 13.4% of the variance. Greater state gun law strength was associated with higher state resident neuroticism. Further hierarchical regression analyses showed that state Republican leaning and gun ownership could account separately and jointly for significant variance in state gun law strength but not with state resident neuroticism controlled.

  16. Evaluation of Academic Library Residency Programs in the United States for Librarians of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Angela; Blue, Yolanda; Im, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate academic library residency programs that successfully recruit and retain academic librarians of color. This study examines library residencies in the United States and discusses findings of two nationwide surveys. One survey posed questions to residents about the structure of their residencies, aspects…

  17. The Origins and Current State of Plastic Surgery Residency in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Donald Roy; Johnson, Shane

    2015-11-01

    The history of plastic surgery residency training in the United States dates back to the establishment of plastic surgery as a specialty. The pivotal role played by the American Board of Plastic Surgery is outlined. The history of the early regulatory bodies leading to the formation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Residency Review Committees and the establishment of the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons gives context to our current training models.

  18. Immigrants and Suffrage: Adding to the Discourse by Integrating State versus National Citizenship, Dual Domestic Residency, and Dual Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John A.

    2012-01-01

    This article builds upon the literature on immigrants and the vote by focusing on three legal and democratic principles: state versus national citizenship, dual domestic residency, and globalization/dual citizenship. It first delineates the discretion and powers that states can utilize to establish suffrage rights. The article next develops…

  19. State Dream Acts: The Effect of In-State Resident Tuition Policies and Undocumented Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Stella M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of in-state resident tuition legislation across the United States on the college enrollment odds of individuals likely to be undocumented Latino immigrants. The study employs a differences-indifferences strategy using data from the Current Population Survey's Merged Outgoing Rotation Groups. Foreign-born noncitizen…

  20. College and University Residence and Migration of College Students by State, New York State, Fall 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Postsecondary Policy Analysis.

    Eight tables present statistical data on the originating residence of students entering New York State institutions of higher education in the Fall of 1986. The first table organizes the number of students by locale (New York, all other states, U.S. territories, and foreign countries). The second table organizes the data by sector (number of…

  1. 14 CFR 47.7 - United States citizens and resident aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false United States citizens and resident aliens... AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.7 United States citizens and resident aliens. (a) U.S. citizens... the application. (b) Resident aliens. An applicant for aircraft registration under 49 U.S.C. 44102 who...

  2. STATE SOVEREIGNTY, INTERNATIONAL HUMAN MOBILITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

    OpenAIRE

    Vedovato, Luís Renato; Naspolini, Samyra Haydêe Dal Farra

    2015-01-01

    International human mobility and human rights can be linked by the dinamogenesis theory. The State sovereignty isn’t the same it was in the past. The State can’t decide about the right to entry without consider international human rights treaties. The nationality has an important row in finding how dinamogenesis can modify the interpretation of the State sovereignty. The right to entry is built in the evolution of human rights. Now State has no more the discretion to decide who can enter its ...

  3. Pediatric dermatology training survey of United States dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Mazza, Joni M; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Variability exists in pediatric dermatology education for dermatology residents. We sought to formally assess the pediatric dermatology curriculum and experience in a dermatology residency program. Three unique surveys were developed for dermatology residents, residency program directors, and pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors. The surveys consisted of questions pertaining to residency program characteristics. Sixty-three graduating third-year residents, 51 residency program directors, and 18 pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors responded. Residents in programs with one or more full-time pediatric dermatologist were more likely to feel very competent treating children and were more likely to be somewhat or extremely satisfied with their pediatric curriculums than residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist (50.0% vs 5.9%, p = 0.002, and 85.3% vs 52.9%, p dermatology fellowships were much more likely to report being extremely satisfied than residents in programs without a pediatric dermatology fellowship (83.3% vs 21.2%; p dermatology residency programs to continue to strengthen their pediatric dermatology curriculums, especially through the recruitment of full-time pediatric dermatologists. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The current state of resident training in genomic pathology: a comprehensive analysis utilizing the Resident In-Service Exam (RISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspel, Richard L.; Rinder, Henry M.; Frank, Karen M.; Wagner, Jay; Ali, Asma M.; Fisher, Patrick B.; Parks, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the current state of pathology resident training in genomic and molecular pathology. Methods The Training Residents in Genomics (TRIG) Working Group developed survey and knowledge questions for the 2013 Pathology Resident In-Service Examination (RISE). Sixteen demographic questions related to amount of training, current and predicted future use, and perceived ability in molecular pathology vs. genomic medicine were included along with five genomic pathology and 19 molecular pathology knowledge questions. Results A total of 2,506 pathology residents took the 2013 RISE with approximately 600 individuals per post-graduate year (PGY). For genomic medicine, 42% of PGY-4 respondents stated they had no training compared to 7% for molecular pathology (ppathology (ppathology. Conclusions The RISE is a powerful tool in assessing the state of resident training in genomic pathology and current results suggest a significant deficit. The results also provide a baseline to assess future initiatives to improve genomics education for pathology residents such as those developed by the TRIG Working Group. PMID:25239410

  5. Medical tourism services available to residents of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Brandon W; Luger, Tana; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Martin, Rene; Horowitz, Michael D; Cram, Peter

    2011-05-01

    There are growing reports of United States (US) residents traveling overseas for medical care, but empirical data about medical tourism are limited. To characterize the businesses and business practices of entities promoting medical tourism and the types and costs of procedures being offered. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND OUTCOMES: Between June and August 2008, we conducted a telephone survey of all businesses engaged in facilitating overseas medical travel for US residents. We collected information from each company including: the number of employees; number of patients referred overseas; medical records security processes; destinations to which patients were referred; treatments offered; treatment costs; and whether patient outcomes were collected. We identified 63 medical tourism companies and 45 completed our survey (71%). Companies had a mean of 9.8 employees and had referred an average of 285 patients overseas (a total of approximately 13,500 patients). 35 (79%) companies reported requiring accreditation of foreign providers, 22 (50%) collected patient outcome data, but only 17 (39%) described formal medical records security policies. The most common destinations were India (23 companies, 55%), Costa Rica (14, 33%), and Thailand (12, 29%). The most common types of care included orthopedics (32 companies, 73%), cardiac care (23, 52%), and cosmetic surgery (29, 66%). 20 companies (44%) offered treatments not approved for use in the US--most commonly stem cell therapy. Average costs for common procedures, CABG ($18,600) and knee arthroplasty ($10,800), were similar to previous reports. The number of Americans traveling overseas for medical care with assistance from medical tourism companies is relatively small. Attention to medical records security and patient outcomes is variable and cost-savings are dependent on US prices. That said, overseas medical care can be a reasonable alternative for price sensitive patients in need of relatively common, elective medical

  6. How states can reduce the dropout rate for undocumented immigrant youth: the effects of in-state resident tuition policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potochnick, Stephanie

    2014-05-01

    As of December 2011, 13 states have adopted an in-state resident tuition (IRT) policy that provides in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants and several other states are considering similar legislation. While previous research focuses on how IRT policies affect college entry and attainment, this study examines the effect these policies have on high school dropout behavior. Using the Current Population Survey (CPS) and difference-in-difference models, this paper examines whether IRT policies reduce the likelihood of dropping out of high school for Mexican foreign-born non-citizens (FBNC), a proxy for undocumented youth. The policy is estimated to cause an eight percentage point reduction in the proportion that drops out of high school. The paper develops an integrated framework that combines human capital theory with segmented assimilation theory to provide insight into how IRT policies influence student motivation and educational attainment at the high school level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Results of the 2012-2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) job search and career planning survey of graduating residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Kharofa, Jordan; Zeidan, Youssef H; Tung, Kaity; Gondi, Vinai; Golden, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    To determine the timeline used by postgraduate year (PGY)-5 radiation oncology residents during the job application process and the factors most important to them when deciding on a first job. In 2012 and 2013, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide electronic survey of PGY-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 2 months of their training. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Surveys were completed by 180 of 314 residents contacted. The median time to start networking for the purpose of employment was January PGY-4; to start contacting practices, complete and upload a curriculum vitae to a job search website, and use the American Society of Radiation Oncology Career Center was June PGY-4; to obtain letters of recommendation was July PGY-5; to start interviewing was August PGY-5; to finish interviewing was December PGY-5; and to accept a contract was January PGY-5. Those applying for a community position began interviewing at an earlier average time than did those applying for an academic position (P=.04). The most important factors to residents when they evaluated job offers included (in order from most to least important) a collegial environment, geographic location, emphasis on best patient care, quality of support staff and facility, and multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Factors that were rated significantly different between subgroups based on the type of position applied for included adequate mentoring, dedicated research time, access to clinical trials, amount of time it takes to become a partner, geographic location, size of group, starting salary, and amount of vacation and days off. The residents' perspective on the job application process over 2 years is documented to provide a resource for current and future residents and employers to use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The United States and the universality of human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, N

    1999-01-01

    The United States takes a highly relativistic stance toward the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It regards the socio-economic rights and the right to development as without status; exempts itself from all provisions of the Declaration by failing to sign the conventions designed to implement these provisions; and unilaterally qualifies its support of civil and political rights. Leading recipients of U.S. aid have traditionally included regimes with atrocious human rights records. Those struggling for human rights should have no illusions about the systems of power and their servants.

  9. A national resident survey about the current state of venous education in vascular surgery training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Kernodle, Amber; Abularrage, Christopher J; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize U.S. vascular surgery trainees' perceptions, case numbers, and attitudes toward venous disease education, as well as their intent to incorporate it into future practice. These data will provide us with a current snapshot of postgraduate venous education from a resident's perspective. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. A 13-question survey was created and distributed to all vascular surgery residents in the United States by SurveyMonkey. Formal electronic distribution remained deidentified as the surveys were e-mailed to residents from the Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery. Of 464 vascular surgery trainees queried, 104 (22%) responded to the survey. The majority of responders (80%) were between 25 and 34 years of age, 60% were male, and 72% were white; 91% reported that they were in an academic training program, and 57% were enrolled in an integrated vascular surgery residency program. Postgraduate years (PGYs) of training among respondents were well represented: PGY 1, 14%; PGY 2, 8%; PGY 3, 14%; PGY 4, 12%; PGY 5, 9%; PGY 6, 18%; and PGY 7, 25%. Vascular resident training experience with venous disease revealed the following: 63% performed training. Experience with endothermal ablations was slightly better, with 74% of responders reporting having performed up to 20 cases. Case volumes for endothermal ablation, vein stripping/ligation, inferior vena cava stenting, and iliac stenting increased progressively by clinical training year among integrated vascular residents (P ≤ .02) but were relatively stable for classic 5 + 2 vascular fellows (P ≥ .67). Integrated residents reported having received more didactic venous education than the 5 + 2 vascular surgery fellows (P = .01). There were no differences in overall reported venous procedure volumes between groups (P ≥ .28). The majority of trainees (82%) acknowledged that treating venous disease is part of a standard vascular

  10. Comparison of Plastic Surgery Residency Training in United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianmin; Zhang, Boheng; Yin, Yiqing; Fang, Taolin; Wei, Ning; Lineaweaver, William C; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is internationally recognized as the only way for the physicians to be qualified to practice independently. China has instituted a new residency training program for the specialty of plastic surgery. Meanwhile, plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States are presently in a transition because of restricted work hours. The purpose of this study is to compare the current characteristics of plastic surgery residency training in 2 countries. Flow path, structure, curriculum, operative experience, research, and evaluation of training in 2 countries were measured. The number of required cases was compared quantitatively whereas other aspects were compared qualitatively. Plastic surgery residency training programs in 2 countries differ regarding specific characteristics. Requirements to become a plastic surgery resident in the United States are more rigorous. Ownership structure of the regulatory agency for residency training in 2 countries is diverse. Training duration in the United States is more flexible. Clinical and research training is more practical and the method of evaluation of residency training is more reasonable in the United States. The job opportunities after residency differ substantially between 2 countries. Not every resident has a chance to be an independent surgeon and would require much more training time in China than it does in the United States. Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States and China have their unique characteristics. The training programs in the United States are more standardized. Both the United States and China may complement each other to create training programs that will ultimately provide high-quality care for all people.

  11. Left-right entanglement entropy of boundary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando; Quiroz, Norma

    2015-01-01

    We study entanglement entropy of boundary states in a free bosonic conformal field theory. A boundary state can be thought of as composed of a particular combination of left and right-moving modes of the two-dimensional conformal field theory. We investigate the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over the right-moving modes in various boundary states. We consider Dirichlet and Neumann boundary states of a free noncompact as well as a compact boson. The results for the entanglement entropy indicate that the reduced system can be viewed as a thermal CFT gas. Our findings are in agreement and generalize results in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory where coherent states can also be considered. In the compact case we verify that the entanglement entropy expressions are consistent with T-duality.

  12. Left-right entanglement entropy of boundary states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics,Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Quiroz, Norma [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima,Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Col. Villas San Sebastián,Colima 28045 (Mexico)

    2015-01-21

    We study entanglement entropy of boundary states in a free bosonic conformal field theory. A boundary state can be thought of as composed of a particular combination of left and right-moving modes of the two-dimensional conformal field theory. We investigate the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over the right-moving modes in various boundary states. We consider Dirichlet and Neumann boundary states of a free noncompact as well as a compact boson. The results for the entanglement entropy indicate that the reduced system can be viewed as a thermal CFT gas. Our findings are in agreement and generalize results in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory where coherent states can also be considered. In the compact case we verify that the entanglement entropy expressions are consistent with T-duality.

  13. Globalisation and the state: implications for the state of human rights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globalisation and the state: implications for the state of human rights in Africa. ... Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences ... This article interrogates, in theoretical cum descriptive fashion, the linkage(s) between neo-liberal globalisation, the state, and the state of human rights, using sub-Sahara Africa as a ...

  14. In-State-Tuition for Unauthorized Residents: Teaching a Person to Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Joe; Martinez, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Illegal immigration has become one of the most important issues we face as a nation, and as greater attention is focused on the sociological and economic impact of illegal immigration, policies related to in-state-tuition for unauthorized residents are in a state of flux. Since 2005, the number of states offering in-state-tuition for unauthorized…

  15. [Rights of the child, parents' rights, and state monitoring : When is state intervention in parental autonomy permissible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maywald, Jörg

    2016-10-01

    Children have their own rights from the outset. It is primarily their parents who are responsible for the implementation of these rights. But state instances also carry responsibility for child rights. The state should only intervene in the parental autonomy against the will of the parents when a child's well-being is endangered. The subject under investigation is whether the development of Frühe Hilfen may have led to a subtle bringing forward of the threshold to state intervention, and how this should be assessed from the perspective of the rights of the child. The relevant legal and sociological literature is surveyed and evaluated with this question in mind. Findings indicate that there has been no change in the threshold to state intervention on a legal level. However, there are obvious signs that with the application of existing norms, more than before, the state no longer waits to intervene until actual harm has been done to a child, but already does so when there is a concrete threat to the child's well-being. The discussion shows that from the rights of the child perspective there is no existing reason to bring forward the threshold to state intervention in the parental autonomy. However, there is need for improvement in regard to specialist as well as legal measures. It is suggested that an approach based on the child's rights should be established across all professional fields, the child's position in various points of social law, and the rights of the child anchored in constitutional law.

  16. Characteristics of residents living in residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, there was a higher percentage of older, female residents in communities with more than 25 beds compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Residents in communities with 4–25 beds were more racially diverse than residents in larger communities. The percentage of Medicaid beneficiaries was higher in communities with 4–25 beds than it was in communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. A higher percentage of residents living in communities with 4–25 beds had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with residents in larger communities. Need for assistance with each of the activities of daily living (ADLs) examined (except walking or locomotion) was substantially higher among residents in communities with 4–25 beds, compared with residents in larger communities. Emergency department visits and discharges from an overnight hospital stay in a 90-day period did not vary across residents by community bed size. This report presents national estimates of residents living in residential care, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care residents provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residents across the different sizes of residential care communities. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website, available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  17. Estimates of the Lawful Permanent Resident Population in the United States: January 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the lawful permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2014. The LPR population includes persons...

  18. Estimates of the Lawful Permanent Resident Population in the United States: January 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the lawful permanent resident (LPR) population living in the United States on January 1, 2013. The LPR population includes persons...

  19. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the size of the unauthorized immigrant population residing in the United States as of January 2012 by period of entry, region and...

  20. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States as of January 2009 by period of entry, region and country of...

  1. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States as of January 2007 by period of entry, region and country of...

  2. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States as of January 2008 by period of entry, region and country of...

  3. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the size of the unauthorized immigrant population residing in the United States as of January 2010 by period of entry, region and...

  4. Estimates of the Resident Nonimmigrant Population in the United States: 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates on the size and characteristics of the resident nonimmigrant population in the United States in 2008.1 The estimates were based on...

  5. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants residing in the United States as of January 2006 by period of entry, region and country of...

  6. Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population Residing in the United States: January 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report provides estimates of the size of the unauthorized immigrant population residing in the United States as of January 2011 by period of entry, region and...

  7. Emergency Department Visits by Nursing Home Residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E.; Shah, Manish N.; Allman, Richard M.; Kilgore, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The Emergency Department (ED) is an important source of health care for nursing home residents. The objective of this study was to characterize ED use by nursing home residents in the United States (US). DESIGN Analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey SETTING US Emergency Departments, 2005-2008 PARTICIPANTS Individuals visiting US EDs, stratified by nursing home and non-nursing home residents. INTERVENTIONS None MEASUREMENTS We identified all ED visits by nursing home residents. We contrasted the demographic and clinical characteristics between nursing home residents and non-nursing home residents. We also compared ED resource utilization, length of stay and outcomes. RESULTS During 2005-2008, nursing home residents accounted for 9,104,735 of 475,077,828 US ED visits (1.9%; 95% CI: 1.8-2.1%). The annualized number of ED visits by nursing home residents was 2,276,184. Most nursing home residents were elderly (mean 76.7 years, 95% CI: 75.8-77.5), female (63.3%), and non-Hispanic White (74.8%). Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely have been discharged from the hospital in the prior seven days (adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Nursing home residents were more likely to present with fever (adjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.5-2.4) or hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.5-2.2). Nursing home patients were more likely to receive diagnostic test, imaging and procedures in the ED. Almost half of nursing home residents visiting the ED were admitted to the hospital. Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely to be admitted to the hospital (adjusted OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.1) and to die (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.3). CONCLUSIONS Nursing home residents account for over 2.2 million ED visits annually in the US. Compared with other ED patients, nursing home residents have higher medical acuity and complexity. These

  8. Continuity of care in dermatology residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Tiffany; Vazirnia, Aria; Afshar, Maryam; Dorschner, Robert; Paravar, Taraneh

    2017-05-15

    As established by the AccreditationCouncil for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME),dermatology residents in the United States must participate in continuity clinic. This requirement may be achieved through multiple means, allowing for program variation. To better assess continuity clinic's role in resident learning, more data on this component of graduate medical education is needed. An anonymous online survey was distributed via the American Board of Dermatology list serv to all U.S. dermatology residents. Continuity clinic organization, setting, frequency, and patient and preceptor characteristics were assessed; resident satisfaction and learning were compared. Of 231 responses, 7.8% reported continuity clinic daily, 77.1% weekly, 9.1% every other week, 3.0%monthly, 0.4% once every several months, and 2.2%only during certain blocks. Of the clinics reported,80.1% were "resident-run with attending" and 11.3%were attending-run. The rest were "resident-run with no attending" (0.9%), both resident and attending run(3.0%), or "other" (4.8%). Trainees in resident-run clinics (with attendings) reported greater continuity of care than those in attending-run clinics (p<0.001).Residents reported better teaching with attending presence during patient encounters than when attendings were present only if concerns were raised(p<0.01).

  9. Principles of human rights protection in foreign and home legal policy of the Russian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anokhin Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The principles of state protection of human rights are stated to be important. The principles of human rights policy being a system are conditional on main state goals and objectives, that is ensuring legal safety and unhindered development of an individual and society. This system is argued to be two-component and to include the principles of government mechanism’s construction and activity and general human rights principles. The principles which are not fixed in the legislation are also of great importance. The legislative fixing of principles of civil servants’ activity concerning the human rights is positively estimated by the authors, notably the priority of rights and freedoms of man and citizen; professionalism and competence of civil servants; availability of information on civil service; cooperation with public associations and citizens; security of civil servants against illegal intrusion into their activity. The facts of departure from impartial justice and disrespectful attitude of law enforcement officers to citizens are stated to be wide-spread. The authors prove the necessity to intensify the control of public authorities’ and officials’ activity, to create conditions of its full transparency for the public. The principles of state protection of human rights are ruling principles of public authority’s organization and activity, stating its essence, social function and orientation on setting high level of legal security of man and citizen, fixed in the international agreements and national legislation. It is proposed to reconsider the principles of Russia’s functioning in the sphere of protecting the rights of citizens and proprietors residing abroad.

  10. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Peter B.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Kathpal, Madeera; Haynes, Jeffrey C.; Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  11. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training in the United States: what can we learn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y F

    2017-04-09

    China is currently in the process of establishing formal residency training programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery and other medical and dental specialties. Regulatory agencies, and educational and academic institutions in China are exploring mechanisms, goals and standards of residency training that meet the needs of the Chinese healthcare system. This article provides an introduction of residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United States, with emphasis on the accreditation standard by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. As there are fundamental differences in the medical and dental education systems between China and United States, the training standards in the United States may not be entirely applicable in China. A competency-based training model that focus on overall competencies in medical knowledge, clinical skills and values at the time of graduation should be taken into consideration in a Chinese residency training program in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  12. Getting the balance right: thick and thin approaches to harmonizing state particularism and the human right to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetow, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The right to health requires States to achieve the highest standard of health attainable for all. A culturally sensitive approach is needed to respect States' interpretation and implementation of the universal right to health, and document their progress. This viewpoint suggests how to harmonize the (i) human right to health and (ii) the particularism of State values and interests. I describe the 'thickness' with which individual States recognize the right to health, as a dimension of universality, and then implement that recognition, as a dimension of particularism. Recognition and implementation by States need to be thick to demonstrate 'glocal' rationality, as characterizes the right to health as a Webberian ideal type. Examples of variation in the thickness of States' interpretation and implementation of the right to health are discussed. It is possible to work towards harmonizing the right to health, and State particularism, by maximizing the thickness with which individual States recognize this right and progressively implement it. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urban Institute. 2006. Polzer K. Assisted living state regulatory review 2011. Washington, DC: National Center for Assisted Living. 2011. MetLife Mature Market Institute. Market Survey of Long-Term Care Costs. ...

  14. Resident Involvement in Professional Otolaryngology Organizations: Current Trends in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Jang, Minyoung; Gilad, Amir; Levi, Jessica R

    2017-08-01

    Involvement by residents in professional medical organizations can enrich their training, but little data exist regarding the number and types of involvement opportunities available to otolaryngology residents. We sought to fill this gap in knowledge by quantifying the extent to which major otolaryngology-related organizations in the United States provide involvement opportunities to otolaryngology residents. Our analysis included 23 organizations and subspecialty societies. Results showed that many opportunities exist for residents to attend conferences and present research; however, fewer involvement and funding opportunities existed in any other leadership, health policy, or service-learning experiences. These findings were consistent across general and subspecialty societies. Given the many purported benefits of resident involvement in otolaryngology outside of the standard training environment, future efforts may be warranted to increase the number and type of involvement opportunities currently available in professional societies.

  15. The current and ideal state of mental health training: pediatric resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Elisa; Richardson, Joshua E; Bostwick, Susan; Ward, Mary J; Green, Cori

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Mental health (MH) problems are prevalent in the pediatric population, and in a setting of limited resources, pediatricians need to provide MH care in the primary medical home yet are uncomfortable doing so citing a lack of training during residency as one barrier. The purpose of this study is to describe pediatric residents' experiences and perspectives on the current and ideal states of MH training and ideas for curriculum development to bridge this gap. A qualitative study using focus groups of pediatric residents from an urban academic medical center was performed. Audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Twenty-six residents participated in three focus groups, which is when thematic saturation was achieved. The team generated five major themes: capabilities, comfort, organizational capacity, coping, and education. Residents expressed uncertainty at every step of an MH visit. Internal barriers identified included low levels of comfort and negative emotional responses. External barriers included a lack of MH resources and mentorship in MH care, or an inadequate organizational capacity. These internal and external barriers resulted in a lack of perceived capability in handling MH issues. In response, residents reported inadequate coping strategies, such as ignoring MH concerns. To build knowledge and skills, residents prefer educational modalities including didactics, experiential learning through collaborations with MH specialists, and tools built into patient care flow. Insights: Pediatric residency programs need to evolve in order to improve resident training in MH care. The skills and knowledge requested by residents parallel the American Academy of Pediatrics statement on MH competencies. Models of collaborative care provide similar modalities of learning requested by residents. These national efforts have not been operationalized in training programs yet may be useful for curriculum development and

  16. International issues: Obtaining an adult neurology residency position in the United States: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Justin T; Sellner, Johann; Struhal, Walter; Schneider, Logan; Mayans, David

    2014-04-08

    Around the world, there are marked differences in neurology training, including training duration and degree of specialization. In the United States, adult neurology residency is composed of 1 year of internal medicine training (preliminary year) and 3 years of neurology-specific training. Child neurology, which is not the focus of this article, is 2 years of pediatrics and 3 years of neurology training. The route to adult neurology residency training in the United States is standardized and is similar to most other US specialties. Whereas US medical graduates often receive stepwise guidance from their medical school regarding application for residency training, international graduates often enter this complex process with little or no such assistance. Despite this discrepancy, about 10%-15% of residency positions in the United States are filled by international medical graduates.(1,2) In adult neurology specifically, 35% of matched positions were filled by international graduates in 2013, 75% of whom were not US citizens.(1) In an effort to provide a preliminary understanding of the application process and related terminology (table 1) and thereby encourage international residency applicants, we describe the steps necessary to apply for neurology residency in the United States.

  17. The right to life in a suicidal state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers when the State must take positive steps to protect the right to life of a suicidal patient. Using recent developments across the Council of Europe which challenge the traditional 'ugly Samaritan' approach of many common law systems, it contends that whenever and wherever public authorities know or ought to know of a real and immediate risk to the life of an identifiable person, they must take reasonable precautions to minimise it. Even J. S. Mill's approach to liberty, it is suggested, would tolerate this limited degree of State interference. However, notions of autonomy and dignity, the unpredictability of human behaviour, and the need to avoid unduly burdening the State must influence what it means to act reasonably. © 2013.

  18. Influencing controlled substance prescribing: attending and resident physician use of a state prescription monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Lance; Skeel Williams, Kristi; Knox, Michele; Coates, John

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of attending physician awareness and utilization of a state prescription monitoring program on resident physician behavior. Twenty-five attending physicians and 70 residents in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry completed an 11-item questionnaire assessing awareness and utilization of a state prescription drug monitoring program. Residents who used the system had, on average, a higher proportion of supervising attendings using the system; residents required to utilize the system had the highest proportion of attendings using the system. Overall, almost 90% of the physicians who utilized the system did so due to concerns surrounding prescription drug abuse. Over one third of attending physicians reported increasing the quantity or amount of medication prescribed after utilizing the system, while no residents reported similar outcomes. Through the behavioral influence of supervising attending physicians, residents were significantly more likely to utilize the system. If system utilization is desired, attendings should use the system and require resident participation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The electrocardiogram in healthy Nigerians resident in Lagos State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S-T segment elevation and T-wave inversion were very common in Nigerian subjects. Another racial difference noted was the extent of T-wave inversion. While T-wave inversion beyond lead V1 is rare in adult Caucasians, in Nigerian subjects it may reach up to V3 regardless of age. The results show that right and left axes ...

  20. 20 CFR 416.1615 - How to prove you are lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... permanent residence in the United States. 416.1615 Section 416.1615 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Residence and Citizenship § 416.1615 How to prove you are lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States. (a) What you...

  1. Legislative Agenda Setting for In-State Resident Tuition Policies: Immigration, Representation, and Educational Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Michael K.; Mokher, Christine G.; Flores, Stella M.

    2011-01-01

    Few recent issues in higher education have been as contentious as that of legislation extending in-state college tuition benefits to undocumented students, initiatives now known as in-state resident tuition (ISRT) policies. Building on several strands of literature in political science and higher education studies, we analyze the effects of…

  2. Educational Placement of Students with Autism: The Impact of State of Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Typically, child characteristics such as IQ and severity of autism symptoms are thought to determine educational placement. The present study examines external factors, including state of residence and state funding formulas, to determine their potential influence on placement outcomes. Findings reveal that considerable variations exist among…

  3. Residence and Migration of College and University Students in New York State, 1974 through 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Postsecondary Research, Information Systems, and Institutional Aid.

    The third of a series on higher education enrollment patterns and trends in New York State for 1974-76, this report is aimed primarily at an audience concerned with policy analysis related to college enrollments. The first section presents interstate residence and migration data and views New York State within the national context. The section…

  4. A CAMAC-resident microprocessor for the monitoring of polarimeter spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.; DuPlantis, D.; Yoder, N.; Dale, D.

    1992-01-01

    A CAMAC module for the reporting of polarimeter spin states is being developed using a resident microcontroller. The module will allow experimenters at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility to monitor spin states and correlate spin information with other experimental data. The use of a microprocessor allows for adaptation of the module as new requirements ensue without change to the printed circuit board layout. (author)

  5. Church and state in South Africa and human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet J. Strauss

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War, there was a universal rise and greater acknowledgement of human rights, which entered churches and ecumenical organisations’ way of thinking. Human rights influenced the church’s understanding of justice and human dignity both internally and externally. The concept of human dignity came from the biblical believe that man is created in the image of God. In South Africa human rights were also increasingly recognised and respected. A charter of human rights was included as chapter 2 of the 1996 Constitution and churches regard human dignity as a central tenet of their approach to members and non-members. Differences between church and state on the issue have arisen as the result of differences on the freedom of religion. Church and state in South Africa can complement each other in the promotion of human dignity. Opsomming: Kerk en staat in Suid-Afrika en menseregte. Na die Tweede Wêreldoorlog is menseregte wêreldwyd erken en aanvaar. Dit was ook die geval in kerke en ekumeniese organisasies. Menseregte het kerke se siening van geregtigheid en menswaardigheid in hulle interne sowel as eksterne optrede beïnvloed. Die begrip menswaardigheid het ontstaan uit die bybelse oortuiging dat die mens na die beeld van God geskape is. In Suid-Afrika is menseregte ook toenemend erken en aanvaar. ’n Verklaring van menseregte is as hoofstuk 2 in die 1996-grondwet ingesluit en kerke beskou menswaardigheid as toonaangewend in hulle benadering van mense binne en buite die kerk. Verskille tussen die kerk en die staat in Suid-Afrika oor menseregte het ontstaan as gevolg van verskille oor die inhoud van die vryheid van godsdiens. Teen hierdie agtergrond kan kerk en staat mekaar egter aanvul in die bevordering van menseregte.

  6. Gendered Struggles over Residency Rights when Turkish Immigrant Marriages Break up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Liversage

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transnational marriages – where immigrant offspring marry spouses from their parents’ country of origin – have been common across Europe. If such marriages end in divorce before a given probationary period is over, the marriage migrant spouses may have to leave Europe again, a fact which affects the power balance in such marriages in their first years. Combining quantitative and qualitative data on divorces in Turkish transnational marriages in Denmark, this article sheds light on the interaction between gender and power in such cases of marital break-up. The statistics show that of the app. 9300 Turkish couples who married transnationally in the 1980s and 1990, around 2000 marriages ended in divorce, and app. 450-500 divorced individuals subsequently left Denmark.Interviews with divorced Turkish men and women document that gender strongly affects the power of the sponsoring spouse: While sponsoring men may act with great audacity in expelling quite powerless marriage migrant wives, sponsoring women can also seek to expel unwanted husbands. However, women may do so with greater caution and may more often have to rely on support from Danish state institutions. Furthermore, family relations – especially with the parental generation – may partially counteract the very weak positions of the marriage migrant wives. Los matrimonios transnacionales -donde descendientes de inmigrantes se casan con cónyuges del país de origen de sus padres- han sido comunes en toda Europa. Si tales matrimonios terminan en divorcio antes de que concluya el período de prueba, los cónyuges emigrantes esposados pueden tener que dejar Europa una vez más, un hecho que afecta al equilibrio de poder de esos matrimonios en sus primeros años. Combinando datos cuantitativos y cualitativos sobre divorcios de matrimonios transnacionales turcos en Dinamarca, este artículo arroja luz sobre la interacción entre el género y el poder en los casos de ruptura conyugal

  7. Introducing first-year radiology residents to the ACR at the AMCLC from 2009-2011: the potential impact for ACR and state radiological society memberships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ryan; McMenomy, Brendan; Chauhan, Anil; Siebert, Derrick; Smith, Kevin; Eckmann, David R

    2013-05-01

    This study was designed to determine if first-year radiology resident attendance at the ACR AMCLC over a period of 3 years from 2009 to 2011 led to increased resident knowledge regarding the ACR and Minnesota Radiological Society (MRS), and whether resident involvement in the conference would influence their decisions to participate in the ACR and state radiological societies in the future. All first-year radiology residents from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic residency programs were invited to attend the ACR AMCLC from 2009 to 2011. Local radiology and radiation oncology groups provided funding for travel and hotel expenses, and both residency programs granted residents one day off from clinical duties to travel. Preconference and postconference questionnaires were used to assess residents' knowledge of the general structure and function of the ACR and MRS. Postconference questionnaires were also used to assess residents' satisfaction with the conference and determine their likelihood of joining the ACR and MRS in the future. A total of 46 residents from the residency programs attended the conference over this time period. Residents' knowledge regarding the ACR and MRS increased after the conference, with improved performance on postconference objective and subjective responses. The number of issues residents identified as important to radiology increased after the conference. The vast majority of residents had a very positive experience at the conference and were "highly likely" or "likely" to join the ACR and MRS in the future. Results from the first 3 years of this ongoing study indicate that attending the ACR AMCLC has been an overwhelmingly positive experience for first-year radiology residents from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic programs. Residents' knowledge regarding the ACR and MRS increased nearly 2-fold following the conference. Future state radiological society and ACR membership rates among the participants in our

  8. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  9. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  10. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  11. Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Buck, David A.; Singh, Anurag K.; Engleman, Mark; Thakkar, Vipul; Frank, Steven J.; Flynn, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice

  12. The effect of acculturation on obesity among foreign-born Asians residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hannah-Hanh D; Smith, Charlotte; Reynolds, Grace L; Freshman, Brenda

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between acculturation and obesity in foreign-born Asians residing in the United States, using the 2009 California Health Interview Survey secondary data (N = 2,871). Two series of proxies and/or behavioral variables were used to measure level of acculturation: (a) length of US residency (years and percent of life) and (b) English language use and proficiency. It was hypothesized that acculturation measured with both proxies would positively predict obesity among foreign-born Asian adults who live in the United States. Results did not support the relationship between obesity and residency length, and greater English use and proficiency seemed to predict lower obesity. However, additional exploratory analysis was performed for each Asian ethnicity and the results showed that the hypothesized links were partly supported for Filipino subgroup, but the links for Vietnamese subgroup were in the opposite direction of the hypotheses and inconsistent with previous literature.

  13. 20 CFR 416.1603 - How to prove you are a resident of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How to prove you are a resident of the United States. 416.1603 Section 416.1603 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL... as— (1) Property, income, or other tax forms or receipts; (2) Utility bills, leases or rent payment...

  14. Stand-By Fee Taxable in Residence State under Art. 15 of the OECD Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgens, F.P.G.

    2008-01-01

    this article considers the decision of the Netherlands supreme Court of 22 December 2006, BNB 2007/97. The Netherlands supreme Court held that the employee's Residence State has the exclusive authority to tax a stand-by fee under Art. 15 of the Netherlands tax treaties that are based on the OECD

  15. Residency Patterns and Secondary Migration of Refugees: A State of the Information Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Susan

    This paper synthesizes available research regarding the residence patterns of refugees in the United States. Information is presented on both initial placement and secondary migration. The first section traces the evolution of U.S. policy and outcomes from 1945 to the start of the Indochinese resettlement program in 1975. The second section…

  16. State residence restrictions and forcible rape rates: a multistate quasi-experimental analysis of UCR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socia, Kelly M

    2015-04-01

    This study examines whether the presence of state residence restrictions resulted in changes in statewide rates of forcible rape. It builds on the limited geographic coverage of prior studies by including state-level Uniform Crime Report (UCR) data across 19 years for 49 states and the District of Columbia. It uses a quasi-experimental research method based on a longitudinal fixed-effects panel model design, which can help control for relatively static differences between states. Results indicate that when a state residence restriction was present, regardless of how it was measured, rates of UCR forcible rape were higher in the state than when the policy was not present. This suggests that residence restrictions, at least at the state level, are not useful as an overall crime prevention measure, but may be useful for increasing detection or reporting levels of such crimes. However, results also suggest that the size of the increase varied by whether the policy only applied to offenders with child victims or also included those with adult victims. Implications for research and policy are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. The state of academic sleep surgery: A survey of United States residency and fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher J; Kern, Robert C; Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan; Capasso, Robson

    2017-10-01

    Our objectives were to describe otolaryngology residency programs' experience in and attitudes toward sleep surgery, and describe current otolaryngology sleep fellowships and their impact on future academic practice. E-mail survey. A survey was e-mailed to program directors of 106 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited otolaryngology residencies assessing resident sleep medicine experience, program satisfaction, and impact of sleep faculty. A separate survey was sent to directors of the seven sleep medicine otolaryngology fellowships. Frequency of graduates pursuing academic careers was examined. Forty-six (43.4%) residency programs responded. Thirty-one (67.4%) have a faculty member with any time spent practicing sleep medicine or surgery. Nineteen (41.3%) have a faculty member with >50% dedicated sleep practice and/or who is board certified in sleep medicine. These programs were significantly more likely to respond "extremely" or "very" satisfied with resident sleep exposure than those without (P sleep surgeon; there was no significant difference in response rates between programs already with and those without dedicated sleep faculty. All fellowship directors responded. In the past 5 years these programs have trained 11 total fellows. Ten (90.9%) have remained in academic practice. There is significantly increased satisfaction in resident sleep education at otolaryngology programs with dedicated sleep providers. Concurrently, there is strong program interest in sleep surgeons' involvement in resident training. Sleep fellowships are producing surgeons who pursue academic careers. This study provides support to training fellowship-specialized sleep surgeons and encouraging otolaryngology sleep faculty. NA Laryngoscope, 127:2423-2428, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. A survey of current state of training of plastic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Asra; Khan, Faraz A; Herman, Floyd; Narasimhan, Nathan; Khan, Shaher; Kubiak, Carrie; Gursel, Eti; Edelman, David A

    2017-06-27

    Plastic surgery training is undergoing major changes however there is paucity of data detailing the current state of training as perceived by plastic surgical trainees. Our aim was to determine the quality of training as perceived by the current trainee pool and their future plans. A 25-item anonymous survey with three discrete sections (demographics, quality of training, and post-graduate career plans) was developed and distributed to plastic surgery residents during the academic year 2013. With the confidence interval of 95% and margin of error of 10%, our target response rate was 87 responders. We received a total of 114 respondents with all levels of Post Graduate Year in training represented. Upon comparison of residents with debt of 250,000, those with higher debt were significantly less interested in fellowship training (p value 0.05) and were more likely to pursue private practice (p value plastic surgery least offered as a separate rotation were microsurgery (45%) followed by aesthetic surgery (33%). 53.7% of the residents felt that they were least trained in aesthetic surgery followed by burn surgery 45.4%. Of note 56.4% intended to seek additional training after residency. Moreover residents with an average of 6.4 months of experience in an individual subspecialty were more likely to feel comfortable with that specialty. This survey highlights the areas and subspecialties that deserve attention as perceived by the current trainee pool.

  19. The prevalence of sexual harassment among female family practice residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovich, M C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual harassment as defined by the AMA among female family practice residents in the United States. Of all 1,802 U.S.FP female resident physicians surveyed, a total of 916, or 51%, completed a survey of which 32% reported unwanted sexual advances, 48% reported use of sexist teaching material, 66% reported favoritism based on gender, 36% reported poor evaluation based on gender, 37% reported malicious gossip, 5.3% reported punitive measures based on gender, and 2.2% reported sexual assault during residency. Thirty two percent of respondents reporting sexual harassment experienced negative effects including poor self-esteem, depression, psychological sequelae requiring therapy, and in some cases, transferring training programs. Sexual harassment is a common occurrence among family practice residents during residency training. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of sexual harassment policies instituted by the American Graduate Council on Medical Education on the prevalence of sexual harassment in medical training since the time of this study.

  20. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  1. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  2. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  3. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) of Residence

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  4. Family medicine residents' perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George Ga

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries.

  5. Rights

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 20 percent of Malawians are Moslems (CIA 2001). 5 . 'Property grabbing” occurs when the relatives of a deceased man take all matrimo- nial property, leaving the widow and children with hardly anything (WLSA 2000). References. Armstrong, Alice. 1993. 'lnternalising International Women's Rights Norms', in.

  6. Health and Human Rights in Karen State, Eastern Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William W; Mullany, Luke C; Shwe Oo, Eh Kalu; Richards, Adam K; Iacopino, Vincent; Beyrer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Decades of conflict in eastern Myanmar have resulted in high prevalence of human rights violations and poor health outcomes. While recent ceasefire agreements have reduced conflict in this area, it is unknown whether this has resulted in concomitant reductions in human rights violations. We conducted a two-stage cluster survey of 686 households in eastern Myanmar to assess health status, access to healthcare, food security, exposure to human rights violations and identification of alleged perpetrators over the 12 months prior to January 2012, a period of near-absence of conflict in this region. Household hunger (FANTA-2 scale) was moderate/high in 91 (13.2%) households, while the proportion of households reporting food shortages in each month of 2011 ranged from 19.9% in December to 47.0% in September, with food insecurity peaking just prior to the harvest. Diarrhea prevalence in children was 14.2% and in everyone it was 5.8%. Forced labor was the most common human rights violation (185 households, 24.9%), and 210 households (30.6%) reported experiencing one or more human rights violations in 2011. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified associations between human rights violations and poor health outcomes. Human rights violations and their health consequences persist despite reduced intensity of conflict in eastern Myanmar. Ceasefire agreements should include language that protects human rights, and reconciliation efforts should address the health consequences of decades of human rights violations.

  7. Chinese State-owned Enterprises and Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whelan, Glen; Muthuri, Judy N.

    2017-01-01

    encouraging them to concentrate on only some human rights (i.e., economic, social, and cultural rights) within their national and intra-organizational environment. The article concludes by identifying a number of ways in which our conceptual framework and empirical findings can inform future research....

  8. African States And The Right To Freedom From Torture: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rights and humanitarian law instruments that prohibit torture. The purpose of this article is to critically examine the extent to which African countries have complied with their obligation to put an end to torture under the relevant international human rights and humanitarian law obligations. The article recommends that African ...

  9. Overweight and obesity prevalence among Indian women by place of residence and socio-economic status: Contrasting patterns from 'underweight states' and 'overweight states' of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Angan; Angeli, Federica; Syamala, Thelakkat S; Dagnelie, Pieter C; van Schayck, C P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence from developing countries demonstrates a mixed relationship of overweight/obesity with socioeconomic status (SES) and place of residence. Theory of nutrition transition suggests that over the course of development, overweight first emerges among rich and urban people before spreading among rural and poor people. India is currently experiencing a rapid rise in the proportion of overweight and obese population especially among adult women. Under the backdrop of huge socio-economic heterogeneity across the states of India, the inter-state scenario of overweight and obesity differs considerably. Hence, this paper investigates the evolution over time of overweight and obesity among ever-married Indian women (15-49 years) from selected 'underweight states' (Bihar, Orissa and Madhya Pradesh, where underweight proportion is predominant) and 'overweight states' (Kerala, Delhi and Punjab, where overweight is the prime concern), in relation to a few selected socio-economic and demographic indicators. This study analysed National Family Health Surveys- NFHS-2 (1998-99) and NFHS-3 (2005-06) following Asian population specific BMI cut-offs for overweight and obesity. The results confirm that within India itself the relationship of overweight and obesity with place of residence and SES cannot be generalized. Results from 'overweight states' show that the overweight problem has started expanding from urban and well-off women to the poor and rural people, while the rural-urban and rich-poor difference has disappeared. On the other hand in 'underweight states' overweight and obesity have remained socially segregated and increasing strongly among urban and richer section of the population. The rate of rise of overweight and obesity has been higher in rural areas of 'OW states' and in urban areas of 'UW states'. Indian policymakers thus need to design state-specific approaches to arrest the rapid growth of overweight and its penetration especially towards under

  10. Fewer Seniors from United States Allopathic Medical Schools are Filling Pathology Residency Positions in the Main Residency Match, 2008-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajosky, Ryan Philip; Jajosky, Audrey N; Kleven, Daniel T; Singh, Gurmukh

    2017-11-24

    Some pathologists have observed that fewer American medical school trainees are entering pathology residency. This trend was measured and further explored using Main Residency Match (MRM) data from 2008 to 2017, obtained from the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Over the past decade, the proportion of pathology residency positions filled in the MRM which were taken by American medical school trainees decreased from 77.7% to 50.1%. This was primarily due to fewer seniors from United States (US) allopathic medical schools filling pathology positions in the MRM (298 in 2008 vs 216 in 2017, a 27.5% decrease). Compared to 14 other medical specialties, pathology had the largest decline in the proportion of pathology positions filled in the MRM which were taken by seniors from US allopathic medical schools (63.8% in 2008 vs 39.6% in 2017). The primary reason for this decline was because fewer seniors from US allopathic medical schools participated in the MRM for pathology positions (326 in 2008 vs 232 in 2017, a 28.8% decrease), however, the underlying reasons for this decline are unknown. In conclusion, over the past decade, fewer seniors from US allopathic medical schools sought / filled pathology residency positions in the MRM. These findings are relevant for pathology residency recruitment, especially in the context of a projected decline in US pathologist workforce. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Policy Analysis of Missouri Community College Residence Hall Discipline Policies with an Analysis of Changes in the State Fair Community College Residence Hall Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgour, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States have long been known as institutions of equal opportunity and affordable education. One facet of student life appearing at more and more community colleges is the addition of residence halls. Still, the number of community colleges with on-campus living is relatively small, and for the campuses with…

  12. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 'Powerlessness' or 'doing the right thing' - Moral distress among nursing home staff caring for residents at the end of life: An interpretive descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amanda; Froggatt, Katherine; Brearley, Sarah G

    2017-10-01

    Caring for dying people can contribute to moral distress experienced by healthcare professionals. Moral distress can occur when this caring is restricted by organisational processes, resources or the provision of futile care. These factors apply to end of life care in nursing homes but research is lacking. To describe how nursing home staff experience moral distress when caring for residents during and at the end of life. An interpretive descriptive design, using the critical incident technique in semi-structured interviews to collect data from nursing home staff. Data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Four nursing homes in one large metropolitan area. A total of 16 staff: 2 nurse managers, 4 nurses and 10 care assistants. Participants described holding 'good dying' values which influenced their practice. The four practice-orientated themes of advocating, caring, communicating and relating with residents were found to influence interactions with residents, relatives, general practitioners, and colleagues. These led staff to be able to 'do the right thing' or to experience 'powerlessness', which could in turn lead to staff perceiving a 'bad death' for residents. When there are incongruent values concerning care between staff and others involved in the care of residents, staff feel powerless to 'do the right thing' and unable to influence care decisions in order to avoid a 'bad death'. This powerlessness is the nature of their moral distress.

  14. A multicenter study of the family educational rights and privacy act and the standardized letter of recommendation: impact on emergency medicine residency applicant and faculty behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Jessica; Riley, Stephanie; Downes, Andrew; Gaeta, Theodore; Hern, H Gene; Hwang, Eric; Kass, Lawrence; Kelly, Michael; Luber, Samuel D; Martel, Marc; Minns, Alicia; Patterson, Leigh; Pazderka, Philip; Sayan, Osman; Thurman, Jason; Vallee, Phyllis; Overton, David

    2014-06-01

    Residency applicants have the right to see letters of recommendation written on their behalf. It is not known whether applicants are affected by waiving this right. Our multicenter study assessed how frequently residency applicants waived their FERPA rights to view their letters of recommendation, and whether this affected the ratings they were given by faculty. We reviewed all ERAS-submitted letters of recommendation to 14 ACGME-accredited programs in 2006-2007. We collected ERAS ID, program name, FERPA declaration, standardized letter of recommendation (SLOR) use, and SLOR Global Assessment ranking. The percentage of applicants who waived their FERPA rights was determined. Chi-square tests of independence assessed whether applicants' decision to waive their FERPA rights was associated with their SLOR Global Assessment. We examined 1776 applications containing 6424 letters of recommendations. Of 2736 letters that specified a Global Assessment, 2550 (93%) applicants waived their FERPA rights, while 186 did not. Of the applicants who chose not to waive their rights, 45.6% received a ranking of Outstanding, 35.5% Excellent, 18.3% Very Good, and 1.6% Good. Of applicants who waived their FERPA rights, 35.1% received a ranking of Outstanding, 49.6% Excellent, 13.7% Very Good, and 1.6% Good. Applicants who did not waive their FERPA rights were more likely to receive an Outstanding Assessment (P  =  .003). The majority (93%) of residency applicants waived their FERPA rights. Those who did not waive their rights had a statistically higher chance of receiving an Outstanding Assessment than those who did.

  15. State duties of protection and fundamental rights | Starck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In its reaching its decision, the German Federal Constitutional Court is responsible for preserving the political discretion of the legislature in protecting interests and remembering the structural distinction between "hard" defensive rights and "soft" protective duties in order to prevent the erosion of the directly binding nature of ...

  16. Governmentality, Democratic State, and Education in Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Oscar Orlando Espinel

    2017-01-01

    Faced with the incessant concern on the part of national and supranational institutions in promoting, expanding, and implementing education on human rights in schools and educational systems, it is necessary to stand back for a moment and review the political and discursive ways in which these projects work and the mechanisms they are based on…

  17. Wakgari Kebeta Djigsa Abstract States have the sovereign right to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 M SORNARAJAH, THE INTERNATIONAL LAW ON FOREIGN INVESTMENT 109-110 (3rd edn, Cambridge University. Press) (2010). .... repatriate capital and investment proceeds; (4) limitations on performance requirements; ... justice so that the foreign investor acquires adequate protection to her economic rights and.

  18. Driver and Traffic Safety Education: A Lesson Plan for the Residents of Gracewood State School and Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Jonathan L.

    Outlined is a course of driver education and traffic safety taught to retarded residents of a state institution. Stressed is the importance of driver education for residents able to leave the institution. The philosophy of the program is given to emphasize individualizing instruction, instructing students who possess the potential for driving,…

  19. Public access to New Hampshire state waters: a comparison of three cohorts of residents across three distinct geographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Pawlawski; Robert A. Robertson; Laura Pfister

    2003-01-01

    This study was intended to provide New Hampshire agencies with a better understanding of public access-related demand information. Through an analysis of three groups of New Hampshire residents based upon geographic location and length of residency, important issues and attitudes were identified from all over the State. The results of this study will assist in policy-...

  20. Results of the 2012-2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Job Search and Career Planning Survey of Graduating Residents in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Kharofa, Jordan; Zeidan, Youssef H.; Tung, Kaity; Gondi, Vinai; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the timeline used by postgraduate year (PGY)-5 radiation oncology residents during the job application process and the factors most important to them when deciding on a first job. Methods and Materials: In 2012 and 2013, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide electronic survey of PGY-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 2 months of their training. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Results: Surveys were completed by 180 of 314 residents contacted. The median time to start networking for the purpose of employment was January PGY-4; to start contacting practices, complete and upload a curriculum vitae to a job search website, and use the American Society of Radiation Oncology Career Center was June PGY-4; to obtain letters of recommendation was July PGY-5; to start interviewing was August PGY-5; to finish interviewing was December PGY-5; and to accept a contract was January PGY-5. Those applying for a community position began interviewing at an earlier average time than did those applying for an academic position (P=.04). The most important factors to residents when they evaluated job offers included (in order from most to least important) a collegial environment, geographic location, emphasis on best patient care, quality of support staff and facility, and multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Factors that were rated significantly different between subgroups based on the type of position applied for included adequate mentoring, dedicated research time, access to clinical trials, amount of time it takes to become a partner, geographic location, size of group, starting salary, and amount of vacation and days off. Conclusions: The residents' perspective on the job application process over 2 years is documented to provide a resource for current and future residents and employers to use

  1. Inappropriate Fentanyl Prescribing Among Nursing Home Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Kevin M; Castillo-Salgado, Carlos; Dore, David D; Segal, Jodi B; Zullo, Andrew R; Alexander, G Caleb

    2017-02-01

    We quantified transdermal fentanyl prescribing in elderly nursing home residents without prior opioid use or persistent pain, and the association of individual and facility traits with opioid-naïve prescribing. Cross-sectional study. Linked Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments; Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) records; and Medicare Part D claims. From a cross-section of all long-stay US nursing home residents in 2008 with an MDS assessment and Medicare Part D enrollment, we identified individuals (≥65 years old) who initiated transdermal fentanyl, excluding those with Alzheimer disease, severe cognitive impairment, cancer, or receipt of hospice care. We used Medicare Part D to select beneficiaries initiating transdermal fentanyl in 2008 and determined whether they were "opioid-naïve," defined as no opioid dispensing during the previous 60 days. We obtained resident and facility characteristics from MDS and OSCAR records and defined persistent pain as moderate-to-severe, daily pain on consecutive MDS assessments at least 90 days apart. We estimated associations of patient and facility attributes and opioid-naïve fentanyl initiation using multilevel mixed effects logistic regression modeling. Among 17,052 residents initiating transdermal fentanyl, 6190 (36.3%) were opioid-naïve and 15,659 (91.8%) did not have persistent pain. In the regression analysis with adjustments, residents who were older (ages ≥95 odds ratio [OR] 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-1.95) or more cognitively impaired (moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment, OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.73-2.29) were more likely to initiate transdermal fentanyl without prior opioid use. Most nursing home residents initiating transdermal fentanyl did not have persistent pain and many were opioid-naïve. Changes in prescribing practices may be necessary to ensure Food and Drug Administration warnings are followed, particularly for vulnerable subgroups, such as the cognitively impaired

  2. Mobile Phone Use in Psychiatry Residents in the United States: Multisite Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Shih; Torous, John; Boland, Robert; Conrad, Erich

    2017-11-01

    Mobile technology ownership in the general US population and medical professionals is increasing, leading to increased use in clinical settings. However, data on use of mobile technology by psychiatry residents remain unclear. In this study, our aim was to provide data on how psychiatric residents use mobile phones in their clinical education as well as barriers relating to technology use. An anonymous, multisite survey was given to psychiatry residents in 2 regions in the United States, including New Orleans and Boston, to understand their technology use. All participants owned mobile phones, and 79% (54/68) used them to access patient information. The majority do not use mobile phones to implement pharmacotherapy (62%, 42/68) or psychotherapy plans (90%, 61/68). The top 3 barriers to using mobile technology in clinical care were privacy concerns (56%, 38/68), lack of clinical guidance (40%, 27/68), and lack of evidence (29%, 20/68). We conclude that developing a technology curriculum and engaging in research could address these barriers to using mobile phones in clinical practice. ©Shih Gipson, John Torous, Robert Boland, Erich Conrad. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 01.11.2017.

  3. [Correlation between psychological state and emotional intelligence in residents of gynecology, and obstetrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Lira, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence is our capacity to acknowledge our own emotions, and the emotions of other people; it also has to do with the way emotions must be understood, and used productively. Given that an altered state of mind can have an impact on emotional intelligence, our objective was to correlate the psychological state with emotional intelligence in residents of gynecology, and obstetrics. We assessed 76 gynecology and obstetrics residents by using What's my M3 and TMMS-24 instruments, in order to know the influence of psychological state on emotional intelligence. In male students of second grade, there was a positive correlation between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and emotional attention (EA), and a negative correlation with emotional clarity (EC). In third grade males, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) correlated positively with EA. In male students of fourth grade there was a positive correlation between OCD and EA. In second grade female students, depression correlated negatively with emotional repair (ER). In third grade female students anxiety, bipolar disorder, and PTSD correlated positively with EA. In fourth grade female students there was a negative correlation between depression and EA, and between anxiety, OCD, and PTSD with EC. Psychological status has a favorable impact on EA and a negative effect on EC and ER.

  4. Estimates of the Size and Characteristics of the Resident Nonimmigrant Population in the United States: January 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This report presents estimates of the size and characteristics of the resident nonimmigrant population in the United States. The estimates are daily averages for the...

  5. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2015. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  6. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2016. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  7. Survey of radiation doses received by atomic-bomb survivors residing in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Yamada, H.; Marks, S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey has been completed of 300 of an estimated 500 to 750 survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki who reside in the United States. Distributions with respect to age, sex, citizenship status, distance from the hypocenter at the time of bombing, and dose from immediate weapon radiation have been tabulated from the results and are presented for this group of 300 survivors. Also presented are survey results concerning exposures to residual radiation from fallout and neutron-induced radioactivity in the areas adjacent to the hypocenter

  8. Civil Rights--State Action Is a Requirement for the Application of Section 1985 (3) to First Amendment Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpass, Susan C.

    1976-01-01

    In Bellamy v. Masons's Stores, Inc., the Fourth Circuit of Appeals held that section 1985 (3) of the Ku Klux Klan Act displayed a congressional intent that state action be required for an action based on a conspiracy to deprive first amendment rights. The decision is examined in regard to Griffin v. Breckenridge. For journal availability see HE…

  9. Systems-Based Aspects in the Training of IMG or Previously Trained Residents: Comparison of Psychiatry Residency Training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Mazhar, Mir Nadeem; Uga, Aghaegbulam; Punwani, Manisha; Broquet, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: International medical graduates (IMGs) account for a significant proportion of residents in psychiatric training in the United States. Many IMGs may have previously completed psychiatry residency training in other countries. Their experiences may improve our system. Authors compared and contrasted psychiatry residency training in the…

  10. Educational "When," "Where," and "How" Implications of In-State Resident Tuition Policies for Latino Undocumented Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darolia, Rajeev; Potochnick, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of in-state resident tuition (IRT) policies, which allow undocumented immigrants to pay in-state rather than out-of state tuition, on when and where undocumented immigrant students enroll, and how they finance their education. We identify effects based on differences in pre- and post-policy outcomes…

  11. Periodic medical check-up among residents of three Nigerian South-western States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Opeyemi Usman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: General medical examination is a common form of preventive medicine. Periodic medical check-up generally involves thorough history, physical examination and screening of asymptomatic persons by physicians on a regular basis as part of a routine health care process. Periodic medical check-up is considered effective in preventing illness and promoting health and reducing morbidity and mortality. This study is therefore designed to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of periodic medical check-up among residents of Osun, Ondo and Ekiti States of Nigeria. It is also to determine the influence of educational status on its practice and compare the outcomes in the three states. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional survey study utilizing both qualitative and quantitative method of data collection was conducted at various locations across the three states. The locations included those of public servants, private sector workers, artisans, traders, business men/women, farmers, among others. Results: 1200 consenting residents participated in the study in each of the three states. 518 (43.2% of the respondents in Ondo State are males while 682 (57.8% are females. 465 (38.8% of the respondents in Ekiti State are males while 735 (61.2% are females. 494 (41.2% of the respondents in Osun State are males while 706 (59.8% are females. The mean age in Ondo, Ekiti and Osun were 43.8 +/- 10.7 years, 44.6 +/- 11.5 years and 41.7 +/- 10.1 years respectively. 89.2%, 88.3% and 87.4% of the respondents are aware of periodic medical check-up in Ondo, Ekiti and Osun states respectively. Conclusion: There is high level of awareness of periodic medical check-up in all three states but the level of practice of routine medical check-up is low. The majority of the respondents probably don't practice it because their health insurance plan does not cover the medical check-up or due to individual/organizational financial constraints. [J Contemp Med 2016

  12. Extent of pharmacovigilance among resident doctors in Edo and Lagos states of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohaju-Obodo, J O; Iribhogbe, O I

    2010-02-01

    Systematic attention to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) started with the thalidomide disaster in the early 60s of the 20(th) century. In 1968 ten countries supported a spontaneous reporting system for ADR and collaborated with the WHO pilot research project for international drug monitoring. This survey was conducted to determine the level of awareness of resident doctors about ADRs reporting, the extent of their involvement in pharmacovigilance activities and to build a useful data base that will improve the quality of health care in Nigeria. This cross-sectional observational survey was conducted in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) and Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH), Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH) in Edo and Lagos states, Nigeria, respectively. STUDY DESIGN / METHODS: A cross-sectional observational survey was used in this study. Total population under survey being 971 residents with the sample size of 350 statistically determined. The survey conducted revealed that 78.1% (258) of the respondents had inadequate knowledge about pharmacovigilance with 71.2% (235) unaware of the yellow forms for ADR reporting distributed by the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC). The respondents (92.4%) have observed ADRs in the course of their training and practice, yet only 25.5% of cases were reported. The reported cases (7.3%) were to the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control. The study showed a statistically significant difference between the institution of respondents, knowledge and experience about pharmacovigilance (p Edo and Lagos states. This may be what obtains in other states in Nigeria.

  13. Efficacy of neurosurgery resident education in the new millennium: the 2008 Council of State Neurosurgical Societies post-residency survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Catherine A; Lobel, Darlene A; Krishnamurthy, Satish; Bloomgarden, Gary M; Benzil, Deborah L

    2010-08-01

    Neurosurgical residency training paradigms have changed in response to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandates and demands for quality patient care. Little has been done to assess resident education from the perspective of readiness to practice. To assess the efficacy of resident training in preparing young neurosurgeons for practice. In response to Resolution V-2007F of the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies, a survey was developed for neurosurgeons who applied for oral examination, Part II of the American Board of Neurological Surgery boards, in 2002 through 2007 (N = 800). The survey was constructed in "survey monkey" format and sent to 775 of 800 (97%) neurosurgeons for whom e-mail addresses were available. The response rate was 30% (233/775). Most neurosurgeons were board certified (n = 226, 97%). General neurosurgical training was judged as adequate by a large majority (n = 188, 80%). Sixty-percent chose to pursue at least 1 additional year of fellowship training (n = 138, 60%). Surgical skills training was acceptable, but 6 skill-technique areas were reported to be inadequate (endovascular techniques, neurosurgical treatment of pain, stereotactic radiosurgery, epilepsy surgery, cranial base surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery). Respondents also noted inadequate education in contract negotiation, practice evaluation, and management. The study suggests that neurosurgeons believed that they were well trained in their surgical skills except for some areas of subspecialization. However, there is a significant need for improvement of resident training in the areas of socioeconomic and medicolegal education. Continued evaluation of the efficacy of neurosurgical education is important.

  14. Inclusive Democracy: Franchise Limitations on Non-Resident Citizens as an Unjust Restriction of Rights under the European Convention on Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The Public International Law and Policy Group (PILPG) advises parties in peace negotiations, on drafting post-conflict constitutions, and assists in prosecuting war criminals. As part of this work, PILPG assists States in establishing and implementing electoral systems that meet international

  15. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  16. Failure on the American Board of Surgery Examinations of General Surgery Residency Graduates Correlates Positively with States' Malpractice Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Daniel L; Al Fayyadh, Mohammed J; Rawlings, Jeremy A; Hassan, Ramy A; Kempenich, Jason W; Willis, Ross E; Stewart, Ronald M

    2018-03-01

    It has been suggested that in environments where there is greater fear of litigation, resident autonomy and education is compromised. Our aim was to examine failure rates on American Board of Surgery (ABS) examinations in comparison with medical malpractice payments in 47 US states/territories that have general surgery residency programs. We hypothesized higher ABS examination failure rates for general surgery residents who graduate from residencies in states with higher malpractice risk. We conducted a retrospective review of five-year (2010-2014) pass rates of first-time examinees of the ABS examinations. States' malpractice data were adjusted based on population. ABS examinations failure rates for programs in states with above and below median malpractice payments per capita were 31 and 24 per cent (P malpractice payments per capita for Qualifying Examination (P Malpractice risk correlates positively with graduates' failure rates on ABS examinations regardless of program size or type. We encourage further examination of training environments and their relationship to surgical residency graduate performance.

  17. Participation in international human rights NGOs: The effect of democracy and state capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min

    2012-09-01

    This study examines the effect of the state on participation in human rights international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) from 1966 through 2006, using random effects negative binomial models. Civic participation in human rights INGOs is not responsive to human rights abuses of the state, but is affected by the institutional environment provided by the state. Two intertwined dimensions within the state, democracy and state capacity, are found to be important in explaining cross-national variation in this participation. Strong state capacity magnifies the effect of democracy. A strong democratic state generates the most favorable condition. A strong but authoritarian state, however, is the most unfavorable, because it has both the motive and the capacity to restrain its citizens' global civic engagement. In contrast, an authoritarian but weak state lacks adequate capacity to intervene, and thus tolerates more participation than its strong counterpart. Over time differential participation across different types of states has not been diminished. This study reveals the role of the state in mediating between local citizens and global civil society, and develops a state-centered explanation for unequal participation in human rights INGOs across countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Deceased Donor Organ Transplantation Performed in the United States for Non- Citizens and Non-Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonico, Francis L; Gunderson, Susan; Iyer, Kishore R; Danovitch, Gabriel M; Pruett, Timothy L; Reyes, Jorge D; Ascher, Nancy L

    2018-01-11

    Since 2012, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) has required transplant centers to record the citizenship and residency status of patients undergoing transplantation in the United States. This policy replaced the 5% threshold of the non-US citizen/non-U.S. residents (NC/NR) undergoing organ transplantation that could result in an audit of transplant center activity.We analyzed the frequency of NC/NR deceased donor organ transplants and wait list registrations at all US transplant centers using data provided by UNOS for that purpose to the UNOS Ad Hoc International Relations Committee. During the period of 2013 - 2016, 1,176 deceased donor transplants (of all organs) were performed in NC/NR candidates (1.2 % of the total number of transplants). There were 5 kidney and 7 liver transplant centers that performed > 5% of the deceased donor kidney and deceased donor liver transplants respectively in NC/NR during the years 2014-2016 with a total of 147 deceased donor kidney transplants and 120 deceased donor liver transplants in NC/NR.This report was prepared to fulfill the transparency policy of UNOS to assure a public trust in the distribution of organs. When viewed with a public awareness of deceased donor organ shortages, it suggests the need for a more comprehensive understanding of current NC/NR activity in the US. Patterns of organ specific NC/NR registrations and transplantations at high-volume centers should prompt a review of transplant center practices to determine whether the deceased donor and center resources may be compromised for their US patients.

  19. A mid year comparison study of career satisfaction and emotional states between residents and faculty at one academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Kristen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME new requirements raise multiple challenges for academic medical centers. We sought to evaluate career satisfaction, emotional states, positive and negative experiences, work hours and sleep among residents and faculty simultaneously in one academic medical center after implementation of the ACGME duty hour requirements. Methods Residents and faculty (1330 in the academic health center were asked to participate in a confidential survey; 72% of the residents and 66% of the faculty completed the survey. Results Compared to residents, faculty had higher levels of satisfaction with career choice, competence, importance and usefulness; lower levels of anxiousness and depression. The most positive experiences for both groups corresponded to strong interpersonal relationships and educational value; most negative experiences to poor interpersonal relationships and issues perceived outside of the physician's control. Approximately 13% of the residents and 14% of the faculty were out of compliance with duty hour requirements. Nearly 5% of faculty reported working more than 100 hours per week. For faculty who worked 24 hour shifts, nearly 60% were out of compliance with the duty-hour requirements. Conclusion Reasons for increased satisfaction with career choice, positive emotional states and experiences for faculty compared to residents are unexplained. Earlier studies from this institution identified similar positive findings among advanced residents compared to more junior residents. Faculty are more frequently at risk for duty-hour violations. If patient safety is of prime importance, faculty, in particular, should be compliant with the duty hour requirements. Perhaps the ACGME should contain faculty work hours as part of its regulatory function.

  20. Linking health states to subjective well-being: an empirical study of 5854 rural residents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Jia, X; Zhu, M; Chen, J

    2015-06-01

    Despite a maturing literature on the association between subjective well-being (SWB) and health status of the general population in Western countries, little is known regarding the happiness-health relation in China, and rural populations in particular. This study was aimed to explore the correlation between SWB and health states of China's rural residents. Cross-sectional survey. Data derived from a household survey conducted in 2010 with 5854 rural residents included. The single-item self-reported happiness measure used in the World Values Survey was employed to measure SWB. EQ-5D dimensions and visual analogue scale (VAS) were applied to measure subjective health status. The number of chronic diseases was used as proxy of objective health status. OLS regressions were performed to estimate the variation in SWB by health status and β coefficients were employed as effect size measures. Among EQ-5D dimensions, anxiety/depression had the strongest negative effect on SWB. Having severe anxiety/depression problems could reduce SWB by 1.65 on a scale 1-4. Reporting severe problems in pain/discomfort could also reduce SWB by 0.41, while the impact of other dimensions was insignificant. The coefficient on VAS implied a difference in SWB of 1.60 between the worst health state and the best health state. And suffering from three chronic diseases could reduce SWB by 0.62, but the effect turned insignificant when all measures of subjective health status were entered in the regression. The results from this study verify the strongly negative effect of the mental health dimension on SWB in the context of rural China. And suffering from chronic diseases has substantial negative effect on SWB even after subjective health status is controlled for. But the impact of chronic diseases on SWB could be fully captured when all measures of subjective health status are taken into account. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mexican pharmacies: benefits and risks for border residents in the United States of America and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    To determine the benefits and risks of using Mexican pharmacies by better understanding the sociodemographics and medication needs of pharmacy clients in Ciudad Juárez; and to ascertain the role and expertise of pharmacy clerks and their impact on medication use. Cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 32 pharmacies in Ciudad Juárez conducted in August 2007-January 2008. Medical professionals interviewed 230 pharmacy clients and 25 pharmacy owners and clerks, and observed 152 clerk-client interactions. The cost of the most frequently-purchased medications was compared with pricing at pharmacies in El Paso, Texas, United States. Of the 311 medications purchased, the most frequent were: antibiotics (54), analgesics (49), fixed drug combinations (29), and blood pressure medications (26). Only 38% were purchased with a prescription; 62% of the prescription drugs bought without a prescription were self-prescribed. Many products purchased were of limited therapeutic value, and others could be harmful when used inappropriately. Pharmacy clerks were poorly trained and did not offer appropriate information on drug use; contraindications were never discussed. Contrary to popular perception, some generic drugs were cheaper in the United States than in Mexico. Conflicts of interest were identified that could be leading to over-medication. While the risks are evident, some uninsured, chronically-ill United States residents may benefit from access to medications previously recommended by a physician, without obtaining a new prescription. The authors suggest five steps for reducing the risks and improving pharmaceutical utilization in the border area.

  2. The health capability paradigm and the right to health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2016-08-01

    Against a backdrop of non-ideal political and legal conditions, this article examines the health capability paradigm and how its principles can help determine what aspects of health care might legitimately constitute positive health care rights-and if indeed human rights are even the best approach to equitable health care provision. This article addresses the long American preoccupation with negative rights rather than positive rights in health care. Positive health care rights are an exception to the overall moral range and general thrust of U.S. legal doctrine. Some positive rights to health care have arisen from U.S. Constitutional Eighth Amendment cases and federal and state laws like Medicare, Medicaid, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Finally, this article discusses some of the difficulties inherent in implementing a positive right to health care in the U.S.

  3. Aesthetic Surgery Training during Residency in the United States: A Comparison of the Integrated, Combined, and Independent Training Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Kim, Rebecca Y.; Wan, Derrick C.; Izadpanah, Ali; Lee, Gordon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Three educational models for plastic surgery training exist in the United States, the integrated, combined, and independent model. The present study is a comparative analysis of aesthetic surgery training, to assess whether one model is particularly suitable to provide for high-quality training in aesthetic surgery. Methods. An 18-item online survey was developed to assess residents' perceptions regarding the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in the US. The survey had three distinct sections: demographic information, current state of aesthetic surgery training, and residents' perception regarding the quality of aesthetic surgery training. Results. A total of 86 senior plastic surgery residents completed the survey. Twenty-three, 24, and 39 residents were in integrated, combined, and independent residency programs, respectively. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to number of aesthetic surgery procedures performed, additional training received in minimal-invasive cosmetic procedures, median level of confidence with index cosmetic surgery procedures, or perceived quality of aesthetic surgery training. Facial aesthetic procedures were felt to be the most challenging procedures. Exposure to minimally invasive aesthetic procedures was limited. Conclusion. While the educational experience in aesthetic surgery appears to be similar, weaknesses still exist with respect to training in minimally invasive/nonsurgical aesthetic procedures. PMID:25225615

  4. The New Czech State Citizenship Act: the Further Liberalization of Individual Rights or the Enpowerment of State Authority?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmert, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2014), s. 187-193 ISSN 2042-6402 Institutional support: RVO:68378122 Keywords : State Citizenship Act; * ius sanguinis * individual rights * Czech citizens Subject RIV: AG - Legal Sciences

  5. 20 CFR 416.1618 - When you are considered permanently residing in the United States under color of law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Residence and... Form I-94 endorsed “Refugee-Conditional Entry”; (2) Aliens paroled into the United States pursuant to 8... establishing this status; (9) Aliens admitted as refugees pursuant to section 207 of the Immigration and...

  6. Pulmonary function studies in healthy Filipino adults residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F L; Kelso, J M

    1999-08-01

    Differences in lung volumes among various ethnic groups are known to occur; however, this has not been studied in Filipinos. We sought to assess pulmonary function in healthy, nonsmoking Filipinos residing in the United States compared with standards for white subjects. Healthy adult Filipinos, age 18 years or greater, were recruited. All subjects were screened with health questionnaires to exclude those with cardiopulmonary disease. Pulmonary function tests were performed by using forced expiratory maneuvers. Values for FEV(1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV(1 )/FVC, forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of FVC, and peak expiratory flow rate were compared with predicted values for white subjects (ie, without a racial adjustment). Two hundred twenty-four healthy subjects (121 men and 103 women) completed the study. The group means (as a percentage of the predicted standard for white subjects) were as follows: FEV(1 ), 86%; FVC, 84%; FEV(1 )/FVC, 103%; forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of FVC, 96%; and peak expiratory flow rate, 107%. These findings are very similar to those for African Americans and other Asians. We conclude that it is appropriate to use an 85% racial adjustment for FEV(1 ) and FVC when interpreting pulmonary function test results in Filipinos.

  7. Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and State Violence: Medical Documentation of Torture in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Başak

    2016-09-01

    State authorities invested in developing official expert discourses and practices to deny torture in post-1980 coup d'état Turkey. Documentation of torture was therefore crucial for the incipient human rights movement there in the 1980s. Human rights physicians used their expertise not only to treat torture victims but also to document torture and eventually found the Human Rights Foundation of Turkey (HRFT) in 1990. Drawing on an ethnographic and archival research at the HRFT, this article examines the genealogy of anti-torture struggles in Turkey and argues that locally mediated intimacies and/or hostilities between victims of state violence, human rights physicians, and official forensics reveal the limitations of certain universal humanitarian and human rights principles. It also shows that locally mediated long-term humanitarian encounters around the question of political violence challenge forensic denial of violence and remake the legitimate levels of state violence. © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association.

  8. Book Review: Anja Jetschke: Human Rights and State Security: Indonesia and the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Santino F. Regilme, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Book Review of the Monograph: Jetschke, Anja (2010, Human Rights and State Security: Indonesia and the Philippines ; Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, ISBN: 978-0-8122-4301-7, 368 pages

  9. The Importance of Interspecific Interactions on the Present Range of the Invasive Mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Persistence of Resident Container Species in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Joseph E

    2016-09-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) established in the United States over 30 yr ago and quickly spread throughout the entire eastern half of the country. It has recently spread into western regions and projected climate change scenarios suggest continued expansion to the west and north. Aedes albopictus has had major impacts on, and been impacted by, a diverse array of resident mosquito species. Laying eggs at the edges of small, water-holding containers, hatched larvae develop within these containers feeding on detritus-based resources. Under limited resource conditions, Ae. albopictus has been shown to be a superior competitor to essentially all native and resident species in the United States. Adult males also mate interspecifically with at least one resident species with significant negative impacts on reproductive output for susceptible females. Despite these strong interference effects on sympatric species, competitor outcomes have been highly variable, ranging from outright local exclusion by Ae. albopictus, to apparent exclusion of Ae. albopictus in the presence of the same species. Context-dependent mechanisms that alter the relative strengths of inter- and intraspecific competition, as well as rapid evolution of satyrization-resistant females, may help explain these patterns of variable coexistence. Although there is a large body of research on interspecific interactions of Ae. albopictus in the United States, there remain substantial gaps in our understanding of the most important species interactions. Addressing these gaps is important in predicting the future distribution of this species and understanding consequences for resident species, including humans, that interact with this highly invasive mosquito. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  11. The right to keep and bear arms in the United States: State Courts precedents in the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulus A.A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available in the article the author describes activities of State Courts in the 19th century on the admissibility of the right to keep and bear arms. The researcher has analyzed the most important precedents of State Courts and presented the jurisprudence evolution in this sphere.

  12. Understanding Digital Technology Access and Use Among New York State Residents to Enhance Dissemination of Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Strogatz, David

    2016-01-01

    Many state and local health departments, as well as community organizations, have been using new technologies to disseminate health information to targeted populations. Yet little data exist that show access and use patterns, as well as preferences for receiving health information, at the state level. This study was designed to obtain information about media and technology use, and health information seeking patterns, from a sample of New York State (NYS) residents. A cross-sectional telephone survey (with mobile phones and landlines) was developed to assess media and technology access, use patterns, and preferences for receiving health information among a sample of 1350 residents in NYS. The survey used random digit dialing methodology. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE software. Data suggest that NYS residents have a high level of computer and Internet use; 82% have at least one working computer at home, and 85% use the Internet at least sometimes. Mobile phone use is also high; 90% indicated having a mobile phone, and of those 63% have a smartphone. When asked about preferences for receiving health information from an organization, many people preferred websites (49%); preferences for other sources varied by demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that the Internet and other technologies are viable ways to reach NYS residents, but agencies and organizations should still consider using traditional methods of communication in some cases, and determine appropriate channels based on the population of interest.

  13. CONSIDERATIONS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF OBSERVING HUMAN RIGHTS WITHIN EUROPEAN STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela, STANCEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The detailed analysis of the institution of human rights and fundamental freedoms is necessary to know its role. The promotion of the human condition in the world leads to the innovative interpretation of this institution. The existence of so many international legal instruments aims towards a better protection of the human rights in contemporary society. The issue of human rights has occupied an important role within the states, human rights violations being a common concern, especially in the former communist states. The issue of human rights in Romania has emerged and developed very early. The changes made in Romania by the revolution of 22 December 1989 caused an intense process of amending the legislation in order to be correlated with the international standards. Within European states human rights observance has acquired great importance, a matter which will be emphasised in the future as well. The European Court of Human Rights ensures the guarantee of respecting human rights in Europe, having as legal instrument the European Convention on Human Rights.

  14. Escaping Burnout through Collaboration: Co-Teaching in a Right-to-Work State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabidoux, Salena; Rottmann, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Generally speaking, whenever teachers are mentioned, so too are teachers' unions. However, that is not the case in "right-to-work" states. Teachers in North Carolina, for example, do not have a collective voice to represent them in local or state political arenas, where politicians are usually not well versed in educational practices. As…

  15. Connecting Corporate Human Rights Responsibilities and State Obligations under the UN Guiding Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2017-01-01

    and communication such as non-financial reporting. HRDD and reporting are discussed as modalities for promoting businesses’ self-regulation. They therefore offer a way for States to push businesses towards greater respect for human rights. States may induce learning and self-regulation on human rights among...... businesses through ‘smart mix’ hard, soft and incentives measures related to HRDD and reporting. The paper argues that that clever deployment of these measures may bring forth normative guidance and directives for business action respectful of human rights, strengthening Pillar Two through Pillar One...

  16. The Interconnected State Crisis Contemporary Democratic Transformation in Citizen Participation and Human Rights Fundamental Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Schneider

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to show how crises undergone by the contemporary state influence the effectiveness of Fundamental Social Rights, and the principles of human dignity, and especially the principle of equality. With this, hopes to demonstrate that the fundamental rights may come in the form of constitutional principles or rules, and that the equality, as a first dimension fundamental right, cannot be understood by a purely formal subjective logic, inherent to liberalism. The conclusion is that it’s necessary that the State abandons a position of neutrality, which has a well proved insufficiency, and start to promote an material-objective equality.

  17. A survey of the current utilization of asynchronous education among emergency medicine residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Mike; Schlein, Sarah; Doctor, Shaneen; Stroud, Susan; Dawson, Matthew; Fix, Megan

    2014-04-01

    Medical education is transitioning from traditional learning methods. Resident interest in easily accessible education materials is forcing educators to reevaluate teaching methodology. To determine emergency medicine residents' current methods of and preferences for obtaining medical knowledge, the authors created a survey and sent it to residents, at all levels of training throughout the United States, whose e-mail addresses were available via their residency's official Web site (June-December 2012). The eight-question voluntary survey asked respondents about demographics, their use of extracurricular time, and the materials they perceived as most beneficial. The authors used descriptive statistics to analyze results. Of the 401 residents who received the e-mailed survey, 226 (56.3%) completed it. Of these, 97.7% reported spending at least one hour per week engaging in extracurricular education, and 34.5% reported spending two to four hours per week (P journals (36.5%), and Google (33.8%; P educators must engage with current learners to guide appropriate use of these.

  18. Pediatric Dental Resident's Education on Children with Special Health Care Needs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Suher; Thomas, Marc

    2017-09-15

    To describe pediatric dental residents education as it pertains to children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN). A web-based survey was administered to 80 program directors of pediatric dental residencies recognized by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD). The survey identified demographic data and education and training methods pertaining to CSHCN. Forty surveys (50 percent) were received from programs in all six AAPD regions. Programs that treated 4,500 patients or less/year were statistically less likely to require a specific assessment and were less likely to use written tests to assess competency treating CSHCN. A specific special needs didactic course (88 percent) and journal articles (85 percent) were the most common didactic training methods. The majority of the programs (69 percent) offered more than 20 hours of didactic education. On average 36.3 percent of the patients treated in residencies reported to be CSHCN and each resident clinically treated and average of 13 CSHCN/week. One-third of the respondents planned to increase CSHCN education in the next three years. Almost 70 percent of respondents supported the standardization of a national curriculum regarding CSHCN. A wide disparity exists among residencies regarding education related to CSHCN. Most pediatric dental residency directors support the national standardization of CSHCN education.

  19. Accuracy of influenza vaccination rate estimates in United States nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosholz, J M; Blake, S; Daugherty, J D; Ayers, E; Omer, S B; Polivka-West, L; Howard, D H

    2015-09-01

    The US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requires nursing homes and long-term-care facilities to document residents' vaccination status on the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI). Vaccinating residents can prevent costly hospital admissions and deaths. CMS and public health officials use RAI data to measure vaccination rates in long-term-care residents and assess the quality of care in nursing homes. We assessed the accuracy of RAI data against medical records in 39 nursing homes in Florida, Georgia, and Wisconsin. We randomly sampled residents in each home during the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 influenza seasons. We collected data on receipt of influenza vaccination from charts and RAI data. Our final sample included 840 medical charts with matched RAI records. The agreement rate was 0·86. Using the chart as a gold standard, the sensitivity of the RAI with respect to influenza vaccination was 85% and the specificity was 77%. Agreement rates varied within facilities from 55% to 100%. Monitoring vaccination rates in the population is important for gauging the impact of programmes and policies to promote adherence to vaccination recommendations. Use of data from RAIs is a reasonable approach for gauging influenza vaccination rates in nursing-home residents.

  20. Building coalitions to support women's health and rights in the United States: South Carolina and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Theresa

    2007-05-01

    There is a health care crisis in the United States and women, particularly low-income women and women of colour, are paying the price. The politicisation of pregnancy, sexuality and women's reproductive rights has created a uniquely contradictory situation in many states. Policymakers are working to control women's reproductive choices and sexuality, and restricting sex education, but doing little to address the overall lack of access to quality reproductive health care. This article describes a new reproductive rights advocacy model that was implemented starting in 2003 in two US states, South Carolina and Florida. In-depth research on the status of reproductive health and rights in each state, analysed by race, economic status, county and state policy initiatives relevant to women's health, showed that in both states access to contraception and abortion, cervical and breast cancer screening and treatment, HIV/AIDS-related care and pregnancy care were poor, with African American and Hispanic women faring even worse than white women. Implementing the advocacy model involved identifying and bringing together a diverse set of health care professionals, academics and activists who formed coalitions and are now working together and developing advocacy strategies in support of policies to improve access to reproductive health care and protect reproductive rights in both states.

  1. Maintaining continuity of care for nursing home residents: effect of states' Medicaid bed-hold policies and reimbursement rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Schleinitz, Mark; Grabowski, David C; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent

    2009-02-01

    Recent public concern in response to states' intended repeal of Medicaid bed-hold policies and report of their association with higher hospitalization rates prompts examination of these policies in ensuring continuity of care within the broader context of Medicaid policies. Minimum Data Set assessments of long-stay nursing home residents in April-June 2000 linked to Medicare claims enabled tracking residents' hospitalizations during the ensuing 5 months and determining hospital discharge destination. Multinomial multilevel models estimated the effect of state policies on discharge destination controlling for resident, hospitalization, nursing home, and market characteristics. Among 77,955 hospitalizations, 5,797 (7.4 percent) were not discharged back to the baseline nursing home. Bed-hold policies were associated with lower odds of transfer to another nursing home (AOR=0.55, 95 percent CI 0.52-0.58) and higher odds of hospitalization (AOR=1.36), translating to 9.5 fewer nursing home transfers and 77.9 more hospitalizations per 1,000 residents annually, and costing Medicaid programs about $201,311. Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates were associated with lower odds of transfer. Bed-hold policies were associated with greater continuity of NH care; however, their high cost compared with their small impact on transfer but large impact on increased hospitalizations suggests that they may not be effective.

  2. 38 CFR 3.42 - Compensation at the full-dollar rate for certain Filipino veterans residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Filipino veterans residing in the United States. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1) United... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation at the full-dollar rate for certain Filipino veterans residing in the United States. 3.42 Section 3.42 Pensions...

  3. Regional differences in right versus left congenital heart disease diagnoses in neonates in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jennifer S; Strassle, Paula D

    2018-03-01

    Differences in the prevalence of left and right congenital heart defects (CHD) across the United States are unclear. This study evaluated the overall prevalence and the distribution of right versus left CHD across US regions and divisions in neonates. Newborns born from 2000 to 2014 diagnosed with CHD were identified using the National Inpatient Sample. Heart defects were stratified into right, left, and "neither" subtypes. The risk of right and left heart diagnoses between US Census regions and divisions was compared using multivariable binomial regression, adjusting for infant, and hospital characteristics. Two hundred forty thousand four hundred fifty-five newborns were included and 38,185 (15.9%) were classifiable as having either right or left subtypes. Between 2000 and 2014, the prevalence of right defects increased from 1.65 to 2.88 cases/1,000 live born infants (p right heart defect diagnosis compared to the West. When stratified by division, New England states had a significantly higher prevalence of right defects compared to the Pacific (RD adj .09, 95% CI .06, 0.11). No differences in the prevalence of left defects were seen. The prevalence of CHD diagnoses at birth in the US has increased, and regional differences in the prevalence of right defects appear to exist. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Teaching the Movement: The State of Civil Rights Education in the United States 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Kate

    2011-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress--commonly called "The Nation's Report Card"--tells a dismal story: Only 2% of high school seniors in 2010 could answer a simple question about the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark "Brown v. Board of Education" decision. And it's no surprise. Across the country, state educational…

  5. Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Carriage State among Elderly Nursing Home Residents in Beirut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Jallad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae can cause severe infections, but they are also isolated from the stool of asymptomatic subjects. Faecal carriage of such organism is poorly understood. Methods. First phase of the study was cross-sectional with prevalence and epidemiology of ESBL faecal carriage in two nursing homes in Beirut: 57 residents in the first (NH1 and 151 residents in the second (NH2. In second phase, faecal swabs from cohort of NH1 residents were examined for carriage at six-week intervals over three-month period. Residents’ charts were reviewed to assess carriage risk factors. Results. Over 3 consecutive samplings at NH1, 81% of residents were at least one-time carriers with 50% at the first round, 60.4% at the second, and 74.5% at the last one. At NH2, 68.2% of residents were carriers. Constipation (in NH1 and antibiotic intake (in NH2 were significantly associated with higher ESBL faecal carriage while the length of stay at the nursing home (in NH2 was associated with less carriage. Conclusion. Faecal carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae is high among nursing home patients in Beirut. The rate of carriage changes rapidly and significantly over time either with multiple factors playing a possible role like outbreak spreading, antibiotic, and health care system exposure.

  6. State obligations to implement African abortion laws: employing human rights in a changing legal landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwena, Charles G

    2012-11-01

    Women in the African region are overburdened with unsafe abortion. Abortion regimes that fail to translate any given abortion rights into tangible access are partly to blame. Historically, African abortion laws have been highly restrictive. However, the post-independence era has witnessed a change toward liberalizing abortion law, even if incremental for many jurisdictions. Furthermore, Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa has significantly augmented the regional trend toward liberalization by recognizing abortion as a human right in given circumstances. However, states are failing to implement abortion laws. The jurisprudence that is emerging from the European Court of Human Rights and United Nations treaty bodies is a tool that can be used to render African governments accountable for failure to implement domestic abortion laws. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing and Promoting the Wellness of United States Ophthalmology Residents: A Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Elaine M; Scott, Ingrid U; Clark, Melissa A; Greenberg, Paul B

    To report on the status of residency-based wellness initiatives in ophthalmic graduate medical education and identify strategies for promoting ophthalmology resident wellness by surveying US ophthalmology program directors (PDs). The PDs were each sent an e-mail containing a link to an anonymous online 15-question survey. The PDs also received a letter with the survey link and a $1 incentive. After 2 weeks, nonresponders received 2 weekly reminder e-mails and phone calls. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the multiple choice responses and categorize the free response answers. National survey. All 111 US ophthalmology PDs were invited to participate. Of 111 PDs, 56 (50%) responded; 14 (26%) of 53 respondents reported that their programs faced an issue involving resident depression, burnout, or suicide within the last year; 25 (45%) of 56 reported that their department had a resident wellness program. Respondents without wellness programs reported a shortage of time (19/30; 63%) and lack of training and resources (19/30; 63%) as barriers to instituting these programs. Respondents reported that the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education could better promote resident wellness by providing training resources for burnout and depression screening (35/53; 66%), resilience skills building (38/53; 72%), and wellness program development (36/53; 68%). This survey suggests that there is a substantial burden of burnout and depression among residents in ophthalmic graduate medical education and that this burden can be addressed by promoting the training of educators to recognize the signs of burnout and depression, and providing resources to develop and expand formal wellness programs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The Arms Trade and States' Duty to Ensure Respect for Humanitarian and Human Rights Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Maya

    2007-01-01

    been growing over the last decade. Against this backdrop, the UN General Assembly invited states in December 2006 to consider the feasibility of an instrument establishing common international standards for conventional arms transfers-also known as the ‘Arms Trade Treaty' (ATT). The legality of arms...... transfers has traditionally been treated as a question of arms control law, but in the recent debate about legal restrictions on states' liberty to transfer arms, norms of international humanitarian and human rights law have frequently been invoked. This article surveys the existing international legal...... regulation of state-authorised conventional arms transfers, examines how humanitarian law, and in particular states' duty to ensure respect for humanitarian law, affects the legality of these transfers and shows why human rights law does not make a significant contribution to the legal regulation...

  9. 26 CFR 20.2208-1 - Certain residents of possessions considered citizens of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER... solely by reason of his being a citizen of such possession or by reason of his birth or residence within such possession. The estate of such a decedent is, therefore, subject to the tax imposed by section...

  10. The family medicine residency training initiative in miscarriage management: impact on practice in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Weaver, Marcia R; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W

    2013-02-01

    Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20--19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women.

  11. Importance of big-game non-resident hunters: The case of moose hunting in the state of Maine

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, Denis

    2006-01-01

    This paper's interest lies in understanding the importance of big-game non-resident hunters and to illustrate this situation, it draws on the State of Maine as a case study. More than 13 million people participated in recreational hunting in the United States in 2001 and spent approximately 20 billion US dollars on hunting activities. Tourists visiting Maine also spend billions of dollars and are a very important part of the Maine economy. Moose hunting is an important part of the Maine touri...

  12. Political Economy of Right to Education in Rural China: Unpacking the Black Box of State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation approaches the inequality of basic education between urban and rural China from a human rights perspective and positions this issue in the context of Chinese political economy. It demonstrates the slackness of the Chinese state in the 1990s and its insufficient efforts in the 2000s

  13. U.N. Withholds Action on a Report of Human Rights Violations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    A panel of seven international jurists and lawyers has found a pattern of human and legal rights violations against Native Americans and other minorities in the United States. Their three-week investigation focused on political prisoners and discovered abuses of both the activists and the criminal process. (Author/DS)

  14. The international right to health: state obligations and private actors in the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paula

    2013-09-01

    Most health systems have historically used a mix of public and private actors for financing and delivering care. But the last 30 years have seen many rich and middle-income countries moving to privatise parts of their health care systems. This phenomenon has generated concerns, especially about equitable access to health care. This article examines what the international right to the highest attainable standard of health in Art 12 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights says about the obligations of states which use private actors in health care. The article involves a close study of the primary documents of the key institutions responsible for interpreting and promoting Art 12. From this study, the article concludes that in mixed public-private health care systems, states not only retain primary responsibility for fulfilling the right to health but are subject to a range of additional specific responsibilities.

  15. The status and rights of undocumented aliens in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, P H

    1987-06-01

    At the most general constitutional level, American immigration law contains 3 structural features that directly affect the rights of aliens, including undocumented ones: 1) the plenary power of the national government over immigration and aliens, 2) the federal system per se, and 3) the separation of powers at the national level. 4 factors that affect the rights of undocumented aliens are 1) the possibility of formal relief from deportation, 2) the possibility of procedural challenges to deportation, 3) the possibility of delay and the resulting ineffectiveness of formal immigration enforcement, and 4) the informal system of enforcement to which the Immigration and Naturalization Service has been forced to resort. Undocumented aliens in the US have full acccess to state and federal courts, possess extensive procedural rights, and have acquired important substantive rights. Recent developments concerning the rights of undocumented aliens under domestic American law raise a number of questions that have not yet been squarely faced, much less resolved in satisfactory ways. These include: 1) the actual utilization by undocumented aliens of public benefits to which they are not legally entitled, 2) the appropriate criteria for determining which rights should be established, 3) the barriers that preve nt undocumented aliens from asserting those rights, and 4) the implications for an effective and fair US immigration policy of expanding undocumented aliens' rights.

  16. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  17. The steady state anaerobic digestion of Laminaria hyperborea--effect of hydraulic residence on biogas production and bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Jamie; Edwards, Stephen; Sallis, Paul J; Caldwell, Gary S

    2013-09-01

    Methane production by anaerobic digestion (AD) of macroalgae (seaweed) is a promising algal bioenergy option. Work presented here is primarily based on the AD of Laminaria hyperborea using batch and continuously stirred tank reactors. Extrapolation of data from batch studies to long term continuous reactors was unreliable. A conservative organic loading rate (OLR) of 1 g L(-1) d(-1) was used due to difficulties experienced in achieving steady state performance at an OLR of 1.5 g L(-1) d(-1). Biogas composition and methane yields (60-70%) were near to values expected from terrestrial feedstocks. Biomass washout, as imposed by the dilution rate (i.e., hydraulic residence), had considerable bearing on the biogas generation profile, particularly at >3 hydraulic residences. Inhibition of methanogen growth was linked to nutrient deficiency and potentially antimicrobial compounds associated with the feedstock. Anaerobic digestion of L. hyperborea proved feasible over extended operational periods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [Public policy, structures of the State and the advocacy of the right to health protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas-Barajas, Enrique; Gay-Molina, Juan Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Not always public policies for the advocacy of citizen rights meet their goal, among other things, because between their formulation and their implementation there is a lack of appropriate structures to generate, articulate and execute these policies. This has been the case of Mexico regarding the advocacy of the rights of non smokers. Very few has been achieved in this matter in the past. This article lists some of the potential causes of the lack of implementation of public policies. At the same time, explores the highly dynamic nature of the health care system at the present and towards the future. The magnitude of the challenges faced by the health care system requires concerted actions of many actors, not only from the very health care system but also from outside. Thus, public policies have to be considered not just at the governmental level but at the state level. Therefore, the main argument of this paper is that given the need to respond to complex challenges to protect the health of the population and their rights in a very complex context, there is a need to formulate and implement state policies that require the intervention of the appropriate state structures to make sure that the design and execution leads to the expected achievements. One such structure at the state level, among others, is the General Health Council, an organization established in 1841, that was incorporated within the Mexican Constitution in 1917, depending directly from the President of Mexico as Head of State. This Council has been reinforced to improve its assigned role to better participate, along other state structures, in the formulation and implementation of public policies such as those for the advocacy of citizen rights.

  19. Case X v. Staatssecretaris van Financiën: Fractional Allocation of Personal and Family Tax Benefits for EU Resident Individuals with Multi-State Income

    OpenAIRE

    Niesten, Hannelore

    2017-01-01

    According to the well-established principles of the Schumacker-doctrine, a source state does not have to grant personal and family tax benefits, applicable for its own residents, unless (1) the non-resident earns ‘all or almost all’ his family income in the working state, and (2) the income in the residence state is insufficient to take into account the personal and family circumstances. This article critically analyses the judgment of the Court of Justice in the X-case, where the Court had t...

  20. How do U.S. state residents form opinions about ‘fracking’ in social contexts? A multilevel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, Emily L.; Li, Nan; Akin, Heather; Scheufele, Dietram A.; Xenos, Michael A.; Brossard, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Increased hydraulic fracturing operations (also known as ‘fracking’) in the U.S. have introduced a larger portion of the public to new and more extensive risks and benefits: from concerns of impacts on water quality and human health to benefits from increased oil and gas production and local economic development. As most policy affecting fracking occurs at the state-level, it is important to understand how citizens’ support for the technology is shaped by their states’ industrial, environmental, and socioeconomic experiences. Using a nationally representative survey, we construct a multilevel model to understand how individuals’ support for fracking varies as a function of both individual- and state-level characteristics. At the state-level, we find that people residing in states with a higher poverty rate and higher ground water use for public drinking supply are more likely to support fracking. At the individual level, the relationships between risk/benefit perceptions and support vary as a function of the state people live in. Additionally, the positive relationship between conservatism and support for fracking is stronger for people residing in states with a higher poverty rate. Based on these findings, we discuss the dynamics of public opinion in social contexts and implications on energy policymaking. - Highlights: • Americans’ support for ‘fracking’ relates to their state's economic and industrial experience. • Percent ground water-use, active shale plays, and poverty rate predict support for fracking. • Individual-level predictors include gender, political ideology, and risk/benefit perceptions. • Conservative ideology's positive relationship to support is stronger for those in poorer states.

  1. Altered resting state connectivity in right side frontoparietal network in primary insomnia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shumei; Tian, Junzhang; Li, Meng; Wang, Tianyue; Lin, Chulan; Yin, Yi; Jiang, Guihua; Zeng, Luxian; Li, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated alterations of resting-state networks (RSNs) in primary insomnia patients as well as relationships between these changes and clinical features. Fifty-nine primary insomnia patients and 53 healthy control subjects underwent a resting-state fMRI scan (rs-fMRI). Ten RSNs were identified using independent component analysis of rs-fMRI data. To assess significant differences between the two groups, voxel-wise analysis of ten RSNs was conducted using dual regression with FSL randomised non-parametric permutation testing and a threshold-free cluster enhanced technique to control for multiple comparisons. Relationships between abnormal functional connectivity and clinical variables were then investigated with Pearson's correlation analysis. Primary insomnia patients showed decreased connectivity in regions of the right frontoparietal network (FPN), including the superior parietal lobule and superior frontal gyrus. Moreover, decreased connectivity in the right middle temporal gyrus and right lateral occipital cortex with the FPN showed significant positive correlations with disease duration and self-rated anxiety, respectively. Our study suggests that primary insomnia patients are characterised by abnormal organisation of the right FPN, and dysfunction of the FPN is correlated with disease duration and anxiety. The results enhance our understanding of neural substrates underlying symptoms of primary insomnia from the viewpoint of resting-state networks. (orig.)

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk among the Mexican American population in the Texas-Mexico border region, by age and length of residence in United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jennifer J; Abdelbary, Bassent; Rentfro, Anne; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; McCormick, Joseph

    2014-04-10

    Although the relationship between health behaviors and outcomes such as smoking and obesity with longer residence in the United States among Mexican American immigrants is established, the relationship between length of residency in the United States and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between immigrant status, length of residence in the United States, age, and CVD markers in a sample of Mexican American adults living in Brownsville, Texas. We categorized participants in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort study as immigrants in the United States for 10 years or less, immigrants in the United States for more than 10 years, or born in the United States. We conducted logistic and ordinary least squares regression for self-reported chronic conditions and CVD biomarkers. We found bivariate differences in the prevalence of self-reported conditions and 1 CVD biomarker (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) by length of residence in the middle (41-64 y) and younger (18-40 y) age groups. After adjusting for covariates, the following varied significantly by immigrant status: stroke and high cholesterol (self-reported conditions) and diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (CVD biomarkers). The association between immigrant status, length of residence in the United States, and CVD markers varied. The effect of length of residence in the United States or immigrant status may depend on age and may be most influential in middle or older age.

  3. The Role of the States and Companies in Human Rights Due Diligence

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez-M., Pilar; Centro Internacional de Pensamiento e Investigación en Derecho (CIPID); Ordoñez-S., Viviana; Centro Internacional de Pensamiento e Investigación en Derecho (CIPID)

    2015-01-01

    The relation between companies and Human Rights has been gaining more and more strength and in that sense it is necessary to specify concepts and insights about what responsibilities we are attributable to companies and what States. So, in this article the authors seek to approach the concept of due diligence, enshrined in John Ruggie’s Guiding Principles, which lies at the head of companies in terms of respect and protection of human rights, while also wants to show which aspects of that dut...

  4. Human rights violations in Roger Prison in the Brazilian state of Paraíba

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Navaroni Soares; Kölling, Gabrielle; Balbinot, Rachelle Amália Agostini

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the extent of human rights within the Brazilian prison system, particularly in terms of the right to health in Roger Prison in the state of Paraíba. It is known that the goals of the punishments imposed upon criminals include prevention and rehabilitation; however, the reality of the Brazilian prison system has been found to be incompatible with these ends. This gap results from the conditions in which the inmates are held. These inmates are serving time in a variety of Br...

  5. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sonya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  6. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sonya; Kusano, Aaron S.; Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura; Thomas, Charles R.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  7. Results of the 2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology career planning survey of practicing physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Golden, Daniel W; Mohindra, Pranshu; Kharofa, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to develop insights about the job application process for graduating radiation oncology residents from the perspective of those involved in hiring. In May and June 2013, a nationwide electronic survey was sent to 1,671 practicing radiation oncologists in academic and private practice settings. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Surveys were completed by 206 physicians. Ninety-six percent were willing to hire individuals directly from residency. Participants believed that the first half of the fourth postgraduate year is the most appropriate time for residents to begin networking and the beginning of the fifth postgraduate year is the most appropriate time to begin contacting practices in pursuit of employment. Seventy percent began interviewing 4 to 9 months before the job start date, and 84% interviewed ≤6 candidates per available position. The 5 most important factors to participants when evaluating prospective candidates were (from most to least important) work ethic, personality, interview impression, experience in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and flexibility. Factors that participants believed should be most important to candidates when evaluating practices included a collegial environment; emphasis on best patient care; quality of equipment, physics, dosimetry, and quality assurance; quality of the support staff and facility; and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Those in academics rated research-related factors higher than those in private practice, who rated business-related factors higher. The perspectives of practicing physicians on the job application process are documented to provide a comprehensive resource for current and future residents and employers. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On the 'inherent' character of the right of states to self-defence

    OpenAIRE

    Roscini, M.

    2016-01-01

    While there is no lack of studies on the use of armed force by states in self-defence, its qualification as an ‘inherent right’ in article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations has received little scholarly attention and has been too quickly dismissed as having no significance. The present article fills this gap in the literature. Its purpose is not to discuss the limits to which article 51 or customary international law submit the exercise of the right of self-defence by states, but to exa...

  9. Does the Fundamental Right to a Balanced Environment Need an Environmental State?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adércio Leite Sampaio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The environment, guaranteed in the brazilian Constitution of 1988 as a fundamental right, has a broad definition, that, beyond the mere reference to nature, contemplating life in all its forms and expressions. In this broad understanding, ecologically balanced environment and essential to a healthy quality of life shall be guaranteed not only for present generations and also for those who has to come. This guarantee for future generations is an expression of the principle of intergenerational equity that inspires but an environmental state, at least a greening democratic state.

  10. Gender, race + geography = jeopardy: marginalized women, human rights and HIV in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Susana T; Kelly, Brook

    2011-11-01

    Across the United States, laws, policies, and practices put women living with HIV in jeopardy. In particular, the dignity, health, and well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV as well as the health and well-being of their families and communities is hampered by punitive laws and policies. Laws and policies that do not meet, or worse, criminalize women's sexual and reproductive rights result in the economic, social and political deprivation of marginalized women and girls-and especially those living with and at risk of HIV. These laws and policies exacerbate an already outsized HIV epidemic in underserved communities, and communities of color in the United States. This article draws from and builds on a human rights workshop that took place as part of the forum "Bringing Gender Home: Implementing Gender Responsive HIV/AIDS Programming for US Women and Girls," sponsored by the Office of Women's Health. It focuses on the damaging impact of laws, policies, and practices that criminalize women's sexuality. These laws significantly impact the well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV, and have an impact on the capacity of poor women of color in the United States to fully exercise their rights. When laws that purport to protect public health have the result of limiting women's reproductive choices, or have a disproportionate impact on marginalized groups such as sex workers, fundamental breaches of women's rights occur. Copyright © 2011 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE CURRENT STATE OF LEGAL INSTITUTIONS PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF JUVENILES IN RUSSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Hafizovna DAVYDOVA

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the current state of the legislation on protection of the rights of under-aged. Much attention is paid to the formation of the juvenile justice system in the Russian Federation. We present problems related to law infringements by teenagers in various fields and their solutions, highlight the work and the development of juvenile courts in Russia, sum up the results of the implementation of juvenile technologies and their significance, gives the definition of the term «co...

  12. Human toxocariasis: incidence among residents in the outskirts of Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaruma Filho Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of estimating the incidence of infection by Toxocara among residents in the outskirts of Campinas (State of São Paulo, Brazil two serological surveys, using ELISA anti-Toxocara tests, were performed in January 1999 and January 2000, involving, respectively, 138 and 115 individuals, 75 of which examined in both occasions. Among this group 67 individuals did not show the presence of anti-Toxocara antibodies in 1999, and 12 presented seroconversion in the second survey, revealing an annual incidence rate of 17.9%.

  13. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-02-02

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85-88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73-82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42-0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64-0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types.

  14. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R.; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85–88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73–82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42–0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64–0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types. PMID:26787856

  15. STATE LIABILITY FOR VIOLATION OF CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AGAINST INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN FREEDOM OF RELIGION AND BELIEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaka Firma Aditya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The government is perceived as the main perpetrator on violations of freedom of religion and belief in Indonesia. As the state organizer, the government frequently issues discriminatory regulations and policies and tend to cause intolerance to minority religions and beliefs, particularly to indigenous peoples. While freedom of religion or belief is a constitutional rights that cannot be reduced and is guaranteed universally in constitution and laws, the law provides limitation that causes ambiguity in the fulfillment of the rights of religion and belief. In addition, the government mindset still adheres to the term of "official religion" and "non-official religion" in any policy-making, causing adherents of minority religions and beliefs to be considered as cultural heritage to be preserved. This creates injustice, discrimination, intimidation and intolerance in rights fulfillment in state and society life. This paper discusses the existence of the guarantee of freedom of religion and belief for indigenous people and state liability for violations of freedom of religion and belief. This research used normative juridical method with statute approach and conceptual approach.

  16. Recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept: unsteady state conditions and hydrodynamic model developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudel S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two recent extensions of the residence time distribution concept are developed. The first one concerns the use of this method under transient conditions, a concept theoretically treated but rarely confirm by relevant experiments. In the present work, two experimental set-ups have been used to verify some limits of the concept. The second extension is devoted to the development of hydrodynamic models. Up to now, the hydrodynamics of the process are either determined by simple models (mixing cells in series, plug flow reactor with axial dispersion or by the complex calculation of the velocity profile obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations. An alternative is to develop a hydrodynamic model by use of a complex network of interconnected elementary reactors. Such models should be simple enough to be derived easily and sufficiently complex to give a good representation of the behavior of the process.

  17. Autonomy and Reproductive Rights of Married Ikwerre Women in Rivers State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princewill, Chitu Womehoma; Jegede, Ayodele Samuel; Wangmo, Tenzin; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Elger, Bernice Simone

    2017-06-01

    A woman's lack of or limited reproductive autonomy could lead to adverse health effects, feeling of being inferior, and above all being unable to adequately care for her children. Little is known about the reproductive autonomy of married Ikwerre women of Rivers State, Nigeria. This study demonstrates how Ikwerre women understand the terms autonomy and reproductive rights and what affects the exercise of these rights. An exploratory research design was employed for this study. A semi-structured interview schedule was used to conduct thirty-four in-depth interviews and six focus group discussions with purposively sampled educated, semi-educated, and uneducated Ikwerre women in monogamous or polygynous marriages. The collected data was analysed qualitatively with MAXQDA 11 using open and axial coding. The interviews and focus group responses reveal a low level of awareness of autonomy and reproductive rights amongst the Ikwerre women in Nigeria. While some educated women were aware of their reproductive rights, cultural practices were reported to limit the exercise of these rights. Participants reported that Ikwerre culture is a patriarchal one where married women are expected to submit and obey their husbands in all matters; and a good married woman according to Ikwerre standard is one who complies with this culture. Women's refusal of sexual advances from their husbands is described as not being acceptable in this culture; and hence rape in marriage is not recognized in Ikwerre culture. Education and awareness creation on the importance of women's reproductive autonomy could improve their reproductive rights and autonomy in marital settings. Overcoming the patriarchal aspects of Ikwerre culture-for example, the greater value placed on male children than female children and treating women as incompetent individuals-is necessary to promote gender equality as well as help improve women's reproductive autonomy.

  18. Substance Use, Mental Disorders and Physical Health of Caribbeans at-Home Compared to Those Residing in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krim K. Lacey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the health conditions of domestic Caribbeans with those living in the United States to explore how national context and migration experiences might influence substance use (i.e., alcohol or drug and other mental and physical health conditions. The study is based upon probability samples of non-institutionalized Caribbeans living in the United States (1621, Jamaica (1216 and Guyana (2068 18 years of age and over. Employing descriptive statistics and multivariate analytic procedures, the results revealed that substance use and other physical health conditions and major depressive disorder and mania vary by national context, with higher rates among Caribbeans living in the United States. Context and generation status influenced health outcomes. Among first generation black Caribbeans, residing in the United States for a longer length of time is linked to poorer health outcomes. There were different socio-demographic correlates of health among at-home and abroad Caribbeans. The results of this study support the need for additional research to explain how national context, migratory experiences and generation status contribute to understanding substance use and mental disorders and physical health outcomes among Caribbean first generation and descendants within the United States, compared to those remaining in the Caribbean region.

  19. State Department leader describes new U.S. commitment to women's rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    In March, 1994, US State Department counselor Timothy Wirth told a UN audience of US support for sustainable development, which includes issues of women's rights, reproductive health care, and rapid population growth. He mentioned that women's rights, well-being, and empowerment are key to attaining population and sustainable development goals. He described the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) as a link between the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development and the 1995 World Summit for Social Development. Environmental destruction; inadequate access to maternal health care, contraception, and safe abortion; sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS; and human rights violations have replaced East-West military conflict and now determine global security. Continued rapid population growth is central to all these issues. Demands for natural resources by the affluent are exhausting forests and water supplies and producing global warming. Sustainable development cannot be achieved without women's total empowerment and complete engagement. Obstacles to sustainable development include lack of primary and reproductive health services, high rates of maternal and child mortality, insufficient educational opportunity, underappreciation of women's potential contribution to environmental goals, and political and economic gender bias. ICPD goals should be meeting the unmet demand for and expanding the range of reproductive health services, investing in women, creating respect for women's basic human rights, assuring women's economic rights, tackling unique problems of female adolescents, persuading men to become responsible for fertility, and involving women in the design and implementation of sustainable development strategies and programs. President Clinton aims to provide almost $600 million for 1995 population activities.

  20. Wintering habitat model for the North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis in the southeastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Gowan

    Full Text Available The coastal waters off the southeastern United States (SEUS are a primary wintering ground for the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis, used by calving females along with other adult and juvenile whales. Management actions implemented in this area for the recovery of the right whale population rely on accurate habitat characterization and the ability to predict whale distribution over time. We developed a temporally dynamic habitat model to predict wintering right whale distribution in the SEUS using a generalized additive model framework and aerial survey data from 2003/2004 through 2012/2013. We built upon previous habitat models for right whales in the SEUS and include data from new aerial surveys that extend the spatial coverage of the analysis, particularly in the northern portion of this wintering ground. We summarized whale sightings, survey effort corrected for probability of whale detection, and environmental data at a semimonthly resolution. Consistent with previous studies, sea surface temperature (SST, water depth, and survey year were significant predictors of right whale relative abundance. Additionally, distance to shore, distance to the 22°C SST isotherm, and an interaction between time of year and latitude (to account for the latitudinal migration of whales were also selected in the analysis presented here. Predictions from the model revealed that the location of preferred habitat differs within and between years in correspondence with variation in environmental conditions. Although cow-calf pairs were rarely sighted in the company of other whales, there was minimal evidence that the preferred habitat of cow-calf pairs was different than that of whale groups without calves at the scale of this study. The results of this updated habitat model can be used to inform management decisions for a migratory species in a dynamic oceanic environment.

  1. Radiology Resident' Satisfaction With Their Training and Education in the United States: Effect of Program Directors, Teaching Faculty, and Other Factors on Program Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christopher Z; Nguyen, HaiThuy N; Ferguson, Emma C

    2016-05-01

    Radiology residency education must evolve to meet the growing demands of radiology training. Resident opinions are a major resource to identify needs. However, few published data are available on a national level investigating the radiology resident perspective on factors that influence the resident experience. Our study investigates factors that affect residents' satisfaction with their residency experience and education. A 67-item survey was sent to all radiology residency program directors and coordinators in the United States to be distributed at their discretion. Questions were multiple choice, free-text answer, or 5-point Likert scale. Statistical significance (p teaching opportunities (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 3.1-13.8), research opportunities (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 2.6-10.6), personal study (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.1), and compensation (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.7). Our study provides incremental data to the existing literature that offers insight into factors that contribute to a successful radiology residency program.

  2. Aging and environmental factors: an estimation of the health state of the elderly population residing in industrialized vs. rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Antonino; Albani, Salvatore; Beretta, Massimiliano; Cappello, Antonella; Mamazza, Grazia; Pavano, Salvatore; Testaì, Manuela; Tomarchio, Marcello; Zuccaro, Carmela; Maugeri, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    The possibilities have already been discussed that the environment of the living beings may influence the aging process, by causing alterations of the homeostatic capacities to such an extent that definitive pathologies will come into being. Therefore, the aim of the present study was at estimating the effective impact of the environmental pollution on the health state of the subjects residing in highly industrialized areas. For this purpose, we compared 2 populations over the age of 56 years, one from the industrialized areas and the other of agricultural character. The health indicator we utilized was the rate of hospitalization calculated for the main geriatric pathologies. It has been observed that among the residents of highly polluted areas, the hospitalizations were more frequent for the screened pathologies. This finding could be an indicator of an interference of the environmental pollution with the physiological process of aging. One can also suspect that for the cardiovascular pathologies also the factor of physical fatigue being more prevalent in the rural population might play an important role in the high occurrence of this type of diseases. On the basis of these findings we intend to emphasize that the sanitary programs of a given territory should consider in the development and application of a sanitary service the intrinsic characteristics of the given area, when designing the possibly most adequate health care service. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Decision Rightness and Emotional Responses to Abortion in the United States: A Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne H Rocca

    Full Text Available Arguments that abortion causes women emotional harm are used to regulate abortion, particularly later procedures, in the United States. However, existing research is inconclusive. We examined women's emotions and reports of whether the abortion decision was the right one for them over the three years after having an induced abortion.We recruited a cohort of women seeking abortions between 2008-2010 at 30 facilities across the United States, selected based on having the latest gestational age limit within 150 miles. Two groups of women (n=667 were followed prospectively for three years: women having first-trimester procedures and women terminating pregnancies within two weeks under facilities' gestational age limits at the same facilities. Participants completed semiannual phone surveys to assess whether they felt that having the abortion was the right decision for them; negative emotions (regret, anger, guilt, sadness about the abortion; and positive emotions (relief, happiness. Multivariable mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in each outcome over time, to compare the two groups, and to identify associated factors.The predicted probability of reporting that abortion was the right decision was over 99% at all time points over three years. Women with more planned pregnancies and who had more difficulty deciding to terminate the pregnancy had lower odds of reporting the abortion was the right decision (aOR=0.71 [0.60, 0.85] and 0.46 [0.36, 0.64], respectively. Both negative and positive emotions declined over time, with no differences between women having procedures near gestational age limits versus first-trimester abortions. Higher perceived community abortion stigma and lower social support were associated with more negative emotions (b=0.45 [0.31, 0.58] and b=-0.61 [-0.93, -0.29], respectively.Women experienced decreasing emotional intensity over time, and the overwhelming majority of women felt that termination was the right

  4. Decision Rightness and Emotional Responses to Abortion in the United States: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Corinne H; Kimport, Katrina; Roberts, Sarah C M; Gould, Heather; Neuhaus, John; Foster, Diana G

    2015-01-01

    Arguments that abortion causes women emotional harm are used to regulate abortion, particularly later procedures, in the United States. However, existing research is inconclusive. We examined women's emotions and reports of whether the abortion decision was the right one for them over the three years after having an induced abortion. We recruited a cohort of women seeking abortions between 2008-2010 at 30 facilities across the United States, selected based on having the latest gestational age limit within 150 miles. Two groups of women (n=667) were followed prospectively for three years: women having first-trimester procedures and women terminating pregnancies within two weeks under facilities' gestational age limits at the same facilities. Participants completed semiannual phone surveys to assess whether they felt that having the abortion was the right decision for them; negative emotions (regret, anger, guilt, sadness) about the abortion; and positive emotions (relief, happiness). Multivariable mixed-effects models were used to examine changes in each outcome over time, to compare the two groups, and to identify associated factors. The predicted probability of reporting that abortion was the right decision was over 99% at all time points over three years. Women with more planned pregnancies and who had more difficulty deciding to terminate the pregnancy had lower odds of reporting the abortion was the right decision (aOR=0.71 [0.60, 0.85] and 0.46 [0.36, 0.64], respectively). Both negative and positive emotions declined over time, with no differences between women having procedures near gestational age limits versus first-trimester abortions. Higher perceived community abortion stigma and lower social support were associated with more negative emotions (b=0.45 [0.31, 0.58] and b=-0.61 [-0.93, -0.29], respectively). Women experienced decreasing emotional intensity over time, and the overwhelming majority of women felt that termination was the right decision for

  5. Right Frontoinsular Cortex and Subcortical Activity to Infant Cry Is Associated with Maternal Mental State Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, Alison E; Guo, Chaohui; Phillips, Mary L; Swain, James E; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L

    2015-09-16

    The study objective was to examine neural correlates of a specific component of human caregiving: maternal mental state talk, reflecting a mother's proclivity to attribute mental states and intentionality to her infant. Using a potent, ecologically relevant stimulus of infant cry during fMRI, we tested hypotheses that postpartum neural response to the cry of "own" versus a standard "other" infant in the right frontoinsular cortex (RFIC) and subcortical limbic network would be associated with independent observations of maternal mental state talk. The sample comprised 76 urban-living, low socioeconomic mothers (82% African American) and their 4-month-old infants. Before the fMRI scan, mothers were filmed in face-to-face interaction with their infant, and maternal behaviors were coded by trained researchers unaware of all other information about the participants. The results showed higher functional activity in the RFIC to own versus other infant cry at the group level. In addition, RFIC and bilateral subcortical neural activity (e.g., thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, putamen) was associated positively with maternal mental state talk but not with more global aspects of observed caregiving. These findings held when accounting for perceptual and contextual covariates, such as maternal felt distress, urge to help, depression severity, and recognition of own infant cry. Our results highlight the need to focus on specific components of caregiving to advance understanding of the maternal brain. Future work will examine the predictive utility of this neural marker for mother-child function. The current study advances extant literature examining the neural underpinning of early parenting behavior. The findings highlight the special functional importance of the right frontoinsular cortex-thalamic-limbic network in a mother's proclivity to engage in mental state talk with her preverbal infant, a circumscribed aspect of maternal caregiving purported to be a prerequisite of

  6. A Study to Identify the Transitional Training Needs for United States Army Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-29

    of no current effort tinder way to ascertain the transitional training needs for members of this most vital segment of the health care team. The goal...leadership development, office communi-ations, professional and legal obligations, Rawls 8 and practice marketing . Because these newly trained physicians...specialty. It is felt, though, that insufficient data were obtained on which to state such inferences. It is conceivable that psychographic

  7. The Legal Rights of LGBT Youth in State Custody: What Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Professionals Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Rudy; Marksamer, Jody

    2006-01-01

    Youth in state custody, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, have federal and state constitutional and statutory rights. These rights guarantee a young person safety in their placement as well as freedom from deprivation of their liberty interest. Many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth have these rights…

  8. The association of duration of residence in the United States with cardiovascular disease risk factors among South Asian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharmal, Nazleen; Kaplan, Robert M; Shapiro, Martin F; Mangione, Carol M; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Wong, Mitchell D; McCarthy, William J

    2015-06-01

    South Asians are disproportionately impacted by cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our objective was to examine the association between duration of residence in the US and CVD risk factors among South Asian adult immigrants. Multivariate logistic regression analyses using pooled data from the 2005, 2007, 2009 California Health Interview Surveys. Duration of residence in the US residence ≥ 15 years after adjusting for illness burden, healthcare access, and socio-demographic characteristics. Duration of residence was not significantly associated with other CVD risk factors. Duration of residence is an important correlate of overweight/obesity and other risk factors among South Asian immigrants.

  9. Monitoring of carbon monoxide in residences with bulk wood pellet storage in the Northeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Alan; Jordan, Carolyn E; Wake, Cameron; Soto-Garcia, Lydia

    2017-10-01

    The interest in biomass fuel is continuing to expand globally and in the northeastern United States as wood pellets are becoming a primary source of fuel for residential and small commercial systems. Wood pellets for boilers are often stored in basement storage rooms or large bag-type containers. Due to the enclosed nature of these storage areas, the atmosphere may exhibit increased levels of carbon monoxide. Serious accidents in Europe have been reported over the last decade in which high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) have been found in or near bulk pellet storage containers. The aim of this study was to characterize the CO concentrations in areas with indoor storage of bulk wood pellets. Data was obtained over approximately 7 months (December 2013 to June 2014) at 25 sites in New Hampshire and Massachusetts: 16 homes using wood pellet boilers with indoor pellet storage containers greater than or equal to 3 ton capacity; 4 homes with wood pellet heating systems with outdoor pellet storage; 4 homes using other heating fuels; and a university laboratory site. CO monitors were set up in homes to collect concentrations of CO in the immediate vicinity of wood pellet storage containers, and data were then compared to those of homes using fossil fuel systems. The homes monitored in this study provided a diverse set of housing stock spanning two and a half centuries of construction, with homes built from 1774 to 2013, representing a range of air exchange rates. The CO concentration data from each home was averaged hourly and then compared to a threshold of 9 ppm. While concentrations of CO were generally low for the homes studied, the need to properly design storage locations for pellets is and will remain a necessary component of wood pellet heating systems to minimize the risk of CO exposure. This paper is an assessment of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure from bulk wood pellet storage in homes in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Understanding the CO concentrations

  10. In the absence of private property rights: Political control and state corporatism during Putin's first tenure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Vanteeva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that Russia's choice of economic organization, which is based on the renewed role of the state, is a response to the existence of severe transaction costs, and subsequent mitigation of contractual incompleteness in the absence of a strong property rights system. Ill-defined property rights have historically hampered formation of business classes in Russia, reducing the necessity for appropriate market infrastructure. This also implied that if Russia's political and economic system had more than one competing hierarchy, the objective of the elites would not have entailed long-term economic growth, as gains from short-term wealth tunneling would have been much larger. As in the early 2000s Russian investment projects were generally defined by large sunk costs and long-term to maturity, under a weak legal system a new substitute governing mechanism, which took form of the state–private co-partnership system, has arisen in order to reduce hold-up costs leading to high levels of underinvestment.

  11. Global health education in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havryliuk, Tatiana; Bentley, Suzanne; Hahn, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Interest in global health and international electives is growing among Emergency Medicine (EM) residents in the United States (US). The majority of EM residency programs offer opportunities for international electives. The degree of participation among residents and type of support provided by the residency program, however, remains unclear. To explore the current state of global health education among EM residents who participate in international electives. A 12-question survey was e-mailed to the program directors of the 192 EM residency programs in the US. The survey included questions about the number of residents participating in international electives and the types of preparation, project requirements, supervision, and feedback participating residents receive. The response rate was 53% with 102 responses. Seventy-five of 102 (74%) programs reported that at least one resident participated in an international elective in the 2010-2011 academic year. Forty-three programs (42%) report no available funding to support any resident on an international elective. Residents receive no preparation for international work in 41 programs (40%). Only 25 programs (26%) required their residents to conduct a project while abroad. Forty-nine programs (48%) reported no formal debriefing session, and no formal feedback was collected from returning residents in 57 of 102 (59%) programs. The majority of EM residencies have residents participating in international electives. However, the programs report variable preparation, requirements, and resident supervision. These results suggest a need for an expanded and more structured approach to international electives undertaken by EM residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Health-related rehabilitation and human rights: analyzing states' obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skempes, Dimitrios; Stucki, Gerold; Bickenbach, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Globally, disability represents a major challenge for health systems and contributes to the rising demand for rehabilitation care. An extensive body of evidence testifies to the barriers that people with disabilities confront in accessing rehabilitation services and to the enormous impact this has on their lives. The international legal dimension of rehabilitation is underexplored, although access to rehabilitation is a human right enshrined in numerous legal documents, specifically the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. However, to date, no study has analyzed the implications of the Convention for Rehabilitation Policy and Organization. This article clarifies states' obligations with respect to health-related rehabilitation for persons with disabilities under the Convention. These obligations relate to the provision of rehabilitation but extend across several key human right commitment areas such as equality and nondiscrimination; progressive realization; international cooperation; participation in policymaking processes; the accessibility, availability, acceptability, and quality of rehabilitation services; privacy and confidentiality; and informed decision making and accountability. To support effective implementation of the Convention, governments need to focus their efforts on all these areas and devise appropriate measures to monitor compliance with human rights principles and standards in rehabilitation policy, service delivery, and organization. This article lays the foundations for a rights-based approach to rehabilitation and offers a framework that may assist in the evaluation of national rehabilitation strategies and the identification of gaps in the implementation of the Convention. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Students' Constitutional Right to a Sound Basic Education: New York State's Unfinished Agenda. Part 1. A Roadmap to Constitutional Compliance Ten Years after "CFE v. State"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebell, Michael A.; Wolff, Jessica R.

    2016-01-01

    Ten years have passed since New York's highest court ruled in the landmark school-funding and educational-rights case, "Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) v. State of New York," that the state was violating students' constitutional right to the "opportunity for a sound basic education" and ordered significant reforms of the…

  14. Building a human rights framework for workers' compensation in the United States: opening the debate on first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgert, Jeffrey A

    2012-06-01

    This article introduces the idea of human rights to the topic of workers' compensation in the United States. It discusses what constitutes a human rights approach and explains how this approach conflicts with those policy ideas that have provided the foundation historically for workers' compensation in the United States. Using legal and historical research, key international labor and human rights standards on employment injury benefits and influential writings in the development of the U.S. workers' compensation system are cited. Workers' injury and illness compensation in the United States does not conform to basic international human rights norms. A comprehensive review of the U.S. workers' compensation system under international human rights standards is needed. Examples of policy changes are highlighted that would begin the process of moving workers' compensation into conformity with human rights standards. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Prevalent Diagnosis of Orofacial Fissures in a Reference Service with Resident Cases in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenal, Mirela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The orofacial fissures are among the most frequent congenital malformations and show a clinical diversity, causing a series of severe complications permanently observed in the individual through his/her lifetime. Objective: To estimate the prevalent types of congenital orofacial fissures diagnosed in a reference service with resident cases in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul from January 2003 to December 2007. Method: An observation study of transverse incision was performed, whose data was obtained from the records at Rehabilitation Hospital of Craniofacial Anomalies (HRAC/USP/SP. To calculate the prevalence, live-born data (SINASC was used. Results: In brief, there were 271 diagnosed cases in the reference service, with the unilateral incisive trans-foramen fissures prevailing for the left side, which mostly attacked the male gender and white ethnicity. The mother's average age was 25 and her school education was from 9 to 11 years, with a history of pregnancy complications and without prior fissures. At SINASC, 98 cases of fissure were noticed for the same period, corresponding to a prevalence of 0.49 per 1,000 births. Conclusion: In the present study, it was possible to estimate the prevalence of fissure by the data from both the Hospital and SINASC, but future studies regarding the orofacial fissures epidemiology in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul and the Midwestern Region, using uniform terminology for classification purposes, are necessary to compare and follow up with the seasonal evolution of prevalence.

  16. Unaccompanied Children at the United States Border, a Human Rights Crisis that can be Addressed with Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataiants, Janna; Cohen, Chari; Riley, Amy Henderson; Tellez Lieberman, Jamile; Reidy, Mary Clare; Chilton, Mariana

    2017-04-08

    In recent years, unaccompanied minors have been journeying to the United States (U.S.)-Mexico border in great numbers in order to escape violence, poverty and exploitation in their home countries. Yet, unaccompanied children attempting to cross the United States border face treatment at the hands of government representatives which violates their inherent rights as children. The result is a human rights crisis that has severe health consequences for the children. Their rights as children are clearly delineated in various, international human rights documents which merit increased understanding of and recognition by the U.S. government. This paper calls for the improvement of policies and procedures for addressing the rights of unaccompanied immigrant children; it provides specific, rights-based recommendations which work together to safeguard the rights of the child at the U.S. southwestern border.

  17. Income inequality and self-reported health in a representative sample of 27 017 residents of state capitals of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, K H C; Pabayo, R; Chiavegatto Filho, A D P

    2018-02-01

    The association between income inequality and health has been analyzed predominantly in developed countries with modest levels of inequality. The study aimed to analyze the association between income inequality and self-reported health (SRH) in the adult population of the 27 Brazilian capitals. Individuals aged 18 years or older from the National Health survey residing in Brazilian capitals in 2013 were analyzed (n = 27 017). Bayesian multilevel models were applied after controlling for individual factors and area-level socioeconomic characteristics. We found a significant association between income inequality and SRH, even after controlling for individual and contextual factors. The results indicate greater odds of poor SRH among those living in areas with medium (OR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.17-1.47) and high income inequality level (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.24-1.56). Income inequality remained significantly associated with SRH, even after controlling for other contextual socioeconomic characteristics, such as local illiteracy rate, violence and per capita income. The study highlights the importance of the individual and contextual characteristics associated with SRH. Our findings suggest that city-level income inequality can have a detrimental effect on individual health, over and above other contextual socioeconomic characteristics and individual factors. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Initial assessment of patient handoff in accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States and Canada: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Abdulaziz M; Paulus, Jessica K; Vassiliou, Melina C; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-08-01

    Communication errors are considered one of the major causes of sentinel events. Our aim was to assess the process of patient handoff among junior surgical residents and to determine ways in which to improve the handoff process. We conducted nationwide surveys that included all accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States and Canada. Of the 244 American and 17 Canadian accredited surgical residency programs contacted, 65 (27%) and 12 (71%), respectively, participated in the survey. Of the American and Canadian respondents, 66% and 69%, respectively, were from postgraduate year (PGY) 1, and 32% and 29%, respectively, were from PGY 2; 85 (77%) and 50 (96%), respectively, had not received any training about patient handoff before their surgical residency, and 27% and 64%, respectively, reported that the existing handoff system at their institutions did not adequately protect patient safety. Moreover, 29% of American respondents and 37% of Canadian respondents thought that the existing handoffs did not support continuity of patient care. Of the American residents, 67% and 6% reported receiving an incomplete handoff that resulted in minor and major patient harm, respectively. These results mirrored those from Canadian residents (63% minor and 7% major harm). The most frequent factor reported to improve the patient handoff process was standardization of the verbal handoff. Our survey results indicate that the current patient handoff system contributes to patient harm. More efforts are needed to establish standardized forms of verbal and written handoff to ensure patient safety and continuity of care.

  19. Length of Residence in the United States is Associated With a Higher Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Immigrants: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne; Ukonu, Nwakaego; Obisesan, Olawunmi; Aboagye, Jonathan Kumi; Agyemang, Charles; Reilly, Carolyn M; Dunbar, Sandra B; Okosun, Ike S

    2016-11-04

    Cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hypertension, overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia are high among United States ethnic minorities, and the immigrant population continues to burgeon. Hypothesizing that acculturation (length of residence) would be associated with a higher prevalence of CMR factors, the authors analyzed data on 54, 984 US immigrants in the 2010-2014 National Health Interview Surveys. The main predictor was length of residence. The outcomes were hypertension, overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between length of US residence and these CMR factors.The mean (SE) age of the patients was 43 (0.12) years and half were women. Participants residing in the United States for ≥10 years were more likely to have health insurance than those with income ratio, age, and sex, immigrants residing in the United States for ≥10 years were more likely to be overweight/obese (odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% CI, 1.10-1.29), diabetic (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.73), and hypertensive (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.32) than those residing in the United States for <10 years. In an ethnically diverse sample of US immigrants, acculturation was associated with CMR factors. Culturally tailored public health strategies should be developed in US immigrant populations to reduce CMR. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. What if Member States Subjected Non-Resident Taxpayers to Unlimited Income Taxation whilst Granting Double Tax Relief under a Netherlands-Style Tax Exemption?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilde, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, the author seeks to illustrate, through examples dealing with cross-border business losses, what the result would be if Member States were to subject non-resident taxpayers to unlimited income taxation whilst granting double tax relief under a Netherlands-style tax exemption method.

  1. A Study Identifying and Validating Competencies Needed for Mid-Managers That Work in Housing and Residence Life at Colleges and Universities in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Hassel Andre

    2016-01-01

    The researcher identified a gap in the knowledge of competencies needed for midmanagers that work in housing and residence life at the southeast colleges and universities in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify and develop a consensus on competencies needed by mid-managers. The review of the literature describes and…

  2. What if Member States Subjected Non-Resident Taxpayers to Unlimited Income Taxation whilst Granting Double Tax Relief under a Netherlands-Style Tax Exemption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. de Wilde (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, the author seeks to illustrate, through examples dealing with cross-border business losses, what the result would be if Member States were to subject non-resident taxpayers to unlimited income taxation whilst granting double tax relief under a Netherlands-style tax

  3. LIVELIHOOD DIVERSIFICATION AND INCOME: A CASE STUDY OF COMMUNITIES RESIDENT ALONG THE KIRI DAM, ADAMAWA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Amurtiya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research analysed livelihood diversifi cation and income in resident communities along the Kiri Dam, Adamawa state, Nigeria. The specifi c objectives of the study were: to describe the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents, assess the level of livelihood diversifi cation of the respondents, analyse income of the respondents, identify factors associated with varying levels of income, and identify constraints to livelihood diversifi cation in the area. A multistage sampling technique was used to collect primary data from 120 respondents from the study area. The data collected were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. The results showed that the majority of the respondents were male (78%, married (76%, educated (70%, below 60 years of age (93% and employed in agricultural activities (83%. The Simpson index of diversifi cation shows that 43% of the respondents diversify at an average level. The majority (60% of the respondents’ annual income is over ₦ 200,000. The ordinary least square estimation shows that age, marital status, education, irrigation activities, fi shing, farm size and level of diversifi cation aff ect income level in the area. The main constraints to diversifi ed livelihood in the area were a lack of basic social infrastructure, a hippopotamus menace and fl ooding. The study recommended the provision of social infrastructure and the control of hippopotamuses. 

  4. The Right Organ for the Right Recipient: the Ninth Annual American Society of Transplant Surgeons' State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Randall S; Abt, Peter L; Desai, Dev M; Garvey, Catherine A; Segev, Dorry L; Kaufman, Dixon B

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of individuals with end-stage organ disease and the increasing success of organ transplantation, the demand for transplants has steadily increased. This growth has led to a greater need to utilize organs from as many donors as possible. As selection criteria have become less stringent to accommodate increasing demand, transplant outcomes are more strongly influenced by recipient and donor factors; thus, finding the right organ for the right recipient is more important than ever. The Ninth Annual American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) State-of-the-Art Winter Symposium, entitled "The Right Organ for the Right Recipient," addressed the matching of donor organs to appropriate recipients. Representative dilemmas in the matching of donor organs with recipients were discussed. These included the following: matching by donor and recipient risk characteristics; use of organs with risk for disease transmission; biologic incompatibility; use of organs from donors after cardiac death; the justification for combined organ transplants like liver-kidney and kidney-pancreas; and the role of allocation in facilitating the matching of donors and recipients. Regardless of the particular issue, decisions about donor-recipient matching should be evidence-based, practical, and made with the goal of maximizing organ utilization while still protecting individual patient interests. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Anesthesiology resident personality type correlates with faculty assessment of resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Randall M; Dilorenzo, Amy N; Li, Hsin-Fang; Fragneto, Regina Y; Bowe, Edwin A; Hessel, Eugene A

    2012-11-01

    To study the association between anesthesiology residents' personality preference types, faculty evaluations of residents' performance, and knowledge. Convenience sample and prospective study. Academic department of anesthesiology. Consenting anesthesiology residents (n = 36). All participants completed the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). All residents' 6-month summation of daily focal evaluations completed by faculty [daily performance score (DPS); 1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = needs improvement, 3 = meets expectations, 4 = exceeds expectations], as well as a global assessment of performance (GAP) score based on placement of each resident into perceived quartile compared with their peers (ie,1 = first, or top, quartile) by senior faculty (n = 7) who also completed the MBTI, were obtained. The resident MBTI personality preferences were compared with the DPS and GAP scores, the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) I and II scores, and faculty MBTI personality type. There was no association between personality preference type and performance on standardized examinations (USMLE I, II). The mean GAP score was better (higher quartile score) for Extraverts than Introverts (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0047) and for Sensing versus Intuition (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0206) preference. Faculty evaluator MBTI preference type did not influence the GAP scores they assigned residents. Like GAP, the DPS was better for residents with Sensing versus Intuition preference (median 3.5 vs 3.3, P = 0.0111). No difference in DPS was noted between Extraverts and Introverts. Personality preference type was not associated with resident performance on standardized examinations, but it was associated with faculty evaluations of resident performance. Residents with Sensing personality preference were evaluated more favorably on global and focal faculty evaluations than those residents who chose the Intuition preference. Extraverted residents were evaluated more favorably on

  6. 12 CFR 987.2 - Law governing rights and obligations of Banks, Finance Board, Office of Finance, United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Finance Board, Office of Finance, United States and Federal Reserve Banks; rights of any Person against Banks, Finance Board, Office of Finance, United States and Federal Reserve Banks. 987.2 Section 987.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURE FOR CONSOLIDATED...

  7. From Wakeful Nights to the Occupation of Schools: State of Exception, Subjectivity and Social Rights in Postmodernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Lerena Misailidis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New social movements are occupying the public space. They are watching the preservation of human rights and are reinventing politics. The article is a contribution for the discussion of the state of exception and the subjectivity of the exercise of citizenship as a praxis to defend social human rights. Inspired by Luís Alberto Warat, the text treats the problem within a critical view of law based on the psychoanalytical theory of Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. So, the state of anomia present in globalization is treated within a dialectical perspective: bears totalitarian violence and the chance for reinvention of rights.

  8. Resting-state functional connectivity between right anterior insula and right orbital frontal cortex correlate with insight level in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have explored the neurobiological basis of insight level in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, though the salience network (SN has been implicated in insight deficits in schizophrenia. This study was then designed to investigate whether resting-state (rs functional connectivity (FC of SN was associated with insight level in OCD patients. We analyzed rs-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from 21 OCD patients with good insight (OCD-GI, 19 OCD patients with poor insight (OCD-PI, and 24 healthy controls (HCs. Seed-based whole-brain FC and ROI (region of interest-wise connectivity analyses were performed with seeds/ROIs in the bilateral anterior insula (AI and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC. The right AI-right medial orbital frontal cortex (mOFC connectivity was found to be uniquely decreased in the OCD-PI group, and the value of this aberrant connectivity correlated with insight level in OCD patients. In addition, we found that the OCD-GI group had significantly increased right AI-left dACC connectivity within the SN, relative to HCs (overall trend for groups: OCD-GI > OCD-PI > HC. Our findings suggest that abnormal right AI-right mOFC FC may mediate insight deficits in OCD, perhaps due to impaired encoding and integration of self-evaluative information about OCD-related beliefs and behaviors. Our findings indicate a SN connectivity dissociation between OCD-GI and OCD-PI patients and support the notion of considering OCD-GI and OCD-PI as two distinct disorder subtypes.

  9. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  10. 20 CFR 408.435 - How do you prove that you are residing outside the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Residence § 408.435 How do you... country; (2) Your plane ticket showing the date you arrived in that country; or (3) An entry permit...

  11. Violence-related firearm deaths among residents of metropolitan areas and cities---United States, 2006--2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    Violence-related firearm deaths remain an important public health concern in the United States. During 2006--2007, a total of 25,423 firearm homicides and 34,235 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. These national totals include 4,166 firearm homicides and 1,446 firearm suicides among youths aged 10--19 years; the rate of firearm homicides among youths slightly exceeded the rate among persons of all ages. This report presents statistics on firearm homicides and firearm suicides for major metropolitan areas and cities, with an emphasis on youths aged 10--19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. It integrates analyses conducted by CDC in response to requests for detailed information, arising from a heightened focus on urban violence by the media, the public, and policymakers over the past year. Firearm homicides and suicides and annual rates were tabulated for the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and their central cities for 2006--2007, using data from the National Vital Statistics System and the U.S. Census Bureau. Firearm homicide rates in approximately two thirds of the MSAs exceeded the national rate, and 86% of cities had rates higher than those of their MSAs. The youth firearm homicide rate exceeded the all-ages rate in 80% of the MSAs and in 88% of the cities. Firearm suicide rates in just over half of the MSAs were below the national rate, and 55% of cities had rates below those of their MSAs. Youth firearm suicide rates in the MSAs and cities were collectively low compared with all-ages rates. Such variations in firearm homicide and firearm suicide rates, with respect to both urbanization and age, should be considered in the continuing development of prevention programs directed at reducing firearm violence.

  12. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George GA

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents’ knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries. PMID:25848326

  13. STATE OBLIGATION ON VIRUS SAMPLE SHARING;FROM COMMON HERITAGE OF MANKIND TO STATE’S SOVEREIGN RIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Barizah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tradition of free international exchange of viruses have been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO probably based on the principle of “Common Heritage of Mankind”.  This tradition lead to legal uncertainty and unfairness in the movement of resources among states and provides an opportunity for developed countries to obtain easy access to viruses of developing countries. Then, International Law has introduced a new regime of “State’s Sovereign Right.” This research focuses on whether Member States have an obligation to share pathogen materials, including viruses for preventing global public health emergency, and whether WHO Collaborating Centers has a right to  share viruses to private sectors. It examines the reason why States should apply that principle. This research is normative legal research by using conceptual approach and  statute approach. This research finds that viruses are part of genetic resources under the meaning of CBD Convention. Accordingly, there is no state obligation under International Law to share it. However, if there is an international human rights obligation to share virus, there should also be an international human rights obligation to assure the access of affordability of drugs and vaccines. Thus, each state will have an equal obligation to enhance the global public health.Key Words : Intellectual Property, Virus Sample Sharing, Common Heritage of Mankind, and State’s Sovereign Right

  14. 42 CFR 483.12 - Admission, transfer and discharge rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... State long term care ombudsman; (vi) For nursing facility residents with developmental disabilities, the... Bill of Rights Act; and (vii) For nursing facility residents who are mentally ill, the mailing address... to ensure safe and orderly transfer or discharge from the facility. (8) Room changes in a composite...

  15. Can there be a developmental state in Morocco? Finding the right balance between autonomy and embeddedness

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This paper draws on Peter Evans’ approach to the developmental state and applies it to examine the scope for state-society synergy at the local level in Morocco. In doing so, it highlights the usefulness of Evans’ concept of ‘embedded autonomy’ for theorizing about the developmental state. The paper studies the internal and interactive capacities of local government and local civil society organizations in Morocco. It argues that there are certain pre-conditions with rega...

  16. Retrospective ecotoxicological data and current information needs for terrestrial vertebrates residing in coastal habitat of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Eisenreich, K.M.; Golden, N.H.; McKernan, M.A.; Hothem, R.L.; Custer, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The Contaminant Exposure and Effects—Terrestrial Vertebrates (CEE-TV) database was developed to conduct simple searches for ecotoxicological information, examine exposure trends, and identify significant data gaps. The CEE-TV database contains 16,696 data records on free-ranging amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals residing in estuarine and coastal habitats of the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts, Alaska, Hawaii, and the Great Lakes. Information in the database was derived from over 1800 source documents, representing 483 unique species (about 252,000 individuals), with sample collection dates spanning from 1884 to 2003. The majority of the records contain exposure data (generally contaminant concentrations) on a limited number (n = 209) of chlorinated and brominated compounds, cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, economic poisons, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons, whereas only 9.3% of the records contain biomarker or bioindicator effects data. Temporal examination of exposure data provides evidence of declining concentrations of certain organochlorine pesticides in some avian species (e.g., ospreys, Pandion haliaetus), and an apparent increase in the detection and possibly the incidence of avian die-offs related to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. To identify spatial data gaps, 11,360 database records with specific sampling locations were combined with the boundaries of coastal watersheds, and National Wildlife Refuge and National Park units. Terrestrial vertebrate ecotoxicological data were lacking in 41.9% of 464 coastal watersheds in the continental United States. Recent (1990–2003) terrestrial vertebrate contaminant exposure or effects data were available for only about half of the National Wildlife Refuge and National Park units in the geographic area encompassed by the database. When these data gaps were overlaid on watersheds exhibiting serious water quality problems and/or high vulnerability to pollution, 72 coastal watersheds, and

  17. Demographic profile of intentional fatalities on railroad rights-of-way in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    One of the Federal Railroad Administrations (FRA) primary safety concerns is trespassing on railway rights-of-way. Some trespasser events end as fatalities which can be intentional or unintentional. This project reviews available trespasser data t...

  18. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress: in search of state obligations in relation to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Yvonne

    2011-11-01

    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights--the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications--has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)--be it at the very end of both instruments -this right hardly received any attention from States, UN bodies and programmes and academics. The role of science in societies and its benefits and potential danger were discussed in various international fora, but hardly ever in a human rights context. Nowadays, within a world that is increasingly turning to science and technology for solutions to persistent socio-economic and development problems, the human dimension of science also receives increased attention, including the human right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications. This contribution analyses the possible legal obligations of States in relation to the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications, in particular as regards health.

  19. Non-state actors and human rights: The case of arms manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Mauricio Bastien Olvera

    2011-01-01

    Irresponsible arms transfers, the illicit manufacturer and the use jeopardize human rights. Thus, it is important that future Arms Trade Treaty, to be concluded next year, addresses serious challenges related to arms transfers, such as the likeliness of these arms to be used to commit serious violations of human rights. For this purpose, this article will analyze the participation of arms manufacturers in the negotiation process taking into account the recent developments on internat...

  20. Can there be a developmental state in Morocco? Finding the right balance between autonomy and embeddedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Bergh (Sylvia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This paper draws on Peter Evans’ approach to the developmental state and applies it to examine the scope for state-society synergy at the local level in Morocco. In doing so, it highlights the usefulness of Evans’ concept of ‘embedded autonomy’ for theorizing about the

  1. Distributing coherence: Human rights, HIV, police violence and the post-Apartheid state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Human, O.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the multiple and sometimes contradictory intersections of power which constitute both the state and the possibilities for life in a working class neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. This ethnography highlights that rather than a simple, reified portrayal of the state, the

  2. The OSHA Communication Standard and State Right-to-Know Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Michalene H.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of a 1988 federal appellate court mandate, schools and colleges in 24 states and 2 territories with OSHA-approved state plans must inform their employees about hazardous chemicals to which they may be exposed. School administrators should implement a responsible program meeting regulatory compliance, tort liability, and public…

  3. Protecting Indigenous Peoples through Right to Natural Resources: Lesson from the Existence of Navajo Tribe in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    I Gusti Ngurah Parikesit Widiatedja

    2015-01-01

    From the perspective of international law, indigenous peoples have the rights to own, use, and control their natural resources within their territories. In the United States, the Navajo Tribe has enjoyed those rights. In terms of law making process, this tribe can enact some acts to preserve a control over their natural resources. Specifically, the Air Pollution Prevention and Control Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Solid Waste Act. Concerning law implementation and enforcement, Navajo Trib...

  4. Health and human rights in Chin State, Western Burma: a population-based assessment using multistaged household cluster sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollom, Richard; Richards, Adam K; Parmar, Parveen; Mullany, Luke C; Lian, Salai Bawi; Iacopino, Vincent; Beyrer, Chris

    2011-02-08

    The Chin State of Burma (also known as Myanmar) is an isolated ethnic minority area with poor health outcomes and reports of food insecurity and human rights violations. We report on a population-based assessment of health and human rights in Chin State. We sought to quantify reported human rights violations in Chin State and associations between these reported violations and health status at the household level. Multistaged household cluster sampling was done. Heads of household were interviewed on demographics, access to health care, health status, food insecurity, forced displacement, forced labor, and other human rights violations during the preceding 12 months. Ratios of the prevalence of household hunger comparing exposed and unexposed to each reported violation were estimated using binomial regression, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were constructed. Multivariate models were done to adjust for possible confounders. Overall, 91.9% of households (95% CI 89.7%-94.1%) reported forced labor in the past 12 months. Forty-three percent of households met FANTA-2 (Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance II project) definitions for moderate to severe household hunger. Common violations reported were food theft, livestock theft or killing, forced displacement, beatings and torture, detentions, disappearances, and religious and ethnic persecution. Self reporting of multiple rights abuses was independently associated with household hunger. Our findings indicate widespread self-reports of human rights violations. The nature and extent of these violations may warrant investigation by the United Nations or International Criminal Court. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  5. The evolution of groundwater rights and groundwater management in New Mexico and the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuMars, Charles T.; Minier, Jeffrie D.

    Historically, rights in water originated as public property and only later became individualized rights to utilize the public resource, in a manner consistent with the public welfare needs of society, but protected by principles of property law. Five basic regulatory systems for rights in groundwater in the United States have evolved to date. The problems raised by the hydrologic differences between groundwater hydraulically connected to stream systems and groundwater in non-replenished aquifers have been resolved to some extent by a couple of leading court cases. Numerical modeling and other technical methodologies have also evolved to evaluate the scientific issues raised by the different hydrologic conditions, but these are not immune from criticism. The current role of aquifers is evolving into that of storage facilities for recycled water, and their utilization in this manner may be expanded even further in the future. The policy implications of the choices relating to joint management of ground and surface water cannot be overstated. As this paper demonstrates, proactive administration of future groundwater depletions that affect stream systems is essential to the ultimate ability to plan for exploitation, management and utilization of water resources in a rational way that coordinates present and future demand with the reality of scarcity of supply. The examples utilized in this paper demonstrate the need for capacity building, not just to develop good measurement techniques, or to train talented lawyers and judges to write good laws, but also for practical professional water managers to keep the process on a rational course, avoiding limitless exploitation of the resource as well as conservative protectionism that forever precludes its use. Historiquement, les droits d'eau étaient à l'origine un bien public; ils sont devenus plus tard des droits individualisés pour utiliser la ressource publique conformément aux besoins de salut public de la soci

  6. Entanglements of right whales, Eubalaena australis (Cetacea, Mysticeti, in the 2010 breeding season in Santa Catarina state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Pontalti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Right whales (Eubalaena australis have been suffering with anthropogenic activities such as pollution, marine traffic and entanglement in fishing nets. The entanglement of right whales grows each breeding season on the southern coast of Santa Catarina state, and can cause strands and even death. During the 2010 breeding season, six entanglements among immature and adult whales were recorded. In most of the cases, the whales kept swimming slowly and didn’t want to approximate the whale watching boat. Fishing activities in the area during the right whale breeding season need to be regularized to avoid conflicts and injuries to the whales.

  7. Affording states a margin of appreciation: comparing the European Court of Human rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    McGoldrick, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    We live in an era of proliferating international legal domains and institutions, not least in the human rights field. For some, normative pluralism within human rights is inevitable, and even desirable. Others view it as a threat to the integrity and coherence of international human rights protection. How far do human rights standards and their interpretation by different regional and international human rights systems diverge? To what extent do human rights bodies ‘borrow’ from or influence ...

  8. The immunity of states and their officials in international criminal law and international human rights law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alebeek, R.

    2008-01-01

    * Provides an in-depth analysis of case law such as the Pinochet, Jones, Al-Adsani, the Arrest Warrant, and Taylor cases. * The first comprehensive treatment of the subject for both civil and criminal proceedings The development of international human rights law and international criminal law has

  9. Paradise lost : Sovereign State Interest, Global Resource Exploitation and the Politics of Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augenstein, Daniel

    Taking its cue from the US Supreme Court judgment in Kiobel that restricted the extraterritorial reach of the Alien Tort Claims Act, this article explores how sovereignty structures the relationship between global resource exploitation and the localization of human rights in the international order

  10. Efficacy of Rights-Based Approach to Education: A Comparative Study of Two States of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sharmila; Saini, Sakshi

    2016-01-01

    The Government of India made a series of policy changes regarding elementary school education in the country in the period 2002--2012. In 2009 the Government made free (and compulsory) education a fundamental right of every child in India between the ages of six and fourteen. The Government also set out the infrastructure provisions that schools…

  11. The Role of Secularism of State on the Relationship Between Catholic Identity, Political Orientation, and Gay Rights Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichy, Zira; Gerges, Mina Halim Helmy; Platania, Silvia; Santisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In discussions of regulations governing same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians, the issue of state secularism is often called into question. This study aims to test the mediating effects of state secularism on the relationship between Catholic identity, political orientation, and gay civil rights. Participants were Catholic Italians who completed a questionnaire measuring the constructs under investigation. Results showed that state secularism mediates the effects of Catholic identity and political orientation on attitudes toward same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians.

  12. Geographic and ethnic differences in childhood leukaemia and lymphoma survival: comparisons of Philippine residents, Asian Americans and Caucasians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaniel, M T; Laudico, A; Mirasol-Lumague, M R; Alcasabas, A P; Pulte, D; Brenner, H

    2010-06-29

    Childhood cancer survival estimates from developing nations are rare. Using the US SEER and the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registry databases in the Philippines, 5-year survival for childhood leukaemia and lymphoma in 2001-2005 among Asian Americans were compared with both Filipinos and Caucasians in the United States. Estimates for patients in the United States in earlier time periods were compared with that of Philippine residents to estimate delay in achievements of comparable levels of survival. Childhood leukaemia and lymphoma relative survival was much lower in Filipinos living in the Philippines (32.9 and 47.7%) than in Asian Americans (80.1 and 90.5%) and Caucasians (81.9 and 87%). Achievement of comparable survival rates of Philippine residents lagged behind by 20 to >30 years compared with patients in the United States. The large differences in survival estimates of US populations and Philippine residents highlight the deficiencies of paediatric cancer care delivery in the Philippines. The long survival lag underlines the need for major improvements in access to diagnostic and treatment facilities.

  13. Young Adolescents' Positioning of Human Rights: Findings from Colombia, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how young adolescents thought about the location of human rights issues and the nature of violations in differing geographic regions. Open-ended, task-based interviews were conducted with 116 students in Colombia, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the United States. Although students in each location pointed to…

  14. Appropriation System: water rights in the western United States; water pollution problems peculiar to the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worcester, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The legal framework surrounding water rights acquisition and usage in the western United States and the steps which should be taken in analyzing potential sources of water are dealt with. Some of the applicable water pollution control laws and regulations are discussed briefly

  15. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  16. State Democratic Rights as Current Political Power Limit and a New Culture for Social Promotion of Development and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Rejane Liczbinski Sarreta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed study relates to the democracy and political power considering the implementation of sustainability. Presented as theoretical basis the democratic principle itself, as well as the realization of human and fundamental rights. Exploring the possibility of re (construction of the state and own power and political and social culture of democracy through the promotion of development and sustainability. In a democratic state the appropriate political power embodies the rights of the citizen. A key element that should be considered is education for training social actors capable of promoting the transformation of dominant practices and that take important roles in politics and influence the state and society. The method used is deductive.

  17. Moving in the Right Direction: Evolution of Protein Structural Vibrations with Functional State and Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    Long-range intramolecular vibrations may enable efficient access to functionally important conformations. We examine how these motions change with inhibitor binding and mutation using terahertz anisotropic absorption and molecular modeling. The measured anisotropic absorption dramatically changes with 3NAG inhibitor binding for wild type (WT) free chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). We examine the evolution of internal motions with binding using normal mode analysis to calculate an ensemble averaged vibrational density of states (VDOS) and isotropic and anisotropic absorptions for both WT and a two residue (R14 and H15) deletion mutant which has a 1.4 higher activity rate. While the VDOS and isotropic response are largely unchanged with inhibitor binding, the anisotropic response changes dramatically with binding. However, for the mutant the calculated unbound anisotropic absorption more closely resembles its bound spectrum, and it has increased calculated mean squared fluctuations in regions overlapping those in its bound state. These results indicate that the mutant's enhanced activity may be due to a shift in the direction of vibrations toward those of the bound state, increasing the sampling rate of the bound conformation.

  18. Children's Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1992-01-01

    Provides a sampling of citations in the ERIC database on children's rights. Includes human rights education, United Nations' conventions, state takeovers of local school districts, and federal law as it affects student rights. Covers child abuse, corporal punishment, child welfare, and child advocacy. (DK)

  19. Reconfiguring the Contours of Statehood and the Rights of Peoples of Disappearing States in the Age of Global Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Skillington

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of the elements that have traditionally supported state level normative self-organization, most notably territory, are being actively undermined by rising sea levels, flooding, desertification, amongst other climate change effects. As more and more states come to be redefined as “disappearing”, that is, states losing their territories to the natural environment through no specific fault of their own, a question arises as to how displaced communities will be assisted in their desire (and right to continue to practice principles of self-determination and self-government? What is clear is that the international community can no longer continue with the fiction of a unified or unchanging model of the liberal democratic state. Instead, alternative ontological models of sovereign community are required, as is a re-imagining of how statehood might be re-constituted in the future in response to deepening ecological problems. The international community must now begin to address the immanent nature of threats posed to disappearing states and consider how a model of statehood that does not privilege territory as a fixed component of state identity could be operationalized. This paper considers how a democratic reform of statehood might proceed and resettlement agreements for displaced communities determined. The transition to an era of peaceful sovereign relations under deteriorating global climate conditions and growing natural resource scarcity, it argues, will require a significant extension of established traditions of democratic compromise, human rights solidarity and cosmopolitan justice.

  20. Food system policy, public health, and human rights in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kerry L; Kim, Brent F; McKenzie, Shawn E; Lawrence, Robert S

    2015-03-18

    The US food system functions within a complex nexus of social, political, economic, cultural, and ecological factors. Among them are many dynamic pressures such as population growth, urbanization, socioeconomic inequities, climate disruption, and the increasing demand for resource-intensive foods that place immense strains on public health and the environment. This review focuses on the role that policy plays in defining the food system, particularly with regard to agriculture. It further examines the challenges of making the food supply safe, nutritious, and sustainable, while respecting the rights of all people to have access to adequate food and to attain the highest standard of health. We conclude that the present US food system is largely unhealthy, inequitable, environmentally damaging, and insufficiently resilient to endure the impacts of climate change, resource depletion, and population increases, and is therefore unsustainable. Thus, it is imperative that the US embraces policy reforms to transform the food system into one that supports public health and reflects the principles of human rights and agroecology for the benefit of current and future generations.

  1. A national survey on the current status of informatics residency education in pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blash, Anthony; Saltsman, Connie L; Steil, Condit

    2017-11-01

    Upon completion of their post-graduate training, pharmacy informatics residents need to be prepared to interact with clinical and technology experts in the new healthcare environment. This study describes pharmacy informatics residency programs within the United States. Preliminary information for all pharmacy informatics residency programs was accessed from program webpages. An email was sent out to programs asking them to respond to a six-item questionnaire. This questionnaire was designed to elicit information on attributes of the program, behaviors of the preceptors and residents, and attitudes of the residency directors. Of 22 pharmacy informatics residencies identified, nineteen (86%) participated. Twenty (91%) were second post-graduate year (PGY2) residencies. Ten (45%) were accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), while eight (36%) were candidates for accreditation. Hospital (17/22, 77%) and administrative offices (3/22, 14%) were the predominant training sites for pharmacy informatics residents. Large institutions were the predominant training environment for the pharmacy informatics resident, with 19 of 22 (86%) institutions reporting a licensed bed count of 500 or more. The median (range) number of informatics preceptors at a site was six to eight. Regarding barriers to pharmacy informatics residency education, residency directors reported that residents did not feel prepared based on the limited availability of curricular offerings. In the United States, relatively few residencies are explicitly focused on pharmacy informatics. Most of these are accredited and hospital affiliated, especially with large institutions (>500 beds). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Health and Human Rights in Chin State, Western Burma: A Population-Based Assessment Using Multistaged Household Cluster Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollom, Richard; Richards, Adam K.; Parmar, Parveen; Mullany, Luke C.; Lian, Salai Bawi; Iacopino, Vincent; Beyrer, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chin State of Burma (also known as Myanmar) is an isolated ethnic minority area with poor health outcomes and reports of food insecurity and human rights violations. We report on a population-based assessment of health and human rights in Chin State. We sought to quantify reported human rights violations in Chin State and associations between these reported violations and health status at the household level. Methods and Findings Multistaged household cluster sampling was done. Heads of household were interviewed on demographics, access to health care, health status, food insecurity, forced displacement, forced labor, and other human rights violations during the preceding 12 months. Ratios of the prevalence of household hunger comparing exposed and unexposed to each reported violation were estimated using binomial regression, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were constructed. Multivariate models were done to adjust for possible confounders. Overall, 91.9% of households (95% CI 89.7%–94.1%) reported forced labor in the past 12 months. Forty-three percent of households met FANTA-2 (Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance II project) definitions for moderate to severe household hunger. Common violations reported were food theft, livestock theft or killing, forced displacement, beatings and torture, detentions, disappearances, and religious and ethnic persecution. Self reporting of multiple rights abuses was independently associated with household hunger. Conclusions Our findings indicate widespread self-reports of human rights violations. The nature and extent of these violations may warrant investigation by the United Nations or International Criminal Court. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21346799

  3. Health and human rights in Chin State, Western Burma: a population-based assessment using multistaged household cluster sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sollom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chin State of Burma (also known as Myanmar is an isolated ethnic minority area with poor health outcomes and reports of food insecurity and human rights violations. We report on a population-based assessment of health and human rights in Chin State. We sought to quantify reported human rights violations in Chin State and associations between these reported violations and health status at the household level. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Multistaged household cluster sampling was done. Heads of household were interviewed on demographics, access to health care, health status, food insecurity, forced displacement, forced labor, and other human rights violations during the preceding 12 months. Ratios of the prevalence of household hunger comparing exposed and unexposed to each reported violation were estimated using binomial regression, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were constructed. Multivariate models were done to adjust for possible confounders. Overall, 91.9% of households (95% CI 89.7%-94.1% reported forced labor in the past 12 months. Forty-three percent of households met FANTA-2 (Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance II project definitions for moderate to severe household hunger. Common violations reported were food theft, livestock theft or killing, forced displacement, beatings and torture, detentions, disappearances, and religious and ethnic persecution. Self reporting of multiple rights abuses was independently associated with household hunger. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate widespread self-reports of human rights violations. The nature and extent of these violations may warrant investigation by the United Nations or International Criminal Court. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  4. Communication dated 12 August 2005 received from the Resident Representative of Yemen to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 12 August 2005 from the Resident Representative of Yemen attaching a letter dated 8 August 2005 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of Yemen in his letter of 12 August 2005, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  5. Present state and some problem of health services for residents of local government neighboring Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    After nuclear disaster, residents of 8 towns and villages of Futaba county within Alert area moved to the west and further removed far. Public offices were also moved. On March 12 health services were started to accept refugee residents at the first refuge. From the end of March to the first part of April they moved to second refuge at specified hotel or inn prepared for a long-term refugee life and then they removed from second refuge to temporary dwelling or loan house. Some of them moved to temporary dwelling at Iwaki city and totaled to more than 20000. New organization of the Fukushima prefecture was established in Iwaki city to start health services for refugee including mental cares. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Strategic analysis of a water rights conflict in the south western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Simone; Hipel, Keith; Johnson, Peter

    2016-09-15

    A strategic analysis of the ongoing conflict between Nevada and Utah, over groundwater allocation at Snake Valley, is carried out in order to investigate ways on how to resolve this dispute. More specifically, the Graph Model for Conflict Resolution is employed to formally model and analyze this conflict using the decision support system called GMCR+. The conflict analysis findings indicate that the dispute is enduring because of a lack of incentive and opportunity for any party to move beyond the present circumstances. Continued negotiations are not likely to resolve this conflict. A substantial change in the preferences or options of the disputants, or new governance tools will be required to move this conflict forward. This may hold lessons for future groundwater conflicts. It is, however, increasingly likely that the parties will require a third party intervention, such as equal apportionment by the US Supreme Court. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 45 CFR 233.40 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... For purposes of this section: (1) A resident of a State is one: (i) Who is living in the State... resident of the State in which he or she is living other than on a temporary basis. Residence may not depend upon the reason for which the individual entered the State, except insofar as it may bear upon...

  8. State-Sponsored Homophobia and the Denial of the Right of Assembly in Central and Eastern Europe : The "Boomerang" and the "Ricochet" between European Organizations and Civil Society to Uphold Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    State-sponsored homophobia emerged in certain Central and Eastern European states in the past decade, with the denial of the right of assembly for gay pride marches. However, more recently there has been progress in the recognition of the fundamental democratic right of assembly. What accounts for

  9. African palm in Los Rios Province of Ecuador: agrobusiness, the state and violation of peasants´ rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Landívar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analysis of the African palm cluster in the upper region of Los Rios province, and is an emblematic case that reveals the current condition of the power exerted by agro-business in Ecuador. As the analysis of the various actors of the cluster demonstrates, this sector has relied on strong state support, as a result of coalitions between State and a handful of big companies that concentrate the sector’s income and result in the violation of peasant and small producers Human Rights. This process, apparently, hides the historical discrimination towards this constituency and perpetuates historical disadvantages and social debts in our society.

  10. STATE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE RIGHTS OF REFUGEES : A Critical Analysis on the Security of Refugees in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Alupo, Susan

    2009-01-01

    When refugees flee their countries and cross the border, security ranks high among the priorities of those seeking asylum. Maintaining the purely civilian and humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements is essential for effective protection of refugees, including safeguarding their personal security. This paper will discuss the aspect of physical and legal security as a fundamental right while highlighting the obligation of the state to take all necessary measures to ensure the sa...

  11. Between Truth and Amnesia: State Terrorism, Human Rights Violations and Transitional Justice in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iasmin Goes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The military rule in Brazil between 1964 and 1985 employed less violence than similar authoritarian regimes in neighbouring countries, and attempted to maintain a façade of legitimacy by allowing for a consented opposition. Nevertheless, Brazil was the last Latin American nation to establish a truth commission. Ever since the Amnesty Law was passed in 1979, authorities and citizens have both struggled to come to terms with the human rights violations committed in the past. The Brazilian government went as far as offering material reparations to the presumed victims without disclosing official information to establish what the reparations were being paid for. Is it better to remember or forget? This Exploration discusses transitional justice strategies, and documents recent developments in Brazil's political history.Resumen: Entre la verdad y la amnesia. Terrorismo de Estado, violaciones de derechos humanos y justicia transicional en BrasilEntre 1964 y 1985, el régimen militar en Brasil empleó menos violencia que regímenes autoritarios de países vecinos, e intentó mantener una fachada de legitimidad. Sin embargo, Brasil fue el último país latinoamericano en establecer una comisión de la verdad. Desde la aprobación de la Ley de Amnistía en 1979, tanto las autoridades como los ciudadanos luchan para hacer justicia a las violaciones de derechos humanos cometidas en el pasado. El gobierno brasileño llegó al extremo de ofrecer reparaciones materiales a las presuntas víctimas, sin revelar informaciones oficiales para establecer por qué las estaba pagando. ¿Es mejor recordar u olvidar? Esta Exploración analiza las estrategias de justicia transicional y documenta evoluciones recientes en la política histórica brasileña.

  12. Criminal policy of the Colombian State and the rights of persons deprived of liberty: Legislative Analysis and Constitutional Court jurisprudence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Huertas Díaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the entry into force of the 1991 Constitution, Colombia entered the era of fundamental rights as they catalog the Superior text is large and that the Constitutional Court has given scope beyond the simple meaning of the sentences that make each of these fundamental rights. In turn, it started the legislation has couple that were in effect prior to the new Charter and new rules are enacted. In this legislative development, the Colombian State has issued numerous rules that allow the restriction of personal freedom of the people living in the Colombian territory, whether of a temporary (security measures or has permanent level (custodial sentences. In that future legislation, the crisis within jails and prisons in the country worsened, today introduced massive violations of fundamental rights of persons deprived of liberty by court order. Overcrowding, lack of information necessary to meet the basic needs of prisoners, the absence of a criminal policy consonant with the reality of these detention centers are just some of the issues that shape the aforementioned rights violations. With the research carried seeks to make recommendations to the criminal policies in jail and prison, to enable the State to overcome this crisis.

  13. Differences in Access to and Use of Electronic Personal Health Information Between Rural and Urban Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Haney, Danielle; Blake, Kelly D; Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W

    2018-02-01

    The increase in use of health information technologies (HIT) presents new opportunities for patient engagement and self-management. Patients in rural areas stand to benefit especially from increased access to health care tools and electronic communication with providers. We assessed the adoption of 4 HIT tools over time by rural or urban residency. Analyses were conducted using data from 7 iterations of the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS; 2003-2014). Rural/urban residency was based on the USDA's 2003 Rural-Urban Continuum Codes. Outcomes of interest included managing personal health information online; whether providers maintain electronic health records (EHRs); e-mailing health care providers; and purchasing medicine online. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression were used to assess relationships between geography and outcomes, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. In total, 6,043 (17.6%, weighted) of the 33,749 respondents across the 7 administrations of HINTS lived in rural areas. Rural participants were less likely to report regular access to Internet (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.61-0.80). Rural respondents were neither more nor less likely to report that their health care providers maintained EHRs than were urban respondents; however, they had decreased odds of managing personal health information online (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.40-0.78) and e-mailing health care providers (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.49-0.77). The digital divide between rural and urban residents extends to HIT. Additional investigation is needed to determine whether the decreased use of HIT may be due to lack of Internet connectivity or awareness of these tools. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  14. Current state of professional and core competency in pediatric residency program at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: A local survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accreditation assesses performance, or capacity to perform, against predetermined standards. It typically combines external quality assurance, through a process of peers review, with elements of self-regulation through internal and selfdirected assessment. This study is an attempt to identify the quality of pediatrics residency educational programs regarding predetermined standards. Methods: This descriptive-analytical evaluation study of applied type was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in the pediatrics department of Shiraz Medical School, Iran. The assessment process occurred in several phases; at first an assessment model for a residency educational development and a series of educational criteria and indices were created based on WFME Standards. Multiple methods including a self-assessment questionnaire and several checklists were used to collect data, whereas systematic site visit, peer review and document reviewing were conducted with survey team. Due to limitation of the statistical society, all faculty members (n=34 and residents (n=41 of the pediatric department were asked to complete the survey. At last, descriptive and deductive statistics data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14. Results: According to the records available in assessing program quality, it seems that the input criteria were desirable for the program based on the residents’ viewpoints (86.6%.There were proper physical facilities for them to meet the residency program goals. The study indicated that the learning environment needed to be revised for the educational needs (Likert scale: 2.96±1.05. The peer evaluation team demonstrated achievement of mission fulfillment in the context of the objectives and indicators by meeting the desired themes. In spite of some weaknesses in the process criteria, the criteria for output indicators were good according to the report (more than desired level of 75-80%. Conclusion: Accreditation is an important step

  15. The neighborhood health exchange: developing a community partnership in residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Press, Valerie G; Freed, Benjamin H; Baker, Timothy; Tang, Joyce W; Cohen, Julie C; Laiteerapong, Neda; Alvarez, Kimberly; Schwartz, Mindy; Arora, Vineet M

    2010-09-01

    The current system of residency training focuses on the hospital setting, and resident exposure to the surrounding community is often limited. However, community interaction can play an important role in ambulatory training and in learning systems-based practice, a residency core competency. The goal of the Neighborhood Health Exchange was to develop a community partnership to provide internal medicine residents with an opportunity to interface with community members through a mutually beneficial educational experience. Internal medicine residents received training during their ambulatory block and participated in a voluntary field practicum designed to engage community members in discussions about their health. Community members participated in education sessions led by resident volunteers. Resident volunteers completed a survey on their experiences. All residents stated that the opportunity to lead an exchange was very useful to their overall residency training. Eight exchanges were held with a total of 61 community participants, who completed a 3-question survey following the session. This survey asked about the level of material, the helpfulness of the exchanges, and opportunities for improvement. We received 46 completed surveys from community members: 91% stated that the material was presented "at the right level" and 93% stated that the presentations were somewhat or very helpful. Eighty percent gave positive and encouraging comments about the exchange. Effective community partnerships involve assessing needs of the stakeholders, anticipating leadership turnover, and adapting the Neighborhood Health Exchange model to different groups. Community outreach can also enhance internal medicine ambulatory training experience, provide residents with patient counseling opportunities, and offer a novel method to enhance resident understanding of systems-based practice, especially within the larger community in which their patients live.

  16. Abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauw, J; Dineley, B; Gerster, K; Hill, N; Costescu, D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the current state of abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs. Surveys were distributed to all Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residents and program directors. Data were collected on inclusion of abortion training in the curriculum, structure of the training and expected competency of residents in various abortion procedures. We distributed and collected surveys between November 2014 and May 2015. In total, 301 residents and 15 program directors responded, giving response rates of 55% and 94%, respectively. Based on responses by program directors, half of the programs had "opt-in" abortion training, and half of the programs had "opt-out" abortion training. Upon completion of residency, 66% of residents expected to be competent in providing first-trimester surgical abortion in an ambulatory setting, and 35% expected to be competent in second-trimester surgical abortion. Overall, 15% of residents reported that they were not aware of or did not have access to abortion training within their program, and 69% desired more abortion training during residency. Abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs is inconsistent, and residents desire more training in abortion. This suggests an ongoing unmet need for training in this area. Policies mandating standardized abortion training in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs are necessary to improve delivery of family planning services to Canadian women. Abortion training in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology residency programs is inconsistent, does not meet resident demand and is unlikely to fulfill the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada objectives of training in the specialty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. How Useful are Orthopedic Surgery Residency Web Pages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Yu, Jonathan C; Oladeji, Afolayan K; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    Medical students interested in orthopedic surgery residency positions frequently use the Internet as a modality to gather information about individual residency programs. Students often invest a painstaking amount of time and effort in determining programs that they are interested in, and the Internet is central to this process. Numerous studies have concluded that program websites are a valuable resource for residency and fellowship applicants. The purpose of the present study was to provide an update on the web pages of academic orthopedic surgery departments in the United States and to rate their utility in providing information on quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We reviewed existing websites for the 156 departments or divisions of orthopedic surgery that are currently accredited for resident education by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Each website was assessed for quality of information regarding quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We noted that 152 of the 156 departments (97%) had functioning websites that could be accessed. There was high variability regarding the comprehensiveness of orthopedic residency websites. Most of the orthopedic websites provided information on conference, didactics, and resident rotations. Less than 50% of programs provided information on resident call schedules, resident or faculty research and publications, resident hometowns, or resident salary. There is a lack of consistency regarding the content presented on orthopedic residency websites. As the competition for orthopedic websites continues to increase, applicants flock to the Internet to learn more about orthopedic websites in greater number. A well-constructed website has the potential to increase the caliber of students applying to a said program. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  18. The Obligation And Warranty To State Reasons Of Judicial Decisions Under The Paradigm Of The New Code Of Civil Procedure: A Right Of Democratic State Of Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quezia Dornellas Fialho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The constitutional state requires den to fundamental rights within the process. The duty, while the guarantee, the evidence of judicial decisions should, together with other procedural principles, lead to a new way of thinking about the process, not aiming at the speed at any cost, but the safe conduct of the fundamental rights of parties during the procedural motion. Thus, with respect to this duty-assurance, the new Code of Civil Procedure innovated by establishing requirements for the goals adequate reasoning of judgments.

  19. Environmental Influences on Physical Activity among Rural Adults in Montana, United States: Views from Built Environment Audits, Resident Focus Groups, and Key Informant Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Brian K; Morgan, Emily H; Folta, Sara C; Graham, Meredith L; Paul, Lynn C; Nelson, Miriam E; Jew, Nicolette V; Moffat, Laurel F; Seguin, Rebecca A

    2017-10-04

    Rural populations in the United States have lower physical activity levels and are at a higher risk of being overweight and suffering from obesity than their urban counterparts. This paper aimed to understand the environmental factors that influence physical activity among rural adults in Montana. Eight built environment audits, 15 resident focus groups, and 24 key informant interviews were conducted between August and December 2014. Themes were triangulated and summarized into five categories of environmental factors: built, social, organizational, policy, and natural environments. Although the existence of active living features was documented by environmental audits, residents and key informants agreed that additional indoor recreation facilities and more well-maintained and conveniently located options were needed. Residents and key informants also agreed on the importance of age-specific, well-promoted, and structured physical activity programs, offered in socially supportive environments, as facilitators to physical activity. Key informants, however, noted that funding constraints and limited political will were barriers to developing these opportunities. Since building new recreational facilities and structures to support active transportation pose resource challenges, especially for rural communities, our results suggest that enhancing existing features, making small improvements, and involving stakeholders in the city planning process would be more fruitful to build momentum towards larger changes.

  20. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  1. STATE`S EVIDENCE AND FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF THE PASSIVE SUBJECT OF CRIMINAL PERSECUTION AS A RESULT OF THE REGULATION INSERTED IN LAW 12.850/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Bedê Freire Júnior

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Criminal Law - and the Procedural Law that takes care of its effectiveness - works, at the same time, as a mechanism available to the State to realize its punitive power and as a limit to the exercise of this same power. This second meaning represents what has been called the humanization of criminal law, marked by the understanding of several rights and guarantees intended to protect the subject of criminal prosecution. The institute of state`s evidence, as an unorthodox method, used especially in the fight against organized crime, raised expressive mistrust in the doctrine about its compatibility with the current system of rights and guarantees designed in the Federal Constitution, so that references to the institute as police practice, exceptional, responsible for the involution of Criminal Law, are very common. However, especially since the advent of the new legislation to combat organized crime, the state`s evidence has gained new theoretical and practical inspiration in Brazil, with wide acceptance of jurisprudence, recommending that it be appreciated with accuracy not only its theoretical aspects, but also the criticisms relevance.

  2. Enhancing interventional radiology training in Canada: creating new choices for medical students and residents. Current training options in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baerlocher, M.O.; Collingwood, P.; Becker, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Vascular interventional radiology (VIR) faces both a current and even greater projected shortage of VIR specialists and VIR researchers. Three new residency programs were introduced in the United States within the past 6 years that may have a dramatic impact on the subspecialty: 1) the 6-year Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Enhanced Clinical Training and Certification (DIRECT) pathway, 2) the 6-year clinical pathway for Vascular and Interventional Radiology, and 3) the 5-year ABR Holman research pathway. In this paper, we introduce these 3 programs, the relevant issues they create and affect, and the relevancy for Canadian radiology training programs. (author)

  3. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  4. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  5. Immigration and the labor mobility of working Mexican legal residents at a border town in the United States: Calexico, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Fimbres Durazo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the labor mobility of a group of Mexican migrant workers that are permanent legal residents in the city of Caléxico, Ca. USA. Since the beginnings of the XX century, this city has been a settlement of immigrants from different countries, among them stands out the Mexican immigrant group that, legally or illegally, has arrived to work temporal or permanently. In order to have and approach to the study of the labor milility of the immigrant workers and identify some situations that made it possible, this paper presents an overview of the historic events that favored the immigration of Mexican workers to this city as well as their participation in the labor market.

  6. Harm reduction or women's rights? Debating access to emergency contraceptive pills in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, L L; Erdman, Joanna N; Foster, Angel M; Trussell, James

    2007-12-01

    This article compares the ethical pivot points in debates over nonprescription access to emergency contraceptive pills in Canada and the United States. These include women's right to be informed about the contraceptive method and its mechanism of action, pharmacists' conscientious objection concerning the dispensing of emergency contraceptive pills, and rights and equality of access to the method, especially for poor women and minorities. In both countries, arguments in support of expanding access to the pills were shaped by two competing orientations toward health and sexuality. The first, "harm reduction," promotes emergency contraception as attenuating the public health risks entailed in sex. The second orientation regards access to pills as a question of women's right to engage in nonprocreative sex and to choose from among all reproductive health-care options. The authors contend that arguments for expanding access to emergency contraceptive pills that frame issues in terms of health and science are insufficient bases for drug regulation; ultimately, women's health is also a matter of women's rights.

  7. Corticosterone response in a resident-intruder-paradigm depends on social state and coping style in adolescent male Balb-C mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Oberascher-Holzinger, Karin; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2007-10-01

    Social stressors modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rodents. However, reports on the association between corticosterone level and behavioural responses to the stressor are ambivalent. This may depend on the experimental paradigm, species- and strain-differences, duration of exposure to the stressor, but also on using either the social state (dominant or subordinate) or the coping style (proactive or passive) of an animal to correlate the corticosterone level with. We used male Balb-C mice in a resident-intruder paradigm. Adolescent intruders (aged five to eight weeks) were transferred into the cage of an adult resident (aged about four month) for five minutes. The interactions were video-taped for behavioural analysis. Ten minutes after the encounters, intruders were sacrificed and blood samples were collected. Dominant intruders showed offensive behaviours (attack, chase, tail tracking) and won most of the fights, whereas subordinate intrudes showed mainly submissive behaviours (flight, freezing) and were further classified into active and passive subordinates. Active subordinates displayed significantly more flight-behaviour than passive subordinates. Dominant intruders showed significantly higher post-stress levels of corticosterone than subordinates, which did not differ from control mice, which experienced five minutes of novel-cage exposure. Comparing all three behavioural phenotypes we found the lowest corticosterone levels in active subordinates. Social state significantly affects the HPA-axis response to acute social stressors.

  8. 78 FR 44467 - Political Activity-State or Local Officers or Employees; Federal Employees Residing in Designated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... General Counsel, United States Office of Personnel Management, (202) 606-1700. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... activity--Federal employees. ] U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Elaine Kaplan, Acting Director...; ] OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Parts 151, 733, and 734 RIN 3206-AM87 Political Activity--State or...

  9. Assessing the potential to sequester carbon within state highway rights-of-way in New Mexico phase 2: development of a right-of-way carbon sequestration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    The New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) was selected by the Federal Highway : Administration (FHWA) to determine the feasibility of maximizing carbon sequestration within state : highway rightsofway (ROW). Golder Associates Inc. was...

  10. An International Collaboration for the Training of Medical Chief Residents in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Ho, Janet J; Karigire, Claudine; Richards, Bradley; Sofair, Andre N

    The year-long position of chief medical resident is a time-honored tradition in the United States that serves to provide the trainee with an opportunity to gain further skills as a clinician, leader, teacher, liaison, and administrator. However, in most training programs in the developing world, this role does not exist. We sought to develop a collaborative program to train the first medical chief residents for the University of Rwanda and to assess the impact of the new chief residency on residency training, using questionnaires and qualitative interviews with Rwandan faculty, chief residents, and residents. The educational context and the process leading up to the appointment of Rwandan chief residents, including selection, job description, and necessary training (in the United States and Rwanda), are described. One year after implementation, we used a parallel, mixed methods approach to evaluate the new chief medical resident program through resident surveys as well as semistructured interviews with key informants, including site chief residents, chief residents, and faculty. We also observed chief residents and site chief residents at work and convened focus groups with postgraduate residents to yield additional qualitative information. Rwandan faculty and residents generally felt that the new position had improved the educational and administrative structure of the teaching program while providing a training ground for future academicians. A collaborative training program between developing and developed world academic institutions provides an efficient model for the development of a new chief residency program in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Observations on the State of Indigenous Human Rights in Light of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultural Survival, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1996 Peace Accords ended the Guatemalan civil war, the country has made strides to legally recognize the rights of its indigenous peoples and has criminalized racial discrimination. However, political exclusion, discrimination, and economic marginalization of indigenous peoples still regularly occur due to the lack of resources and…

  12. Private Property Rights and Selective Private Forest Conservation: Could a Nordic Hybrid Policy Address a United States Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Political and legal conflicts between the need for targeted private forest conservation and the continued assurance of private property rights in the U.S. presents a seemingly intractable resource management problem. Scandinavian use of habitat protection areas on private forests offers an additional tool that may be suitable for solving the historical and on-going tension found within U.S. efforts to reconcile desires to maintain lands in a forested condition while also respecting private property rights. This article presents a comparative cross-sectional policy analysis of Sweden, Finland, and the U.S., supported with a supplemental case example from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Similarities in all three countries among forest ownership patterns, use of public subsidies, and changing attitudes towards conservation are generally encouraging. Additionally, Virginia’s current consideration and development of state-wide forest policies focused on forestland and open space conservation suggests both a need and an opportunity to systematically assess the applicability of the Nordic forest reserve approach to local private forest conservation. Future research at a high-resolution, and specifically at the state level, should focus on the social and political factors that would ultimately determine the viability of a forest reserve program.

  13. Right Where, Right When?

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Beryl

    2015-01-01

    This exhibition catalogue essay was invited by the curator of The Lowry, Salford, for her Right Here, Right Now exhibition. The international artists included Thomson and Craighead, Timo Arnall, Mishka Henner and Daniel Rozin.

  14. Exposure to and Attitudes Regarding Transgender Education Among Urology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Geolani W; Osbun, Nathan C; Morrison, Shane D; Grant, David W; Merguerian, Paul A

    2016-10-01

    Transgender individuals are underserved within the health care system but might increasingly seek urologic care as insurers expand coverage for medical and surgical gender transition. To evaluate urology residents' exposure to transgender patient care and their perceived importance of transgender surgical education. Urology residents from a representative sample of U.S. training programs were asked to complete a cross-sectional survey from January through March 2016. Respondents were queried regarding demographics, transgender curricular exposure (didactic vs clinical), and perceived importance of training opportunities in transgender patient care. In total, 289 urology residents completed the survey (72% response rate). Fifty-four percent of residents reported exposure to transgender patient care, with more residents from Western (74%) and North Central (72%) sections reporting exposure (P ≤ .01). Exposure occurred more frequently through direct patient interaction rather than through didactic education (psychiatric, 23% vs 7%, P importance on gender-confirming surgical training than did their male colleagues (91% vs 70%, P important. Most residents (77%) stated transgender-related surgical training should be offered in fellowships. Urology resident exposure to transgender patient care is regionally dependent. Perceived importance of gender-confirming surgical training varies by sex and geography. A gap exists between the direct transgender patient care urology residencies provide and the didactic transgender education they receive. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARISON OF NATURAL BACKGROUND DOSE RATES FOR RESIDENTS OF THE AMARGOSA VALLEY, NV, TO THOSE IN LEADVILLE, CO, AND THE STATES OF COLORADO AND NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Moeller and L. C. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In the latter half of 2005, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Proposed Rule (40 CFR Part 197) for establishing a dose rate standard for limiting radionuclide releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository during the time period from 10 4 to 10 6 years after closure. The proposed standard was based on the difference in the estimated total dose rate from natural background in the Amargosa Valley and the ''average annual background radiation'' for the State of Colorado. As defined by the USEPA, ''natural background radiation consists of external exposures from cosmic and terrestrial sources, and internal exposures from indoor exposures to naturally-occurring radon''. On the basis of its assessments, the USEPA estimated that the difference in the dose rate in the two identified areas was 3.5 mSv y -1 . The purpose of this review was to provide an independent evaluation and review of this estimate. One of the first observations was that, because site-specific dose rate measurements for the Amargosa Valley ''were not available'', the dose rates for various sources of natural background in that area, used by the USEPA in its assessment, were based on modifications of the average values for the State of Nevada. A second observation was that the conversion factor applied in estimating the dose rates due to exposures to indoor radon and its decay products was a factor of 2 higher than the currently accepted value. Further review revealed that site-specific data for many natural background sources in the Amargosa Valley were available. One particularly important observation was that about 91% of the residents of that area live in mobile homes which, due to their construction and design, have indoor radon concentrations comparable to, or less than, those outdoors. For that reason, alone, the USEPA estimate of the average dose rate for residents of the Amargosa Valley, due to indoor radon, was not valid. For purposes

  16. Vocalization characteristics of North Atlantic right whale surface active groups in the calving habitat, southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygonis, Vasilis; Gerstein, Edmund; Moir, Jim; McCulloch, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Passive acoustic surveys were conducted to assess the vocal behavior of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the designated critical calving habitat along the shallow coastal waters of southeastern United States. Underwater vocalizations were recorded using autonomous buoys deployed in close proximity to surface active groups (SAGs). Nine main vocalization types were identified with manual inspection of spectrograms, and standard acoustic descriptors were extracted. Classification trees were used to examine the distinguishing characteristics of calls and quantify their variability within the SAG vocal repertoire. The results show that descriptors of frequency, bandwidth, and spectral disorder are the most important parameters for partitioning the SAG repertoire, contrary to duration-related measures. The reported source levels and vocalization statistics provide sound production data vital to inform regional passive acoustic monitoring and conservation for this endangered species.

  17. Communication dated 29 May 2006 received from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 29 May 2006 from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic attaching a letter dated 28 May 2006 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic in his letter of 29 May 2006, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  18. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest

  19. Normal right- and left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass in children measured by steady state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Achim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of ventricular volume by Steady State Free Precession (SSFP cardiovascular magnetic resonance is accurate and reproducible. Normal values exist for adults, but are lacking for children. We sought to establish normal values for left and right ventricular volumes, mass and function in healthy children by using SSFP. Methods and results Fifty children (27 females, 23 males without cardiovascular disease were evaluated. Median age was 11 years (range 7 months – 18 years, weight 35 kg (range 7–77 kg, height 146 cm (range 66–181 cm. Thirty-six examinations were performed with breath holding, 14 in freely breathing sedated children. Ventricular volumes and mass were measured in the end systolic and end diastolic phase on SSFP cine images acquired in a short axis plane as a stack of 12 contiguous slices covering full length of both ventricles. Regression analysis showed an exponential relationship between body surface area (BSA and ventricular volumes and mass (normal value = a*BSAb. Normative curves for males and females are presented in relation to BSA for the enddiastolic volume, endsystolic volume and mass of both ventricles. Intra- and interobserver variability of the measurements was within the limits of 2% and 7% respectively, except for right ventricular mass (10%. Conclusion The exponential equation for calculation of normal values for each ventricular parameter and graphical display of normative curves for data acquired in healthy children by SSFP cardiovascular magnetic resonance are provided.

  20. Flexner's global influence: medical education accreditation in countries that train physicians who pursue residency in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Marta; Boulet, John R; Simon, Frank A

    2010-02-01

    Abraham Flexner's report on medical education, published 100 years ago, remains influential in the United States today, although its international impact is unclear. In addition to global variability in content and delivery of medical education programs, systems of quality assurance oversight are not universal, and there are variations in the scope of the reviews, protocols, and standards used. The authors used the process and elements of medical school evaluation that Flexner regarded as important for ensuring quality to create a framework for describing aspects of the accreditation systems used in the 10 countries that supply the greatest numbers of international medical graduates (IMGs) to the United States. Of these 10 countries, most have an accreditation system, although the review in some is voluntary. Globally, there is variability in the use of Flexner's system. Prerequisite entrance requirements vary according to the degree offered. Faculty involvement in research is frequently encouraged but seldom required. Almost all standards mention the need for adequate facilities for experiential learning in the basic sciences. Three accrediting organizations require that clinical facilities be under the direct control of the medical school, and seven indicate that affiliation agreements are acceptable. All accreditation plans use predetermined standards and external evaluation. Data describing accreditation of the medical education programs of IMGs currently seeking to enter graduate training in the United States contribute to a better understanding of medical education practices around the world and can supplement other information available to graduate medical education program directors who select IMGs for their training programs.

  1. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  2. Communication dated 19 January 2009 received from the Resident Representative of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on behalf of the Council of Ambassadors of Arab States Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 19 January 2009 from the Resident Representative of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in Vienna on behalf of the Council of Ambassadors of Arab States Members of the Agency. The communication, as requested therein, is circulated herewith for information of all Member States

  3. Modafinil alters intrinsic functional connectivity of the right posterior insula: a pharmacological resting state fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Cera

    Full Text Available Modafinil is employed for the treatment of narcolepsy and has also been, off-label, used to treat cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders. In a previous study, we have reported that single dose administration of modafinil in healthy young subjects enhances fluid reasoning and affects resting state activity in the Fronto Parietal Control (FPC and Dorsal Attention (DAN networks. No changes were found in the Salience Network (SN, a surprising result as the network is involved in the modulation of emotional and fluid reasoning. The insula is crucial hub of the SN and functionally divided in anterior and posterior subregions.Using a seed-based approach, we have now analyzed effects of modafinil on the functional connectivity (FC of insular subregions.Analysis of FC with resting state fMRI (rs-FMRI revealed increased FC between the right posterior insula and the putamen, the superior frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the modafinil-treated group.Modafinil is considered a putative cognitive enhancer. The rs-fMRI modifications that we have found are consistent with the drug cognitive enhancing properties and indicate subregional targets of action.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306.

  4. Modafinil alters intrinsic functional connectivity of the right posterior insula: a pharmacological resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cera, Nicoletta; Tartaro, Armando; Sensi, Stefano L

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil is employed for the treatment of narcolepsy and has also been, off-label, used to treat cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders. In a previous study, we have reported that single dose administration of modafinil in healthy young subjects enhances fluid reasoning and affects resting state activity in the Fronto Parietal Control (FPC) and Dorsal Attention (DAN) networks. No changes were found in the Salience Network (SN), a surprising result as the network is involved in the modulation of emotional and fluid reasoning. The insula is crucial hub of the SN and functionally divided in anterior and posterior subregions. Using a seed-based approach, we have now analyzed effects of modafinil on the functional connectivity (FC) of insular subregions. Analysis of FC with resting state fMRI (rs-FMRI) revealed increased FC between the right posterior insula and the putamen, the superior frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the modafinil-treated group. Modafinil is considered a putative cognitive enhancer. The rs-fMRI modifications that we have found are consistent with the drug cognitive enhancing properties and indicate subregional targets of action. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306.

  5. A profile of hospital union election activity, 1985--1994 NLRB rulemaking and results in right-to-work states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Thomas; Rakich, Jonathon S

    2004-01-01

    The authors present union election results in non-governmental, short-term hospitals for the 10-year period 1985--1994. The authors include profiles for the periods before (1985--1989) and after (1990--1994) the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rulemaking. When comparing the period data, they found that the impact of rulemaking was a reduction in mean bargaining unit size, an increase in the absolute number of elections in hospitals, and an increase in the percentage of union wins. Their examination of hospital union election results in right-to-work (RTW) versus non-RTW states revealed that unions did not aggressively try to organize workers in non-RTW states and, when they did, they were not very successful. When the authors examined only initial recognition elections during the periods before and after rulemaking, as well as the whole 10 years, regression analysis identified three variables significantly related to union wins: the 1989 NLRB rule change, bargaining unit size, and employee participation rates.

  6. DNA Polymerase Fidelity: Comparing Direct Competition of Right and Wrong dNTP Substrates with Steady State and Presteady State Kinetics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Oertell, Keriann; Petruska, John; Goodman, Myron F.

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase fidelity is defined as the ratio of right (R) to wrong (W) nucleotide incorporations when dRTP and dWTP substrates compete at equal concentrations for primer extension at the same site in the polymerase-primer-template DNA complex. Typically, R incorporation is favored over W by 103 – 105, even in the absence of 3′-exonuclease proofreading. Straightforward in principal, a direct competition fidelity measurement is difficult to perform in practice because detection of a small amount of W is masked by a large amount of R. As an alternative, enzyme kinetics measurements to evaluate kcat/Km for R and W in separate reactions are widely used to measure polymerase fidelity indirectly, based on a steady-state derivation by Fersht. A systematic comparison between direct competition and kinetics has not been made until now. By separating R and W products using electrophoresis, we have successfully made accurate fidelity measurements for directly competing R and W dNTP substrates for 9 of the 12 natural base mispairs. We compare our direct competition results with steady state and presteady state kinetic measurements of fidelity at the same template site, using the proofreading-deficient mutant of Klenow Fragment (KF−) DNA polymerase. All the data are in quantitative agreement. PMID:20000359

  7. The United States Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (2006: New challenges to balancing patient rights and physician responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor Joan L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advance health care directives and informed consent remain the cornerstones of patients' right to self-determination regarding medical care and preferences at the end-of-life. However, the effectiveness and clinical applicability of advance health care directives to decision-making on the use of life support systems at the end-of-life is questionable. The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA has been revised in 2006 to permit the use of life support systems at or near death for the purpose of maximizing procurement opportunities of organs medically suitable for transplantation. Some states have enacted the Revised UAGA (2006 and a few of those have included amendments while attempting to preserve the uniformity of the revised Act. Other states have introduced the Revised UAGA (2006 for legislation and remaining states are likely to follow soon. The Revised UAGA (2006 poses challenges to the Patient Self Determination Act (PSDA embodied in advance health care directives and individual expression about the use of life support systems at the end-of-life. The challenges are predicated on the UAGA revising the default choice to presumption of donation intent and the use of life support systems to ensure medical suitability of organs for transplantation. The default choice trumps the expressed intent in an individual's advance health care directive to withhold and/or withdraw life support systems at the end-of-life. The Revised UAGA (2006 overrides advance directives on utilitarian grounds, which is a serious ethical challenge to society. The subtle progression of the Revised UAGA (2006 towards the presumption about how to dispose of one's organs at death can pave the way for an affirmative "duty to donate". There are at least two steps required to resolve these challenges. First, physicians and hospitals must fulfill their responsibilities to educate patients on the new legislations and document their preferences about the use of life support

  8. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  9. Comparison of anal HPV natural history among men by country of residence: Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudenga, Staci L; Nyitray, Alan G; Torres, B Nelson; Silva, Roberto; Villa, Luisa; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Salmeron, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-07-01

    Globally, anal cancer incidence is rare, but is increasing in some world regions. Our objective was to assess differences in anal HPV natural history in three countries. Men aged 18-70 years were recruited from the US (n = 634), Mexico (n = 665), and Brazil (n = 731). Anal specimens were collected every six-months. HPV genotyping was assessed by Linear Array. Anal HPV prevalence was compared using the Fisher's exact test. HPV infection incidence rates (IR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Any anal HPV prevalence was highest among men from Brazil (24%) compared to Mexico (15%) and the US (15%). When stratified by sexual history, the prevalence of any HPV among MSM/MSMW was 43%, 37%, and 45% and 9%, 12%, and 10% for MSW from Brazil, Mexico, and US, respectively. Any HPV incidence was significantly higher among men from Brazil compared to US men (IRR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.7-3.4) and comparable between men from Mexico and the US (IRR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.8-1.8). Men in Brazil and Mexico often have similar, if not higher incidence of anal HPV compared to men from the U.S., and may benefit from gender neutral HPV vaccine policies. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A psychological profile of surgeons and surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Neidert, Gregory P M; Brubaker-Rimmer, Ruth; Artalejo, Diana; Caruso, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20 percent of general surgery residents never complete their original residency programs. The psychological, programmatic, and financial costs for this attrition are substantial for both the residents, who spend valuable time and money pursuing incompatible career paths, and the residency programs, which also lose valuable time and money invested in these residents. There is a large amount of information in the field about the performance dimensions and skill sets of surgeons and surgical residents. To date, however, no research has been conducted on important process and content dimensions, which are critical in determining good person-job fit. A research team from the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University and Maricopa Medical Center conducted descriptive research to determine the work-related personality and interest variables of attending surgeons and surgical residents. Sixty-three surgical residents and 27 attending/teaching surgeons completed 2 sections (interests and personality scales) of the World of Work Inventory Online (WOWI Online). This multidimensional assessment was offered to all attending/teaching surgeons and surgical residents at Maricopa Medical Center. All members of the Department of Surgery participated in the trial. Based on the attending/teaching and high-performing resident profiles, a stable interest and personality profile emerged, which highlights the unique characteristics necessary to identify those who would be most satisfied with and suitable for work as surgeons. The profiles of the attending/teaching surgeons and the high-performing residents were similar. This contrasted with the interest and personality profiles of low-performing residents. The differences in the 2 groups' profiles provide insight into low performance and possible incompatibility with surgical residency, and possibly with general surgery as a profession choice. The WOWI Online assessment tool provides a stable profile of successful

  11. A divergent spirochete strain isolated from a resident of the southeastern United States was identified by multilocus sequence typing as Borrelia bissettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Vancová, Marie; Clark, Kerry; Oliver, James H; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rudenko, Nataliia

    2016-02-04

    Out of 20 spirochete species from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) complex recognized to date some are considered to have a limited distribution, while others are worldwide dispersed. Among those are Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) and Borrelia bissettii which are distributed both in North America and in Europe. While B. burgdorferi s.s. is recognized as a cause of Lyme borreliosis worldwide, involvement of B. bissettii in human Lyme disease was not so definite yet. Multilocus sequence typing of spirochete isolates originating from residents of Georgia and Florida, USA, revealed the presence of two Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains highly similar to those from endemic Lyme borreliosis regions of the northeastern United States, and an unusual strain that differed from any previously described in Europe or North America. Based on phylogenetic analysis of eight chromosomally located housekeeping genes divergent strain clustered between Borrelia bissettii and Borrelia carolinensis, two species from the B.burgdorferi s.l. complex, widely distributed among the multiple hosts and vector ticks in the southeastern United States. The genetic distance analysis showed a close relationship of the diverged strain to B. bissettii. Here, we present the analysis of the first North American human originated live spirochete strain that revealed close relatedness to B. bissettii. The potential of B. bissettii to cause human disease, even if it is infrequent, is of importance for clinicians due to the extensive range of its geographic distribution.

  12. Searching for the right scale in catchment hydrology: the effect of soil spatial variability in simulated states and fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Gabriele; Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    The advances in computer science and the availability of new detailed data-sets have led to a growing number of distributed hydrological models applied to finer and finer grid resolutions for larger and larger catchment areas. It was argued, however, that this trend does not necessarily guarantee better understanding of the hydrological processes or it is even not necessary for specific modelling applications. In the present study, this topic is further discussed in relation to the soil spatial heterogeneity and its effect on simulated hydrological state and fluxes. To this end, three methods are developed and used for the characterization of the soil heterogeneity at different spatial scales. The methods are applied at the soil map of the upper Neckar catchment (Germany), as example. The different soil realizations are assessed regarding their impact on simulated state and fluxes using the distributed hydrological model mHM. The results are analysed by aggregating the model outputs at different spatial scales based on the Representative Elementary Scale concept (RES) proposed by Refsgaard et al. (2016). The analysis is further extended in the present study by aggregating the model output also at different temporal scales. The results show that small scale soil variabilities are not relevant when the integrated hydrological responses are considered e.g., simulated streamflow or average soil moisture over sub-catchments. On the contrary, these small scale soil variabilities strongly affect locally simulated states and fluxes i.e., soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated at the grid resolution. A clear trade-off is also detected by aggregating the model output by spatial and temporal scales. Despite the scale at which the soil variabilities are (or are not) relevant is not universal, the RES concept provides a simple and effective framework to quantify the predictive capability of distributed models and to identify the need for further model improvements e

  13. Residency in urology and training in kidney transplantation. Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Benavente, R; González-Enguita, C

    2015-06-01

    To determine the current state of kidney transplantation (KT) training in a country that is leader in organ donation and transplantation. We conducted an online survey by e-mail to 138 urology residents. The survey contained 5 sections: affiliation, training in KT, interest in KT, residents of transplant centers and residents of nontransplant centers. Sixty-five residents responded, 47.1% of the urologists in training surveyed, representing 28 cities and 15 provinces. Fifty-five percent (n=36) of the respondents deemed the KT training offered during their residency as insufficient, and 85% (n=55) demanded more resources. More than half were not confident in their abilities to perform transplantation surgery over the course of their residency (n=35). Nineteen percent of the residents considered KT an important discipline in their residency, with a mean score of 56.2 (1-100). Among the residents of the transplant centers (69.2%, n=45), 73% (n=33) considered KT when choosing a center for their residency. Of the surveyed residents from nontransplant centers (30.7%, n=20), 45% (n=9) do not perform an external rotation in KT. The surveyed residents demand more training in KT. The most common situation is to end a residency without having performed a complete KT. KT is considered an asset when selecting a resident medical intern position and commonly they are part of the transplantation team. The majority of residents are trained in centers with less than 75 transplants/year. External rotations in KT are not the rule in centers where transplantation is not performed. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An evaluation of the current state of sexual and reproductive health and rights of women in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Bismark; Wolterbeek, Ron; Peters, Alexander A W

    2015-01-01

    To provide a current account of women's sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in Ghana (West Africa), a priority area in achieving the World Health Organization's Millennium Development Goals. The study was observational. Three-hundred ninety Ghanaian women attending cervical cancer screening were surveyed about their SRHR. The data were analyzed with chi-squared test (p ≤ 0.05, two-sided). 22.1% had a life-time history of non-consensual sexual experience and 55.4% a previous history of abortion, mostly using services of a registered clinic (68.5%). Experience of sexual violence increased life-time risk of abortion (p = 0.018). The overall use of contraceptives was high (>60%); however, condom use during sexual intercourse with a new partner was low (23%), even among the highly educated women (32.7%) and women who stated to have received information on the risks and benefits of condom use (26.0%). Although condom use among the highly educated women was low, it was still 2 times higher than among the lower educated women, 15.7% (p < 0.001). There was also less condom use among the women with multiple sexual partners compared to single-partnered women (p = 0.001). More than a decade after the inception of the Millennium Development Goals, there is still work to be done in Ghana, especially on education and sexual violence.

  16. Civil rights as determinants of public health and racial and ethnic health equity: Health care, education, employment, and housing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, R A; Truman, B I; Williams, D R

    2018-04-01

    This essay examines how civil rights and their implementation have affected and continue to affect the health of racial and ethnic minority populations in the United States. Civil rights are characterized as social determinants of health. A brief review of US history indicates that, particularly for Blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians, the longstanding lack of civil rights is linked with persistent health inequities. Civil rights history since 1950 is explored in four domains-health care, education, employment, and housing. The first three domains show substantial benefits when civil rights are enforced. Discrimination and segregation in housing persist because anti-discrimination civil rights laws have not been well enforced. Enforcement is an essential component for the success of civil rights law. Civil rights and their enforcement may be considered a powerful arena for public health theorizing, research, policy, and action.

  17. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  18. Practice gaps in patient safety among dermatology residents and their teachers: a survey study of dermatology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swary, Jillian Havey; Stratman, Erik J

    2014-07-01

    Curriculum and role modeling adjustments are necessary to address patient safety gaps occurring during dermatology residency. To identify the source of clinical practices among dermatology residents that affect patient safety and determine the best approach for overcoming gaps in knowledge and practice patterns that contribute to these practices. A survey-based study, performed at a national medical dermatology meeting in Itasca, Illinois, in 2012, included 142 dermatology residents from 44 residency programs in the United States and Canada. Self-reported rates of dermatology residents committing errors, identifying local systems errors, and identifying poor patient safety role modeling. Of surveyed dermatology residents, 45.2% have failed to report needle-stick injuries incurred during procedures, 82.8% reported cutting and pasting a previous author's patient history information into a medical record without confirming its validity, 96.7% reported right-left body part mislabeling during examination or biopsy, and 29.4% reported not incorporating clinical photographs of lesions sampled for biopsy in the medical record at their institution. Residents variably perform a purposeful pause ("time-out") when indicated to confirm patient, procedure, and site before biopsy, with 20.0% always doing so. In addition, 59.7% of residents work with at least 1 attending physician who intimidates the residents, reducing the likelihood of reporting safety issues they witness. Finally, 78.3% have witnessed attending physicians purposefully disregarding required safety steps. Our data reinforce the need for modified curricula, systems, and teacher development to reduce injuries, improve communication with patients and between physicians, residents, and other members of the health care team, and create an environment free of intimidation.

  19. Supreme Court Update: The Free Speech Rights of Students in the United States Post "Morse v. Frederick"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    Enshrined in the First Amendment as part of the Bill of Rights that was added to the then 4 year old US Constitution in 1791, it should be no surprise that freedom of speech may be perhaps the most cherished right of Americans. If anything, freedom of speech, which is properly treated as a fundamental human right for children, certainly stands out…

  20. A Chinese resource curse? The human rights effects of oil export dependence on China versus the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, J.; Daxecker, U.

    2015-01-01

    Critiques of China’s ‘oil diplomacy’ center on its alleged disregard for transparency and human rights, yet such claims ignore that the problematic relationship between resource extraction and human rights precedes Chinese market entry. This article explores whether human rights implications are

  1. Exam preparation course in obstetrics and gynecology for the German Medical State Examination: proof of concept and implications for the recruitment of future residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Fabian; Fremd, Carlo; Tabatabai, Patrik; Smetanay, Katharina; Doster, Anne; Heil, Joerg; Schuetz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Hennigs, André

    2016-11-01

    Today´s written part of the medical state examination requires students to retrieve a comprehensive amount of knowledge in a limited period of time. Therefore, the main study objectives were to implement and to evaluate a two-day exam preparation course for the German Medical State Examination in obstetrics and gynecology. The project evaluation focused on acceptability, satisfaction and the gain of knowledge for the participants of such a face-to-face course. The two-day intensive training for senior medical students offered a review of the entire exam-relevant content in the field of obstetrics and gynecology in combination with interactive discussions along selected exam questions. Skill gains were assessed using pre- and post-course multiple choice tests. In addition, a qualitative questionnaire assessed attitudes and satisfaction of course participants. A total of 101 fifth year senior medical students from Heidelberg University Medical School participated in the two pilot courses (summer 2014 and winter 2015). Pre- and post-course tests showed a significant skill-gain from 14.9 to 18.0 points [of a maximum of 20; pre-post difference 95 % CI (2.21; 3.98), t test: p obstetrics and gynecology is feasible, effective and highly appreciated by senior medical students preparing for the Second German Medical State Examination. It further suggests surplus value for academic clinical departments to recruit future residents. Methods and tools presented in this paper are intended to inspire and guide clinical colleagues in implementing the format at their respective universities.

  2. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying the...

  3. Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Schlundt, Marie Gertz

    2011-01-01

    The project intends to investigate to what extent and under what conditions, United Nations human rights conventions have been internalized in the minimally democratic and isolated state of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). The ‘spiral model’ of Risse et al (1999) will be used as the theoretical framework for the project. This framework sets out to understand the process of socialization by which principled ideas held by individuals become norms in the sense of collective unde...

  4. Right patient, Right blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Madsen, Trine Stougaard

    2014-01-01

    : The objective of the current study was to test workshops focusing on procedures of safe blood transfusion by combining theory and practice, integrating current guidelines on safe blood transfusion and hereby help students to better recognize and handle errors and adverse reactions. Methods: 372 third year......Right patient, Right Blood Simulation based training in blood transfusion practice in nursing education Background: In spite of strict checking procedures to handling transfusion of blood severe adverse reactions are likely to happen and the major cause of morbidity occurs to be liable to human...... errors. Nursing students have limited possibility to practice safe blood transfusion during clinical placements. We introduced simulation-based workshops to reinforce safe transfusion practice and thus increase patient safety but equally important to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Objectives...

  5. Tax treaty entitlement issues concerning dual residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanghavi, D.

    2014-01-01

    The question whether a dual resident taxpayer is entitled to tax treaties concluded by each residence state with a third state has been controversial. Since 2008, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Commentary on Article 4(1) of the OECD Model states that such a

  6. Reflection About the Relation Between Internet and State in Contemporary Societies: The Importance of a Proper Regulation that Comprehends the Dynamic of Technological Development and Appreciates Fundamental Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fernando de Arruda e Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article makes a reflection, of transdisciplinary character and hypothetic-deductive reasoning line, about the relation between Internet and State in contemporary societies. The objective is to demonstrate that the Internet is not a simply mean of mass dissemination of information and needs a proper regulation, in view of the dynamics of technological development and emphasis on appreciating the Fundamental Rights, already provided in both the domestic and international legal system, in a way to avoid a regulation that can configure a meaning of exception state that admits the violation of the users’ rights on behalf of State sovereignty.

  7. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  8. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  9. A Teacher Fears for Kids over Freshly Ambushed Gay Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bonnie J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the passing of new laws forbidding gay marriage or legal recognition of same-sex unions in the United States and the impact of the gay rights issue on students. Across the nation, faculty who enjoy secure academic appointments, work with caring colleagues, and reside in university towns are subject to new…

  10. Reproductive Rights are Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Pitanguy

    1999-01-01

    Jacqueline Pitanguy outlines the political context of the ICPD +5 process on the basis of her work in Brazil and internationally on reproductive rights. She argues that the women's movement has to continue to lobby hard to decrease the gap between what has been promised and the reality of most women's lives, particularly in the context of the cuts in state funding towards social and health services. Development (1999) 42, 11–14. doi:10.1057/palgrave.development.1110002

  11. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress: in search of state obligations in relation to health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donders, Y.

    2011-01-01

    After having received little attention over the past decades, one of the least known human rights—the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications—has had its dust blown off. Although included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and in the International

  12. Forty Years of State Alcohol and Pregnancy Policies in the USA: Best Practices for Public Health or Efforts to Restrict Women's Reproductive Rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah C M; Thomas, Sue; Treffers, Ryan; Drabble, Laurie

    2017-11-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy remains a public health problem despite >40 years of attention. Little is known about how state policies have evolved and whether policies represent public health goals or efforts to restrict women's reproductive rights. Our data set includes US state policies from 1970 through 2013 obtained through original legal research and from the National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's (NIAAA)'s Alcohol Policy Information System. Policies were classified as punitive to women or supportive of them. The association between numbers of punitive policies and supportive policies in 2013 with a measure of state restrictions on reproductive rights and Alcohol Policy Effectiveness Scores (APS) was estimated using a Pearson's correlation. The number of states with alcohol and pregnancy policies has increased from 1 in 1974 to 43 in 2013. Through the 1980s, state policy environments were either punitive or supportive. In the 1990s, mixed punitive and supportive policy environments began to be the norm, with punitive policies added to supportive ones. No association was found between the number of supportive policies in 2013 and a measure of reproductive rights policies or the APS, nor was there an association between the number of punitive policies and the APS. The number of punitive policies was positively associated, however, with restrictions on reproductive rights. Punitive alcohol and pregnancy policies are associated with efforts to restrict women's reproductive rights rather than effective efforts to curb public health harms due to alcohol use in the general population. Future research should explore the effects of alcohol and pregnancy policies. The number of states with alcohol and pregnancy policies has increased since 1970 (1 in 1974 and 43 in 2013). Alcohol and pregnancy policies are becoming increasingly punitive. These punitive policies are associated with efforts to restrict women's reproductive rights rather than

  13. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  15. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  16. Reconfiguring the Contours of Statehood and the Rights of Peoples of Disappearing States in the Age of Global Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Tracey Skillington

    2016-01-01

    Many of the elements that have traditionally supported state level normative self-organization, most notably territory, are being actively undermined by rising sea levels, flooding, desertification, amongst other climate change effects. As more and more states come to be redefined as â disappearingâ , that is, states losing their territories to the natural environment through no specific fault of their own, a question arises as to how displaced communities will be assisted in their desire (...

  17. United States Medical Licensing Examination and American Board of Pediatrics Certification Examination Results: Does the Residency Program Contribute to Trainee Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Thomas R; Olson, Brad G; Nelsen, Elizabeth; Beck Dallaghan, Gary L; Kennedy, Gloria A; Botash, Ann

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether training site or prior examinee performance on the US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and step 2 might predict pass rates on the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) certifying examination. Data from graduates of pediatric residency programs completing the ABP certifying examination between 2009 and 2013 were obtained. For each, results of the initial ABP certifying examination were obtained, as well as results on National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) step 1 and step 2 examinations. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to nest first-time ABP results within training programs to isolate program contribution to ABP results while controlling for USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores. Stepwise linear regression was then used to determine which of these examinations was a better predictor of ABP results. A total of 1110 graduates of 15 programs had complete testing results and were subject to analysis. Mean ABP scores for these programs ranged from 186.13 to 214.32. The hierarchical linear model suggested that the interaction of step 1 and 2 scores predicted ABP performance (F[1,1007.70] = 6.44, P = .011). By conducting a multilevel model by training program, both USMLE step examinations predicted first-time ABP results (b = .002, t = 2.54, P = .011). Linear regression analyses indicated that step 2 results were a better predictor of ABP performance than step 1 or a combination of the two USMLE scores. Performance on the USMLE examinations, especially step 2, predicts performance on the ABP certifying examination. The contribution of training site to ABP performance was statistically significant, though contributed modestly to the effect compared with prior USMLE scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Access to electoral rights : Panama

    OpenAIRE

    HOYO, Henio; RUBI, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This report discusses electoral rights in Panama. It focuses on the inclusion in the electoral franchise of citizen residents, non-resident citizens, and non-citizen residents. Research for the 2016/2017 GLOBALCIT Reports has been supported by the European University Institute's Global Governance Programme, the EUI Research Council, and the British Academy Research Project CITMODES (co-directed by the EUI and the University of Edinburgh).

  19. Understanding human rights obligations of states engaged in public activity overseas:the case of transnational education

    OpenAIRE

    O Cuinn, Gearoid Micheal; Skogly, Sigrun Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Legal consideration of extraterritorial obligations contained in the European Convention of Human Rights have largely developed in respect of military occupation or the custodial control of individuals. For a number of reasons situations involving transnational cooperation have received little judicial scrutiny. This paper examines human rights concerns associated with the rapidly expanding field of transnational education an activity frequently reliant on interstate cooperation. By re-examin...

  20. Domestic Worker, Transnational Advocacy and the State of Exception: A Case Study on The Advocacy of Domestic Worker’s Rights in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Ramadhan Bastari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains why domestic workers (PRT remain not considered as formal workers in Indonesia. This problem becomes very urgent as PRT covers 76% of the national labor population and there has been considerable pressure from transnational community. This question is answered by applying  Agamben's theory of state of exception. This paper deploysdiscourse analysis method to examine a number of texts related to the Government of Indonesian's stance and the advocacy for PRT’s rights in Indonesia. This study finds that the Government of Indonesia has established a state of exception allowing to ignore PRT’s rights as workers under existing law. The study, then, concludes that the Government of Indonesian cannot be expected to meet PRT’s rights. Consequently, the strategy of advocacy should be directed to encourage other countries to push Indonesia so as to meet PRT’s rights.

  1. Association of duration of residence in the southeastern United States with chronic kidney disease may differ by race: the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior evidence suggests that longer duration of residence in the southeastern United States is associated with higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension. We postulated that a similar association would exist for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods In a national population-based cohort study that enrolled 30,239 men and women ≥ 45 years old (42% black/58% white; 56% residing in the Southeast) between 2003 and 2007, lifetime southeastern residence duration was calculated and categorized [none (0%), less than half (>0-residence duration, in either race. ESRD incidence was not statistically significantly associated with all vs. none southeastern residence duration (HR = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.22-1.14) among whites, whereas blacks with all vs. none exposure showed increased risk of ESRD (HR = 1.63, 95% CI, 1.02-2.63; PraceXduration = 0.011). Conclusions These data suggest that blacks but not whites who lived in the Southeast their entire lives were at increased risk of ESRD, but we found no clear geographic pattern for earlier-stage CKD. PMID:23518004

  2. Relationship between Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Visual Acuity in Residents of Esan West Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Ernest-Nwoke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the relationship between body mass index (BMI and blood pressure (BP on visual acuity among apparently healthy residents of Ekpoma, Esan West Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study among 225 subjects (ages of 18–35 years from whom BP, body weight, and height were collected. Visual acuity was measured using the Snellen chart following standard procedures of number of letters seen at 6-metre distance. The data were then analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results. The sampled population consists of 112 male and 113 female (mean age 31.72±14.2 years. Majority (180 of the respondents had normal visual acuity. However, compared with the respondents with normal BMI (R19.61±1.5; L19.67±1.70, visual acuity of underweight (R18.53±2.30; L18.53±2.70 and obese (R15.68±4.79; L17.73±1.70 were more deviated. Similarly, compared with respondent with normal BP (120–125/80–85 mmHg; R18.00±2.53; L18.07±3.11, hypotensive (R15.5±7.35; L15.00±10.20, and hypertensive (R15.01±21.25; L15.00±11.91 respondents had deviated visual acuity. Conclusion. Abnormal body weight (underweight and obese and BP (hypotension and hypertension have potential negative impacts on visual acuity. Based on the observed relationship between weights, BP, and visual acuity, eye examinations can be included as regular screening exercise for abnormal BMI and BP conditions.

  3. Financial Contribution of Residents When Billing as "Junior Associates" in the "Surgical Firm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Jeremy; Pratt, Sarah; Stanek, Stephen; Zelenock, Gerald; Nazzal, Munier

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing number of proposals to change the way Graduate Medical Education is funded. This study attempts to estimate the potential financial contribution of surgical residents using an alternative funding mechanism similar to that used by law firms, which would allow surgery departments to bill for resident activity as "junior associates." Following 24 residents over a period of 12 weeks, we were able to estimate the annual revenue that they generated from operating room procedures, independent consultations, patient management, and minor procedures using Medicare reimbursement rates. The appropriate first assistant modifier was used to calculate the operating room procedure fees, but full price was used to calculate the revenue for minor procedures, patient management, and consultations done independently. We adjusted for vacation time and academic activities. Including postgraduate year 1 residents, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $33,305.67. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $37,350.66. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $70,656.33. Excluding postgraduate year 1 residents, as most states require completion of the intern year before full licensure, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $38,914.56. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $55,957.33. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $94,871.89. Residents provide a significant service to hospitals. If resident activity was compensated at the level of supervised "junior associates" of a surgery department, more than 75% of the direct educational costs of training could be offset. Furthermore, we believe this value is underestimated. Given the foreseeable

  4. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  5. Developing an acoustic method for reducing North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) ship strike mortality along the United States eastern seaboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Kaitlyn Allen

    North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis ) are among the world's most endangered cetaceans. Although protected from commercial whaling since 1949, North Atlantic right whales exhibit little to no population growth. Ship strike mortality is the leading known cause of North Atlantic right whale mortality. North Atlantic right whales exhibit developed auditory systems, and vocalize in the frequency range that dominates ship acoustic signatures. With no behavioral audiogram published, current literature assumes these whales should be able to acoustically detect signals in the same frequencies they vocalize. Recorded ship acoustic signatures occur at intensities that are similar or higher to those recorded by vocalizing North Atlantic right whales. If North Atlantic right whales are capable of acoustically detecting oncoming ship, why are they susceptible to ship strike mortality? This thesis models potential acoustic impediments to North Atlantic right whale detection of oncoming ships, and concludes the presence of modeled and observed bow null effect acoustic shadow zones, located directly ahead of oncoming ships, are likely to impair the ability of North Atlantic right whales to detect and/or localize oncoming shipping traffic. This lack of detection and/or localization likely leads to a lack of ship strike avoidance, and thus contributes to the observed high rates of North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality. I propose that North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality reduction is possible via reducing and/or eliminating the presence of bow null effect acoustic shadow zones. This thesis develops and tests one method for bow null effect acoustic shadow zone reduction on five ships. Finally, I review current United States policy towards North Atlantic right whale ship strike mortality in an effort to determine if the bow null effect acoustic shadow zone reduction method developed is a viable method for reducing North Atlantic right whale ship

  6. Was Pythagoras Chinese? An Examination of Right Triangle Theory in Ancient China. The Pennsylvania State University Studies No. 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.; Kao, T. I.

    This book is primarily a scholarly monograph on ancient Chinese theory and application concerning the right triangle, based on evidence contained in classical mathematics texts and scrolls. It is also the first complete English translation of the ninth chapter of the Chiu chang suan chu, the richest source of problems from antiquity dealing with…

  7. Know Your Rights on Campus: A Guide on Racial Profiling, and Hate Crime for International Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Civil Rights Project, Cambridge, MA.

    This guide to the rights of international students explains racial profiling and hate crimes. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, many immigrants and international students have experienced heightened scrutiny and outright discrimination. Racial profiling refers to the reliance by law enforcement officers on a person's ethnicity,…

  8. Sociopolitical Antecedents to Stonewall: Analysis of the Origins of the Gay Rights Movement in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Cynthia Cannon

    1997-01-01

    Examines three traditional organizational theories on social action movement and applies Aldon Morris's analytical framework for understanding collective social action to the emergence of the modern U.S. gay civil rights movement. Concludes that social workers should gain access to and support indigenous social structures to assist oppressed…

  9. Check Your Privacy Rights at the Front Gate: Consensual Sodomy Regulation in Today's Military Following United States v. Marcum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coyne, Erik C

    2005-01-01

    .... The implications this may have on homosexual conduct has yet to be seen. If the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces continues to follow this relationship-based path, then it would seem consensual homosexual sodomy would be proscribed and within the government's right to prosecute.

  10. LAWS ON SEX DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT--FEDERAL CIVIL RIGHTS ACT, TITLE VII. STATE FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES LAWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    TITLE VII OF THE FEDERAL CIVIL RIGHTS ACT (1964) PROHIBITS DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN ADDITION TO THE USUAL GROUNDS OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, AND NATIONAL ORIGIN. IT COVERS PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR ORGANIZATIONS ENGAGED IN INDUSTRIES AFFECTING COMMERCE, AS WELL AS EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR EMPLOYERS TO REFUSE TO HIRE,…

  11. Evolving Perceptions of the Plastic Surgery Integrated Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Elizabeth; Mast, Bruce; Pierson, Justine M; Leavitt, Adam; Reintgen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    integrated program, with lack of funding being the primary indication of not making the transition. Upon responding with their level of agreement to several statements, respondents indicated that they agreed that the integrated training program is superior to the independent program and is not negatively effecting the specialty. The transition to the integrated plastic surgery residency program is continuing to grow. Most respondents in this survey indicated their belief in the superiority of the integrated program. However, a large proportion of respondents stated that they neither agreed nor disagreed with several of the provided statements concerning which residency program is superior. Thus, further research is needed to discern whether or not the integrated program is in fact superior to the independent residency training program. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Vogt, Kelly N; Sullivan, Maura E; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bullying is at the forefront of social behavior research, garnering significant media attention. Most of the medical research has addressed bullying of nurses by physicians and demonstrates that patient care and outcomes may suffer. The intent of this study was to determine if general surgery residents are bullied by nurses. A survey instrument previously validated (Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised) to evaluate for workplace bullying was modified to reflect the resident-nurse relationship. After institutional review board approval, the piloted online survey was sent to general surgery program directors to forward to general surgery residents. Demographic data are presented as percentages, and for negative acts, percentages of daily, weekly, and monthly frequencies are combined. Allopathic general surgery residencies in the United States. General surgery residents. The response rate was 22.1% (n = 452). Most respondents were men (55%) and had a mean age of 29 years (standard deviation = 7). Although 27.0% of the respondents were interns, the remaining classes were equally represented (12%-18% of responses/class). The respondents were primarily from medium-sized residency programs (45%), in the Midwest (28%), training in university programs (72%), and rotating primarily in a combined private and county hospital that serves both insured and indigent patients (59%). The residents had experienced each of the 22 negative acts (11.5%-82.5%). Work-related bullying occurs more than person-related bullying and physical intimidation. Ignoring of recommendations or orders by nurses occurs on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for 30.2% of residents (work-related bullying). The most frequent person-related bullying act is ignoring the resident when they approach or reacting in a hostile manner (18.0%), followed by ignoring or excluding the resident (17.1%). Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses is prominent. Future research is needed to determine

  13. Features of the psychological States of a person residing in the area of armed conflict, in the context of the transformation of life strategies in the post-conflict period

    OpenAIRE

    Ryadinskaya E.N.

    2017-01-01

    The article is a theoretical study of the psychological characteristics of the effects of armed conflict. In this article the author considers issues of importance to modern psychology, such as mental and emotional state of people in the period of occurrence of the armed conflict, the impact of immediate residence in the area of armed conflict on the mental state of the person, the stressors that affect the mental state of a person in an armed conflict. The author focuses on the fact th...

  14. Securing a Right to Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A national deportation campaign targeting Romanian Roma in France has recently drawn international criticism from human rights organizations and the European Union. In this context, some French municipalities have created villages d’insertion—integration villages—for some of their Roma residents. Proponents of these spaces have declared that they are humanitarian solutions to the existence of Roma slums in the urban peripheries of many French cities. Yet the creation of a “healthy space” for Roma migrants in the city has also legitimated the further eviction and exclusion of people from “unhealthy slums.” This article is based on ethnographic research among residents of an integration village and a number of unauthorized encampments in Strasbourg, France. This article analyzes the village d’insertion as a contemporary setting where the uneven medical citizenship of Roma migrants in France is being articulated in relation to wider debates about Roma inclusion in Europe. Ultimately, the village d’insertion is a local manifestation of state power, where the division between those deserving and undeserving of public support is reconfigured through the provision and exclusion of access to rights such as health care and shelter. PMID:29302162

  15. Politics, religion and gender equality in contemporary Mexico: women's sexuality and reproductive rights in a contested secular state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuchástegui, Ana; Cruz, Guadalupe; Aldaz, Evelyn; Mejía, María Consuelo

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the complexities of the interaction between politics, religion and gender equality in contemporary Mexico, by analysing recent developments in public debate, legal changes and implementation of government policies in two areas: 1) the inclusion of emergency contraception in public health services in 2004; and 2) the decriminalisation of abortion in Mexico City in 2008, which was followed by a massive campaign to re-criminalise abortion in the federal states. Three main findings emerge from our analysis: first, that women's sexual and reproductive autonomy has become an issue of intense public debate that is being addressed by both state-public policy and society; second, that the gradual democratisation of the Mexican political system and society is forcing the Catholic Church to play by the rules of democracy; and third, that the character and nature of the Mexican (secular) state has become an arena of intense struggle within which traditional political boundaries and ideologies are being reconfigured.

  16. [Development of recommendations for legislation's harmonization of Eurasec member states in the field of children's healthcare rights in educational institutions of various types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubova, I Sh; Yeremin, G B; Suvorova, A V; Blinova, L T

    2014-01-01

    In the paper there are presented the main results of the performed study on comparative legal analysis of national legislative acts in the field of providing of children's rights for health care in institutions of various types for the delivery of recommendations for harmonization of legislation of States--members of the Eurasian Economic Community.

  17. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  18. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Right-handed currents and final state interaction phases in B0→φK*0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, E.; Epele, L.N.; Gomez Dumm, D.; Szynkman, A.

    2004-01-01

    We consider possible effects of new physics (NP) on the angular distributions of the decay B 0 →φK* 0 , showing how these effects depend on the nature of nonstandard interactions. In a general framework based on factorization, we show that triple products can be used to probe the chirality of NP currents. In this analysis we take into account the presence of nonvanishing strong phases, which is motivated by recent experimental evidence. It is seen that the observability of right-handed NP is strongly dependent on the relation between the relative magnitude of these phases and the ratio of standard model and NP scales. As an application we estimate the expected values of relevant observables in a particular left-right symmetric model

  20. From Protector to Producer: The Role of the State in the Discursive Shift from Minority Rights to Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emanuel; Heller, Monica

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges that neoliberalism and the globalized new economy present to the politics of linguistic minority movements by ethnographically examining language policy as a discursive process, rooted in political economy. Following the post-WWII period, as most Western States restructured from welfarism to neoliberalism, there…

  1. Queer Youth v. the State of California: Interrogating Legal Discourses on the Rights of Queer Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Rigoberto; Brockenbrough, Ed

    2013-01-01

    For nearly 2 decades, lawsuits filed on behalf of students who have endured anti-queer bias in schools have resulted in favorable verdicts and settlements for the plaintiffs, thus spurring an increasing number of school districts across the United States to establish antidiscrimination policies and other initiatives to protect students from…

  2. Laws on Sex Discrimination in Employment. Federal Civil Rights Act, Title VII State Fair Employment Practices Laws, Executive Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This report describes the applicable laws regarding sex discrimination in employment. In addition to Federal law and two relevant Executive Orders, the report includes 21 state laws and the District of Columbia's law prohibiting discrimination based on sex. This document is a revision of ED 014 611. (BH)

  3. The Erosion of Rights to Abortion Care in the United States: A Call for a Renewed Anthropological Engagement with the Politics of Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaya, Elise; Mishtal, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Women's rights to legal abortion in the United States are now facing their greatest social and legislative challenges since its 1973 legalization. Legislation restricting rights and access to abortion care has been passed at state and federal levels at an unprecedented rate. Given the renewed vigor of anti-abortion movements, we call on anthropologists to engage with this shifting landscape of reproductive politics. This article examines recent legislation that has severely limited abortion access and maps possible directions for future anthropological analysis. We argue that anthropology can provide unique contributions to broader abortion research. The study of abortion politics in the United States today is not only a rich opportunity for applied and policy-oriented ethnographic research. It also provides a sharply focused lens onto broader theoretical concerns in anthropology and new social formations across moral, medical, political, and scientific fields in 21st-century America. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  4. 31 CFR 515.335 - Permanent resident alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent resident alien. 515.335... Definitions § 515.335 Permanent resident alien. As used in § 515.208, the term permanent resident alien means an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence into the United States. [61 FR 37386, July 18...

  5. National Courts in the Frontline: Abuse of Rights under the Citizens’ Rights Directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Szabados

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The free movement and residence of Union citizens and their third country national family members may be restricted under Article 35 of Directive 2004/38/EC on the grounds of abuse of rights. Although the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU had the opportunity to address abuse of rights cases, so far there have been no cases where it has established that abuse of rights took place. For this reason, the legal literature has tended to downplay the significance of the abuse of rights exception. The analysis of national case law, however, demonstrates that the courts of the Member States do apply Article 35 in its implemented form and have established abuse of rights on several occasions. Moreover, national courts have decided legal questions related to the abuse of rights which were not answered previously by the CJEU.

  6. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  7. The Status of Women's Reproductive Rights and Adverse Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Maeve Ellen; Evans, Melissa Goldin; Theall, Katherine

    Reproductive rights-the ability to decide whether and when to have children-shape women's socioeconomic and health trajectories across the life course. The objective of this study was to examine reproductive rights in association with preterm birth (PTB; reproductive rights composite index score was assigned to records from each state based on the following indicators for the year before birth (2011): mandatory sex education, expanded Medicaid eligibility for family planning services, mandatory parental involvement for minors seeking abortion, mandatory abortion waiting periods, public funding for abortion, and percentage of women in counties with abortion providers. Scores were ranked by tertile with the highest tertile reflecting states with strongest reproductive rights. We fit logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for PTB and LBW associated with reproductive rights score controlling for maternal race, age, education, and insurance and state-level poverty. States with the strongest reproductive rights had the lowest rates of LBW and PTB (7.3% and 10.6%, respectively) compared with states with more restrictions (8.5% and 12.2%, respectively). After adjustment, women in more restricted states experienced 13% to 15% increased odds of PTB and 6% to 9% increased odds of LBW compared with women in states with the strongest rights. State-level reproductive rights may influence likelihood of adverse birth outcomes among women residents. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The transformation of the Afar commons in Ethiopia: State coercion, diversification and property rights change among pastoralists

    OpenAIRE

    Hundie Bekele; Padmanabhan, Martina

    2008-01-01

    "The major economic activity for pastoralists is animal husbandry. The harsh environment in which herders raise their livestock requires constant mobility to regulate resource utilisation via a common property regime. In contrast to the mobile way of life characterizing pastoralism, agriculture as a sedentary activity is only marginally present in the lowlands of the Afar regional state in Ethiopia. Nevertheless, this study reveals a situation where the traditional land-use arrangements in Af...

  9. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  10. Trends in medical error education: are we failing our residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Corey K; Fischer, Melissa A; Walsh, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for physician education as a key step in medical error prevention. In our 2002 national survey, pediatric resident education about medical error prevention was sporadic. We sought to describe the amount and type of pediatric resident training about medical errors and to assess the change in training since 2002. We surveyed a national sample of 50 pediatric chief residents randomly selected from the 198 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs from August to November 2010. The 31-item telephone survey was developed from the 2002 survey, with the addition of 10 items about electronic learning and resident quality improvement projects. The survey included 4 domains: current patient safety curriculum, chief resident knowledge, learning from medical errors, and demographics. We phoned 55 chief residents and contacted 51. Fifty participated (90% participation rate). Ninety-four percent of chief residents stated that their program had a formalized curriculum to discuss medical errors, compared to only 50% (P medical error should be systemic change. The primary method for educating residents about medical error reported was informal teaching. Ninety-two percent reported never or rarely discussing medical error in an outpatient setting. Seventy-four percent of chief residents reported that they never or rarely learn from an error made by an attending physician, and 50% never or rarely learned from an error made by a fellow resident. Although resident education about medical errors has improved since 2002, opportunities to model learning from mistakes are frequently missed. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CNA Training Requirements and Resident Care Outcomes in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy B; Yang, Bo Kyum; Han, Kihye

    2017-06-01

    To examine the relationship between certified nursing assistant (CNA) training requirements and resident outcomes in U.S. nursing homes (NHs). The number and type of training hours vary by state since many U.S. states have chosen to require additional hours over the federal minimums, presumably to keep pace with the increasing complexity of care. Yet little is known about the impact of the type and amount of training CNAs are required to have on resident outcomes. Compiled data on 2010 state regulatory requirements for CNA training (clinical, total initial training, in-service, ratio of clinical to didactic hours) were linked to 2010 resident outcomes data from 15,508 NHs. Outcomes included the following NH Compare Quality Indicators (QIs) (Minimum Data Set 3.0): pain, antipsychotic use, falls with injury, depression, weight loss and pressure ulcers. Facility-level QIs were regressed on training indicators using generalized linear models with the Huber-White correction, to account for clustering of NHs within states. Models were stratified by facility size and adjusted for case-mix, ownership status, percentage of Medicaid-certified beds and urban-rural status. A higher ratio of clinical to didactic hours was related to better resident outcomes. NHs in states requiring clinical training hours above federal minimums (i.e., >16hr) had significantly lower odds of adverse outcomes, particularly pain falls with injury, and depression. Total and in-service training hours also were related to outcomes. Additional training providing clinical experiences may aid in identifying residents at risk. This study provides empirical evidence supporting the importance of increased requirements for CNA training to improve quality of care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Assessment of differences in psychosocial resources and state of health of rural and urban residents – based on studies carried out on students during examination stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zarzycka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Civilization changes of the environment shaping the psychosocial resources from rural to urban influence human health. [b]aim.[/b] The study aimed to identify the differences due to the place of residence (rural, urban as far as health resources are concerned (social support, sense of coherence, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentration in plasma and health in examination stress situations. The study also determined the concentration of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (health resource and cortisol (stress indicator. [b]material and methods.[/b] The psychosocial variables were assessed using the scales: ISEL-48v. Coll., SOC-29, SF-36v.2™ o and analogue scale (perception of examination stress. The study included, based on a stratified sampling (year of study and purposive sampling (written examination, major, 731 students representing the six universities in Lublin, south-east Poland. Among the respondents, 130 students were rural residents. [b]results.[/b] Health resources of students living in rural and urban areas generally differ statistically significantly in social support and the subscales of availability of tangible support, availability of appreciative support, the availability of cognitive-evaluative support and a sense of resourcefulness. The study recorded a sstatistically significantly larger network of family ties among students living in rural areas. The demonstrated diversity of resources did not substantially affect the perceived health, with the exception of pain sensation. Examination stress assessed by subjective opinion of the respondents and plasma cortisol levels vary relative to the place of residence. Students residing in rural areas showed significantly lower cortisol levels values, but subjectively perceived the situation of examation as more stressful. [b]conclusions[/b]. Differences in health resources and their mechanism of impact on health, to a limited extent, were conditioned by the place

  13. CIVIL RIGHTS AND MINORITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARTMAN, PAUL

    A MAJOR INTENT OF THE CONSTITUTION AND ITS AMENDMENTS, TO GUARANTEE EQUAL RIGHTS TO ALL CITIZENS REGARDLESS OF RACE, CREED, OR COLOR, HAS BEEN REINFORCED BY THE CIVIL RIGHTS STATUTES OF MANY STATES. IN SOME STATES SUCH LAWS HAVE BEEN ON RECORD FOR THREE-QUARTERS OF A CENTURY. IN OTHER STATES THE SAME CONSTITUTIONAL INTENT HAS BEEN DENIED BY…

  14. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  15. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  16. Nationwide survey of US integrated 6-year cardiothoracic surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebastchi, Amir H; Yuh, David D

    2014-08-01

    Integrated 6-year cardiothoracic surgical residency programs have recently been implemented in the United States. We report the results of the first published nationwide survey assessing the motivations, satisfaction, and ambitions of integrated 6-year residents. A 63-question web-based survey was distributed to 83 residents enrolled in 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited integrated 6-year programs in November 2013. There was an outstanding 69% response rate. The median age of integrated 6-year residents was 29 years with women comprising 24%. A clear majority had faculty mentorship (95%) and significant clinical exposure in medical school. Focused (100%) and abbreviated (74%) training curricula were identified as the top advantages of integrated 6-year programs; the format itself was a significant factor (46%) in career choice. Most integrated 6-year residents (95%) were satisfied with their program; 80.7% were satisfied with their operative experience thus far. Career plans skewed toward adult cardiac surgery (67%), followed by pediatric cardiac (24%) and general thoracic (9%) surgery; 49% were not particularly concerned about future employment, with 65% foreseeing an increase in opportunities. Specialized training (eg, aortic, heart failure, minimally invasive, congenital) was anticipated by 77%. Most integrated 6-year residents envision an academic career (94.7%). This survey takes an important snapshot of the nascent integrated 6-year format. Mentorship and intense clinical exposure are critical in attracting applicants. Purported advantages of the format are holding true among integrated 6-year residents, with the majority satisfied with their programs. These early data indicate that this format holds significant promise in attracting and retaining highly qualified trainees to academic cardiothoracic surgery. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cross-Tissue Transcriptomic Analysis of Human Secondary Lymphoid Organ-Residing ILC3s Reveals a Quiescent State in the Absence of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam E. Bar-Ephraim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of human and mouse group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s reside in secondary lymphoid organs, yet the phenotype and function of these ILC3s is incompletely understood. Here, we employed an unbiased cross-tissue transcriptomic approach to compare human ILC3s from non-inflamed lymph nodes and spleen to their phenotypic counterparts in inflamed tonsils and from circulation. These analyses revealed that, in the absence of inflammation, lymphoid organ-residing ILC3s lack transcription of cytokines associated with classical ILC3 functions. This was independent of expression of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp44. However, and in contrast to ILC3s from peripheral blood, lymphoid organ-residing ILC3s express activating cytokine receptors and have acquired the ability to be recruited into immune responses by inflammatory cytokines. This comprehensive cross-tissue dataset will allow for identification of functional changes in human lymphoid organ ILC3s associated with human disease.

  18. Whose Rights?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The debate over ritual infant male circumcision has increasingly been thematized as a Human Rights issue. But the claims on such rights seem highly conflicting. In particular, the rights of the child seems to conflict with the freedom of religion of parents, the rights of religious and ethnic...

  19. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  20. Beyond the decade of policy and community euphoria: The state of livelihoods under new local rights to forest in rural Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil René Oyono

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper interrogates the state of livelihoods under the exercise of new community rights to forest in rural Cameroon. The assessment makes use of a set of livelihoods indicators. The granting and exercise of new community rights, namely, management rights and market rights, are not synonymous with improved livelihoods, despite initial predictions and expectations. The resource base has not changed; it is more and more threatened by poor local level institutional arrangements and social and bio-physical management strategies, in addition to the weak central level regulation and monitoring actions. Similarly, the rights-based reform and community forestry are not improving basic assets and means at the household level. Nevertheless, this paper suggests that this experiment should not be judged hastily, since fifteen years are not enough to judge social and institutional processes like those in progress in Cameroon. The authors draw policy options likely to improve the livelihoods dimension of the reform and launch a debate on the real contribution of community income derived from community forests towards poverty alleviation at the household level.

  1. Do international rotations make surgical residents more resource-efficient? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Jason L; Ruhlandt, Ronell R; Sherman, Stanley R; Schlatter, Marc G; Green, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    Interest in international surgery among general surgery residents in the United States has been shown in several publications. Several general surgery residency programs have reported their experiences with international surgery rotations (ISRs). Learning to use limited resources more efficiently is often cited as a benefit of such rotations. We hypothesized that general surgery residents become more resource efficient after they have completed an ISR. Laboratory, radiologic, and diagnostic studies ordered on 2900 patients by 21 general surgery residents over 65 months at a single institution were analyzed retrospectively. The patient populations they wrote orders on were assessed for similarity in age, gender, and diagnoses. The outcomes in those patient populations were assessed by duration of stay and in-hospital mortality. Six (29%) of these residents (ISR residents) completed a 1-month ISR during their third year of residency. Their orders were compared with their classmates who did not participate in an ISR (NISR residents). The results were compared between the 2 cohorts from both before and after their international rotations. An analysis focused on comparing the changes from pre-ISR to post-ISR. A survey was also sent after objective data were collected to all residents and alumni involved in the study to assess their subjective perception of changes in their resource efficiency and to characterize their ISRs. Patient populations were similar in terms of demographics and diagnoses. ISR residents generated an average of $122 less in orders per patient per month after their ISR compared with before. NISR residents generated an average of $338 more in orders per patient per month after the ISRs compared with before (p = 0.04). Pre-ISR order charges were statistically similar. Similar results were observed when radiologic/diagnostic study orders were analyzed independently. Differences in outcomes were statistically insignificant. The survey revealed that most

  2. Interactive distance learning for orthodontic residents: utilization and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katherine P; Hannum, Wallace M; Koroluk, Lorne D; Proffit, William R

    2012-03-01

    Sharing resources through distance education has been proposed as 1 way to deal with a lack of full-time faculty in orthodontic residency programs. To keep distance education for orthodontic residents as cost-effective as possible while retaining interaction, we developed a "blended" interactive distance learning approach that combines observation of Web-based seminars with live postseminar discussions. For the 2009-2010 academic year, a grant from the American Association of Orthodontists opened access to the blended learning experience to all orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. The specific aims of this project were to (1) measure programmatic interest in using blended distance learning, (2) determine resident and faculty interest, (3) determine the seminars' perceived usefulness, and (4) elicit feedback regarding future use. Participants in this project were expected to (1) read all assigned articles before viewing a recorded seminar, (2) watch a 1 to 1.5 hour recording of an actual interactive seminar on a Web site, and (3) participate in a 30-minute follow-up discussion immediately after watching the recorded seminar either with a faculty member at the participating institution or via a videoconference with the leader of the Web-based seminar. The residents and faculty then completed surveys about the experience. Half (52%) of the 63 orthodontic programs in the United States fully participated in this project. The blended approach to distance learning was judged to be effective and enjoyable; faculty members were somewhat more enthusiastic about the experience than were residents. Most residents were not adequately prepared for the seminars (only 14% read all preparatory articles in depth); this impacted their perception of the effectiveness and enjoyability of the experience (P = 0.0016). Prepared residents reported a greater ability to learn from the seminars (P = 0.0035) than those who did not read, and also indicated that they were more

  3. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  4. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  5. Pediatric dermatology training during residency: a survey of the 2014 graduating residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Alaleh; Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Friedman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of pediatric dermatology is considered a core competency of dermatology training and should be expected of all practicing dermatologists. While the numbers of both pediatric dermatology fellowships and board certified pediatric dermatologists in the workforce have increased over the years, recent reports suggest that there is a gap in pediatric dermatology education during dermatology residency. The goal of this study is to assess the current state of pediatric education during residency, as well as the clinical experience, satisfaction and expectations of graduating dermatology residents. A 31-question self-report survey was distributed electronically to 294 third-year dermatology residents with questions pertaining to demographics, didactic education, resident experience in pediatric dermatology training, satisfaction with pediatric training and future plans. One hundred and twenty-three residents responded (41.8% response rate) representing approximately 29.1% of the total number of graduating residents. 69 (56.1%) residents reported academic time specifically devoted to pediatric dermatology, the majority (79.7%) of which was led by pediatric dermatologists. 82% of residents reported dedicated pediatric dermatology clinics at their program. 86.8% of respondents felt that their training in pediatric dermatology will allow them to confidently see pediatric dermatology patients in practice. This survey highlights a promising state of pediatric dermatology training among current graduating dermatology residents. The majority of current graduating dermatology residents are satisfied with their pediatric dermatology education, feel confident treating pediatric patients, and plan to see pediatric patients in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Knowledge and prevalence of Human African Trypanosomiasis among residents of Kachia grazing reserve, Kachia local government area, Kaduna state, Nigeria, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, Belinda Vernyuy; Aliyu, Ahmad; Abubakar, Aisha; Uba, Sabo Ado; Gidado, Saheed; Edukugho, Aboyowa; Anagbogu, Ifeoma; Kalejaiye, John; Nguku, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector borne parasitic disease transmitted to humans by infected tse-tse flies cause morbidity including delayed child mental development. Reports of nuisance and bites from tse-tse flies by residents of Kachia grazing led to the study to determine the knowledge, practices and prevalence of HAT among residents of the grazing reserve. We conducted active case search in a cross-sectional study using multi-stage sampling with probability proportionate to size. We administered structured questionnaire on Knowledge, practices relating to HAT prevention and screened for HAT using card agglutination test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). Knowledge of HAT was scored 0-5 and categorized good (3-5) and poor (0-2) based on score, predisposition to risk of HAT as exposure to ≥two risk factors and, a case of HAT as any respondent that tested positive on CATT. We analysed data using Epi-info and MS-excel. Of the 300 respondents, mean age 39(±17years) interviewed, 56.3% were males, 12.0% had good knowledge of HAT and 76.3% were exposed to HAT risk factors. Prevention practices included clearing of overgrown bushes around houses (99%), use of insecticidal treated nets (75.7%) and protective clothing (41.0%). Males {Odds Ratio [OR] 5.0; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.8 - 13.6}, age above 40 years {OR 5.0; 95% CI 1.1 - 24.4} and family history of HAT {OR 8.7; 95% CI 2.4 - 32.1} were significantly associated with HAT knowledge. None tested positive on CATT. Despite poor knowledge of HAT, residents practiced HAT preventive measures and zero HAT prevalence was recorded.

  7. A comparison of medical education in Germany and the United States: from applying to medical school to the beginnings of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Dmitry; Jubbal, Kevin T; Noé, Jonas G; Gansbacher, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Both Germany and the United States of America have a long tradition of science and medical excellence reaching back as far as the nineteenth century. The same tribute must be paid to the medical educational system in both countries. Despite significant initial similarities and cross-inspiration, the paths from enrolling in a medical university to graduating as a medical doctor in Germany and the US seem to have become much different. To fill a void in literature, the authors' objective therefore is to delineate both structures of medical education in an up-to-date review and examine their current differences and similarities. Recent medical publications, legal guidelines of governmental or official organizations, articles in media, as well as the authors' personal experiences are used as sources of this report. Tuition loans of over $200,000 are not uncommon for students in the US after graduating from medical schools, which are often private institutions. In Germany, however, the vast majority of medical universities are tax-funded and, for this reason, free of tuition. Significant differences and surprisingly multiple similarities exist between these two systems, despite one depending on government and the other on private organizations. Germany currently employs an integrated medical curriculum that typically begins right after high school and consists of a 2-year long pre-clinical segment teaching basic sciences and a 4-year clinical segment leading medical students to the practical aspects of medicine. On the other hand, the US education is a two-stage process. After successful completion of a Bachelor's degree in college, an American student goes through a 4-year medical program encompassing 2 years of basic science and 2 years of clinical training. In this review, we will address some of these similarities and major differences.

  8. Communication dated 4 March from the Governor for the Russian Federation and the Resident Representatives of China, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America concerning UN Security Council resolution 1803 (2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 4 March 2008 from the Governor for the Russian Federation and the Resident Representatives of China, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, attaching the text of a statement agreed by the Foreign Ministers of China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, with the support of the High Representative of the European Union and read by the Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom on the occasion of the adoption on 3 March 2008 of United Nations Security Council resolution 1803 (2008). The letter and, as requested therein, the attached text, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  9. Request by the Resident Representative of Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The attached clarification by a spokesman of the Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs is being circulated for the information of Member States pursuant to a request made by the Resident Representative of Iraq

  10. Adaptation of occupants with its environment in the official residence (case study: Housing of TNI AD Gaperta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirfalini Aulia, Dwira; Aritonang, Cindy

    2018-03-01

    An official residence is a housing provided by the state and used as a residence occupied by the official duties of officials and civil servants during their service in the city. The property rights of the official residence have limit, only valid while the residents serve in the city. The process of adaptation becomes indispensable because, in the early days of occupying the housing, residents will face a new social environment, which may be different from their previous environment. Furthermore, backgrounds such as economic, cultural, and social factors of each occupant will also determine the adaptation process that occurs. This research aims to find out and analyze adaptation process of the official residence’s dwellers to its environment. This study used the descriptive-qualitative method by interviewing ten occupants who selected by purposive sampling method. Results of research indicated that the most adaptation process occurs adaptation by the reaction such as adding the number of room and service area.

  11. Communication received from the Resident Representatives of the Russian Federation and the United States of America to the IAEA enclosing the text of a declaration on nuclear energy and nonproliferation joint actions, and the text of a joint statement by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, Sergey Lavrov, and U.S. Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 10 July 2007 from the Resident Representatives of the Russian Federation and the United States of America with the attachments of a Declaration on Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Joint Actions published by the Russian Federation and the United States of America on 3 July 2007; and the text of a Joint Statement by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Sergey Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. As requested in that communication, the letter and its attachments are circulated for the information of Member States

  12. Child temperament and paternal transition to non-residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2010-12-01

    Using the Millennium Cohort Study data this study showed that, even after adjustment, resident biological fathers of high-regularity children at 9 months were less likely than resident biological fathers of low-regularity children at 9 months to become non-resident by the time these children were 3 years old. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Emergency Medicine Malpractice Cases Involving Residents to Non-Resident Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Kiersten L; Grossman, Shamai A; Janes, Margaret; Yu-Moe, C Winnie; Song, Ellen; Tibbles, Carrie D; Shapiro, Nathan I; Rosen, Carlo L

    2018-04-17

    (permanent, grave disability or death) (p=0.05). Procedures involved were identified in 32% (36) of resident and 26% (188) of non-resident cases (p=0.17). The final diagnoses in resident cases were more often cardiac related 19% (21) vs 10% (71), pvs 3% (3), pvs 76% (p=0.24); communication 27% vs 30% (p=0.46); and documentation 20% vs 21% (p=0.95). Technical skills contributed to 20% (22) of resident versus 13% (96) of non-resident cases (p=0.07) but those procedures involving vascular access 2.7% (3) vs 0.1% (1) and spinal procedures 3.5% (4) vs 1.1% (8) were more prevalent in resident cases (p<0.05 for each). There are higher total incurred losses in non-resident cases. There are higher severity scores in resident cases. The overall case profiles, including allegation categories, final diagnoses and contributing factors between resident and non-resident cases are similar. Cases involving residents are more likely to involve certain technical skills, specifically vascular access and spinal procedures, which may have important implications regarding supervision. Clinical judgment, communication and documentation are the most prevalent contributing factors in all cases and should be targets for risk-reduction strategies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural Rights and Human Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser Qorban Nia

    2013-01-01

    Any human rights bereft of philosophical and anthropological foundations are susceptible to weakness and vulnerability. The question as to how from a logical point of view we arrive at the conclusion that the fact of being a human accords us with rights is one that has been provided with several answers. Belief in the natural rights is justification for some prominent proponents. However, in spite of serious challenges facing the proponents of natural rights, it is possible to consider the...

  15. Do otolaryngology residency applicants relocate for training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Grant M; Hauser, Leah J; Dally, Miranda J; Weitzenkamp, David A; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether there is an association between the geographic location of an applicant's undergraduate school, medical school, and residency program among matched otolaryngology residency applicants. Observational. Otolaryngology residency program applications to our institution from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed. The geographic location of each applicant's undergraduate education and medical education were collected. Online public records were queried to determine the residency program location of matched applicants. Applicants who did not match or who attended medical school outside the United States were excluded. Metro area, state, and region were determined according to US Census Bureau definitions. From 2009 to 2013, 1,089 (78%) of 1,405 applicants who matched into otolaryngology residency applied to our institution. The number of subjects who attended medical school and residency in the same geographic region was 241 (22%) for metropolitan area, 305 (28%) for state, and 436 (40%) for region. There was no difference in geographic location retention by gender or couples match status of the subject. United States Medical Licensing Exam step 1 scores correlated with an increased likelihood of subjects staying within the same geographic region (P = .03). Most otolaryngology applicants leave their previous geographic area to attend residency. Based on these data, the authors recommend against giving weight to geography as a factor when inviting applicants to interview. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Assessing Residents' Readiness for OR Autonomy: A Qualitative Descriptive Study of Expert Surgical Teachers' Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Sullivan, Amy M; Alseidi, Adnan; Kwakye, Gifty; Smink, Douglas S

    Providing resident autonomy in the operating room (OR) is one of the major challenges for surgical educators today. The purpose of this study was to explore what approaches expert surgical teachers use to assess residents' readiness for autonomy in the OR. We particularly focused on the assessments that experts make prior to conducting the surgical time-out. We conducted semistructured in-depth interviews with expert surgical teachers from March 2016 to September 2016. Purposeful sampling and snowball sampling were applied to identify and recruit expert surgical teachers from general surgery residency programs across the United States to represent a range of clinical subspecialties. All interviews were audio-recorded, deidentified, and transcribed. We applied the Framework Method of content analysis, discussed and reached final consensus on the themes. We interviewed 15 expert teachers from 9 institutions. The majority (13/15) were Program or Associate Program Directors; 47% (7/15) primarily performed complex surgical operations (e.g., endocrine surgery). Five themes regarding how expert surgical teachers determine residents' readiness for OR autonomy before the surgical time-out emerged. These included 3 domains of evidence elicited about the resident (resident characteristics, medical knowledge, and beyond the current OR case), 1 variable relating to attending characteristics, and 1 variable composed of contextual factors. Experts obtained one or more examples of evidence, and adjusted residents' initial autonomy using factors from the attending variable and the context variable. Expert surgical teachers' assessments of residents' readiness for OR autonomy included 5 key components. Better understanding these inputs can contribute to both faculty and resident development, enabling increased resident autonomy and preparation for independent practice. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Teaching Communication Skills to Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Yacob, Sammy; Mithqal, Ayman

    The transition of health care in the United States from volume to value requires a systems-based approach aligning clinical services across the continuum of care. The ability to communicate effectively and resolve conflict is a critical skill within the systems-based model. Recognizing the essential role of communication in medicine, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has designated interpersonal and communication skills a core competency for all residents regardless of specialty. Yet, communication skills are often developed through on-the-job training or not at all. Traditional educational curricula use a predominantly didactic approach without opportunities for trainees to observe, actively experiment, or reflect on what is learned as a part of the learning process. In this article, we describe a 1-day experiential communication skills workshop customized for radiology residents that consists of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and conflict management sessions designed to develop interpersonal, communication, and conflict management skills through group discussion, role-play, and simulation. The purpose of this educational initiative was to determine the perceived value of an experiential communication skills workshop designed for radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Righting wrongs and reforming rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Laurie C

    2014-03-01

    Discusses issues faced by LGBT people, such as a lack of equal civil rights and the need for extra legal and financial protection for families because partners cannot be married. The author notes that, in our society, it is no longer acceptable to be racist, but it is still okay to be homophobic. The many campaigns against gay marriage and efforts in the legislature to prevent change toward equal civil rights and protections are prime examples. In our current political climate, two things are very clear: (a) homophobia is freely tolerated and (b) the times are changing as we inch closer to equal rights every day. We are "righting wrongs and reforming rights."

  19. The Resident Academic Project Program: A Structured Approach to Inspiring Academic Development During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Jill; Vaida, Sonia J; Bezinover, Dmitri; McCloskey, Diane E; Mets, Berend

    2016-02-15

    We report the successful implementation of structured resident academic projects in our Department of Anesthesiology at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010, we adopted an expectation that each resident complete a project that results in a manuscript of publishable quality. Defining a clear timeline for all steps in the project and providing research education, as well as the necessary infrastructure and ongoing support, has helped grow the academic productivity of our anesthesia residents.

  20. Confidence, knowledge, and skills at the beginning of residency. A survey of pathology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cindy M; Nolan, Norris J

    2015-01-01

    To document the pathology learning experiences of pathology residents prior to residency and to determine how confident they were in their knowledge and technical skills. An online survey was distributed to all pathology residency program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward the survey link to their residents. Data were obtained on pathology electives, grossing experience, and frozen section experience. Likert scale questions assessed confidence level in knowledge and skills. In total, 201 pathology residents responded (8% of residents in the United States). Prior to starting residency, most respondents had exposure to anatomic pathology through elective rotations. Few respondents had work-related experience. Most did not feel confident in their pathology-related knowledge or skills, and many did not understand what pathology resident duties entail. Respondents gained exposure to pathology primarily through elective rotations, and most felt the elective experience prepared them for pathology residency. However, elective time may be enhanced by providing opportunities for students to increase hands-on experience and understanding of resident duties. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  1. Development and implementation of a residency project advisory board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagam, Julie K; Iglar, Arlene; Kindsfater, Julie; Loeb, Al; Smith, Chad; Spexarth, Frank; Brierton, Dennis; Woller, Thomas

    2017-06-15

    The development and implementation of a residency project advisory board (RPAB) to manage multiple pharmacy residents' yearlong projects across several residency programs are described. Preceptor and resident feedback during our annual residency program review and strategic planning sessions suggested the implementation of a more-coordinated approach to the identification, selection, and oversight of all components of the residency project process. A panel of 7 department leaders actively engaged in residency training and performance improvement was formed to evaluate the residency project process and provide recommendations for change. These 7 individuals would eventually constitute the RPAB. The primary objective of the RPAB at Aurora Health Care is to provide oversight and a structured framework for the selection and execution of multiple residents' yearlong projects across all residency programs within our organization. Key roles of the RPAB include developing expectations, coordinating residency project ideas, and providing oversight and feedback. The development and implementation of the RPAB resulted in a significant overhaul of our entire yearlong resident project process. Trends toward success were realized after the first year of implementation, including consistent expectations, increased clarity and engagement in resident project ideas, and more projects meeting anticipated endpoints. The development and implementation of an RPAB have provided a framework to optimize the organization, progression, and outcomes of multiple pharmacy resident yearlong projects in all residency programs across our pharmacy enterprise. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Internal medicine residency training in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hatice; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Medical school entrance depends on passing a central examination that is given annually by the National Selection and Placement Center. Undergraduate medical education takes 6 years. About 5000 students graduate from medical faculties annually. The central exam necessary for residency training is given by the National Selection and Placement Center. A Specialist Training Regulation regulates residency training. Internal medicine residency training takes 4 years and includes inpatient and outpatient care in wards and rotations. Residents prepare a dissertation that is used in the evaluation of residency competency. At the end of the residency period, residents who have been successful in previous evaluations take an oral exam followed by a written exam, which lead to their certification in internal medicine. Residents' scientific knowledge and skills are assessed by a jury consisting of five people, four from the same department and one from the equivalent department in another training institution. The title of specialist is granted after a certification exam given by training institutions and approved by the Ministry of Health. Internists are mainly employed in state hospitals, which are under the Ministry of Health. Subspecialty areas in internal medicine include gastroenterology, geriatrics, endocrinology, nephrology, hematology, rheumatology, immunology, allergology, and oncology. The training period for a subspecialty is 2 years. A substantial effort is being made all over the country to improve regulations and health care service delivery. These changes will also affect the residency training and manpower planning and employment of internists.

  3. Protection of asylum seekers and illegal migrants human rights: Practice of the European Court of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukanović Anđela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection of asylum seeker and Illegal migrants human rights, has often been difficult due to the need of states to regulate unwanted migration flows. European Court of Human Rights plays an important role in protecting the rights of these individuals, through a set of human rights. Requests for interim measures under Rule 39 of the Rules of Court also have great importance. In cases involving illegal migrants and asylum-seekers, Court was often in difficult position, given the contradictions that could arise from the protection of human rights and the legitimate aim of the Contracting States to control the entry, residence and expulsion of aliens. Recent Courts judgment in case of M. S. S. against Belgium is particularly important, because of its remarkable influence on the perception of a common asylum system in the EU, as well as the judgment in the case of Jama Hirsi and Others v. Italy.

  4. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  5. Abnormal left and right amygdala-orbitofrontal cortical functional connectivity to emotional faces: state versus trait vulnerability markers of depression in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Amelia; Thompson, Wesley K; Zhou, Donli; Almeida, Jorge R C; Hassel, Stefanie; Klein, Crystal R; Kupfer, David J; Phillips, Mary L

    2010-03-01

    Amygdala-orbitofrontal cortical (OFC) functional connectivity (FC) to emotional stimuli and relationships with white matter remain little examined in bipolar disorder individuals (BD). Thirty-one BD (type I; n = 17 remitted; n = 14 depressed) and 24 age- and gender-ratio-matched healthy individuals (HC) viewed neutral, mild, and intense happy or sad emotional faces in two experiments. The FC was computed as linear and nonlinear dependence measures between amygdala and OFC time series. Effects of group, laterality, and emotion intensity upon amygdala-OFC FC and amygdala-OFC FC white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) relationships were examined. The BD versus HC showed significantly greater right amygdala-OFC FC (p relationship (p = .001) between left amygdala-OFC FC to sad faces and FA in HC. In BD, antidepressants were associated with significantly reduced left amygdala-OFC FC to mild sad faces (p = .001). In BD, abnormally elevated right amygdala-OFC FC to sad stimuli might represent a trait vulnerability for depression, whereas abnormally elevated left amygdala-OFC FC to sad stimuli and abnormally reduced amygdala-OFC FC to intense happy stimuli might represent a depression state marker. Abnormal FC measures might normalize with antidepressant medications in BD. Nonlinear amygdala-OFC FC-FA relationships in BD and HC require further study. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recourse right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, M.R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The recourse right concerning nuclear power plants is analysed. It is emphasized that in the Brazilian civil liability legislation, the operator has this right against who admitted it through a written contract or against the individual who has acted or omitted to act whith the intent to provoke nuclear incidents. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  7. Radiology Resident Supply and Demand: A Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Cory M

    2017-09-01

    Radiology was subject to crippling deficits in the number of jobs available to graduates of training programs from 2012 through 2015. As the specialty transitions to the assimilation of osteopathic training programs and the welcoming of direct competition from new integrated interventional radiology programs, the assessment of growth in radiology training positions over the 10 years preceding this pivotal time will serve to characterize the genesis of the crisis while inspiring stakeholders to avoid similar negative fluctuations in the future. The number of per capita radiology trainees in each region was derived from data published by the National Resident Matching Program, as were annual match statistics over the years 2012 through 2016. Data regarding new interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology enrollees were also obtained from the National Resident Matching Program. The seven states with the most per capita radiology residents were in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in both 2006 and 2016, and three of these seven also showed the greatest per capita growth over the course of the 10 years studied. New radiology programs were accredited during the peak of the job shortage. Integrated interventional radiology training created 24 de novo radiology residents in the 2017 match. Fill rates are weakly positively correlated with program size. Unregulated radiology program growth persisted during the decade leading up to 2016. The region with the fewest jobs available since 2012 is also home to the greatest number of per capita radiology residents. Numerous published opinions during the crisis did not result in enforced policy change. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Training Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology Residents in Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Assessment Gathered from Participants in AANS and ASTRO Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jason; Suh, John H; Kavanagh, Brian; Xu, Zhiyuan; Ren, Lydia; Sheehan, Kimball; Lunsford, L Dade

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents an expanding approach for neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists. We evaluate educational gaps of senior residents drawn from each specialty as part of a focused SRS course. We also evaluate the strengths and limitations of SRS training in current residency programs of the course residents and faculty. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons and American Society of Radiation Oncology jointly held a senior resident course in SRS. Residents were nominated by program directors from across the United States. Thirty residents were chosen to participate in the course. The residents were surveyed before and after the course. Faculty (n = 14) were also surveyed to ascertain their perspectives on current training in SRS. Most (96.7%) of the residents planned to perform SRS when finished, and 94% anticipated SRS indications to expand. Regarding SRS technique, 47% reported average/above average understanding of intracranial SRS; only 17% expressed similar understanding of spinal SRS. Before the course, 76.6% noted below average/average ability to recognize and manage SRS complications. Twenty-three percent of the faculty indicated that graduating residents from their programs were unprepared to perform radiosurgery. Residents' self-assessed understanding of brain SRS indication (P = 0.000693), SRS techniques (P = 0.000021), spinal SRS indications (P = 0.000050), spinal SRS techniques (P = 0.000019), and complication recognition and management (P = 0.00033) significantly improved following the course. Knowledge and training gaps in SRS appear evident to the senior residents and faculty of both specialties. We believe that other educational opportunities for SRS experience are necessary to optimize clinical competency, as well as meet future clinical staffing needs for this expanding, multidisciplinary approach. Further evaluation of gaps in SRS is necessary through a larger, nationwide survey of U.S. neurosurgeons

  9. Extraterritorial Human Rights Obligations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amsinck Boie, Hans Nikolaj; Torp, Kristian

    The book addresses the issue of corporate respect for human rights by examining if and how states are obligated to ensure that corporations originating from their jurisdiction respect human rights when they operate abroad. The existence of such a duty is much debated by academics at national...... and international level, and in an attempt to bring something new to the table, the book examines both if states have extraterritorial obligations in regard to their corporations and what can be required of states under such an obligation. The complex issue of states and corporate respect for human rights cannot...... adequately be addressed without including the approach to the problem taken in practice; Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. The book therefore draws upon the concept of CSR and the approaches developed here and discusses whether states may utilize the CSR-based concept of human rights due diligence...

  10. Extraterritorial Human Rights Obligations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amsinck Boie, Hans Nikolaj; Torp, Kristian

    adequately be addressed without including the approach to the problem taken in practice; Corporate Social Responsibility, CSR. The book therefore draws upon the concept of CSR and the approaches developed here and discusses whether states may utilize the CSR-based concept of human rights due diligence...... and international level, and in an attempt to bring something new to the table, the book examines both if states have extraterritorial obligations in regard to their corporations and what can be required of states under such an obligation. The complex issue of states and corporate respect for human rights cannot......The book addresses the issue of corporate respect for human rights by examining if and how states are obligated to ensure that corporations originating from their jurisdiction respect human rights when they operate abroad. The existence of such a duty is much debated by academics at national...

  11. 26 CFR 1.871-3 - Residence of alien seamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence of alien seamen. 1.871-3 Section 1.871... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-3 Residence of alien seamen. In order to determine whether an alien seaman is a resident of the United States for purposes of the income...

  12. Training in Psychiatric Genomics during Residency: A New Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winner, Joel G.; Goebert, Deborah; Matsu, Courtenay; Mrazek, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors ascertained the amount of training in psychiatric genomics that is provided in North American psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A sample of 217 chief residents in psychiatric residency programs in the United States and Canada were identified by e-mail and surveyed to assess their training in psychiatric genetics and…

  13. Judicious Leadership for Residence Hall Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercoal, Forrest

    This book presents a theory of judicious leadership for residence hall management that advocates the creation of an ethical and educational perspective based on the U.S. Bill of Rights. It argues that by recognizing college students' citizenship rights, providing them an opportunity to experience individual liberties, and helping them to…

  14. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    radiation oncology, current residents, training programs, and prospective employers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Working rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Jovan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the article focuses on 'Employment at will', a scheme in which all obligations and rights of employers and employees are subject to negotiation and explicit agreement of the parties in the working process. Free consent and almost absolute freedom to terminate the relations are features of this scheme. The second part of the article deals with the issue of the right to work and rights in the working place. As restrictions of the freedom contained in the original Employment at Will scheme, all these rights have to be justified from the moral point of view. The third part deals with due process in the workplace, especially regarding the issue of layoffs.

  16. Nature of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos López Dawson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the formation of a new Constitution the constituents will require to know or reach an agreement on the nature of human rights; then, to determine how the State will enforce the respect to those rights. To do so, it is necessary to resort to the history and evolution of these rights, and the present work aims to contribute to an efficient productive debate about the nature of human rights, so that citizens can decide on the understanding that this is a thoughtful democratic and humanistic founded decision. The analysis is in the actual technical-ideological republican system which correspond to the current state of international law

  17. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  18. Use of coolant for high-speed tooth preparation: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Vargas, Karen G; Waggoner, William F; Fuks, Anna B

    2010-01-01

    To determine current teaching policies regarding the use of coolant type during tooth preparation with high-speed hand-pieces in pediatric dental residency programs in the US. A 17-question survey was electronically mailed to 63 program directors with one follow-up. Multiple-choice questions asked about school and program teaching of cavity preparation with or without water coolant, including hypothetical clinical situations. Fifty-two (83%) program directors returned the survey. Fifty-two percent taught both dry and water coolant methods, 6% taught dry cutting exclusively, and 42% did not teach the dry method and always used water coolant. Dry techniques were used primarily for special needs patients with poor swallow reflexes (50%) and for young children undergoing sedation (41%). Air coolant was taught more frequently in programs in the Midwest (77%) and South (85%) vs. the Northeast (32%) and West (50%) (P<.01). Forty-four percent of combined programs and 60% of hospital programs taught water spray use exclusively, while all university programs taught the dry cutting technique (P<.01). A majority of program directors teach the use of air coolant alone for high-speed preparation of teeth. University and combined programs were more likely to teach the method compared with hospital based ones.

  19. Doing the right things right

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Pernille Hammar; Hussmann, Peter Munkebo; Jensen, Helge Elbrønd

    2009-01-01

    Are we doing the right things and are we doing them right? These questions should be subject to constant attention within Higher Education Institutions in pursuit of high quality educations and attracting students nationally as well as internationally. And due to the international development...

  20. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  1. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  2. Understanding the Role of an International Convention on the Human Rights of People with Disabilities: An Analysis of the Legal, Social, and Practical Implications for Policy Makers and Disability and Human Rights Advocates in the United States. White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Janet E.

    This White Paper by the National Council on Disability urges the support and participation of American policymakers and organizations representing people with disabilities in the drafting of an international human rights treaty specifically addressing the rights of people with disabilities. Following an executive summary and an introductory…

  3. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  4. Associations of doctor-diagnosed asthma with immigration status, age at immigration, and length of residence in the United States in a sample of Mexican American School Children in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldeirawi, Kamal; McConnell, Rob; Furner, Sylvia; Freels, Sally; Stayner, Leslie; Hernandez, Eva; Amoruso, Lisa; Torres, Shioban; Persky, Victoria W

    2009-10-01

    Among Mexican Americans in the United States, children who were born in the US had higher rates of asthma than their Mexico-born peers. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of doctor-diagnosed asthma with immigration-related variables and to investigate whether these associations could be explained by factors that may change with migration. We surveyed parents of 2,023 school children of Mexican descent and examined the associations of asthma with nativity, age at immigration, and length of residence in the US after adjusting for potential confounding variables. In multivariate analyses, US-born children had a 2.42-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52-3.83) increased odds of asthma compared with their Mexico-born peers. Mexico-born participants who moved to the US before 2 years of age were almost twice as likely to experience asthma compared with Mexico-born children who moved to the US >or=2 years of age. In addition, Mexico-born participants who lived in the US for 10 years or more were 2.37 times more likely to have asthma than Mexico-born students who lived in the US for less than 10 years. These associations were not explained by a wide variety of factors such as place of residence in infancy; exposure to animals/pets; history of infections, Tylenol use, and antibiotic use in infancy; breastfeeding; exposure to environmental tobacco smoke; daycare attendance and number of siblings; and language use. Our findings point to the effects of nativity, age at immigration, and duration of residence in the US on the risk of asthma in Mexican American children, suggesting that potentially modifiable factors that change with migration may be linked with the disease. The findings of this study should stimulate further research to explain factors that may be responsible for the observed differentials in the risk of asthma among Mexican Americans.

  5. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self-identify wit...... to large organization but also reflect the practices and operations that reside in SMEs. This volume also utilizes labor market and firm data to determine whether there is a definitive relationship between IP and economic performance on the firm level....

  6. Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Characteristics Associated with Measured Adverse Outcomes During Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Bohrer-Clancy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Negative outcomes in emergency medicine (EM programs use a disproportionate amount of educational resources to the detriment of other residents. We sought to determine if any applicant characteristics identifiable during the selection process are associated with negative outcomes during residency. Methods Primary analysis consisted of looking at the association of each of the descriptors including resident characteristics and events during residency with a composite measure of negative outcomes. Components of the negative outcome composite were any formal remediation, failure to complete residency, or extension of residency. Results From a dataset of 260 residents who completed their residency over a 19-year period, 26 (10% were osteopaths and 33 (13% were international medical school graduates A leave of absence during medical school (p <.001, failure to send a thank-you note (p=.008, a failing score on United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I (p=.002, and a prior career in health (p=.034 were factors associated with greater likelihood of a negative outcome. All four residents with a “red flag” during their medicine clerkships experienced a negative outcome (p <.001. Conclusion “Red flags” during EM clerkships, a leave of absence during medical school for any reason and failure to send post-interview thank-you notes may be associated with negative outcomes during an EM residency.

  7. [Patients' rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Giorgio; Morello, Enrico; Quadrino, Silvana

    2018-02-01

    Forty years have passed since the publication of the "Patients' Rights Charter" (included in a separate section at the end of the work: "Patients' rights: a critical guide to understanding and usage of civil hospital facilities"), but it still remains remarkably topical. We here provide an analysis of the original Charter (1975) taking into consideration the changes that have occurred in sensitivity to gender, cultural as well as socioeconomic differences, the right to body privacy and to continuity of care, the key role of general practitioners, the reciprocal relations in the information and decision-making processes with shared diagnostic and therapeutic pathways and active patient participation, which mandates that adequate education in communication and care strategies be provided to all caregivers.

  8. Evaluation of ethics education in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John; Straub, Heather; DiGiovanni, Laura; Chor, Julie

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the current status of ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was designed in conjunction with a professional survey laboratory at the University of Chicago. The survey was piloted with a convenience sample of clinical medical ethics fellows to assess question content and clarity. The survey was deployed by e-mail to all obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant responses. The University of Chicago's Institutional Review Board deemed this study exempt from institutional review board formal review. Of 242 eligible obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors, 118 (49%) completed the survey. Most respondents were from university-based programs (n = 78, 66%) that were not religiously affiliated (n = 98, 83%) and trained 4-6 residents per postgraduate year (n = 64, 70%). Although 50% of program directors (n = 60) reported having ethics as part of their core curriculum, most programs teach ethics in an unstructured manner. Fifty-seven percent of respondents (n = 66) stated their program dedicated 5 or fewer hours per year to ethics. The majority of program directors (n = 80, 73%) responded they would like more to a lot more ethics education and believed that ethics education should be required (n = 93, 85%) for residents to complete their training. Respondents identified that crowding in the curriculum was a significant barrier to increased ethics training (n = 50, 45%) and two-thirds (n = 74, 67%) reported a lack of faculty expertise as a moderate barrier to providing ethics education in the residency curriculum. This study found that a lack of structured curricula, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited time were important barriers for ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology programs across the nation. Despite these existing challenges, program directors have a strong interest in increasing ethics

  9. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as policy and strategy for social work action in child welfare in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, James L

    2012-01-01

    The United States and Somalia are the only two countries in the world that have not ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Opposition in the United States stems from the CRC's demand for a cultural change in how a society cares for children and a political hesitancy to become involved in binding international agreements. An earlier analysis for understanding the CRC is reviewed and replaced with one that uses a policy analysis model. This new model provides a basis for uniform child welfare policy and strategy throughout the nation. Although NASW has been supportive, it has not actively studied the consequences of implementation of the CRC, nor has it incorporated the CRC into its policy statements as a fundamental tenet. This article recommends that the NASW use the CRC as a basis for all child welfare policy statements and reference the CRS in future articles on child welfare issues. It also urges social workers to become politically active on behalf of the CRC to achieve ratification. Finally, it recommends a national committee to not only coordinate efforts toward ratification, but also oversee implementation of the CRC once it is ratified.

  10. Are the rules for the right to self-defense outdated to address current conflicts like attacks from non-state actors and cyber-attacks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Arias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The latest US-led coalition’s attacks against ISIS in Syria raised the question whether states can use defensive force against non-state actors. Two critical incidents had previously triggered the discussion on the importance and consequences of cyber-attacks as a new form armed attacks. The first one occurred in Estonia in 2007, when the country experienced extensive computer hacking attacks that lasted several weeks. The second incident happened in 2008, during the Georgia–Russia conflict over South Ossetia, when Georgia experienced cyber-attacks similar to those suffered by Estonia in the previous year. Furthermore, on June 21, 2016, the central banks of Indonesia and South Korea were hit by cyber-attacks on their public websites since activist hacking group Anonymous pledged last month to target banks across the world. The previous incidents have created, once again, public questioning if the rules on the use of force and the right of self-defense established in the United Nations Charter are sufficient and efficient to address these new forms of attacks.

  11. The necessity of parameters for effectuation of right to health: judicial action for access to growth hormone in the State of Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbicaro L. P.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is the result of research on the acquisition of the medication Somatropin, the growth hormone, by the Public Health Department of the State of Pará, during the years 2009 to 2013. The study aimed to analyze the effects of court action for access to medica-tion based on the preliminary injunction, in the records of the Public Civil Action (GPA nº 0021681-17.2011.8.14.0301, which determined that the State of Pará could supply the drug Hormotrop®- Somatropin 12 IU to all children and adolescents who have a deficiency in the production of growth hormone, and which demonstrated, through a concrete case, the need to establish parameters for judicial action in ensuring the right to health. A review of the literature was undertaken regarding legal aspects involved in the process of legalization of health, the technical and psychological aspects related to the use of growth hormone, and the public policies related to access. The data collected showed that there was a change in the consumption pattern of Somatropin starting from the year 2011, the periodthe above--mentioned civil action injunction was issued, creating the need to establish parameters based on technical criteria for judicial action for issues related to medications, in a context of increasing court action in politics and social relations in Brazil.

  12. The mini mental state examination at the time of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders diagnosis, according to age, education, gender and place of residence: a cross-sectional study among the French National Alzheimer database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradier, Christian; Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Le Duff, Franck; Layese, Richard; Metelkina, Asya; Anthony, Sabine; Tifratene, Karim; Robert, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    was firstly to describe the MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) score upon initial diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders among the French population, according to age. Secondly, education, gender and place of residence were studied as factors potentially associated with delayed Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. we conducted a cross sectional analysis of the French National Alzheimer database (BNA). Data from 2008 to 2012 were extracted. Patients were selected at the moment of their first diagnosis of AD (n = 39,451). The MMSE score at initial diagnosis dropped significantly with increasing age. The test score increased with the degree of educational background regardless of age. Gender and place of residence were significantly related to the MMSE score, women and persons living in medical institutions having lower MMSE scores under the age of 90 years and at all educational levels. Health care professionals should be aware of these risk factors in order to maximize chances of earliest possible diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

  13. The mini mental state examination at the time of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders diagnosis, according to age, education, gender and place of residence: a cross-sectional study among the French National Alzheimer database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pradier

    Full Text Available THE AIM OF THIS STUDY: was firstly to describe the MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination score upon initial diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders among the French population, according to age. Secondly, education, gender and place of residence were studied as factors potentially associated with delayed Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. DESIGN: we conducted a cross sectional analysis of the French National Alzheimer database (BNA. Data from 2008 to 2012 were extracted. Patients were selected at the moment of their first diagnosis of AD (n = 39,451. RESULTS: The MMSE score at initial diagnosis dropped significantly with increasing age. The test score increased with the degree of educational background regardless of age. Gender and place of residence were significantly related to the MMSE score, women and persons living in medical institutions having lower MMSE scores under the age of 90 years and at all educational levels. CONCLUSIONS: Health care professionals should be aware of these risk factors in order to maximize chances of earliest possible diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

  14. Research during general surgery residency: a Web-based review of opportunities, structure and outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Audrey; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2018-03-01

    Academic research is an integral part of general surgery training. Despite the recent research curriculum requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, there is perceived lack of research structure for residents. The aim of this study was to identify research opportunities, structure, and academic outputs during general surgical United States (US) residency. A Web-based review of all accredited general surgery US residency programs was undertaken. Individual websites were reviewed for resident research duration, type, and structure. Research outputs, departmental projects, and availability of faculty supervisors were also identified. Data were available for 242 general surgery residency programs of which 137 (56.6%) offer dedicated research years, ranging from 1 to 4 years, and 30 (12.4%) programs mandate such time as required. One hundred forty-two (58.7%) programs mentioned opportunities in clinical research, 129 (53.3%) in basic sciences, 29 (12.0%) in health services and outcomes-based research, and 15 (6.2%) in education. Advanced degrees were mentioned by 38 (15.7%) programs, the majority being Master of Public Health, Master of Business Administration, or Doctor of Philosophy. Nineteen (7.9%) programs mentioned research structure, mostly qualitative in description. Thirty-four (14.0%) programs provided examples of resident presentations or publications, and 25 (10.3%) mentioned a resident research day. One hundred ninety-nine (82.2%) programs offered a list of faculty supervisors and 129 (53.3%) listed examples of department research projects. Although research opportunities are ample within surgical US residency training, programs should consider the opportunity to offer varied types of research, with the potential to pursue an advanced degree. Finally, guidelines should be developed with regard to resident research structure, process, and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Agricultural buffers at the rural-urban fiinge: an examination of approval by farmers, residents, and academics in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Sullivan; Olin M. Anderson; Sarah Taylor Lovell

    2004-01-01

    In the Midwestern United States, urban areas most often expand by converting farmland into residential sites. This process puts households and working farms in close contact, often resulting in conflicts. Can agricultural buffers, which provide a variety of environmental and aesthetic benefits, help mediate this conflict? This study examined the approval of different...

  16. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  17. Employee Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2016-01-01

    , on the one hand, and what is considered as equitable (in accordance with employment rights) by employees, on the other. Since equality in reward counts for more among a considerable fraction of employees, while equity in contribution counts more for most employers, this is an inherent dilemma, constantly...

  18. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards

  19. Evaluation of stress experienced by pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hung M; Young, Shardae D

    2017-04-15

    Results of a study of stress and negative affect levels in postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residents are presented. A cross-sectional approach was used. Pharmacy residency program directors received e-mailed invitation letters requesting that they ask their residents to participate in an online survey in 2011. The main study outcomes included evaluation of resident scores on the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10) and the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist-Revised (MAACL-R) anxiety, depression, hostility, and dysphoria subscales. Of the 524 pharmacy residents included in the study, 75.4% were female, 41.2% were under 26 years of age, and 41% reported working more than 60 hours per week. There were no significant differences between PGY1 and PGY2 residents in stress levels, as assessed with the PSS10 (mean ± S.D. score, 19.05 ± 5.96 versus 19.09 ± 5.77). MAACL-R scores for hostility were, on average, higher among PGY2 residents (mean ± S.D., 50.83 ± 10.02) than among PGY1 residents (48.62 ± 8.96), while there were no significant differences in anxiety, depression, and dysphoria levels. Relative to residents who worked 60 or fewer hours per week, those who worked more than 60 hours had higher perceived stress levels as well as higher depression, hostility, and dysphoria scores. Pharmacy residents exhibited high levels of perceived stress, especially those who worked more than 60 hours per week. Perceived stress was highly correlated to negative affect levels. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Urbanization and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihr, A.

    Urban governance on the basis of human rights can help to set up problem solving mechanisms to guarantee social peace, economic growth and political participation.If states both integrate more in international or regional human rights regime and give more autonomy to urban governments and local

  1. Denialism and Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Roland; Nelen, Hans; Willems, Jan CM

    2016-01-01

    The safeguarding of human rights remains highly problematic, despite the proliferation of human rights instruments and the many actions taken by a variety of actors, such as governmental and non-governmental organizations, (individual) states and the international community over the past decades.

  2. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capricorn-A Web-Based Automatic Case Log and Volume Analytics for Diagnostic Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Hao; Chen, Yin Jie; Cook, Tessa S

    2015-10-01

    On-service clinical learning is a mainstay of radiology education. However, an accurate and timely case log is difficult to keep, especially in the absence of software tools tailored to resident education. Furthermore, volume-related feedback from the residency program sometimes occurs months after a rotation ends, limiting the opportunity for meaningful intervention. We surveyed the residents of a single academic institution to evaluate the current state of and the existing need for tracking interpretation volume. Using the results of the survey, we created an open-source automated case log software. Finally, we evaluated the effect of the software tool on the residency in a 1-month, postimplementation survey. Before implementation of the system, 89% of respondents stated that volume is an important component of training, but 71% stated that volume data was inconvenient to obtain. Although the residency program provides semiannual reviews, 90% preferred reviewing interpretation volumes at least once monthly. After implementation, 95% of the respondents stated that the software is convenient to access, 75% found it useful, and 88% stated they would use the software at least once a month. The included analytics module, which benchmarks the user using historical aggregate average volumes, is the most often used feature of the software. Server log demonstrates that, on average, residents use the system approximately twice a week. An automated case log software system may fulfill a previously unmet need in diagnostic radiology training, making accurate and timely review of volume-related performance analytics a convenient process. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pregnancy and the Plastic Surgery Resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Rebecca M; Weston, Jane S; Furnas, Heather J

    2017-01-01

    Combining pregnancy with plastic surgery residency has historically been difficult. Two decades ago, 36 percent of plastic surgery program directors surveyed actively discouraged pregnancy among residents, and 33 percent of women plastic surgeons suffered from infertility. Most alarmingly, 26 percent of plastic surgery trainees had had an elective abortion during residency. With increasing numbers of women training in plastic surgery, this historical lack of support for pregnancy deserves further attention. To explore the current accommodations made for the pregnant plastic surgery resident, an electronic survey was sent to 88 plastic surgery program directors in the United States. Fifty-four responded, for a response rate of 61.36 percent. On average, a director trained a total of 7.91 women among 17.28 residents trained over 8.19 years. Of the women residents, 1.43 were pregnant during a director's tenure, with 1.35 of those residents taking maternity leave. An average 1.75 male residents took paternity leave. Approximately one-third of programs had a formal maternity/paternity leave policy (36.54 percent) which, in most cases, was limited to defining allowed weeks of leave, time required to fulfill program requirements, and remuneration during leave. This survey of plastic surgery directors is a first step in defining the challenges training programs face in supporting the pregnant resident. Directors provided comments describing their challenges accommodating an absent resident in a small program and complying with the American Board of Plastic Surgery's required weeks of training per year. A discussion of these challenges is followed by suggested solutions.

  5. Evolution of the Pathology Residency Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Suzanne Z.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The required medical knowledge and skill set for the pathologist of 2020 are different than in 2005. Pathology residency training curriculum must accordingly change to fulfill the needs of these ever-changing requirements. In order to make rational curricular adjustments, it is important for us to know the current trajectory of resident training in pathology—where we have been, what our actual current training curriculum is now—to understand how that might change in anticipation of meeting the needs of a changing patient and provider population and to fit within the evolving future biomedical and socioeconomic health-care setting. In 2013, there were 143 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pathology residency training programs in the United States, with approximately 2400 residents. There is diversity among residency training programs not only with respect to the number of residents but also in training venue(s). To characterize this diversity among pathology residency training programs, a curriculum survey was conducted of pathology residency program directors in 2013 and compared with a similar survey taken almost 9 years previously in 2005 to identify trends in pathology residency curriculum. Clinical pathology has not changed significantly in the number of rotations over 9 years; however, anatomic pathology has changed dramatically, with an increase in the number of surgical pathology rotations coupled with a decline in stand-alone autopsy rotations. With ever-expanding medical knowledge that the graduating pathology resident must know, it is necessary to (1) reflect upon what are the critical need subjects, (2) identify areas that have become of lesser importance, and then (3) prioritize training accordingly. PMID:28725779

  6. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  7. Globalization, human rights, and the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2009-02-01

    Globalization, a process characterized by the growing interdependence of the world's people, impacts health systems and the social determinants of health in ways that are detrimental to health equity. In a world in which there are few countervailing normative and policy approaches to the dominant neoliberal regime underpinning globalization, the human rights paradigm constitutes a widely shared foundation for challenging globalization's effects. The substantive rights enumerated in human rights instruments include the right to the highest attainable level of physical and mental health and others that are relevant to the determinants of health. The rights stipulated in these documents impose extensive legal obligations on states that have ratified these documents and confer health entitlements on their residents. Human rights norms have also inspired civil society efforts to improve access to essential medicines and medical services, particularly for HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, many factors reduce the potential counterweight human rights might exert, including and specifically the nature of the human rights approach, weak political commitments to promoting and protecting health rights on the part of some states and their lack of institutional and economic resources to do so. Global economic markets and the relative power of global economic institutions are also shrinking national policy space. This article reviews the potential contributions and limitations of human rights to achieving greater equity in shaping the social determinants of health.

  8. Social networking profiles and professionalism issues in residency applicants: an original study-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Brent A; Determann, Jason R; Boohaker, Hikel A; Sheppard, Evan; McGwin, Gerald; Theiss, Steven

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of social networking, the degree of information publicly disclosed, and whether unprofessional content was identified in applicants from the 2010 Residency Match. Medical professionalism is an essential competency for physicians to learn, and information found on social networking sites may be hazardous to the doctor-patient relationship and an institution's public perception. No study has analyzed the social network content of applicants applying for residency. Online review of social networking Facebook profiles of graduating medical students applying for a residency in orthopedic surgery. Evidence of unprofessional content was based upon Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. Additional recorded applicant data included as follows: age, United States Medical Licensing Examination part I score, and residency composite score. Relationship between professionalism score and recorded data points was evaluated using an analysis of variance. Nearly half of all applicants, 46% (200/431), had a Facebook profile. The majority of profiles (85%) did not restrict online access to their profile. Unprofessional content was identified in 16% of resident applicant profiles. Variables associated with lower professionalism scores included unmarried relationship status and lower residency composite scores. It is critical for healthcare professionals to recognize both the benefits and risks present with electronic communication and to vigorously protect the content of material allowed to be publically accessed through the Internet. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Work-Related Quality of Life of US General Surgery Residents: Is It Really so Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Muhammad H; Hussain, Lala R; Williams, Kristen N; Grannan, Kevin J

    The quality of working life of US surgical residents has not been studied, and given the complexity of interaction between work and personal life there is a need to assess this interaction. We utilized a validated Work Related Quality of Life (WRQoL) questionnaire to evaluate the perceived work-related quality of life of general surgery residents, using a large, nationally representative sample in the United States. Between January 2016 and March 2016, all US general surgery residents enrolled in an ACGME general surgery training program were invited to participate. The WRQoL scale measures perceived quality of life covering six domains: General Well-Being (GWB), Home-Work Interface (HWI), Job and Career Satisfaction (JCS), Control at Work (CAW), Working Conditions (WCS) and Stress at Work (SAW). After excluding for missing data, the final analysis included 738 residents. The average age was 30 (±3) years, of whom 287 (38.9%) were female, 272 (36.9%) were from a community hospital, and 477 (64.6%) were juniors (postgraduate year ≤ 3). Demographically, the respondents matched expected percentages. When male and female residents were compared, males had statistically better HWI (pQuality of Life. Our findings suggest further study is needed to elucidate why female residents have or experience a lower perceived WRQoL than their male colleagues. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Features of the psychological States of a person residing in the area of armed conflict, in the context of the transformation of life strategies in the post-conflict period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryadinskaya E.N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is a theoretical study of the psychological characteristics of the effects of armed conflict. In this article the author considers issues of importance to modern psychology, such as mental and emotional state of people in the period of occurrence of the armed conflict, the impact of immediate residence in the area of armed conflict on the mental state of the person, the stressors that affect the mental state of a person in an armed conflict. The author focuses on the fact that the current socio-political situation in the regions where there was armed conflict, seriously affect the population, its relation to reality, setting goals, and vision of prospects in life. In conclusion, the article notes that the experience of life crisis in a situation of armed conflict may manifest in the loss of a sense of integrity and inner balance, the loss of the ability to control and manage their own lives. The study was supported by the grant SFU № 213.01-11/2016-2НМ (job Minobrnauki No. 28.125.2016/NM.

  11. General Surgery Resident Satisfaction on Cardiothoracic Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiez, Alisha; Bevins, Jack; Plaska, Andrew; Rosin, Vadim; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2016-01-01

    General surgery residents' exposure to cardiothoracic (CT) surgery rotations has decreased, which may affect resident satisfaction. We surveyed general surgery graduates to assess the relationships among rotation satisfaction, CT disease exposure, rotation length, mentorship, and mistreatment. A survey assessing CT curriculum, exposure, mentorship, and satisfaction was forwarded to general surgery graduates from 17 residency programs. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to assess statistical significance of ordinal level data. Statistical significance was defined as p surgery residency programs who graduated between the years of 1999 to 2014. A total of 94 responses were completed and received. Receiving adequate exposure to CT procedures and disease management was significantly associated with higher satisfaction ratings for all procedures, particularly thoracotomy incisions (p Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drug target residence time: a misleading concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmer, Rutger H A

    2018-01-01

    Since the importance of drug target residence time was first highlighted more 10 years ago, slow binding kinetics has received much attention in the drug discovery literature, and indeed within pharmaceutical research. However, the residence concept as presented in most papers is supported by rather misleading simulations and arguments, and by examples where compounds are taken out of their pharmacokinetic context. Moreover, fast association is typically more desirable than slow, and advantages of long residence time, notably a potential disconnect between pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK), would be partially or completely offset by slow on-rate. Therefore, plain potency is likely a better predictor of drug development success than is residence time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of medical residents technology readiness for an online residents-as-teachers curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Débora; Lewis, Kadriye O

    2014-06-01

    The University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine has a need to expand the current Residents-as-Teachers workshops into a comprehensive curriculum. One way to do so is to implement an online curriculum, but prior to this, the readiness of the medical residents to participate in such a curriculum should be assessed. Our objective was to determine whether the residents at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine are prepared to engage in an online Residents-as-Teachers program. This was a descriptive, mixed-method-design study that collected qualitative and quantitative data using an online survey and a focus-group interview. The study was conducted with students from 11 of the residency programs at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. More than 80% of the participating residents had the technical knowledge to engage in an online program; 90.5% thought an online Residents-as-Teachers course would be a good alternative to what was currently available; 87.5% would be willing to participate in an online program, and 68.6% of the residents stated that they preferred an online course to a traditional one. Determinants of readiness for online learning at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine were identified and discussed. Our results suggest that the majority of the residents who participated in this study are ready to engage in an online Residents-as-Teachers program. The only potential barrier found was that one-third of the residents still preferred a traditional curriculum, even when they thought an online Residents-as-Teachers curriculum was a good alternative and were willing to participate in the course or courses forming part of such a curriculum. Therefore, prior to wide-spread implementation of such a curriculum, a pilot test should be conducted to maximize the presumed and eventual success of that curriculum.

  14. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  15. Search for heavy right-handed neutrinos at the LHC and beyond in the same-sign same-flavor leptons final state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, John N.; Puente, Alejandro de la [Theory Group, TRIUMF,4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Pan, Bob Wei-Ping [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua Univeristy,Hsin Chu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-28

    In this study we explore the LHC’s Run II potential to the discovery of heavy Majorana neutrinos, with luminosities between 30 and 3000 fb{sup −1} in the l{sup ±}l{sup ±}j j final state. Given that there exist many models for neutrino mass generation, even within the Type I seesaw framework, we use a simplified model approach and study two simple extensions to the Standard Model, one with a single heavy Majorana neutrino, singlet under the Standard Model gauge group, and a limiting case of the left-right symmetric model. We then extend the analysis to a future hadron collider running at 100 TeV center of mass energies. This extrapolation in energy allows us to study the relative importance of the resonant production versus gauge boson fusion processes in the study of Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders. We analyze and propose different search strategies designed to maximize the discovery potential in either the resonant production or the gauge boson fusion modes.

  16. Association between presence of visible in-house mold and health-related quality of life in adults residing in four U.S. states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao Jun; Balluz, Lina

    2011-05-01

    Despite the broad use of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as one of the measurements to assess health status and effectiveness of health care and interventions, the impact of in-house mold exposure on HRQOL is unknown. The study described in this article examined the relationship between presence of visible in-house mold (PVIM) and HRQOL among adults. Data were analyzed from the 2005 and 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys that consisted of a random cross-sectional sample of 18,356 adults in four states. The authors examined the relationship between PVIM and three important indicators of the HRQOL by logistic regression analyses. Their results suggest that PVIM is independently associated with the indicators of HRQOL including mentally unhealthy, physically unhealthy, and total unhealthy days. Therefore, implementation of appropriate measures at the household level to eliminate or reduce in-house mold may improve individuals' HRQOL.

  17. National trends in minimally invasive and open operative experience of graduating general surgery residents: implications for surgical skills curricula development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey S; Smith, Lynette; Are, Madhuri; Edney, James; Azarow, Kenneth; Mercer, David W; Thompson, Jon S; Are, Chandrakanth

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national trends in minimally invasive and open cases of all graduating residents in general surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education logs (1999-2008) of graduating residents from all US general surgery residency programs. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests and the Bonferroni adjustment to detect trends in the number of minimally invasive and open cases. Minimally invasive procedures accounted for an increasing proportion of cases performed (3.7% to 11.1%, P surgery (P general surgery residents in the United States are performing a greater number of minimally invasive and fewer open procedures for common surgical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Text messaging among residents and faculty in a university general surgery residency program: prevalence, purpose, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Galante, Joseph M; Bold, Richard J; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R

    2013-01-01

    There is little information about the use of text messaging (texting) devices among resident and faculty physicians for patient-related care (PRC). To determine the prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding texting among resident and attending surgeons and to identify factors associated with PRC texting. E-mail survey. University medical center and its affiliated hospitals. Surgery resident and attending staff. Prevalence, frequency, purpose, and concerns regarding patient-related care text messaging. Overall, 73 (65%) surveyed physicians responded, including 45 resident (66%) and 28 attending surgeons (62%). All respondents owned a texting device. Majority of surgery residents (88%) and attendings (71%) texted residents, whereas only 59% of residents and 65% of attendings texted other faculty. Most resident to resident text occurred at a frequency of 3-5 times/d (43%) compared with most attending to resident texts, which occurred 1-2 times/d (33%). Most resident to attending (25%) and attending to attending (30%) texts occurred 1-2 times/d. Among those that texted, PRC was the most frequently reported purpose for resident to resident (46%), resident to attending (64%), attending to resident (82%), and attending to other attending staff (60%) texting. Texting was the most preferred method to communicate about routine PRC (47% of residents vs 44% of attendings). Age (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.79-0.95; p = 0.003), but not sex, specialty/clinical rotation, academic rank, or postgraduate year (PGY) level predicted PRC texting. Most resident and attending staff surveyed utilize texting, mostly for PRC. Texting was preferred for communicating routine PRC information. Our data may facilitate the development of guidelines for the appropriate use of PRC texting. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Are neurology residents interested in headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    The years of residency are the pillars of the subsequent practice in every medical specialty. The aim of our study is to evaluate the current situation, degree of involvement, main interests, and perceived quality of the training received by Spanish residents of neurology, specifically in the area of headache. A self-administered survey was designed by the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) and was sent via e-mail to all residents who were members of the Society as of May 2015. Fifty-three residents completed the survey (N = 426, 12.4%): 6% were first year residents, 25.5% second year, 23.5% third year, and 45% fourth year residents, all from 13 different Spanish autonomous communities. The areas of greatest interest are, in this order: Vascular neurology, headache, and epilepsy. Of them, 85% believe that the area of headache is undervalued. More than half of residents (52.8%) do not rotate in specific Headache Units and only 35.8% complete their training dominating anaesthetic block and toxin infiltration techniques. Of them, 81.1% believe that research is scarce or absent; 69.8% have never made a poster/presentation, 79.3% have not published and only 15% collaborate on research projects in this area. Lastly, 40% believe that they have not received adequate training. Headache is among the areas that interest our residents the most; however, we believe that we must improve their training both at a patient healthcare level and as researchers. Thus, increasing the number of available courses, creating educational web pages, involving residents in research, and making a rotation in a specialised unit mandatory are among the fundamental objectives of the GECSEN. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Pragmatic Challenges to Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2007-01-01

    Pragmatism offers a platform for posing relevant questions. This article uses a pragmatic point of departure to question a natural law conception of human rights and to take a closer look at three pressing human rights problems: The human rights situation in states with little or no state capacity......; the revision and adaptation of human rights law; and the not straightforward relationship betweemn human rights and democracy....

  1. 8 CFR 204.303 - Determination of habitual residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... resident in the United States if the individual: (1) Has his or her domicile in the United States, even if... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of habitual residence. 204... IMMIGRANT PETITIONS Intercountry Adoption of a Convention Adoptee § 204.303 Determination of habitual...

  2. Teaching Psychiatry Residents to Teach: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp-Han, Holly; Chambliss, R. Bryan; Coverdale, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because there have been no previously published national surveys on teaching psychiatry residents about how to teach, the authors surveyed United States psychiatry program directors on what and how residents are taught about teaching. Methods: All psychiatry training programs across the United States were mailed a semistructured…

  3. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  4. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  5. Are the French neurology residents satisfied with their training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, P; Roux, T; Le Guennec, L; Zuber, M

    2015-11-01

    There have been dramatic changes in neurology over the past decade; these advances require a constant adaptation of residents' theoretical and practical training. The French Association of Neurology Residents and the College of Neurology Teachers conducted a national survey to assess the French neurology residents' satisfaction about their training. A 16-item questionnaire was sent via e-mail to French neurology residents completing training in 2014. Data were collected and processed anonymously. Of eligible respondents, 126 returned the survey, representing approximately 40% of all the French neurology residents. Most residents (78%) rated their clinical training favorably. Seventy-two percent reported good to excellent quality teaching of neurology courses from their faculty. However, many residents (40%) felt insufficient their doctoral thesis supervision. All residents intended to enter fellowship training after their residency, and most of them (68%) planned to practice in a medical center. French neurology residents seemed satisfied with the structure and quality of their training program. However, efforts are required to improve management of the doctoral thesis and make private practice more attractive and accessible during the residency. In the future, similar surveys should be scheduled to regularly assess neurology residents' satisfaction and the impact of the forthcoming national and European reforms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Autonomy and minority rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barten, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    to a specific group. The question never posed is, if there is a point and in that case at what point the group can actually talk about being autonomous. Is there a minimum in the number of special rights and procedures that has to be reached in order for the package of rights to qualify as ‘granting autonomy......'? I will look at this in connection with minority rights, as minority rights accord special rights and procedures to a specific group. For example, minorities have sometimes far reaching competences in the educational field: setting up and running their own schools and to a certain degree also decide...... with kin-states face a two-way situation regarding autonomy. First there is the autonomy from the home-state - the state the minority exists in. Secondly, though, there is the question of autonomy from the kin-state: How autonomous is a minority when it is (partly) financed by the kin-state? The discussion...

  7. Resident Perception of Technical Skills Education and Preparation for Independent Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, David D; Macke, Ryan A; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Loor, Gabriel; Nelson, Jennifer S; LaPar, Damien J; LaZar, John F; Wei, Benjamin; DeNino, Walter F; Berfield, Kathleen; Stein, William; Youssef, Samuel J; Nguyen, Tom C

    2015-12-01

    Surgical skills are traditionally taught and practiced in the operating room. However, changes in health care policy and outcome-based evaluation have decreased trainee operative autonomy. We examined cardiothoracic residents' perceptions of operative experience and the role of simulation. The In-Training Examination (ITE) is taken each year by all residents. Completion of a 30-question preexamination survey is mandatory, ensuring a 100% response rate. Survey data related to operative experience, career preparedness, and surgical simulation were analyzed. Opinion questions were asked on a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents were grouped into three cohorts by training paradigm (2-year versus 3-year traditional programs and 6-year integrated programs). In all, 314 respondents (122 2-year, 96 3-year, and 96 6-year integrated) completed the survey. Of the three groups, residents in 3-year programs had the highest levels of satisfaction. Advanced training was most common among residents in 6-year integrated programs (66%, versus 49% for 2-year and 26% for 3-year programs; p = 0.63). Desire to specialize drove further training (97%), with 2% stating further training was needed owing to inadequacy and 1% owing to a poor job market. In all assessed categories, the majority of residents believed that simulation did not completely replicate the educational value of an operative case. Cardiothoracic residents largely feel well prepared for the transition to practice under the current educational paradigm. Although many residents seek advanced training, it seems driven by the desire for specialization. Residents view simulation as an adjunct to traditional intraoperative education, but not as a viable replacement. Further study is necessary to better understand how best to integrate simulation with operative experience. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Variability in the Use of Simulation for Procedural Training in Radiology Residency: Opportunities for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Chikarmane, Sona A; Yeh, Eren D; Smith, Stacy E; Mayo-Smith, William W; Giess, Catherine S

    2018-03-19

    Increased attention to quality and safety has led to a re-evaluation of the classic apprenticeship model for procedural training. Many have proposed simulation as a supplementary teaching tool. The purpose of this study was to assess radiology resident exposure to procedural training and procedural simulation. An IRB-exempt online survey was distributed to current radiology residents in the United States by e-mail. Survey results were summarized using frequency and percentages. Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis where appropriate. A total of 353 current residents completed the survey. 37% (n = 129/353) of respondents had never used procedure simulation. Of the residents who had used simulation, most did not do so until after having already performed procedures on patients (59%, n = 132/223). The presence of a dedicated simulation center was reported by over half of residents (56%, n = 196/353) and was associated with prior simulation experience (P = 0.007). Residents who had not had procedural simulation were somewhat likely or highly likely (3 and 4 on a 4-point Likert-scale) to participate if it were available (81%, n = 104/129). Simulation training was associated with higher comfort levels in performing procedures (P simulation training is associated with higher comfort levels when performing procedures, there is variable use in radiology resident training and its use is not currently optimized. Given the increased emphasis on patient safety, these results suggest the need to increase procedural simulation use during residency, including an earlier introduction to simulation before patient exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Overview of Cultural Competency Curricula in ACGME-accredited General Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sagar S; Sapigao, Francisco B; Chun, Maria B J

    Cultural competency(CC) in surgical residency curricula is not the novel idea it was fourteen years ago when the ACGME challenged program directors to teach and assess six core competencies. CC is recognized as a component of "patient care", "professionalism", and "interpersonal and communication skills." The results of five programs (2004-2012) with CC curricula were identified in a 2013 paper by Ly and Chun. The primary objective of this paper is to provide the current status of CC curricula in general surgery residency programs. Three sources were used for this study. First, a four question survey on the current status of CC education was sent to program directors of ACGME-accredited surgery residency programs. Second, the lead authors from five programs previously reported in the 2013 paper were interviewed. Third, the survey mentioned above was resent to 52 residency programs who implemented New York University's (NYU) SPICE program, which has a CC component. Participants for the survey consisted of program directors of ACGME-accredited surgery residency programs. The interviews were conducted with the corresponding authors from the previous study by Ly and Chun. Of the 256 surveyed, nine responded; seven stated that CC is not taught formally at their institution while four stated that they do not feel any part of CC curricula is missing from their program. Due to the low response rate, we identified and conducted interviews with general surgery residency programs with CC curricula. Of the five programs contacted, only three remain active and utilize Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) to teach cultural competency. One of the three, the SPICE program at NYU, has expanded to 52 other residency programs in the US. Although the importance of CC has been identified in general surgery, formal curricula and documentation of implementation remains elusive. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  10. The role of laboratory dissection training in neurosurgical residency: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mullin, Jeffrey P; Schlenk, Richard; Recinos, Pablo F; Benzel, Edward C

    2014-11-01

    Work hour restrictions and current quality, financial, and legal concerns have reduced resident operative volume and autonomy. Although laboratory (cadaveric or animal) dissection has a rich history in neurosurgery, its current role in resident training is unclear. Recent literature suggests educators have looked to simulation to accelerate the learning curve of acquiring neurosurgical technical skills. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and extent of laboratory dissection in neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. A survey was sent to program directors of all 100 neurosurgical residency programs in the United States. Response rate was 65%. Most programs (93.8%) incorporate laboratory dissection into resident training. Most programs have 1-3 (36.1%) or 4-6 (39.3%) sessions annually. Residents in postgraduate years 2-6 (85.2%-93.4%) most commonly participate. The most common topics are cranial approaches (100%), spinal approaches (88.5%), spine instrumentation (80.3%), and endoscopy (50.8%). Thirty-one (47.7%) programs use artificial physical model or virtual reality simulators; the most common simulators are endoscopy (15.4%), microvascular anastomosis (13.8%), and endovascular (10.8%). Only 8 programs (13.1%) formally grade dissection skills. Educators (95.4%) believe laboratory dissection is an integral component of training and no respondent believed simulation could currently provide greater educational benefit than laboratory dissection. Most (89.2%) respondents would support a national "suggested" dissection curriculum and manual. In neurosurgical resident education, laboratory dissection is widely used; however, significant variation exists. Nonetheless, program directors believe laboratory dissection plays an integral role in neurosurgical training and is currently associated with greater educational benefit than simulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing a curriculum for emergency medicine residency orientation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Raymond; Choudhri, Tina; Roche, Colleen; Ranniger, Claudia; Greenberg, Larrie

    2014-05-01

    New residents enter emergency medicine (EM) residency programs with varying EM experiences, which makes residency orientation programs challenging to design. There is a paucity of literature to support best practices. We report on a curriculum development project for EM residency orientation using the Kern Model. Components of the revised curriculum include administrative inculcation into the program; delivering skills and knowledge training to ensure an entering level of competence; setting expectations for learning in the overall residency curriculum; performing an introductory performance evaluation; and socialization into the program. Post-implementation resident surveys found the new curriculum to be helpful in preparing them for the first year of training. The Kern Model was a relevant and useful method for redesigning a new-resident orientation curriculum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. STATE RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROTECTION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: THE INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION IN LENAHAN (GONZALES AND ITS APPLICATION IN CANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Koshan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In August, 2011, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights released its decision in Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales v United States, a case concerning states’ obligations to use due diligence in responding to domestic violence. The IACHR found that the United States had breached several articles of the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man for failing to protect Lenahan and her children from domestic violence, and made wide-reaching recommendations at both the individual and systemic level. This comment will discuss the IACHR decision in Lenahan and analyze its implications for Canada’s compliance with its international obligations towards domestic violence in the judicial, legislative and policy spheres. Focusing on the concept of access to justice as articulated by the IACHR, the analysis will show that Canada may be in violation of its obligations for failing to provide access to justice in the context of domestic violence, and otherwise in violation of its due diligence obligations under international law. En août 2011, la Commission interaméricaine des droits de l’homme [CIDH] rendait sa décision dans l’affaire Jessica Lenahan (Gonzales c. les États-Unis, cas ayant trait à l’obligation des États de faire preuve d’une diligence raisonnable dans ses interventions en matière de violence familiale. La CIDH a conclu que les États-Unis avaient contrevenu à plusieurs articles de la Déclaration américaine des droits et devoirs de l’homme, étant donné qu’ils n’avaient pas protégé Mme Lenahan et ses enfants contre des actes de violence familiale. Elle a formulé des recommandations d’une grande portée tant au plan individuel que systémique. Le présent commentaire porte sur la décision de la CIDH dans l’affaire Lenahan et présente une analyse des répercussions de cette décision en ce qui concerne le respect par le Canada de ses obligations internationales à l’égard de la violence familiale

  13. Estado e sociedade e as reconfigurações do direito à saúde State and society and the new configurations of the right to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Cohn

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio resgata algumas das principais discussões travadas na literatura das ciências sociais sobre as relações entre Estado, sociedade civil e participação social nas políticas de saúde. O recorte adotado é a dimensão política propriamente dita, deixando-se à parte - embora seja igualmente relevante - a participação da sociedade na provisão e produção de serviços de saúde. Os principais eixos de análise são as implicações sociais e políticas da opção pela perspectiva da pobreza ou da desigualdade; os movimentos sociais e os direitos sociais; e a relação Estado/sociedade num contexto de destituição de direitos. Privilegia-se a ótica da instituição da cidadania da perspectiva da justiça e da eqüidade social frente à diversidade e ao pluralismo que marcam as sociedades contemporâneas, em especial a brasileira, dadas as enormes desigualdades sociais que a caracterizam. A última sessão retoma de forma sucinta alguns dos principais traços que vêm marcando a experiência da participação social nos Conselhos de Saúde apontados pelas numerosas análises a respeito, sem no entanto se fazer um balanço dessa literatura quanto aos marcos teóricos e metodológicos aí presentes.The present essay in which the author seeks to reintroduce some of the main discussions within the social sciences literature on the relationship among state and civil society, and which can contribute for a reflection about social involvement in health policies. In this regard, the focus is on the political dimension proper of this relationship, putting aside - despite its relevance - society's participation on the provision of health services. The main axes of the analysis are the social and political implications in choosing the poverty or inequality perspective; social movements and social rights; and the state/society relationship in a context lacking basic rights. Attention is given to the institutionalization of citizenship

  14. 26 CFR 1.871-5 - Loss of residence by an alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loss of residence by an alien. 1.871-5 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.871-5 Loss of residence by an alien. An alien who has acquired residence in the United States retains his status as a resident until he...

  15. The right to life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Stavri Sinjari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The right to life constitutes one of the main human rights and freedoms, foreseen by article 21 of the Albanian Constitution and article 2 of European Human Rights Convention. No democratic or totalitarian society can function without guarantees and protection of the human right to life We intend to address these issues on our article: What is life. What we legally understand with life. When the life starts and finish. How this right has evolved. Which is the state interest on protecting the life. Should we consider that the life is the same for all. Should the state interfere at any cost to protect the life. Is there any criminal charge for responsible persons to the violation of this right. Is this issue treated by European Human Rights Court. What are the Albanian legal provisions on protection of this right. This research is performed mainly according to a comparative and analytical methodology. Comperative analysis will be present almost throughout the paper. Treatment of issues of this research will be achieved through a system comparable with international standards in particular and the most advanced legislation in this area. At the same time, this research is conducted by analytical and statistical data processing. We believe that our research will make a modest contribution, not only to the legal literature, but also to criminal policy makers, law makers, lawyers and attorneys.

  16. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Informatics and Technology in Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, William

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical or clinical informatics is the transdisciplinary field that studies and develops effective uses of biomedical data, information technology innovations, and medical knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving, and decision making, with an emphasis on improving human health. Given the ongoing advances in information technology, the field of informatics is becoming important to clinical practice and to residency education. This article will discuss how informatics is specifically relevant to residency education and the different ways to incorporate informatics into residency education, and will highlight applications of current technology in the context of residency education. How informatics can optimize communication for residents, promote information technology use, refine documentation techniques, reduce medical errors, and improve clinical decision making will be reviewed. It is hoped that this article will increase faculty and trainees' knowledge of the field of informatics, awareness of available technology, and will assist practitioners to maximize their ability to provide quality care to their patients. This article will also introduce the idea of incorporating informatics specialists into residency programs to help practitioners deliver more evidenced-based care and to further improve their efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparative View of Equality Under the UN Convention on the Rights of PERSONS with Disabilities and the Disability Laws of the United States and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene S Kanter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities [CRPD], the first international treaty addressing specifically the rights of people with disabilities, including in the workplace.  The purpose of the CRPD is “to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity....” The CRPD has been ratified by 160 countries, including Canada, but not yet by the United States. Article 27 of the CRPD, entitled Work and Employment, prohibits not only discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, but also the right of people with disabilities to reasonable accommodations, equal remuneration for work of equal value, safe and healthy working conditions,  assistance in finding, obtaining, maintaining and returning to employment,  rehabilitation, job retention and return-to-work programmes,  as well as affirmative action programmes, incentives and other measures to promote equal employment opportunities. As compared to the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Canadian Charter, the CRPD, therefore, goes beyond prohibiting discrimination and instead seeks to ensure greater substantive equality for people with disabilities in the workplace.  As such, the author proposes that both US and Canadian legislatures and courts should look to the CRPD to help their respective countries move beyond traditional notions of formal equality towards a new right to substantive equality in the workplace for people with disabilities. En 2006, les Nations Unies ont adopté la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées [CDPH], le premier traité international portant explicitement sur les droits des personnes handicapées, y compris les droits dans le milieu de travail. La CDPH a pour objet de « promouvoir, protéger et assurer la pleine et égale jouissance de tous

  19. Urbanization and human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Mihr, A.

    2010-01-01

    Urban governance on the basis of human rights can help to set up problem solving mechanisms to guarantee social peace, economic growth and political participation.If states both integrate more in international or regional human rights regime and give more autonomy to urban governments and local authorities, many of these issues of urbanization can be solved. Where people organize themselves on local levels and in neighborhood initiatives, new forms of governance mechanisms evolve. These mecha...

  20. Resident and Non resident Persons in Theory and Practice Tax – Case of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitore Morina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In each country there is the attempt to impose their jurisdiction persons who derive income and require sufficient connection between the state and these persons to enable the collection of these revenues on behalf of taxes. However, it should be asked which connection is required between the state and subjects of law to achieve this goal. There is a number of factors stemming from the subjects of law that can create report - link between the state and subjects of law, such as: citizenship, residence, nationality, presence in the state concerned, etc. Tax systems in the country (domestic tax systems will determine which subject will be considered for the purposes of the tax legislation of the respective state tax subject to domestic (resident and which foreign (non- resident. In this context, local tax legislation must modulate two basic issues: The first, are the characteristics of natural and legal persons who are established, organized and operate within the boundaries of the respective state (resident and the Second, the characteristics of natural and legal persons who are established and organized under the laws of foreign (non- resident.

  1. Intellectual Property Rights Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkærsig, Lars; Beukel, Karin; Reichstein, Toke

    Intellectual Property Rights Management explores how the entire toolbox of intellectual property (IP) protection and management are successfully combined and how firms generate value from IP. In particular, this book provides a framework of archetypes which firms will be able to self......-identify with and which will allow companies to focus on the IP and IP Management issues most relevant to them. By doing so, the authors offer further insights as to the use of IP and IP management practices across firms. By looking at empirical data covering the population of firms, the findings not only pertain...... to large organization but also reflect the practices and operations that reside in SMEs. This volume also utilizes labor market and firm data to determine whether there is a definitive relationship between IP and economic performance on the firm level....

  2. Teaching Strategy: Comparing Rights Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Engages students in comparing the rights proclaimed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) with those present in the United States Bill of Rights and other constitutional amendments. Challenges the students to explore reasons for the presence or absence of certain rights and to reflect on the role of the government. (CMK)

  3. THE RESALE RIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria MARINESCU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses one of the most important rights of the authors of original works of art namely: the resale right. It will be analyzed the subject matter of the resale right, the works of art to which the resale right relates, the rates applicable to the resale right, the persons entitled to receive royalties, the term of protection of the resale right, third-country nationals entitled to receive royalties and the right to obtain information. Also, the article will refer to the EU Directive in the field: Directive 2001/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 September 2001 on the resale right for the benefit of the author of an original work of art. It will be the subject of the article, also, the European Court of Justice jurisprudence related to the resale right, for example the judgment in the case C-518/08 (VEGAP vs. ADAGP, underlying that, in the light of the objectives pursued by Directive 2001/84, Member States may make their own legislative choice in determining the categories of persons capable of benefiting from the resale right after the death of the author of a work of art. One of parts of the article, will analyses the collective management for the resale right, especially: the terms of the collective management, forms of the collective management and examples. For all the above mentioned reasons, the article will refer to the main aspects of the resale right in a comprehensive manner and will analyses in a scientifically manner this very important right of the authors of original works of art.

  4. Global Health Imaging in Radiology Residency: A Survey of Canadian Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zener, Rebecca; Ross, Ian

    2017-11-01

    The study sought to determine Canadian radiology resident perception of and interest in global health imaging (GHI) and the barriers they encounter in pursuing GHI experiences during residency training. A peer-reviewed, online, anonymous, multiple-choice survey was distributed to Canadian radiology residents at English-language programs. Fifty residents responded to the survey (∼16% response rate); 72% of respondents perceived an unmet need for medical imaging in the developing world. A majority of residents (60%) would have been likely to participate in a GHI experience if one had been available during their residency; 65% planned on pursuing international outreach work as future radiologists, 81% of whom with on-site collaboration in education and training of local staff. However, 82% of respondents were uncertain or believed they would not be adequately prepared to help improve access and availability of medical imaging services in developing countries upon completion of residency. Overall, residents believed a GHI program would increase their knowledge of infectious diseases, increase their exposure to diseases at advanced stage presentation, enhance their knowledge of basic imaging modalities, and improve their cultural competence. Lack of information about opportunities, lack of funding, and lack of infrastructure were ranked as the most important barriers to participating in a radiology rotation in a developing country during residency. While many Canadian radiology residents are interested in participating in GHI, their preparation to do so may be inadequate. Formalizing international GHI rotations may alleviate barriers impeding their pursuit. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The "hidden curriculum" and residents' attitudes about medical error disclosure: comparison of surgical and nonsurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, William; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani

    2013-12-01

    The "hidden curriculum" and role models for responding to medical errors might play a central role in influencing residents' attitudes about disclosure. We sought to compare surgical and nonsurgical residents' exposure to role modeling for responding to medical errors and their attitudes about error disclosure. We conducted a cross-sectional, electronic survey of surgical and nonsurgical residents at 2 large academic medical centers. The questionnaire asked respondents about personal experience with medical errors; training for responding to errors; frequency of exposure to role modeling related to disclosure; and attitudes about disclosure. Descriptive statistics were used to describe frequencies. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were used to compare proportions between surgical and nonsurgical trainees. The response rate was 58% (253 of 435). Surgical residents reported more frequently observing a colleague be treated harshly (eg, humiliated or verbally abused) for an error than nonsurgical residents (sometimes or often, 39% [26 of 66] vs 20% [37 of 187]; p = 0.002). Surgical residents were more likely than nonsurgical residents to believe they would be treated harshly by others if they acknowledged making a medical error (35% [23 of 66] vs 12% [23 of 187]; p medical errors at their institution (11% [7 of 66] vs 2% [4 of 187]; p = 0.008). Surgical residents were less likely than nonsurgical residents to feel free to express concerns to other members of the team about medical errors in patient care (70% [46 of 66] vs 83% [115 of 187]; p = 0.02). The punitive response to error by senior members of the health care team might be an impediment to the transparent disclosure of errors among residents that might disproportionally affect surgical training programs. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Right to Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Coman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we set ourselves to analyze a subject, which, due to its importance andextreme complexity, generated many discussions and controversies both at national and international level:the right to life. The great evolution of the contemporary society and the progress registered in various fieldsbrought into the attention of the states, international organizations, specialists in the field and public opinionthe pressing problem of interpreting the content and limits of the human fundamental rights and liberties. Weset ourselves to analyze the main international instruments regulating the right to life and to identify thesituations where determining the content of this fundamental right in necessary. Without the intent of acomplete work, we understand, throughout this study, to highline the great importance of the right to liferespecting for the entire humanity.

  7. Autonomy and minority rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barten, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    in the cultural, educational, religious and social sectors which have of course are exercised in a limited territory; however, do not threaten the state's sovereignty in the same way as independent political decisions could do. How far minority rights have the same dimensions, will be another issue. Minorities......'? I will look at this in connection with minority rights, as minority rights accord special rights and procedures to a specific group. For example, minorities have sometimes far reaching competences in the educational field: setting up and running their own schools and to a certain degree also decide......, are they at odds with each other or do they possibly overlap? This last possibility would be that minority rights are so extensive that they actually amount to autonomy. Autonomy has a range of dimensions and one must distinguish between political autonomy which is largely territorial in nature and autonomy...

  8. [Regulations governing the training of diagnostic imaging residents: the residents' statute and the medical specialties law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Santos, A; del Cura Rodríguez, J L; Vieito Fuentes, X

    2010-01-01

    The current system for training medical specialists in Spain originated in 1963, and diagnostic radiology was one of the first specialties recognized. There are currently three types of regulations that govern the training of specialists: a) professional, The Health Professions Law; b) labor: The Residents' Statute; and c) educational, The New Medical Specialties Law and the Diagnostic Imaging Program This system consists of an exclusive contract with the training organization, a unified system of access, and a training program in accredited units that includes tutoring, evaluation, and progressive assignment of responsibilities. Residents have a right to be trained and evaluated, to participate in the teaching unit, and to their labor rights. In exchange, they must complete the tasks assigned in the program and abide by the institution's rules. Residents must be supervised directly in the first year and thereafter they should be given progressively more responsibility. Copyright 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation of full patient simulation training in surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gladys L; Lee, Patrick C; Page, David W; D'Amour, Elizabeth M; Wait, Richard B; Seymour, Neal E

    2010-01-01

    Simulated patient care has gained acceptance as a medical education tool but is underused in surgical training. To improve resident clinical management in critical situations relevant to the surgical patient, high-fidelity full patient simulation training was instituted at Baystate Medical Center in 2005 and developed during successive years. We define surgical patient simulation as clinical management performed in a high fidelity environment using a manikin simulator. This technique is intended to be specifically modeled experiential learning related to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are fundamental to patient care. We report 3 academic years' use of a patient simulation curriculum. Learners were PGY 1-3 residents; 26 simulated patient care experiences were developed based on (1) designation as a critical management problem that would otherwise be difficult to practice, (2) ability to represent the specific problem in simulation, (3) relevance to the American Board of Surgery (ABS) certifying examination, and/or (4) relevance to institutional quality or morbidity and mortality reports. Although training started in 2005, data are drawn from the period of systematic and mandatory training spanning from July 2006 to June 2009. Training occurred during 1-hour sessions using a computer-driven manikin simulator (METI, Sarasota, Florida). Educational content was provided either before or during presimulation briefing sessions. Scenario areas included shock states, trauma and critical care case management, preoperative processes, and postoperative conditions and complications. All sessions were followed by facilitated debriefing. Likert scale-based multi-item assessments of core competency in medical knowledge, patient care, diagnosis, management, communication, and professionalism were used to generate a performance score for each resident for each simulation (percentage of best possible score). Performance was compared across PGYs by repeated

  10. Comparing video games and laparoscopic simulators in the development of laparoscopic skills in surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara J; Margaron, Franklin; Kaplan, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    both before and after testing (p = 0.05). Most residents stated that playing the video games helped to ease stress over the 6 weeks and cooperative play promoted better relationships among colleagues. Studies have shown that residents who engage in video games have better visual, spatial, and motor coordination. We showed that over 6 weeks, residents who played video games improved in their laparoscopic skills more than those who practiced on laparoscopic simulators. The accessibility of gaming systems is 1 of the most essential factors making these tools a good resource for residents. Handheld games are especially easy to use and offer a readily available means to improve visuospatial and motor abilities. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Specialty Palliative Care Consultations for Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Martin, Edward; Bull, Janet; Hanson, Laura C

    2017-07-01

    U.S. nursing home (NH) residents with dementia have limited access to specialty palliative care beyond Medicare hospice. The objective of this study was to examine the value of expanded palliative care access for NH residents with moderate-to-very severe dementia. We merged palliative care consultation data in 31 NHs in two states to Medicare data to identify residents with consultations, moderate-to-very severe dementia, and deaths in 2006-2010. Initial palliative consultations were identified as occurring later and earlier (1-30 days and 31-180 days before death, respectively). Three controls for each consultation recipient were selected using propensity score matching. Weighted multivariate analyses evaluated the effect of consultations on hospital or acute care use seven and 30 days before death and on (potentially) burdensome transitions (i.e., hospital or hospice admission three days before death or two plus acute care transitions 30 days before death). With earlier consultation (vs. no consultation), hospitalization rates in the seven days before death were on average 13.2 percentage points lower (95% confidence interval [CI] -21.8%, -4.7%) and with later consultation 5.9 percentage points lower (95% CI -13.7%, +4.9%). For earlier consultations (vs. no consultations), rates were 18.4 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -8.4%) for hospitalizations and 11.9 lower (95% CI -20.7%, -3.1%) for emergency room visits 30 days before death; they were 20.2 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -12.0%) for burdensome transitions. Consultations appear to reduce acute care use and (potentially) burdensome transitions for dying residents with dementia. Reductions were greater when consultations were earlier. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical resident learning styles: faculty and resident accuracy at identification of preferences and impact on ABSITE scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Gilbert, Timothy; Ristig, Kyle; Chu, Quyen D

    2013-09-01

    accurately 41% of the time; more experienced faculty were better than less experienced ones (R(2) = 0.703, P = 0.018). Residents had similar accuracy to faculty in identifying their peers' learning styles. Chief residents were more accurate than junior residents (44% versus 28%, P = 0.009). Most general surgery residents have a multimodal learning preference. Faculty members are relatively inaccurate at identifying residents' preferred learning styles; however, there is a strong correlation between years of faculty experience and accuracy. Chief residents are more accurate than junior residents at learning style identification. Higher mean ABSITE scores may be a reflection of a dominant read/write learning style. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Medicaid Services (CMS) Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set, Version 2.0; and (ii) Describing... Set, Version 2.0 must be submitted electronically to VA at the IP address provided by VA to the State... information collection requirements in this section under control number 2900-0160) [65 FR 968, Jan. 6, 2000...

  14. Medical residency: factors relating to "difficulty in helping" in the resident physician-patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Alfredo De Marco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have attempted to understand what leads physicians to label patients as 'difficult'. Understanding this process is particularly important for resident physicians, who are developing attitudes that may have long-term impact on their interactions with patients. The aim of this study was to distinguish between patients' self-rated emotional state (anxiety and depression and residents' perceptions of that state as a predictor of patients being considered difficult. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional survey conducted in the hospital of Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp. METHODS: The residents completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and rated their patients using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Difficulty in Helping the Patient Questionnaire (DTH. The patients completed HADS independently and were rated using the Karnofsky Performance Status scale. RESULTS: On average, the residents rated the patients as presenting little difficulty. The residents' ratings of difficulty presented an association with their ratings for patient depression (r = 0.35, P = 0.03 and anxiety (r = 0.46, P = 0.02, but not with patients' self-ratings for depression and anxiety. Residents from distant cities were more likely to rate patients as difficult to help than were residents from the city of the hospital (mean score of 1.93 versus 1.07; P = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding what leads residents to label patients as having depression and anxiety problems may be a productive approach towards reducing perceived difficulty. Residents from distant cities may be more likely to find their patients difficult

  15. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  16. Controlled trial to improve resident sign-out in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchal, Rahul; Aebly, Brian; Graves, Gabrielle; Truwit, Jonathon; Kumar, Gagan; Taneja, Amit; Dagar, Gaurav; Graf, Jeanette; Hubertz, Erin; Ramalingam, Vijaya; Fletcher, Kathlyn E

    2017-12-01

    Poor sign-out or handover of care may lead to preventable patient harm. Critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICU) are complex and prone to rapid clinical deterioration. If clinical deterioration occurs, timeliness of appropriate interventions is essential to prevent or reduce adverse outcomes. Therefore sign-outs need to efficiently transmit key information and provide anticipatory guidance. Interventions to improve resident-to-resident ICU sign-outs have not been well described. We conducted a controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a standardised ICU sign-out process to the usual ICU sign-out. Prospective controlled trial. A 26-bed medical intensive care unit (MICU) in an urban tertiary academic medical centre. Residents rotating through the MICU. ICU-specific written sign-out template. Residents completed postcall surveys assessing satisfaction with verbal and written sign-outs and incidence of non-routine events. Our main outcome of interest was the occurrence of non-routine events. Compared with the intervention group, on significantly more nights, night float residents in the control group encountered patients who were sicker than sign-out would have suggested (15.94% vs 43.75%; psign-out process compared with usual sign-out significantly reduced the occurrence of non-routine events in an academic MICU. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. The Education of American Surgeons and the Rise of Surgical Residencies, 1930-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin

    2018-02-02

    In the first half of the twentieth century, the training of American surgeons changed from an idiosyncratic, often isolated venture to a standardized, regulated, and mandated regimen in the form of the surgical residency. Over the three critical decades between 1930 and 1960, these residencies developed from an extraordinary, unique opportunity for a few leading practitioners to a widespread, uniform requirement. This article explores the transformation of surgical education in the United States, focusing on the standardization and dissemination of residencies during this key period. Utilizing the archives of professional organizations, it shows how surgical societies initiated and forced reform in the 1930s. It demonstrates the seminal and early role taken by the federal government in the expansion of surgical residencies through incentivized policies and, especially, the growth of the Veterans Administration health system after World War II. Finally, an examination of intra-professional debates over this process illustrates both the deeper struggles to control the nature of surgical training and the importance of residency education in defining the midcentury American surgeon. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Familiarity with Long-acting Reversible Contraceptives among Obstetrics and Gynecology, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics Residents: Results of a 2015 National Survey and Implications for Contraceptive Provision for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Susan A; Braykov, Nikolay P; Lathrop, Eva; Haddad, Lisa B

    2018-02-01

    To assess familiarity with long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) among current obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), family medicine (FM), and pediatrics senior residents in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We selected 156 OB/GYN, FM, and pediatrics residency programs using the American Medical Association Freida database. Senior residents completed a survey addressing any training they had received on LARC, and rated their comfort level counseling about and inserting LARC. Residents rated their likelihood of recommending LARC to an adolescent, nulliparous patient, and indicated whether they would like additional training on LARC. Descriptive and analytic statistics were generated using R statistical software (The R Project for Statistical Computing; https://www.r-project.org). The survey was completed by 326 of 1,583 residents (20.6% response rate); at least 1 resident completed the survey at 105 (67.3%) of the residency programs contacted. Most programs (84.8%) provided some training on LARC. Residents in OB/GYN programs were comfortable counseling about and inserting contraceptive implants (97%, 83%), copper intrauterine devices (IUDs; 100%, 86%), and levonorgestrel (LNG) IUDs (100%, 86%). In FM programs, fewer residents were comfortable counseling about and inserting contraceptive implants (71%, 47%), copper IUDs (68%, 21%), and LNG IUDs (79%, 18%). Residents in pediatrics programs had low comfort levels counseling about contraceptive implants (14%), copper IUDs (14%), and LNG IUDs (25%); no pediatrics residents were comfortable inserting LARC. OB/GYN residents were significantly more likely to recommend a LARC to an adolescent, nulliparous patient (P = .019). Most pediatric and FM residents desired additional training on LARC (82.7% and 60.7%, respectively). This study shows that knowledge gaps exist regarding LARC among FM and pediatrics residents. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for

  19. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  20. How Different Newspapers Cover Xingjian Conflicts from Human Right Perspective? A Frame Analysis of 10 Newspapers from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Mainland China, Britain and Unites States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hwa Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drastic increase of riots has been noted in Xingjian, the far-western Chinese region, in recent years, resulting in international media concerns about its ethnic conflicts, terrorism and human rights abuses. How different newspapers covered those conflict events from the human rights perspective? The paper aims to analyze different news frames of 10 newspapers: 4 major Taiwan newspapers, 2 China’s major newspapers, 2 Hong Kong newspapers, New York Times of US and The Guardian in Britain. Adopting a content analysis of 7 major Xingjian riots coverage during 2013/06 to 2013/12, the research finds out that there are 2 major frames, one is the China official frame, which shows less news sources with one-sided pro-regime position, accusing the protesters, concerning less human rights abuses. While the “critical frame” demonstrates more news sources from different positions, accusing both the regime and the protesters, and covering more human rights abuses.